WorldWideScience

Sample records for dual setting cements

  1. Dual-setting brushite-silica gel cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffers, Martha; Barralet, Jake E; Groll, Jürgen; Gbureck, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The current study describes a dual-mechanism-setting cement that combines a brushite-forming cement paste with a second inorganic silica-based precursor. Materials were obtained by pre-hydrolyzing tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under acidic conditions following the addition of a calcium phosphate cement (CPC) powder mixed of β-tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate. Cement setting occurred by a dissolution-precipitation process, while changes in pH during setting simultaneously initiated the condensation reaction of the hydrolyzed TEOS. This resulted in an interpenetrating phase composite material in which the macropores of the CPC were infiltrated by the microporous silica gel, leading to a higher density and a compressive strength ∼5-10 times higher than the CPC reference. This also altered the release of vancomycin as a model drug, whereby in contrast to the quantitative release from the CPC reference, 25% of the immobilized drug remained in the composite matrix. By varying the TEOS content in the composite, the cement phase composition could be controlled to form either brushite, anhydrous monetite or a biphasic mixture of both. The composites with the highest silicate content showed a cell proliferation similar to a hydroxyapatite reference with a significantly higher activity per cell. Surprisingly, the biological response did not seem to be attributed to the released silicate ions, but to the release of phosphate and the adsorption of magnesium ions from the cell culture medium.

  2. (31)P Solid-State NMR study of the chemical setting process of a dual-paste injectable brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, A P; Sfihi, H; Lequeux, N; Lemaître, J

    2009-10-01

    The composition and evolution of a brushite-type calcium phosphate cement was investigated by Solid-State NMR and X-ray during the setting process. The cement is obtained by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O, MCPM] in presence of water, with formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate or brushite [CaHPO(2).2H(2)O, DCPD]. Analysis of the initial beta-TCP paste has shown the presence of beta-calcium pyrophosphate [Ca(2)P(2)O(7), beta-CPy] and that of the initial MCPM a mixture of MCPM and dicalcium phosphate [CaHPO(4), DCP]. Follow-up of the chemical composition by (31)P Solid-State NMR enables to show that the chemical setting process appeared to reach an end after 20 min. The constant composition observed at the end of the process was similarly determined.

  3. The Setting Chemistry of Glass Ionomer Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hanting; LIU Hanxing; ZHANG Guoqing

    2005-01-01

    The setting chemistry of glass ionomer cement was investigated by using mechanical determination of compressive strength at predetermined intervals, and measurement of structure changes of corresponding fracture sample by means of IR spectra and differential scanning calorimetry ( DSC). Zinc polycarboxylate cement was used as a comparison sample. The compressive strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC) increases with aging. IR spectra and DSC of corresponding fracture sample show the structure changes of the matrix and interface layer comprising of silica gel during the predetermined intervals studied, however, no significant changes occur in the zinc polycarxyolate cement. Hence the structure changes of the matrix and/or interface layer are responsible for compressive strength increasing with aging. The structure changes include the crosslink density, the ratio of complex form to ionic form, the content ratio of Al-PAA to Ca-PAA, the forming and mauring process of the interface layer comprising of silica gel.

  4. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. RESULTS: GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. CONCLUSION: It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation. PMID:28028417

  5. Fast Setting Cement - Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    materials does produce early set times and high strengths . It is re- ported, also, that the addition of 1.5 percent Ca"l 2 to clinkers contain- Ing more than...produce high strength concrete. They include addition of iron asggregate, physical treatment of clinker , ’ addition of highly reactive SiO2 or Ca0, and...Fast-Fix. The Western Co. has developed materials designated as Fast-Fix with rapid setting and high strength properties. Published data show i .1

  6. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  7. Setting mechanisms of an acidic premixed calcium phosphate cement

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements (pCPC), where glycerol is used instead of water as mixing liquid, present better handling characteristics than water-based cements. However, the setting mechanisms of pCPC have not been described thoroughly. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the setting mechanism of pCPC. The investigated cement starts to set when glycerol is exchanged with water via diffusion of glycerol out to the surrounding body fluid and water into the material. ...

  8. Innovative cement plug setting process reduces risk and lowers NPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, T.; Rogers, H.; Lloyd, S.; Quinton, C. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tetrault, N. [Apache Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    With increased drilling in mature fields and unconventional reservoirs, Canadian operators are experiencing a higher rate of lost circulation events. When drilling into lower fracture-gradient zones, operators face the risk of drilling through shallower depleted zones. The unique challenges associated with setting cement plugs in such open hole wells were described. The best solution to address lost circulation events is a properly designed cement slurry where cement can be squeezed into the lost circulation zones to strengthen the wellbore when set. The cement plug is drilled through, leaving the residual cement setting inside the problem zones. Since cement plugs are used for a wide range of reasons, such as healing losses, abandonment, and directional drilling, it is important that a competent cement plug is placed the first time. This paper presented a newly developed tool and a special process designed to meet the challenges associated with setting cement plugs. It is based on a tubing-release tool (TRT) in which a sacrificial tubing is placed into the lost circulation zone to balance the cement plug. The sacrificial tubing is released from the drillstring and remains in the wellbore. The TRT has been used as a plug-setting aid for lost-circulation plugs; shallow-water shut-off; kick-off plug placement; and multizone plugs to abandon. An overview of the TRT features was presented. The tool and process has been used by more than 20 operating companies around the world to successfully place cement plugs downhole on the first attempt. The disconnect has been used successfully in more than 120 wells throughout North and South America, Europe, the Middle East, and Australia. It has proven to lower the risk and non-productive time associated with drilling in mature fields and unconventional reservoirs. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Development of a novel cement by conversion of hopeite in set zinc phosphate cement into biocompatible apatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic bone cement that has zinc oxide core particles covered with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was developed; that is, the conversion of hopeite, the traditional zinc phosphate cement, into HAP was attempted. Here, hopeite is the final product of the reaction between powders and trituration liquid of the traditional zinc phosphate cement. This cement may have many advantages not only in terms of biological functions but also the setting process of the traditional cement and the mechanical properties of the developed compact if the hopeite can be converted into calcium phosphate (CP). In this study, calcium nitrate solutions of various concentrations were used for the conversion of hopeite crystals into CP. The products after the solution treatment were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. These results indicated that the converted scholzite crystals could be partially detected. Several types of set zinc phosphate cement with different P/L ratios were arranged. The surface products of the set cement after the solution treatment were analyzed by XRD. However, the crystal phase such as hopeite was not detected except for zinc oxide. The set cement, which was treated with the calcium nitrate solution, was immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). HAP-like crystals on the set cement could be detected for the specimens immersed for 4 weeks. These findings suggested that the binding phase in the set cement could be converted into HAP by immersion in SBF.

  10. New aspects of the setting of glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, E A; Nicholson, J W

    1993-02-01

    For many years, glass-ionomer cements have been described as setting by the formation of a poly(acrylate) matrix. Recent research has suggested that a second reaction may be involved, namely, the formation of a silica matrix. So that this hypothesis could be tested, non-polymer cements, based on an ionomer glass plus acetic acid, were prepared and stored for up to six months. They were insoluble in water, and their compressive strength was found to increase rapidly over the period of storage. By contrast, the product of the reaction between ZnO and acetic acid was soluble in water. These results support the idea that there is a secondary setting reaction in glass ionomers and suggest that it is responsible for the increase in strength observed.

  11. The Effects of Exposure Time on the Surface Microhardness of Three Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus C. Bandéca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the exposure time of light-curing of the polymers used for cementation on microhardness test in different storage times. The polymers (specifically called resin cements were RelyX ARC, RelyX U100, and SET. Five specimens of each group were prepared and photo-polymerized with exposure times of 20 s and 180 s, using a LED polymerization unit with wavelength of 440 ~ 480 nm and light output was consistently 1,500 mW/cm2. The Vickers hardness test was performed in a MMT-3 Microhardness Tester. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The values of RelyX ARC showed statistically significant difference to groups with light exposure when considering only chemical cure (p < 0.05. The groups with light exposure (20 s and 180 s showed no significant difference between them (p > 0.05. The RelyX U100 cured only chemically showed statistically significant difference between 48 h and 7 days (p < 0.05. The SET resin cement showed no significant difference to groups without light exposure for all storage times (p > 0.05. The values of hardening of the dual-cured resin cements improved after setting by light and chemical activation demonstrating the importance of light curing.

  12. The Stabilizing Granular Soil with Slow-setting and Slight-expansive Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ming-kai; SHENG Wei-guo; TIAN Zhong-qing

    2002-01-01

    According to the characteristics of granular soil, the technological requirements of the specialpurpose cement for stabilizing granular soil are pat forward to meet the demands of implementation of highway base engineering. A kind of slow-setting and slight-expansive cement is developed by the cross experiment method in slag-clinker-gypsum-alkaline system, the final setting time of the cement can be prolonged to 8 h, and it has properties of low dry shrirkage , high flexural strength and good crack resistance. The strength of granular soil stabilized by the cement is increased by 20% compared with that stabilized by Chinese 425-Grade slag cement.

  13. Additional chemical polymerization of dual resin cements: reality or a goal to be achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Sakaguti UMETSUBO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This study serves as a warning to dentists and researchers that dual-cured resin cements may not polymerize completely under some prosthetic crowns. Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the polymerization degree of dual-cured resin cements under prosthetic barrier, by microhardness test. Material and method Three cements (Bistite II, RelyX ARC and Variolink II were light-cured through different barriers, placed between the cement and the light source: G1: without barrier; G2: composite resin (Cesead; G3: Inceram alumina; G4: IPS Empress; G5: Inceram zirconia; G6: tooth fragment. Photopolymerization was carried out using a halogen light unit (650 mW/cm2; microhardness was evaluated using the Microhardness Tester FM 700, under a load of 50gf with a dwell time of 15s, at two evaluation times (30min and 24h. Result The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (5%. Both Inceram alumina and Inceram zirconia ceramic barriers hindered polymerization. Bistite, followed by RelyX and Variolink, exhibited the highest microhardness values (p<0.05. As the highest values were obtained without a barrier, it was determined that the barrier, followed by the tooth, influenced microhardness. Both Empress and Cesead had the smallest microhardness values but with no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion The barrier negatively affected the microhardness of dual-cured resin cements; evaluation time did not affect microhardness values for most of the conditions tested. There is a limited effect of the chemical activator on the polymerization of some dual-cured cements, and their performance is product specific.

  14. Interaction of ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay: Dual porosity modelling compared to experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, A.; Gimmi, T.; Alt-Epping, P.; Mäder, U.; Cloet, V.

    2017-06-01

    Interactions between concrete and clays are driven by the strong chemical gradients in pore water and involve mineral reactions in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, these reactions may influence safety-relevant clay properties such as swelling pressure, permeability or radionuclide retention. Interfaces between ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay show weaker, but more extensive chemical disturbance compared to a contact between low-pH cement and Opalinus Clay. As a consequence of chemical reactions porosity changes occur at cement-clay interfaces. These changes are stronger and may lead to complete pore clogging in the case of low-pH cements. The prediction of pore clogging by reactive transport simulations is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusive solute fluxes, cement clinker chemistry, and phase reaction kinetics. For instance, the consideration of anion-depleted porosity in clays substantially influences overall diffusion and pore clogging at interfaces. A new concept of dual porosity modelling approximating Donnan equilibrium is developed and applied to an ordinary Portland cement - Opalinus Clay interface. The model predictions are compared with data from the cement-clay interaction (CI) field experiment in the Mt Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), which represent 5 y of interaction. The main observations such as the decalcification of the cement at the interface, the Mg enrichment in the clay detached from the interface, and the S enrichment in the cement detached from the interface, are qualitatively predicted by the new model approach. The model results reveal multiple coupled processes that create the observed features. The quantitative agreement of modelled and measured data can be improved if uncertainties of key input parameters (tortuosities, reaction kinetics, especially of clay minerals) can be reduced.

  15. Changes in the drug release pattern of fresh and set simvastatin-loaded brushite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Gemma; Kugiejko, Karol; Pastorino, David; Unosson, Johanna; Öhman, Caroline; Karlsson Ott, Marjam; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Persson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are synthetic bone graft substitutes able to set at physiological conditions. They can be applied by minimally invasive surgery and can also be used as drug delivery systems. Consequently, the drug release pattern from the cement paste (fresh cement) is of high clinical interest. However, previous studies have commonly evaluated the drug release using pre-set cements only. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine if the time elapsed from cement preparation until immersion in the solution (3 min for fresh cements, and 1h and 15 h for pre-set cements) had an influence on its physical properties, and correlating these to the drug release profile. Simvastatin was selected as a model drug, while brushite cement was used as drug carrier. This study quantified how the setting of a material reduces the accessibility of the release media to the material, thus preventing drug release. A shift in the drug release pattern was observed, from a burst-release for fresh cements to a sustained release for pre-set cements.

  16. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  17. A Concept for Rapid Repair of Bomb-Damaged Runways Using Regulated-Set Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    TAlo0 .CaX , in which X is a halogen; the cement can also be a blended cement produced by grinding together portland - ceraent clinker and a...than those used for portland cement. The accel- erated setting time of the cement is achieved by burning into the cement clinker a controlled amount...4,779, 26 April 1971 British Patent No. 1,311,^25, 25 July 1973 Indian Patent No. 133,6Ul, 5 July 197^ South African Patent No. 3069/71, 3 May 1972

  18. Vertical bone augmentation with granulated brushite cement set in glycolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, F Tamimi; Torres, J; Tresguerres, I; Jerez, L Blanco; Cabarcos, E López

    2007-04-01

    Brushite cements are a biocompatible materials that are resorbed in vivo. A new cement composed of a mixture of monocalcium phosphate (MCP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) that sets using glycolic acid (GA) was synthesized and characterized. After setting, the cement composition, derived from X-ray diffraction, was 83 wt % brushite and 17 wt % beta-TCP with an average brushite crystal size of about 2.6 +/- 1.4 microm. The cement has a diametral tensile strength of 2.9 +/- 0.7 MPa. Granules prepared from the set-cement were used as grafting material in bone defects on rabbit calvaria for evaluating in vivo its bone regeneration capacity. Considerable cement resorption, improvement in the bone mineral density, and bone neoformation was observed after 4 weeks of the granules' implantation.

  19. Shear bond strength of three dual-cured resin cements to dentin analyzed by finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the shear bond strength to bovine dentin of dual-cured resin cements cured in different circumstances, the contraction stress and volumetric shrinkage in both polymerization modes, and to review the failure stress distribution at the cement-tooth interface with finite element

  20. Properties and Acceleration Mechanism of Cement Mortar Added with Low Alkaline Liquid State Setting Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zhihua; WANG Xuebing; LIU Weiqing

    2014-01-01

    Low alkaline liquid state setting accelerator(LSA) for Portland cement was prepared in laboratory from aqueous solution of several inorganic sulfate salts and some organic chemical substances. Properties of cement with addition of LSA relating to its setting time and strength development as well as its resistance to sulfate attack for short and long term exposure were experimentally examined. The experimental results showed that 5%-7%addition of LSA significantly accelerated the initial and final setting of Portland cement in the presence or absence of the blending of mineral admixtures, the initial and final setting time being less than 3 min and 6 min respectively. Meanwhile, the early 1 day curing age compressive strength increased remarkably by 20%, while the late 28th day curing age compressive strength remained almost unchanged as compared with that of the reference accelerator free cement mortar specimen. Furthermore, mortar specimens of cement added with LSA and exposed to 5%Na2SO4 solution showed their excellent resistance to sulfate attack, with their short and long term curing age resistance coefficient to sulfate attack being around 1.04 to 1.17, all larger than 1.0. XRD analysis on hardened cement paste specimens at very early curing ages of several minutes disclosed the existence of more ettringite in specimens added with LSA than that of the reference specimens, meanwhile SEM observation also revealed the existence of well crystallized ettringite at very early hydration stage, suggesting that the accelerated setting of Portland cement can be attributed to the early and rapid formation of ettringite over the whole cement paste matrix due to the introduction of LSA. MIP measurement revealed that hardened cement paste specimens with the addition of LSA presented less medium diameter pores, more proportion of small pores and less proportion of large capillary pores, which is in a very good coincidence with the improvement of strength development of

  1. Effects of barriers on chemical and biological properties of two dual resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Iori, Andrea; Rossini, Carlo; Martorana, Giuseppe E; Ciasca, Gabriele; Arcovito, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Lupi, Alessandro; Marigo, Luca

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of conversion, monomer release, and cytotoxicity of two dual-cure resin cements (Cement-One and SmartCem2), light-cured across two indirect restorative materials in an attempt to simulate in vitro the clinical conditions. The results obtained show that the degree of conversion was influenced by both barriers, but the effect of the composite material was greater than that of the ceramic one. The amount of monomers released from the polymerized materials in the absence of barriers was significantly lower than that released in the presence of either the ceramic or the composite barrier. However, a higher amount of monomers was released in the presence of the ceramic barrier. All materials, in all the experimental conditions employed, induced slight cytotoxicity (5-10%) on human pulp cells. Our examinations showed that the two resin cements had similar chemical and biological properties. The decreased degree of conversion of the dual-curing self-adhesive composite showed that the light-curing component of these materials has an important role in the polymerization process. In clinical practice, it is therefore important to pay attention to the thickness of the material used for the reconstruction.

  2. Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and moisture resistance of oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P S Chandrawat; T N Ojha; R N Yadav

    2001-06-01

    Addition of bitumen emulsion to the matrix has been found to improve strength and soundness of the product while decreasing the initial setting periods. Thus, bitumen emulsion as an admixture in magnesia cement is a moisture proofing and strengthening material.

  3. Top-down cracking of rigid pavements constructed with fast setting hydraulic cement concrete

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heath, AC

    2009-01-29

    Full Text Available Jointed plain concrete pavement (JPCP) test sections were constructed using fast setting hydrualic cement concrete (FSHCC) as part of the California accelerated pavement testing program (CAL/APT). Many of the longer slabs cracked under environmental...

  4. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  5. Thio-urethanes improve properties of dual-cured composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, A; Dobson, A; Ferracane, J L; Consani, R; Pfeifer, C S

    2014-12-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm(2) × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and

  6. Thio-urethanes Improve Properties of Dual-cured Composite Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, A.; Dobson, A.; Ferracane, J.L.; Consani, R.; Pfeifer, C.S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm2 × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and

  7. Hydration Heat Evolution of Cement and Its Relation With Setting Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to veritably measure the first peak of hydration heat evolution that has been illustrated important in indicating cement behavior in early hydration, an improved way of water addition into cement in isothermally calorimetric experiment is put forward. The experimental results indicated that: the magnitude of first peak of heat evolution varies from sample to sample, correlation between heat evolution during first peak of heat evolution and initial (as well as final) setting time is unsatisfactory when samples are not classified; while groups of sample classified based on strength grade represent satisfactory correlations, which indicating the existence of close relation between hydration heat evolution in much earlier hydration age and setting property of cement in rather later age. Importance of first peak in hydration heat evolution for understanding cement setting property and reasons for sample classification are also discussed in this paper.

  8. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  9. Characterization of chlorhexidine-releasing, fast-setting, brushite bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anne M; Ng, Poon Yun J; Gbureck, Uwe; Nazhat, Showan N; Barralet, Jake E; Hofmann, Michael P

    2008-07-01

    The effect of antibacterial chlorhexidine diacetate powder (CHX) on the setting kinetics of a brushite-forming beta-tricalcium phosphate/monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (beta-TCP/MCPM) cement was monitored using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The final composition of the set cement with up to 12 wt.% CHX content before and after submersion in water for 24h, the kinetics of chlorhexidine release and the total sample mass change in water over four weeks was monitored using Raman mapping, UV spectroscopy and gravimetry, respectively. Below 9 wt.%, CHX content had no significant effect on brushite formation rate at 37 degrees C, but at 12 wt.% the half-life of the reaction decreased by one-third. Raman mapping confirmed that brushite was the main inorganic component of the set cements irrespective of CHX content, both before and after submersion in water. The CHX could be detected largely as discrete solid particles but could also be observed partially dispersed throughout the pores of the set cement. The percentage of CHX release was found to follow Fick's law of diffusion, being independent of its initial concentration, proportional to the square root of time and, with 1mm thick specimens, 60% was released at 24h. Total set cement mass loss rate was not significantly affected by CHX content. On average, cements exhibited a loss of 7 wt.% assigned largely to surface phosphate particle loss within the initial 8h followed by 0.36 wt.% per day.

  10. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part One—Porosity, Setting Times and Compressive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Fitremann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides, to calcium phosphate cement designed for bone reconstruction is described. Thanks to their surface activity and through their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, they both induced a strong increase in the porosity (quantified by Image Analysis and brought a very good workability. Other properties typically studied for these cements are reported, including setting times, compressive strength, cohesion in water, and effect of sterilization on these properties. The whole study brought good insight in the interest of adding these mild surfactants to improve several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing their function.

  11. POF based smart sensor for studying the setting dynamics of cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, M [City University, Northampton square, London, ECV1 0HB (United Kingdom); Sheeba, M [Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, 680022 (India); Nampoori, V P N [Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, 680022 (India)

    2007-10-15

    Fiber optic smart sensors are used to monitor the civil structures. One of the important parameters in civil engineering is the setting characteristics of concrete made of cement. The paper discusses how a simple polymer optical fiber can be used to characterise the setting dynamics of various grades of cement. The results explain the comparative performance of polymer fiber over silica fiber. The basic principle underlying the sensor is that as the cement sets, it exerts a stress on the sensing fiber, which is laid within the cement paste. This stress induces strain on the optical fiber, which can be thought of as a series of aperiodic microbends on the surface of the fiber. This in turn changes the characteristics of the light signal transmitted through the fiber and can be viewed as stress induced modulation of light in the fiber. By monitoring the intensity variation of transmitted light signal with time we can determine the cement setting rate. This can be used as an effective tool for quality testing of commercially available cements of different grades.

  12. Petroleum sludge treatment and reuse for cement production as setting retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeslina, A. K.; Ali, B.

    2017-05-01

    Petroleum sludge is a dangerous waste that needs to be treated to avoid any contamination of soil and groundwater due to its disposal. As an attempt to treat this waste, it has been incorporated into cement production as substitution for gypsum. As results, 5% of petroleum sludge has shown effective results and could play the same role of gypsum in delaying the flash setting of cement clinker.

  13. CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

  14. Study of P-350 cement setting kinetic by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duque Fernández, Gabriel L.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic study of cement setting process is presented in this paper A new method which allows the microscopic research of the evolution of the cement hydration applied to the study of three P-350 cuban cements is used. The initial and final values of the specific surfaces of the hydration products and cement were obtained, and the different periods of the hydration process of cement pastes were characterized. The influence of the cement phase composition on the surface development of the hydrated cement stone is discussed.

    En el presente trabajo se presenta el estudio de la cinética del proceso de fraguado del cemento empleando un método novedoso que permite investigar microscópicamente la evolución de la hidratación del cemento, el cual fue aplicado al estudio de tres cementos cubanos P-350. Se obtuvieron los valores iniciales y finales de las superficies específicas de los productos de hidratación y del cemento. Se caracterizaron los diferentes períodos del proceso de hidratación de las pastas de cemento. Se muestra la influencia de la composición fásica del cemento sobre el desarrollo superficial de la pasta hidratada.

  15. Influence of composition on setting kinetics of new injectable and/or fast setting tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setbon, H M; Devaux, J; Iserentant, A; Leloup, G; Leprince, J G

    2014-12-01

    New commercial tricalcium silicate based cements were elaborated to improve handling properties and setting time. The goals of the present work were: (i) to determine the composition of the new injectable and/or fast setting calcium silicate based cements, and (ii) to investigate the impact of the differences in composition on their setting kinetics. The materials considered were Angelus MTA™, Biodentine™, MM-MTA™, MTA-Caps™, and ProRoot MTA™ as control. Elemental composition of materials was studied by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Energy Dispersive analysis, whereas phases in presence were analyzed by Micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis and cement surface by Scanning Electron Microscope. Setting kinetics was evaluated using rheometry. Elemental analysis revealed, for all cements, the presence of three major components: calcium, silicon and oxygen. Chlorine was detected in MM-MTA, MTA-Caps and Biodentine. Different radio-opacifiers were identified: bismuth oxide in ProRoot MTA, Angelus MTA and MM-MTA, zirconium oxide in Biodentine and calcium tungstate (CaWO4) in MTA-Caps. All cements were composed of di- and tri-calcium silicate, except Biodentine for which only the latter was detected. Major differences in setting kinetics were observed: a modulus of 8×10(8)Pa is reached after 12min for Biodentine, 150min for MM-MTA, 230min for Angelus MTA and 320min for ProRoot MTA. The maximum modulus reached by MTA-Caps was 7×10(8)Pa after 150min. Even if these cements possess some common compounds, major differences in their composition were observed between them, which directly influence their setting kinetics. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of saliva and blood contamination on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of two calcium-silicate based cements: Portland cement and biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhodiry, W; Lyons, M F; Chadwick, R G

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of contamination with saliva and blood on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of pure gray Portland cement and Biodentine (Septodont, Allington, UK). A one-way ANOVA showed that contamination caused no significant difference between the cements in bi-axial flexural strength (P> 0.05). However there was a significant difference in setting time (Pcement taking longer than Biodentine, regardless of the contaminant, and contamination with blood increased the setting time of both materials. Biodentine was similar in strength to Portland cement, but had a shorter setting time for both contaminated and non-contaminated samples.

  17. Phase composition, mechanical performance and in vitro biocompatibility of hydraulic setting calcium magnesium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammert, Uwe; Reuther, Tobias; Blank, Melanie; Reske, Isabelle; Barralet, Jake E; Grover, Liam M; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-04-01

    Brushite (CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O)-forming calcium phosphate cements are of great interest as bone replacement materials because they are resorbable in physiological conditions. However, their short setting times and low mechanical strengths limit broad clinical application. In this study, we showed that a significant improvement of these properties of brushite cement could be achieved by the use of magnesium-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate with the general formula Mg(x)Ca((3-x))((PO(4))(2) with 0 cement reactants. The incorporation of magnesium ions increased the setting times of cements from 2 min for a magnesium-free matrix to 8-11 min for Mg(2.25)Ca(0.75)(PO(4))(2) as reactant. At the same time, the compressive strength of set cements was doubled from 19 MPa to more than 40 MPa after 24h wet storage. Magnesium ions were not only retarding the setting reaction to brushite but were also forming newberyite (MgHPO(4) x 3H(2)O) as a second setting product. The biocompatibility of the material was investigated in vitro using the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. A considerable increase of cell proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating an osteoblastic differentiation, could be noticed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the scaffolds. Analysis of the culture medium showed minor alterations of pH value within the physiological range. The concentrations of free calcium, magnesium and phosphate ions were altered markedly due to the chemical solubility of the scaffolds. We conclude that the calcium magnesium phosphate (newberyite) cements have a promising potential for their use as bone replacement material since they provide a suitable biocompatibility, an extended workability and improved mechanical performance compared with brushite cements.

  18. Influence of polymerization mode and C-factor on cohesive strength of dual-cured resin cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the C-factor and the mode of polymerization on the cohesive strength of various dual-cure resin cements. Methods Three curing conditions were tested; chemical curing with free shrinkage conditions (C = 0), and constraint shrinkage con

  19. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  20. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. Materials and Methods A total of 80 ceramic veneer discs were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These discs were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups, based on ceramic disc thickness (0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm2) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using ANOVA. Results For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (P.05). Conclusion The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. Clinical Significance While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm. PMID:26162252

  1. Fabrication of Novel Biodegradable α-Tricalcium Phosphate Cement Set by Chelating Capability of Inositol Phosphate and Its Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiisa Konishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP cement based on the chelate-setting mechanism of inositol phosphate (IP6 was developed. This paper examined the effect of the milling time of α-TCP powder on the material properties of the cement. In addition, biocompatibility of the result cement in vitro using osteoblasts and in vivo using rabbit models will be studied as well. The α-TCP powders were ballmilled using ZrO2 beads in pure water for various durations up to 270 minutes, with a single-phase α-TCP obtained at ballmilling for 120 minutes. The resulting cement was mostly composed of α-TCP phase, and the compressive strength of the cement was 8.5±1.1 MPa, which suggested that the cements set with keeping the crystallite phase of starting cement powder. The cell-culture test indicated that the resulting cements were biocompatible materials. In vivo studies showed that the newly formed bones increased with milling time at a slight distance from the cement specimens and grew mature at 24 weeks, and the surface of the cement was resorbed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-(TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells until 24 weeks of implantation. The present α-TCP cement is promising for application as a novel paste-like artificial bone with biodegradability and osteoconductivity.

  2. Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin; Sakai, Etsuo

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

  3. Curing units' ability to cure restorative composites and dual-cured composite cements under composite overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Sun; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Noh, Byng-Duk

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of using conventional low-power density QTH (LQTH) units, high-power density QTH (HQTH) units, argon (Ar) laser and Plasma arc curing (PAC) units for curing dual-cured resin cements and restorative resin composites under a pre-cured resin composite overlay. The microhardness of the two types of restorative resins (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) were measured after they were light cured for 60 seconds in a 2 mm Teflon mold. The recorded microhardness was determined to be the optimum microhard-ness (OM). Either one of the two types of restorative resins (Z100, Tetric Ceram) or the dual cured resin cement (Variolink II) were placed under a 1.5-mm thick and 8 mm diameter pre-cured Targis (Vivadent/Ivoclar AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) overlay. The specimens that were prepared for each material were divided into four groups depending upon the curing units used (HQTH, PAC, Laser or LQTH) and were further subdi-vided into subgroups according to light curing time. The curing times used were 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds for HQTH; 12, 24, 36 and 48 seconds for the PAC unit; 15, 30, 45 and 60 for the Laser and 60, 120 or 180 seconds for the LQTH unit. Fifteen specimens were assigned to each sub- group. The microhardness of the upper and and lower composite surfaces under the Targis overlay were measured using an Optidur Vickers hardness-measuring instrument (Göttfert Feinwerktechnik GmbH, Buchen, Germany). In each material, for each group, a three-way ANOVA with Tukey was used at the 0.05 level of significance to compare the microhardnesses of the upper and lower composite surfaces and the previously measured OM of the material. From the OM of each material, 80% OM was calculated and the time required for the microhardness of the upper and lower surface of the specimen to reach 100% and 80% of OM was determined. In Z100 and Tetric Ceram, when the composites were light cured for 120 seconds using the HQTH lamp

  4. Influence of Curing Units and Indirect Restorative Materials on the Hardness of Two Dual-curing Resin Cements Evaluated by the Nanoindentation Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuguimiya, Rosiane Noqueira; Rode, Kátia Martins; Carneiro, Paula Mendes Acatauassú; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; Turbino, Miriam Lacalle

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the hardness of a dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) and a conventional dual-curing resin cement (RelyX ARC) cured with different light curing units of different wavelengths (Elipar Freelight 2 LED [430 to 480 nm, conventional], Bluephase LED [380 to 515 nm, polywave], AccuCure 3000 Laser [488 nm]) by means of the nanoindentation test. Bovine incisors were cleaned and then sectioned at the cementoenamel junction to remove the crown. After embedding in acrylic, dentin surfaces of the specimens were exposed and ground flat to standardize the surfaces. To simulate clinically placing indirect restorations, ceramic (IPS e.maxPress/Ivoclar Vivadent) or indirect composite resin (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) slabs were cemented on dentin surfaces. The specimens were sectioned longitudinally at low speed under constant irrigation and then polished. In the positive control group, the cement was light cured without the interposition of indirect restorative material; in the negative control group, after the indirect restorative material was cemented, no light curing was performed, allowing only chemical polymerization of the cement. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Nanoindentadion hardness of the cement layer was measured under a 100-mN load. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Although the self-adhesive cement is technically simple, conventional cement showed the best polymerization performance. The polywave LED technology did not differ significantly from other light-curing units. The hardness of the resin cements evaluated was negatively influenced by the interposition of an indirect restorative material; only the LEDs were able to maintain the same degree of cement polymerization when an indirect restorative material was used. The photoactivation step is required during the cementation of indirect restorations to ensure adequate polymerization of dual-curing resin cements.

  5. Cytotoxicity evaluation of a new fast set highly viscous conventional glass ionomer cement with L929 fibroblast cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Mohamed Aly Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions : This new fast set highly viscous conventional GIC showed low cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblast cells, and it can be suggested as a substitute for dental cements exhibiting a long setting time.

  6. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Hong Liu; Yue-Tong Qian; Song Zhu; Su-Qian Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested:(i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts:DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (a50.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts.

  7. Increase of the final setting time of brushite cements by using chondroitin 4-sulfate and silica gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi-Mariño, F; Mastio, J; Rueda, C; Blanco, L; López-Cabarcos, E

    2007-06-01

    Chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S) is a bioactive glycosaminoglycan with inductive properties in bone and tissue regeneration. Dicalcium phosphate dehydrate cements (known as brushite) are biocompatible and resorbable materials used in bone and dental surgery. In this study we analyzed the effect of C4S on the setting of a calcium phosphate cement and the properties of the resulting material. Brushite based cement powder was synthesised by mixing monocalcium phosphate with beta-tricalcium phosphate and sodium pyrophosphate. When the concentration of C4S, in the liquid added to the cement powder, was between 1 and 8% the cement final setting time increases. Furthermore, the cement diametral tensile strength remains unaffected when solutions with concentrations of C4S below 5% were used, but decreases at higher C4S concentrations. Calorimetric analysis showed that the cements prepared with C4S alone and in combination with silica gel have a greater content of hydrated water. We concluded from our study that the addition of small amounts of C4S increases the cement setting time without affecting its diametral tensile strength and at the same time improves the cement's hydrophilicity.

  8. Effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual – cure resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashi; Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cement. Materials and Methods: Dual-cure resin cement (SoloCem) was used to prepare disk-shaped samples (0.5 mm thick × 5 mm diameter). Study group samples (n = 5) were light-cured for 40, 60, and 80 s through all ceramic leucite-reinforced (Cergo Kiss), lithium disilicate-reinforced (IPS e.max), and monolithic zirconia-reinforced (Ziecon) of three thicknesses (2, 3, and 4 mm). Negative control group samples were cured through metal disks and positive control samples were cured without the presence of ceramic. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The recorded data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc analysis (Tukey HSD). Results and Conclusion: Greatest light transmission and DC were seen through Cergo Kiss, followed by IPS e.max Press and Ziecon, with insignificant difference between the latter two. The attenuation of light irradiance increased with increasing thickness of ceramic disks, with statistically significant values between 3 and 4 mm. Increasing time of irradiation to cure dual-cure resin cement did not always result in greater degree of polymerization. PMID:27656058

  9. Polymerization kinetics of dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kyung; Chun, Ju-Na; Kwon, Pyung Cheol; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the chemical polymerization kinetics of commercial dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-curing resin cement. Four adhesive systems comprising simplified-step adhesives and activators (Prime&Bond NT with Self Cure Activator, Excite DSC, AQ Bond Plus, All-Bond SE) were used. The pH values of the adhesives and adhesive/activator blends were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the extent of the chemical polymerization of the adhesives when used alone or directly intermixed with a chemically-cured resin cement (C&B Cement) for 60 min (n = 5). The data derived from the DSC analysis were statistically compared using one-way ANOVA and the Games-Howell post-hoc test (α = 0.05). All the adhesives were highly acidic; when they were blended with the respective activators, their pH values increased. Neither the adhesive/activator blends nor the adhesive alone/cement mixtures showed any detectable heat generation. The Prime&Bond NT/activator showed delayed heat generation only when intermixed with the catalyst/base paste. The other three adhesive systems produced similar exotherms when intermixed with the catalyst paste alone or with the catalyst/base paste (p > 0.05), but at significantly different maximum rates of polymerization (p adhesive system/resin cement interface appears highly dependent on the adhesive system used and may be considerably delayed.

  10. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  11. Kinetic study of the setting reaction of a calcium phosphate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, E; Ginebra, M P; Boltong, M G; Driessens, F C; Ginebra, J; De Maeyer, E A; Verbeeck, R M; Planell, J A

    1996-11-01

    The setting reaction of a calcium phosphate bone cement consisting of a mixture of 63.2 wt % alpha-tertiary calcium phosphate (TCP)[alpha-Ca3(PO4)2], 27.7 wt % dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (CaHPO4), and 9.1 wt % of precipitated hydroxyapatite [(PHA) used as seed material] was investigated. The cement samples were prepared at a liquid-to-powder ratio of: L/P = 0.30 ml/g. Bi-distilled water was used as liquid solution. After mixing the powder and liquid, some samples were molded and aged in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. At fixed time intervals they were unmolded and then immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen at a temperature of TN = -196 degrees C, lyofilized, and examined by X-ray diffraction as powder samples. The compressive strength versus time was also measured in setting samples of this calcium phosphate bone cement. The crystal entanglement morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that: 1) alpha-TCP reacted to a calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), Ca9(HPO4)(PO4)5O H, whereas DCP did not react significantly; 2) the reaction was nearly finished within 32 h, during which both the reaction percentage and the compressive strength increased versus time, with a strong correlation between them; and 3) the calcium phosphate bone cement showed in general a structure of groups of interconnected large plates distributed among agglomerations of small crystal plates arranged in very dense packings.

  12. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Encarnação, Monalisa Olga Lessa da; Santos Junior,Gildo Coelho; Bottino, Marco Antonio [UNESP

    2010-01-01

    p. 110-115 OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC) photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal) disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light sourc...

  13. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (pcement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature.

  14. Five to thirteen year results of a cemented dual mobility socket to treat recurrent dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadouche, Moussa; Ropars, Mickael; Rodaix, Camille; Musset, Thierry; Gaucher, François; Biau, David; Courpied, Jean Pierre; Huten, Denis

    2017-03-01

    Dual mobility (DM) socket has been associated with a low rate of dislocation following both primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, little is known about the long-term efficiency of DM in the treatment of THA instability. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of a cemented DM socket to treat recurrent dislocation after a minimum of five year follow-up. The series included 51 patients with a mean age of 71.3 ± 11.5 (range, 41-98) years presenting with recurrent dislocation (mean 3.3). A single DM socket design was used consisting of a stainless steel outer shell with grooves with a highly polished inner surface articulating with a mobile polyethylene component. The femoral head was captured in the polyethylene component using a snap-fit type mechanism, the latter acting as a large unconstrained head inside the metal cup. At the minimum five year follow-up evaluation, 18 of the 51 patients deceased at a mean of 4.8 ± 2.3 years, three were lost to follow-up at a mean of 1.4 years, seven had been revised at a mean of 4.7 ± 3.1 years (range, 1.5-9.1), and the remaining 23 were still alive and did not have revision at a mean of 8.2 ± 2.4 years (range, 5-13 years). Of the seven revision, three were performed for further episodes of dislocation (at the large bearing for one patient and intra-prosthetic for two patients) after a mean 5.9 ± 2.9 years (range, 2.7-9.1), whereas two were performed for late sepsis and two for aseptic loosening of the acetabular component. Radiographic analysis did not reveal any further loosening on the acetabular side. The survival rate of the cup at ten years, using re-dislocation as the end-point, was 86.1 ± 8.4% (95% confidence interval, 69.7-100%). The survival rate of the cup at ten years, using revision for any reason as the end-point, was 75.2 ± 9.3% (95% confidence interval, 56.9-93.5%). A cemented dual mobility cup was able to restore hip

  15. Ultrasonically set novel NVC-containing glass-ionomer cements for applications in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Ansari, Sahar; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Schricker, Scott R; Chee, Winston W L

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of application of ultrasound on the physical properties of a novel NVC (N-vinylcaprolactam)-containing conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC). Experimental GIC (EXP) samples were made from the acrylic acid (AA)-itaconic acid (IA)-NVC synthesized terpolymer with Fuji IX powder in a 3.6:1 P/L ratio as recommended by the manufacturer. Specimens were mixed and fabricated at room temperature and were conditioned in distilled water at 37°C for 1 day up to 4 week. Ultrasound (US) was applied 20 s after mixing by placing the dental scaler tip on the top of the cement and applying light hand pressure to ensure the tip remained in contact with cement without causing any deformation. Vickers hardness was determined using a microhardness tester. The working and setting times were determined using a Gillmore needle. Water sorption was also investigated. Commercial Fuji IX was used as control for comparison (CON). The data obtained for the EXP GIC set through conventional set (CS) and ultrasonically set (US) were compared with the CON group, using one-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test at α = 0.05. Not only ultrasonic (US) application accelerated the curing process of both EXP cement and CON group but also improved the surface hardness of all the specimens. US set samples showed significantly lower water sorption values (P < 0.05) due to improved acid-base reaction within the GIC matrix and accelerated maturation process. According to the statistical analysis of data, significant increase was observed in the surface hardness properties of CS and US specimens both in EXP samples and the CON groups. It was concluded that it is possible to command set GICs by the application of ultrasound, leading to GICs with enhanced physical and handling properties. US application might be a potential way to broaden the clinical applications of conventional GICs in restorative dentistry for procedures such as class V cavity

  16. Effect of retardants on the heat release during setting of bone cement-type composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pijocha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of retardants on the heat release during setting of the new hydroxyapatite (HA - magnesium phosphate cement (MPC - calcium sulphate hemihydrate (CSH composites.Design/methodology/approach: We used the calorimetric method to measure the temperature effect of setting reaction in these new composites. Microstructure observations by means of scanning electron microscopy was also performed.Findings: The decrease in maximum temperature reached during hardening process with use of different retardants was confirmed.Research limitations/implications: Biological evaluation and in vitro physico-chemical tests of the novel composites need to be done.Practical implications: The highly exothermic setting reaction of cement composites based on MPC can be lowered to avoid harmful necrosis of the tissues surrounding the implant material.Originality/value: Detailed studies on the heat release during setting of HA - MPC - CSH composites were performed for a first time, giving an opportunity to choose the best composition for further studies.

  17. Atomic and vibrational origins of mechanical toughness in bioactive cement during setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kun V.; Yang, Bin; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bowron, Daniel T.; Mayers, Jerry; Donnan, Robert S.; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Nicholson, John W.; Fang, De-Cai; Greer, A. Lindsay; Chass, Gregory A.; Greaves, G. Neville

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs) have been in widespread use for ~40 years in dentistry and medicine. However, these composites fall short of the toughness needed for permanent implants. Significant impediment to improvement has been the requisite use of conventional destructive mechanical testing, which is necessarily retrospective. Here we show quantitatively, through the novel use of calorimetry, terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and neutron scattering, how GIC's developing fracture toughness during setting is related to interfacial THz dynamics, changing atomic cohesion and fluctuating interfacial configurations. Contrary to convention, we find setting is non-monotonic, characterized by abrupt features not previously detected, including a glass-polymer coupling point, an early setting point, where decreasing toughness unexpectedly recovers, followed by stress-induced weakening of interfaces. Subsequently, toughness declines asymptotically to long-term fracture test values. We expect the insight afforded by these in situ non-destructive techniques will assist in raising understanding of the setting mechanisms and associated dynamics of cementitious materials.

  18. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Xi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lian, Xiaojie [College of Mechanics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Zhongwu [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jiang, Hong-Jiang [Wendeng Hospital of Traditional Chinese Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shandong 264400 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration.

