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Sample records for dsaga-specific dada2b mutation

  1. A decision tree for the genetic diagnosis of deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2): a French reference centres experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Mélanie; Duflos, Claire; Melki, Isabelle; Bessis, Didier; Bonhomme, Axelle; Martin, Hélène; Doummar, Diane; Valence, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Diana; Carme, Emilie; Genevieve, David; Heimdal, Ketil; Insalaco, Antonella; Franck, Nathalie; Queyrel-Moranne, Viviane; Tieulie, Nathalie; London, Jonathan; Uettwiller, Florence; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Belot, Alexandre; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Hentgen, Véronique; Boursier, Guilaine; Touitou, Isabelle; Sarrabay, Guillaume

    2018-04-23

    Deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2) is a recently described autoinflammatory disorder. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis. We aimed to describe the identifying symptoms and genotypes of patients referred to our reference centres and to improve the indications for genetic testing. DNA from 66 patients with clinically suspected DADA2 were sequenced by Sanger or next-generation sequencing. Detailed epidemiological, clinical and biological features were collected by use of a questionnaire and were compared between patients with and without genetic confirmation of DADA2. We identified 13 patients (19.6%) carrying recessively inherited mutations in ADA2 that were predicted to be deleterious. Eight patients were compound heterozygous for mutations. Seven mutations were novel (4 missense variants, 2 predicted to affect mRNA splicing and 1 frameshift). The mean age of the 13 patients with genetic confirmation was 12.7 years at disease onset and 20.8 years at diagnosis. Phenotypic manifestations included fever (85%), vasculitis (85%) and neurological disorders (54%). Features best associated with a confirmatory genotype included fever with neurologic or cutaneous attacks (odds ratio [OR] 10.71, p = 0.003 and OR 10.9, p < 0.001), fever alone (OR 8.1, p = 0.01), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) level with neurologic involvement (OR 6.63, p = 0.017). Our proposed decision tree may help improve obtaining genetic confirmation of DADA2 in the context of autoinflammatory symptoms. Prerequisites for quick and low-cost Sanger analysis include one typical cutaneous or neurological sign, one marker of inflammation (fever or elevated CRP level), and recurrent or chronic attacks in adults.

  2. TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies.

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    Tanasubsinn, Natchaya; Sittiwangkul, Rekwan; Pongprot, Yupada; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Ohazama, Atsushi; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2017-08-01

    Mutations inTFAP2B has been reported in patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and Char syndrome. We performed mutation analysis of TFAP2B in 43 patients with isolated PDA, 7 patients with PDA with other congenital heart defects and 286 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies. The heterozygous c.1006G>A mutation was identified in 20 individuals. Those mutation carriers consisted of 1 patient with term PDA (1/43), 16 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies (16/286; 5.6%), 1 patient with PDA and severe valvular aortic stenosis and tooth agenesis (1/4) and 2 normal controls (2/100; 1%). The mutation is predicted to cause an amino-acid substitution p.Val336Ile in the TFAP2B protein. Tfap2b expression during early mouse tooth development supports the association of TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies. It is hypothesized that this incidence might have been the result of founder effect. Here we report for the first time that TFAP2B mutation is associated with tooth agenesis, microdontia, supernumerary tooth and root maldevelopment. In addition, we also found that TFAP2B mutations, the common causes of PDA in Caucasian, are not the common cause of PDA in Thai population.

  3. Oyelami & Dada (14)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    in manufacturing industries for quality control and reduction of .... solved using MATLAB. ... Along y* - axis in the fluid ... + g. (2). (3). (4). (5). Oyelami and Dada: Transient Magnetohydrodynamic Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid in A Porous Medium ...

  4. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient. ...

  5. Dada Redux: Elements of Dadaist Practice in Contemporary Electronic Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rettberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dada movement was a multimedia avant-garde art practice that began in Zurich during World War I and flourished in Berlin, Paris, and New York from 1916 until 1920. Beginning as a disgusted response to the war and the blithely nationalistic bourgeois attitudes the Dada felt were at the root of the conflict, the Dada developed and refined the notion of “anti-art” as an expression of dissatisfaction with the dominant contemporary ideology. Although the period in which Dada was an active organized cultural movement was quite short, its legacy is widespread and profound. Through readings of works of electronic literature, the essay argues that while techniques have been adapted to the media-specific affordances of the networked computer, many of the practices popularized by the Dada during the early twentieth century form the basis of methods utilized by new media artists and writers today. By comparing the art and activities of early Dadaist artists to the work of contemporary digital writers, the essay advocates a critical approach to new media writing that both accounts for the specific properties of literature produced for networked computer environments and also examines these artifacts within the contextualizing historical framework of the avant-garde.

  6. VHL type 2B mutations retain VBC complex form and function.

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    Kathryn E Hacker

    Full Text Available von Hippel-Lindau disease is characterized by a spectrum of hypervascular tumors, including renal cell carcinoma, hemangioblastoma, and pheochromocytoma, which occur with VHL genotype-specific differences in penetrance. VHL loss causes a failure to regulate the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha, resulting in accumulation of both factors to high levels. Although HIF dysregulation is critical to VHL disease-associated renal tumorigenesis, increasing evidence points toward gradations of HIF dysregulation contributing to the degree of predisposition to renal cell carcinoma and other manifestations of the disease.This investigation examined the ability of disease-specific VHL missense mutations to support the assembly of the VBC complex and to promote the ubiquitylation of HIF. Our interaction analysis supported previous observations that VHL Type 2B mutations disrupt the interaction between pVHL and Elongin C but maintain partial regulation of HIF. We additionally demonstrated that Type 2B mutant pVHL forms a remnant VBC complex containing the active members ROC1 and Cullin-2 which retains the ability to ubiquitylate HIF-1alpha.Our results suggest that subtypes of VHL mutations support an intermediate level of HIF regulation via a remnant VBC complex. These findings provide a mechanism for the graded HIF dysregulation and genetic predisposition for cancer development in VHL disease.

  7. Association between a specific apolipoprotein B mutation and familial defective apolipoprotein B-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, L.F.; Ludwig, E.H.; Clarke, H.R.G.; McCarthy, B.J.; Vega, G.L.; Grundy, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Familial defective apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 is a genetic disease that leads to hypercholesterolemia and to an increased serum concentration of low density lipoproteins that bind defectively to the apoB,E(LDL) receptor. The disorder appears to result from a mutation in the gene for apoB-100. Extensive sequence analysis of the two alleles of one subject heterozygous for the disorder has revealed a previously unreported mutation in the codon for amino acid 3500 that results in the substitution of glutamine for arginine. This same mutant allele occurs in six other, unrelated subjects and in eight affected relatives in two of these families. A partial haplotype of this mutant apoB-100 allele was constructed by sequence analysis and restriction enzyme digestion at positions where variations in the apoB-100 are known to occur. This haplotype is the same in three probands and four affected members of one family and lacks a polymorphic Xba I site whose presence has been correlated with high cholesterol levels. Thus, it appears that the mutation in the codon for amino acid 3500 (CGG → CAG), a CG mutational hot spot, defines a minor apoB-100 allele associated with defective low density lipoproteins and hypercholesterolemia

  8. Variations in the occurrence of specific rpoB mutations in rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients of different ethnic groups in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Al-Mutairi, Noura M; Mokaddas, Eiman

    2012-05-01

    Frequency of resistance-conferring mutations vary among isoniazid- and ethambutol-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates obtained from patients of various ethnic groups. This study was aimed to determine the occurrence of specific rpoB mutations in rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis patients of various ethnic groups in Kuwait. Rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates (n=119) from South Asian (n=55), Southeast Asian (n=23), Middle Eastern (n=39) and other (n=2) patients and 107 rifampicin-susceptible isolates were tested. Mutations in rpoB were detected by DNA sequencing. Polymorphisms at katG463 and gyrA95 were detected by PCR-RFLP for genetic group assignment. None of rifampicin-susceptible but 116 of 119 rifampicin-resistant isolates showed rpoB mutation(s). Mutations among isolates from South Asian patients were distributed at rpoB516 (20%), rpoB526 (24%) and rpoB531 (27%) while 78 and 51 per cent of isolates from Southeast Asian and Middle Eastern patients, respectively, contained a mutated rpoB531. All isolates with rpoB N-terminal and cluster II mutations were obtained from Middle Eastern and South Asian patients. Most isolates from South Asian (84%) and Southeast Asian (70%) patients belonged to genetic group I while nearly all remaining isolates belonged to genetic group II. Isolates from Middle Eastern patients were distributed among genetic group I (46%), genetic group II (33%) and genetic group III (21%). The occurrence of specific rpoB mutations varied considerably in rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from patients of different ethnic groups within the same country. The present data have important implications for designing region-specific rapid methods for detecting majority of rifampicin-resistant strains.

  9. Presymptomatic generalized brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ahsan, R Laila; Isaacs, Adrian M

    2009-01-01

    mutation carriers with a control group of 7 mutation-negative family members. Volumetric MRI brain scans were performed on all subjects at two time points, and rates of volume change were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: We demonstrate that generalized atrophy occurs presymptomatically in CHMP2B...... gene mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: This finding suggests that mutations in CHMP2B have widespread effects throughout the brain, leading to a neuro-anatomical signature distinct from other diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum........ There are no detailed studies of brain imaging in CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. This study aimed to investigate whether there were early or presymptomatic changes in this group of patients. METHODS: Subjects comprised 16 members of a Danish family with CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. Nine subjects were presymptomatic...

  10. EZH2 and CD79B mutational status over time in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas detected by high-throughput sequencing using minimal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saieg, Mauro Ajaj; Geddie, William R; Boerner, Scott L; Bailey, Denis; Crump, Michael; da Cunha Santos, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous genomic abnormalities in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) have been revealed by novel high-throughput technologies, including recurrent mutations in EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) and CD79B (B cell antigen receptor complex-associated protein beta chain) genes. This study sought to determine the evolution of the mutational status of EZH2 and CD79B over time in different samples from the same patient in a cohort of B-cell NHLs, through use of a customized multiplex mutation assay. METHODS: DNA that was extracted from cytological material stored on FTA cards as well as from additional specimens, including archived frozen and formalin-fixed histological specimens, archived stained smears, and cytospin preparations, were submitted to a multiplex mutation assay specifically designed for the detection of point mutations involving EZH2 and CD79B, using MassARRAY spectrometry followed by Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: All 121 samples from 80 B-cell NHL cases were successfully analyzed. Mutations in EZH2 (Y646) and CD79B (Y196) were detected in 13.2% and 8% of the samples, respectively, almost exclusively in follicular lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In one-third of the positive cases, a wild type was detected in a different sample from the same patient during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Testing multiple minimal tissue samples using a high-throughput multiplex platform exponentially increases tissue availability for molecular analysis and might facilitate future studies of tumor progression and the related molecular events. Mutational status of EZH2 and CD79B may vary in B-cell NHL samples over time and support the concept that individualized therapy should be based on molecular findings at the time of treatment, rather than on results obtained from previous specimens. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2013;121:377–386. © 2013 American Cancer Society. PMID:23361872

  11. Establishment of novel monoclonal antibodies KMab-1 and MMab-1 specific for IDH2 mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Mika Kato [Regional Innovation Strategy Support Program, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575 (Japan); Molecular Tumor Marker Research Team, Global COE Program, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Morita, Shunpei; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Yanagiya, Ryo; Nasu, Kana; Sasaki, Hiroko [Molecular Tumor Marker Research Team, Global COE Program, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Natsume, Atsushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Watanabe, Mika [Department of Pathology and Histotechnology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575 (Japan); Kumabe, Toshihiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574 (Japan); Takano, Shingo [Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Kato, Yukinari, E-mail: yukinari-k@bea.hi-ho.ne.jp [Regional Innovation Strategy Support Program, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575 (Japan); Molecular Tumor Marker Research Team, Global COE Program, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► IDH1/2 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas. ► We established anti-mutated IDH2-specific mAbs KMab-1 and MMab-1. ► KMab-1 or MMab-1 specifically reacted with mutated IDH2 in ELISA. ► MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing CHO cells in ICC. ► MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing gliomas in IHC. - Abstract: Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutations have been detected in gliomas, cartilaginous tumors, and leukemias. IDH1/2 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations, are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arginine 132 (R132) in IDH1 and Arginine 172 (R172) in IDH2. We previously established several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which are specific for IDH1 mutations: clones IMab-1 or HMab-1 against IDH1-R132H or clone SMab-1 against IDH1-R132S. However, specific mAbs against IDH2 mutations have not been reported. To establish IDH2-mutation-specific mAbs, we immunized mice or rats with each mutation-containing IDH2 peptides including IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M. After cell fusion, IDH2 mutation-specific mAbs were screened in Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Established mAbs KMab-1 and MMab-1 reacted with the IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M peptides, respectively, but not with IDH2-wild type (WT) in ELISA. Western-blot analysis also showed that KMab-1 and MMab-1 reacted with the IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M recombinant proteins, respectively, not with IDH2-WT or other IDH2 mutants, indicating that KMab-1 and MMab-1 are IDH2-mutation-specific. Furthermore, MMab-1 specifically stained the IDH2-R172M-expressing cells in immunocytochemistry, but did not stain IDH2-WT and other IDH2-mutation-containing cells. In immunohistochemical analysis, MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing glioma. This is the first report to establish anti-IDH2-mutation-specific mAbs, which could be useful in diagnosis of mutation-bearing tumors.

  12. Establishment of novel monoclonal antibodies KMab-1 and MMab-1 specific for IDH2 mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mika Kato; Morita, Shunpei; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Yanagiya, Ryo; Nasu, Kana; Sasaki, Hiroko; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Natsume, Atsushi; Watanabe, Mika; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Takano, Shingo; Kato, Yukinari

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► IDH1/2 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas. ► We established anti-mutated IDH2-specific mAbs KMab-1 and MMab-1. ► KMab-1 or MMab-1 specifically reacted with mutated IDH2 in ELISA. ► MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing CHO cells in ICC. ► MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing gliomas in IHC. - Abstract: Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutations have been detected in gliomas, cartilaginous tumors, and leukemias. IDH1/2 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations, are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arginine 132 (R132) in IDH1 and Arginine 172 (R172) in IDH2. We previously established several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which are specific for IDH1 mutations: clones IMab-1 or HMab-1 against IDH1-R132H or clone SMab-1 against IDH1-R132S. However, specific mAbs against IDH2 mutations have not been reported. To establish IDH2-mutation-specific mAbs, we immunized mice or rats with each mutation-containing IDH2 peptides including IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M. After cell fusion, IDH2 mutation-specific mAbs were screened in Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Established mAbs KMab-1 and MMab-1 reacted with the IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M peptides, respectively, but not with IDH2-wild type (WT) in ELISA. Western-blot analysis also showed that KMab-1 and MMab-1 reacted with the IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M recombinant proteins, respectively, not with IDH2-WT or other IDH2 mutants, indicating that KMab-1 and MMab-1 are IDH2-mutation-specific. Furthermore, MMab-1 specifically stained the IDH2-R172M-expressing cells in immunocytochemistry, but did not stain IDH2-WT and other IDH2-mutation-containing cells. In immunohistochemical analysis, MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing glioma. This is the first report to establish anti-IDH2-mutation-specific mAbs, which could be useful in diagnosis of mutation-bearing tumors

  13. Invoking the muse: Dada's chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Diane

    2014-07-01

    Dada, a self-proclaimed (anti)art (non)movement, took shape in 1916 among a group of writers and artists who rejected the traditions of a stagnating bourgeoisie. Instead, they adopted means of creative expression that embraced chaos, stoked instability and undermined logic, an outburst that overturned centuries of classical and Romantic aesthetics. Paradoxically, this insistence on disorder foreshadowed a new order in understanding creativity. Nearly one hundred years later, Nonlinear Dynamical Systems theory (NDS) gives renewed currency to Dada's visionary perspective on chance, chaos and creative cognition. This paper explores commonalities between NDS-theory and this early precursor of the nonlinear paradigm, suggesting that their conceptual synergy illuminates what it means to 'be creative' beyond the disciplinary boundaries of either. Key features are discussed within a 5P model of creativity based on Rhodes' 4P framework (Person, Process, Press, Product), to which I add Participant-Viewer for the interactivity of observer-observed. Grounded in my own art practice, several techniques are then put forward as non-methodical methods that invoke creative border zones, those regions where Dada's chance and design are wedded in a dialectical tension of opposites.

  14. TET2 mutations in B cells of patients affected by angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Friederike H; Cai, Qian; Fellmann, Eva; Hartmann, Sylvia; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Sundström, Christer; Scholtysik, René; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Küppers, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (AITLs) frequently carry mutations in the TET2 and IDH2 genes. TET2 mutations represent early genetic lesions as they had already been detected in haematopoietic precursor cells of AITL patients. We show by analysis of whole-tissue sections and microdissected PD1 + cells that the frequency of TET2-mutated AITL is presumably even higher than reported (12/13 cases in our collection; 92%). In two-thirds of informative AITLs (6/9), a fraction of B cells was also TET2-mutated. Investigation of four AITLs by TET2 and IGHV gene sequencing of single microdissected B cells showed that between 10% and 60% of polyclonal B cells in AITL lymph nodes harboured the identical TET2 mutations of the respective T-cell lymphoma clone. Thus, TET2-mutated haematopoietic precursor cells in AITL patients not only give rise to the T-cell lymphoma but also generate a large population of mutated mature B cells. Future studies will show whether this is a reason why AITL patients frequently also develop B-cell lymphomas. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation is characterised by neuronal lysosomal storage pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, Emma L.; Mizielinska, Sarah; Edgar, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report that mice which express FTD-causative mutant CHMP2B at physiological levels develop a novel lysosomal storage pathology characterised by large neuronal autofluorescent aggregates...... in human CHMP2B mutation brain than in neurodegenerative disease or age-matched control brains. These data suggest that lysosomal storage pathology is the major neuronal pathology in FTD caused by CHMP2B mutation. Recent evidence suggests that two other genes associated with FTD, GRN and TMEM106B...... are important for lysosomal function. Our identification of lysosomal storage pathology in FTD caused by CHMP2B mutation now provides evidence that endolysosomal dysfunction is a major degenerative pathway in FTD....