  19. Effect of poly car boxy late admixtures on portland cement paste setting and rheological behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work was to determine the effects of polycarboxilated-type admixture on the setting times and the rheological properties of different types of cements including CEM I 42.5 R, CEM Il/B-V 42.5 N and CEM III/B 32.5 N, defined according to the UNE EN 197-1:2000 standard. The results show that there is a lineal relationship between the initial setting times and the admixture dosage. Mathematical equations that model this behaviour for each of the cements have been determined. The data obtained from the minislump test and from the rheological parameters determined using the rheometer (plastic viscosity and yield stress point to similar conclusions. It was also verified that the workability effect of the polycarboxilate admixture is most intense for blended cements.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar el efecto de la dosificación de un aditivo basado en policarboxilatos sobre el inicio de tiempo de fraguado y las propiedades reo lógicas en pastas de diferentes tipos de cemento (CEM 142.5 R, CEM 11/ B-V42.5 NYCEMIII/B 32.5 N-Norma EN 197-1:2000. existe una relación lineal entre el inicio del fraguado y la dosificación del aditivo, se han determinado las ecuaciones matemáticas que describen este comportamiento para cada cemento, los resultados obtenidos sobre la fluidez de la pasta en el ensayo del "minislump" coinciden con la evolución de los valores de los parámetros reológicos (esfuerzo de cizalladura y viscosidad plástica determinados a través de un reómetro. el efecto fluidificante del aditivo superplastificante basado en policarboxilatos es mucho más marcado en cementos que contienen adiciones.

  20. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  1. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  2. Biodegradable β-tricalcium phosphate cement with anti-washout property based on chelate-setting mechanism of inositol phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Toshiisa; Takahashi, Shuhei; Zhuang, Zhi; Nagata, Kohei; Mizumoto, Minori; Honda, Michiyo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Mamoru

    2013-06-01

    Novel biodegradable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements with anti-washout properties were created on the basis of chelate-setting mechanism of inositol phosphate (IP6) using β-TCP powders. The β-TCP powders were ball-milled using ZrO₂ beads for 0-6 h in the IP6 solutions with concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm. The chelate-setting β-TCP cement with anti-washout property was successfully fabricated by mixing the β-TCP powder ball-milled in 3,000 ppm IP6 solution for 3 h and 2.5 mass% Na₂HPO₄ solution, and compressive strength of the cement was 13.4 ± 0.8 MPa. An in vivo study revealed that the above cement was directly in contact with host and newly formed bones without fibrous tissue layers, and was resorbed by osteoclast-like cells on the surface of the cement. The chelate-setting β-TCP cement with anti-washout property is promising for application as a novel injectable artificial bone with both biodegradability and osteoconductivity.

  3. Treatment of a Vertical Root Fracture Using Dual-Curing Resin Cement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Moradi Majd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vertical root fracture (VRF is one of the most frustrating complications of root canal treatment. The prognosis of the root with VRF is poor therefore tooth extraction and root amputation are usually the only treatment options. However, bonding of the fracture line with adhesive resin cement during the intentional replantation procedure was recently suggested as an alternative to tooth extraction. Methods. A vertically fractured left maxillary incisor was carefully extracted, fracture line was treated with adhesive resin cement, a retrograde cavity was produced and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM cement, and tooth was replanted. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The size of periapical radiolucency was noticeably reduced and there was no clinical sign of ankylosis. Conclusion. Using adhesive resin cement to bond the fracture lines extraorally in roots with VRF and intentional replantation of the reconstructed teeth could be considered as an alternative to tooth extraction, especially for anterior teeth.

  4. "MTA"-an Hydraulic Silicate Cement: review update and setting reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvell, B W; Wu, R C T

    2011-05-01

    To review the current status and understanding of Portland cement-like endodontic materials commonly referred to by the trade designation "MTA" (alias "Mineral Trioxide Aggregate"), and to present an outline setting reaction scheme, hitherto unattempted. The literature was searched using on-line tools, overlapping an earlier substantial review to pick up any omissions, including that in respect of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), with which MTA shares much. The search was conducted for the period January 2005 to December 2009 using 'MTA', 'GMTA', 'WMTA', and 'mineral AND trioxide AND aggregate' as keywords, with various on-line search engines including ScienceDirect (http://www.sciencedirect.com), SAGE Journals Online (http://online.sagepub.com), Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com), SciELO Scientific electronic library online (http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php), JSTOR (http://www.jstor.org), and Scopus (http://www.scopus.com). References of articles found were cross-checked where appropriate for missed publications. Manufacturers' and related websites were searched with Google Search (http://www.google.com.hk). A generic name for this class of materials, Hydraulic Silicate Cement (HSC), is proposed, and an outline reaction scheme has been deduced. HSC has distinct advantages apparent, including sealing, sterilizing, mineralizing, dentinogenic and osteogenic capacities, which research continues to demonstrate. However, ad hoc modifications have little supporting justification. While HSC has a definite place in dentistry, with few of the drawbacks associated with other materials, some improvements in handling and other properties are highly desirable, as are studies of the mechanisms of the several beneficial physiological effects. Reference to the extensive, but complex, literature on OPC may provide the necessary insight. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Film Thickness of Two Commercial Brands of Glass lonomer Cement and One Dual-cured Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Rajat R; Singh, Rishav; Barua, Pranamee; Hajira, Nausheen; Gupta, Naveen; Thakkar, Rohit R

    2017-08-01

    The present study is undertaken to examine the film thickness of three most commonly used luting cements and to determine their usage as a luting agent. This study was carried out strictly according to the guidelines of American Dental Association (ADS) specification no. 8. Two glass slabs of 5 cm in length and 2 cm in width were used. One glass slab was kept over the other glass slab and the space between the two glass slabs was measured using metallurgical microscope at the power of 10*. Two brands of glass ionomer cement (GIC) and one dual-cured resin cement were used in this study. The test cement is sandwiched between two glass slabs. A static load of 15 kg was applied using universal testing machine on the glass slabs for 1 hour and the space present between the two glass slabs was measured using metallurgical microscope at the power of 10*. Greatest film thickness was found in group III (Paracore) followed by group II (micron) and lowest in group I (GC luting and lining cement). All the tested samples can be used for luting purposes. Greatest film thickness was observed in Paracore followed by micron and lowest in GC luting and lining cement. This suggests that the 25 to 27°C is ideal for mixing of the cement when used for luting consistency. The cement with film thickness more than 30 urn should never be used for luting purposes. The dentist should choose the luting cement with utmost care noting the film thickness and bond strength of the cement. The cement with low exothermic heat production and good bond strength should be encouraged.

  6. Wollastonite nanofiber–doped self-setting calcium phosphate bioactive cement for bone tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Han Guo,1,2 Jie Wei,2 Wenhua Song,2 Shan Zhang,2 Yonggang Yan,3 Changsheng Liu,2 Tiqiao Xiao11Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The purpose of this study was to synthesize a self-setting bioactive cement by incorporation of wollastonite nanofibers (WNFs into calcium phosphate cement (CPC. The composition, morphology, setting time, compressive strength, hydrophilicity, and degradation of WNF-doped CPC (wnf-CPC were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy were utilized. Additionally, methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium bromide assay, scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and histological evaluation were used to study the cell and tissue responses to wnf-CPC, both in vitro and in vivo. The results confirmed that the addition of WNFs into CPC had no obvious effect on the setting time or the compressive strength of wnf-CPC, provided the WNF amount was not more than 10 wt%. However, the hydrophilicity and degradability of wnf-CPC were significantly improved by the addition of WNFs – this was because of the change of microstructure caused by the WNFs. The preferred dissolution of WNFs caused the formation of microporosity in wnf-CPC when soaked in tris hydrochloride solution. The microporosity enlarged the surface area of the wnf-CPC and so promoted degradation of the wnf-CPC when in contact with liquid. In addition, MG-63 cell attachment and proliferation on the wnf-CPC were superior to that on the CPC, indicating that

  7. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light source. Three indentations (50 g for 15 s were performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and a mean Vickers hardness number (VHN was calculated for each specimen. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test was used for post-hoc pairwise comparisons. RESULTS: Increased indirect resin disk thickness resulted in decreased mean VHN values. Mean VHN values for the top surfaces of the resin cement specimens ranged from 23.2 to 46.1 (QTH and 32.3 to 41.7 (LED. The LED curing light source produced higher hardness values compared to the QTH light source for 2- and 3-mm-thick indirect resin disks. The differences were clinically, but not statistically significant. Increased indirect resin disk thickness also resulted in decreased mean VHN values for the bottom surfaces of the resin cement: 5.8 to 19.1 (QTH and 7.5 to 32.0 (LED. For the bottom surfaces, a statistically significant interaction was also found between the type of curing light source and the indirect resin disk thickness. CONCLUSION: Mean surface hardness values of resin cement specimens decreased with the increase of indirect resin disk thickness. The LED curing light source generally produced higher surface hardness values.

  8. Effect of various surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia after thermal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Nijhuis, Henk; Felipe Valandro, Luiz

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chairside and laboratory types of surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia ceramic after thermocycling. Disk-shaped (diameter: 10 mm, thickness: 2 mm) Y-TZP ceramics (Lava(TM), 3M ESPE) were used

  9. Washout resistance of fast-setting pozzolan cement under various root canal irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Yeon Jang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fast-setting pozzolan cement (Endocem, Maruchi was recently developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various root canal irrigants on the washout of Endocem in comparison to the previously marketed mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot; Dentsply in a furcal perforation model. Materials and Methods ProRoot and Endocem were placed into acrylic molds on moist Oasis. Each mold was then immediately exposed to either physiologic saline, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX under gentle shaking for five minutes. Washout testing was performed by scoring scanning electron microscope (SEM images. Results Endocem exhibited higher washout resistance compared to ProRoot, especially in the NaOCl group. Conclusions These results suggest that Endocem can be considered a useful repair material for furcal perforation, especially in a single-visit scenario.

  10. Evaluation of the Effect of Porcelain Laminate Thickness on Degree of Conversion of Light Cure and Dual Cure Resin Cements Using FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorizad Ganjkar, Maryam; Heshmat, Haleh; Hassan Ahangari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Increasing the thickness of the veneering porcelain may affect the polymerization of resin cements. Incomplete polymerization of resin cements can lead to compromised quality of restoration and decrease the longevity of indirect restorations. Purpose: This study sought to assess the effect of IPS Empress porcelain thickness on the degree of conversion of light-cure and dual-cure resin cements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, IPS Empress porcelain discs (A2 shade) with 10mm diameter and 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Choice2 (Bisco, USA) and Nexus3 (Kerr, USA) resin cements were light cured through the three porcelain thicknesses in two groups of 3 samples using a LED light-curing unit (LEDemetron II; Kerr, USA). The control group samples were cured individually with no porcelain disc. The degree of conversion of resin cements was determined using FTIR (Bruker; Equinox55, Germany). The data were analyzed using Dunn’s test. Results: The degree of conversion (in percent) beneath the 0.5, 1.5 and 2 mm thicknesses of IPS Empress was 68.67±0.88, 71.06±0.94 and 72.51±0.41 for Choice2 resin cement and 69.60±2.12, 69.64±1.63 and 69.24±2.12 for Nexus3, respectively. Porcelain thickness and type of resin cement had no significant effect on degree of conversion (p≥ 0.05). Conclusion: It seems that increasing the porcelain thickness by up to 1.5 mm has no adverse effect on degree of conversion of both dual cure and light cure resin cements evaluated in this study. PMID:28280757

  11. Influence of energy density of different light sources on knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Piva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL, light-emitting diode (LED and xenon plasma-arc (PAC lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce. Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I of each LCU and the irradiation time (T: 24 Jcm-2 (I/2x2T, 24 Jcm-2 (IxT and 48 Jcm-2 (Ix2T. Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus. Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10. Knoop hardness number (KHN means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (a=5%. Application of 48 J.cm-2 energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5±2.8 and HAL (50.9±3.7 produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05 than the control (44.7±3.8. LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  12. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  13. Evaluation of bond strength of D.T.Light- post to root canal using dual-cure and self-cure resin cements after irrigation with various solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atai M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Nonmetallic tooth- colored posts adhere to canal walls by dentin bonding agents and resin cements. Better retention and proper distribution of stress result from enough and proper bonding. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of D.T. Light - post with two different resin cements (self-cure & dual-cure and to investigate the effect of irrigating solutions applied in root canal on bond strength of the resin cements and D.T.Light- post to root canal wall. "nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study 40 single root teeth (maxillary canine & central were selected and stored in 0.1% thymol solution for one week and transferred to distilled water. The teeth were decoronated 2mm above CEJ. The canal space was mechanically enlarged using k-files (up to # 70. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups. The first group was irrigated with 2.6% NaOCl, and the second was irrigated with normal saline. After drying, the teeth were filled with gutta percha cones using lateral condensing method. After two weeks the post space was prepared and D.T.Light- post was inserted in each subgroup using self or dual-cure cements according to manufacturer's instructions. After thermocycling, the apical part was cut 1cm below CEJ. The remained length was divided into 9 equal sequential sections. Each section was submitted to shear push-out test in universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the bond strength data was performed using ANOVA and post hoc tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. All failed specimens were examined under stereomicroscope. Degrees of conversion of the cements were determined by FTIR. "nResults: Significant difference in bond strength values were found among sites (P=0.001 and cements (P=0.03. With increasing in depth, bond strength decreased. The mean bond strength value in dual-cure resin cement was higher than self-cure cement. The irrigating solutions caused no significant

  14. Self-setting bioactive calcium-magnesium phosphate cement with high strength and degradability for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Wei, Jie; Guo, Han; Chen, Fangping; Hong, Hua; Liu, Changsheng

    2008-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, poor mechanical properties and a low biodegradation rate limit any further applications. Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) is characterized by fast setting, high initial strength and relatively rapid degradation in vivo. In this study, MPC was combined with CPC to develop novel calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC). The setting time, compressive strength, phase composition of hardened cement, degradation in vitro, cells responses in vitro by MG-63 cell culture and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of CMPC in bone defect of rabbits were investigated. The results show that CMPC has a shorter setting time and markedly better mechanical properties than either CPC or MPC. Moreover, CMPC showed significantly improved degradability compared to CPC in simulated body fluid. Cell culture results indicate that CMPC is biocompatible and could support cell attachment and proliferation. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis, the CMPC samples were implanted into bone defects in rabbits. Histological evaluation showed that the introduction of MPC into CPC enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation. CMPC also exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results obtained suggest that CMPC, having met the basic requirements of bone tissue engineering, might have a significant clinical advantage over CPC, and may have the potential to be applied in orthopedic, reconstructive and maxillofacial surgery.

  15. Odontogenic effects of a fast-setting calcium-silicate cement containing zirconium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-A; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Min, Kyung-San

    2015-01-01

    A fast-setting calcium-silicate cement (Endocem) was introduced in the field of dentistry for use in vital pulp therapy. Similar to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), it contains bismuth oxide to provide radiopacity. Recently, another product, EndocemZr, which contains zirconium oxide (ZrO2) as a radiopacifier, was developed by the same company. In this study, the biological/odontogenic effects of EndocemZr were investigated in human primary dental pulp cells (hpDPCs) in vitro and on capped rat teeth in vivo. The biocompatibility of EndocemZr was similar to that of ProRoot and Endocem on the basis of cell viability tests and cell morphological analysis. The mineralization nodule formation, expression of odontogenic-related markers, and reparative dentin formation of EndocemZr group was similar to those of other material groups. Our results suggest that EndocemZr has the potential to be used as an effective material for vital pulp therapy, similar to ProRoot and Endocem.

  16. Micromorphology of resin/dentin interfaces using 4th and 5th generation dual-curing adhesive/cement systems: a confocal laser scanning microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais, Cesar A G; Miyake, Katsuia; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Pashley, David H; Giannini, Marcelo

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the differential composition of resin/dentin interfaces of indirect restorations created by the application of 4th and 5th generation dual-curing luting systems (bonding agents/resin cements), when each material was either light cured or allowed to self-cure. Occlusal flat dentin surfaces of 60 human third molars were assigned into 12 groups (n = 5) according to curing mode and dual-curing cementing system: 4th generation All Bond2 (AB2)/Duolink (Bisco) and 5th generation (B1) Bond1/Lute-it (Pentron). Fluorescein-labeled dextran (FDx) was mixed with the bonding agents, while rhodamine-labeled dextran (RhDx) was incorporated into resin cements and Pre-Bond resin from AB2. Resin cements were applied to 2-mm-thick, precured resin composite disks (Z250, 3M ESPE), which were fixed to dentin surfaces containing adhesive resin in either cured (light cured; LC) or uncured (self-cured; SC) states. The restored teeth were light activated (XL3000, 3M ESPE) according to the manufacturers' instructions (LRC) or allowed to self-cure (SRC), were stored for 24 h, and then vertically, serially sectioned into l-mm-thick slabs, which were analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescent additives indicated where individual components of the bonding/cement systems were located. Additional specimens were prepared and analyzed using a conventional scanning electron microscope. AB2/LC and B1/LC exhibited nonuniform primer/adhesive layer thickness. AB2/SC showed adhesive resin penetration within the primed dentin, and resin cement penetration at the entrance of the dentin tubules. B1/SC/LRC demonstrated resin cement penetration within the hybrid layer and into the dentin tubules. More resin cement penetration was observed in B1/SC/SRC groups than in its LRC equivalent. The morphological features and component interactions among materials at resin/dentin interfaces are related to the activation modes of the primer/adhesive layer and of the resin cement

  17. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

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    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  18. Real-time monitoring of the setting reaction of brushite-forming cement using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, M P; Nazhat, S N; Gbureck, U; Barralet, J E

    2006-11-01

    The setting behavior of a brushite-forming cement (beta-tricalcium phosphate/mono calcium monophosphate) was investigated using an indentation technique (the Gillmore needles method) and isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The two objectives of the study were to investigate whether DSC could be used to real-time monitor a fast-setting calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and to determine if it is possible to correlate DSC results directly with conventional setting-time measurements. Best-fit linear correlation analysis revealed that both the initial and final setting time (T(i) and T(f)) measured by indentation were strongly correlated to the maximum heat flow measured with DSC. It seems therefore possible to predict the setting times, usually achieved with user dependent indentation methods, of this specific fast setting CPC on the basis of objective DSC measurements. The drawbacks of DSC, however, are its overall complexity and expense and the fact that only exothermal reactions can be investigated in comparison to the Gillmore needles method, furthermore, it is not possible to monitor the complete reaction as the first 2 or 3 min are lost due to sample preparation and apparatus set up.

  19. Tridimensional quantitative porosity characterization of three set calcium silicate-based repair cements for endodontic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Erika Thuanne Gonçalves; Nunes Tameirão, Michele Dias; Roter, Juliana Marins; De Assis, Joaquim Teixeira; De Almeida Neves, Aline; De-Deus, Gustavo André

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the this study was to quantitatively evaluate in three-dimensional (3D), the porosity degree of three improved silicate-based endodontic repair cements (iRoot BP Plus®, Biodentine®, and Ceramicrete) compared to a gold-standard calcium silicate bioactive cement (Pro Root® MTA). From each tested cement, four samples were prepared by a single operator following the manufacturer's instructions in terms of proportion, time, and mixing method, using cylindrical plastic split-ring moulds. The moulds were lubricated and the mixed cements were inserted with the aid of a cement spatula. The samples were scanned using a compact micro-CT device (Skyscan 1174, Bruker micro-CT, Kontich, Belgium) and the projection images were reconstructed into cross-sectional slices (NRecon v.1.6.9, Bruker micro-CT). From the stack of images, 3D models were rendered and the porosity parameters of each tested material were obtained after threshold definition by comparison with standard porosity values of Biodentine®. No statistically significant differences in the porosity parameters among the different materials were seen. Regarding total porosity, iRoot BP Plus® showed a higher percentage of total porosity (9.58%), followed by Biodentine® (7.09%), Pro Root® MTA (6.63%), and Ceramicrete (5.91%). Regarding closed porosity, Biodentine® presented a slight increase in these numbers compared to the other sealers. No significant difference in porosity between iRoot BP Plus®, Biodentine®, and Ceramicrete were seen. In addition, no significant difference in porosity between the new calcium silicate-containing repair cements and the gold-standard MTA were found.

  20. Atomic and vibrational origins of mechanical toughness in bioactive cement during setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Kun V.; Yang, Bin; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs) have been in widespread use for B40 years in dentistry and medicine. However, these composites fall short of the toughness needed for permanent implants. Significant impediment to improvement has been the requisite use of conventional destructive mechanical ...

  1. A Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Multigranulation Rough Set over Two-Universe Model for Medical Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Deyu; Yan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In medical science, disease diagnosis is one of the difficult tasks for medical experts who are confronted with challenges in dealing with a lot of uncertain medical information. And different medical experts might express their own thought about the medical knowledge base which slightly differs from other medical experts. Thus, to solve the problems of uncertain data analysis and group decision making in disease diagnoses, we propose a new rough set model called dual hesitant fuzzy multigranulation rough set over two universes by combining the dual hesitant fuzzy set and multigranulation rough set theories. In the framework of our study, both the definition and some basic properties of the proposed model are presented. Finally, we give a general approach which is applied to a decision making problem in disease diagnoses, and the effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical example.

  2. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  3. Influence of ultrasonic setting on compressive and diametral tensile strengths of glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Jesus Esteves Barata

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of ultrasonic wave propagation on the compressive (CS and diametral tensile (DTS strengths of glass ionomer cements (GICs. Three variables were evaluated: conventional GICs, ultrasonic excitation and storage time (1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days. Bovine teeth molds were used for simulating a clinical ultrasonic excitation. The data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05. All the tested conventional GICs presented an increase in strength from 1 hour to 7 days for CS and DTS. Ultrasonic excitation resulted in a statistically significant increase in the CS, but showed no statistically significant difference in the DTS. Regardless the GICs tested the increase in strength was maturation time-dependent for all groups.

  4. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Research into the Phosphogypsum as Cement Set- control ling Admixture%磷石膏作水泥缓凝剂的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝丽红

    2000-01-01

    After phosphogypsum is washed with water or sulphuric acid, it is used as set-controlling admixture of rotary kiln cement and shaft kiln cement. The experimental result shows that, the setting characteristics and strength of cement made of phosphogypsum processed with sulphuric acid accord with GB175-92 and can meet the needs of production.%磷石膏经过水洗或酸洗后用作立窑和旋窑的水泥缓凝剂,试验结果表明,酸处理的磷石膏配制的水泥凝结性能及强度符合GB175-92,并能满足生产的需要.

  6. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  7. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Física, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacústica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Maringá – UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho – UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-21

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  8. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (˜7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (˜12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10-3 cm2/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s0.5/cm2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water).

  9. Atomic and vibrational origins of mechanical toughness in bioactive cement during setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Kun V.; Yang, Bin; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    testing, which is necessarily retrospective. Here we show quantitatively, through the novel use of calorimetry, terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and neutron scattering, how GIC’s developing fracture toughness during setting is related to interfacial THz dynamics, changing atomic cohesion and fluctuating...... interfacial configurations. Contrary to convention, we find setting is non-monotonic, characterized by abrupt features not previously detected, including a glass–polymer coupling point, an early setting point, where decreasing toughness unexpectedly recovers, followed by stress-induced weakening of interfaces...

  10. Preparation of the fast setting and degrading Ca-Si-Mg cement with both odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Wang, Kan; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-03-01

    Develop a fast setting and controllable degrading magnesium-calcium silicate cement (Mg-CS) by sol-gel, and establish a mechanism using Mg ions to stimulate human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs) are two purposes of this study. We have used the diametral tensile strength measurement to obtain the mechanical strength and stability of Mg-CS cement; in addition, the cement degradation properties is realized by measuring the releasing amount of Si and Mg ions in the simulated body fluid. The other cell characteristics of hPDLs, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization were examined while hPDLs were cultured on specimen surfaces. This study found out the degradation rate of Mg-CS cements depends on the Mg content in CS. Regarding in vitro bioactivity; the CS cements were covered with abundant clusters of apatite spherulites after immersion of 24h, while less apatite spherulites were formatted on the Mg-rich cement surfaces. In addition, the authors also explored the effects of Mg ions on the odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of hPDLs in comparison with CS cement. The proliferation, alkaline phosphatase, odontogenesis-related genes (DSPP and DMP-1), and angiogenesis-related protein (vWF and ang-1) secretion of hPDLs were significantly stimulated when the Mg content of the specimen was increased. The results in this study suggest that Mg-CS materials with this modified composition could stimulate hPDLs behavior and can be good bioceramics for bone substitutes and hard tissue regeneration applications as they stimulate odontogenesis/angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Nano-SiO2 on the Consistency, Setting Time, Early-Age Strength, and Shrinkage of Composite Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study outlined the raw materials and mix proportions to prepare composite cement pastes with the addition of silica-based micro- and nanoparticles. The effects of amorphous nano-SiO2 on the early-age properties, including the consistency, setting time, early-age strength, and chemical and autogenous shrinkages, were investigated. Under the condition of the same dosage of superplasticizer used, the consistency of cement paste with nano-SiO2 is higher than that with silica fume. Significant reductions of the initial and final setting times are observed especially for nano-SiO2 addition groups, and the time difference between the initial and final setting times goes up with the increasing proportions of nano-SiO2. The addition of nano-SiO2 is more helpful to the improvement of early-age strengths of the paste with or without fly ash admixed than silica fume additive for the same mass proportion. Both the chemical and autogenous shrinkages of cement paste develop with the increasing amount of micro- or nanolevel silica particles; however, nano-SiO2 plays a more active role than silica fume in inspiring early-age shrinkage. The physical and chemical mechanisms of nano-SiO2 in cement paste are also discussed.

  12. Biaxial Flexural Strength of High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Cements Heat-Cured with an LED Lamp during Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fabián Molina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding heat to glass ionomers during setting might improve mechanical properties. The aim was to compare the biaxial flexural strength (BFS between and within four glass ionomers, by time of exposure to a high-intensity LED light-curing unit. Materials and methods. Samples of Fuji 9 Gold Label, Ketac Molar Easymix, ChemFil Rock, and the EQUIA system were divided into three treatment groups (n=30: without heating (Group 1, heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm2 for 30 s while setting (Group 2, and heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm2 for 60 s while setting (Group 3. Samples were stored for 48 hours in distilled water at 37°C until tested. BFS was tested, using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed, using ANOVA test with the Bonferroni correction (α=0.05. Heating the glass-ionomer cements with an LED curing light of 1400 mW/cm2 during setting for 30 s increased the BFS value of all GICs. No statistically significant difference in mean BFS scores was found between the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock at 30 s and 60 s. The mean BFS value was statistically significantly higher for the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock than for Fuji 9 Gold Label and Ketac Molar Easymix at all exposure times.

  13. NREL, CSEM Jointly Set New Efficiency Record with Dual-Junction Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-01

    Scientists set a new world record for converting non-concentrated sunlight into electricity using a dual-junction III-V/Si solar cell. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) scientists have collaborated to create a novel tandem solar cell that operates at 29.8% conversion efficiency under non-concentrator (1-sun) conditions. In comparison, the 1-sun efficiency of a silicon (Si) single-junction solar cell is probably still a few years away from converging on its practical limit of about 26%.

  14. Preparation of the fast setting and degrading Ca–Si–Mg cement with both odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi-Wen [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); 3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Tuan-Ti [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kan [H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-01

    Develop a fast setting and controllable degrading magnesium–calcium silicate cement (Mg–CS) by sol–gel, and establish a mechanism using Mg ions to stimulate human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs) are two purposes of this study. We have used the diametral tensile strength measurement to obtain the mechanical strength and stability of Mg–CS cement; in addition, the cement degradation properties is realized by measuring the releasing amount of Si and Mg ions in the simulated body fluid. The other cell characteristics of hPDLs, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization were examined while hPDLs were cultured on specimen surfaces. This study found out the degradation rate of Mg–CS cements depends on the Mg content in CS. Regarding in vitro bioactivity; the CS cements were covered with abundant clusters of apatite spherulites after immersion of 24 h, while less apatite spherulites were formatted on the Mg-rich cement surfaces. In addition, the authors also explored the effects of Mg ions on the odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of hPDLs in comparison with CS cement. The proliferation, alkaline phosphatase, odontogenesis-related genes (DSPP and DMP-1), and angiogenesis-related protein (vWF and ang-1) secretion of hPDLs were significantly stimulated when the Mg content of the specimen was increased. The results in this study suggest that Mg–CS materials with this modified composition could stimulate hPDLs behavior and can be good bioceramics for bone substitutes and hard tissue regeneration applications as they stimulate odontogenesis/angiogenesis. - Highlights: • The fast setting and degrading Mg–CS cement was synthesized by sol–gel. • Promoted proliferation of hPDLs on Mg–CS specimens • Mg–CS can degrade and release Si and Mg ions into SBF. • Up-regulation of odontogenic and angiogenic of hPDLs • Mg–CS may be good bone substitutes for hard tissue regeneration applications.

  15. Experimental Approach To Elucidating Damage Mechanisms In Cement-Well Casting-Host Rock Settings For Underground Storage of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Jafari Azad, V.; Rodriguez, D.; Ideker, J.; Isgor, B.; Verba, C.

    2014-12-01

    During CO2 sequestration, wellbore cement could be vulnerable to high temperature and high pressure in underground storage settings. Wellbore alteration has been observed under supercritical CO2 exposure condition in previous experimental and field studies. One such study also showed that a reduction in both tensile and compressive strength when specimens were exposed to CO2-O2 gases at 50°C and 85°C as compared to specimens only exposed to CO2 gases; secondary mineral precipitation (SMP) and high temperature was speculated as the causes. In this study, experiments were designed to justify how different variables influenced SMP, and to quantify its effect on mechanical properties of Class H Portland cement. Chemical and mechanical alterations of Class H cement were investigated to verify the impact of SMP during this process. Cement prisms were investigated under different scenarios including influence of brine composition (simulated Mt. Simon basin), high temperature (up to 85 °C); high pressure (up to 4200psi); CO2 sequestration; CO2-O2 co-sequestration. Modulus of rupture and compressive strength of the cement prisms were tested under each scenario and several exposure durations. Initial results indicated that high temperature and synthetic brine composition had a negative influence on compressive strength. Pore solution analysis was conducted to examine the ionic exchange and geochemical alteration between the cement and brine. Specimens decreased in sodium and potassium, significantly increased in calcium, and slightly increased in sulfate after CO2 injected into system. Scanning electronic microscopy visually identified SMP and the alteration depth of specimens exposed to CO2 gas and CO2-O2 gases with time of exposure, respectively. The predicted degree of SMP, change of pore solution, and mechanic strength based on temperature, pressure, brine composition, and gas exposure conditions will be presented.

  16. The effect of curing light and chemical catalyst on the degree of conversion of two dual cured resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different curing lights and chemical catalysts on the degree of conversion of resin luting cements. A total of 60 disk-shaped specimens of RelyX ARC or Panavia F of diameter 5 mm and thickness 0.5 mm were prepared and the respective chemical catalyst (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus or ED Primer) was added. The specimens were light-cured using different curing units (an argon ion laser, an LED or a quartz-tungsten-halogen light) through shade A2 composite disks of diameter 10 mm and thickness 2 mm. After 24 h of dry storage at 37°C, the degree of conversion of the resin luting cements was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used, with p ≤ 0.05. Panavia F when used without catalyst and cured using the LED or the argon ion laser showed degree of conversion values significantly lower than RelyX ARC, with and without catalyst, and cured with any of the light sources. Therefore, the degree of conversion of Panavia F with ED Primer cured with the quartz-tungsten-halogen light was significantly different from that of RelyX ARC regardless of the use of the chemical catalyst and light curing source. In conclusion, RelyX ARC can be cured satisfactorily with the argon ion laser, LED or quartz-tungsten-halogen light with or without a chemical catalyst. To obtain a satisfactory degree of conversion, Panavia F luting cement should be used with ED Primer and cured with halogen light.

  17. How to Set the Allowance Benchmarking for Cement Industry in China’s Carbon Market: Marginal Analysis and the Case of the Hubei Emission Trading Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse gas (GHG benchmarking for allocation serves as rewards for early actions in mitigating GHG emissions by using more advanced technologies. China Hubei launched the carbon emission trading pilot in 2014, with the cement industry represented as a major contributor to the GHG emissions in Hubei. This article is set to establish a general benchmarking framework by describing and calculating the marginal abatement cost curve (MACC and marginal revenue and then comparing the different GHG benchmarking approaches for the cement industry in the Hubei Emission Trading Pilot (Hubei ETS case. Based on the comparison of three GHG benchmarking approaches, the Waxman-Markey standard, the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS cement benchmarking, and the benchmarking approach applied in California Cap-and-Trade program, it is found that; (1 the Waxman-Markey benchmark is too loose to apply in Hubei as it provides little incentive for companies to mitigate; (2 the EU ETS benchmark approach fits the current cement industry in Hubei ETS; and (3 the GHG benchmarking standard in the California Cap-and-Trade Program is the most stringent standard and drives the direction of the future development for Hubei ETS.

  18. Production and characterization of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate; Obtencao e caracterizacao de cimentos de fosfato de calcio de pega hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Santos, Luis A dos; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Carrodeguas, Raul G. [Universidad de La Habana, Habana (Cuba). Centro de Biomateriales

    1997-12-31

    Setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate has risen great interest in scientific literature during recent years due to their total bio compatibility and to the fact that they harden `in situ`, providing easy handling and adaptation to the shape and dimensions of the defect which requires correction, differently from the predecessors, the calcium phosphate ceramics (Hydroxy apatite, {beta}-tri calcium phosphate, biphasic, etc) in the shape of dense or porous blocks and grains. In the work, three calcium-phosphate cement compositions were studied. The resulting compositions were characterized according to the following aspects: setting times, pH, mechanical resistance, crystalline phases, microstructure and solubility in SBF (Simulated Body Fluid). The results show a potential use for the compositions. (author) 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  20. Influence the translucence of glass fiber posts and time of photoactivation of a dual cement bond strength to root dentin

    OpenAIRE

    FELIPE AUGUSTO VILLA

    2012-01-01

    O objetivo deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar por meio do teste de push-out, se a utilização de pinos de fibra de vidro opaco (Exacto Angelus [PO]) e translúcido (Exacto Translúcido Angelus [PT]), cimentados adesivamente no canal radicular com cimento resinoso de presa dual (Variolink II Ivoclar Vivadent) sob diferentes tempos de fotoativação apresentavam influência na resistência de união nos três diferentes terços do canal radicular. Quarenta e oito pré-molares unirradiculares human...

  1. Push-out Bond Strength of Fast-setting Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Pozzolan-based Cements: ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Guberman, Marta Reis da Costa Labanca; Prado, Marina; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Souza, Erick M; De-Deus, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    The present study investigated the root canal dentin bond strength of 2 newly developed fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and pozzolan-based cements: ENDOCEM MTA (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) and ENDOCEM Zr (Maruchi). White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was used as the reference material for comparison. Root slices (1 mm ± 0.1 mm) were obtained from the middle third of 15 maxillary incisors previously selected. Three canal-like holes (0.8 diameter) were drilled perpendicularly on the axial surface of each root slice. A standardized irrigation protocol was applied for all samples, and after drying, each hole was filled with 1 of 3 test repair materials. Finally, slices were stored in contact with phosphate-buffered saline solution (pH = 7.2) for 7 days at 37°C before the push-out assay. Data were nonparametrically evaluated at α = 5%. The Friedman test was unable to confirm a significant dissimilarity in push-out ranks among the tested cements (P = .220). The new fast-setting MTA and pozzolan-based cements ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr present suitable bond strength performance, which is comparable with white MTA. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of pre-heated dual-cured resin cements on the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Morais

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of resin luting agents (LA polymerized using increased temperature on the in vitro microtensile bond strength (mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 40 human third molars were exposed and flattened. The teeth were assigned to 8 groups (n = 5 according to the LA temperature (25°C o r 50°C, curing mode (dual- or self-curing mode, and product (Excite DSC/Variolink II [VII] and XP Bond/Calibra [Cal]. The bonding agents were applied to the dentin surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. For preheated groups, the LAs were heated to 50°C, subsequently mixed on a heated stirrer surface, and applied to the previously heated pre-polymerized resin discs (2 mm thickness, TPH-Spectrum. The discs were bonded to the dentin surfaces, and the LAs were either exposed to a curing light according to manufacturers' instructions or allowed to self-cure. Specimens were stored in relative humidity at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were mesio-distally and bucco-lingually sectioned to obtain multiple bonded beams with a 1-mm² cross-sectional area for mTBS testing. Data (MPa were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (a = 5% for each product. Specimen failure patterns were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. VII groups showed higher mTBS at 50°C than at 25°C regardless of curing mode (p = 0.05. Cal groups showed similar mTBS at 25°C and 50°C in all activation modes. The use of some dual-polymerizing LAs at 50°C may improve the mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin.

  3. Modified Boracic Acid Retarding the Set of Sulphoaluminate Cement%改性硼酸延缓硫铝酸盐水泥的凝结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜鹏; 叶正茂; 程新

    2011-01-01

    A new type of retarder, of which main ingredients are boracic acid and aluminum sulphate, was developed for sulphoaluminate cement. The influence of the new type of retarder and aluminum sulphate on the retarding effect and the mechanical property of sulphoaluminate cement was analyzed by SEM. Experimental results show that adding 0.3% mass fraction of boracic acid, the initial setting time of sulphoaluminate cement is 296 min ,and the final setting time is 361 min;adding 0.3% mass fraction of boracic acid and 0.5% mass fraction of aluminum sulphate,the initial setting time and the final setting time reduce to 113 min and 168 min;continuing to increase the mass of aluminum sulphate will further reduce the setting time without negative effects on the early strength and increase the later strength. Aluminum sulphate can accelerate the set of sulphoaluminate cement, but slightly decrease the compressive strength.%复掺硼酸和硫酸铝研制新型硫铝酸盐水泥缓凝剂.采用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)分析新型缓凝剂和硫酸铝对硫铝酸盐水泥的缓凝效果和力学性能的影响.结果表明:掺入w=0.3%的硼酸,硫铝酸盐水泥初凝时间为296 min,终凝时间为361 min;复掺w(硼酸)=0.3%, w(硫酸铝)=0.5%,初凝和终凝时间降为113 min和168 min,继续增加硫酸铝掺量,凝结时间会进一步降低,对前期强度无不利影响,且后期强度升高.单掺硫酸铝对硫铝酸盐水泥有促凝作用,但强度略有下降.

  4. Experimental Analysis of a Small Generator set Operating on Dual Fuel Diesel-Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Alex Vailatti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to analyze the operation of a generator set on single fuel mode with diesel oil, and on dual fuel mode using diesel–ethanol blends. The engine used to realize the experimental analysis was a diesel cycle model, single cylinder, direct injection, air refrigerated and coupled to a three-phase electric generator, whose set capacity was 8.0 kVA. The generated electric energy was dissipated in electrical resistances inside a reservoir with running water. Fuels were blended in different volumetric ratios, using a small portion of vegetable castor oil to promote the homogenization. The percentages of substitutions of diesel oil were by 10% to 50%, increasing by 10% the replacement for each sample. Also, the engine was operated with 100% substitution of diesel oil, i.e., for this condition, the samples were composed of ethanol/castor oil 90/10 (volume/volume, 80/20 and 75/25. The blends of diesel and ethanol did not obtain good performance, mainly in taxes of substitution above 40%, causing combustion failures, operational instability, and increase of fuel consumption, although it has achieved a greatly reduction on opacity percentages. The blends with 100% of substitution of diesel oil obtained good performance except to blend with 90% ethanol, where occurred combustion failures, which caused operational instability. To these conditions, the results achieved are increase of consumption by 17%, decrease of opacity by 79%, decrease of exhaust gas temperature by 3.5% and increase of engine thermal efficiency by 1.3%. At the ethanol – castor oil blends there was a decrease in the percentage of opacity by 96%, decrease of exhaust gas temperature by 17.6%, with a minimum of operational irregularities, although fuel consumption has increased by 52.4% and the engine thermal efficiency has decreased almost 1.7%.

  5. The effect of blood contact on the setting and the osteointegration ability of the calcium phosphate bone cement. Experimental study in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faldini, C.; Moroni, A.; Rocca, M.; Stea, S.; Donati, E.; Mosca, M.; Giannini, S. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Orthopaedic Dept.

    2001-07-01

    Blood contact could alter the setting and the osteointegration ability of the calcium phosphate bone cements. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of blood contact on the setting of bone source. 32 mature rabbits were divided in 4 paired groups: A, B, C, D. Group A were operated without tourniquet, while in groups B, C and D ischemia at the right hind limb was obtained with a rubber band. Through a lateral approach a 5 mm diameter hole was drilled in the lateral femoral condyles, and bone source was inserted into the holes. The tourniquet was removed 10 minutes after the bone cement implantation in group B, 30 minutes after in group C, and 60 minutes after in group D. In all the groups, 4 rabbits were euthanized one day after surgery and the remaining 4 after six weeks. Histomorphometric analyses performed one day after surgery showed a gap of 150-300 {mu}m at the bone source interface in group A. Gap size was smaller (50-200 {mu}m) in groups B, C, and D (p<0.05). Histomorphometric analyses performed six weeks after surgery showed excellent osteointegration. 80% of the surface of bone source was covered by adhering bone trabeculae in all the groups. This study shows that both blood contact and tourniquet time do not affect the setting of CPBC and its osteointegration ability. (orig.)

  6. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOVAIS, Veridiana Resende; RAPOSO, Luís Henrique Araújo; de MIRANDA, Rafael Resende; LOPES, Camila de Carvalho Almança; SIMAMOTO, Paulo Cézar; SOARES, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick. PMID:28198977

  7. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  8. Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    2003-06-12

    This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R&D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities.

  9. Cements containing by-product gypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensted, J. [University of Greenwich, London (United Kingdom). School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Chemical by-product gypsum can readily replace natural gypsum in Portland cements and in blended cements like Portland pfa cement and Portland blast furnace cement without technical detriment in many instances. Indeed, sometimes the technical performance of the cement can be enhanced. The hydration chemistry is often changed, in that where there is at least some retardation of setting, more AFT phase (ettringite) is formed during early hydration at the expense of calcium silicate hydrates. By-product gypsum can also replace natural gypsum in speciality products like calcium aluminate cement-Portland cement mixes for producing quick setting cements and in calcium sulphoaluminate-type expansive cements. However, by-products gypsum have proved to be less successful for utilization in API Classes of oilwell cements, because of the greater difficulty in obtaining batch-to-batch consistency in properties like thickening time and slurry rheology. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Texting and walking: effect of environmental setting and task prioritization on dual-task interference in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Prudence; Apple, Sarah; Dowd, Colleen; Keith, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that young adults significantly reduce their gait speed and weave more when texting while walking. Previous research has not examined the simultaneous dual-task effects on texting performance, therefore, the attention prioritization strategy used by young adults while texting and walking is not currently known. Moreover, it is not known whether laboratory-based studies accurately reflect texting and walking performance in the real world. This study compared dual-task interference during texting and walking between laboratory and real-world settings, and examined the ability of young adults to flexibly prioritize their attention between the two tasks in each environment. Texting and walking were assessed in single-task and three dual-task conditions (no-priority, gait-priority, texting-priority) in the lab and a University Student Center, in 32 healthy young adults. Dual-task effects on gait speed, texting speed, and texting accuracy were significant, but did not significantly differ between the two environments. Young adults were able to flexibly prioritize their attention between texting and walking, according to specific instruction, and this ability was not influenced by environmental setting. In the absence of instructions, young adults prioritized the texting task in the low-distraction environment, but displayed more equal focus between tasks in the real world. The finding that young adults do not significantly modify their texting and walking behavior in high-distraction environments lends weight to growing concerns about cell phone use and pedestrian safety.

  11. Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings with Digital Dual-language Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız Turgut

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Providing a story in two languages, digital dual-language storybooks can play an important role in supporting EFL students‟ cultural awareness, language and literacy skills. Based on constructivist theoretical framework, this study investigates the impact of digital dual-language storybooks on bilingual learners‟ vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension skills.Methods: The participants of the study were ten seventh and eighth grade students who were bilingual in Arabic and Turkish, studying English at an elementary level as a compulsory course at a primary school in Turkey. In order to determine the impact of digital dual-language storybooks, the students read two different digital dual-language storybooks individually at different times. Through the process, think aloud procedures, observations and semi-structured interviews were conducted. Transcriptions of observations and interviews were analyzed through discourse analysis.Findings and Results: The results of the study indicated that the use of dual language books have a significant impact on learners‟ vocabulary knowledge growth. Using digital dual-language storybooks, learners can develop some strategies for learning new words, make use of images in comprehending the story and engage eagerly to the stories as they reflect and value their own culture and heritage.Conclusions and Recommendations: Awareness about new language systems, diversity and multiculturality in learners‟ immediate environment can be raised.

  12. Histological and mechanical evaluation of self-setting calcium phosphate cements in a sheep vertebral bone void model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Ong, Kevin; Villarraga, Marta; Schwardt, Jeffrey; Wenz, Robert; Togawa, Daisuke; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Bauer, Thomas W

    2007-06-15

    We investigated the histological and compressive properties of three different calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) using a sheep vertebral bone void model. One of the CPCs contained barium sulfate to enhance its radiopacity. Bone voids were surgically created in the lumbar region of 23 ovine spines - L3, L4, and L5 (n = 69 total vertebral bodies) - and the voids were filled with one of the three CPCs. A fourth group consisted of whole intact vertebrae. Histologic evaluation was performed for 30 of the 69 vertebrae 2 or 4 months after surgery along with radiographic evaluation. Compressive testing was performed on 39 vertebrae 4 months after surgery along with micro-CT analysis. All three CPCs were biocompatible and extremely osteoconductive. Osteoclasts associated with adjacent bone formation suggest that each cement can undergo slow resorption and replacement by bone and bone marrow. Compressive testing did not reveal a significant difference in the ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and structural modulus, among the three CPCs and intact whole vertebrae. Micro-CT analysis revealed good osseointegration between all three CPCs and adjacent bone. The barium sulfate did not affect the CPCs biocompatibility or mechanical properties. These results suggest that CPC might be a good alternative to polymethylmethacrylate for selected indications.

  13. Optimizing window settings for improved presentation of virtual monoenergetic images in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wanyi; Marin, Daniele; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Solomon, Justin; Schabel, Christoph; Patel, Bhavik N; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-08-04

    Dual-energy computed tomography virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI) at 40 keV exhibits superior contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), although practicing radiologists do not consistently prefer it over VMI at 70 keV due to high perceivable noise. We hypothesize that the presentation of 40 keV VMI may be compromised using window settings (i.e., window-and-level values [W-L values]) designed for conventional single-energy CT. This study aimed to devise optimum window settings that reduce the apparent noise and utilize the high CNR of 40 keV VMI, in order to improve the conspicuity of hypervascular liver lesions. Three W-L value adjustment methods were investigated to alter the presentation of 40 keV VMI. To harness the high CNR of 40 keV VMI, the methods were designed to achieve (a) liver histogram distribution, (b) lesion-to-liver contrast, or (c) liver background noise comparable to those perceived in 70 keV VMI. This IRB-approved study included 18 patient abdominal datasets reconstructed at 40 and 70 keV. For each patient, the W-L values were determined using the three methods. For each of the images with default or adjusted W-L values, the noise, contrast, and CNR were calculated in terms of both display space and native CT number (referred to as HU) space. An observer study was performed to compare the 40 keV images with the three adjusted W-L values, and 40 and 70 keV images with default W-L values in terms of noise, contrast, and diagnostic preference. A comparison was also made in terms of the applicability of using patient-specific or patient-averaged W-L values. Using the default W-L values, 40 keV VMI exhibited higher HU CNR than 70 keV VMI by 24.6 ± 14.9% (P VMI dataset image quality by improving the actual display CNR. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  15. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  16. Dual job holding by public sector health professionals in highly resource-constrained settings: problem or solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Stephen; Bian, Ying; Jumpa, Manuel; Meng, Qingyue; Nyazema, Norman; Prakongsai, Phusit; Mills, Anne

    2005-10-01

    This paper examines the policy options for the regulation of dual job holding by medical professionals in highly resource-constrained settings. Such activity is generally driven by a lack of resources in the public sector and low pay, and has been associated with the unauthorized use of public resources and corruption. It is also typically poorly regulated; regulations are either lacking, or when they exist, are vague or poorly implemented because of low regulatory capacity. This paper draws on the limited evidence available on this topic to assess a number of regulatory options in relation to the objectives of quality of care and access to services, as well as some of the policy constraints that can undermine implementation in resource-poor settings. The approach taken in highlighting these broader social objectives seeks to avoid the value judgements regarding dual working and some of its associated forms of behaviour that have tended to characterize previous analyses. Dual practice is viewed as a possible system solution to issues such as limited public sector resources (and incomes), low regulatory capacity and the interplay between market forces and human resources. This paper therefore offers some support for policies that allow for the official recognition of such activity and embrace a degree of professional self-regulation. In providing clearer policy guidance, future research in this area needs to adopt a more evaluative approach than that which has been used to date.

  17. Advances in Glass Ionomer Cements

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, Dt. Tuğba; TİRALİ, Yard. Doç. Dr. Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there have been a number of innovations and developments with respect to glass ionomer cements and their applications in clinical dentistry. This article considers some of the recent outstanding studies regarding the field of glass ionomer cement applications, adhesion and setting mechanisms, types, advantage and disadvantages among themselves and also to enhance the physical and antibacterial properties under the title of 'Advances in Glass Ionomer Cements'. As their biologic...

  18. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  19. Influence of activation modes on diametral tensile strength of dual-curing resin cements Influência dos métodos de ativação na resistência à tração diametral de cimentos resinosos duais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Garcia Fonseca

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In metallic restorations, the polymerization of dual-curing resin cements depends exclusively on chemical activation. The effect of the lack of photoactivation on the strength of these cements has been rarely studied. This study evaluated the influence of activation modes on the diametral tensile strength (DTS of dual-curing resin cements. Base and catalyst pastes of Panavia F, Variolink II, Scotchbond Resin Cement, Rely X and Enforce were mixed and inserted into cylindrical metal moulds (4 x 2 mm. Cements were either: 1 not exposed to light (chemical activation = self-cured groups or 2 photoactivated through mylar strips (chemical and photo-activation = dual-cured groups (n = 10. After a 24 h storage in 37ºC distilled water, specimens were subjected to compressive load in a testing machine. A self-curing resin cement (Cement-It and a zinc phosphate cement served as controls. Comparative analyses were performed: 1 between the activation modes for each dual-curing resin cement, using Student’s t test; 2 among the self-cured groups of the dual-curing resin cements and the control groups, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = 0.05. The dual-cured groups of Scotchbond Resin Cement (53.3 MPa, Variolink II (48.4 MPa and Rely X (51.6 MPa showed higher DTS than that of self-cured groups (44.6, 40.4 and 44.5 MPa respectively (p 0.05. The self-cured groups of all the dual-curing resin cements presented statistically the same DTS as that of Cement-It (44.1 MPa (p > 0.05, and higher DTS than that of zinc phosphate (4.2 MPa. Scotchbond Resin Cement, Variolink II and Rely X depended on photoactivation to achieve maximum DTS. In the absence of light, all the dual-curing resin cements presented higher DTS than that of zinc phosphate and statistically the same as that of Cement-It (p > 0.05.Em restaurações metálicas, a polimerização dos cimentos resinosos duais depende exclusivamente da ativação química. Há poucas pesquisas sobre o efeito

  20. Biaxial flexural strength of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements heat-cured with an LED lamp during setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, G. Fabian; Cabral, R.J.; Mazzola, I.; Lascano, L. Brain; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adding heat to glass ionomers during setting might improve mechanical properties. The aim was to compare the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) between and within four glass ionomers, by time of exposure to a high-intensity LED light-curing unit. Materials and methods. Samples of Fuji 9 Gold Label, Ket

  1. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  2. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  3. Controlled but independent: effects of mental rotation and developmental dyslexia in dual-task settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Thomas; Schumacher, Bettina; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2009-01-01

    In two experiments, we compared the performance of normal-reading (n = 26) and dyslexic children (n = 22) in discriminating letters from their mirrored images. In experiment 1, they were always presented in the upright orientation; in experiment 2, they were presented in different angular orientations (0 degrees, 90 degrees, 180 degrees). In order to determine whether task and dyslexia affect reaction times in early or late stages of processing, a dual-task paradigm was adopted in which the primary task was tone discrimination. Stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between first and second task was systematically varied (50 ms versus 400 ms). In both experiments dyslexics were slower overall than controls. No effects of mirror-image letters were found. In experiment 2, mental-rotation effects were additive with SOA. In accordance with earlier findings we concluded that the mental-rotation effect involves central processing capacity. Mental-rotation effects were the same for normal-reading and dyslexic children; mental rotation is not impaired in dyslexia. Remarkably, SOA effects were larger in normal readers than in dyslexics. This result was explained by observing that dyslexics experience decision difficulties already on the first task. As a result, they do not benefit optimally from increased latencies between first and second tasks.

  4. Phosphate based oil well cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  5. Antibacterial potential of contemporary dental luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugela, Povilas; Oziunas, Rimantas; Zekonis, Gediminas

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate the antibacterial activities of different types of dental luting cements and to compare antibacterial action during and after setting. Agar diffusion testing was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of seven types of dental luting cements (glass ionomer cements (GICs), resin modified GICs, resin composite, zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide non-eugenol, zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate cements) on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. Instantly mixed zinc phosphate cements showed the strongest antibacterial activity in contrast to the non-eugenol, eugenol and resin cements that did not show any antibacterial effects. Non-hardened glass ionomer, resin modified and zinc polycarboxylate cements exhibited moderate antibacterial action. Hardened cements showed weaker antibacterial activities, than those ones applied right after mixing.

  6. Fifteen years of dual polarimetric observations of tropical convection: The CPOL data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Scott; Protat, Alain; Jackson, Robert; Helmus, Jonathan; Giangrande, Scott; Louf, Valentin; Lang, Timothy; May, Peter; Glasson, Ken; Atkinson, Brad; Whimpey, Michael; Keenan, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The use of polarization diversity to measure properties of hydrometeors is not new and was first mentioned by Seliga and Bringi from an engineering perspective in 1976 and by Hendry et al (again in 1976) from a measurement perspective shortly thereafter. In the forty years that have passed since these accomplishments there have been several key data-sets that have guided the development of retrieval science and the use of polarimetry in understanding the nature of precipitation. One such data set has been collected using the C-Band POLarimetric radar (Keenan et al, 1998), which collected 15 years of observations of break/buildup and monsoon season phenomena when it was sited 23km from Darwin, Australia. This presentation will report on the progress of a collaboration aimed at producing a quality controlled set of polarimetric measurements and microphysical retrievals for this 15-year data set. Techniques such as calibration offset, specific differential phase and attenuation retrieval and comparison with disdrometer measurements (via scattering calculations on collected drop size distributions) will be covered including contrasting several different open source approaches. Seliga, T.A., Bringi, V.N., 1976. Potential Use of Radar Differential Reflectivity Measurements at Orthogonal Polarizations for Measuring Precipitation. J. Appl. Meteor. 15, 69-76. doi:10.1175/1520-0450(1976)0152.0.CO;2 Hendry, A., McCormick, G.C., 1976. Radar observations of the alignment of precipitation particles by electrostatic fields in thunderstorms. Journal of Geophysical Research 81, 5353-5357. doi:10.1029/JC081i030p05353 Keenan, T., Glasson, K., Cummings, F., Bird, T.S., Keeler, J., Lutz, J., 1998. The BMRC/NCAR C-Band Polarimetric (C-POL) Radar System. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 15, 871-886. doi:10.1175/1520-0426(1998)0152.0.CO;2

  7. SU-E-I-40: Phantom Research On Monochromatic Images Taken by Dual CBCT with Multiple Energy Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, R [Duke University, Durham, NC - North Carolina (United States); Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang, H [Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, Y [Duke University, Durham, NC - North Carolina (United States); Mao, R [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Ren, L; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of monochromatic images at the same virtual monochromatic energy using dual cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with either kV/kV or MV/kV or MV/MV energy sets. Methods: CT images of Catphan 504 phantom were acquired using four different KV and MV settings: 80kV, 140kV, 4MV, 6MV. Three sets of monochromatic images were calculated: 80kV-140kV, 140kV-4MV and 4MV-6MV. Each set of CBCT images were reconstructed from the same selected virtual monochromatic energy of 1MeV. Contrast-to-Noise Ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared between each pair of images with different energy sets. Results: Between kV/MV and MV/MV images, the CNRs are comparable for all inserts. However, differences of CNRs were observed between the kV/kV and kV/MV images. Delrin’s CNR ratio between kV/kV image and kV/MV image is 1.634. LDPE’s (Low-Density Polyethylene) CNR ratio between kV/kV and kV/MV images is 0.509. Polystyrene’s CNR ratio between kV/kV image and kV/MV image is 2.219. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicated that the CNRs calculated from CBCT images reconstructed from either kV/MV projections or MV/MV projections for the same selected virtual monochromatic energy may be comparable.

  8. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  9. Influence of different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins on the setting time of Grossman cements Influência de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas sobre o tempo de endurecimento dos cimentos do tipo Grossman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Damião SOUSA NETO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the setting time by the addition of different kinds of rosin and hydrogenated resin on the Grossman cement powder was evaluated. The experiments were carried out following the American Dental Association’s specification number 57 for root canal sealers. For this analysis, different Grossman cement powders were prepared using different rosins (X, WW and WG and hydrogenated resins (Staybelite and Staybelite ester 10. The study of the physicochemical properties of the Grossman cements obtained the different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins interference on the cement’s setting time. The hydrogenated resin, having a higher pH, increased the setting time of the cement when compared to the X, WW and WG rosins.No presente estudo, analisou-se o efeito da adição de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas ao pó do cimento de GROSSMAN sobre o tempo de endurecimento. Os experimentos foram realizados de acordo com a Especificação 57 para materiais obturadores de canais radiculares da American Dental Association (ADA. Para análise, foram aviados pós do cimento de GROSSMAN com diferentes tipos de breu (X, WW e WG e resinas hidrogenadas (Stabylite e Stabylite éster 10. Os estudos das propriedades físico-químicas dos cimentos tipo GROSSMAN obtidos de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas interferem no tempo de endurecimento do cimento. A resina hidrogenada, obtida do processo de hidrogenação tem o pH mais alto, provocando um aumento do tempo de endurecimento do cimento em relação aos breus tipo X, WW e WG, que têm pH mais ácido.

  10. Some Aggregation Operators Based on Einstein Operations under Interval-Valued Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Setting and Their Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenkai Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the multiple attribute decision making (MADM problems in which attribute values take the form of interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy information. Firstly, some operational laws for interval-valued dual hesitation fuzzy elements (IVDHFEs based on Einstein operations are developed. Then we develop some aggregation operators based on Einstein operations: the interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy Einstein weighted averaging (IVDHFEWA operator, interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy Einstein ordered weighted averaging (IVDHFEOWA operator, interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy Einstein hybrid averaging (IVDHFEHA operator, interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy Einstein weighted geometric (IVDHFEWG operator, interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy Einstein ordered weighted geometric (IVDHFEOWG operator, and interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy Einstein hybrid geometric (IVDHFEHG operator. Furthermore, we discuss some desirable properties of these operators, and investigate the relationship between the developed operators and the existing ones. Based on the IVDHFEWA operator, an approach to MADM problems is proposed under the interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy environment. Finally, a numerical example is given to show the application of the developed method, and a comparison analysis is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  12. 磷酸镁生物骨水泥固化时间影响因素分析∗%The Research on the Setting Time of Magnesium Phosphate Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马安博; 赵娜娜

    2015-01-01

    In vivo applications,curing reaction of magnesium phosphate bone cement is too slow or too fast,which will cause inconvenience to use.Effect of magnesium oxide calcinations temperature,liquid/solid ratio and temperature on the setting time of magnesium phosphate bone cement are studied.Furthermore,solidifying mechanism and products of magne-sium phosphate bone cement are analyzed.The results indicate that the setting time increases as the increase of magnesium oxide calcinations temperature and the liquid/solid ratio.Besides,the influence of the temperature on the setting process of magnesium phosphate cement is significant.And thus,raising the temperature can accelerate the hydration process and shorten the setting time.The hydration products of magnesium phosphate bone cement are mainly potassium magnesium phosphate hexahydrate and potassium magnesium phosphate monohydrate.In addition,it also contains a large number of particles not involved in the hydration of magnesium oxide.%在生物体内应用,磷酸镁生物骨水泥固化反应过快或者过慢都会给使用带来不便。研究了氧化镁煅烧温度、液固比及环境温度对磷酸镁生物骨水泥固化时间的影响规律,并进一步分析了磷酸镁生物骨水泥的固化机理及产物。结果表明:提高氧化镁煅烧温度或增加液固比,磷酸镁生物骨水泥固化时间延长;环境温度对骨水泥固化过程有显著影响,提高温度能加快水化进程,进而大大缩短固化时间;磷酸镁生物骨水泥水化产物主要是 MgKPO4·6 H 2 O 和 MgKPO4·H 2 O,此外还含有大量未参与水化的氧化镁颗粒。

  13. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall conditioning, and AASHTO T-283 tests and to evaluate the long-term stripping susceptibility of CBETB while also predicting the liquid antistripping additives to assess the mixture’s durability and workability. Specimens were stabilized with Portland cement (0%–6%, bitumen emulsion (0%–5%, and Portland cement-bitumen emulsion mixtures and cured for 7 days, and their short- and long-term performances were studied. Evaluation results of both the Marshall stability ratio and the tensile strength ratio show that the additions of additives increase the resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage. Results of durability tests performed for determining the resistance of compacted specimens to repeated FT cycles indicate that the specimen with the 4% cement-3% bitumen emulsion mixture significantly improves water absorption, volume changes, and weight losses. This indicates the effectiveness of this additive as a road base stabilizer with excellent engineering properties for cold regions.

  14. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  15. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P S Chandrawat; R N Yadav

    2000-02-01

    The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

  16. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  17. Some durability aspects of hybrid alkaline cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatello S.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Blended cements that contain a high content of fly ash and a low content of Portland cement typically suffer from low early strength development and long setting times. Recently, one method of overcoming these problems has been to use an alkali activator to enhance the reactivity of fly ash particles at early ages. Such cements can be grouped under the generic term “hybrid alkaline cements”, where both cement clinker and fly ash, encouraged by the presence of alkalis, are expected to contribute to cementitious gel formation. The work presented here examines some of the durability aspects of high fly ash content hybrid alkaline cement. Specifically, the aspects investigated were: exposure at high temperatures (up to 1000°C, resistance to immersion in aggressive solutions and susceptibility to the alkali aggregate reaction. All tests were repeated with a commercially available sulfate resistant Portland cement for comparison. When exposed to high temperatures, the hybrid alkaline cement showed strikingly different behaviour compared to the control Portland cement, showing fewer micro-cracks and maintaining residual compressive strengths at least equal to original strengths. Beyond 700°C, the hybrid alkaline cement began to sinter, which resulted in shrinkage of around 5% and a 100% increase in residual compressive strengths. No such sintering event was noted in the control Portland cement, which showed a drastic loss in residual compressive strengths upon heating. In immersion tests, the hybrid alkaline cement possessed excellent resistance to sulfate and seawater attack, similar to the control sulfate resistant cement. Both cements were however severely degraded by immersion in 0.1M HCl for 90 days. Both binders complied with the accelerated alkali-aggregate test but when this test was extended, the hybrid alkaline binder showed much greater dimensional stability. Possible reasons for the differences in durability behaviour in both cements

  18. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  19. Effect of bioglass granules on the physico-chemical properties of brushite cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohner, M. [Robert Mathys Foundation, Bettlach (Switzerland); Matter, S. [Stratec Medical, Oberdorf (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Bioglass granules were added to a brushite cement in an attempt to neutralize the cement paste after setting. Results show that the pH of the cement paste was drastically increased by the addition of these granules. However, the setting time and the mechanical properties of the cement were strongly reduced. Therefore, the addition of bioglass granules is not a good way to modify the acidity of the cement paste after setting. (orig.)

  20. Polymerization of a dual-cured cement through ceramic: LED curing light vs halogen lamp Polimerização de um cimento resinoso dual através de uma porcelana: LED vs lâmpada halógena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Gonzaga Lopes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light source, LED unit and halogen lamp (HL, on the effectiveness of Enforce dual-cured cement cured under a ceramic disc. Three exposure times (60, 80 and 120 s were also evaluated. Two experimental groups, in which the polymerization of the dual-cured cement was performed through a ceramic disc, and two control groups, in which the polymerization of the dual-cured cement was performed directly without presence of ceramic disc were subdivided into three subgroups (three different exposure times, with five specimens each: G1A- HL 60s; G1B- HL 80s; G1C- HL 120s; G2A- LED 60s; G2B- LED 80s; G2C- LED 120s; and control groups: G3A- HL 60s; G3B- HL 80s; G3C- HL 120s; G4A- LED 60s; G4B- LED 80s and G4C- LED 120s. Cement was applied in a steel matrix (4mm diameter, 1.2mm thickness. In the experimental groups, a ceramic disc was placed on top. The cement was light-cured through the ceramic by a HL and LED, however, the control groups were cured without the ceramic disc. The specimens were stored in a light-proof container at 37ºC for 24 hours, then Vickers hardness was determined. A four-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p£ 0.05 were performed. All specimens cured by LED for 60s showed inferior values compared with the halogen groups. In general, light-curing by LED for 80s and 120s was comparable to halogen groups (60s and 80s and their control groups. LED technology can be viable for light-curing through conventional ceramic indirect restorations, when curing time is increased in relation to HL curing time.O objetivo deste estudo foi estudar a influência da fonte de luz, LED e lâmpada halógena (LH, na efetividade de polimerização do cimento resinoso dual Enforce fotoativado sob um disco de porcelana. Três tempos de exposição (60, 80 e 120 segundos foram também avaliados. Dois grupos experimentais, na qual a polimerização do cimento resinoso foi feita através de um disco cerâmico, e dois

  1. Multivariate optimization and simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride-forming elements in samples of a wide pH range using dual-mode sample introduction with plasma techniques: application on leachates from cement mortar material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Wibetoe, Grethe; Engelsen, Christian J; Asfaw, Alemayehu

    2009-02-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydride-forming (As, Sb) and non-hydride-forming (Cr, Mo, V) elements in aqueous samples of a wide pH range (pH 3-13). The methods used dual-mode (DM) sample introduction with ICP-AES and ICP-MS instruments. The effect of selected experimental variables, i.e., sample pH and concentrations of HNO(3), thiourea, and NaBH(4), were studied in a multivariate way using face-centered central composite design (FC-CCD). Compromised optimum values of the experimental parameters were identified using a response optimizer. The statistically found optimum values were verified experimentally. The methods provided improved sensitivities for the hydride-forming elements compared with the respective conventional nebulization (Neb) systems by factors of 67 (As) and 64 (Sb) for ICP-AES and 36 (As) and 54 (Sb) for ICP-MS. Slight sensitivity improvements were also observed for the non-hydride-forming elements. The limits of detection (LOD) of As and Sb were lowered, respectively, to 0.8 and 0.9 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-AES system and to 0.01 and 0.02 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-MS system. The short-term stabilities of both methods were between 2.1 and 5.4%. The methods were applied for the analysis of leachates of a cement mortar material prepared in the pH range 3-13. The elemental concentration of the leachates determined by the two DM methods were statistically compared with the values obtained from Neb-ICP-MS analysis; the values showed good agreement at the 95% confidence level. Quantitative spike recoveries were obtained for the analytes from most of the leachates using both DM methods.

  2. Dual-time-point Imaging and Delayed-time-point Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography Imaging in Various Clinical Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind;

    2016-01-01

    The techniques of dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) and delayed-time-point imaging, which are mostly being used for distinction between inflammatory and malignant diseases, has increased the specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases. A gradually...

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  4. Cement Manufacturing Plant Guidelines: An Approach to Reconciling the Financing of Cement with Climate Change Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cement manufacturing is an energy-intensive process, requiring high fuel consumption to operate cement kilns, which in turn generates carbon dioxide (CO2). These Guidelines aim to provide clear and quantitative Minimum Climate Change Performance Criteria necessary for IDB to support projects, as well as guidance on assessing and reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of projects. The purpose of the Cement Manufacturing Plant guidelines is to set forth an approach for the financing of new...

  5. Frozen delivery of brushite calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Liam M; Hofmann, Michael P; Gbureck, Uwe; Kumarasami, Balamurgan; Barralet, Jake E

    2008-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cements typically harden following the combination of a calcium phosphate powder component with an aqueous solution to form a matrix consisting of hydroxyapatite or brushite. The mixing process can be very important to the mechanical properties exhibited by cement materials and consequently when used clinically, since they are usually hand-mixed their mechanical properties are prone to operator-induced variability. It is possible to reduce this variability by pre-mixing the cement, e.g. by replacing the aqueous liquid component with non-reactive glycerol. Here, for the first time, we report the formation of three different pre-mixed brushite cement formulations formed by freezing the cement pastes following combination of the powder and liquid components. When frozen and stored at -80 degrees C or less, significant degradation in compression strength did not occur for the duration of the study (28 days). Interestingly, in the case of the brushite cement formed from the combination of beta-tricalcium phosphate with 2 M orthophosphoric acid solution, freezing the cement paste had the effect of increasing mean compressive strength fivefold (from 4 to 20 MPa). The increase in compression strength was accompanied by a reduction in the setting rate of the cement. As no differences in porosity or degree of reaction were observed, strength improvement was attributed to a modification of crystal morphology and a reduction in damage caused to the cement matrix during manipulation.

  6. Control of in vivo mineral bone cement degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Britta; Geffers, Martha; Ignatius, Anita; Gbureck, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    The current study aimed to prevent the formation of hydroxyapatite reprecipitates in brushite-forming biocements by minimizing the availability of free Ca(2+) ions in the cement matrix. This was achieved by both maximizing the degree of cement setting to avoid unreacted, calcium-rich cement raw materials which can deliver Ca(2+) directly to the cement matrix after dissolution, and by a reduction in porosity to reduce Ca(2+) diffusion into the set cement matrix. In addition, a biocement based on the formation of the magnesium phosphate mineral struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) was tested, which should prevent the formation of low-solubility hydroxyapatite reprecipitates due to the high magnesium content. Different porosity levels were fabricated by altering the powder-to-liquid ratio at which the cements were mixed and the materials were implanted into mechanically unloaded femoral defects in sheep for up to 10 months. While the higher-porosity brushite cement quantitatively transformed into crystalline octacalcium phosphate after 10 months, slowing down cement resorption, a lower-porosity brushite cement modification was found to be chemically stable with the absence of reprecipitate formation and minor cement resorption from the implant surface. In contrast, struvite-forming cements were much more degradable due to the absence of mineral reprecipitates and a nearly quantitative cement degradation was found after 10 months of implantation.

  7. Influence of Calcium Sulfate State and Fineness of Cement on Hydration of Portland Cements Using Electrical Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; LI Zongjin; XIAO Lianzhen; THONG Wangfai

    2006-01-01

    The influence of calcium sulfate state and fineness of cement on hydration of Portland cement was studied using electrical resistivity measurement. The bulk resistivity curve of the paste from the abnormal cement mainly with hemihydrate had a characteristic abnormal peak and rapid increase in early period. The resistivity measurement technique can be used to discriminate abnormal setting. For normal cement with gypsum, the increase in fineness of the Portland cement decreases the minimum resistivity due to a higher ionic concentration and increases the 24 hour resistivity due to a reduction in macroscopic pore size. Thesetting time, compressive strength, pore structure of pastes made from different cements were carried out to compare the influence of water to cement ratio, calcium sulfate state and fineness. It is found that the electrical and mechanical properties are strongly affected by the initial porosity, the presence of hemihydrate or gypsum, and the fineness of cement.

  8. Laboratory development and field application of novel cement system for cementing high-temperature oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, X.; Zhang, H.; Li, Y.; Yang, Y. [SINOPEC, Beijing (China); Shan, H.; Xiao, Z. [OPT, Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    The challenges that oil and gas well engineers face when cementing mid-to-high temperature exploration oil and gas wells were discussed. A newly developed cement system with an effective laminar-flow spacer was presented along with case histories that document the system's effectiveness for cementing high temperature exploration wells. The problems associated with cementing high temperature exploration wells include high bottom hole static temperature; very low pump rates; and very long job times. These challenges contribute to the operational risks during cement slurry placement in the wellbore as well as during cement sheath setting during the life of the well. The new cement formulation presented in this paper addresses these challenges. Eight jobs have been completed in the field with much success. The combination of a new retarder and fluid loss control additive improves the system performance considerably in terms of low fluid loss rate, minimal free water, proper rheology, predictable thickening time, high resistance to salt contaminations and no adverse effect on set cement strength. The drilling muds are effectively displaced by the laminar flow spacer, thus improving the cementing bond. 9 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. Dual-time-point Imaging and Delayed-time-point Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography Imaging in Various Clinical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Segtnan, Eivind Antonsen; Grupe, Peter; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2016-01-01

    The techniques of dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) and delayed-time-point imaging, which are mostly being used for distinction between inflammatory and malignant diseases, has increased the specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases. A gradually increasing trend of FDG uptake over time has been shown in malignant cells, and a decreasing or constant trend has been shown in inflammatory/infectious processes. Tumor heterogeneity can be assessed by using early and delayed imaging because differences between primary versus metastatic sites become more detectable compared with single time points. This article discusses the applications of DTPI and delayed-time-point imaging.

  10. Dual-Targeting Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus FMN Riboswitch Disrupt Riboflavin Homeostasis in an Infectious Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Mann, Paul A; Xiao, Li; Gill, Charles; Galgoci, Andrew M; Howe, John A; Villafania, Artjohn; Barbieri, Christopher M; Malinverni, Juliana C; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; McCurry, Megan D; Murgolo, Nicholas; Flattery, Amy; Mack, Matthias; Roemer, Terry

    2017-05-18

    Riboswitches are bacterial-specific, broadly conserved, non-coding RNA structural elements that control gene expression of numerous metabolic pathways and transport functions essential for cell growth. As such, riboswitch inhibitors represent a new class of potential antibacterial agents. Recently, we identified ribocil-C, a highly selective inhibitor of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch that controls expression of de novo riboflavin (RF, vitamin B2) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. Here, we provide a mechanistic characterization of the antibacterial effects of ribocil-C as well as of roseoflavin (RoF), an antimetabolite analog of RF, among medically significant Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis. We provide genetic, biophysical, computational, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence that ribocil-C and RoF specifically inhibit dual FMN riboswitches, separately controlling RF biosynthesis and uptake processes essential for MRSA growth and pathogenesis. Such a dual-targeting mechanism is specifically required to develop broad-spectrum Gram-positive antibacterial agents targeting RF metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Clinical Cement of Nanoapatite and Polyamide Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new type of inorganicorganic biomimetic bone cement consisting of nanohydroxyapatite and polyamide 66 composite was investigated. This cement can be handled as paste and easily shaped into any contour. Nanoapatite and polyamide composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent washout resistance, high mechanical strength and bioactivity, and it is easily handled and shaped, which can be developed as a clinical cement. It can be predicted that nanoapatite/polymer composite cement would be a new trend of biomedical material, showing a promising prospect.

  12. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the co...

  13. Injectable bioactive calcium-magnesium phosphate cement for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie; Guo, Han; Liu, Changsheng

    2008-12-01

    Novel injectable and degradable calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC) with rapid-setting characteristic was developed by the introduction of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) into calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The calcium-magnesium phosphate cement prepared under the optimum P/L ratio exhibited good injectability and desired workability. It could set within 10 min at 37 degrees C in 100% relative humidity and the compressive strength could reach 47 MPa after setting for 48 h, indicating that the prepared cement has relatively high initial mechanical strength. The results of in vitro degradation experiments demonstrated the good degradability of the injectable CMPC, and its degradation rate occurred significantly faster than that of pure CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. It can be concluded that the novel injectable calcium-magnesium phosphate cement is highly promising for a wide variety of clinical applications, especially for the development of minimally invasive techniques.

  14. Injectable Premixed Cement of Nanoapatite and Polyamide Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new type of injectable premixed bone cement consisting of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and polyamide 66(PA66) composite is investigated. This cement can be handled as paste and easily shaped, which can set in air, in physiological saline solution and in blood. The setting time, injectability and compressive strength of the cement largely depend on the ratio of liquid to powder (L/P). Moreover, the content of n-HA in composite also affects the compressive strength and injectability of the cement. The premixed composite cement can remain stable in the package for a long period and harden only after delivery to the defects site. The results suggest that injectable premixed cement has a reasonable setting time, reasonable viscosity for injecting, excellent washout resistance and high mechanical strength, which can be developed for root canal filling, sealing and various bone defects augmentation.

  15. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  16. Dicalcium phosphate cements: brushite and monetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Barralet, Jake

    2012-02-01

    Dicalcium phosphate cements were developed two decades ago and ever since there has been a substantial growth in research into improving their properties in order to satisfy the requirements needed for several clinical applications. The present paper presents an overview of the rapidly expanding research field of the two main dicalcium phosphate bioceramics: brushite and monetite. This review begins with a summary of all the different formulae developed to prepare dicalcium phosphate cements, and their setting reaction, in order to set the scene for the key cement physical and chemical properties, such as compressive and tensile strength, cohesion, injectability and shelf-life. We address the issue of brushite conversion into either monetite or apatite. Moreover, we discuss the in vivo behavior of the cements, including their ability to promote bone formation, biodegradation and potential clinical applications in drug delivery, orthopedics, craniofacial surgery, cancer therapy and biosensors.

  17. The Effectiveness of TAG or Guard-Gates in SET Suppression Using Delay and Dual-Rail Configurations at 0.35 microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Robert L.; Balasubramanian, Anupama; Narasimham, Balaji; Bhuva, Bharat; O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy

    2006-01-01

    Design options for decreasing the susceptibility of integrated circuits to Single Event Upset (SEU) fall into two categories: (1) increasing the critical charge to cause an upset at a particular node, and (2) employing redundancy to mask or correct errors. With decreasing device sizes on an Integrated Circuit (IC), the amount of charge required to represent a logic state has steadily reduced. Critical charge methods such as increasing drive strength or increasing the time required to change state as in capacitive or resistive hardening or delay based approaches extract a steadily increasing penalty as a percentage of device resources and performance. Dual redundancy is commonly assumed only to provide error detection with Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) required for correction, but less well known methods employ dual redundancy to achieve full error correction by voting two inputs with a prior state to resolve ambiguity. This requires special circuits such as the Whitaker latch [1], or the guard-gate [2] which some of us have called a Transition AND Gate (TAG) [3]. A 2-input guard gate is shown in Figure 1. It is similar to a Muller Completion Element [4] and relies on capacitance at node "out" to retain the prior state when inputs disagree, while eliminating any output buffer which would be susceptible to radiation strikes. This paper experimentally compares delay based and dual rail flip-flop designs wherein both types of circuits employ guard-gates to optimize layout and performance, and draws conclusions about design criteria and suitability of each option. In both cases a design goal is protection against Single Event Transients (SET) in combinational logic as well as SEU in the storage elements. For the delay based design, it is also a goal to allow asynchronous clear or preset inputs on the storage elements, which are often not available in radiation tolerant designs.

  18. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  20. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  1. Magnesia Modification of Alkali-Activated Slag Fly Ash Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Weiguo; WANG Yiheng; ZHANG Tao; ZHOU Mingkai; LI Jiasheng; CUI Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01

    A new type of magnesia modification alkali-activated cement was prepared, the strength, setting time, shrinkage ratio and cracking behavior, as well as the composition and structure of the hydration product were investigated. The results indicate that the setting time of this cement is similar to that of the ordinary commercial cements; its strength reaches the standard of 42.5 degree cement, its cracking resistance has been remarkably improved because of the micro-aggregate effect of fly ash and shrinkage compensating of magnesia.

  2. Effect of silica gel on the cohesion, properties and biological performance of brushite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Rueda, Carmen; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Tamimi Mariño, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Gbureck, Uwe; Lopez Cabarcos, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    The cohesion of calcium phosphate cements can be improved by the addition of substances to either the solid or liquid phase during the setting reaction. This study reports the effect of silica gel on brushite cement cohesion. The cement was prepared using a mixture of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate as the solid phase, while the liquid phase comprised carboxylic acids silica gel. This cement presents a shorter final setting time (FST), better cohesion and higher amount of unreacted beta-TCP than the cement prepared without silica gel. Furthermore, in vivo experiments using rabbits as an animal model showed that after 8 weeks of implantation cements modified with silica gel showed a similar new bone formation volume and more remaining graft in comparison with unmodified cements. Thus, the silica gel could be efficiently applied to reduce cement disintegration and to decrease the resorption rate of brushite cements.

  3. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the Cement-in-Cement Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Pallante, Graham D; Floccari, Lorena V; Vasileiadis, George I; Trousdale, Robert T

    2017-03-01

    The cement-in-cement technique is useful in the setting of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), especially to gain acetabular exposure, change a damaged or loose femoral component, or change the version, offset, or length of a fixed femoral component. The goal of this retrospective study was to assess the clinical and radiographic characteristics of revision THA using the cement-in- cement technique. Between 1971 and 2013, a total of 63 revision THAs used an Omnifit (Osteonics, Mahwah, New Jersey) or Exeter (Howmedica, Mahwah, New Jersey) stem and the cement-in-cement technique at the senior author's institution. Aseptic loosening (74%) was the predominant preoperative diagnosis followed by periprosthetic fracture (14%), instability (8%), and implant fracture (6%). Mean clinical follow-up was 5.5±3.8 years. The Harris Hip Score had a statistically significant increase of 18.5 points (Pfracture, or circumferential lucent lines at final follow-up. The patients who underwent cement-in-cement revision THA at the senior author's institution had good restoration of function but a high complication rate. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e348-e351.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  5. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  6. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-07-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl(2) accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores.

  7. Study on methods of calculating resistance of flue gas from cement production line into dual-pressure waste heat recovery power generation system%水泥线双压余热发电系统烟风阻力计算方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王为术; 贺慧宁; 董英斌; 张红生; 刘军

    2011-01-01

    The dual-pressure waste heat recovery power generation system efficiently recovers low-temperatured waste heat from cement production lines. In order to accurately calculate the pressure of flue gas from cement production lines into the waste heat recovery power generation system, three resistance mathematical models are deduced based on the momentum law and the energy conservation law, which are cooling resistance in clinker layers, resistance of flue gas flowing from boilers into pipeline as well as resistance in boiler tubes. In addition, visual software of calculating resistance of flue gas is developed based on C++ Builder.%水泥线双压余热发电系统可高效回收水泥线低温余热,为准确计算水泥线余热发电系统的烟风阻力,基于动量定律和能量守恒定律,推导建立了熟料料层冷却阻力、锅炉引入管道阻力、锅炉管束阻力等阻力计算模型,并基于C++Builder开发了水泥线余热发电系统烟风阻力可视化计算软件.

  8. Development of monetite-nanosilica bone cement: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we reported the results of our efforts in developing DCPA/nanosilica composite orthopedic cement. It is motivated by the significances of DCPA and silicon in bone physiological activities. More specifically, this paper examined the effects of various experimental parameters on the properties of such composite cements. In this work, DCPA cement powders were synthesized using a microwave synthesis technique. Mixing colloidal nanosilica directly with synthesized DCPA cement powders can significantly reduce the washout resistance of DCPA cement. In contrast, a DCPA-nanosilica cement powder prepared by reacting Ca(OH)2 , H3 PO4 and nanosilica together showed good washout resistance. The incorporation of nanosilica in DCPA can improve compressive strength, accelerate cement solidification, and intensify surface bioactivity. In addition, it was observed that by controlling the content of NaHCO3 during cement preparation, the resulting composite cement properties could be modified. Allowing for the development of different setting times, mechanical performance and crystal features. It is suggested that DCPA-nanosilica composite cement can be a potential candidate for bone healing applications.

  9. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  10. Degree of Conversion and Mechanical Properties of Resin Cements Cured Through Different All-Ceramic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Rodrigues, Renata Borges; André Luis Faria e Silva; Paulo Cézar SIMAMOTO JÚNIOR; Soares, Carlos José; Novais,Veridiana Resende

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The aim of this study was to verify the degree of conversion (DC), Vickers microhardness (VH) and elastic modulus (E) of resin cements cured through different ceramic systems. One 1.5-mm-thick disc of each ceramic system (feldspathic, lithium dissilicate and zircônia veneered with feldspathic) was used. Three dual-cured (Allcem, Variolink II and RelyX U200) and one chemically-cured (Multilink) resin cements were activated through ceramic discs. For dual-cured resin cements was used ...

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  12. Beta-tricalcium phosphate release from brushite cement surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, M Hamdan; Mariño, F Tamimi; Retama, J Rubio; Jerez, L Blanco; López-Cabarcos, E

    2008-03-01

    Different in vivo studies demonstrated that brushite cements are biocompatible, bioresorbable, and osteoconductive. However, the decay of brushite cements has been scarcely studied even though it may be of great concern for clinical applications in highly blood-perfused regions. This work was elaborated to elucidate factors that determine brushite cement surface disintegration. For that, brushite cements were modified using in their preparation different aqueous solutions of phosphoric, glycolic, tartaric, and citric acids in concentrations that were reported to improve the cement properties. Two-viscosity enhancing polysaccharides, chondroitin-4 sulfate and hyaluronic acid, were also assayed. Thereafter, pre- and set cement samples were immersed in distilled water for 24 h. The cement-solid weight loss, microstructure, liquid phase viscosity, mean size of the released particles, and zeta potential were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. It was found that the particles released from the cement surface were beta-TCP, and their amount depends on the carboxylic acid used in the preparation of the cement. The addition of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4 sulfate decreased the amount of released particles from the surface of the set brushite cement made with citric acid. Furthermore, the hyaluronic acid increased significantly the viscosity of the citric acid solution and the cement paste prepared with this liquid phase showed a pronounced step down in particle release. In this study, we showed that the water solubility of calcium carboxylate and the viscosity of mixing liquid may dictate the superficial disintegration of brushite cements.