  16. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B on chromosome 3 (FTD3, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III. We have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome due to mutations in the RRM2B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Belén; Area, Estela; Flanigan, Kevin M; Ganesh, Jaya; Jayakar, Parul; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Coku, Jorida; Naini, Ali; Shanske, Sara; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2008-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS) is characterized by a reduction in mtDNA copy number and has been associated with mutations in eight nuclear genes, including enzymes involved in mitochondrial nucleotide metabolism (POLG, TK2, DGUOK, SUCLA2, SUCLG1, PEO1) and MPV17. Recently, mutations in the RRM2B gene, encoding the p53-controlled ribonucleotide reductase subunit, have been described in seven infants from four families, who presented with various combinations of hypotonia, tubulopathy, seizures, respiratory distress, diarrhea, and lactic acidosis. All children died before 4 months of age. We sequenced the RRM2B gene in three unrelated cases with unexplained severe mtDNA depletion. The first patient developed intractable diarrhea, profound weakness, respiratory distress, and died at 3 months. The other two unrelated patients had a much milder phenotype and are still alive at ages 27 and 36 months. All three patients had lactic acidosis and severe depletion of mtDNA in muscle. Muscle histochemistry showed RRF and COX deficiency. Sequencing the RRM2B gene revealed three missense mutations and two single nucleotide deletions in exons 6, 8, and 9, confirming that RRM2B mutations are important causes of MDS and that the clinical phenotype is heterogeneous and not invariably fatal in infancy.

  18. Charcot Marie Tooth 2B Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy: How Rab7 Mutations Impact NGF Signaling?

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    Harry Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2B peripheral sensory neuropathy (CMT2B is a debilitating autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy. Patients with this disease lose pain sensation and frequently need amputation. Axonal dysfunction and degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons is a major clinical manifestation of CMT2B. However, the cellular and molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. CMT2B is caused by missense point mutations (L129F, K157N, N161T/I, V162M in Rab7 GTPase. Strong evidence suggests that the Rab7 mutation(s enhances the cellular levels of activated Rab7 proteins, thus resulting in increased lysosomal activity and autophagy. As a consequence, trafficking and signaling of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF in the long axons of peripheral sensory neurons are particularly vulnerable to premature degradation. A “gain of toxicity” model has, thus, been proposed based on these observations. However, studies of fly photo-sensory neurons indicate that the Rab7 mutation(s causes a “loss of function”, resulting in haploinsufficiency. In the review, we summarize experimental evidence for both hypotheses. We argue that better models (rodent animals and human neurons of CMT2B are needed to precisely define the disease mechanisms.

  19. Charcot Marie Tooth 2B Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy: How Rab7 Mutations Impact NGF Signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Harry; Wu, Chengbiao

    2017-02-04

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2B peripheral sensory neuropathy (CMT2B) is a debilitating autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy. Patients with this disease lose pain sensation and frequently need amputation. Axonal dysfunction and degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons is a major clinical manifestation of CMT2B. However, the cellular and molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. CMT2B is caused by missense point mutations (L129F, K157N, N161T/I, V162M) in Rab7 GTPase. Strong evidence suggests that the Rab7 mutation(s) enhances the cellular levels of activated Rab7 proteins, thus resulting in increased lysosomal activity and autophagy. As a consequence, trafficking and signaling of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF) in the long axons of peripheral sensory neurons are particularly vulnerable to premature degradation. A "gain of toxicity" model has, thus, been proposed based on these observations. However, studies of fly photo-sensory neurons indicate that the Rab7 mutation(s) causes a "loss of function", resulting in haploinsufficiency. In the review, we summarize experimental evidence for both hypotheses. We argue that better models (rodent animals and human neurons) of CMT2B are needed to precisely define the disease mechanisms.

  20. TUBB2B Mutation in an Adult Patient with Myoclonus-Dystonia

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    Joshua T. Geiger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tubulin mutations are a cause of neuronal migrational disorders referred to as tubulinopathies. Mutations in tubulin genes can have a severe impact on microtubule function and result in heterogeneous clinical presentations. Current understanding of the clinical spectrum of tubulinopathies is predominantly based on research in fetal tissue and early-childhood cases. Methods: Testing of candidate genes followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed in an adult woman with a neurodevelopmental, hyperkinetic movement disorder, to identify the underlying genetic cause. Bioinformatic modeling and a systematic review of literature was conducted to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations. Results: The patient was found to carry a heterozygous, de novo c.722G>A, p.R241H mutation in a conserved domain of TUBB2B, encoding the β-isoform of tubulin. In silico analysis indicated that this mutation was pathogenic. On neuroimaging, the patient had asymmetric pachygyria and dysmorphic basal ganglia. Her neurological examination demonstrated mild cognitive impairment, myoclonus-dystonia, and skeletal anomalies. Conclusions: Here, we report the unique phenotype of an adult TUBB2B mutation carrier. This case illustrates a relatively mild phenotype compared to previously described fetal and early childhood cases. This highlights the importance of obtaining molecular genetic testing in individuals with a high probability of a genetic disease, including undiagnosed adult patients.

  1. A novel mutation in HSD11B2 causes apparent mineralocorticoid excess in an Omani kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Mabel; Azkawi, Hanan Said Al; Haider, Shozeb; Khattab, Ahmed; Badi, Maryam Al; Abdullah, Wafa; Senani, Aisha Al; Wilson, Robert C; Yuen, Tony; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2016-07-01

    Apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder causing severe hypertension in childhood due to a deficiency of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2), which is encoded by HSD11B2. Without treatment, chronic hypertension leads to early development of end-organ damage. Approximately 40 causative mutations in HSD11B2 have been identified in ∼100 AME patients worldwide. We have studied the clinical presentation, biochemical parameters, and molecular genetics in six patients from a consanguineous Omani family with AME. DNA sequence analysis of affected members of this family revealed homozygous c.799A>G mutations within exon 4 of HSD11B2, corresponding to a p.T267A mutation of 11βHSD2. The structural change and predicted consequences owing to the p.T267A mutation have been modeled in silico. We conclude that this novel mutation is responsible for AME in this family. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Play and the Avant-Garde: Aren't We All a Little Dada?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Dada, an art movement that became well known in the late 1910s and early 1920s, challengeded traditional notions of art and aesthetics. Dada artists, for example, tossed colored scraps of paper into the air to compose chance-based collages, performed sound poems devoid of semantic value, and mode......Dada, an art movement that became well known in the late 1910s and early 1920s, challengeded traditional notions of art and aesthetics. Dada artists, for example, tossed colored scraps of paper into the air to compose chance-based collages, performed sound poems devoid of semantic value...... originates from art history’s methodological blindness to the importance of play, not only to creative and artistic endeavors, but to human identity itself. Dada is characterized by an effervescent love of improvisation, curiosity, novelty and an unselfconscious exploration of the phenomenal world...

  3. Somatic mutation of EZH2 (Y641) in follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of germinal center origin | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin et al. describe recurrent somatic mutations in EZH2, a polycomb group oncogene. The mutation, found in the SET domain of this gene encoding a histone methyltransferase, is found only in a subset of lymphoma samples. Specifically, EZH2 mutations are found in about 12% of follicular lymphomas (FL) and almost 23% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) of germinal center origin. This paper goes on to demonstrate that altered EZH2 proteins, corresponding to the most frequent mutations found in human lymphomas, have reduced activity using in vitro histone methylation assays.

  4. Long-range PCR facilitates the identification of PMS2-specific mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenning, Mark; Hampel, Heather; LaJeunesse, Jennifer; Lindblom, Annika; Lockman, Jan; Nilbert, Mef; Senter, Leigha; Sotamaa, Kaisa; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2006-05-01

    Mutations within the DNA mismatch repair gene, "postmeiotic segregation increased 2" (PMS2), have been associated with a predisposition to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch syndrome). The presence of a large family of highly homologous PMS2 pseudogenes has made previous attempts to sequence PMS2 very difficult. Here, we describe a novel method that utilizes long-range PCR as a way to preferentially amplify PMS2 and not the pseudogenes. A second, exon-specific, amplification from diluted long-range products enables us to obtain a clean sequence that shows no evidence of pseudogene contamination. This method has been used to screen a cohort of patients whose tumors were negative for the PMS2 protein by immunohistochemistry and had not shown any mutations within the MLH1 gene. Sequencing of the PMS2 gene from 30 colorectal and 11 endometrial cancer patients identified 10 novel sequence changes as well as 17 sequence changes that had previously been identified. In total, putative pathologic mutations were detected in 11 of the 41 families. Among these were five novel mutations, c.705+1G>T, c.736_741del6ins11, c.862_863del, c.1688G>T, and c.2007-1G>A. We conclude that PMS2 mutation detection in selected Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome-like patients is both feasible and desirable. Published 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Disruption of endocytic trafficking in frontotemporal dementia with CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urwin, Hazel; Authier, Astrid; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in CHMP2B cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in a large Danish pedigree, which is termed FTD linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3), and also in an unrelated familial FTD patient. CHMP2B is a component of the ESCRT-III complex, which is required for function of the multivesicular body (MVB), a...

  6. Dada Typography: Patterns of Experimentation with Graphic Design 1912-1930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Don

    Dada was a collective movement among avant-garde artists who rejected the existing culture of post-World War I Europe on the grounds that it belonged to the same society that had produced the war. This paper discusses Dada typography in relation to typography's role and function in the history of printing, the changes resulting from the…

  7. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific heterozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) on chromosome 3 (FTD3), a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III). ...

  8. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) on chromosome 3 (FTD3), a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III). ...

  9. Mutation analysis of the RET proto-oncogene in Dutch families with MEN 2A, MEN 2B and FMTC : Two novel mutations and one de novo mutation for MEN 2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsvater, RM; Jansen, RPM; Hofstra, RMW; Buys, CHCM; Lips, CJM; vanAmstel, HKP

    Hereditary C-cell carcinoma is encountered in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A), MEN 2B, and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Mutations of the RET proto-oncogene are associated with all three diseases. To obtain an insight into the molecular heterogeneity of MEN 2 syndromes

  10. High Inter-Individual Diversity of Point Mutations, Insertions, and Deletions in Human Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Reiche

    Full Text Available The diversity of virus-specific antibodies and of B cells among different individuals is unknown. Using single-cell cloning of antibody genes, we generated recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from influenza nucleoprotein-specific memory B cells in four adult humans with and without preceding influenza vaccination. We examined the diversity of the antibody repertoires and found that NP-specific B cells used numerous immunoglobulin genes. The heavy chains (HCs originated from 26 and the kappa light chains (LCs from 19 different germ line genes. Matching HC and LC chains gave rise to 43 genetically distinct antibodies that bound influenza NP. The median lengths of the CDR3 of the HC, kappa and lambda LC were 14, 9 and 11 amino acids, respectively. We identified changes at 13.6% of the amino acid positions in the V gene of the antibody heavy chain, at 8.4% in the kappa and at 10.6 % in the lambda V gene. We identified somatic insertions or deletions in 8.1% of the variable genes. We also found several small groups of clonal relatives that were highly diversified. Our findings demonstrate broadly diverse memory B cell repertoires for the influenza nucleoprotein. We found extensive variation within individuals with a high number of point mutations, insertions, and deletions, and extensive clonal diversification. Thus, structurally conserved proteins can elicit broadly diverse and highly mutated B-cell responses.

  11. Serial prenatal and postnatal MRI of dystroglycanopathy in a patient with familial B3GALNT2 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Mai-Lan [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sherr, Eliott H. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); Strober, Jonathan B. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of conditions, with mutations in B3GALNT2 described in association with congenital muscular dystrophy. The serial prenatal MRI findings in this disorder have not been well described. We present sequential prenatal and postnatal MRI findings in a boy with compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2, as well as the MRI findings of his two siblings with similar mutations. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis and neurodevelopment of congenital muscular dystrophy. (orig.)

  12. Serial prenatal and postnatal MRI of dystroglycanopathy in a patient with familial B3GALNT2 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Mai-Lan; Glenn, Orit A.; Sherr, Eliott H.; Strober, Jonathan B.

    2017-01-01

    The dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of conditions, with mutations in B3GALNT2 described in association with congenital muscular dystrophy. The serial prenatal MRI findings in this disorder have not been well described. We present sequential prenatal and postnatal MRI findings in a boy with compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2, as well as the MRI findings of his two siblings with similar mutations. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis and neurodevelopment of congenital muscular dystrophy. (orig.)

  13. Patient iPSC-Derived Neurons for Disease Modeling of Frontotemporal Dementia with Mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The truncated mutant form of the charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B is causative for frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD3. CHMP2B is a constituent of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT and, when mutated, disrupts endosome-to-lysosome trafficking and substrate degradation. To understand the underlying molecular pathology, FTD3 patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were differentiated into forebrain-type cortical neurons. FTD3 neurons exhibited abnormal endosomes, as previously shown in patients. Moreover, mitochondria of FTD3 neurons displayed defective cristae formation, accompanied by deficiencies in mitochondrial respiration and increased levels of reactive oxygen. In addition, we provide evidence for perturbed iron homeostasis, presenting an in vitro patient-specific model to study the effects of iron accumulation in neurodegenerative diseases. All phenotypes observed in FTD3 neurons were rescued in CRISPR/Cas9-edited isogenic controls. These findings illustrate the relevance of our patient-specific in vitro models and open up possibilities for drug target development.

  14. X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of two-component heterokaryons of Neurospora crass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Serres, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    More extensive complementation tests than those performed initially on a series of 832 X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations in the adenine-4 (ad-3) region of a two-component heterokaryon (H-12) of Neurospora crassa showed that unexpectedly high frequencies of specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region have additional, but separate, sites of recessive lethal damage in the immediately adjacent genetic regions. In the present paper, X-ray-induced irreparable ad-3 mutants of the folowing genotypes and numbers (ad-3A ad-3B, ad-3A ad-3B nic-2, and ad-3B nic-2) have also subjected to the same genetic fine structure analysis. These experiments, in the previous and present papers, were designed to determine the extent of the functional inactivation in the ad-3 and immediately adjacent genetic regions in individual mutants classified as presumptive multilocus deletions or multiplelocus mutations. The data in the present paper have shown that in Neurospora crassa most X-ray-induced irreparable mutants of genotype ad-3A ad-3B, ad-3A ad-3B nic-2, and ad-3 nic-2 map as a series of overlapping multilocus deletions. In addition, genetic fine structure analysis has shown that some of the mutants classified, initially, as multilocus deletions, are actually multiple-locus mutations: multilocus deletions with closely linked, and separate, sites of recessive lethal damage with a wide variety of genotyes. Combining data from the present experiments with previously published date, the frequency of multiple-locus mutations among X-ray-induced gene/point mutations and multilocus deletions in the ad-3 region is 6.2%. (author). 27 refs.; 4 figs.; 7 tab

  15. No Evidence for JAK2(V617F) Mutation in Monoclonal B Cells in 2 Patients with Polycythaemia Vera and Concurrent Monoclonal B Cell Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijnis, C.; Kroes, W. G. M.; Balkassmi, S.; Marijt, E. W. A.; van Rossum, A. P.; Bakker, E.; Vlasveld, L. T.

    2012-01-01

    Occurrence of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph- MPN) and lymphoproliferative disorders, like B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL), in the same patient is rare. JAK2(V617F) mutation was recently introduced as a powerful diagnostic tool for Ph- MPN. JAK2(V617F)

  16. Convergent Evolution of Head Crests in Two Domesticated Columbids Is Associated with Different Missense Mutations in EphB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickrey, Anna I.; Domyan, Eric T.; Horvath, Martin P.; Shapiro, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Head crests are important display structures in wild bird species and are also common in domesticated lineages. Many breeds of domestic rock pigeon (Columba livia) have crests of reversed occipital feathers, and this recessive trait is associated with a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB2 (Ephrin receptor B2). The domestic ringneck dove (Streptopelia risoria) also has a recessive crested morph with reversed occipital feathers, and interspecific crosses between crested doves and pigeons produce crested offspring, suggesting a similar genetic basis for this trait in both species. We therefore investigated EphB2 as a candidate for the head crest phenotype of ringneck doves and identified a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain that is significantly associated with the crested morph. This mutation is over 100 amino acid positions away from the crest mutation found in rock pigeons, yet both mutations are predicted to negatively affect the function of ATP-binding pocket. Furthermore, bacterial toxicity assays suggest that “crest” mutations in both species severely impact kinase activity. We conclude that head crests are associated with different mutations in the same functional domain of the same gene in two different columbid species, thereby representing striking evolutionary convergence in morphology and molecules. PMID:26104009

  17. Glaucoma and Cytochrome P4501B1 Gene Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Tanwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental anomalies of the ocular anterior chamber angle may lead to an incomplete development of the structures that form the conventional aqueous outflow pathway. Thus, disorders that present with such dysfunction tend to be associated with glaucoma. Among them, Axenfeld-Rieger (ARS malformation is a rare clinical entity with an estimated prevalence of one in every 200,000 individuals. The changes in eye morphogenesis in ARS are highly penetrant and are associated with 50% risk of development of glaucoma. Mutations in the cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1 gene have been reported to be associated with primary congenital glaucoma and other forms of glaucoma and mutations in pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2 gene have been identified in ARS in various studies. This case was negative for PITX2 mutations and compound heterozygote for CYP1B1 mutations. Clinical manifestations of this patient include bilateral elevated intraocular pressure (>40 mmHg with increased corneal diameter (>14 mm and corneal opacity. Patient also had iridocorneal adhesions, anteriorly displaced Schwalbe line, anterior insertion of iris, broad nasal bridge and protruding umbilicus. This is the first study from north India reporting CYP1B1 mutations in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome with bilateral buphthalmos and early onset glaucoma. Result of this study supports the role of CYP1B1 as a causative gene in ASD disorders and its role in oculogenesis.