  13. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Wahl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne®abutments (abutment and coping sets, using four types of cements (n = 10. A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco®/ SSW, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX®luting / 3M-ESPE, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE®/ SSW and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE®/ KERR were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5ºC ± 2º to 55ºC ± 2º for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min. The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p < 0.05, and statistically significant difference was found among the cements. The highest tensile strength mean value found was for zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf, zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf. Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  14. Third-Order Incremental Dual-Basis Set Zero-Buffer Approach for Large High-Spin Open-Shell Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dolg, Michael

    2015-03-10

    The third-order incremental dual-basis set zero-buffer approach (inc3-db-B0) is an efficient, accurate, and black-box quantum chemical method for obtaining correlation energies of large systems, and it has been successfully applied to many real chemical problems. In this work, we extend this approach to high-spin open-shell systems. In the open-shell approach, we will first decompose the occupied orbitals of a system into several domains by a K-means clustering algorithm. The essential part is that we preserve the active (singly occupied) orbitals in all the calculations of the domain correlation energies. The duplicated contributions of the active orbitals to the correlation energy are subtracted from the incremental expansion. All techniques of truncating the virtual space such as the B0 approximation can be applied. This open-shell inc3-db-B0 approach is combined with the CCSD and CCSD(T) methods and applied to the computations of a singlet-triplet gap and an electron detachment process. Our approach exhibits an accuracy better than 0.6 kcal/mol or 0.3 eV compared with the standard implementation, while it saves a large amount of the computational time and can be efficiently parallelized.

  15. Development and characterisation of injectable calcium phosphate cements for use in vertebroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The global objective of this thesis was to understand how the starting components of brushite cements influence the cement properties relevant for its use in vertebroplasty. Therefore, this work focussed on the following cement properties : mechanical strength, X-ray opacity and heat release upon setting. To carry out the global objective, a test protocol was first developed to characterise the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements. The Mohr's circles representation allowed to un...

  16. Development and characterisation of injectable calcium phosphate cements for use in vertebroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The global objective of this thesis was to understand how the starting components of brushite cements influence the cement properties relevant for its use in vertebroplasty. Therefore, this work focussed on the following cement properties : mechanical strength, X-ray opacity and heat release upon setting. To carry out the global objective, a test protocol was first developed to characterise the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements. The Mohr's circles representation allowed to un...

  17. 环境温度对磷酸镁水泥凝结时间和强度发展的影响%Effect of Ambient Temperature on Setting Time and Strength Development of Magnesia-phosphate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆珍; 钱觉时; 秦继辉; 尤超; 汪宏涛

    2013-01-01

    The confrontation between the prolonged setting time and high early strength impairs the practical use of magne-sia-phosphate cement (MPC) at a higher ambient temperature. The effect of ambient temperature on the setting time and strength de-velopment of MPC was investigated. The ambient temperatures used were 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35℃, and the borax contents used were 3%, 6%, 9% and 12%, respectively. An approach that the MPC paste after casting was cured for different periods at elevated ambient temperature was used to improve the early strength development of MPCs with a high borax content. The relationship between early temperature rise within MPC and setting time and early strength development of MPC were analyzed. The results show that a higher ambient temperature produces a faster early strength development and a quicker setting for MPC. At all ambient temperatures, the setting time was delayed and the early strength decreased with increasing the borax content. The higher and sooner the peak in the temperature rise curve, the faster the early strength and the quicker the setting could be. The initial setting time of MPC is 40min at the borax content of 12% and ambient temperature of 25℃. The strength at 1.5h increases to 27.2MPa when the elevating curing temperature increases to 50℃ for 10min after casting. It is suggested that increasing of borax content and elevating curing tempera-ture after casting could meet the practical engineering requirements on setting time and early strength of MPC.%在较高环境温度条件下,磷酸镁水泥(MPC)足够长的凝结时间和高早强之间的矛盾影响其实际应用。研究了环境温度为15、20、25、30和35℃,硼砂掺量为3%、6%、9%和12%时,MPC净浆凝结时间和抗压强度的变化规律。并研究了高硼砂掺量的MPC浇注一段时间后提高环境温度对其早期强度的改善作用,测量MPC体系早期温升曲线,并与凝结时间和早期强度相联系。结果

  18. pH variations of a solution after injecting brushite cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohner, M. [Robert Mathys Foundation, Bettlach (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Brushite cements were injected into an aqueous solution during their setting reaction. The presence of brushite cement provoked a decrease of the solution pH. The latter decrease was measured over time depending on the time of injection, the mode of injection, and the solution composition. Our results indicated that brushite cements released some acid during setting. The released amount was in the range of 20%-70% of the initial acidity. The released amount was mostly determined by the interfacial area cement-solution. Solubility calculations could be used to predict qualitatively the effect of the interfacial area cement-solution on the solution pH. (orig.)

  19. Cement and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  20. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  1. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan KAPLAN; Hanifi BİNİCİ

    1995-01-01

    Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, ce...

  2. on the setting time of cement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    waste. 1.0 INTRODUCTION. Daily generation and dumping of solid waste on authorized dumpsites, such as landfills, and on .... waste, and the ash can cheaply be produced by simple incineration ..... The American Ceramic Society. 2001, pp.

  3. Technical difficulties in the cementing of horizontal shale gas wells in Weiyuan block and the countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When well cementing is conducted in horizontal shale gas wells in Weiyuan block of the Weiyuan–Changning State Shale Demonstration Area, Sichuan Basin, the oil-based drilling fluid is not compatible with cement slurry, is difficult to be displaced because of its high density, and cement sheath tends to be broken in the situations of large-scale stimulated reservoir volume fracturing. In view of these problems, a series of studies were carried out specifically on the theoretical basis of cement sheath sealing mechanical parameters, oil-displacement preflush improving the interface cementation quality, toughness set cement satisfying large-scale fracturing requirements and cementing technology conducive to the wellbore integrity. The following achievements were made. First, the theoretical model of cement sheath mechanical integrity taking into account the plastic characteristics and interface cementation strength of cement sheath is instructive to the mechanical design of set cement for horizontal shale gas wells, avoiding the micro-annulus as much as possible. Second, oil-displacement preflush is developed and it is well compatible with oil-based drilling fluids and cement slurry with the flushing efficiency on oil-based drilling fluids higher than 90%. Third, the tough set cement which is developed based on the theoretical model of cement sheath sealing integrity not only guarantees higher compressive strength, but decreases Young's modulus by 30%. Forth, it is confirmed that water displacement cementing technology suitable for shale gas wells is conducive to improving the wellbore seal integrity. These research findings were applied in 12 horizontal wells. It is indicated that the quality cementing ratio of horizontal segment reaches 92% and the post fracturing effect is very good, which guarantees the sealing integrity of wellbores and provides a technical support for the highly efficient development of shale gas reservoirs.

  4. Light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness and microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Cekic Nagas, Isil; Egilmez,Ferhan; Ergün, Gülfem; Kaya, Bekir-Murat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia and the light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness. Study design: A total of 126 disc-shaped specimens (2 mm in height and 5 mm in diameter) were prepared from dual-cured resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Panavia F and Clearfil SA cement). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen and light emitting diode light curing units under differen...

  5. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  6. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Kelly Lopes HERNANDES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3 layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP, and chroma of low (LT and high (HT translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B and white (W background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  7. Active Additives to Improve the Performance of Anti-Corrosion of Carbon Dioxide of Set Cement in Oil Well%活性外掺料提高油井水泥石抗二氧化碳腐蚀能力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸华军; 姚晓; 王道正; 张祖华; 华苏东; 何玉鑫

    2011-01-01

    为提高固井水泥环的抗CO2腐蚀能力,开发了富硅铝质活性外掺料(HA).通过比较不同碳化龄期水泥石的抗压强度、分析孔结构、测定渗透率、分析碳化层的成分和显微形貌等方法,对水泥石的抗碳化性能进行了研究.结果表明,加HA水泥石抗CO2腐蚀能力明显优于净浆水泥石和掺硅灰水泥石:加HA水泥石在CO2压力2 MPa、95℃腐蚀介质中养护28和90 d后,试样的抗压强度为35.4和33.7 MPa,较同龄期盐水养护试样分别降低了3.01%和13.14%(净浆水泥石分别降低了7.750%和31.15%),试样总孔隙率分别为19.87%和21.45%(净浆水泥石分别为28.81%和31.850%),且有害孔(直径>100 nm)所占比例小;在7 MPa驱替压力下,两个腐蚀龄期的加HA水泥石均未发生渗滤(净浆水泥石的渗透率分别为1.21×10-3 μm2和1.68×10-3 μm2);碳化90 d后的加HA水泥石外层试样中CaCO3的衍射峰强度明显低于净浆水泥石,且碳化试样的产物呈连续致密,与净浆水泥石腐蚀后形成颗粒的结构明显不同.%Rich silicon-aluminum active admixture (HA) has been developed with the aim at improving the performance of anti-carbonation of oil well cement sheath. The compressive strength of set cement, its pore structure, permeability, component and micro-morphology of carbonated specimens at different ages were analyzed. The performance of anti-carbonization was investigated. The results showed that the anti-carbonation property of set cement with HA agent was higher than that of the pure cement and those containing silica fume. Under CO2 pressure of 2 Mpa and temperature of 95 ℃ ,the compressive strength of set cement with HA agent was 35. 4 Mpa and 33. 7 Mpa respectively with aging for 28 and 90 days, which decreased by 3. 01% and 13. 14% respectively compared with those samples after salt water curing (the compressive strength of pure cement was reduced by 7. 75% and 31. 15% respectively). The total

  8. Biologically mediated resorption of brushite cement in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Liam M; Gbureck, Uwe; Wright, Adrian J; Tremayne, Maryjane; Barralet, Jake E

    2006-04-01

    A new calcium phosphate cement is reported, which sets to form a matrix consisting of brushite, dicalcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and an amorphous phase following the mixture of beta-tricalcium phosphate with an aqueous pyrophosphoric acid solution. This reactant combination set within a clinically relevant time-frame (approximately 10 min) and exhibited a higher compressive strength (25 MPa) than previously reported brushite cements. The in vitro degradation of the beta-tricalcium phosphate-pyrophosphoric acid cement was tested in both phosphate buffered saline and bovine serum. The pyrophosphate ion containing cement reported here was found not to be hydrolysed to form hydroxyapatite in vitro like beta-tricalcium phosphate-orthophosphoric acid solution cements. This finding is significant since the formation of hydroxyapatite by hydrolysis is thought to retard in vivo degradation of brushite cements. When aged in bovine serum, the cement lost considerably more mass than when aged in phosphate buffered saline, indicating that proteins, most likely phosphatase enzymes played an important role in the degradation. As pyrophosphate ions are thought to be the source of orthophosphate ions during bone mineralisation, this new class of bone cement offers a route to new degradable synthetic bone grafting materials.

  9. Biocompatibility of alendronate-loaded acrylic cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Calvo-Fernández

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a biological evaluation of a non-resorbable acrylic cement loaded with alendronate for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. The cement formulation was based on polymethyl methacrylate and acrylic monomers; one of these had covalently linked vitamin E residues. The same cement in the absence of alendronate was used as a control. The setting of the charged cement presented a maximum polymerization temperature of 44ºC, a setting time of 24 min, a residual monomer content lower than 3 wt.%, a compressive strength of 99±10 MPa and an elastic modulus of 1.2±0.2 GPa. Cytotoxicity studies using human osteoblast cultures revealed that the leachable substances of the alendronate loaded cement collected between 1 and 7 days decreased cell viability to values lower than 80%. However, morphological changes and cellular damage in cells produced by the extracts decreased with the leak time. Cell adhesion and growth on charged cement was significantly lower than on the control. Implantation of the cement paste in the intra-femoral cavity of rabbits showed that initially the osteogenic activity was evident for the cement charged with alendronate, and the osteosynthesis process took place mainly in the trabeculae and was manifested by the presence of a non-mineralised osseous spicule. The interface between material and adjacent bone tissue was initially characterized by a variable fibrous response that in many cases it appeared reduced to thin connective tissue after a 24-week-period.

  10. Environmental set-up and tidal propagation in a tropical estuary with dual connection to the sea (SW Coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Revichandran, C.; Srinivas, K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Rafeeq, M.; Shivaprasad, A.; Vijayakumar, K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.

    regions according to the tidal forcing from the north (Pallipuram) and south (Vallarpadam). This demarcation is useful for computing the propagation speeds of the dominant tidal constituents in the northern branch of the KB with dual opening for opposing...

  11. Quality control of cemented waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slate, L.J.

    1994-12-31

    To insure that cemented radwaste remains immobilized after disposal, certain standards have been set in Europe by the Commission of the European Communities. One such standard is compressive strength. If the compressive strength can be predicted during the early curing stages, time and money can be saved and the quality of the final waste form guaranteed. It was determined that the 7- and 28-day compressive strength from radwaste cementation can be predicted during the mixing and early curing stages by at least three methods. The three that were studied were maturity, rheology, and impedance. Maturity is a temperature-to-time measurement, rheology is a shear stress-to-shear rate measurement, and impedance is the opposition offered to the flow of alternating current. These three methods were employed on five different cemented radwaste concentrations with three different water-to-cement ratios; thus, a total of 15 different mix designs were considered. The results showed that the impedance was the easiest to employ for an on-line process. The results of the impedance method showed a very good relationship between impedance and water-to-cement ratio; therefore, an accurate prediction of compressive strength of cemented radwaste can be drawn from this method. The results of the theology method were very good. The method showed that concrete conforms to the Bingham plastic rheologic model, and the theology method can be used to predict the compressive strength of cemented radwaste, but may be too cumbersome. The results of the maturity method were shown to be limited in accuracy for determining compressive strength.

  12. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Carlos; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Smanio, Henrique

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne abutments (abutment and coping sets), using four types of cements (n = 10). A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco/ SSW), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX luting / 3M-ESPE), a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE/ SSW) and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE/ KERR) were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5 degrees C +/- 2 degrees to 55 degrees C +/- 2 degrees) for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf) followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf), zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf) and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf). Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  13. Karakterisasi Unjuk Kerja Diesel Engine Generator Set Sistem Dual Fuel Solar-Syngas Hasil Gasifikasi Briket Municipal Solid Waste (MSW Secara Langsung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Rizkal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sejalan dengan semakin banyaknya kebutuhan energi untuk dapat digunakan sebagai bahan bakar maka perlu adanya pengembangan gas biomassa sebagai bahan bakar alternatif pada motor pembakaran dalam maka akan dilakukan penelitian mengenai aplikasi sistem dual fuel gas hasil gasifikasi biomassa municipal solid waste (msw pada sistem downdraft dengan minyak solar pada motor diesel stasioner. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui seberapa besar solar yang tersibtitusi dengan adanya penambahan syngas yang disalurkan secara langsung. Penelitian ini dilakukan secara eksperimental dengan proses pemasukan aliran syngas yang dihasilkan downdraft municipal solid waste (MSW kedalam saluran udara mesin diesel generator set secara langsung menggunakan sistem mixer. Pengujian dilakukan dengan putaran konstan 2000 rpm dengan pembebanan bervariasi dari 200 watt sampai dengan 2000 watt dengan interval 200 watt. Bahwa produksi syngas dari reaktor gasifikasi ditambahkan sistem bypass untuk mengetahui kesesuaian antara reaktor gasifikasi dan mesin generatorset data ṁ syngas yang dibutuhkan mesin diesel, ṁ syngas yang di bypass untuk mendapatkan kesesuaian antara produksi syngas dan yang di bypass.  Data-data yang diukur dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa besar nilai mass flowrate gas syngas yang dibutuhkan mesin diesel pada AFR reaktor gasifier 1,39 sebesar 0,0003748 kg/s. Mass flowrate gas syngas yang di bypass menunjukkan nilai 0 pada saat sistem dijalankan karena seluruh gas syngas masuk kedalam ruang bakar. AFR rata-rata sebesar 14,54 ,Nilai Spesifik fuel consumption (sfc mengalami peningkatan 68% dari kondisi standar single fuel , Nilai efesiensi thermal mengalami kenaikan sebesar 7% dari kondisi single fuel, Nilai daya rata-rata sebesar 2,28kW, Nilai torsi rata-rata sebesar 10,94 N.m. Solar yang tersibtitusi sebesar 48%. Nilai temperatur (coolant, mesin, oil, dan gas buang pada setiap pembebanan mengalami kenaikan.

  14. Bone mineral density measurements of the proximal femur from routine contrast-enhanced MDCT data sets correlate with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bauer, J.S.; Dobritz, M.; Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Baum, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Beer, A.J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Wolf, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the utility of femoral bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in routine contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (ceMDCT) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the reference standard. Forty-one patients (33 women, 8 men) underwent DXA measurement of the proximal femur. Subsequently, transverse sections of routine ceMDCT of these patients were used to measure BMD of the femoral head and femoral neck. The MDCT-to-DXA conversion equations for BMD and T-score were calculated using linear regression analysis. The conversion equations were applied to the MDCT data sets of 382 patients (120 women, 262 men) of whom 74 had osteoporotic fractures. A correlation coefficient of r = 0.84 (P < 0.05) was calculated for BMD{sub MDCT} values of the femoral head and DXA T-scores of the total proximal femur using the conversion equation T-score = 0.021 x BMD{sub MDCT} - 5.90. The correlation coefficient for the femoral neck was r = 0.79 (P < 0.05) with the conversion equation T-score = 0.016 x BMD{sub MDCT} - 4.28. Accordingly, converted T-scores for the femoral neck in patients with versus those without osteoporotic fractures were significantly different (female, -1.83 versus -1.47; male, -1.86 versus -1.47; P < 0.05). BMD measurements of the proximal femur were computed in routine contrast-enhanced MDCT and converted to DXA T-scores, which adequately differentiated patients with and without osteoporotic fractures. (orig.)

  15. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Reza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Background: Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL]; the push-out bond strength (PBS at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. Results: The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05. No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Conclusion: Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post.

  16. Characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using a novel hydroxyapatite-based formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alge, Daniel L [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47908 (United States); Cruz, Grace Santa; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Goebel, W Scott, E-mail: tgchu@iupui.ed [Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements are typically prepared using beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as the base component. However, hydroxyapatite (HA) is an interesting alternative because of its potential for reducing cement acidity, as well as modulating cement properties via ionic substitutions. In the present study, we have characterized DCPD cements prepared with a novel formulation based on monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and HA. Cements were prepared using a 4:1 MCPM:HA molar ratio. The reactivity of HA in this system was verified by showing DCPD formation using poorly crystalline HA, as well as highly crystalline HA. Evaluation of cements prepared with poorly crystalline HA revealed that setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system, and that the use of a setting regulator is necessary to maintain workability of the cement paste. Compressive testing showed that MCPM/HA cements have strengths comparable to what has previously been published for DCPD cements. However, preliminary in vitro analysis of cement degradation revealed that conversion of DCPD to HA may occur much more rapidly in the MCPM/HA system compared to cements prepared with beta-TCP. Future studies should investigate this property further, as it could have important implications for the use of HA-based DCPD cement formulations.

  17. Advantages of using glycolic acid as a retardant in a brushite forming cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Faleh Tamimi; Torres, Jesús; Hamdan, Mohammad; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2007-11-01

    In this study we have compared the effect of using acetic, glycolic, and citric acids on the brushite cement setting reaction and the properties of the resultant cement. The cement solid phase was made by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium dihydrogen phosphate anhydrate (MCPA), and sodium pyrophosphate, whereas the cement liquid phase consisted of aqueous solutions of carboxy acids at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5M. Cements were prepared by mixing the solid phase with the liquid phase to form a workable paste. The cement setting time was longer for glycolic and citric acids. The best mechanical properties in dry environments were obtained using glycolic and citric acid liquid phases. In a wet environment at 37 degrees C, the cement set with glycolic acid was the strongest one. Brushite cement diametral tensile strength seems to be affected by the calcium-carboxyl phase produced in the setting reaction. The acceptable setting time and mechanical properties of cements set in glycolic acid solutions are attributed to the additional hydrophilic groups in the carboxylic acid and the low solubility in water of the calcium salt produced in the reaction. Moreover, at high concentrations, carboxylic acids add chemically to the cement matrix becoming reactants themselves.

  18. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  19. SODIUM CITRATE INFLUENCE ON FORMATION OF CEMENT STONE IN THE ALUMINOUS BINDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the effect of sodium citrate on the formation of a cement stone in the aluminous binder. Formation of cement stone framework in cement hydraulic binder is accompanied with complicated physical and chemical processes of interphase interactions and dispersion, these processes are predicated on qualitative and quantitative composition of the cement mortar, continuous changes in its properties from preparation stage till curing. Addition of sodium citrate to tempering water enhances hydration of both Portland cement and calcium aluminate cement. Process pertaining to an increase of cement hydration rate is considered as a consequence of destruction in surface formations and exclusion of damping effect in respect of hydration rate and hydrolysis of products resulted from interaction of clinker material with tempering. It has been established that sodium citrate makes it possible to control processes of hydration, hydrolysis, binding and curing for cement mass. High degree of hydration of aluminous cement in the presence of sodium citrate provides fast binding and curing of binder, low porosity and rather high compression breaking strength of cement stone for all curing stages. An increase in concentration of sodium citrate in cement mixture up to 10 % of the cement mass exerts an influence not only on the process of cement mortar liquefaction, reduction of time for cement mass setting and hardening but also increases compression strength of cement stone. An analysis of the structure for cleavage surface of cement stone gives ground to declare that the addition of sodium citrate provides cement stone sealing and reduces its water absorption.

  20. Organic Additive Implantation onto Cement Hydration Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jipeng; LI Zongjin; YANG Ruochong; ZHANG Yamei

    2014-01-01

    In polymer modified cementitious materials, it is hard to set up a chemical connection between the added polymer and the cement moiety. In this study FS (functional silane) was adopted to form this connection as a bridge component which has the functional group forming bonds with polymer. To testify the connection between FS and cement moiety, Q2/Q1 ratio (Qx:intensity ratio) investigation was carried out by the means of quantitative solid state 29Si MAS NMR. The results show that the Q2/Q1 ratio has increased with the addition of FS which indicates that the silicon chain length has increased, and the quantity of silicon atoms at site of Q2, chain site, has enhanced, showing that the silicon atom of FS has connected to the silicon chain of cement moiety by the bond“-Si-O-Si-”formation.

  1. Polyelectrolyte addition effect on the properties of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate; Efeito da adicao de polieletrolitos sobre as propriedades de cimentos de fosfato de calcio de pega hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Luis A. dos; Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Carrodeguas, Raul Gracia [Universidad de La Habana, Habana, (Cuba). Centro de Biomateriales

    1997-12-31

    In the present work the effects of the addition of some poly electrolytes (sodium alginate and poly acrylic acid) on the solubility, crystalline phases, pH and mechanical strength under compression of three calcium phosphate cements were studied. (author) 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. [A new hydroxyapatite cement for craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistner, H; Reuther, J; Reinhart, E; Kübler, N; Priessnitz, B

    1998-05-01

    A new stoechiometric mixture of 27% dicalcium-phosphate (DCPA) and 73% tetra-calcium-phosphate (TTCP) can be prepared with water intraoperatively to a paste that subsequently sets to a structurally stabile implant composed of hydroxyapatite (HA). Primary setting time is about 20 min; pH during setting ranges from 6.5 to 8.5. There is no relevant curing heat or expansion or contraction. Compressive strength is about 50 MPa, tensile strength about 8 MPa. Over a period of about 4 h in physiological milieu, the cement converts to hydroxyapatite. This product is no longer redissolvable in normal body fluid. This cement can be used for non-load-bearing applications especially in craniofacial bone surgery. Cranial defects due to tumour or trauma as well as deficits in the facial skeleton may be reconstructed using this new biomaterial. In nine of ten patients we used the hydroxyapatite cement successfully for reconstructions in the craniofacial area. Fluid control of the operation field and implant site is extremely important and sometimes difficult to achieve. Further applications could be all non-load-bearing augmentations such as filling of blocked paranasal sinuses, of dentoalveolar cysts and defects following dental apectomy or fixation of implanted hearing-aid electrodes. The perspectives for the hydroxyapatite cement include its application as a carrier for osteogenic protein preparations, especially because of its isothermic reaction and intrinsic osteoconductive characteristics.

  3. [New hydroxylapatite cement for craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistner, H; Reuther, J; Reinhart, E; Kübler, N; Priessnitz, B

    1998-05-01

    A new stoechiometric mixture of 27% dicalcium-phosphate (DCPA) and 73% tetra-calcium-phosphate (TTCP) can be prepared with water intraoperatively to a paste that subsequently sets to a structurally stabile implant composed of hydroxyapatite (HA). Primary setting time is about 20 min; pH during setting ranges from 6.5 to 8.5. There is no relevant curing heat or expansion or contraction. Compressive strength is about 50 MPa, tensile strength about 8 MPa. Over a period of about 4 h in physiological milieu, the cement converts to hydroxyapatite. This product is no longer redissolvable in normal body fluid. This cement can be used for non-load-bearing applications especially in craniofacial bone surgery. Cranial defects due to tumour or trauma as well as deficits in the facial skeleton may be reconstructed using this new biomaterial. In nine of ten patients we used the hydroxyapatite cement successfully for reconstructions in the craniofacial area. Fluid control of the operation field and implant site is extremely important and sometimes difficult to achieve. Further applications could be all non-load-bearing augmentations such as filling of blocked paranasal sinuses, of dentoalveolar cysts and defects following dental apectomy or fixation of implanted hearing-aid electrodes. The perspectives for the hydroxyapatite cement include its application as a carrier for osteogenic protein preparations, especially because of its isothermic reaction and intrinsic osteoconductive characteristics.

  4. In vitro aging of a calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, M; Merkle, H P; Lemaître, J

    2000-03-01

    Cement samples made of beta-tricalcium phoshate (beta-TCP), phosphoric acid (PA) and water mixtures were incubated in several aqueous solutions to determine their stability over time. The effects of the cement composition and the incubating temperature were investigated in more detail. The cement samples contained mostly dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and remnants of beta-TCP crystals. Depending on the initial cement composition, a certain amount of dicalcium phosphate (DCP) crystals were formed. The larger the initial PA concentration, the larger the DCP amount. After setting, the cement composition was stable for at least 16 days up to 60 degrees C. Above that temperature, the DCPD crystals decomposed into DCP crystals. The latter reaction provoked a decrease of the pH of the incubation solution, phenomenon expected for a cement sample containing an excess of PA. As the cement samples contained an excess of beta-TCP, it was postulated that beta-TCP crystals became so covered by DCP or DCPD crystals during setting that the setting reaction was stopped prematurely. The latter phenomenon gave a good explanation for the low pH values measured in the incubation solutions.

  5. Short-term Mechanical Properties of Glass Ionomer Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Sanbao; XU Dongxuan

    2009-01-01

    The setting reaction of glass ionomer cement was studied by analyzing and comparing the short-tem mechanical properties of set cement stored in silicone oil,air and distilled water respectively at different temperatures.For the set cement stored at 37℃,the strength of the sample in the air reached the maximum value after 24 h,then decreased to about 210 MPa and kept steady.The strength of the sample in water increased continuously and slowly,however,the increasing rate of sample stored in silicone oil was higher than that in the water.At 20℃,the increasing rate of compressive strength for sample in air was higher than those in silicone oil and water.The diffusion speed and maintenance of water has significant effects on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements.

  6. Radiopacity of portland cement associated with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Oliveira El Kadre, Guâniara D'arc; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of Portland cement associated with the following radiopacifying agents: bismuth oxide, zinc oxide, lead oxide, bismuth subnitrate, bismuth carbonate, barium sulfate, iodoform, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide. A ratio of 20% radiopacifier and 80% white Portland cement by weight was used for analysis. Pure Portland cement and dentin served as controls. Cement/radiopacifier and dentin disc-shaped specimens were fabricated, and radiopacity testing was performed according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard for dental root sealing materials. Using Insight occlusal films, the specimens were radiographed near to a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized and radiopacity compared with the aluminum stepwedge using Digora software (Orion Corporation Soredex, Helsinki, Finland). The radiographic density data were converted into mmAl and analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (alpha = 0.05). The radiopacity of pure Portland cement was significantly lower (p oxide and Portland cement/lead oxide presented the highest radiopacity values and differed significantly from the other materials (p oxide presented the lowest radiopacity values of all mixtures (p < 0.05). All tested substances presented higher radiopacity than that of dentin and may potentially be added to the Portland cement as radiopacifying agents. However, the possible interference of the radiopacifiers with the setting chemistry, biocompatibility, and physical properties of the Portland cement should be further investigated before any clinical recommendation can be done.

  7. Porosity prediction of calcium phosphate cements based on chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhman, Caroline; Unosson, Johanna; Carlsson, Elin; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The porosity of calcium phosphate cements has an impact on several important parameters, such as strength, resorbability and bioactivity. A model to predict the porosity for biomedical cements would hence be a useful tool. At the moment such a model only exists for Portland cements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a first porosity prediction model for calcium phosphate cements. On the basis of chemical reaction, molar weight and density of components, a volume-based model was developed and validated using calcium phosphate cement as model material. 60 mol% β-tricalcium phosphate and 40 mol% monocalcium phosphate monohydrate were mixed with deionized water, at different liquid-to-powder ratios. Samples were set for 24 h at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Thereafter, samples were dried either under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h or in air at 37 °C for 7 days. Porosity and phase composition were determined. It was found that the two drying protocols led to the formation of brushite and monetite, respectively. The model was found to predict well the experimental values and also data reported in the literature for apatite cements, as deduced from the small absolute average residual errors (brushite, monetite and apatite cements. The model gives a good estimate of the final porosity and has the potential to be used as a porosity prediction tool in the biomedical cement field.

  8. Ionic modification of calcium phosphate cement viscosity. Part II: hypodermic injection and strength improvement of brushite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barralet, J E; Grover, L M; Gbureck, U

    2004-05-01

    Brushite-forming calcium phosphate cements are of great interest as bone replacement materials because they are resorbable in physiological conditions. However, their short setting times, low mechanical strengths and limited injectability limit broad clinical application. In this study, we showed that a significant improvement of these properties of brushite cement could be achieved by the use of sodium citrate or citric acid as setting retardants, such that workable cement pastes with a powder to liquid ratio of up to 5 could be manufactured. The cement used in this study consisted of an equimolar powder mixture of beta-tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate hydrate The use of 500 mM-1M retardant solutions as liquid phase enabled initial setting times of 8-12 min. Wet compressive strength were found to be in the range between 12-18 MPa after immersion of uncompacted cement samples in serum for 24 h. A further strength improvement to 32 MPa was obtained by compaction of the cement paste during samples preparation. This is significant because high-temperature processes cannot be used to fabricate hydrated calcium phosphate materials. Cement pastes were injectable through a hypodermic needle at a powder to liquid ratio of 3.3 g/ml when a 1M citric acid was used as liquid phase, thus enabling precise controlled delivery to small defects.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  10. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  11. Novel bioactive composite bone cements based on the beta-tricalcium phosphate-monocalcium phosphate monohydrate composite cement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Zhiguang; Chang, Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Bioactive composite bone cements were obtained by incorporation of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5, C3S) into a brushite bone cement composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate [beta-Ca3(PO4)2, beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O, MCPM], and the properties of the new cements were studied and compared with pure brushite cement. The results indicated that the injectability, setting time and short- and long-term mechanical strength of the material are higher than those of pure brushite cement, and the compressive strength of the TCP/MCPM/C3S composite paste increased with increasing aging time. Moreover, the TCP/MCPM/C3S specimens showed significantly improved in vitro bioactivity in simulated body fluid and similar degradability in phosphate-buffered saline as compared with brushite cement. Additionally, the reacted TCP/MCPM/C3S paste possesses the ability to stimulate osteoblast proliferation and promote osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells. The results indicated that the TCP/MCPM/C3S cements may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration, and might have significant clinical advantage over the traditional beta-TCP/MCPM brushite cement.

  12. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grau Grullón

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite. Dos lámparas de diodos (Optilight CL [CL] y Ultra-Lume 5 [UL] fueron comparadas con la lámpara halógena (Optilux 401 [OH]. Fueron confeccionados especímenes en cerómero con un diámetro de 5 mm y una espesura de 1 y 2 mm, los cuales fueron interpuestos entre la luz y la matriz metálica de 5 mm de ancho y 0,5 mm de grosor que contenía el cemento de composite. Los 45 cuerpos de prueba fueron divididos en 9 grupos: G1: exposición directa de luz DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL y G9: 2 mm/UL. La fotoactivación fue realizada durante 60 segundos. La dureza Vickers (50 g/30s fue medida en la superficie tope de todos los especímenes luego de 24 horas y 180 días de almacenamiento. La lámpara fotoactivadora y el grosor del cerómero fueron estadísticamente significativas (pThis study evaluated the influence of indirect composite resin thickness, the storage time and light-curing units on the Vickers hardness of a dual-cure resin luting cement. Two light-emitting diodes lights (Optilight CL [CL] and UltraLume5 [UL] were compared with a quartz tungsten halogen unit (Optilux 401 [OH]. Laboratory-processed composite specimens with a diameter of 5mm and thickness of 1 and 2 mm were constructed to be interposed between the light guide and the metal matrix (5mm wide and 0.5 mm deep with the resin luting cement. Then, 45 dual-cure resin luting specimens were divided in nine groups: G1: direct light exposure DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL and G9: 2 mm/UL. The light curing was performed for 60 seconds. The Vickers hardness (50g/30s was measured at the top surface of all specimens, either after 24 hours or 180 days. The Light

  13. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  14. Formulation of an injectable phosphocalcium cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, S. [CIRIMAT Equipe de Physico-Chimie des Phosphates ENSCT INP, Toulouse (France); TEKNIMED, Vic en Bigorre (France); Brouchet, A.; Delisle, B. [CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France). Service d' Anatomie Pathologie; Freche, M.; Lacout, J.L. [CIRIMAT Equipe de Physico-Chimie des Phosphates ENSCT INP, Toulouse (France); Rodriguez, F. [Lab. de Galenique, Chmin des Maraichers, Toulouse (France)

    2001-07-01

    In orthopedic surgery, the loss or the reinforcement of osseous substance often requires filling of the defective part. In order to make the surgical operations easier we sought to make an injectable form. This study examined the effect of silicone and polyglycol on the injectability, setting time and mechanical properties of the cement. The basic solid phase was composed of a mixture of tetracalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}O), {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) and sodium glycerophosphate. The basic liquid phase was made up of lime, orthophosphoric acid and water. Silicone was previously dissolved in cyclohexane and introduced in the solid phase. Polyglycol is a water-soluble compound so it is introduced in the liquid phase. For the mechanical properties, the strong increase in the percentage of additives decreased the compressive strength. Silicone and polyglycol made it possible to improve viscosity without modifying the basic setting time. The rate of evolution was different with the two different additives. From the data it was possible to optimize the formulation of cements to give predicted properties. Testing the in vivo implantation of the cement has already started. Preliminary results show the perfect osteointegration of the new cements without reactions to the foreign body in spite of the presence of silicone. (orig.)

  15. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  16. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  17. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  18. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  19. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  20. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  1. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  2. Dual of Function One Direction S-rough Set and Discovery of F--forecast Law%函数单向S-粗集对偶与F--预测规律发现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌

    2009-01-01

    函数S-粗集理论是粗集理论的拓展,函数单向S-粗集对偶是函数S-粗集的三类形式之一. 函数S-粗集具有规律特性、动态特性、遗传特性、记忆特性与预测特性. 利用函数单向S-粗集对偶的动态特征, 给出-预测规律、F-预测规律和预测度概念, 提出预测规律的预测定理, 并在通信传输识别系统中给出应用. 函数S-粗集(函数单向S-粗集、函数单向S-粗集对偶、函数双向S-粗集)与信息系统融合、交叉是粗集理论中的一个新的研究方向.%Function S-rough sets theory is the prolongation of rough sets theory; dual of function one direction S-rough set is one of the three forms of function S-rough set.Function S-rough set has law characteristics,dynamic characteristics,inherited characteristics,memory characteristics and prediction characteristics.By employing the dynamic characteristics of dual of function one direction S-rough set,the concepts of -prediction law,-prediction law and prediction degree were proposed,then the prediction theorem of prediction law was given,and their applications in transformation and identification of communication system were also presented.Function S-rough set(function one direction S-rough set,dual of function one direction S-rough set,function two direction S-rough set)integrated with information system is a new research direction of rough sets theory.

  3. Investigation of k-struvite formation in magnesium phosphate cements

    OpenAIRE

    LE ROUZIC, Mathieu; Chaussadent, Thierry; Stefan, Lavinia; PLATRET, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium phosphate cements can be used as an alternative of Portland cements for the stabilization/solidification (S/S) process of specific wastes like mercury, lead, … These cements are based on the reaction between magnesium oxide (MgO) and monopotassium phosphate (KH2PO4) mixed with water which leads to the formation of the solid skeleton of the matrix: MgO + KH2PO4 + 5H2O  MgKPO4.6H2O. The development of k-struvite crystals (MgKPO4.6H2O) leads to the setting of these ...

  4. Self-adhesive resin cements - chemistry, properties and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Stansbury, J W; Burke, F J T

    2011-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were introduced to dentistry within the past decade but have gained rapidly in popularity with more than a dozen commercial brands now available. This review article explores their chemical composition and its effect on the setting reaction and adhesion to various substrates, their physical and biological properties that may help to predict their ultimate performance and their clinical performance to date and handling characteristics. The result of this review of self-adhesive resin cements would suggest that these materials may be expected to show similar clinical performance as other resin-based and non-resin based dental cements. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. On the development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Komath; H K Varma; R Sivakumar

    2000-04-01

    Development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement is reported. 100 Particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) were mixed in equimolar ratio to form the cement powder. The wetting medium used was distilled water with Na2HPO4 as accelerator to manipulate the setting time. The cement powder, on wetting with the medium, formed a workable putty. The setting times of the putty were measured using a Vicat type apparatus and the compressive strength was determined with a Universal Testing Machine. The nature of the precipitated cement was analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and energy dispersive electron microprobe (EDAX). The results showed the phase to be apatitic with a calcium–to–phosphorous ratio close to that of hydroxyapatite. The microstructure analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed hydroxyapatite nanocrystallite growth over particulate matrix surface. The structure has an apparent porosity of ∼ 52%. There were no appreciable dimensional or thermal changes during setting. The cement passed the in vitro toxicological screening (cytotoxicity and haemolysis) tests. Optimization of the cement was done by manipulating the accelerator concentration so that the setting time, hardening time and the compressive strength had clinically relevant values.

  6. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  7. Formulation of geopolymer cement using mixture of slag and class f fly ash for oil well cementing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesan, Dinesh; Ridha, Syahrir; Rao, Prasath

    2017-05-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions has been a factor for the increase in global temperature. Geopolymer cement has been intensively studied to replace conventional ordinary Portland cement, however the focus is limited to civil purposes under atmospheric conditions. This research focuses on the formulation of geopolymer cement to be used in oil well cementing application by taking account the effect of sodium hydroxide (NaoH) molarity, ratio of alkali binder and fly ash, amount of dispersant for oilwell operation under temperature ranging of 80°C and 90C° and pressure of 1000 and 3000psi. The formulated composition is tested for fluid loss where the standard has been from 60 to 80 ml. The cement slurry is cured in a 50mm x 50mm x 50mm mold for period of 24 hours. Four manipulating variables were set in formulating the cement slurry namely, the ratio between fly ash and slag to alkali binder, ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaoH) to sodium silicate, molarity of NaoH and amount of dispersant added. After running a set of 16 experiment, sample (12) was found to possess the best rheological properties and fluid loss according to API RP10B. It was found that as the curing temperature and pressure increase, the compressive strength of the formulated geopolymer cement also increased.

  8. CEMENT. "A Concrete Experience." A Curriculum Developed for the Cement Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary Lou

    This instructor's guide contains 11 lesson plans for inplant classes on workplace skills for employees in a cement plant. The 11 units cover the following topics: goals; interpreting memoranda; applying a standard set of work procedures; qualities of a safe worker; accident prevention; insurance forms; vocabulary development; inventory control…

  9. Concrete Durability Properties and Microstructural Analysis of Cement Pastes with Nopal Cactus Mucilage as a Natural Additive

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Arellanes, S.; Cano-Barrita, P. F. de J.; Julián-Caballero, F.; Gómez-Yañez, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the addition of a 3% nopal cactus mucilage solution to cement pastes, in its effects on setting times, flow, hydration, and microstructure, as well as on capillary water absorption and chloride diffusion in concrete. Hydration was characterized through XRD and microstructure was characterized with SEM. The mucilage solution/cement and water/cement ratios tested were 0.30, 0.45, and 0.60. The results in cement pastes indicate that the addition of mucilage increases ...

  10. Applications of a thru-tubing cement retainer conveyed on coiled tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, T. (Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (Canada)); Tudor, E.H. (Canadian Fracmaster Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)); Cooke, J.A. (Chevron Canada Resources, Fox Creek, AB (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    A thru-tubing inflatable permanent cement retainer has been developed to selectively squeeze cement without pulling the production tubing or killing the well. The system has been run successfully on coiled tubing through 73 mm tubing and set in 177.8 mm casing. Due to the performance limitations of the inflatable cement retainer, unconventional methods were used to inflate the tool and perform a hesitation cement squeeze. Equipment and procedures used to selectively squeeze off water production in two wells in the Kaybob south field in central Alberta are described. Both wells are gas producers from a sour, underpressured carbonate formation. In order to control hydrostatic pressure and obtain the squeeze, nitrogen gas was used as the circulation and displacement medium. Workover design considerations, cement retainer differential pressure ratings, depth control, inflation procedure, cement slurry design, cement squeeze operation, and job procedure are described. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Chemistry of glass-ionomer cements: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, J W

    1998-03-01

    Studies of the setting of glass-ionomer cements have been carried out for over twenty years, and there is now a considerable body of information concerning the steps that lead to the conversion of a freshly mixed cement paste into a solid, durable dental restorative. This paper reviews these studies, paying particular attention to more recent work. The conclusion is that glass-ionomers consist of interpenetrating networks of inorganic and organic components forming a matrix in which particles of unreacted glass are embedded. However, there remain uncertainties over aspects of the setting chemistry, for example over the role of (+)-tartaric acid in the setting reaction, and over the nature of the fluoride species which form during the reaction. The chemistry of resin-modified glass-ionomers is also discussed and shown to be more complex than that of the simple cements. The presence of the resin component slows down the ionic cure reaction of the conventional cement, and leads to both a significant exotherm and a set material capable of absorbing water reversibly. The paper concludes that the microstructure of the set cement depends completely on chemical composition and the kinetics of the setting process, and that an understanding of the setting chemistry of these materials is thus important for optimal clinical use.

  12. Development of LiCl-containing calcium aluminate cement for bone repair and remodeling applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Gutiérrez, I O; Escobedo-Bocardo, J C; Almanza-Robles, J M; Cortés-Hernández, D A; Saldívar-Ramírez, M M G; Reséndiz-Hernández, P J; Zugasti-Cruz, A

    2017-01-01

    The effect of LiCl additions on the in vitro bioactivity, hemolysis, cytotoxicity, compressive strength and setting time of calcium aluminate cements was studied. Calcium aluminate clinker (AC) was obtained via solid state reaction from reagent grade chemicals of CaCO3 and Al2O3. Calcium aluminate cements (CAC) were prepared by mixing the clinker with water or aqueous LiCl solutions (0.01, 0.0125 or 0.015M (M)) using a w/c ratio of 0.4. After 21days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at physiological conditions of temperature and pH, a Ca-P rich layer, identified as hydroxyapatite (HA), was formed on the cement without LiCl and on the cement prepared with 0.01M of LiCl solution. This indicates the high bioactivity of these cements. The cements setting times were significantly reduced using LiCl. The measured hemolysis percentages, all of them lower than 5%, indicated that the cements were not hemolytic. The compressive strength of the cements was not negatively affected by the LiCl additions. The obtained cement when a solution of LiCl 0.010M was added, presented high compressive strength, appropriated bioactivity, no cytotoxicity and low setting time, making this material a potentially bone cement.