  18. Secondary immunization generates clonally related antigen-specific plasma cells and memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Daniela; Giesecke, Claudia; Mei, Henrik E; Reiter, Karin; Daridon, Capucine; Lipsky, Peter E; Dörner, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Rechallenge with T cell-dependent Ags induces memory B cells to re-enter germinal centers (GCs) and undergo further expansion and differentiation into plasma cells (PCs) and secondary memory B cells. It is currently not known whether the expanded population of memory B cells and PCs generated in secondary GCs are clonally related, nor has the extent of proliferation and somatic hypermutation of their precursors been delineated. In this study, after secondary tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization, TT-specific PCs increased 17- to 80-fold on days 6-7, whereas TT-specific memory B cells peaked (delayed) on day 14 with a 2- to 22-fold increase. Molecular analyses of V(H)DJ(H) rearrangements of individual cells revealed no major differences of gene usage and CDR3 length between TT-specific PCs and memory B cells, and both contained extensive evidence of somatic hypermutation with a pattern consistent with GC reactions. This analysis identified clonally related TT-specific memory B cells and PCs. Within clusters of clonally related cells, sequences shared a number of mutations but also could contain additional base pair changes. The data indicate that although following secondary immunization PCs can derive from memory B cells without further somatic hypermutation, in some circumstances, likely within GC reactions, asymmetric mutation can occur. These results suggest that after the fate decision to differentiate into secondary memory B cells or PCs, some committed precursors continue to proliferate and mutate their V(H) genes.

  19. Study of hepatitis B virus gene mutations with enzymatic colorimetry-based DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hailei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Donglei; Mao, Hongju; Zhao, Jianlong; Shi, Jian; Cui, Zhichu

    2006-01-01

    To establish a modified microarray method for detecting HBV gene mutations in the clinic. Site-specific oligonucleotide probes were immobilized to microarray slides and hybridized to biotin-labeled HBV gene fragments amplified from two-step PCR. Hybridized targets were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, followed by intensity measurement using BCIP/NBT colorimetry. HBV genes from 99 Hepatitis B patients and 40 healthy blood donors were analyzed. Mutation frequencies of HBV pre-core/core and basic core promoter (BCP) regions were found to be significantly higher in the patient group (42%, 40% versus 2.5%, 5%, P colorimetry method exhibited the same level of sensitivity and reproducibility. An enzymatic colorimetry-based DNA microarray assay was successfully established to monitor HBV mutations. Pre-core/core and BCP mutations of HBV genes could be major causes of HBV infection in HBeAg-negative patients and could also be relevant to chronicity and aggravation of hepatitis B.

  20. Making an Art of Creativity: The Cognitive Science of Duchamp and Dada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Dada is the infant terrible of art history, an anarchic movement that is typically referred to as nihilistic, pathological, and firmly enshrined within the modernist paradigm and the context of WWI. Through the lens of classical, romantic, and psychoanalytic notions, it certainly appears almost...... antithetical to creativity. Yet from a cognitive point-of-view, Dada marks a watershed in the understanding of creativity, and articulates principles of creative cognition with surprising insight and precision many decades ahead of science....

  1. Mutational specificity of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoebee, Barbara.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis was to get more information on the mutagenic properties of radiation-induced DNA modifications and the possible mechanisms involved in radiation-induced mutagenesis, principally by investigating the kinds of mutations by DNA sequence analysis. The mutations were analyzed after γ-irradiation of recombinant bacteriophage M13 and plasmide pUC DNA in diluted aqueous solutions, followed by transfection or transformation to E. coli cells, in which the damaged DNA molecules are repaired and replicated. Error-prone repair, misrepair or bypass of lesions during replication may lead to the introduction of mutations. Both the M13 and the plasmid DNA used in our mutation studies contain a mutation target sequence, which makes an easy selection and sequence analysis of mutant DNA molecules possible. Under the radiation conditions used, e.g. irradiation of diluted aqueous DNA solutions, only DNA damage occurs introduced by the water derived OH* and H* radicals and the hydrated electrons. By using different gas conditions during irradiation the relative yields of these reaction species can be manipulated, which opens up the opportunity to determine their effects separately. The mutation spectrum obtained in double-stranded (ds) M13DNA after irradiation under oxic conditions and the mutation spectrum obtained under the same conditions and in the same mutation target but cloned in plasmid DNA, are described. The mutation specificity under anoxic conditions in ds M13DNA is given. Results obtained after irradiation of ds M13DNA under N 2 conditions are discussed together with experiments with single-stranded DNA. Similarities and differences between radiation-induced mutation spectra obtained by other groups and those presented in this thesis are discussed. (author). 155 refs.; 134 figs.; 16 tabs

  2. Darier disease mutation E917K of SERCA2b relieves the inhibitory influence of the 11th transmembrane segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Stine; Holdensen, Anne Nyholm; Vangheluwe, Peter

    Mutation E917K of the Sarco(endo)plasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2b (SERCA2b) causes Darier disease, an autosomal dominantly inherited skin disease also denoted as Keratosis Follicularis or Darier-White disease. SERCA is encoded by three genes ATP2A1, ATP2A2 and ATP2A3 giving rise to the pr......Mutation E917K of the Sarco(endo)plasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2b (SERCA2b) causes Darier disease, an autosomal dominantly inherited skin disease also denoted as Keratosis Follicularis or Darier-White disease. SERCA is encoded by three genes ATP2A1, ATP2A2 and ATP2A3 giving rise...

  3. Population-specific regulation of Chmp2b by Lbx1 during onset of synaptogenesis in lateral association interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Chmp2b is closely related to Vps2, a key component of the yeast protein complex that creates the intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular bodies. Dominant negative mutations in Chmp2b cause autophagosome accumulation and neurodegenerative disease. Loss of Chmp2b causes failure of dendritic spine maturation in cultured neurons. The homeobox gene Lbx1 plays an essential role in specifying postmitotic dorsal interneuron populations during late pattern formation in the neural tube. We have discovered that Chmp2b is one of the most highly regulated cell-autonomous targets of Lbx1 in the embryonic mouse neural tube. Chmp2b was expressed and depended on Lbx1 in only two of the five nascent, Lbx1-expressing, postmitotic, dorsal interneuron populations. It was also expressed in neural tube cell populations that lacked Lbx1 protein. The observed population-specific expression of Chmp2b indicated that only certain population-specific combinations of sequence specific transcription factors allow Chmp2b expression. The cell populations that expressed Chmp2b corresponded, in time and location, to neurons that make the first synapses of the spinal cord. Chmp2b protein was transported into neurites within the motor- and association-neuropils, where the first synapses are known to form between E11.5 and E12.5 in mouse neural tubes. Selective, developmentally-specified gene expression of Chmp2b may therefore be used to endow particular neuronal populations with the ability to mature dendritic spines. Such a mechanism could explain how mammalian embryos reproducibly establish the disynaptic cutaneous reflex only between particular cell populations.

  4. The CDC Hemophilia B mutation project mutation list: a new online resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengguo; Miller, Connie H; Payne, Amanda B; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-11-01

    Hemophilia B (HB) is caused by mutations in the human gene F9. The mutation type plays a pivotal role in genetic counseling and prediction of inhibitor development. To help the HB community understand the molecular etiology of HB, we have developed a listing of all F9 mutations that are reported to cause HB based on the literature and existing databases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Hemophilia B Mutation Project (CHBMP) mutation list is compiled in an easily accessible format of Microsoft Excel and contains 1083 unique mutations that are reported to cause HB. Each mutation is identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards. The mutation types and the predicted changes in amino acids, if applicable, are also provided. Related information including the location of mutation, severity of HB, the presence of inhibitor, and original publication reference are listed as well. Therefore, our mutation list provides an easily accessible resource for genetic counselors and HB researchers to predict inhibitors. The CHBMP mutation list is freely accessible at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations.