  13. Modeling of Pulverized Coal Combustion in Cement Rotary Kiln

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, based on analysis of the chemical and physical processes of clinker formation, a heat flux function was introduced to take account of the thermal effect of clinker formation. Combining the models of gas-solid flow, heat and mass transfer, and pulverized coal combustion, a set of mathematical models for a full-scale cement rotary kiln were established. In terms of commercial CFD code (FLUENT), the distributions of gas velocity, gas temperature, and gas components in a cement rot...

  14. Kinetics of strength gain of biocidal cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodin Aleksandr Ivanovich

    Full Text Available Biocorrosion becomes the determinative durability factor of buildings and constructions. Damages of construction materials caused by bacteria, filamentous fungi, actinomycetes constitute a serious danger to the constructions of a building or a structure and to the health of people. Biodeteriorations are typical both in old and new constructions. A great quantity of destruction factors of industrial and residential buildings under the influence of microorganisms was established in practice. Providing products and constructions based on concretes fungicidal and bactericidal properties is an important direction of modern construction material science. The most efficient way to solve this task is creation of biocidal cements. The article presents the results of experimental studies of kinetic dependences of strength gain by biocidal cements by physico-mechanical and physico-chemical analysis methods. The identical velocity character of initial hydration of the developed compositions of biocidal cements is set, as well as a more calm behavior of hardening processes at later terms. It has been established that the compositions of biocidal cements modified by sodium sulfate and sodium fluoride possess the greatest strength.

  15. Scavenging effect of Trolox released from brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Gemma; Santos, Carlos F; Engman, Lars; Persson, Cecilia; Ott, Marjam Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    In this study a brushite cement was doped with the chain-breaking antioxidant Trolox. The effect of the antioxidant on the physical properties of the cement was evaluated and the release of Trolox was monitored by UV spectroscopy. The ability of the Trolox set free to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) released by macrophages was determined in vitro using a luminol-amplified chemiluminescence assay. Trolox did not modify the crystalline phases of the set cement, which mainly formed crystalline brushite after 7 days in humid conditions. The setting time, compressive strength and morphology of the cement also remained unaltered after the addition of the antioxidant. Trolox was slowly released from the cement following a non-Fickian transport mechanism and nearly 64% of the total amount was released after 3 days. Moreover, the capacity of Trolox to scavenge the ROS released by macrophages increased in a dose-dependent manner. Trolox-loaded cements are expected to reduce some of the first harmful effects of acute inflammation and can thus potentially protect the surrounding tissue during implantation of these as well as other materials used in conjunction.

  16. Injectability and mechanical properties of magnesium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseke, Claus; Saratsis, Vasileios; Gbureck, Uwe

    2011-12-01

    Up to now magnesium phosphate cements are mainly being utilized in wastewater treatment due to their adsorptive properties. Recently they also have been shown to have a high potential as degradable biocements for application as replacement materials for bone defects. In comparison to degradable calcium phosphate cements they have the advantage of setting at neutral pH, which is favorable in biological environment. In this study two parameters of the cement composition, namely powder-to-liquid ratio (PLR) and citrate content, were varied in order to optimize the injectability properties of the cement paste and the mechanical properties of the reaction product. These properties were determined by means of testing setting time and temperature, paste viscosity, and injectability as well as phase composition and compressive strength of the set cements. Best results were obtained, when the cements were prepared with a PLR of 2.5 and a binder liquid consisting of an aqueous solution of 3 mol/l diammonium hydrogen phosphate and 0.5 mol/l diammonium citrate.

  17. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect

  18. Evaluation of a porosity measurement method for wet calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaxon, Ingrid; Maazouz, Yassine; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Öhman, Caroline; Persson, Cecilia

    2015-11-01

    The porosity of a calcium phosphate cement is a key parameter as it affects several important properties of the cement. However, a successful, non-destructive porosity measurement method that does not include drying has not yet been reported for calcium phosphate cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate isopropanol solvent exchange as such a method. Two different types of calcium phosphate cements were used, one basic (hydroxyapatite) and one acidic (brushite). The cements were allowed to set in an aqueous environment and then immersed in isopropanol and stored under three different conditions: at room temperature, at room temperature under vacuum (300 mbar) or at 37℃. The specimen mass was monitored regularly. Solvent exchange took much longer time to reach steady state in hydroxyapatite cements compared to brushite cements, 350 and 18 h, respectively. Furthermore, the immersion affected the quasi-static compressive strength of the hydroxyapatite cements. However, the strength and phase composition of the brushite cements were not affected by isopropanol immersion, suggesting that isopropanol solvent exchange can be used for brushite calcium phosphate cements. The main advantages with this method are that it is non-destructive, fast, easy and the porosity can be evaluated while the cements remain wet, allowing for further analysis on the same specimen.

  19. Maximizing the Sustainability of Cement Utilization in Building Projects through the Use of Greener Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bediako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Greener technologies and sustainable developments are currently among the main tools used by many industries in shaping the world for a better future. The construction industry that is known to have numerous negative impact on sustainability is now wide awake on sustainable measures which can aid in reducing its negative impact. In this work, green cement was produced from pyroprocessed clay (PC at 800°C and mixed together with Portland cement. This paper presents both laboratory tests and some field applications of green cement application. Laboratory tests performed included setting times, compressive strength, and shrinkage. Field applications of the green cement are shown. Results from the work showed that well-proportioned greener cement gained strengths between 11% and 30% more than Portland cement at standard curing period of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. However, in real statistical terms, there was no difference between Portland cement and green cement strength performance. Shrinkage from both total and autogenous tests also showed insignificant differences between the two cements. The study recommends the use of green cements with pozzolanic origin than only Portland cement as a way to maximize sustainability in building projects.

  20. Biocompatibility and resorption of a brushite calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Felix; Apelt, Detlef; Brand, Bastian; Kutter, Annette; Zlinszky, Katalin; Bohner, Marc; Matter, Sandro; Frei, Christian; Auer, Joerg A; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2005-07-01

    A hydraulic calcium phosphate cement with beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) granules embedded in a matrix of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was implanted in experimentally created defects in sheep. One type of defect consisted of a drill hole in the medial femoral condyle. The other, partial metaphyseal defect was located in the proximal aspect of the tibia plateau and was stabilized using a 3.5 mm T-plate. The bone samples of 2 animals each per group were harvested after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Samples were evaluated for cement resorption and signs of immediate reaction, such as inflammation, caused by the cement setting in situ. Differences regarding these aspects were assessed for both types of defects using macroscopical, radiological, histological and histomorphometrical evaluations. In both defects the brushite matrix was resorbed faster than the beta-TCP granules. The resorption front was followed directly by a front of new bone formation, in which residual beta-TCP granules were embedded. Cement resorption occurred through (i) extracellular liquid dissolution with cement disintegration and particle formation, and (ii) phagocytosis of the cement particles through macrophages. Signs of inflammation or immunologic response leading to delayed new bone formation were not noticed at any time. Cement degradation and new bone formation occurred slightly faster in the femur defects.

  1. Does dental zinc phosphate cement really shrink in clinical applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hai-Yang

    2009-08-01

    Crowns are cemented onto abutments with adhesives; and zinc phosphate cement is a routine permanent luting agent, which is believed to secure crowns to abutments by non-adhesive micro-mechanical interlocking. Because it has been proven, and the public widely accepts, that zinc phosphate cement forms no chemical bonds with either the crown or the tooth tissue; it is impossible for the cement to attain adequate retention force if it contracts in volume. Assuming that the cement contracts in volume after setting, the prosthesis tends to loose and is doomed to be hampered by fretting damage when it functions during the masticatory cycle; thus the prognosis for the prosthesis is questionable. However, zinc phosphate is popular because of its brilliant clinical record. This paradox between theory and practice indicates that something might be wrong with the standing theory. The most possible problem with previous studies is that their samples' dimensions differ from those that are used clinically, which causes the studies' results, which claim that the cement shrinks, to deviate from clinical results. The real rationale must be that the zinc phosphate cement tends to expand in volume, and thus mechanically fasten the crown to the abutment.

  2. Mechanical and fracture behavior of calcium phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Victoria Chou

    Apatite-based calcium phosphate cements are currently employed to a limited extent in the biomedical and dental fields. They present significant potential for a much broader range of applications, particularly as a bone mineral substitute for fracture fixation. Specifically, hydroxyapatite (HA) is known for its biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity, attributed to its similarity to the mineral phase of natural bone. The advantages of a cement-based HA include injectability, greater resorbability and osteoconductivity compared to sintered HA, and an isothermal cement-forming reaction that avoids necrosis during cement setting. Although apatite cements demonstrate good compressive strength, tensile properties are very weak compared to natural bone. Applications involving normal weight-bearing require better structural integrity than apatite cements currently provide. A more thorough understanding of fracture behavior can elucidate failure mechanisms and is essential for the design of targeted strengthening methods. This study investigated a hydroxyapatite cement using a fracture mechanics approach, focusing on subcritical crack growth properties. Subcritical crack growth can lead to much lower load-bearing ability than critical strength values predict. Experiments show that HA cement is susceptible to crack growth under both cyclic fatigue-crack growth and stress corrosion cracking conditions, but only environmental, not mechanical, mechanisms contribute to crack extension. This appears to be the first evidence ever presented of stress corrosion crack growth behavior in calcium phosphate cements. Stress corrosion cracking was examined for a range of environmental conditions. Variations in pH have surprisingly little effect. Behavior in water at elevated temperature (50°C) is altered compared to water at ambient temperature (22°C), but only for crack-growth velocities below 10-7 m/s. However, fracture resistance of dried HA cement in air increases significantly

  3. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  4. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KAPLAN

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, cement with pozzolan is produced by adding the pozzolan, which has a large reservoir in the country, in cement in sertain amount. However this type of cement is consumed in the construction sector, sortage of scientific investigation and speculative news on the subject.are worried the users and producers. In this paper, prior to an experimental study on the cements having pozzolan additive, historical development of pozzolan, reservoir of Turkiye, and comparison with portland cement is carried out. Advantages and disadvantages of pozzolan are also discussed in some points.

  5. Combined effect of strontium and pyrophosphate on the properties of brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, M Hamdan; Mariño, F Tamimi; Rodríguez, C Rueda; Jerez, L Blanco; Cabarcos, E López

    2008-05-01

    In this study we report the synthesis of strontium-containing brushite cement with good cohesion and a diametral tensile strength (DTS) of 5 MPa. The cement powder, composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and monocalcium phosphate, was adjusted by different concentrations of strontium and pyrophosphate ions. The cement liquid phase was 2M phosphoric acid solution. The cement cohesion and mechanical properties were measured after being aged in water for 24h at 37 degrees C. It was found that at low concentration both strontium and pyrophosphate ions inhibit the cement setting reaction. However, the final setting time was significantly reduced when SrCl2 increased from 5 to 10 wt.% at pyrophosphate concentrations equal to or higher than 2.16 wt.%. The incorporation of strontium ions did not increase the DTS of brushite cements significantly. In contrast, the addition of pyrophosphate ions did increase the DTS of brushite cements significantly. When both ions were added simultaneously, the brushite cement with a Sr2+ content of 5 wt.% had the highest DTS value. Nevertheless, the DTS values of Sr-containing cements were significantly reduced if the pyrophosphate concentration was higher than 2.16 wt.%. The Sr2+ ions had a negative effect on brushite cement cohesion, although the solid weight loss started to decrease at Sr2+ concentrations higher than 5 wt.%.

  6. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Mechanical and In Vitro Biocompatibility of Brushite Cement Modified by Polyethylene Glycol

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement, owing to its high solubility in physiological condition and ability to guide new bone formation, is widely used to treat bone defects. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of poly ethylene glycol (PEG) addition on the setting time, compressive strength and in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cement. The brushite cements were prepared by mixing β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP, Ca3(PO4)2] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate...

  8. Novel Osteointegrative Sr-Substituted Apatitic Cements Enriched with Alginate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Sprio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the synthesis of novel injectable, self-setting bone cements made of strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA, obtained by single-phase calcium phosphate precursors doped with different amounts of strontium and enriched with alginate. The addition of alginate improved the injectability, cohesion, and compression strength of the cements, without affecting the hardening process. A Sr-HA cement exhibiting adequate hardening times and mechanical strength for clinical applications was further tested in vivo in a rabbit model, in comparison with a commercial calcium phosphate cement, revealing the maintenance of biomimetic composition and porous microstructure even after one month in vivo, as well as enhanced ability to induce new bone formation and penetration.

  9. Properties of cement based composites modified using diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Diatomite belongs among natural materials rich on amorphous silica (a-SiO2). When finely milled, it can potentially substitute part of cement binder and positively support formation of more dense composite structure. In this connection, two types of diatomaceous earth applied as a partial substitution of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mass% of Portland cement in the composition of cement paste were studied. In the tested mixtures with cement blends, the amount of batch water remained same, with water/binder ratio 0.5. For fresh paste mixtures, initial and final setting times were measured. First, hardened pastes cured 28 days in water were characterized by their physical properties such as bulk density, matrix density and open porosity. Then, their mechanical and thermophysical parameters were assessed. Obtained results gave clear evidence of setting time shortening for pastes with diatomite what brought negative effect with respect to the impaired workability of fresh mixtures. On the other hand, there was observed strength improvement for mixtures containing diatomite with higher amount of SiO2. Here, the increase in mechanical resistivity was distinct up to 15 mass% of cement replacement. Higher cement substitution by diatomite resulted in an increase in porosity and thus improvement of thermal insulation properties.

  10. In vitro studies of calcium phosphate silicate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuxin; Ma, Jingzhi; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Ruse, N Dorin; Yang, Quanzu; Troczynski, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A novel calcium phosphate silicate bone cement (CPSC) was synthesized in a process, in which nanocomposite forms in situ between calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel and hydroxyapatite (HAP). The cement powder consists of tricalcium silicate (C(3)S) and calcium phosphate monobasic (CPM). During cement setting, C(3)S hydrates to produce C-S-H and calcium hydroxide (CH); CPM reacts with the CH to precipitate HAP in situ within C-S-H. This process, largely removing CH from the set cement, enhances its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The testing results of cell culture confirmed that the biocompatibility of CPSC was improved as compared to pure C(3)S. The results of XRD and SEM characterizations showed that CPSC paste induced formation of HAP layer after immersion in simulated body fluid for 7 days, suggesting that CPSC was bioactive in vitro. CPSC cement, which has good biocompatibility and low/no cytotoxicity, could be a promising candidate as biomedical cement.

  11. Dual phase evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Green, David G; Abbass, Hussein A

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how dual phase evolution operates in all these settings and provides a detailed treatment of the subject. The authors discuss the theoretical foundations for the theory, how it relates to other phase transition phenomena and its advantages in evolutionary computation and complex adaptive systems. The book provides methods and techniques to use this concept for problem solving. Dual phase evolution concerns systems that evolve via repeated phase shifts in the connectivity of their elements. It occurs in vast range of settings, including natural systems (species evolution, landscape ecology, geomorphology), socio-economic systems (social networks) and in artificial systems (annealing, evolutionary computing).

  12. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pestana Passos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured, light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED, and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling. All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h and sectioned (n = 10: G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. The bond strength values (MPa were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH. There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  13. Influence of the interposition of ceramic spacers on the degree of conversion and the hardness of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Angelica Milani Calgaro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated: I the effect of photo-activation through ceramics on the degree of conversion (DC and on the Knoop hardness (KHN of light- and dual-cured resin cements; and II two different protocols for obtaining the spectra of uncured materials, to determine the DC of a dual-cured resin cement. Thin films of cements were photo-activated through ceramics [feldspathic porcelain (FP; lithium disilicate glass-ceramics of low translucency (e.max-LT, medium opacity (e.max-MO and high translucency (e.max-HT; glass-infiltrated alumina composite (IC and polycrystalline zirconia (ZR] with thicknesses of 1.5 and 2.0 mm. DC was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Two protocols were used to obtain the spectra of the uncured materials: I base and catalyst pastes were mixed, and II thin films of base and catalyst pastes were obtained separately, and an average was obtained. KHN assessment was performed with cylindrical specimens. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. The light-cured cement showed higher DC (61.9% than the dual-cured cement (55.7%. The DC varied as follows: FP (65.4%, e.max-HT (65.1%, e.max-LT (61.8%, e.max-MO (60.9%, ZR (54.8%, and IC (44.9%. The light-cured cement showed lower KHN (22.0 than the dual-cured (25.6 cement. The cements cured under 1.5 mm spacers showed higher KHN (26.2 than when polymerized under 2.0 mm ceramics (21.3. Regarding the two protocols, there were significant differences only in three groups. Thus, both methods can be considered appropriate. The physical and mechanical properties of resin cements may be affected by the thickness and microstructure of the ceramic material interposed during photo-activation.

  14. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement.

  15. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality.

  16. Influence of water content on hardening and handling of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Aberg, Jonas; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Handling of calcium phosphate cements is difficult, where problems often arise during mixing, transferring to syringes, and subsequent injection. Via the use of premixed cements the risk of handling complications is reduced. However, for premixed cements to work in a clinical situation the setting time needs to be improved. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the addition of water on the properties of premixed cement. Monetite-forming premixed cements with small amounts of added water (less than 6.8 wt.%) were prepared and the influence on injectability, working time, setting time and mechanical strength was evaluated. The results showed that the addition of small amounts of water had significant influence on the properties of the premixed cement. With the addition of just 1.7 wt.% water, the force needed to extrude the cement from a syringe was reduced from 107 (±15) N to 39 (±9) N, the compression strength was almost doubled, and the setting time decreased from 29 (±4) min to 19 (±2) min, while the working time remained 5 to 6h. This study demonstrates the importance of controlling the water content in premixed cement pastes and how water can be used to improve the properties of premixed cements.

  17. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Zhou, Huan, E-mail: Huan.Zhou@Rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO{sub 4}) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09 ± 1.85 MPa to 21.56 ± 2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials. - Highlights: • A monetite bone cement for orthopedic applications is reported. • Incorporation of MWCNTs into monetite bone cement is discussed. • Surface functionalized MWCNTs can improve the mechanical strength of monetite cement. • MWCNTs have no impacts on the cytocompatibility of monetite cements.

  18. Investigation on the potential of waste cooking oil as a grinding aid in Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Jianfeng; Huang, Yuyan; Jiang, Zhengwu; Yang, Xiaojie; Yang, Zhenghong; Chen, Qing

    2016-12-15

    Although there are several methods for managing waste cooking oil (WCO), a significant result has not been achieved in China. A new method is required for safe WCO management that minimizes the environmental threat. In this context, this work was developed in which cement clinker and gypsum were interground with various WCOs, and their properties, such as grindability, water-cement ratio required to achieve a normal consistency, setting times, compressive strength, contents of calcium hydroxide and ettringite in the hardened paste, microstructure and economic and environmental considerations, were addressed in detail. The results show that, overall, WCO favorably improves cement grinding. WCO prolonged the cement setting times and resulted in longer setting times. Additionally, more remarkable effects were found in cements in which WCO contained more unsaturated fatty acid. WCOs increased the cement strength. However, this enhancement was rated with respect to the WCO contents and components. WCOs decreased the CH and AFt contents in the cement hardened paste. Even the AFt content at later ages was reduced when WCO was used. WCO also densify microstructure of the hardened cement paste. It is economically and environmentally feasible to use WCOs as grinding aids in the cement grinding process. These results contribute to the application of WCOs as grinding aids and to the safe management of WCO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF CO2 ON WELL CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture and storage is one way to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Underground gas storage operations and CO2 sequestration in aquifers relay on both the proper wellbore construction and sealing properties of the cap rock. CO2 injection candidates may be new wells or old wells. In both cases, the long-term wellbore integrity (up to 1 000 years is one of the key performance criteria in the geological storage of CO2. The potential leakage paths are the migration CO2 along the wellbore due to poor cementation and flow through the cap rock. The permeability and integrity of the set cement will determine how effective it is in preventing the leakage. The integrity of the cap rock is assured by an adequate fracture gradient and by sufficient set cement around the casing across the cap rock and without a micro-annulus. CO2 storage in underground formations has revived the researc of long term influence of the injected CO2 on Portland cements and methods for improving the long term efficiency of the wellbore sealant. Some researchers predicted that set cement will fail when exposed to CO2 leading to potential leakage to the atmosphere or into underground formations that may contain potable water. Other researchers show set cement samples from 30 to 50 year-old wells (CO2 EOR projects that have maintained sealing integrity and prevented CO2 leakage, in spite of some degree of carbonation. One of reasons for the discrepancy between certain research lab tests and actual field performance measurements is the absence of standard protocol for CO2 resistance-testing devices, conditions, or procedures. This paper presents potential flow paths along the wellbore, CO2 behaviour under reservoir conditions, and geochemical alteration of hydrated Portland cement due to supercritical CO2 injection.

  1. Robust dual-response optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanikoglu, Ihsan; den Hertog, Dick; Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a robust optimization reformulation of the dual-response problem developed in response surface methodology. The dual-response approach fits separate models for the mean and the variance and analyzes these two models in a mathematical optimization setting. We use metamodels esti

  2. Dynamic Properties of Fiber Reinforced Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志平; 徐松林; 胡晓军; 廖香丽; 蔡建

    2004-01-01

    Based on the shear wave tracing(SWT) technique proposed by Tang Z P, particle velocity gauge and the dual internal measurement for pressure and shear waves (IMPS) system are applied to investigate the responses of fiber reinforced cement subjected to impact loading. Series of experiments are conducted. The results show that there exist four critical points, A, B, C, D, in p-V Hugoniot curves. They correspond to the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the material, the critical point for shear strength limit and transition from damage state to failure state, void collapse, and solid compression, respectively. The critical point B is difficult to be aware of and never reported. However, it can be clearly disclosed with SWT method. Based on the analyses of shear strength, it can be concluded that the transversal wave, especially the unloading transversal wave, is especially important for the dynamic damage investigation of brittle materials.

  3. Vibrational investigation of calcium-silicate cements for endodontics in simulated body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Modena, Enrico; Tinti, Anna; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2011-05-01

    Calcium-silicate MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) cements have been recently developed for oral and endodontic surgery. This study was aimed at investigating commercial (White ProRoot MTA, White and Grey MTA-Angelus) and experimental (wTC-Bi) accelerated calcium-silicate cements with regards to composition, hydration products and bioactivity upon incubation for 1-28 days at 37 °C, in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). Deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes during incubation were investigated by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy, and pH measurements. Vibrational techniques disclosed significant differences in composition among the unhydrated cements, which significantly affected the bioactivity as well as pH, and hydration products of the cements. After one day in DPBS, all the cements were covered by a more or less homogeneous layer of B-type carbonated apatite. The experimental cement maintained a high bioactivity, only slightly lower than the other cements and appears a valid alternative to commercial cements, in view of its adequate setting time properties. The bioactivity represents an essential property to favour bone healing and makes the calcium-silicate cements the gold standard materials for root-apical endodontic surgery.

  4. Silver nanoparticles in resin luting cements: Antibacterial and physiochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francine-Couto-Lima; Alves, Denise-Ramos-Silveira; Estrela, Cyntia-Rodrigues-Araújo; Estrela, Carlos; Carrião, Marcus-Santos; Bakuzis, Andris-Figueiroa; Lopes, Lawrence-Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Background Silver has a long history of use in medicine as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent. Silver nanoparticles (NAg) offer the possibility to control the formation oral biofilms through the use of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive, and delivery abilities. This study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect of resin luting cements with and without NAg, and their influence on color, sorption and solubility. Material and Methods NAg were incorporated to two dual-cured resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA) color A1 and RelyX U200 (RU) color A2) in two concentrations (0.05% and 0.07%, in weight), obtaining six experimental groups. Disc specimens (1x6mm) were obtained to verify the antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans in BHI broth after immersion for 1min, 5min, 1h, 6h, and 24h (n=3), through optical density readings. Specimens were evaluated for color changes after addition of NAg with a spectrophotometer (n=10). Sorption and solubility tests were also performed, considering storage in water or 75% ethanol for 28 days (n=5), according to ISO 4049:2010. Data were subjected to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Tukey (p=0.05). Results The optical density of the culture broths indicated bacterial growth, with and without NAg. NAg produced significant color change on the resin cements, especially in RA. Solubility values were very low for all groups, while sorption values raised with NAg. The cements with NAg did not show antibacterial activity against S. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Conclusions The resin luting cements with NAg addition did not show antibacterial activity against SS. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Key words:Silver, resin cements, products with antimicrobial action, solubility, color perception tests. PMID:27703610

  5. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori; Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO4) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09±1.85 MPa to 21.56±2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials.

  6. Osteogenesis Capacity of a Novel BMP/α-TCP Bioactive Composite Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei-zhong; ZHOU Da-li; YIN Shao-ya; YIN Guang-fu; GAO Li-da; ZHANG Yun

    2004-01-01

    To improve the osteogenesis ability of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) bone cement,a novel BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement was prepared.By measuring the setting time and compressive strength,the hydration characteristic of bone cement was evaluated.Animal experiments including histological observation,radiographic investigation as well as digital image analyses reveal the difference of osteogenesis ability among BMP,α-TCP bone cement and BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement.Results show that α-TCP bone cement possesses excellent hydration and setting properties as well as high mechanical property.Comparison experiments show that BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement has a stronger osteogenesis ability.The gross observation of the implant site does not exhibit any inflammation or necrosis.Histological analyses reveal that the material has good osteointegration with host bone,and new bone formation is detected within the materials,which are degrading.Strong osteogenesis ability of the composite is due to not only the excellent osteoconductive potential but also the osteoinductive potential contributed by active BMP releasing and the material degradation.Large skull defect could be well-healed by filling BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement.This novel material proves itself to be an absorbable and bioactive bone cement with an osteogenesis ability.

  7. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0-10mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Minimally invasive maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation using brushite based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Bassett, David C; Habibovic, Pamela; Luceron, Elena; Barralet, Jake E

    2009-01-01

    An ideal material for maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation procedures should not only be osteoconductive, biocompatible and mechanically strong, but should also be applied using minimally invasive procedures and remain stable with respect to the original bone surfaces. This way, implant exposure and infection might be reduced and good mechanical stability may be achieved. Calcium phosphate cements are proven biocompatible and osteoconductive materials that can be injected using minimally invasive procedures. Among these cements, brushite based cements have the added advantage of being biodegradable in vivo. Therefore, this material has the potential for use in the aforementioned procedures. An in vivo study was performed in rabbits to evaluate the potential use of brushite cements in minimally invasive maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation procedures. In this study, we injected self-setting brushite cements on the subperiosteal bone surface using a minimally invasive tunnelling technique. The cement pastes were stable on the bone surface and hardened soon after they were injected thereby negating the need for additional supports such as membranes or meshes. The animals were sacrificed 8 weeks after the intervention and histological observations revealed signs of successful vertical bone augmentation. Therefore, we have demonstrated a minimally invasive vertical bone augmentation procedure that is an attractive alternative to current surgical procedures in terms of increased simplicity, reduced trauma, and lower cost of surgery.

  9. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5±1 min. The compressive strength after 24h of incubation was approximately 8.45±1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10±1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16±4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics.

  10. Development of monetite/phosphorylated chitosan composite bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we report the development of a biodegradable monetite [dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), CaHPO4 ]/phosphorylated chitosan (p-chitosan) composite orthopedic cement. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties, injectability, and washout resistance. The incorporation of p-chitosan powders at 5 wt % shortened the setting time of DCPA and significantly improved the mechanical performance of DCPA cement, increasing the compressive strength almost twice from 11.09 ± 1.85 MPa at 0% chitosan to 23.43 ± 1.47 MPa at 5 wt % p-chitosan. On the other hand, higher p-chitosan content or untreated chitosan incorporation lowered the performance of DCPA cements. The cytocompatibility of the composite cement was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase in cell proliferation was observed in both DCPA and DCPA-p-chitosan. The results show that both the materials are as cytocompatible as hydroxyapatite. Based on these results, DCPA-p-chitosan composite cement can be considered as potential bone repair material.

  11. Benefits and drawbacks of zinc in glass ionomer bone cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G [Unit of Dental Physical Sciences, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Gentleman, Eileen; Stevens, Molly M [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Farrar, David F, E-mail: d.brauer@qmul.ac.uk [Smith and Nephew Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington YO10 5DF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements (GPCs) based on poly(acrylic acid) and fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses are successfully used in a variety of orthopaedic and dental applications; however, they release small amounts of aluminium, which is a neurotoxin and inhibits bone mineralization in vivo. Therefore there has been significant interest in developing aluminium-free glasses containing zinc for forming GPCs because zinc can play a similar structural role in the glass, allowing for glass degradation and subsequent cement setting, and is reported to have beneficial effects on bone formation. We created zinc-containing GPCs and characterized their mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Zinc-containing cements showed adhesion to bone close to 1 MPa, which was significantly greater than that of zinc-free cements (<0.05 MPa) and other currently approved biological adhesives. However, zinc-containing cements produced significantly lower metabolic activity in mouse osteoblasts exposed to cell culture medium conditioned with the cements than controls. Results show that although low levels of zinc may be beneficial to cells, zinc concentrations of 400 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} or more resulted in cell death. In summary, we demonstrate that while zinc-containing GPCs possess excellent mechanical properties, they fail basic biocompatibility tests, produce an acute cytotoxic response in vitro, which may preclude their use in vivo.

  12. The effect of composition on mechanical properties of brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Due to a fast setting reaction, good biological properties, and easily available starting materials, there has been extensive research within the field of brushite cements as bone replacing material. However, the fast setting of brushite cement gives them intrinsically low mechanical properties due to the poor crystal compaction during setting. To improve this, many additives such as citric acid, pyrophosphates, and glycolic acid have been added to the cement paste to retard the crystal growth. Furthermore, the incorporation of a filler material could improve the mechanical properties when used in the correct amounts. In this study, the effect of the addition of the two retardants, disodium dihydrogen pyrophosphate and citric acid, together with the addition of β-TCP filler particles, on the mechanical properties of a brushite cement was investigated. The results showed that the addition of low amounts of a filler (up to 10%) can have large effects on the mechanical properties. Furthermore, the addition of citric acid to the liquid phase makes it possible to use lower liquid-to-powder ratios (L/P), which strongly affects the strength of the cements. The maximal compressive strength (41.8MPa) was found for a composition with a molar ratio of 45:55 between monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and beta-tricalcium phosphate, an L/P of 0.25ml/g and a citric acid concentration of 0.5M in the liquid phase.

  13. The Man of Dual Nationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    Presents an English translation of the first few pages, set in a Japanese internment camp in the U.S. during World War II, of a Japanese novel about the problems of dual nationality and personal identity. (KH)

  14. Antibiotic elution from acrylic bone cement loaded with high doses of tobramycin and vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua; Gietman, Bradley; Squire, Matthew

    2017-09-06

    Two-stage revision treatment of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) frequently employs the use of a temporary bone cement spacer loaded with multiple antibiotic types. Tobramycin and vancomycin are commonly used antibiotics in cement spacers, however, there is no consensus on the relative concentrations and combinations that should be used. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of dual antibiotic loading on the total antibiotic elution and compressive mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement. Varying concentrations of tobramycin (0-3 g) and vancomycin (0-3 g) were added either alone or in combination to acrylic cement (Palacos R), resulting in 12 experimental groups. Samples were submerged in 37°C saline for 28 d and sampled at specific time points. The collected eluent was analyzed to determine the cumulative antibiotic release. In addition, the cement's compressive mechanical properties and porosity were characterized. Interestingly, the cement with the highest concentration of antibiotics did not possess the best elution properties. Cement samples containing both 3 g of tobramycin and 2 g vancomycin demonstrated the highest cumulative antibiotic release after 28 d, which was coupled with a significant decrease in the mechanical properties and an increased porosity. The collected data also suggests that tobramycin elutes more effectively than vancomycin from cement. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that high antibiotic loading in cement does not necessarily lead to enhanced antibiotic elution. Clinically this information may be used to optimize cement spacer antibiotic loading so that both duration and amount of antibiotics eluted are optimized. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Use of dual-energy CT and virtual non-calcium techniques to evaluate post-traumatic bone bruises in knees in the subacute setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Songtao [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Qu, Mingliang; Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Liu, Yu; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Rhee, Peter C. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and virtual non-calcium (VNCa) imaging to detect magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-demonstrated bone bruises several weeks after unilateral knee injury. Patients with unilateral knee injury and MRI-confirmed bone bruises who had undergone a DECT scan of both knees were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists evaluated VNCa images for bruises in four regions per knee without knowing the MRI results. The mean CT numbers were calculated for the lesion-positive and lesion-negative regions of the injured knee, and the contralateral knee. Fourteen patients with a total of 36 regions positive for bone bruises on MRI were identified. The median delay between injury and DECT was 37 days (range, 11-99 days). The mean CT numbers in VNCa images for lesion-positive and lesion-negative regions were -7.6 ± 24.9 HU and -58.2 ± 19.5 HU, respectively. There were no significant differences in mean CT number between the lesion-negative regions in the injured knee and the contralateral knee. No resolution of bruising was seen before week 5, and bone bruising was still identifiable in one out of the two patients scanned at 10 weeks following injury. DECT and VNCa images can identify bone bruising for at least 10 weeks after injury. (orig.)

  16. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement as a Carbonic Cement: The Mechanisms, Dynamics, and Implications of Self-Sealing and CO2 Resistance in Wellbore Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, George Drake Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-07-28

    This report analyzes the dynamics and mechanisms of the interactions of carbonated brine with hydrated Portland cement. The analysis is based on a recent set of comprehensive reactive-transport simulations, and it relies heavily on the synthesis of the body of work on wellbore integrity that we have conducted for the Carbon Storage Program over the past decade.

  17. Clean Development Mechanism: Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zaighum Abbass

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 a major Green House Gas (GHG in the atmosphere, is believed to be largely responsible for global climate change through industrial emissions. The level of CO2 concentration has exponentially increased from about 280 ppm at the start of the industrial revolution to about 380 ppm to date. Although Kyoto protocol has bound industrialized nations to reduce green house gas emissions by 5.2% below 1990 levels around year 2008-2012, but violation continues. The cement industry is one of the major emitter of green house gases, particularly CO2 due to its energy intensive production process. It is estimated that approximately 1 tone of CO2 is released during the manufacturing of each tone of Portland cement. Most of CO2 emissions originate from burning fossil fuels and de-carbonization of limestone in a cement plant. During past several decades, the use of by-product materials in concrete, either as components of blended cements or as admixtures, has increased significantly. In this study, another alternate Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM, Laterite has been used with the objectives: to evaluate the performance of cement containing different percentages of laterite (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 %; to identify the optimum replacement percentage; and to investigate the effects of different concentrations of laterite on various properties of cement. For that purpose, laterite was tested: before blending (for elemental and mineralogical composition by using XRF, SEM and XRD: after blending (Elemental analysis using XRF, fineness test by using Blaine’s air permeability test and for particle size % on 45, 90 and 200 µ sieve, respectively; and after hydration (for mineralogical analysis using SEM. Furthermore, physical tests of manufactured cement, i.e., water consistency, setting time, Le-Chatlier-expansion and compressive strength were also evaluated and compared with limestone and fly-ash cement blends. The results show that with the

  18. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal (n = 15 and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal (n = 3. The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post; and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post. The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal (P = 0.959. There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04 and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003 and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033 when using the chemical system. Conclusion: Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  19. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Misra; Renu Mathur

    2007-06-01

    The scope of magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement in concrete works has been evaluated. MOC cement concrete compositions of varying strengths having good placing and finishing characteristics were prepared and investigated for their compressive and flexural strengths, -values, abrasion resistance etc. The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ratio of compressive to flexural strength varies between 6 and 8. The elastic moduli of the compositions studied are found to be 23–85 GPa and the abrasion losses between 0.11 and 0.20%. While alternate heating–cooling cycles have no adverse effect on MOC concrete, it can be made durable against freezing–thawing and the excessive exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution of the same concentration.

  20. Cemented total hip arthroplasty with Boneloc bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, D C; Hoard, D B; Porretta, C A

    2001-01-01

    Boneloc cement (WK-345, Biomet Inc, Warsaw, Ind) attempted to improve cement characteristics by reducing exotherm during polymerization, lowering residual monomer and solubility, raising molecular weight, and lowering airborne monomer and aromatic amines. To study the efficacy of this cement, a selected group of 20 patients were prospectively enrolled and followed up after hip arthroplasty. All components were cemented. During the enrollment period, approximately 70 other hip arthroplasties were performed. Clinical evaluation was based on the Harris hip score. Radiographic evaluation was based on assessment of position of the components, subsidence, and/or presence of radiolucencies. Patients had follow-up for an average of 42 months (11 to 58 months); 1 was lost to follow-up. Of these, 7 (35%) had failure at last follow-up. Despite its initial promise, Boneloc cement had an unacceptably high failure rate over a relatively short follow-up period and is not recommended for use. Despite the longevity and odor toxicity problems with conventional bone cement, new cement technologies must be approached with caution.

  1. Experimental Study for Improving the Toughness of Harden Cement Using Carbon Fiber%碳纤维改善水泥石韧性实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    步玉环; 程荣超; 王瑞和; 曹祥元

    2005-01-01

    Many measures, such as water injection, acid fracturing, thermal recovery, have been taken in the oilfield development. These can easily induce brittle fracture of set cement. Most of all, there are greater potential for fractures in set cement in slim holes. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the toughness of the cement mantle. Results obtained from experiments show that carbon fiber, with a concentration of 0.12%-0.19% in cement and a length of 700 to 1,400 μm, plays an important role in improving cement quality. Addition of carbon fiber can improve the bending strength of set cement by up to 30%. At the same time, the increase in fiber concentration can lower the elastic modulus and increase the Poisson's ratio of set cement. Thin-section analysis shows that fiber can effectively prevent the propagation of fractures and enhance the plasticity of the matrix and the ability to prevent fracture.

  2. 壳聚糖微球/抗生素自固化磷酸钙骨水泥复合材料治疗慢性骨髓炎的临床研究%Clinical Study of Chronic Osteomyelitis Treated with Chitosan Microspheres/Self-setting Calcium Phosphate Cement Composites Mixed with Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高志刚; 王一羽; 潘姿璇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study of chronic osteomyelitis treated with chitosan microspheres /self-setting cal-cium phosphate cement composites mixed with antibiotics .Methods From April 2009 to March 2012,34 patients with chronic osteomyelitis were involved,30 males and 4 females,aging from 23 to 65 years old,average of 40.2 years old.All the patients were treated with local debridement ,removal of dead bone,chitosan microspheres/self-setting calcium phos-phate cement composites mixed with antibiotics implantation and Kawashima continuous washing therapy .Results The mean follow-up period was 14.52 ±2.62 months(ranging 8~22 months),32 cases received chitosan microspheres/self-setting calcium phosphate cement composites mixed with antibiotics implantation achieved bony union ,2 cases healed af-ter dressing change drainage,and no systemic abnormal reaction and complications happened in all patients .Conclusion Thorough debridement,chitosan microspheres/self-setting calcium phosphate cement composites mixed with antibiotics implantation and Kawashima continuous washing therapy for treatment of chronic osteomyelitis is a simple and effective method.%  目的探讨壳聚糖微球/抗生素自固化磷酸钙骨水泥治疗慢性骨髓炎的临床疗效。方法2009年4月~2012年3月共收治34例慢性骨髓炎患者,其中男30例,女4例,年龄23~65岁,平均40.2岁。对所有患者局部行彻底清创、去除死骨,壳聚糖微球/抗生素自固化磷酸钙骨水泥植入并同时行川岛式持续冲洗疗法治疗。结果术后均获8~22(14.52±2.62)个月随访。经壳聚糖微球/抗生素自固化磷酸钙骨水泥植入32例患者一次痊愈,2例患者经换药引流后愈合,所有病例未出现全身异常反应和并发症。结论经彻底清创、壳聚糖微球/抗生素自固化磷酸钙骨水泥植入并同时行川岛式持续冲洗疗法治疗是治疗慢性骨髓炎简单而有效的方法。

  3. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  4. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  5. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  6. Grout cement. ; Grout cement to fill ground/grout cement to fill cracks. Chunyuyo cement. ; Jiban chunyuyo cement /hibiware chunyuyo cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaue, H. (Nittetsu Cement Co. Ltd., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    Ground grout cement is grouted into the ground under high pressure in high water ratio (100 to 1000%) in the form of milk differing from concrete in terms of the water-cement ratio. The grouted milk is governed by characteristics of the cement the milk itself possesses, resulting in variable grouting modes, which are divided in fracture grouting, permeation grouting and boundary grouting. Their applications include cutting off of water in dams, ground reinforcement, prevention of water gushing in tunnel excavation, natural ground reinforcement, improvement of sandy soil and prevention of its collapse, and stabilization of ground for urban civil engineering works such as subway, water supply and sewerage constructions. Grout cement to fill cracks in concrete structures is so grouted into cracks that the slurry fills up contiguous cracks to a certain level and goes upward while pushing out air or water existing in the cracks. The slurry filled into the cracks solidifies and hardens while being absorbed into the concrete, and finally integrates with the concrete. The grout cement is used to rework such concrete structures as dams, tunnels, and bridge bases. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. Statistical analysis One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey’s test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p 0.05). Conclusion The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. How to cite this article Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200. PMID:27843249

  8. Mechanical property and in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cement modified by polyethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Mangal; DeVoe, Ken; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita, E-mail: sbose@wsu.edu

    2012-12-01

    Brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement, owing to its high solubility in physiological condition and ability to guide new bone formation, is widely used to treat bone defects. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of poly ethylene glycol (PEG) addition on the setting time, compressive strength and in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cement. The brushite cements were prepared by mixing {beta}-tricalcium phosphate [{beta}-TCP, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [MCPM, Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2} Dot-Operator H{sub 2}O]. PEG was introduced at 2.0 and 5.0 wt% with the liquid. Introduction of PEG resulted in marginal increase in both initial and final setting time, however, significantly affected the compressive strength. Effects of PEG incorporation on in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cements were studied by using human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) cells. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that pure and PEG incorporated brushite cement facilitates cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Fewer cells expressed vinculin protein with increased PEG content in the cement. Cell proliferation was found to decrease with increased PEG concentration while the cell differentiation increased with PEG content. Our results provide a better understanding of in vitro biocompatibility of PEG added brushite cements that can be used to customize the cement compositions based on application need. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Setting time was not altered for brushite cement with PEG addition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hFOB cell proliferation was found to decrease with increased PEG concentration in brushite cement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced ALP activity was noticed with addition of PEG in brushite cements.