  5. Enhancement of B-cell receptor signaling by a point mutation of adaptor protein 3BP2 identified in human inherited disease cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Kazuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Takeuchi, Kenji; Horiguchi, Tomoko; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2011-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of adaptor protein c-Abl-Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-binding protein-2 (3BP2, also referred to SH3BP2) positively regulates the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR)-mediated signal transduction, leading to the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Here we showed the effect of the proline to arginine substitution of 3BP2 in which is the most common mutation in patients with cherubism (P418R) on B-cell receptor signaling. Comparing to the wild type, overexpression of the mutant form of 3BP2 (3BP2-P416R, corresponding to P418R in human protein) enhanced BCR-mediated activation of NFAT. 3BP2-P416R increased the signaling complex formation with Syk, phospholipase C-γ2 (PLC-γ2), and Vav1. In contrast, 3BP2-P416R could not change the association with the negative regulator 14-3-3. Loss of the association mutant that was incapable to associate with 14-3-3 could not mimic BCR-mediated NFAT activation in Syk-deficient cells. Moreover, BCR-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was not affected by P416R mutation. These results showed that P416R mutation of 3BP2 causes the gain of function in B cells by increasing the interaction with specific signaling molecules. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Genetic and proteomic characterization of rpoB mutations and their effect on nematicidal activity in Photorhabdus luminescens LN2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Qiu

    Full Text Available Rifampin resistant (Rif(R mutants of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens LN2 from entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LN2 were genetically and proteomically characterized. The Rif(R mutants showed typical phase one characters of Photorhabdus bacteria, and insecticidal activity against Galleria mellonella larvae, but surprisingly influenced their nematicidal activity against axenic infective juveniles (IJs of H. bacteriophora H06, an incompatible nematode host. 13 out of 34 Rif(R mutants lost their nematicidal activity against H06 IJs but supported the reproduction of H06 nematodes. 7 nematicidal-producing and 7 non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R mutants were respectively selected for rpoB sequence analysis. rpoB mutations were found in all 14 Rif(R mutants. The rpoB (P564L mutation was found in all 7 mutants which produced nematicidal activity against H06 nematodes, but not in the mutants which supported H06 nematode production. Allelic exchange assays confirmed that the Rif-resistance and the impact on nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria were conferred by rpoB mutation(s. The non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R mutant was unable to colonize in the intestines of H06 IJs, but able to colonize in the intestines of its indigenous LN2 IJs. Proteomic analysis revealed different protein expression between wild-type strain and Rif(R mutants, or between nematicidal-producing and non nematicidal-producing mutants. At least 7 putative proteins including DsbA, HlpA, RhlE, RplC, NamB (a protein from T3SS, and 2 hypothetical proteins (similar to unknown protein YgdH and YggE of Escherichia coli respectively were probably involved in the nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria against H06 nematodes. This hypothesis was further confirmed by creating insertion-deletion mutants of three selected corresponding genes (the downregulated rhlE and namB, and upregulated dsbA. These results indicate that the rpoB mutations greatly influence the

  7. Characterization of Human Disease Phenotypes Associated with Mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crow, Y.J.; Chase, D.S.; Schmidt, J.L.; Szynkiewicz, M.; Forte, G.M.A.; Gornall, H.L.; Oojageer, A.; Anderson, B.; Pizzino, A.; Helman, G.; Abdel-Hamid, M.S.; Abdel-Salam, G.M.; Ackroyd, S.; Aeby, A.; Agosta, G.; Albin, C.; Allon-Shalev, S.; Arellano, M.; Ariaudo, G.; Aswani, V.; Babul-Hirji, R.; Baildam, E.M.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; Bailey, K.M.; Barnerias, C.; Barth, M.; Battini, R.; Beresford, M.W.; Bernard, G.; Bianchi, M.; de Villemeur, T.B.; Blair, E.M.; Bloom, M.; Burlina, A.B.; Carpanelli, M.L.; Carvalho, D.R.; Castro-Gago, M.; Cavallini, A.; Cereda, C.; Chandler, K.E.; Chitayat, D.A.; Collins, A.E.; Corcoles, C.S.; Cordeiro, N.J.V.; Crichiutti, G.; Dabydeen, L.; Dale, R.C.; D'Arrigo, S.; De Goede, C.G.E.L.; de Laet, C.; De Waele, L.M.H.; Denzler, I.; Desguerre, I.; Devriendt, K.; Di Rocco, M.; Fahey, M.C.; Fazzi, E.; Ferrie, C.D.; Figueiredo, A.; Gener, B.; Goizet, C.; Gowrinathan, N.R.; Gowrishankar, K.; Hanrahan, D.; Isidor, B.; Kara, L.; Khan, N.; King, M.D.; Kirk, E.P.; Kumar, R.; Lagae, L.; Landrieu, P.; Lauffer, H.; Laugel, V.; La Piana, R.; Lim, M.J.; Lin, J.P.S.M.; Linnankivi, T.; Mackay, M.T.; Marom, D.R.; Lourenco, C.M.; McKee, S.A.; Moroni, I.; Morton, J.E.V.; Moutard, M.L.; Murray, K.; Nabbout, R.; Nampoothiri, S.; Nunez-Enamorado, N.; Oades, P.J.; Olivieri, I.; Ostergaard, J.R.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Prendiville, J.S.; Ramesh, V.; Rasmussen, M.; Regal, L.; Ricci, F.; Rio, M.; Knaap, M.; Orcesi, S.; Rice, G.I.

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical

  8. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, and interferon-based therapy cures only 40 to 80% of patients, depending on HCV genotype. Research was accelerated by genotype 2a (strain JFH1) infectious cell culture systems. We previously developed viable JFH1-based...... (HC-TN and DH6), 1b (DH1 and DH5), and 3a (DBN) isolates, using previously identified adaptive mutations. Introduction of mutations from isolates of the same subtype either led to immediate efficient virus production or accelerated culture adaptation. The DH6 and DH5 recombinants without introduced...... mutations did not adapt to culture. Universal adaptive effects of mutations in NS3 (Q1247L, I1312V, K1398Q, R1408W, and Q1496L) and NS5A (V2418L) were investigated for JFH1-based genotype 1 to 5 core-NS2 recombinants; several mutations conferred adaptation to H77C (1a), J4 (1b), S52 (3a), and SA13 (5a...

  9. Direct stacking of sequence-specific nuclease-induced mutations to produce high oleic and low linolenic soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Zachary L; Coffman, Andrew; Baltes, Nicholas J; Stoddard, Thomas J; Clasen, Benjamin M; Luo, Song; Retterath, Adam; Yabandith, Ann; Gamo, Maria Elena; Bissen, Jeff; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2016-10-13

    The ability to modulate levels of individual fatty acids within soybean oil has potential to increase shelf-life and frying stability and to improve nutritional characteristics. Commodity soybean oil contains high levels of polyunsaturated linoleic and linolenic acid, which contribute to oxidative instability - a problem that has been addressed through partial hydrogenation. However, partial hydrogenation increases levels of trans-fatty acids, which have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Previously, we generated soybean lines with knockout mutations within fatty acid desaturase 2-1A (FAD2-1A) and FAD2-1B genes, resulting in oil with increased levels of monounsaturated oleic acid (18:1) and decreased levels of linoleic (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3). Here, we stack mutations within FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B with mutations in fatty acid desaturase 3A (FAD3A) to further decrease levels of linolenic acid. Mutations were introduced into FAD3A by directly delivering TALENs into fad2-1a fad2-1b soybean plants. Oil from fad2-1a fad2-1b fad3a plants had significantly lower levels of linolenic acid (2.5 %), as compared to fad2-1a fad2-1b plants (4.7 %). Furthermore, oil had significantly lower levels of linoleic acid (2.7 % compared to 5.1 %) and significantly higher levels of oleic acid (82.2 % compared to 77.5 %). Transgene-free fad2-1a fad2-1b fad3a soybean lines were identified. The methods presented here provide an efficient means for using sequence-specific nucleases to stack quality traits in soybean. The resulting product comprised oleic acid levels above 80 % and linoleic and linolenic acid levels below 3 %.

  10. A gain-of-function mutation in Tnni2 impeded bone development through increasing Hif3a expression in DA2B mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoquan Zhu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distal arthrogryposis type 2B (DA2B is an important genetic disorder in humans. However, the mechanisms governing this disease are not clearly understood. In this study, we generated knock-in mice carrying a DA2B mutation (K175del in troponin I type 2 (skeletal, fast (TNNI2, which encodes a fast-twitch skeletal muscle protein. Tnni2K175del mice (referred to as DA2B mice showed typical DA2B phenotypes, including limb abnormality and small body size. However, the current knowledge concerning TNNI2 could not explain the small body phenotype of DA2B mice. We found that Tnni2 was expressed in the osteoblasts and chondrocytes of long bone growth plates. Expression profile analysis using radii and ulnae demonstrated that Hif3a expression was significantly increased in the Tnni2K175del mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that both wild-type and mutant tnni2 protein can bind to the Hif3a promoter using mouse primary osteoblasts. Moreover, we showed that the mutant tnni2 protein had a higher capacity to transactivate Hif3a than the wild-type protein. The increased amount of hif3a resulted in impairment of angiogenesis, delay in endochondral ossification, and decrease in chondrocyte differentiation and osteoblast proliferation, suggesting that hif3a counteracted hif1a-induced Vegf expression in DA2B mice. Together, our data indicated that Tnni2K175del mutation led to abnormally increased hif3a and decreased vegf in bone, which explain, at least in part, the small body size of Tnni2K175del mice. Furthermore, our findings revealed a new function of tnni2 in the regulation of bone development, and the study of gain-of-function mutation in Tnni2 in transgenic mice opens a new avenue to understand the pathological mechanism of human DA2B disorder.

  11. Structural and mutational analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB provides insight into substrate specificity and DNA damage searching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG iron(II dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG and 3-methylthymine (3-meT at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a "searching" mode and "repair" mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  12. Extending Jak2V617F and MplW515 mutation analysis to single hematopoietic colonies and B and T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, Animesh; Lasho, Terra L; Finke, Christy; Mesa, Ruben A; Hogan, William J; Ketterling, Rhett P; Gilliland, Dwight Gary; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2007-09-01

    JAK2V617F and MPLW515L/K are myeloproliferative disorder (MPD)-associated mutations. We genotyped 552 individual hematopoietic colonies obtained by CD34+ cell culture from 16 affected patients (13 JAK2V617F and 3 MPLW515L/K) to determine (a) the proportion of colonies harboring a particular mutation in the presence or absence of cytokines, (b) the lineage distribution of endogenous colonies for each mutation, and (c) the differences (if any) in the pattern of mutation among the various MPDs, as established by genotyping of individual colonies. Genotyping analysis revealed cohabitation of mutation-negative and mutation-positive endogenous colonies in polycythemia vera as well as other MPDs. Culture of progenitor cells harboring MPLW515L/K yielded virtually no endogenous erythroid colonies in contrast to JAK2V617F-harboring progenitor cells. The mutation pattern (i.e., relative distribution of homozygous, heterozygous, or wild-type colonies) was not a distinguishing feature among the MPDs, and MPLW515 mutations were detected in B and/or T lymphocytes in all three patients tested. These observations suggest that clonal myelopoiesis antedates acquisition of JAK2V617F or MPLW515L/K mutations and that the latter is acquired in a lympho-myeloid progenitor cell.

  13. Mutational specificity of SOS mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takeshi

    1986-01-01

    In an approach to the isolation of mutants of E. coli unable to produce mutations by ultraviolet light, the author has found new umuC-mutants. Their properties could be explained by ''SOS hypothesis of Radman and Witkin'', which has now been justified by many investigators. Analysis of the umuC region of E. coli chromosome cloned in pSK 100 has led to the conclusion that two genes, umuD and umuC, having the capacity of mutation induction express in the same mechanism as that of SOS genes, which is known to be inhibited by LexA protein bonding to ''SOS box'' found at promotor region. Suppressor analysis for mutational specificity has revealed: (i) umuDC-independent mutagens, such as EMS and (oh) 4 Cy, induce selected base substitution alone; and (ii) umuDC-dependent mutagens, such as X-rays and gamma-rays, induce various types of base substitution simultaneously, although they have mutational specificity. In the umuDC-dependent processes of basechange mutagenesis, the spectra of base substitution were a mixture of base substitution reflecting the specific base damages induced by individual mutagens and nonspecific base substitution. In conclusion, base substitution plays the most important role in umuDC-dependent mutagenesis, although mutagenesis of umuDC proteins remains uncertain. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Early microgliosis precedes neuronal loss and behavioural impairment in mice with a frontotemporal dementia-causing CHMP2B mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, Emma L.; Mancuso, Renzo; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2017-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-causing mutations in the CHMP2B gene lead to the generation of mutant C-terminally truncated CHMP2B. We report that transgenic mice expressing endogenous levels of mutant CHMP2B developed late-onset brain volume loss associated with frank neuronal loss and FTD-like c...

  15. Contribution of CYP1B1 mutations and founder effect to primary congenital glaucoma in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Hernandez-Merino, Elena; Mejia-Lopez, Herlinda; Matías-Florentino, Margarita; Michel, Norma; Elizondo-Olascoaga, Celia; Korder-Ortega, Vincent; Casab-Rueda, Homero; Garcia-Ortiz, Jose Elias

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG)-causing CYP1B1 mutations varies importantly among distinct populations, ranging from 20% in Indonesians and Japanese to about 100% among the Saudi Arabians and Slovakian Gypsies. Thus, the molecular characterization of large groups of PCG from different ethnic backgrounds is important to establish the actual CYP1B1 contribution in specific populations. In this work, the molecular analysis of the CYP1B1 gene in a group of Mexican PCG patients is reported. Thirty unrelated Mexican patients fulfilling the clinical criteria for PCG were included. Two cases were familial and with proven consanguinity, originating from distinct regions of the country. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct automated sequencing of the CYP1B1 coding region was performed in each participating subject. An identical pathogenic CYP1B1 mutation was demonstrated in 2 unrelated PCG subjects. The mutation consisted of a homozygous G to A transition at nucleotide position 1505 in exon 3, which predicted a substitution of glutamic acid for lysine at residue 387 of the protein (E387K). In the remaining 28 PCG subjects, no deleterious mutations were identified. Both subjects with the E387K mutation shared a same haplotype for 5 CYP1B1 intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, indicating a common origin of the allele. Mexican patients with PCG are rarely (less than 10%) due to CYP1B1 mutations. Available data indicate that most of the non-Brazilian Latin American PCG patients investigated to date are not due to CYP1B1 defects. Populations with low incidence of CYP1B1 mutations are appropriate candidates for the identification of novel PCG-causing genes.

  16. Predominant porB1A and porB1B genotypes and correlation of gene mutations with drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates in Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Renxian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations of porB1A and porB1B genes and their serotypes exist in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from different geographical areas, and some site mutations in the porB1B gene correlate with drug resistance. Methods The β-lactamase production of N. gonorrhoeae isolates was determined by paper acidometric test and nitrocefin discs. The porB1A and porB1B genes of 315 non-penicillinase-producting N. gonorrhoeae (non-PPNG strains were amplified by PCR for sequencing to determine serotypes and site mutations. A duplex PCR was designed to simultaneously detect both porB1A and porB1B genes. Penicillin and tetracycline resistance was assessed by an in vitro drug sensitivity test. Results Of the N. gonorrhoeae isolates, 31.1% tested positive for porB1A and 68.9% for porB1B genes. All the 98 porB1A+ isolates belonging to IA6 serotype with either no mutation at the 120 and 121 sites (88.8% or a D120G (11.2% mutation and were no resistance to both penicillin and tetracycline. Among the 217 porB1B+ isolates, 26.7%, 22.6% and 11.5% belonged to IB3, IB3/6 and IB4 serotypes, respectively. Particularly, two novel chimeric serotypes, IB3/6-IB2 and IB2-IB4-IB2, were found in 77 and 8 porB1B+ isolates. Two hundred and twelve (97.7% of the porB1B+ isolates were presented G120 and/or A121 mutations with 163 (76.9% at both sites. Interestingly, within the 77 porB1B+ isolates belonging to IB3/6-IB2 serotype, 15 were discovered to possess novel deletions at both A121 and N122 sites. All the replacement mutations at these sites in PorB1B were correlated with resistance and the deletion mutation showed the highest resistance. Conclusion N. gonorrhoeae isolates circulating in Eastern China include a sole PorB1A serotype (IA6 and five PorB1B serotypes. Multiple mutations in porB1B genes, including novel A121 and N122 deletions, are correlated with high levels of penicillin and tetracycline resistance.

  17. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR......, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94...... was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Refinement of sensitivity for the mutation-specific antibodies is warranted to improve molecular diagnosis using EGFR immunohistochemistry....

  18. rpoB gene mutations among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from extrapulmonary sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Meghdadi, Hossein; Ghadiri, Ata A; Alami, Ameneh; Sina, Amir Hossein; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze mutations occurring in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from clinical samples of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and fresh tissue samples from confirmed EPTB cases were analyzed. Nested PCR based on the rpoB gene was performed on the extracted DNAs, combined with cloning and subsequent sequencing. Sixty-seven (95.7%) samples were positive for nester PCR. Sequence analysis of the 81 bp region of the rpoB gene demonstrated mutations in 41 (61.2%) of 67 sequenced samples. Several point mutations including deletion mutations at codons 510, 512, 513 and 515, with 45% and 51% of the mutations in codons 512 and 513 respectively were seen, along with 26% replacement mutations at codons 509, 513, 514, 518, 520, 524 and 531. The most common alteration was Gln → His, at codon 513, presented in 30 (75.6%) isolates. This study demonstrated sequence alterations in codon 513 of the 81 bp region of the rpoB gene as the most common mutation occurred in 75.6% of molecularly confirmed rifampin-resistant strains. In addition, simultaneous mutation at codons 512 and 513 was demonstrated in 34.3% of the isolates. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding...... syntaxin-1B(6), that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees(7,8) identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations...... and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature...