  9. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per

  10. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography: optimization of kiloelectron volt settings in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Simon S; Pfeifer, Sophia; Wichmann, Julian L; Albrecht, Moritz H; Leithner, Doris; Lenga, Lukas; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI+) reconstruction technique on quantitative and qualitative image analysis in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) at dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of the abdomen. Forty-five DECT datasets of 21 patients (14 men; 63.7 ± 9.2 years) with GISTs were reconstructed with the standard linearly blended (M_0.6) and VMI+ and traditional virtual monoenergetic (VMI) algorithm in 10-keV increments from 40 to 100 keV. Attenuation measurements were performed in GIST lesions and abdominal metastases to calculate objective signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). Five-point scales were used to evaluate overall image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and image noise. Quantitative image parameters peaked at 40-keV VMI+ series (SNR 27.8 ± 13.0; CNR 26.3 ± 12.7), significantly superior to linearly blended (SNR 16.8 ± 7.3; CNR 13.6 ± 6.9) and all VMI series (all P VMI+ reconstructions regarding overall image quality and image sharpness (median 5, respectively; P ≤ 0.023). Qualitative assessment of lesion delineation peaked in 40 and 50-keV VMI+ series (median 5, respectively). Image noise was superior in 90 and 100-keV VMI and VMI+ reconstructions (all medians 5). Low-keV VMI+ reconstructions significantly increase SNR and CNR of GISTs and improve quantitative and qualitative image quality of abdominal DECT datasets compared to traditional VMI and standard linearly blended image series.

  11. Advanced image-based virtual monoenergetic dual-energy CT angiography of the abdomen: optimization of kiloelectron volt settings to improve image contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Moritz H.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Huesers, Kristina; Beeres, Martin; Bucher, Andreas M.; Kaup, Moritz; Martin, Simon S.; Fischer, Sebastian; Bodelle, Boris; Bauer, Ralf W.; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wichmann, Julian L. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To compare quantitative image quality parameters in abdominal dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DE-CTA) using an advanced image-based (Mono+) reconstruction algorithm for virtual monoenergetic imaging and standard DE-CTA. Fifty-five patients (36 men; mean age, 64.2 ± 12.7 years) who underwent abdominal DE-CTA were retrospectively included. Mono + images were reconstructed at 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 keV levels and as standard linearly blended M{sub 0}.6 images (60 % 100 kV, 40 % 140 kV). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the common hepatic (CHA), splenic (SA), superior mesenteric (SMA) and left renal arteries (LRA) were objectively measured. Mono+ DE-CTA series showed a statistically superior CNR for 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 keV (P < 0.031) compared to M{sub 0}.6 images for all investigated arteries except SMA at 80 keV (P = 0.08). CNR at 40 keV revealed a mean relative increase of 287.7 % compared to linearly blended images among all assessed arteries (P < 0.001). SNR of Mono+ images was consistently significantly higher at 40, 50, 60 and 70 keV compared to M{sub 0}.6 for CHA and SA (P < 0.009). Compared to linearly blended images, Mono+ reconstructions at low keV levels of abdominal DE-CTA datasets significantly improve quantitative image quality. (orig.)

  12. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  13. Influence of particle size on hardening and handling of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Jonas; Engstrand, Johanna; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-04-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements (pCPC) have been developed to circumvent problems related to mixing and transfer of cements in the operating room. In addition, by using pCPC the short working times generally associated with conventional water-mixed cements are avoided. In this work, the influence of particle size on handling and hardening characteristics of a premixed monetite cement has been assessed. The cements were evaluated with respect to their injectability, setting time and compressive strength. It was found that cements with smaller particle sizes were more difficult to inject and had higher compressive strength. Regarding setting time, no clear trend could be discerned. The addition of granules made the cements easier to inject, but setting time was prolonged and lower strengths were obtained. The main findings of this work demonstrate that particle size can be used to control handling and physical properties of premixed cements and that previous knowledge from water-based CPC, regarding effects of particle size, is not directly applicable to premixed CPC.

  14. High-strength resorbable brushite bone cement with controlled drug-releasing capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, M P; Mohammed, A R; Perrie, Y; Gbureck, U; Barralet, J E

    2009-01-01

    Brushite cements differ from apatite-forming compositions by consuming a lot of water in their setting reaction whereas apatite-forming cements consume little or no water at all. Only such cement systems that consume water during setting can theoretically produce near-zero porosity ceramics. This study aimed to produce such a brushite ceramic and investigated whether near elimination of porosity would prevent a burst release profile of incorporated antibiotics that is common to prior calcium phosphate cement delivery matrices. Through adjustment of the powder technological properties of the powder reactants, that is particle size and particle size distribution, and by adjusting citric acid concentration of the liquid phase to 800mM, a relative porosity of as low as 11% of the brushite cement matrix could be achieved (a 60% reduction compared to previous studies), resulting in a wet unprecompacted compressive strength of 52MPa (representing a more than 100% increase to previously reported results) with a workable setting time of 4.5min of the cement paste. Up to 2wt.% of vancomycin and ciprofloxacin could be incorporated into the cement system without loss of wet compressive strength. It was found that drug release rates could be controlled by the adjustable relative porosity of the cement system and burst release could be minimized and an almost linear release achieved, but the solubility of the antibiotic (vancomycin>ciprofloxacin) appeared also to be a crucial factor.

  15. Physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of chitosan oligosaccharide/gelatin/calcium phosphate hybrid cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ting-Yi [Department of Dental Laboratory Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Ho, Chia-Che [Institute of Oral Biology and Biomaterials Science, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chen, David Chan-Hen [Institute of Veterinary Microbiology, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lai, Meng-Heng [Institute of Oral Biology and Biomaterials Science, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ding, Shinn-Jyh, E-mail: sjding@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Biology and Biomaterials Science, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung-Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-15

    A bone substitute material was developed consisting of a chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) solution in a liquid phase and gelatin (GLT) containing calcium phosphate powder in a solid phase. The physicochemical and biocompatible properties of the hybrid cements were evaluated. The addition of COS to cement did not affect the setting time or diametral tensile strength of the hybrid cements, whereas GLT significantly prolonged the setting time and decreased the strength slightly. The setting reaction was inhibited by the addition of GLT to the initial mixture, but not by COS. However, the presence of GLT appreciably improved the anti-washout properties of the hybrid cement compared with COS. COS may promote the cement's biocompatibility as an approximate twofold increase in cell proliferation for 10% COS-containing cements was observed on day 3 as compared with the controls. The combination of GLT and COS was chosen due to the benefits achieved from several synergistic effects and for their clinical applications. Cement with 5% GLT and 10% COS may be a better choice among cements in terms of anti-washout properties and biological activity.

  16. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: A novel solution to the exothermicity problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: Huan.Zhou@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted system for bone cement manufacturing • A solution to exothermicity problem of acid–base reaction based bone cement

  17. The Media as a Dual Mediator of the Political Agenda–Setting Effect of Protest : A Longitudinal Study in Six Western European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, R.; Walgrave, S.; Wouters, R.; Hutter, S.; Jennings, W.; Gava, R.; Tresh, A.; Varone, F.; Grossman, E.; Breunig, C.; Brouard, S.; Chaques-Bonafont, L.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the impact of media coverage of protest on issue attention in parliament (questions) in six Western European countries. Integrating several data sets on protest, media, and political agendas, we demonstrate that media coverage of protest affects parliamentary agendas: the more

  18. 合成温度对含镁铝尖晶石的铝酸盐水泥晶粒尺寸及凝结性能的影响%Influence of synthesis temperature on crystal size and setting properties of calcium aluminate cement with magnesium aluminate spinel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平安; 李享成; 朱伯铨

    2016-01-01

    Dolomite,industrial alumina and caustic magnesite were used as starting materials to study the in-fluence of temperature on the crystal size and setting properties of aluminate cement with magnesium alu-minate spinel.The starting materials were mixed homogeneously according to the mass ratio of 71 9 20 of Al2 O3 MgO CaO,heated to 1 100,1 200,1 300,1 400,1 500 ℃,respectively,in a high temperature furnace and soaked for 3 h.After that,the cement bulk was crushed to below 50 μm.The MA bearing aluminate ce-ment was characterized by XRD and SEM,and the setting time was tested.The results show that the phases of CA,MA and CA2 can be formed at 900,1 100 and 1 200 ℃,respectively.The crystal size of spinel could be controlled from nanometer to micrometer as the synthesis temperature rises from 1 100 to 1 500 ℃,and CA as well as CA2 grows from 2 -3 μm to 5 μm,and then sinter together forming skeleton,CA and CA2 crystals are surrounded by MA crystals.Meanwhile,the setting time delays with the synthesis temperature rising due to the growth of CA or CA2 crystals,decreasing the hydration activity;and the growth of MA crystals,hindering the reactions between water and CA or CA2 ,thus obviously hindering the hydration of the cement.%为了研究合成温度对含镁铝尖晶石的铝酸盐水泥晶粒尺寸和凝结性能的影响,以白云石、工业氧化铝和轻烧镁砂为原料,按 Al2 O3、MgO、CaO 质量比为71920配料后混合均匀,并在高温炉中分别经1100、1200、1300、1400和1500℃保温3 h 煅烧并破粉碎至50μm 以下,制备了含 MA 的铝酸盐水泥,对水泥试样进行了XRD 和 SEM分析,并检测了凝结时间。研究结果表明:含 MA 的铝酸盐水泥中的 CA、MA 和 CA2相分别在900、1100和1200℃生成。当合成温度从1100℃升高至1500℃时,水泥中 MA 的晶粒尺寸从纳米到微米级可控,CA 或 CA2的粒径从2~3μm 逐渐长大至5μm 以上,并烧结在一起形成骨架,MA

  19. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  20. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weiwei [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Sun, Tao, E-mail: sunt@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Roadway Bridge & Structure Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Li, Xinping [Key Laboratory of Roadway Bridge & Structure Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Sun, Mian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Lu, Yani [Urban Construction Institute, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, Hubei 432000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Borosilicate glass waste used as cement additive can improves its radiation shielding. • When content is 14.8%, the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm{sup −1} after 28 d. • From 0 to 22.2%, linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. - Abstract: Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm{sup −1} after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  1. Factors influencing calcium phosphate cement shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbureck, Uwe; Dembski, Sofia; Thull, Roger; Barralet, Jake E

    2005-06-01

    Long-term stability during storage (shelf-life) is one major criterion for the use of a material as medical device. This study aimed to investigate the ageing process of beta-tricalcium phosphate/monocalcium phosphate cement powders when stored in sealed containers at ambient conditions. This kind of cement type is of interest because it is forming dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (brushite) when set, which is in contrast to hydroxyapatite resorbable in physiological conditions. The stability of cements was checked by either measuring the phase composition of powders as well as the setting time and compressive strength when mixed with sodium citrate as liquid. Critical factors influencing ageing were found to be temperature, humidity and the mixing regime of the powders. Mechanically mixed cement powders which were stored in normal laboratory atmosphere (22 degrees C, 60% rel. humidity) converted to dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (monetite) within a few days; this could be mechanistically related to a dissolution/precipitation process since humidity condensed on the particles' surfaces and acted as reaction medium. Various storage conditions were found to be effective in prolonging cement stability which were in order of effectiveness: adding solid citric acid retardant>dry argon atmosphere=gentle mixing (minimal mechanical energy input) low temperature.

  2. Apatite bone cement reinforced with calcium silicate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motisuke, Mariana; Santos, Verônica R; Bazanini, Naiana C; Bertran, Celso A

    2014-10-01

    Several research efforts have been made in the attempt to reinforce calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) with polymeric and carbon fibers. Due to their low compatibility with the cement matrix, results were not satisfactory. In this context, calcium silicate fibers (CaSiO3) may be an alternative material to overcome the main drawback of reinforced CPCs since, despite of their good mechanical properties, they may interact chemically with the CPC matrix. In this work CaSiO3 fibers, with aspect ratio of 9.6, were synthesized by a reactive molten salt synthesis and used as reinforcement in apatite cement. 5 wt.% of reinforcement addition has increased the compressive strength of the CPC by 250% (from 14.5 to 50.4 MPa) without preventing the cement to set. Ca and Si release in samples containing fibers could be explained by CaSiO3 partial hydrolysis which leads to a quick increase in Ca concentration and in silica gel precipitation. The latter may be responsible for apatite precipitation in needle like form during cement setting reaction. The material developed presents potential properties to be employed in bone repair treatment.

  3. Utilization of ground waste seashells in cement mortars for masonry and plastering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit; Makul, Natt; Siripattarapravat, Chalothorn

    2012-11-30

    In this research, four types of waste seashells, including short-necked clam, green mussel, oyster, and cockle, were investigated experimentally to develop a cement product for masonry and plastering. The parameters studied included water demand, setting time, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and thermal conductivity of the mortars. These properties were compared with those of a control mortar that was made of a conventional Portland cement. The main parameter of this study was the proportion of ground seashells used as cement replacement (5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% by weight). Incorporation of ground seashells resulted in reduced water demand and extended setting times of the mortars, which are advantages for rendering and plastering in hot climates. All mortars containing ground seashells yielded adequate strength, less shrinkage with drying and lower thermal conductivity compared to the conventional cement. The results indicate that ground seashells can be applied as a cement replacement in mortar mixes and may improve the workability of rendering and plastering mortar.

  4. Development of hydroxyapatite bone cement for controlled drug release via tetracycline hydrochloride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sayed Mahmood Rabiee

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the preparation and characterization of drug–hydroxyapatite cement. The hydroxyapatite (HA) cement has been synthesized by using tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous with sodium hydrogen phosphate as liquid phase. The effect of added tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) as drug on final phases, microstructure, setting behaviour and compressive strength has been studied. The drug release rate was first order within the first day and then was zero order. No obvious difference could be detected in XRD patterns of the TCH–HA cement with various amounts of drug. By increasing the drug concentration, mechanical strength of cement was decreased and its setting time was increased. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using HA cement as a carrier for drug delivery.

  5. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to measure the effects of a thirteen-week moderate to vigorous aquatic exercise and nutritional education intervention on percent body fat in adults with intellectual disabilities from group home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Amanda; Boyd, Colin; Mackenzie, Sasho; Rasmussen, Roy

    2012-05-01

    People with intellectual disability are more likely to be obese and extremely obese than people without intellectual disability with rates remaining elevated among adults, women and individuals living in community settings. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured the effects of a 13-week aquatic exercise and nutrition intervention on percent body fat in eight adults with intellectual disabilities (aged 41.0 ± 13.7 yrs) of varying fat levels (15%-39%) from two group homes. A moderate to vigorous aquatic exercise program lasted for the duration of 13 weeks with three, one-hour sessions held at a 25m pool each week. Nutritional assistants educated participants as to the importance of food choice and portion size. A two-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test determined the impact of the combined intervention on body fat percentage and BMI at pre and post test. Median body fat percentage (0.8 %) and BMI (0.3 kg/m(2)) decreased following the exercise intervention, but neither were statistically significant, p = .11 and p = .55, respectively. The combined intervention was ineffective at reducing percent body fat in adults with intellectual disability according to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. These results are in agreement with findings from exercise alone interventions and suggest that more stringent nutritional guidelines are needed for this population and especially for individuals living in group home settings. The study did show that adults with intellectual disability may participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity when given the opportunity.

  6. Properties of Portland-Composite Cements with metakaolin: Commercial and manufactured by Thermal Activation of Serbian Kaolin Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrovic A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Portland-composite cements (CEM II were prepared with addition of 5 to 35% of metakaolin (MK, manufactured by thermal activation/calcination of Serbian kaolin clay, and commercial matakaolin (CMK. Performance of the composite cements was evaluated, through the setting time (initial and final, compressive strengths (for ages 2, 7, 28, 90 and 180 days and soundness, and compared with control cement (Portland cement – CEM I. Setting time (initial and final is accelerated in Portlandcomposite cements, for both metakaolins used. The acceleration is higher in cement with addition of commercial metakaolin. Lower compressive strength is obtained after 2 days of curing for all Portland-composite cements in comparison with control cement, since pozzolanic reaction still did not show its effect. After 7 days, pozzolanic reaction show its effect, manifested as compressive strength increase of Portland-composite cements with addition of up to 35% of CMK, and 25% in the case of cements with MK. After 28 days compressive strength was higher than that for control cement for cements prepared with addition of CMK, and with addition of up to 25% MK. After 90 days increased compressive strength was noticed with addition of 10 - 20% of CMK, and with 10 and 15% of MK, while after 180 days addition of both metakaolins influences compressive strength decrease. The results of the soundness, 0.5 mm for CEM I, and 1.0 mm in most Portland-composite cements indicate soundness increase with addition of metakaolins. Generally, better performance of Portland-composite cements was obtained with addition of commercial metakaolin, which may be attributed to the differences in the pozzolanic activity of the applied metakaolins, 20.5 MPa and 14.9 MPa for CMK and MK, respectively. By our previous findings pozzolanic activity of the thermally activated clay may be increased by subsequent milling of the metakaolin manufactured by thermal activation process.

  7. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Wen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Nai-Shuo [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Ding, Shinn-Jyh, E-mail: sjding@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  8. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    This research evaluates the ... The paper details results of API specification tests and the physical ... Keywords: Compressive strength, Free fluid, Portland cement, Rheology, Thickening time ..... Geothermal Well Cementing” Proceedings of.

  9. Mechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility Improvement of Vertebroplasty PMMA Bone Cements by Incorporating Mineralized Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jiang Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cement is a commonly used bone adhesive and filling material in percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty surgeries. However, PMMA bone cements have been reported to cause some severe complications, such as secondary fracture of adjacent vertebral bodies, and loosening or even dislodgement of the set PMMA bone cement, due to the over-high elastic modulus and poor osteointegration ability of the PMMA. In this study, mineralized collagen (MC with biomimetic microstructure and good osteogenic activity was added to commercially available PMMA bone cement products, in order to improve both the mechanical properties and the cytocompatibility. As the compressive strength of the modified bone cements remained well, the compressive elastic modulus could be significantly down-regulated by the MC, so as to reduce the pressure on the adjacent vertebral bodies. Meanwhile, the adhesion and proliferation of pre-osteoblasts on the modified bone cements were improved compared with cells on those unmodified, such result is beneficial for a good osteointegration formation between the bone cement and the host bone tissue in clinical applications. Moreover, the modification of the PMMA bone cements by adding MC did not significantly influence the injectability and processing times of the cement.

  10. Effect of Superplasticizers on the Early Age Hydration of Sulfoaluminate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiaohui; CHEN Wei; YANG Mo

    2014-01-01

    The effects of two types of superplasticizers on the properties of CSA cement pastes during early hydration were studied. The influences of two types of superplasticizers on the properties of cement pastes, including the normal consistency, setting time, fluidity, and compressive strength, were investigated by using various methods. The hydration products of the cement pastes cured for 1 day and 3 days were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the PCE type superplasticizer retards the early age hydration while the FDN type superplasticizer accelerates the early age hydration of the CSA cement. Both types of superplasticizers have no influence on the further hydration of CSA cement, confirmed by the calorimeter tests as well. The ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to probe the influence of two types of superplasticizers on the hydration of CSA cement pastes at a high water-cement ratio (0.45). The results show that the PCE type superplasticizer retards the early age hydration of the CSA cement while the FDN type superplasticizer has little influence on the early age hydration of the CSA cement.

  11. Durability of lopinavir/ritonavir dual-therapies in individuals with viral load <50 copies/mL in the observational setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gianotti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aimed at evaluating the efficacy and durability of a lopinavir/ritonavir-based dual regimen (LPV/r-DR in virologically controlled HIV-infected individuals in current clinical practice. Methods: Patients who have initiated for the first time a LPV/r-DR with HIV-RNA50 copies/mL] and time to experience either a single VL>200 copies/mL or discontinuation/intensification (= treatment failure, TF. Individuals’ follow-up accrued from the date of starting the LPV/r-DR to event or last available VL. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis were used. Covariates included in the multivariable analysis were gender, age, route of transmission, hepatitis co-infection, calendar year of starting the DR, nadir CD4+ count, VL at initiation of first cART, previous failures to protease inhibitors (PIs, time with undetectable VL before starting the DR and the type of DR [nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI, non-NRTI (NNRTI, raltegravir or maraviroc, with NRTI as reference group]. Results are presented as median (Q1, Q3 or frequency (% as appropriate. Results: 108 individuals followed for 18 (7, 30 months were included; baseline (BL characteristics are detailed in Table 1.LPV/r was associated with a NRTI in 51, with a NNRTI in 10, with raltegravir in 29, and with maraviroc in 18 individuals. By 36 months from switching to the LPV/r-DR, the proportion of individuals with VR and TF was 10% (95% CI 3–17% and 36% (95% CI 22–50%, respectively. We did not find any factor independently associated with the risk of VR. Older age (ARH=0.49 (95% CI 0.30–0.78 per 10 years older; p=0.003 was found to be protective from TF. Mean (SE CD4+ cells/µL increase from BL to month 36 resulted significant: 195 (40.1 cells/µL (p=0.0028. We did not observe significant changes in AST, ALT, eGFR (MDRD formula, triglycerides and both total and HDL-cholesterol. Conclusions: A LPV/r-DR can be considered a valuable option in patients with HIV-RNA<50 copies

  12. A new type of cementation flushing fluid for efficiently removing wellbore filter cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erding Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available For effectively removing the water-based drilling fluid filter cake and improving interfacial cementing strength and cementing quality, a new type of cementation flushing fluid (WD-C was developed based on the strong flushing principle of water soluble fiber and the oxygenolysis principle of filter cake. It is composed of 0.5% WF-H fiber, 2.2% WF-O oxidant, 0.35% FeSO4, 1.8% KCl, 3.0% swollen powder perlite and water with its density of 1.03 g/cm3. This cementation flushing fluid was systematically tested and evaluated in terms of its washing efficiency on the filter cake of water-based drilling fluid and its capacity to improve the bonding strength of cementation interface. In addition, an analysis was performed of its effect on the physical-chemical characteristics and the micro-structures of interfacial cements by means of infrared spectrum (IR, scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS. It is shown that the new cementation flushing fluid presents excellent washing effect on water-based drilling fluid filter cake (with washing time within 10 min. The cement particles at the cemented interface can be hydrated normally, and hydrated calcium silicate gel, Ca(OH2 and rod-shaped ettringite (AFt crystal are generated and interwoven with each other. In this way, dense network structures are formed, so the bonding strength of the second cementing interface rises significantly, and then cementing quality is improved. Based on the research results, one more technology is set up for removing the water-based drilling fluid filter cake efficiently and improving the bonding strength of the second cementing interface.

  13. In vivo bone response to porous calcium phosphate cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Real, R.P. del; Ooms, E.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Vallet-Regi, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an in vivo experiment to evaluate the resorption rate of a calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with macropores larger than 100 microm, using the CPC called Biocement D (Merck Biomaterial, Darmstadt, Germany), which after setting only shows pores smaller than 1 microm. The gas bubble method u

  14. Calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement compositions for bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, C; Bareille, R; Rey, C

    2006-11-01

    The feasibility of making calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO(3)-CaP) mixed cements, comprising at least 40% (w/w) CaCO(3) in the dry powder ingredients, has been demonstrated. Several original cement compositions were obtained by mixing metastable crystalline CaCO(3) phases with metastable amorphous or crystalline CaP powders in aqueous medium. The cements set within at most 1 h at 37 degrees C in atmosphere saturated with water. The hardened cement is microporous and exhibits weak compressive strength. The setting reaction appeared to be essentially related to the formation of a highly carbonated nanocrystalline apatite phase by reaction of the metastable CaP phase with part or almost all of the metastable CaCO(3) phase. The recrystallization of metastable CaP varieties led to a final cement consisting of a highly carbonated poorly crystalline apatite analogous to bone mineral associated with various amounts of vaterite and/or aragonite. The presence of controlled amounts of CaCO(3) with a higher solubility than that of the apatite formed in the well-developed CaP cements might be of interest to increase resorption rates in biomedical cement and favors its replacement by bone tissue. Cytotoxicity testing revealed excellent cytocompatibility of CaCO(3)-CaP mixed cement compositions.

  15. Self-cleaning and mechanical properties of modified white cement with nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataee, R; Heydari, V; Moradkhannejhad, L; Safarpour, M; Joo, S W

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, self-cleaning and mechanical properties of white Portland cement by addition of commercial available TiO2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 80 nm were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET were used to characterize TiO2 nanoparticles. For determination of self-cleaning properties of TiO2-modified white cement, colorimetric tests in decolorization of C.I. Basic Red 46 (BR46) in comparison to unmodified cement samples was applied. The results indicated that with increasing the amount of TiO2 nanoparticles in modified cement, self-cleaning property of the samples increased. The mechanical properties of TiO2-modified and unmodified cement samples, such as time of setting of hydraulic cement, compressive strength of hydraulic cement mortar and flexural strength of hydraulic cement mortar were examined. The results indicated that addition of TiO2 nanoparticles up to maximum replacement level of 1.0% improved compressive and flexural strength and decreased its setting time.

  16. Mechanical and In Vitro Biocompatibility of Brushite Cement Modified by Polyethylene Glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mangal; Devoe, Ken; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-12-01

    Brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement, owing to its high solubility in physiological condition and ability to guide new bone formation, is widely used to treat bone defects. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of poly ethylene glycol (PEG) addition on the setting time, compressive strength and in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cement. The brushite cements were prepared by mixing β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP, Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [MCPM, Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2). H(2)O]. PEG was introduced at 2.0 and 5.0 wt% with the liquid. Introduction of PEG resulted in marginal increase in both initial and final setting time; however, significantly affected the compressive strength. Effects of PEG incorporation on in vitro biocompatibility of brushite cements were studied by using human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) cells. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that pure and PEG incorporated brushite cement facilitates cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Fewer cells expressed vinculin protein with increased PEG content in the cement. Cell proliferation was found to decrease with increased PEG concentration while the cell differentiation increased with PEG content. Our results provide a better understanding of in vitro biocompatibility of PEG added brushite cements that can be used to customize the cement compositions based on application need.

  17. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung, 407, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jian-Chih [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan [Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Tien, Yin-Chun [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung, 407, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30 MPa after 24 h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. - Highlights: • Bone cement precursor with nanocrystals is characterized. • DCP-rich CPCs with nanocrystals exhibited biphasic product phases. • Nanocrystals in cement significantly affected the interlocking ability. • Nanocrystals in cement exhibited higher strength and anti-dispersion. • DCP-rich CPCs increase the potential of bioresorption after reaction.

  18. Does vertebroplasty affect radiation dose distribution?: comparison of spatial dose distributions in a cement-injected vertebra as calculated by treatment planning system and actual spatial dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Yagi, Rie; Nakatani, Miyuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sano, Akira; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Harima, Yoko; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution.

  19. Are spatial responses to visuospatial stimuli and spoken responses to auditory letters ideomotor-compatible tasks? Examination of set-size effects on dual-task interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yun-Kyoung; Proctor, Robert W

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have paired a visual-manual Task 1 with an auditory-vocal Task 2 to evaluate whether the psychological refractory period (PRP) effect is eliminated with two ideomotor-compatible tasks (for which stimuli resemble the response feedback). The present study varied the number of stimulus-response alternatives for Task 1 in three experiments to determine whether set-size and PRP effects were absent, as would be expected if the tasks bypass limited-capacity response-selection processes. In Experiments 1 and 2, the visual-manual task was used as Task 1, with lever-movement and keypress responses, respectively. In Experiment 3, the auditory-vocal task was used as Task 1 and the visual-manual task as Task 2. A significant lengthening of reaction time for 4 vs. 2 alternatives was found for the visual-manual Task 1 and the Task 2 PRP effect in Experiments 1 and 2, suggesting that the visual-manual task is not ideomotor compatible. Neither effect of set size was significant for the auditory-vocal Task 1 in Experiment 3, but there was still a Task 2 PRP effect. Our results imply that neither version of the visual-manual task is ideomotor compatible; other considerations suggest that the auditory-vocal task may also still require response selection.

  20. Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

  1. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite.

  2. Pulmonary cement embolism after pedicle screw vertebral stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial embolization of polymethylmethacrylate cement, most usually occurring after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, is very uncommon following vertebral stabilization procedures. Unenhanced CT scans viewed at lung window settings allow confident identification of cement emboli in the pulmonary circulation along with possible associate parenchymal changes, whereas hyperdense emboli may be less conspicuous on CT-angiographic studies with high-flow contrast medium injection. Although clinical manifestations are largely variable from asymptomatic cases to severe respiratory distress, most cases are treated with anticoagulation.

  3. Effect on Hydration and Hardening of Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The bioactive α-Ca3 (PO4)2 bone cement was studied by XRD , SEM and isothermal calorimetric measurements. The results showed that a mixed pattern of TCP and hydroxylapatite were obtained after hydration and hardening. The mechanism of hydration and hardening of the α-Ca3 ( PO4 )2 was dissolution-precipitation,(NH4) H2 PO4 was the best set accelerator to the α-Ca3 ( PO4 )2 cement, and the HAP powers and the(NH4) H2 PO4 concentration had a great effect on the hydration rate of α-Ca3 ( PO4 )2.

  4. The effects of citric acid on the hydration of calcium phosphate cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hong-lian; YAN Yu-hua; WANG You-fa; LI Shi-pu

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) overcome the practical disadvantages of blocks or granulesl can be handled as a paste and sit in situ. Their structure and composition close to that of HAP make them biocompatible materials. 2 The conventional calcium phosphate cement had some problems such as long setting time (30~60 min) and low compressive strength, etc. In our system, an α-TCP/TTCP powder mixture was mixed with water containing citric acid to control the setting time and compressive strength. In this paper, the effects of various concentration citric acid solutions on the properties of the cement are reported.

  5. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  6. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  7. New System of Shrinkage Measurement through Cement Mortars Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, Carlos; Saiz, Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; García-Fuentevilla, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Cement mortar is used as a conglomerate in the majority of construction work. There are multiple variants of cement according to the type of aggregate used in its fabrication. One of the major problems that occurs while working with this type of material is the excessive loss of moisture during cement hydration (setting and hardening), known as shrinkage, which provokes a great number of construction pathologies that are difficult to repair. In this way, the design of a new sensor able to measure the moisture loss of mortars at different age levels is useful to establish long-term predictions concerning mortar mass volume loss. The purpose of this research is the design and fabrication of a new capacitive sensor able to measure the moisture of mortars and to relate it with the shrinkage. PMID:28272297

  8. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Saout, Gwenn, E-mail: gwenn.le-saout@mines-ales.fr [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hori, Akihiro [DENKA Chemicals GmbH, Wehrhahn-Center, Cantadorstr. 3, D-40211 Duesseldorf (Germany); Higuchi, Takayuki [Denki Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (DENKA), Omi, Itoigawa, Niigata, 949-0393 (Japan); Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  9. Biological Evaluation of α-TCP/TTCP Composite Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    α-tricalcium phosphate(α-TCP)/tetracalcium phosphate(TTCP) composite bone cement had good hydration characteristic.In our system,α-TCP/TTCP powder mixture was mixed with water at a powder/liquid (P/L) ratio of 1.50g*mL-1.The setting time could be adjusted,the maximum compressive strength was 45.36MPa,and the hydration product was hydroxyapatite (HAP).In vitro biological simulated experiments indicate that α-TCP/TTCP bone cement has α certain dissolubility.The hardened product is mainly HAP after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 10 weeks.The results of in vitro test and animal experiments and SEM analyses show that no local or general toxicity response,no muscle stimulation,no haemolysis,no cruor,no inflammatory reaction and no exclusion response are caused by α-TCP/TTCP cement, which can be contributed to bone tissue spreading and impinging.α-TCP/TTCP cement hydrated and hardened continually in vivo.The materials fused with host bone together with implanting time prolonging.Therefore,it is believed that α-TCP/TTCP composite bone cement has a high biocompatibility and bioactivity,a certain biodegradation and good osteogenesis as well.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of cement treated aggregate containing crushed clay brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Hu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The waste clay bricks from debris of buildings were evaluated through lab tests as environmental friendly materials for pavement sub-base in the research. Five sets of coarse aggregates which contained 0, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% crushed bricks, respectively, were blended with sand and treated by 5% cement. The test results indicated that cement treated aggregate which contains crushed clay brick aggregate had a lower maximum dry density (MDD and a higher optimum moisture content (OMC. Moreover, the unconfined compressive strength (UCS, resilience modulus, splitting strength, and frost resistance performance of the specimens decreased with increase of the amount of crushed clay brick aggregate. On the other hand, it can be observed that the use of crushed clay brick in the mixture decreased the dry shrinkage strain of the specimens. Compared with the asphalt pavement design specifications of China, the results imply that the substitution rate of natural aggregate with crushed clay brick aggregate in the cement treated aggregate sub-base material should be less than 50% (5% cement content in the mixture. Furthermore, it needs to be noted that the cement treated aggregate which contains crushed clay bricks should be cautiously used in the cold region due to its insufficient frost resistance performance.

  11. In-situ polymerization behaviour of bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffezzoli, A; Ronca, D; Guida, G; Pochini, I; Nicolais, L

    1997-02-01

    The polymerization behaviour of bone cements during total hip replacements is characterized by a fast and highly non-isothermal bulk reaction. In the first part of this paper the reaction kinetics are analysed by calorimetric analysis in order to determine the rates of polymerization in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. A phenomenological kinetic model, accounting for the effects of autoacceleration and vitrification, is presented. This model, integrated with an energy balance, is capable of predicting the temperature across the prosthesis, the cement and the bone and the degree of reaction in the cement, during in situ polymerization. The temperature and the degree of reaction profiles are calculated, as a function of the setting time, taking into account the system geometry, the thermal diffusivity of bone, prosthesis and cement, and the heat rate generated by the reaction according to the kinetic model. Material properties, boundary and initial conditions are the input data of the heat transfer model. Kinetic and heat transfer models are coupled and a numerical solution method is used. The model is applied in order to study the effects of different application procedures on temperature and degree of reaction profiles across the bone-cement-prosthesis system.

  12. Dry-grinded ultrafine cements hydration. physicochemical and microstructural characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foteini Kontoleontos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research work was the evaluation of the physicochemical and microstructural properties of two ultrafine cements, produced by dry grinding of a commercial CEM I 42.5N cement. The effect of grinding on particle size distribution was determined by laser scattering analyzer. All cements were tested for initial and final setting times, consistency of standard paste, soundness, flow of normal mortar and compressive strengths after 1, 2, 7 and 28 days. The effect of the fineness on the heat of hydration was also investigated. The hydration products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, at 1, 2, 7 and 28 days. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated by mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of greater fineness on compressive strengths were evident principally at early ages. After the first 24 hours of hydration, the compressive strength of the finest cements was about 3 times higher (over 48 MPa than the corresponding of CEM I 42.5N (15.1 MPa.

  13. A novel controlled-release system for antibacterial enzyme lysostaphin delivery using hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite bone cement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xue, Bai; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Yihan; Wang, Jincheng; Zhang, Jien; Lu, Min; Li, Guodong; Cao, Zhizhong; Huang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a lysostaphin-loaded, control-released, self-setting and injectable porous bone cement with efficient protein delivery was prepared by a novel setting method using hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS) composite scaffold...

  14. A Novel Controlled-Release System for Antibacterial Enzyme Lysostaphin Delivery Using Hydroxyapatite/Chitosan Composite Bone Cement: e113797

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bai Xue; Cheng Zhang; Yihan Wang; Jincheng Wang; Jien Zhang; Min Lu; Guodong Li; Zhizhong Cao; Qingshan Huang

    2014-01-01

      In this work, a lysostaphin-loaded, control-released, self-setting and injectable porous bone cement with efficient protein delivery was prepared by a novel setting method using hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS) composite scaffold...

  15. Correlation between flexural and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Gianluca; Fischer, Jens; Rohr, Nadja

    2016-11-04

    To evaluate a potential correlation between flexural strength and indirect tensile strength in assessing the mechanical strength of resin composite cements. Flexural strength (n = 5) and indirect tensile strength (n = 5) of 7 resin composite cements (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix [RXU], Panavia SA [PSA], Clearfil SA [CSA], Panavia F2.0 [PF2], Multilink Implant [MLI], DuoCem [DCM], Panavia 21 [P21]) were determined. Specimens were either auto-polymerized or dual-cured (except P21) and stored in water at 37 °C for 1 day prior to measurement. Flexural and indirect tensile strength of 4 cements (RXU, PSA, PF2, MLI) was additionally measured directly after curing and after 96 h water storage at 37 °C. Except for PF2, dual-cured specimens achieved higher flexural strength than auto-polymerized specimens. In the indirect tensile strength test differences in auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens were only detected for RXU and DCM. A general non-linear correlation was found between flexural and indirect tensile strength values. However, strength values of auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens did not generally correlate. Flexural strength and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements are correlated. At high strength values the indirect tensile test is less sensitive than the flexural test. The results suggest that the indirect tensile test may only be recommended as a screening test especially for low or medium strength resin composite cements.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.”...

  17. Cementation of Loose Sand Particles based on Bio-cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Hui; QIAN Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Loose sand particles could be cemented to sandstone by bio-cement (microbial induced magnesium carbonate). The bio-sandstone was firstly prepared, and then the compressive strength and the porosity of the sandstone cemented by microbial induced magnesium carbonate were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness. In addition, the formed mineral composition and the microstructure of bio-sandstone were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results show that the feasibility of binding loose sand particles using microbial induced magnesium carbonate precipitation is available and the acquired compressive strength of bio-sandstone can be excellent at certain ages. Moreover, the compressive strength and the porosity could be improved with the increase of microbial induced magnesium carbonate content. XRD results indicate that the morphology of magnesium carbonate induced by microbe appears as needles and SEM results show that the cementation of loose sand particles to sandstone mainly relies on the microbial induced formation of magnesium carbonate precipitation around individual particles and at particle-particle contacts.

  18. Effects of Static Magnetic Fields on the Physical, Mechanical, and Microstructural Properties of Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Soto-Bernal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study carried out to comprehend the physical, mechanical, and microstructural behavior of cement pastes subjected to static magnetic fields while hydrating and setting. The experimental methodology consisted in exposing fresh cement pastes to static magnetic fields at three different magnetic induction strengths: 19.07, 22.22, and 25.37 Gauss. The microstructural characterization makes evident that there are differences in relation to amount and morphology of CSH gel; the amount of CSH is larger and its morphology becomes denser and less porous with higher magnetostatic induction strengths; it also shows the evidence of changes in the mineralogical composition of the hydrated cement pastes. The temperature increasing has no negative effects over the cement paste compressive strength since the magnetostatic field affects the process of hydration through a molecular restructuring process, which makes cement pastes improve microstructurally, with a reduced porosity and a higher mechanical strength.

  19. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

    1995-12-01

    A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

  20. Effects of colemanite waste, coal bottom ash, and fly ash on the properties of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, I.; Olgun, A.; Erdogan, Y.; Sevinc, V. [Celal Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey)

    2001-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties of colemanite ore waste from concentrator, coal bottom ash, fly ash, cement+ash mixtures, cement+colemanite ore waste, and their effects on the mechanical properties of concrete were investigated. These materials with different proportion were substituted with Portland cement. Physical properties such as setting time, volume expansion, and compressive strength were determined and compared to reference mixture and Turkish standards (TS). The results showed that cement replacement materials had clear effects on the mechanical properties. The use of fly ash and bottom ash even at the concentration of 25% showed either comparable or better result compared to reference mixture. Although replacement of Portland cement by 9 wt.% of colemanite ore waste causes reduction in the compressive strength, the values obtained are within the limit of TS. As a result, colemanite ore waste, fly ash, and bottom ash may be used as cementitious materials.

  1. In vitro biodegradation of three brushite calcium phosphate cements by a macrophage cell-line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhidao; Grover, Liam Michael; Huang, Yizhong; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Gbureck, Uwe; Triffitt, James T; Shelton, Richard M; Barralet, Jake E

    2006-09-01

    Depending upon local conditions, brushite (CaHPO4 x 2 H2O) cements may be largely resorbed or (following hydrolysis to hydroxyapatite) remain stable in vivo. To determine which factors influence cement resorption, previous studies have investigated the solution-driven degradation of brushite cements in vitro in the absence of any cells. However, the mechanism of cell-mediated biodegradation of the brushite cement is still unknown. The aim of the current study was to observe the cell-mediated biodegradation of brushite cement formulations in vitro. The cements were aged in the presence of a murine cell line (RAW264.7), which had the potential to form osteoclasts in the presence of the receptor for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) in vitro, independently of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). The cytotoxicity of the cements on RAW264.7 cells and the calcium and phosphate released from materials to the culture media were analysed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy were used to characterise the ultrastructure of the cells. The results showed that the RAW264.7 cell line formed multinucleated TRAP positive osteoclast-like cells, capable of ruffled border formation and lacunar resorption on the brushite calcium phosphate cement in vitro. In the osteoclast-like cell cultures, ultrastructural analysis by SEM revealed phenotypic characteristics of osteoclasts including formation of a sealing zone and ruffled border. Penetration of the surface of the cement, was demonstrated using FIB, and this showed the potential demineralising effect of the cells on the cements. This study has set up a useful model to investigate the cell-mediated cement degradation in vitro.

  2. Successful field implementation of novel cementing solution for ISC wells : case histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meher, R.K.; Suyan, K.M.; Dasgupta, D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)]|[Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Tel Bhavan, Dehradun (India); Deodhar, S.; Sharma, V.; Jain, V.K. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Tel Bhavan, Dehradun (India)

    2008-10-15

    Cementation of in-situ combustion (ISC) wells is challenging since wells are frequently associated with weak and unconsolidated formation. However, cement rise up to surface is desired to prevent casing failure. Moreover, the cement sheath is also required to withstand extreme stresses due to high temperature cycling experienced during in-situ combustion process. In response to the problem of inadequate placement time and flash setting, Portland cement-silica blends were used for cementation of ISC wells in India instead of alumina cement blends. However, the use of the cement-silica blends has resulted in insufficient cement rise because of losses during cementation. The cured cement failed to contain the strength and permeability in course of ISC process causing charge of sub-surface shallower layers. This paper discussed the development and implementation of a non-alumina based thermally stable lightweight lead slurry and a ductile high temperature resistance tail slurry for mitigating these problems. The paper provided details of the study as well as four successful case histories. The cementing practice for ISC wells around the world was first described and illustrated. Next, the paper outlined the formulation of thermally stable tail slurry through laboratory studies. Slurry parameters of the tail slurry were presented, including slurry weight; thickening time; fluid loss; free fluid; and rheology. The paper also reviewed a study of compressive strength and permeability of thermal slurry; slurry parameters of the lightweight lead slurry; and study of compressive strength and permeability of lightweight thermal slurry. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  3. Dual surrogate markers for rapid prediction of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status in advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung: A novel approach in resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Udupa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic lung cancer in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations. Amplified refractory mutation system (ARMS-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, the current standard for detecting EGFR mutation status is time-consuming and highly expensive. Consequently any surrogate test which are cheaper, faster and as accurate as the PCR method will help in early diagnosis and management of patients with lung cancer, especially in resource-limited settings. Materials and Methods: Eighty-five patients, all of South Indian origin, with adenocarcinoma of lung, registered between October 2009 and January 2013, were evaluated for EGFR mutation status by using scorpion probe based ARMS RT-PCR method. Immunohistochemical (IHC was performed using the phosphorylated AKT (P-AKT and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 on above patient's sample, and the results were compared with EGFR mutation tests. Results: EGFR mutation was positive in 34 of 85 patients (40%. P-AKT and TTF-1 were positive in 50 (58.8% and 68 (80% patients respectively. Both P-AKT and TTF-1 had statistically significant correlation with EGFR mutation status. Positive and negative predictive value of P-AKT in diagnosing EGFR mutation was 58% and 85.5% and that for TTF-1 was 48.5% and 94.1%, respectively. The problem of low positive predictive value can partly be overcome by testing P-AKT and TTF-1 simultaneously. Conclusion: P-AKT and TTF-1 using IHC had statistically significant correlation with EGFR mutation with high negative predictive value. In the case of urgency of starting treatment, EGFR mutation testing may be avoided in those patients who are negative for these IHC markers and can be started on chemotherapy.

  4. Dual diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Dual diagnosis denotes intertwining of intellectual disabilities with mental disorders. With the help of systematic examination of literature, intellectual disabilities are determined (they are characterized by subaverage intellectual activity and difficulties in adaptive skills), along side mental disorders. Their influence is seen in changes of thinking, perception, emotionality, behaviour and cognition. Mental disorders often occur with people with intellectual disabilities (data differs f...

  5. A New Fenchel Dual Problem in Vector Optimization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radu Ioan Boţ; Anca Dumitru; Gert Wanka

    2009-04-01

    We introduce a new Fenchel dual for vector optimization problems inspired by the form of the Fenchel dual attached to the scalarized primal multiobjective problem. For the vector primal-dual pair we prove weak and strong duality. Furthermore, we recall two other Fenchel-type dual problems introduced in the past in the literature, in the vector case, and make a comparison among all three duals. Moreover, we show that their sets of maximal elements are equal.

  6. Coagulated silica - a-SiO2 admixture in cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous silica (a-SiO2) in fine-grained form possesses a high pozzolanic activity which makes it a valuable component of blended binders in concrete production. The origin of a-SiO2 applied in cement-based composites is very diverse. SiO2 in amorphous form is present in various amounts in quite a few supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) being used as partial replacement of Portland cement. In this work, the applicability of a commercially produced coagulated silica powder as a partial replacement of Portland cement in cement paste mix design is investigated. Portland cement CEM I 42.5R produced according to the EU standard EN 197-1 is used as a reference binder. Coagulated silica is applied in dosages of 5 and 10 % by mass of cement. The water/binder ratio is kept constant in all the studied pastes. For the applied silica, specific surface area, density, loss on ignition, pozzolanic activity, chemical composition, and SiO2 amorphous phase content are determined. For the developed pastes on the basis of cement-silica blended binder, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density, and total open porosity are accessed. Pore size distribution is determined using MIP analysis. Initial and final setting times of fresh mixtures are measured by automatic Vicat apparatus. Effect of silica admixture on mechanical resistivity is evaluated using compressive strength, bending strength, and dynamic Young's modulus measurement. The obtained data gives evidence of a decreased workability of paste mixtures with silica, whereas the setting process is accelerated. On the other hand, reaction activity of silica with Portland cement minerals results in a slight decrease of porosity and improvement of mechanical resistivity of cement pastes containing a-SiO2.

  7. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  8. Preparation, physical-chemical characterization, and cytocompatibility of polymeric calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashaba, Rania M; Moussa, Mervet; Koch, Christopher; Jurgensen, Arthur R; Missimer, David M; Rutherford, Ronny L; Chutkan, Norman B; Borke, James L

    2011-01-01

    Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control). Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5-12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  9. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naceri, Abdelghani; Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement.

  10. Influence of polymeric additives on the cohesion and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jie; Wolke, Joop G C; Jansen, John A; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2016-03-01

    To expand the clinical applicability of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) to load-bearing anatomical sites, the mechanical and setting properties of CPCs need to be improved. Specifically, organic additives need to be developed that can overcome the disintegration and brittleness of CPCs. Hence, we compared two conventional polymeric additives (i.e. carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) and hyaluronan (HA)) with a novel organic additive that was designed to bind to calcium phosphate, i.e. hyaluronan-bisphosphonate (HABP). The unmodified cement used in this study consisted of a powder phase of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and liquid phase of 4% NaH2PO4·2H2O, while the modified cements were fabricated by adding 0.75 or 1.5 wt% of the polymeric additive to the cement. The cohesion of α-TCP was improved considerably by the addition of CMC and HABP. None of the additives improved the compression and bending strength of the cements, but the addition of 0.75% HABP resulted into a significantly increased cement toughness as compared to the other experimental groups. The stimulatory effects of HABP on the cohesion and toughness of the cements is hypothesized to derive from the strong affinity between the polymer-grafted bisphosphonate ligands and the calcium ions in the cement matrix.

  11. Influence of polymer addition on the mechanical properties of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements can reduce handling complications that are associated with the mixing of cements in the operating room. However, to extend the clinical indication of ceramic cements their mechanical properties need to be further improved. The incorporation of a polymeric material with intrinsically high tensile properties could possibly assist in increasing the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement. In this study polymer microparticles made from poly(lactid-co-glycolide) plasticised with poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PLGA/PEG microparticles) were added in amounts of up to 5 wt% to a premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement. The PLGA/PEG microparticles added undergo a shape transformation at 37 °C, which could give a better integration between polymer microparticles and ceramic cement compared with polymer microparticles lacking this property. The results showed that the incorporation of 1.25 wt% PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the compressive strength by approximately 20% up to 15.1 MPa while the diametral tensile strength was kept constant. The incorporation of PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the brushite to monetite ratio after setting compared with pure ceramic cements. In conclusion, small amounts of PLGA/PEG microparticles can be incorporated into premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement and increase their mechanical properties, which could lead to increased future applications.

  12. Influence of polymer addition on the mechanical properties of a premixed calcium phosphate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements can reduce handling complications that are associated with the mixing of cements in the operating room. However, to extend the clinical indication of ceramic cements their mechanical properties need to be further improved. The incorporation of a polymeric material with intrinsically high tensile properties could possibly assist in increasing the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement. In this study polymer microparticles made from poly(lactid-co-glycolide) plasticised with poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PLGA/PEG microparticles) were added in amounts of up to 5 wt% to a premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement. The PLGA/PEG microparticles added undergo a shape transformation at 37 °C, which could give a better integration between polymer microparticles and ceramic cement compared with polymer microparticles lacking this property. The results showed that the incorporation of 1.25 wt% PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the compressive strength by approximately 20% up to 15.1 MPa while the diametral tensile strength was kept constant. The incorporation of PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the brushite to monetite ratio after setting compared with pure ceramic cements. In conclusion, small amounts of PLGA/PEG microparticles can be incorporated into premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement and increase their mechanical properties, which could lead to increased future applications. PMID:24270588

  13. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  14. Biodeterioration of the Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luptáková, Alena; Eštoková, Adriana; Mačingová, Eva; Kovalčíková, Martina; Jenčárová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The destruction of natural and synthetic materials is the spontaneous and irreversible process of the elements cycling in nature. It can by accelerated or decelerated by physical, chemical and biological influences. Biological influences are represented by the influence of the vegetation and microorganisms (MO). The destruction of cement composites by different MO through the diverse mechanisms is entitled as the concrete biodeterioration. Several sulphur compounds and species of MO are involved in this complex process. Heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic bacteria together with fungi have all been found in samples of corroding cement composites. The MO involved in the process metabolise the presented sulphur compounds (hydrogen sulphide, elemental sulphur etc.) to sulphuric acid reacting with concrete. When sulphuric acid reacts with a concrete matrix, the first step involves a reaction between the acid and the calcium hydroxide forming calcium sulphate. This is subsequently hydrated to form gypsum, the appearance of which on the surface of concrete pipes takes the form of a white, mushy substance which has no cohesive properties. In the continuing attack, the gypsum would react with the calcium aluminate hydrate to form ettringite, an expansive product. The use supplementary cementing composite materials have been reported to improve the resistance of concrete to biodeterioration. The aim of this work was the study of the cement composites biodeterioration by the bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Experimental works were focused on the comparison of special cement composites and its resistance affected by the activities of used sulphur-oxidising

  15. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  16. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  17. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland...

  18. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cement....... According to these experimental results, the acoustic emission measured around setting time was attributed to cavitation events occurring in the pores of the cement paste due to self-desiccation. This paper shows how acoustic emission might be used to indicate the time when the fluid–solid transition occurs...

  19. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  20. Intracoronal sealing ability of two dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John D; Pashley, David H; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Kimbrough, W Frank; Pereira, Patricia N

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of sealing the coronal 2-mm of the root canals versus covering the entire pulpal floor with one of two dental-resin cements (Principle or C&B Metabond). Sixty-two molars with the occlusal half of the crowns and the apical half of the roots removed were used. Each canal was enlarged by using a #3 Gates Glidden bur and obturated with unsealed gutta-percha cones. The teeth were randomly assigned to four groups, each containing 15 teeth, plus a negative and a positive control. In group 1, 2 mm of Principle were placed over the entire pulpal floor. In group 2, Principle was placed 2 mm into each canal orifice. Groups 3 and 4 were the same as groups 1 and 2, except C&B Metabond cement was used. After the cement set, the gutta-percha was removed and the integrity of the seal was tested by fluid filtration at a pressure of 20 cm H2O at 1 h and at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. The data were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests at alpha = 0.05. The controls behaved as expected. Results showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the materials used or the location (p > 0.05), but there was a significant difference with respect to time. Principle leaked significantly more than C&B Metabond at 1 h (p < 0.05), but the seal became tighter over time. C&B Metabond leaked less early (p < 0.05) but increased in leakage at 4 weeks. Both materials sealed well over the 4-week study. Principle was easier to use, and sealing the entire pulpal floor was easier than sealing only the canal orifice.

  1. Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and micromechanics modelling for the evaluation of the poroelastic parameters of a hardened cement paste

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2010-01-01

    The results of a macro-scale experimental study performed on a hardened class G cement paste [Ghabezloo et al. (2008) Cem. Con. Res. (38) 1424-1437] are used in association with the micromechanics modelling and homogenization technique for evaluation of the complete set of poroelastic parameters of the material. The experimental study consisted in drained, undrained and unjacketed isotropic compression tests. Analysis of the experimental results revealed that the active porosity of the studied cement paste is smaller than its total porosity. A multi-scale homogenization model, calibrated on the experimental results, is used to extrapolate the poroelastic parameters to cement pastes prepared with different water-to-cement ratio. The notion of cement paste active porosity is discussed and the poroelastic parameters of hardened cement paste for an ideal, perfectly drained condition are evaluated using the homogenization model.

  2. 76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement clinker...

  3. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United... cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation on the bioactivity of ZnO containing nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.; Yubao, L.; Yi, Z.; Lan, W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    A ZnO containing nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan (n-HA/CS) cement was developed and its bone formation ability was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The physico-chemical properties of the cement were determined in terms of pH variation during and after setting, injectability and wettability. The resul

  5. Application of the Hand-instrument of Measurement of Tyre Gap and Diameter in Cement Rotary Kiln

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This article is concerned with the cement rotary kiln, the hand-instrument of measurements of tyre gap and the outer diameter. The accuracy of measurements of tyre gap and diameter is less than ±1mm. The hand- instrument wins two patents in China. It has been applied to the measurement for 16 sets of cement rotary kiln in China.

  6. rhBMP-2 release from injectable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium-phosphate cement composites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, P.Q.; Hedberg, E.L.; Padron, N.T.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In bone tissue engineering, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are frequently used as a delivery vehicle for bioactive molecules. Calcium phosphate cement is an injectable, osteoconductive, and degradable bone cement that sets in situ. The objective of this study was

  7. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weiwei; Sun, Tao; Li, Xinping; Sun, Mian; Lu, Yani

    2016-08-01

    Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm-1 after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  8. QCD Dual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We uncover a novel solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for QCD. Interestingly in the perturbative regime the new gauge theory, if interpreted as a possible QCD dual, predicts the critical number of flavors above which QCD in the nonperturbative regime, develops an infrared stable...... fixed point. Remarkably this value is identical to the maximum bound predicted in the nonpertubative regime via the all-orders conjectured beta function for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories.......We uncover a novel solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for QCD. Interestingly in the perturbative regime the new gauge theory, if interpreted as a possible QCD dual, predicts the critical number of flavors above which QCD in the nonperturbative regime, develops an infrared stable...

  9. PERFORMANCE OF PULVERIZED SLAG-SUBSTITUTED CEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The Portland cement is equivalently substituted by slag micropowders with various specific areas. The workability,activity and acid-corrosion resistance of the slag-substituted cements are investigated,the activation of gypsum is discussed,also the porosity and pore distribution of mortars of the slag micropowders cement are determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  10. Cementation in adhesive dentistry: the weakest link

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Het succesvol bevestigen van tandrestauraties is een belangrijke en veeleisende procedure. Met behulp van cement wordt het restauratiemateriaal aan de tandstructuur verbonden. Op die manier worden twee hechtvlakken gecreëerd: het raakvlak tussen tand en cement, en het raakvlak tussen cement en resta

  11. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  12. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  13. Effect of Mixing on Properties and Microstructure of Magnesium Oxychloride Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhenhui; YANG Hongjian; SONG Hui; GUO Tao; WU Songyi

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the effect of mixing on the properties of magnesium oxychloride cement, such as ap-parent viscosity, setting time, compressive strength, and specific strength as well. The phase composition and crystallo-graphic structure of the cement were determined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results in-dicate that the increases of stirring rate and mixing time change apparent viscosity distinctly, shorten setting time and enhance mechanical property. Magnesium oxychloride cement after mixing for 20 min exhibits the optimal mechanical performance. The effect of stirring rate on the phase composition of magnesium oxychloride cement dominates over the effect of mixing time. The increases of stirring rate and mixing time can increase the dispersion state and accelerate the neutralization, thus promoting the strength of magnesium oxychloride cement due to the formation of stable 5·1·8 phase, needle-like crystals and continuous crystalline structure in the whole cement matrix. The properties and microstructure of magnesium oxychloride cement at a stirring rate of 280 rpm are better than those at 140 rpm.

  14. Effect of Mixing on Properties and Microstructure of Magnesium Oxychloride Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Zhenhui; YANG; Hongjian; SONG; Hui; GUO; Tao; WU; Songyi

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the effect of mixing on the properties of magnesium oxychloride cement, such as apparent viscosity, setting time, compressive strength, and specific strength as well. The phase composition and crystallographic structure of the cement were determined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the increases of stirring rate and mixing time change apparent viscosity distinctly, shorten setting time and enhance mechanical property. Magnesium oxychloride cement after mixing for 20 min exhibits the optimal mechanical performance. The effect of stirring rate on the phase composition of magnesium oxychloride cement dominates over the effect of mixing time. The increases of stirring rate and mixing time can increase the dispersion state and accelerate the neutralization, thus promoting the strength of magnesium oxychloride cement due to the formation of stable 5·1·8 phase, needle-like crystals and continuous crystalline structure in the whole cement matrix. The properties and microstructure of magnesium oxychloride cement at a stirring rate of 280 rpm are better than those at 140 rpm.

  15. Polymeric-Calcium Phosphate Cement Composites-Material Properties: In Vitro and In Vivo Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashaba, Rania M.; Moussa, Mervet M.; Mettenburg, Donald J.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Chutkan, Norman B.; Borke, James L.

    2010-01-01

    New polymeric calcium phosphate cement composites (CPCs) were developed. Cement powder consisting of 60 wt% tetracalcium phosphate, 30 wt% dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and 10 wt% tricalcium phosphate was combined with either 35% w/w poly methyl vinyl ether maleic acid or polyacrylic acid to obtain CPC-1 and CPC-2. The setting time and compressive and diametral tensile strength of the CPCs were evaluated and compared with that of a commercial hydroxyapatite cement. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of the two CPCs and hydroxyapatite cement were assessed. The setting time of the cements was 5–15 min. CPC-1 and CPC-2 showed significantly higher compressive and diametral strength values compared to hydroxyapatite cement. CPC-1 and CPC-2 were equivalent to Teflon controls after 1 week. CPC-1, CPC-2, and hydroxyapatite cement elicited a moderate to intense inflammatory reaction at 7 days which decreased over time. CPC-1 and CPC-2 show promise for orthopedic applications. PMID:20811498

  16. Incorporation of a controlled-release glass into a calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairoun, I; Boltong, M G; Gil, F J; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Seijas, M M; Martínez, S

    1999-04-01

    A so-called controlled-release glass was synthesized occurring in the system CaO-Na2O-P2O5. A certain sieve fraction of this glass was incorporated in a calcium phosphate cement, of which the powder contained alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP), dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and precipitated hydroxyapatite (HA). The glass appeared to retard the cement setting slightly and it reduced considerably the compressive strength after aging in aqueous solutions which were continuously refreshed. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the samples after 5 weeks of aging showed that the glass was not dissolved but that large brushite crystals were formed. Thereby, aging in CaCl2 solutions resulted in more brushite formation than aging in NaCl solutions. The brushite crystals did not reinforce the cement. Neither was the aged glass-containing cement weaker than it was before the brushite formation right after complete setting. In conclusion, the incorporation of controlled-release glasses into a calcium phosphate cement and subsequent aging in aqueous solutions did not result in the formation of macropores in the cement structure, but that of brushite crystals. This incorporation reduced the compressive strength of the cement considerably.

  17. Polymeric-Calcium Phosphate Cement Composites-Material Properties: In Vitro and In Vivo Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Khashaba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New polymeric calcium phosphate cement composites (CPCs were developed. Cement powder consisting of 60 wt% tetracalcium phosphate, 30 wt% dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and 10 wt% tricalcium phosphate was combined with either 35% w/w poly methyl vinyl ether maleic acid or polyacrylic acid to obtain CPC-1 and CPC-2. The setting time and compressive and diametral tensile strength of the CPCs were evaluated and compared with that of a commercial hydroxyapatite cement. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of the two CPCs and hydroxyapatite cement were assessed. The setting time of the cements was 5–15 min. CPC-1 and CPC-2 showed significantly higher compressive and diametral strength values compared to hydroxyapatite cement. CPC-1 and CPC-2 were equivalent to Teflon controls after 1 week. CPC-1, CPC-2, and hydroxyapatite cement elicited a moderate to intense inflammatory reaction at 7 days which decreased over time. CPC-1 and CPC-2 show promise for orthopedic applications.

  18. Loading and release of doxycycline hyclate from strontium-substituted calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, M Hamdan; Rueda, C; Cabrejos-Azama, J; Lucas-Aparicio, J; Mariño, F Tamimi; Torres García-Denche, J; Jerez, L Blanco; Gbureck, U; Cabarcos, E Lopez

    2010-04-01

    Novel Sr-substituted calcium phosphate cement (CPC) loaded with doxycycline hyclate (DOXY-h) was employed to elucidate the effect of strontium substitution on antibiotic delivery. The cement was prepared using as reactants Sr-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate (Sr-beta-TCP) and acidic monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. Two different methods were used to load DOXY-h: (i) the adsorption on CPC by incubating the set cement in drug-containing solutions; and (ii) the use of antibiotic solution as the cement liquid phase. The results revealed that the Sr-substituted cement efficiently adsorbs the antibiotic, which is attributed to an enhanced accessibility to the drug-binding sites within this CPC. DOXY-h desorption is influenced by the initial adsorbed amount and the cement matrix type. Furthermore, the fraction of drug released from CPCs set with DOXY-h solution was higher, and the release rate was faster for the CPC prepared with 26.7% Sr-beta-TCP. The analysis of releasing profiles points to Fickian diffusion as the mechanism responsible for antibiotic delivery. We can conclude that Sr substitution in secondary calcium phosphate cements improves their efficiency for DOXY-h adsorption and release. The antibiotic loading method provides a way to switch from rapid and complete to slower and prolonged drug release. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of various amount of diatomaceous earth used as cement substitute on mechanical properties of cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Medved, Igor; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Zahálková, Jana; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Active silica containing materials in the sub-micrometer size range are commonly used for modification of strength parameters and durability of cement based composites. In addition, these materials also assist to accelerate cement hydration. In this paper, two types of diatomaceous earths are used as partial cement replacement in composition of cement paste mixtures. For raw binders, basic physical and chemical properties are studied. The chemical composition of tested materials is determined using classical chemical analysis combined with XRD method that allowed assessment of SiO2 amorphous phase content. For all tested mixtures, initial and final setting times are measured. Basic physical and mechanical properties are measured on hardened paste samples cured 28 days in water. Here, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive and flexural strength, are measured. Relationship between compressive strength and total open porosity is studied using several empirical models. The obtained results give evidence of high pozzolanic activity of tested diatomite earths. Their application leads to the increase of both initial and final setting times, decrease of compressive strength, and increase of flexural strength.

  20. Rheology of cement mixtures with dolomite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez de la Cuesta, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental program has studied the behavior of fresh paste made up from cements mixed with dolomite filler. Through prior experiments the starting point is obtained for the designs 22 and 23 factorials. With these designs the governing equations are established that influence the specific surface of the filler, the filler percentage and the ratio water/(cement + filler, used as objective functions: test probe penetration, flow on table and shear stress in viscometer. Also the type of rheological conduct is determined and the influence over initial and final setting is observed.

    Este programa experimental estudia el comportamiento de las pastas frescas fabricadas a partir de cementos mezclados con filler dolomítico. En los experimentos previos se obtiene el punto central para los diseños 22 y 23 factoriales. Con estos diseños se establecen las ecuaciones que rigen la influencia de la superficie específica del filler, el porcentaje de filler y la relación agua/(cemento + filler, utilizando como funciones objetivos la penetración de sonda, la mesa de sacudidas y la tensión de corte en el viscosímetro. También se determina el tipo de conducta reológica y la influencia sobre el principio y fin de fraguado.

  1. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  2. Slurry circulation after cement compression operations; Circulacao de pasta apos operacoes de compressao de cimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Clavio Roberto S. [PETROBRAS, BA (Brazil). Regiao de Producao da Bahia. Divisao Regional de Complementacao

    1994-07-01

    In the traditional low pressure cement compression method, after pressure stabilization we wait for the setting and remove the hardened cement with a rock bit. The method described here suggests that following pressure stabilization, the slurry must be removed from the casing with reverse circulation, thus excluding the whole process of cutting hardened cement, optimizing rig time and equipment wear, and anticipating oil production. This work describes this experience in Reconcavo basin, Potiguar basin, and Campos basin, production regions of PETROBRAS, and suggests slurry parameters and a methodology to employ the method. (author)

  3. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  4. Vibrational study on the bioactivity of Portland cement-based materials for endodontic use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, P.; Tinti, A.; Gandolfi, M. G.; Rossi, P. L.; Prati, C.

    2009-04-01

    The bioactivity of a modified Portland cement (wTC) and a phosphate-doped wTC cement (wTC-P) was studied at 37 °C in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). The cements, prepared as disks, were analysed at different ageing times (from 1 day to 2 months) by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopies. The presence of deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes as a function of the storage time were investigated. The presence of an apatite deposit on the surface of both cements was already revealed after one day of ageing in DPBS. The trend of the I 965/I 991 Raman intensity ratio indicated the formation of a meanly thicker apatite deposit on the wTC-P cement at all the investigated times. This result was confirmed by the trend of the I 1030/I 945 IR intensity ratio calculated until 14 days of ageing. At 2 months, the thickness of the apatite deposit on wTC and wTC-P was about 200 and 500 μm, respectively, as estimated by micro-Raman spectroscopy, confirming the higher bioactivity of the phosphate-doped cement. Vibrational techniques allowed to gain more insights into the cement transformation and the different hydration rates of the various cement component. The setting of the cement and the formation of the hydrated silicate gel (C-S-H phase) was spectroscopically monitored through the I 830/I 945 IR intensity ratio.

  5. Thoughts on the Current Cement Industry Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhihe

    2003-01-01

    According to the analysis of cement capacity andits relations with macro economy running index, the mainreasons for the present rapid development of cement capacityare the rapid development of economy and the shot up ofwhole society fixed asset investment. According to the presentspeed of economy development, cement still enjoys a po-tential increase, So here has not been an overall excessivepopularity of cement industry. The best way to prevent lowlevel repeated construction is to promote the development ofnew dry- process cement as well as try to get rid of blindness.

  6. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  7. Understanding cement mechanical behavior in SAGD wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J.; Zahacy, T. A. [C-FER Technologies (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, the steam assisted gravity drainage process is often used to enhance oil recovery but it can cause cracks in the cement sheath. These cracks are the result of high steam temperatures and thermal expansion. In order to mitigate this risk, improved well designs are required. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanical behavior of the cement sheath during the heating phase. An analysis of the impact of design and operating parameters was conducted through thermal hydraulic and thermal mechanical analyses to assess cement integrity. These analyses were then performed on an example of an SAGD project in the southern part of the Athabasca oilsands region to assess the performance of the cement sheath. Results showed that potential damage to the cement can be reduced by slow heating and a lower Young's modulus cement blend. This paper makes recommendations for optimizing cement design in thermal recovery wells.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF THE COMPLEX CHEMICAL ADDITIVE CONTAINING THE STRUCTURED CARBON NANOMATERIAL ON PROPERTIES OF CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Sheyda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on influence of domestic complex chemical additive containing structured carbon nanomaterial and characterized by a combination effect (curing acceleration and plasticizing on cement and cement stone properties. The purpose of the investigations, on the one hand, has been to confirm efficacy of УКД-1additive from the perspective for increasing the rate of gain, strength growth of cement concrete and additive influence on setting time with the purpose to preserve molding properties of concrete mixes in time, and on the other hand, that is to assess “mechanism” of the УКД-1 additive action in the cement concrete. The research results have revealed regularities in changes due to the additive of water requirements and time period of the cement setting. The reqularities are considered as a pre-requisite for relevant changes in molding properties of the concrete mixes. The paper also experimentally substantiates the possibility to decrease temperature of cement concrete heating with the УДК-1 additive. It has been done with the purpose to save energy resources under production conditions. In addition to this the paper proves the efficiency of the additive which is expressed in strength increase of cement stone up to 20–40 % in the rated age (28 days that is considered as a basis for strength growth of cement concrete. The paper confirms a hypothesis on physical nature of this phenomenon because the X-ray phase analysis method has shown that there are no changes in morphology of portland cement hydration products under the action of the additive agent containing a structured carbon nanomaterial. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations on УКД-1 additive efficiency have been proved by industrial approbation while fabricating precast concrete products and construction of monolithic structures under plant industrial conditions (Minsk, SS “Stroyprogress” JSC MAPID and on

  9. Manufacture Of Pozzolanic Cement From RFCC Spent Catalyst In Khartoum Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam E Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolana is defined as Siliceous and aluminous material which reacts with calcium hydroxide in presence of water at room temperature to form strong slow-hardening cement. Pozzolana has the advantage of reduction of leachibility of calcium hydroxide liberated during the setting and hydration of cement. In Khartoum Refinery five to ten tons per week of spent catalyst are produced in fine powder this quantity is sent to dumping sites or landfills. In this study pilot experiments were successfully carried out at different ratios to produce cement. The RFCC spent catalyst samples were subjected to chemical analysis to determine the content of Al2O3 SiO3TiO3 CaO and V2O5 ..etc. These were found to be 49.5 41.1 0.32 1.4 and 0.09 percent respectively other compounds are Na2O MgO P2O5SO3 K2O MnOFe2O3Co3O4 and NiO2 with. It is found that the percentages of SiO2 Al2O3 and Fe2O3 amount up to 91.5 that is above the ASTM standard C6182003 which stipulated that the minimum of such compound is 70 . Physical properties of RFCC spent catalyst were also carried out including crystallinity and Pozzolanicity index. The cement produced was tested for compressive strength consistency and setting time .It is concluded that RFCC spent catalyst in Khartoum Refinery is a Pozzolanic material and up to 30 replacement from Portland cement blended cement complies with the Sudanese and European Standards No SSMO 39982011and EN-197-11992 respectively. The study shows that the compressive strength of blended Pozzolanic cements decreases with increasing Pozzolana content. From the foregoing it is recommended to use RFCC spent catalyst with Portland cement as blended cement to produce mortars for construction and concrete.

  10. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    LIN, JIE; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coat...

  11. In vitro performance assessment of new brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr-substituted beta-TCP bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, S; Vieira, S I; Torres, P M C; Goetz-Neunhoeffer, F; Neubauer, J; da Cruz E Silva, O A B; da Cruz E Silva, E F; Ferreira, J M F

    2010-08-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro performance of brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr-substituted beta-TCP bone cements in terms of wet mechanical strength and biological response. Quantitative phase analysis and structural refinement of the powdered samples were performed by X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement technique. Initial and final setting times of the cement pastes, measured using Gilmore needles technique, showed that ZnSrCPC sets faster than ZnCPC. The measured values of the wet strength after 48 h of immersion in PBS solution at 37 degrees C showed that ZnSrCPC cements are stronger than ZnCPC cements. Human osteosarcoma-derived MG63 cell line proved the nontoxicity of the cement powders, using the resazurin metabolic assay.

  12. Elucidation of real-time hardening mechanisms of two novel high-strength calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Valery V; Rau, Julietta V; Generosi, Amanda; Albertini, Valerio Rossi; Ferro, Daniela; Barinov, Sergey M

    2010-04-01

    Despite the numerous literature data available in the field of calcium phosphate bone cements, the mechanism and kinetics of their hardening, both of which are of great importance for cements application, in most cases, is unknown. In this work, the mechanism and kinetics of hardening of two novel high-strength calcium phosphate bone cements were studied using the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, which allows rapid collection of the patterns. The phase transformations occurring on the setting and hardening processes were monitored in situ. Containing minimal quantity of components, whose mixing leads to the formation of cements with pH close to neutral, the cements under study are simple in handling. The main component of both formulations is tetracalcium phosphate. In both cements, the effect of the addition of high- and low-molecular weight chitosan on phase development and kinetics was investigated in detail. One of the cements has the compressive strength of about 70 MPa, whereas the strength of the other, containing Ca(3)Al(2)O(6), is much higher, about 100 MPa. This latter cement could be regarded as an alternative to the common low-strength bioresorbable brushite cements.

  13. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying-Fang; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials.

  14. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Cementation is a very useful process to solidify radioactive wastes. Depending on the waste it can be necessary to use of chemical additives (admixtures) to improve the cementation process and its product. Admixtures are materials, other than cement, aggregate and water, that are added either before or during the mixing to alter some properties, such as workability, curing temperature range, and setting time. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. In this changeable scenario it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their characteristics. In this research the effects of chemical admixtures in the solidification process has been studied. For the tests it was prepared a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste, cemented by two different formulations, and three chemical admixtures from two manufacturers. The tested admixtures were accelerators, set retarders and super plasticizers. The experiments were organized by a planning factorial 23 to quantify the effects of formulations, of the admixtures, its quantity and manufacturer in properties of the paste and products. The measured parameters were the density, the viscosity and the setting time of the paste, and the product compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  15. Bioactive materials improve some physical properties of a MTA-like cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Ledesma, A; Barceló Santana, F; Bucio, L; Arenas-Alatorre, J A; Faraji, M; Wintergerst, A M

    2017-02-01

    One of the main disadvantages of MTA is its long setting time which could result in higher solubility and microleakage, producing a failed treatment. Studies have shown that the addition of bioactive glass may decrease the setting time. The aim of this study is to evaluate the compressive strength, setting time, solubility and radiopacity of a MTAlike experimental cement to which different percentage of wollastonite and bioactive glass are added. White MTA Angelus® was used as control; an experimental MTA-like cement (ExpC) was prepared using white Portland cement with 20wt% of Bi2O3; three wollastonite cement composites were prepared adding 10, 20 and 30wt% of wollastonite to ExpC, and three more adding the same proportions of bioactive glass. Compressive strength was tested according to ADA 30; radiopacity, setting time and solubility were tested according to ISO 6876. SEM observations of the surface were made after the solubility test. Compressive strength, setting time, solubility and radiopacity were reduced as the wollastonite increased; solubility increased with the addition of bioactive glass. The surfaces of MTA Angelus® and ExpC were smoother than Wollastonite and Bioactive glass groups. Addition of wollastonite and bioactive glass improved the physical properties of a MTA-like experimental cement, reducing the setting time with good solubility percentages, which would be an advantage in its clinical use.

  16. Novel tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate composite bone cement having high compressive strength, in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjuan; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Although inorganic bone cements such as calcium phosphate cements have been widely applied in orthopaedic and dental fields because of their self-setting ability, development of high-strength bone cement with bioactivity and biodegradability remains a major challenge. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prepare a tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate (C3S/MPC) composite bone cement, which is intended to combine the excellent bioactivity of C3S with remarkable self-setting properties and mechanical strength of MPC. The self-setting and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation and degradation behaviour, and cytocompatibility of the composite cements were investigated. Our results showed that the C3S/MPC composite cement with an optimal composition had compressive strength up to 87 MPa, which was significantly higher than C3S (25 MPa) and MPC (64 MPa). The setting time could be adjusted between 3 min and 29 min with the variation of compositions. The hydraulic reaction products of the C3S/MPC composite cement were composed of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) derived from the hydration of C3S and gel-like amorphous substance. The C3S/MPC composite cements could induce apatite mineralization on its surface in SBF solution and degraded gradually in Tris-HCl solution. Besides, the composite cements showed good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. Our results indicated that the C3S/MPC composite bone cement might be a new promising high-strength inorganic bioactive material which may hold the potential for bone repair in load-bearing site.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of Cement Replacement Fillers on the Performance of Slurry Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Mansour; Alrezaei, Hossein Ali; Naji Almasi, Soroush

    2016-10-01

    Reducing the level of roads service is a process that starts from the first day of the operation of road and the slope of deterioration curve of road sustainability becomes faster with the passage of time. After building the road, adopting an economic approach in order to maintain the road is very important. Slurry seal as one type of protective asphalts that works by sealing inactive cracks of the road and increasing skid resistance is the most effective types of restoration with environmentally friendly behaviour. Fillers are responsible for adjusting set time in slurry seal. Cement is the most common filler used in slurry seal. Cements having suitable properties as a filler, has a very energy demanding manufacturing process and a notable amount of energy is used for manufacturing cement in the country annually. On the other hand, manufacturing process and application of cement have increased levels of pollutant gases, followed by significant environmental pollution. So in this study other options as a filler such as hydrated lime, stone powder and the slag from iron melting furnace were compared with two common types of cement (Portland and type-v cement) in the mixtures of slurry seal by wet abrasion and cohesion tests. Results indicated that, in both tests, lime and slag fillers had behaviours close to the cement filler.

  18. The use of glass powder as a partial Portland cement replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Finely grinded waste glass powder can become material having suitable properties from the point of view of particle size and pozzolanic activity. Glass powder incorporation into cement paste and cement-based composites can bring improvement in porous structure resulting in increased mechanical strength and durability characteristics. On this account, two types of recycled glass powder are investigated in the presented paper as a possible partial Portland cement substitutes in cement blends. For raw glass powders, basic physical parameters and chemical composition are measured. The studied glass powders are applied as 5, 10 and 20 mass% of Portland cement replacement in cement paste mix composition, whereas water/binder ratio of 0.3 is used for all studied pastes. Fresh paste mixtures are characterized using initial and final setting time measurement. For hardened pastes cured 28 days in water, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity and mechanical properties represented by flexural and compressive strength are accessed. Portlandite consumption by the pozzolanic reaction is monitored with TGA. The obtained results show effectiveness of a borosilicate glass powder that acts as a pozzolanic active admixture. This resulted in improvement of mechanical characteristics for cement substitution up to 10 mass%.

  19. Dual-Schemata Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tadahiro; Sawaragi, Tetsuo

    In this paper, a new machine-learning method, called Dual-Schemata model, is presented. Dual-Schemata model is a kind of self-organizational machine learning methods for an autonomous robot interacting with an unknown dynamical environment. This is based on Piaget's Schema model, that is a classical psychological model to explain memory and cognitive development of human beings. Our Dual-Schemata model is developed as a computational model of Piaget's Schema model, especially focusing on sensori-motor developing period. This developmental process is characterized by a couple of two mutually-interacting dynamics; one is a dynamics formed by assimilation and accommodation, and the other dynamics is formed by equilibration and differentiation. By these dynamics schema system enables an agent to act well in a real world. This schema's differentiation process corresponds to a symbol formation process occurring within an autonomous agent when it interacts with an unknown, dynamically changing environment. Experiment results obtained from an autonomous facial robot in which our model is embedded are presented; an autonomous facial robot becomes able to chase a ball moving in various ways without any rewards nor teaching signals from outside. Moreover, emergence of concepts on the target movements within a robot is shown and discussed in terms of fuzzy logics on set-subset inclusive relationships.

  20. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    A clinical validation study was conducted to determine the performance of a new bioactive dental cement (Ceramir C&B, Doxa Dental AB) for permanent cementation. The cement is a new formulation class, which is a hybrid material comprised of calcium aluminate and glass-ionomer components. A total of 38 crowns and bridges were cemented in 17 patients; 31 of the abutment teeth were vital and seven were non-vital. Six restorations were bridges with a total of 14 abutment teeth (12 vital/ two non-vital). One fixed splint comprising two abutment teeth was also included. Preparation parameters were recorded, as well as cement characteristics such as working time, setting time, seating characteristics, and ease of cement removal. Baseline data were recorded for the handling of the cement, gingival inflammation, and pre-cementation sensitivity. Post-cementation parameters included post-cementation sensitivity, gingival tissue reaction, marginal integrity, and discoloration. All patients were seen for recall examinations at 30 days and 6 months. Fifteen of 17 subjects and 13 of 17 patients were also available for subsequent comprehensive 1- and 2-year recall examination, and 13 patients were available for a 3-year recall examination. Restorations available for the 3-year recall examination included 14 single-unit full-coverage crown restorations, four three-unit bridges comprising eight abutments, and one two-unit splint. Three-year recall data yielded no loss of retention, no secondary caries, no marginal discolorations, and no subjective sensitivity. All restorations rated excellent for marginal integrity. Average visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tooth sensitivity decreased from 7.63 mm at baseline to 0.44 mm at 6-month recall, 0.20 mm at 1-year recall, and 0.00 mm at 2- and 3-year recall. Average gingival index (GI) score for gingival inflammation decreased from 0.56 at baseline to 0.11 at 6-month recall, 0.16 at 1-year recall, 0.21 at 2-year recall, and 0.07 at 3

  1. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: a novel solution to the exothermicity problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-10-01

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions.

  2. Impact of Nano-Cr2O3 Addition on the Properties of Aluminous Cements Containing Spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Otroj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of nano-Cr2O3 addition on the properties of aluminous cement containing MgAl2O4 spinel was investigated. For this reason, the raw dolomite was used as raw material along with calcined alumina for the preparation of the aluminous cement. Then, the compositions containing different amounts of nano-Cr2O3 particles were fired at   1450 °C and their mineralogical compositions and microstructures were investigated. The setting times of prepared cements were measured after grounding and ball-milling. Besides, the slag resistance of refractory castables containing prepared cements was evaluated. The results showed that nano-Cr2O3 addition has effect on the increasing of spinel and CA2 and decreasing of CA and C12A7 phases in the cement composition. The decreasing of C12A7 leads to increasing of setting times of cement. Besides, the slag resistance of refractory castables containing prepared cements is improved due to increasing of spinel and decreasing of C12A7 amount in the cement composition.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5211

  3. Occupational hand dermatitis among cement workers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bour-Jr Wang

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that occupational cement hand dermatitis among cement workers is an important and severe issue in Taiwan, and the most common allergens among cement workers are potassium dichromate, thiuram mix, fragrance mix and cobalt chloride. The high positive rate of chromium hypersensitivity among cement workers reflects the urgency to regulate the addition of ferrous sulfate to cement in Taiwan.

  4. Dual mobility total hip replacement in a high risk population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Jatinder Singh; Al Riyami, Amur; Allami, Mohamad Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate results of dual mobility total replacement in a high risk population who take hip into hyperflexed position while sitting and praying on the floor. Method: The study included 65 (35 primary total replacement and 30 complex total hip replacement) cases of total hip replacement using avantage privilege dual mobility cup system from biomet. A cemented acetabular component and on femoral side a bimetric stem, either cemented or uncemented used depending on the canal type. Ten cases were examined fluoroscopically in follow up. Result: There was dislocation in one patient undergoing complex hip replacement. Fluoroscopy study showed no impingement between the neck of prosthesis and acetabular shell at extremes of all movements. Conclusion: The prevalence of dislocation is low in our high risk population and we consider it preferred concept for patients undergoing complex total hip replacement. PMID:27924742

  5. Dual mobility total hip replacement in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthra Jatinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate results of dual mobility total replacement in a high risk population who take hip into hyperflexed position while sitting and praying on the floor. Method: The study included 65 (35 primary total replacement and 30 complex total hip replacement cases of total hip replacement using avantage privilege dual mobility cup system from biomet. A cemented acetabular component and on femoral side a bimetric stem, either cemented or uncemented used depending on the canal type. Ten cases were examined fluoroscopically in follow up. Result: There was dislocation in one patient undergoing complex hip replacement. Fluoroscopy study showed no impingement between the neck of prosthesis and acetabular shell at extremes of all movements. Conclusion: The prevalence of dislocation is low in our high risk population and we consider it preferred concept for patients undergoing complex total hip replacement.

  6. Changes in degree of conversion and microhardness of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong Li; Kim, Young Kyung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies available on the post-light activation or post-mix polymerization of dental resin cements as a function of time. This in vitro study evaluated the successive changes in the degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness during polymerization of six commercial resin cements (light-cured [Choice 2, RelyX Veneer], chemical-cured [Multilink, C&B Cement] and dual-cured [Calibra, RelyX ARC]) within the first 24 hours and up to seven days. Resin specimens were prepared for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness testing to determine the DC and Vickers hardness (VH), respectively. The light-cured materials or mixed pastes of the dual-cured materials were irradiated with a light-curing unit (Elipar TriLight) through a precured composite overlay for 40 seconds. The FTIR spectra and microhardness readings were taken at specified times: 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes; 24 hours and after two days and seven days. According to the FTIR study, most of the curing reaction of Choice 2 and RelyX Veneer occurred within 10 and 30 minutes, respectively. Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra exhibited gradual increases in the DC up to 24 hours, with no further statistically significant increase (p > 0.05). RelyX ARC attained a DC value within five minutes, similar to that at seven days (p > 0.05). Choice 2 and RelyXARC showed gradual increases in the VH, up to 15 minutes, with no further significant change over the remaining observation time (p > 0.05). For RelyX Veneer, Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra, there were no significant increases in the VH value after 24 hours (p > 0.05). The light-cured materials produced significantly higher DC values than the chemical-cured materials (p < 0.05). The DC values of the two dual-cured resin cements were significantly different from each other (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the significant polymerization reaction was finished within 24 hours post-mix or post-light activation for all resin

  7. Pairs of dual periodic frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Goh, Say Song

    2012-01-01

    is needed. The purpose of the present paper is to provide constructions of dual pairs of frames in the setting of the Hilbert space of periodic functions L2(0,2π). The frames constructed are given explicitly as trigonometric polynomials, which allows for an efficient calculation of the coefficients...

  8. Novel magnesium phosphate cements with high early strength and antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Gemma; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2011-04-01

    Magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) have been extensively used as fast setting repair cements in civil engineering. They have properties that are also relevant to biomedical applications, such as fast setting, early strength acquisition and adhesive properties. However, there are some aspects that should be improved before they can be used in the human body, namely their highly exothermic setting reaction and the release of potentially harmful ammonia or ammonium ions. In this paper a new family of MPCs was explored as candidate biomaterials for hard tissue applications. The cements were prepared by mixing magnesium oxide (MgO) with either sodium dihydrogen phosphate (NaH(2)PO(4)) or ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (NH(4)H(2)PO(4)), or an equimolar mixture of both. The exothermia and setting kinetics of the new cement formulations were tailored to comply with clinical requirements by adjusting the granularity of the phosphate salt and by using sodium borate as a retardant. The ammonium-containing MPC resulted in struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) as the major reaction product, whereas the MPC prepared with sodium dihydrogen phosphate resulted in an amorphous product. Unreacted magnesium oxide was found in all the formulations. The MPCs studied showed early compressive strengths substantially higher than that of apatitic calcium phosphate cements. The Na-containing MPCs were shown to have antibacterial activity against Streptococcus sanguinis, which was attributed to the alkaline pH developed during the setting reaction.

  9. Technology Roadmap: Low-Carbon Technology for the Indian Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The Indian cement industry is one of the most efficient in the world. Its efforts to reduce its carbon footprint by adopting the best available technologies and environmental practices are reflected in the achievement of reducing total CO2 emissions to an industrial average of 0.719 tCO2/t cement in 2010 from a substantially higher level of 1.12 tCO2/t cement in 1996. However, because the manufacturing process relies on the burning of limestone, it still produced 137 MtCO2 in 2010 – approximately 7% of India’s total man-made CO2 emissions. Yet opportunity for improvement exists, particularly in relation to five key levers that can contribute to emissions reductions: alternative fuel and raw materials; energy efficiency; clinker substitution; waste heat recovery and newer technologies. This roadmap sets out one pathway by which the Indian cement industry can reach its targets to improve energy efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions by 2050, thereby laying the foundation for low-carbon growth in the years beyond. The Technology Roadmap: Low-Carbon Technology for the Indian Cement Industry builds on the global IEA technology roadmap for the cement sector developed by the IEA and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development’s Cement Sustainability Initiative. It outlines a possible transition path for the Indian cement industry to reduce its direct CO2 emissions intensity to 0.35 tCO2/t cement and support the global goal of halving CO2 emissions by 2050.

  10. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Substitutionen af fossilt med alternativt brændsel i cement produktionen er steget betydeligt i den sidste dekade. Af disse nye alternative brændsler, udgør de faste brændsler p.t. den største andel, hvor kød- og benmel, plastic og dæk i særdeleshed har været de alternative brændsler der har bidraget med mest alternativ brændsels energi til den tyske cement industri. De nye alternative brændsler er typisk karakteriseret ved et højt indhold af flygtige bestanddele og adskiller sig typisk fra t...

  11. 区间值对偶犹豫模糊集的距离测度及其在多属性决策中的应用%Distance Measures for Interval-valued Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Sets and its Applicationto Multi-Attribute Decision Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金英; 韩晓冰

    2015-01-01

    基于区间值对偶犹豫模糊集的定义,提出了距离测度的公理化定义,给出了区间值对偶犹豫模糊集的各种距离测度的公式,如Hamming距离测度、Euclidean距离测度和Hausdorff距离测度,最后,通过一个实际案例研究了距离测度在多属性决策中的应用。%Based on the definition of interval-valued dual hesitate fuzzy sets, the axiomatic definition of distance measure is proposed, the various distance measure formulas of interval-valued dual hesitate fuzzy sets are given, such as Hamming distance measures, Euclidean distance measures and Hausdorff distance measures, finally, the distance measure is applied to multiple attribute decision making through a practical example.

  12. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar was investigated in a range of temperatures and cesium concentrations. {yields} The pseudo-second order kinetic model produced a good fit with the experimental kinetic data. {yields} Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. {yields} The interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar was dominated by chemical adsorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L{sup -1} and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L{sup -1} while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol{sup -1} suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  13. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  14. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    pastes have shown that the matrix is microporous; mesopores are absent unless the material is allowed to dry out. This results in water adsorption at low...only to water. When subsequently dried a portion of3 the porosity is converted to larger mesopores . • Only about one third of the cement reacts in a...Frictional sliding, in this case was characterized by a decreasing slope in the loading curve followed by hysteresis in the unload/reloading curves

  15. Effects of Specimen Height on the Acoustic Emission Rate Value ‘a’ for Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; HU Hongxiang; LU Guijuan; CHEN Shijie; LIU Shaojun; WANG Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the size effect on the AE rate ‘a’ value, three kinds of mix ratios were set up by different particle sizes and water cement ratios, 45 cement mortar specimens with ifve different heights were tested under axial compression. And the whole damage processes were monitored by full-digital acoustic emission acquisition system, followed by an analysis of mechanical behavior and AE activity. The experimental results show that the height of the cement specimen has signiifcant effects on the compressive strength and the acoustic emission rate ‘a’ value, but a slight effect on the accumulated AE hits number, which is analyzed from aspects of failure process of cement mortar specimens.

  16. Si-TCP synthesized from "Mg-free" reagents employed as calcium phosphate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Motisuke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of silicon doping on calcium phosphate cement were explored in this work. α-TCP and Si-α-TCP were prepared by solid state reaction employing "Mg-free" CaHPO4, CaCO3 and CaSiO3 as precursors. It was possible to obtain TCP powders with low contents of β phase as contaminant. Cement liquid phase was an aqueous solution containing 2.5 wt. (% of Na2HPO4 and 1.5 wt. (% of citric acid. The liquid-to-powder ratio was 0.6 mL.g-1. Chemical, physical and mechanical properties of the cement samples were determined by means of XRD, FTIR, XRF, compressive strength and SEM. The calcium phosphate cements obtained achieved satisfactory properties; however, Si-α-TCP presented a decrease on the rate of setting reaction.

  17. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Harris E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walsh, Stuart D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DuFrane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carroll, Susan A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  18. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing.

  19. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green house gases (i.e., CO and CO2 and also saves lot of money in the long run process. A small amount of these gases in environment can cause major problems over time. Use of white cement in composite pavement design where there is heavy traffic loads are acting as well as number of vehicles are more such as junctions, bus stops, check posts etc., can perform better and acts asenvironment friendly. Its light colour reflects more than bituminous pavement so that it can be easily identified and avoid accidents to some extent. White cement helps to lower the average bus stop, junction temperature providing comfort to the people because it has high solar reflectance there by reducing “urban heat island” effect. In addition to this it has some more advantages which increase the sustainability, durability and workability of the pavements.

  20. [Utilizing the wastewater treatment plant sludge for the production of eco-cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Ming; Zhou, Shao-Qi; Zhou, De-Jun; Wu, Yan-Yu

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect on cement property by using of municipal sewage as additive in the process of clinker burning. Based on the standard sample P. 042. 5 from cement plant, the properties of eco-cement samples adding municipal sewage to unit raw material by 0%, 0.50%, 1.00%, 1.50%, 2.00%, 2.50% respectively and the standard sample from the cement plant were compared. According to the analysis of X-ray diffraction, microstructure, the particles size determination material change, the setting time, specific surface area, leaching toxicity and strength of cement mortar of the cement, respectively, it showed that the strength of the productions were similar to the P. 042.5 standard sample. The metal ion concentrations of Al, Fe, Ba, Mn and Ti in clinkers and raw material decreased, the initial and setting time increased, as well as the strength of the paste within the curing time of 3 days decreased with the increase of municipal sewage ratio. However, after the curing of 7 days, the strength was similar to non-sludge-mortar or even higher.

  1. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantin Sobolev

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  2. Correction of abnormal setting of a hydraulic cement with additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxán, M. P.

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available Not availableEl cemento, componente principal del hormigón, está sometido al cumplimiento riguroso de unas Normas Oficiales. Cabe introducir sustancias que modifiquen su composición, pero tal operación ha de realizarse en el momento de confeccionar el hormigón. Con ellas se pueden conseguir objetivos muy diferentes, entre los que podemos mencionar los siguientes: disminuir el calor de hidratación, aumentar su resistencia al ataque de medios agresivos, mejorar la manejabilidad, facilitar el hormigonado con temperaturas extremas de frío y calor, conseguir un mayor período de tiempo disponible entre fabricación y puesta en obra, etc. Así surge la aparición de productos que permiten acelerar o retardar, unas veces el fraguado y otras el endurecimiento.

  3. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  4. Pulmonary Cement Embolism following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimal invasive procedure that is applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. During vertebroplasty, the leakage of bone cement outside the vertebral body leads to pulmonary cement embolism, which is a serious complication of this procedure. Here we report a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea after percutaneous vertebroplasty and diagnosed as pulmonary cement embolism.

  5. Light weight phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  6. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    where the limestone was blended (i.e., not interground) as needed, enabling variation of the size of the limestone particles. In addition, one of the commercially produced OPCs and PLCs were used with fly ash. A series of standardized tests were run to assess the physical effects of intergrinding limestone in portland cement, the effect of limestone presence and method of inclusion on the hydration reaction, and the associated mechanical and transport properties of concretes made with these limestone cements. The second phase of the study used a commercially produced OPC, a PLC, and a PLC-slag all made from the same parent clinker to quantify the early age shrinkage and cracking potential. The study presents a series of tests that quantify the fundamental origins of shrinkage in cementitious materials to elucidate the differences between PLC and OPC. The bulk shrinkage of these systems is then quantified under free and restrained conditions to provide an assessment of the susceptibility for cracking in portland limestone cements. The results of the first phase of this thesis showed that in general the PLC and OPC systems have similar hydration, set, and mechanical performance. Transport properties in this study show behavior that is +/- 30% of the conventional OPC system depending on the system. Literature has shown similar freeze-thaw resistance when these materials are used in properly air entrained mixtures, and the results for PLC systems with fly ash show added performance. Based on these results it appears that PLC that meets ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 should be able to be used interchangeably with OPC, while it should also be noted that the investigation of the influence of salts and sulfates on PLCs is still ongoing and should be monitored. The results of the second phase of this thesis showed that while the PLCs are finer, this comes primarily by reducing the very large particles (clinker particles greater than 30 microns) using advanced separator technology and

  7. Effects of cement flue dusts from a Nigerian cement plant on air, water and planktonic quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Victor F; Oluyemi, Emmanuel A

    2010-03-01

    Effects of cement flue dust from Ewekoro cement Kilns were monitored at some aquatic receptor locations. High levels of total suspended particulates (TSPs) and atmospheric deposition rates (ADRs) were recorded within the factory compared to ancillary locations outside the factory. The TSP and ADR levels which were location dependent were significantly higher (P cement factory catchment areas.

  8. The mechanical effects of different levels of cement penetration at the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical effects of varying the depth of cement penetration in the cement-bone interface were investigated using finite element analysis (FEA) and validated using companion experimental data. Two FEA models of the cement-bone interface were created from micro-computed tomography data and the p

  9. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  10. Engineering and sustainability aspect of palm oil shell powder in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohammad Razaul; Hossain, Md. Moktar; Yusoff, Sumiani Binti

    2017-06-01

    Palm oil shell (POS) is a waste material which significantly produced in palm oil mills. In current practice, this waste is dumped in open land or landfill sites or is used as fuel to run a steam turbine of a boiler, which leads to environmental pollutions. The characterization, engineering and sustainability aspect of this waste for using in cement-based applications lead to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide and cost, save natural resources for cement production and also sustainable usage of waste material. The characterization was carried out using particle size analyzer, XRF, SEM and total organic carbon analyzer. ASTM standard methods were used to observe the setting time and water for normal consistency. The compressive strength of palm oil shell powder (POSP) blended cement was explored with the water to cement and cement to sand ratio of 0.40 and 0.50, respectively up to 40% replacement levels of OPC. Result found that the setting time and water demand were increased, but compressive strength was decreased to replacement levels. However, the incorporation of POSP in cement was reduced 9.6% of CO2 emission, 25 % of the cost and save natural resource, i.e. limestone, clay, iron ore, silica shale and gypsum of 35.1%, 4.95%, 0.9%, 4.05 % and 1.2 %, respectively at 30% replacement level of OPC. The results of this extensive study on POSP characterization, effect on basic cement properties and sustainability aspect provide the guidance for using the POSP at industrial scale for cement production.

  11. Effect of curing characteristics on residual stress generation in polymethyl methacrylate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, J A; Dunne, N J; Looney, L; McGuinness, G B

    2008-08-01

    Residual stresses resulting from the shrinkage of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement have been implicated in the formation of cracks in cement mantles following total hip arthroplasty. This study investigates whether two such cements, with differentiated solidification characteristics (i.e. working and setting times), display significant differences in their residual stress characteristics in an experiment designed to replicate the physical conditions of total hip arthroplasty. Experiments were performed using a representative femoral construct to measure and compare the temperatures and residual strains developed for standard PMMA cement mantles (CMW 1 Gentamicin) and slow curing cement mantles (SmartSet HV Gentamicin) during and following polymerization. These experimental results revealed no statistically significant difference (t-test, p > 0.05) for peak exotherm temperature and residual strain levels between the cements (measured after 3 h). The tailored polymerization characteristics of the slow-curing cement do not significantly affect residual stress generation, compared with the standard cement. It is often considered that residual stresses significantly relax following polymerization and before biomechanical loads are first applied during rehabilitation (up to 3 days later). This was examined for durations of 18 h to 3 days. Axial strains in the model femur and stem reduced by averages of 5.5 and 7.9 per cent respectively, while hoop strains in the stem exhibited larger reductions. An axisymmetric transient thermoelastic finite element model of the experiment was developed, allowing residual stresses to be predicted based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the heat released throughout the exothermic curing reaction. The model predictions closely replicated the experimental measurements of both temperature and residual strain at 3 h, suggesting that residual strains can be fully accounted for by the thermal contraction

  12. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  13. Hidration kinetics study of tlie mixed cements

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Fernández, Gabriel . L; Díaz Quintanilla, David; Zapata Sierra, Manuel; Rubio Frías, Ester

    1993-01-01

    A study of the hydration process of cements with 10% and 20% addition of a tuff from "Las Carolinas" quarry (Cienfuegos, Cuba) by different methods was done. The results obtained by different methods showed a good agreement. It was proved an increment of the hydration products, an acceleration of alite hydration and a swelling of the fixed water in mixed cements. The resistance of the cement with 10% addition is similar to that of the pure cement for ages of 28 days, whereas with 20% addition...

  14. Strength improvement of fibre cement product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waranya Sonphuak

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to improve the strength or the Modulus of Rupture (MOR of fibre cement. The Six Sigma approach with the DMAIC steps was applied to a case study company. This research started from defining problem, setting the project objective and the project scope. Next, the measurement system was analyzed and the process map was set up. The potential factors of the problem was then determined. Due to there were many factors that affect the MOR, the Cause and Effect Matrix and the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis technique were then used to reduce the number of factors to be studied further. Next, three process factors, which were the pulp slurry freeness, the film-layer thickness, and the pressure step, were optimized using the results from the Box-Behnken experimental design. Other 13 remaining factors were improved by creating or revising the standard work instructions and training the operators. After that, the statistical process control and the control plan were set up to control the production processes. After improvement, the process capability index (Ppk significantly increased from 0.26 to 1.35.

  15. Synthesization and characterization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) / calcium phosphate bone cement from crab shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, M. R. Abdul; Daud, N. M.; Ismail, L. H.; Saidin, S.

    2017-05-01

    An injectable calcium phosphate (CaP) bone cement has been widely used for musculoskeletal and bone disorder due to its biocompatible and osteoconductive properties. In this study, CaP was successfully synthesized from crab shells by a wet chemical route. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which have been produced through a double emulsion technique were incorporated into the CaP mixture for the purpose of bone cement solidification. The ratio of both compounds, CaP and PLGA, were set at 8:2. The CaP and PLGA/CaP bone cement were analyzed by ATR-FTIR, FESEM-EDX and contact angle analyses. The bone cement was composed of CaP and PLGA where the micro-powders of CaP were agglomerated on the PLGA microspheres. Addition of the PLGA has increased the hydrophilicity of the bone cement which will be beneficial for materials degradation and bone integration.

  16. A retrospective observational study of the effect of surface treatments and cementing media on the durability of gold palatal veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, R G; Linklater, K I

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a retrospective observational study that sought to determine both the longevity and effects of surface treatments of gold palatal veneers used to restore tooth surface loss. Details of all gold palatal veneers fabricated from Mattident 60 were sourced from hospital records spanning 11 years and 9 months. The case notes of each individual were accessed and, for each restoration, a note was made of the date and method of cementation, together with the period of patient follow-up. When patients continued their routine checkups, the records were scrutinized closely for evidence of restoration failure. This yielded a data set of 151 palatal gold veneer cementations for which the surface treatments and/or cementing media were known. Survival analysis by the Kaplan-Meier method of alumina blasted veneers revealed median survival times of 4,663 days when cemented with Panavia 21 and 687 days if cemented with Aquacem. Veneers that were alumina blasted, oxidized and cemented with Panavia 21 had a survival probability of 1.0. A Logrank test revealed highly statistically significant differences between the survival curves (pveneer prior to cementation with Panavia 21 resulted in a significantly more durable restoration compared to alumina blasting and cementation with Aquacem and no etching of tooth substance. (2) Due to low MST cementing, gold palatal veneers with a conventional glass polyalkenoate cement are not recommended. (3) Pre-treatment of gold palatal veneers by alumina blasting and oxidation prior to cementing with Panavia 21 appears to improve the chances of obtaining a dependable restoration. A greater number of restorations would be required to statistically test this trend.

  17. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG, according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2 and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave. The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent.

  18. Graphene Nanosheets to Improve Physico-Mechanical Properties of Bioactive Calcium Silicate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nileshkumar Dubey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive calcium silicate cements are widely used to induce mineralization, to cement prosthetic parts, in the management of tooth perforations, and other areas. Nonetheless, they can present clinical disadvantages, such as long setting time and modest physico-mechanical properties. The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of graphene nanosheets (GNS to improve two bioactive cements. GNS were obtained via reduction of graphite oxide. GNS were mixed (1, 3, 5, and 7 wt % with Biodentine (BIO and Endocem Zr (ECZ, and the effects on setting time, hardness, push-out strength, pH profile, cell proliferation, and mineralization were evaluated. Statistics were performed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. GNS has not interfered in the composition of the set cements as confirmed by Raman, FT-IR and XRD. GNS (1 and 3 wt % shortened the setting time, increased hardness of both materials but decreased significantly the push-out strength of ECZ. pH was not affected but 1 wt % and 7 wt % to ECZ and 5 wt % to BIO increased the mineralization compared to the controls. In summary, GNS may be an alternative to improve the physico-mechanical properties and bioactivity of cements. Nonetheless, the use of GNS may not be advised for all materials when effective bonding is a concern.

  19. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  20. Dispersão e comportamento reológico de concretos refratários ultra-baixo teor de cimento no sistema Al2O3-SiC-SiO2-C Dispersion and setting control of ultra-low cement refractory castables in the Al2O3-SiC-SiO2-C system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. de Oliveira

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Concretos refratários no sistema Al2O3-SiC-SiO2-C vêm sendo amplamente utilizados em indústrias siderúrgicas como revestimento de canais de corrida de altos-fornos, em virtude principalmente da sua elevada refratariedade aliada a altas resistências ao choque térmico e ao ataque por escória e metal fundido. Neste trabalho, investigou-se a influência de diferentes tipos de aditivos na trabalhabilidade e dispersão de concretos refratários de ultra-baixo teor de cimento nesse sistema. Apesar da sua alta capacidade de complexar íons de cálcio, moléculas de citrato não foram capazes de controlar adequadamente o tempo de pega do concreto estudado, contradizendo a idéia geral de que os íons de citrato devem ser utilizados para controlar a sua trabalhabilidade. Por outro lado, o aditivo polimetacrilato de sódio mostrou-se eficiente na otimização simultânea da dispersão e da trabalhabilidade do concreto devido provavelmente ao retardamento da dissolução dos íons advindos do cimento.Refractory castables in the Al2O3-SiC-SiO2-C system have been extensively used as linings for blast furnace runners, due mainly to their improved resistance to thermal shock damage and to slag and metal corrosion, respectively. In this work, ULC refractory castables in the Al2O3-SiC-SiO2-C system were prepared in order to evaluate the efficiency of different sort of additives on their dispersion and setting behavior. Although citrate ions are known to be efficient chelating agents, they were not able to properly control the working time of the castable studied, contradicting the general idea that citrate ions are necessary for controlling castable setting. On the other hand, the sodium polymethacrylate additive was found to be more efficient for the simultaneous optimization of the castable dispersion state and working time. This may be attributed to a retardation effect imparted by polymethacrylate molecules on the dissolution of ions from the surface

  1. Failure rate of cemented and uncemented total hip replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makela, K. T.; Matilainen, M.; Pulkkinen, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the failure rate of cemented, uncemented, hybrid, and reverse hybrid total hip replacements in patients aged 55 years or older. Design Register study. Setting Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database (combined data from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland......). Participants 347 899 total hip replacements performed during 1995-2011. Main outcome measures Probability of implant survival (Kaplan-Meier analysis) along with implant survival with revision for any reason as endpoint (Cox multiple regression) adjusted for age, sex, and diagnosis in age groups 55-64, 65......-74, and 75 years or older. Results The proportion of total hip replacements using uncemented implants increased rapidly towards the end of the study period. The 10 year survival of cemented implants in patients aged 65 to 74 and 75 or older (93.8%, 95% confidence interval 93.6% to 94.0% and 95.9%, 95...

  2. Fibre-reinforced calcium phosphate cements: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, C; Ginebra, M P

    2011-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) consist of one or more calcium orthophosphate powders, which upon mixing with water or an aqueous solution, form a paste that is able to set and harden after being implanted within the body. Different issues remain still to be improved in CPC, such as their mechanical properties to more closely mimic those of natural bone, or their macroporosity to favour osteointegration of the artificial grafts. To this end, blends of CPC with polymer and ceramic fibres in different forms have been investigated. The present work aims at providing an overview of the different approaches taken and identifying the most significant achievements in the field of fibre-reinforced calcium phosphate cements for clinical applications, with special focus on their mechanical properties.

  3. Strength of Concrete Containing Rubber Particle as Partial Cement Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Siti Radziah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled issues of disposal waste tire rubber create huge environmental impact and health hazards. An alternative viable solution to minimize these problems is by utilizing the waste rubber tires in construction materials, which in turn can reduce the use of natural resources and eventually lessen the cost of construction. This paper mainly focuses on the use of waste rubber tires particles in concrete with different set of composition ranging from 3 to 12% of cement replacement. Concrete cubes size of 150mm x 150mm x 150mm were prepared for compressive strength test, and concrete cylinders size of 150m x 300mm were prepared for splitting tensile test. The result shows that the compressive and split tensile strength of concrete with rubber as cement replacements is 6-21% lower than the normal concrete.

  4. IR spectroscopy of sulphates in clinkers and cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez, T.

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Infrared spectroscopy is a very useful technique in Cement Chemistry. This work is devoted to the study of a large number of sulphates that should have an incidence in false set phenomena, and they are qualitative and semi-quantitatlvely studied when they are in some degree in the clinker or in the portland cement.

    La espectroscopía infrarroja es una técnica de gran utilidad en la Química del Cemento. En el presente trabajo se aplica al estudio de numerosos sulfatos que pueden tener incidencia en el fenómeno de falso fraguado, y se estudian cualitativa y semicuantitativamente cuando forman parte del clinker o cemento portland.

  5. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ying-Fang [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung [Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jaw-Ji, E-mail: jjyang@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • The higher the Si in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • Si20-doped in TCP improved cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. • The Si ion stimulated collagen secreted from cells. • The Si released from substrate can promote osteogenic and angiogenic.

  6. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. For the tested cements, the strongest bonds

  7. Thoracic applications of dual energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy-Jardin, Martine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pontana, Francois; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Tacelli, Nunzia; Santangelo, Teresa; Remy, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Recent technological advances in multidetector computed tomography (CT) have led to the introduction of dual-source CT, which allows acquisition of CT data at the same energy or at 2 distinct tube voltage settings during a single acquisition. The advantage of the former is improvement of temporal resolution, whereas the latter offers new options for CT imaging, allowing tissue characterization and functional analysis with morphologic evaluation. The most investigated application has been iodine mapping at pulmonary CT angiography. The material decomposition achievable opens up new options for recognizing substances poorly characterized by single-energy CT. Although it is too early to draw definitive conclusions on dual-energy CT applications, this article reviews the results already reported with the first generation of dual-source CT systems.

  8. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus.Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  9. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczaj-Cepowicz, Elżbieta; Marczuk-Kolada, Grażyna; Zalewska, Anna; Pawińska, Małgorzata; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-22

    The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC), Fuji IX (GC), Ketac Molar (3M Espe) and Ketac Silver (3M Espe). Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep) were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  10. Leachable characteristics of arsenical borogypsum wastes and their potential use in cement production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Ibrahim; Deveci, Haci; Süngün, Y Halil; Yazici, Ersin Y; Savaş, Mehmet; Demirci, Songül

    2009-09-15

    In this study; the potential use of arsenical borogypsum wastes (ABW) as a set retarder in cement industry was investigated. The comparative performances of arsenical borogypsum wastes (ABW) and natural gypsum samples (NG1 and NG2) at different proportions in the range of 3-8 wt % were tested based on compressive strength over 1, 2, 7, and 28 days and setting times. The use of ABW was observed to lead to a somewhat slower rate of development of strength of the mortar samples than those of NG1 and NG2 during the curing period of 7 days. This is the indication of the effectiveness of ABW as a set retarder. The 28-day compressive strength of mortars tended to decrease with the addition or increasing the proportion of ABW, beyond 5 wt % in particular. The data for setting times of the cement products confirmed set retarding characteristics of ABW with an initial setting time of 90-120 min at 3-5 wt % dosage, which conforms to the desired setting time of > or = 60 min for CEM I (42.5 N) type cement (TS EN 197-1). Leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have also shown that ABW can be classified as a nonhazardous waste; but it can readily release metals such as As and Mn, in particular, whereas the mortar samples containing ABW-cement clinker present no environmental concern with its remarkably reduced leachability.

  11. Microbial analysis of biofilms on cement surfaces: An investigation in cement-associated peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Obst, Ursula

    2014-09-05

    The cementation of implant-supported restorations always poses the risk of excess cement retained in the peri-implant sulcus despite careful clinical control. Excess cement can become the basis of colonization by oral microorganisms. As a result of the biofilm formation peri-mucositis or peri-implantitis may develop. Complications were observed in the routine prosthetic restoration of implants when a methacrylate-based cement was used. These developed a few weeks after cementation of the suprastructure and caused bleeding on probing as well as suppuration from the peri-implant tissue. In the revision therapy, excess cement in the peri-implant sulcus was found in many cases. This excess cement was sampled from ten patients and investigated for biofilm formation. For this purpose, the cement samples were collected and analyzed for bacterial in situ colonization by 16S rDNA-based methods. In laboratory experiments, the methacrylate-based cement and two other dental cements were then investigated for their proneness to form biofilm. The results of the in situ and in vitro investigations revealed a strong tendency towards bacterial invasion of the methacrylate-based cement by opportunistic species and pathogens.

  12. Approximately dual frames in Hilbert spaces and applications to Gabor frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Laugesen, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately dual frames are studied in the Hilbert space setting. Approximate duals are easier to construct than classical dual frames, and can be tailored to yield almost perfect reconstruction. Bounds on the deviation from perfect reconstruction are obtained for approximately dual frames cons...

  13. Copper Slag Blended Cement: An Environmental Sustainable Approach for Cement Industry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmeet Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indian cement industry is facing environmental issue of emission of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas. Blended cements including supplementary cementitious materials are substitute of Portland cement to reduce CO2 emission. The present paper investigates theappropriateness of copper slag (CS as supplementary cementitious material. Strength properties and hydration of mixes were determined at different replacement levels of CS with cement. Compressive, flexural and tensile strength of each mix was found out at different curing periods. The hydration of cement was investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD. The strength test results showed that substitution of up to 20% of CS can significantly replace Portland cement.XRD test results were corresponding to strength test results. The present study encourages the utilization of CS as supplementary cementitious material to make economical and environmentally sustainable blended cement

  14. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  15. In vivo resorption behavior of a high strength injectable calcium-phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolke, J.G.C.; Ooms, E.M.; Jansen, J.A. [Univ. Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. Biomaterials

    2001-07-01

    A high strength calcium-phosphate-cement powder was prepared from a composition comprising of {alpha}-TCP, CaHPO{sub 4} (monetite), CaCO{sub 3} and some seeds of precipitated apatite. An aqueous solution of 4% Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} was used as liquid to start the setting reaction. The powder was mixed with cement liquid in three different liquid/powder ratios respectively 0.3, 0.35 and 0.4. Observation of the setting reaction versus time revealed that the maximum of compressive strength was achieved after 3 days reaching the value of 81 MPa. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the Ca-P cement measured 3 days after mixing and storage in Ringer's solution at 37 C showed that the {alpha}-TCP was transformed to hydroxylapatite with superposition of the peaks for monetite. XRD showed that after eight weeks of implantation the monetite peaks had disappeared. Further, the clinical handling properties of all three types of Ca-P cement appeared to be excellent. No problems in setting time or cavity filling were met during the application. The histological evaluation after two weeks of implantation showed abundant bone apposition on the cement surface without inflammatory reaction. At later time points the Ca-P cements were totally covered by a thin layer of bone and osteoclast-like cells in remodeling lacunae at the interface were resorbing the cement. At all implantation periods the PMMA controls showed the presence of a thin fibrous membrane. (orig.)

  16. Hardness of resin cement cured under different thickness of lithium disilicate-based ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuan; WANG Fu

    2011-01-01

    Background The lithium disilicate-based ceramic is a newly developed all-ceramic material,which is lithium disilicate-based and could be used for fabricating almost all kinds of restorations.The extent of light attenuation by ceramic material was material-dependent.Ceramic materials with different crystal composition or crystalline content would exhibit distinct light-absorbing characteristics.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of ceramic thickness and light-curing time on the polymerization of a dual-curing resin luting material with a lithium disilicate-based ceramic.Methods A lithium disilicate-based ceramic was used in this study.The light attenuation caused by ceramic with different thickness was determined using a spectral radiometer.The commercial dual-cured resin cement was light-cured directly or through ceramic discs with different thickness (1,2 and 3 mm,respectively) for different times (10,20,30,40,50 and 60 seconds,respectively).The polymerization efficiency of resin cement was expressed in terms as Vickers hardness (VHN) measured after 24 hours storage.Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used to determine differences.Results Intensity of polymerizing light transmitted through ceramic discs was reduced from 584 mW/cm2 to about 216 mW/cm2,80 mW/cm2 and 52 mW/cm2 at thicknesses of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,respectively.Resin cement specimens self-cured alone showed significantly lower hardness values.When resin cement was light-cured through ceramic discs with a thickness of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,no further increasing in hardness values was observed when light-curing time was more than 30 seconds,40 seconds and 60 seconds,respectively.Conclusions Within the limitation of the present study,ceramic thickness and light-curing time had remarkable influence on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cement.When resin cement is light-cured beneath a lithium disilicate ceramic with different thickness,prolonging light

  17. A Pause for China's Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cement industry suffers excess productionWith the advent of global financial crisis,the Chinese government has laid out a stimulus package on infrastructure construction.Driven by the investment spree,China's cement makers are flocking to expand output capacity,which is now leading the industry into a much-higher-thanneeded state.

  18. Contact dermatitis in cement workers in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraji Fariba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to recent industrialization and inadequately protected workers or in other words poor supervision on constructive workers habits in our large city of Isfahan cement contact dermatitis is relatively high especially among cement factory workers and constructive personnel. PURPOSES: To investigate the prevalence rate of cement contact dermatitis in cement factory workers in Isfahan. METHODS: A case-control clinical study was carried out by randomly selecing 150 factory workders and 150 official clerks in a cement factory in Isfahan in 2001. After a complete physical examination, data was recorded in observational checklists. FINDINGS: The percentages of contact dermatitis prevalences in the first and the second groups were 22% and 5.3% respectively. About 60% of cement workers with contact dermatitis were between 30-40 years of age. There was a direct relationship with age in both groups of the workers. In the high-exposure group, the hand eczema along was 70% but in the other group the percentage of involvement was the same in exposed and unexposed anatomical areas. CONCLUSIONS: There was a direct relationship between occurrence and the severity of involvement and duration of contact in the first group. Cent percent of cement workers had contact dermatitis after 10 or less years, but the percentage among the other group was 35%. LIMITATION: Irritant contact dermatitis to cement has not been detected.

  19. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  20. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  1. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  3. A note on cement in asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G

    2016-01-01

    Cement mineral tobermorite was formed in hydrothermal experiments on alternation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Unidentified bands at 14 microns were measured for CAIs and the matrix of the Allende meteorite sample, as well as for Hektor and Agamemnon asteroids. The presence of cement nanoparticles may explain the feature at 14 microns.

  4. A note on cement in asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilalbegović, G.

    2016-09-01

    Cement mineral tobermorite was formed in hydrothermal experiments on alternation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Unidentified bands at 14 μm were measured for CAIs and the matrix of the Allende meteorite sample, as well as for Hektor and Agamemnon asteroids. The presence of cement nanoparticles may explain the feature at 14 μm.

  5. Toughness, bonding and fluoride-release properties of hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Milanita E; Arita, Kenji; Nishino, Mizuho

    2003-09-01

    Improving the mechanical strength of glass ionomer cement while preserving its favorable clinical properties such as fluoride release, bonding to tooth structure and biocompatibility is desirable. In this study, hydroxyapatite was incorporated into chemically setting glass ionomer cement and its effect on the fracture toughness, bonding to dentin and fluoride release was identified. Commercial glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP((R)) ) was the control and base material. Eight weight percent of hydroxyapatite was added into the glass ionomer powder. Specimens were fabricated and the fracture toughness, shear bond strength and eluted fluoride ion concentration were measured. Adding hydroxyapatite into the glass ionomer cement led to significantly higher fracture toughness after 15min and 24h from mixing. The hydroxyapatite-added cement also exhibited bond strength to dentin similar to that of the control from 15min to 56 days and consistent fluoride release for 13 weeks. SEM findings showed a cohesive type of fracture in the material for all specimens in both groups. These results indicate that hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement has a potential as a reliable restorative material with improved fracture toughness, long-term bonding to dentin and unimpeded ability of sustained fluoride release.

  6. Numerical simulation of thermal bone necrosis during cementation of femoral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzullo, S; Paolini, M; Verdi, C

    1991-01-01

    The implant of a femoral prosthesis is a critical process because of the relatively high temperature values reached at the bone/cement interface during the cementation of the infibulum. In fact, the cement is actually a polymer that polymerizes in situ generating heat. Moreover, the conversion of monomer into polymer is never 100%; this is dangerous because of the toxicity of the monomer. In this paper, we present a 3-D axisymmetric mathematical model capable of taking into account both the geometry of the implant and the chemical/physical properties of the cement. This model, together with its numerical simulation, thus represents a useful tool to set up the optimal conditions for the new materials developed in this orthopaedic field. The real complex geometry is assumed to be a bone/cement/metallic system having cylindrical symmetry, thus allowing the model to be reduced to two space variables. The cementation process is described by the Fourier heat equation coupled with a suitable polymerization kinetics. The numerical approximation is accomplished by semi-implicit finite differences in time and finite elements in space with numerical quadrature. The full discrete scheme amounts to solve linear positive definite symmetric systems preceded by an elementwise algebraic computation. We present various numerical simulations which confirm some critical aspects of this orthopaedic fixing technique such as thermal bone necrosis and the presence of unreacted residual monomer.

  7. Preparation and characterization of a novel injectable strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement with collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Ziqiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop a novel injectable strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement with collagen. Methods: A novel calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC was prepared with the addition of strontium element, collagenⅠ, and modified starch; the injectability, solidification time, microstructure, phase composition, compressive strength, anti-collapsibility and histological properties of material were evaluated. Results: The results showed that the material could be injected with an excellent performance; the modified starch significantly improved the anti-washout property of cement; with the liquid to solid ratio of 0.3, the largest compressive strength of cement was obtained (48.0 MPa ± 2.3 MPa; histological examination of repair tissue showed that the bone was repaired after 16 weeks; the degradation of cement was consistent with the new bone growth. Conclusion: A novel injectable collagen-strontium-containing CPC with excellent compressive strength and suitable setting time was prepared, with addition of modified starch. The CPC showed a good antiwashout property and the degradation time of the cement met with the new bone growing. This material is supposed to be used in orthopedic and maxillofacial surgery for bone defects.

  8. Effect of hydrogen sulfide emissions on cement mortar specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idriss, A. F. [Alberta Environment, Science and Technology Branch, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Negi, S. C.; Jofriet, J. C.; Haywoard, G. L. [Guelph Univ., Guelph, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Six different cement mortar specimens used in animal buildings, where they were exposed to hydrogen sulfide generated from anaerobic fermentation of manure during a period of one year, were investigated. Primary interest was on comparing the corrosion resistance of different cement mortar specimens under long term exposure to hydrogen sulfide. The impressed voltage technique was used to test the specimens in the laboratory. Results revealed that test specimens made with eight per cent silica fume cement replacement performed best and similar Portland cement mortar specimens with a water-cement ratio of 0.55 (PC55) the poorest. All other treatments, (Portland cement with a water to cement ratio of 045, Portland cement Type 50, Portland cement with fibre mesh and Portland cement Type 10 coated with linseed oil) all with water-cement ratios of 0.45, were less effective in preventing corrosion than silica fume replacement.

  9. Investigation of the physical properties of tricalcium silicate cement-based root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-02-01

    Tricalcium silicate-based cements have been displayed as suitable root-end filling materials. The physical properties of prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material was used as a control. The physical properties of a prototype zirconium oxide replaced tricalcium silicate cement and two proprietary cements composed of tricalcium silicate namely Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material (IRM) was used as a control. Radiopacity assessment was undertaken and expressed in thickness of aluminum. In addition the anti-washout resistance was investigated using a novel basket-drop method and the fluid uptake, sorption and solubility were investigated using a gravimetric method. The setting time was assessed using an indentation technique and compressive strength and micro-hardness of the test materials were investigated. All the testing was performed with the test materials immersed in Hank's balanced salt solution. All the materials tested had a radiopacity value higher than 3mm thickness of aluminum. IRM exhibited the highest radiopacity. Biodentine demonstrated a high washout, low fluid uptake and sorption values, low setting time and superior mechanical properties. The fluid uptake and setting time was the highest for Bioaggregate. The addition of admixtures to tricalcium silicate-based cements affects the physical properties of the materials. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilization of waste heat from rotary kiln for burning clinker in the cement plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztekler Karol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement subsector next to the glass industry is counted among one of the most energy-intensive industries, which absorbs approx. 12-15% of the total energy consumed by the industry. In the paper various methods of energy consumption reduction of in the cement industry are discussed. Cement production carries a very large emissions of greenhouse gases, where CO2 emissions on a global scale with the industry than approx. 5%. Great opportunity in CO2 emissions reduction in addition to the recovery of waste heat is also alternative fuels co-firing in cement kilns [1], [2]. In the cement sector interest in fitting-usable waste energy is growing in order to achieve high rates of savings and hence the financial benefits, as well as the environment ones [3]. In the process of cement production is lost irretrievably lot of energy and reduction of these losses on a global scale gives a visible saving of consumed fuel. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of waste heat use in Rudniki Cement Plant near to Czestochowa. After analyzing of all waste heat sources will be analyzed the heat emitted by radiation from the surface of the rotary kiln at the relevant facility. On the basis of thermal-flow calculations the most favorable radiative heat exchanger will be designed. The calculations based on available measurements provided by the cement plant, a thermal power of the heat exchanger, the heat exchange surface, the geometry of the heat exchanger, and other important parameters will be established. In addition the preliminary calculations of hydraulic losses and set directions for further work will be carried out. Direct benefits observed with the introduction of the broader heat recovery technology, is a significant increase in energy efficiency of the industrial process, which is reflected in the reduction of energy consumption and costs. Indirectly it leads to a reduction of pollution and energy consumption.

  11. Utilization of Red Mud as Raw Material in the Production of Field Road Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao; LUO Zhongtao; ZHANG Lei; RONG Hui; YANG Jiujun

    2016-01-01

    The total utilization amount of red mud is limited due to its high content of alkali, heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive element. In order to rationalize the use of red mud, a typical ifeld road cement using dealkalized red mud (content of alkali lower than 1%) as raw material was ifrstly prepared in this paper. Then, a preliminary research on the radioactivity of the red mud based ifeld road cement has been carried out. For that reason, two samples of raw materials were prepared. One was with ordinary raw materials, as the control group (CG), the other was with 23w % red mud, as the experimental group (EG). The clinkers were acquired by sintering the above two raw materials at 1 400℃. Subsequently, the two types of cement prepared by the above two kinds of clinkers were tested by measuring the normal consistency, setting time, mechanical strength and drying shrinkage. Meanwhile, the hydration products of the two types of cement were examined by XRD analysis at the curing age of 6 hours, 1, 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively. The radioactivity of the two kinds of cement clinkers was then measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. The experimental results indicate that the main mineralogical phases components in the EG ifeld road cement clinkers are C3S, C2S, and C4AF, the 28 days lfexural and compressive strength of the EG ifeld road cement mortars could be up to 8.45 and 53.2 MPa, respectively. The radioactive measuring results of the EG field road cement show that the value of radium equivalent activity index (Raeq) is 254.8 Bq/Kg-1, which is lower than the upper limit.

  12. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  13. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa......-per the shrinkage properties of cement stabilized gravel have been documented under various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Two cement contents corresponding to a 28-days compressive strength of 6.2 MPa and 12.3 MPa have been tested and compared. It is found that the coefficient of linear expansion...... for the two cement contents is 9.9 × 10-6 ⁰C-1 and 11.3 × 10-6 ⁰C-1, respectively. Furthermore, it is found that reflecting cracking can mainly be explained by temperature dependent shrinkage rather than moisture dependent shrinkage....

  14. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  15. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  16. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Barbosa Ramos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-eSPe and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray used for cementing fiberreinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a no light activation; b light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. CONCLUSIONS: The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent.

  17. Murine osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation on strontium releasing hydroxyapatite forming cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun, E-mail: bol11@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Parekh, Shrey, E-mail: smp116@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds and self-setting cements containing Sr{sup 2+} ions incorporated are particularly of interest in bone regeneration. To date, the approach widely used to incorporate Sr{sup 2+} ions into HA cements has been the addition of Sr{sup 2+} containing salts, such as SrCO{sub 3}, SrCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O, or SrHPO{sub 4}. However, this approach is dependent upon the relative solubility of Sr{sup 2+} containing salts with respect to calcium phosphate (CaP) precursors. Therefore, in the current study Sr{sup 2+} substituted dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was first synthesized and directly reacted with tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) to form Sr{sup 2+} substituted HA forming cements. Rietveld refinement indicated that after one week of aging in phosphate buffered saline, cements prepared with and without Sr{sup 2+} were composed of 75% HA and 25% unreacted TTCP by weight. Cements prepared with 10% Sr{sup 2+} DCPD exhibited increased compressive strengths in comparison to unsubstituted cements. Increased MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation were also observed on the cements prepared with increasing Sr{sup 2+} content. It was concluded that both the scaffold microstructure and Sr{sup 2+}