  20. Insights into the binding specificity of wild type and mutated wheat germ agglutinin towards Neu5Acα(2-3)Gal: a study by in silico mutations and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuraman, Ponnusamy; Murugan, Veeramani; Selvin, Jeyasigamani F A; Gromiha, M Michael; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Veluraja, Kasinadar

    2014-08-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a plant lectin, which specifically recognizes the sugars NeuNAc and GlcNAc. Mutated WGA with enhanced binding specificity can be used as biomarkers for cancer. In silico mutations are performed at the active site of WGA to enhance the binding specificity towards sialylglycans, and molecular dynamics simulations of 20 ns are carried out for wild type and mutated WGAs (WGA1, WGA2, and WGA3) in complex with sialylgalactose to examine the change in binding specificity. MD simulations reveal the change in binding specificity of wild type and mutated WGAs towards sialylgalactose and bound conformational flexibility of sialylgalactose. The mutated polar amino acid residues Asn114 (S114N), Lys118 (G118K), and Arg118 (G118R) make direct and water mediated hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with sialylgalactose. An analysis of possible hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, total pair wise interaction energy between active site residues and sialylgalactose and MM-PBSA free energy calculation reveals the plausible binding modes and the role of water in stabilizing different binding modes. An interesting observation is that the binding specificity of mutated WGAs (cyborg lectin) towards sialylgalactose is found to be higher in double point mutation (WGA3). One of the substituted residues Arg118 plays a crucial role in sugar binding. Based on the interactions and energy calculations, it is concluded that the order of binding specificity of WGAs towards sialylgalactose is WGA3 > WGA1 > WGA2 > WGA. On comparing with the wild type, double point mutated WGA (WGA3) exhibits increased specificity towards sialylgalactose, and thus, it can be effectively used in targeted drug delivery and as biological cell marker in cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Polyalanine expansion and frameshift mutations of the paired-like homeobox gene PHOX2B in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Jeanne; Laudier, Béatrice; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Trang, Ha; de Pontual, Loïc; Gener, Blanca; Trochet, Delphine; Etchevers, Heather; Ray, Pierre; Simonneau, Michel; Vekemans, Michel; Munnich, Arnold; Gaultier, Claude; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2003-04-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS or Ondine's curse; OMIM 209880) is a life-threatening disorder involving an impaired ventilatory response to hypercarbia and hypoxemia. This core phenotype is associated with lower-penetrance anomalies of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) including Hirschsprung disease and tumors of neural-crest derivatives such as ganglioneuromas and neuroblastomas. In mice, the development of ANS reflex circuits is dependent on the paired-like homeobox gene Phox2b. Thus, we regarded its human ortholog, PHOX2B, as a candidate gene in CCHS. We found heterozygous de novo mutations in PHOX2B in 18 of 29 individuals with CCHS. Most mutations consisted of 5-9 alanine expansions within a 20-residue polyalanine tract probably resulting from non-homologous recombination. We show that PHOX2B is expressed in both the central and the peripheral ANS during human embryonic development. Our data support an essential role of PHOX2B in the normal patterning of the autonomous ventilation system and, more generally, of the ANS in humans.

  2. SF3B1-initiating mutations in MDS-RSs target lymphomyeloid hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortera-Blanco, Teresa; Dimitriou, Marios; Woll, Petter S; Karimi, Mohsen; Elvarsdottir, Edda; Conte, Simona; Tobiasson, Magnus; Jansson, Monika; Douagi, Iyadh; Moarii, Matahi; Saft, Leonie; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2017-08-17

    Mutations in the RNA splicing gene SF3B1 are found in >80% of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS). We investigated the origin of SF3B1 mutations within the bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell compartments in patients with MDS-RS. Screening for recurrently mutated genes in the mononuclear cell fraction revealed mutations in SF3B1 in 39 of 40 cases (97.5%), combined with TET2 and DNMT3A in 11 (28%) and 6 (15%) patients, respectively. All recurrent mutations identified in mononuclear cells could be tracked back to the phenotypically defined hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment in all investigated patients and were also present in downstream myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells. While in agreement with previous studies, little or no evidence for clonal ( SF3B1 mutation) involvement could be found in mature B cells, consistent involvement at the pro-B-cell progenitor stage was established, providing definitive evidence for SF3B1 mutations targeting lymphomyeloid HSCs and compatible with mutated SF3B1 negatively affecting lymphoid development. Assessment of stem cell function in vitro as well as in vivo established that only HSCs and not investigated progenitor populations could propagate the SF3B1 mutated clone. Upon transplantation into immune-deficient mice, SF3B1 mutated MDS-RS HSCs differentiated into characteristic ring sideroblasts, the hallmark of MDS-RS. Our findings provide evidence of a multipotent lymphomyeloid HSC origin of SF3B1 mutations in MDS-RS patients and provide a novel in vivo platform for mechanistically and therapeutically exploring SF3B1 mutated MDS-RS. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Analysis of IgV gene mutations in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia according to antigen-driven selection identifies subgroups with different prognosis and usage of the canonical somatic hypermutation machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degan, Massimo; Bomben, Riccardo; Bo, Michele Dal; Zucchetto, Antonella; Nanni, Paola; Rupolo, Maurizio; Steffan, Agostino; Attadia, Vincenza; Ballerini, Pier Ferruccio; Damiani, Daniela; Pucillo, Carlo; Poeta, Giovanni Del; Colombatti, Alfonso; Gattei, Valter

    2004-07-01

    Cases of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) with mutated (M) IgV(H) genes have a better prognosis than unmutated (UM) cases. We analysed the IgV(H) mutational status of B-CLL according to the features of a canonical somatic hypermutation (SHM) process, correlating this data with survival. In a series of 141 B-CLLs, 124 cases were examined for IgV(H) gene per cent mutations and skewing of replacement/silent mutations in the framework/complementarity-determining regions as evidence of antigen-driven selection; this identified three B-CLL subsets: significantly mutated (sM), with evidence of antigen-driven selection, not significantly mutated (nsM) and UM, without such evidence and IgV(H) gene per cent mutations above or below the 2% cut-off. sM B-CLL patients had longer survival within the good prognosis subgroup that had more than 2% mutations of IgV(H) genes. sM, nsM and UM B-CLL were also characterized for the biased usage of IgV(H) families, intraclonal IgV(H) gene diversification, preference of mutations to target-specific nucleotides or hotspots, and for the expression of enzymes involved in SHM (translesion DNA polymerase zeta and eta and activation-induced cytidine deaminase). These findings indicate the activation of a canonical SHM process in nsM and sM B-CLLs and underscore the role of the antigen in defining the specific clinical and biological features of B-CLL.

  4. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  6. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Peng, Wenjie; Grant, Oliver C.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Zhu, Xueyong; Bouwman, Kim M.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Woods, Robert J.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-06-15

    The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA) mutation (Q226L) that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal), as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  7. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P de Vries

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA mutation (Q226L that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal, as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2 and 1968 (H3N2 human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  8. PHOX2B mutation-confirmed congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in a Chinese family: presentation from newborn to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peilin; Su, Yi-Ning; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2009-02-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is characterized by compromised chemoreflexes resulting in sleep hypoventilation. We report a Chinese family with paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) mutation-confirmed CCHS, with a clinical spectrum from newborn to adulthood, to increase awareness of its various manifestations. After identifying central hypoventilation in an adult man (index case), clinical evaluation was performed on the complete family, which consisted of the parents, five siblings, and five offspring. Pulmonary function tests, overnight polysomnography, arterial blood gas measurements, hypercapnia ventilatory response, and PHOX2B gene mutation screening were performed on living family members. Brain MRI, 24-h Holter monitoring, and echocardiography were performed on members with clinically diagnosed central hypoventilation. The index patient and four offspring manifested clinical features of central hypoventilation. The index patients had hypoxia and hypercapnia while awake, polycythemia, and hematocrit levels of 70%. The first and fourth children had frequent cyanotic spells, and both died of respiratory failure. The second and third children remained asymptomatic until adulthood, when they experienced impaired hypercapnic ventilatory response. The third child had nocturnal hypoventilation with nadir pulse oximetric saturation of 59%. Adult-onset CCHS with PHOX2B gene mutation of the + 5 alanine expansions were confirmed in the index patient and the second and third children. The index patient and the third child received ventilator support system bilevel positive airway pressure treatment, which improved the hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and polycythemia without altering their chemosensitivity. Transmission of late-onset CCHS is autosomal-dominant. Genetic screening of family members of CCHS probands allows for early diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Specific heat of holmium and YNi2B2C. Criticalbehaviour and superconducting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekkali, Abdelhakim

    2010-01-01

    Object of the thesis is the study of the specific heat of holmium and YNi 2 B 2 C in the temperature ranges from 50 to 200 KI respectively from 380 mK to 20 K in magnetic fields up to 9 T. In the present thesis the criticalbehaviour of YNi 2 B 2 C and properties of the superconducting state of tne non-magnetic rare-earth nickel borocarbide YNi 2 B 2 C are studied by means of a self-developed measurement apparatur of the specific heat using the quasi-adiabatic heating-pulse method as well as of holmium by means of the relaxation method. In this thesis reliable statements about the critical exponents on monocrystalline holmium could be made. The study on holmium proves that the critical behaviour of the specific heats cannot be described in the framework of the predictions of the chiral universality classes. By means of measurements of the specific heat in this thesis could be confirmed that YNi 2 B 2 C is a multiband superconductor. The positive curvature of the boundary line below T c in the phase diagram yields a first hint to the many-band character of YNI 2 B 2 C. In the zero-field the electronic specific heat in the superconducting state c es (T) can be not explained in the framework of the pure BCS theory. At low temperatures a residual contribution by normally conducting electrons could be detected, which hints to a not completely opened energy gap. A possible explanation would be that a band (or several bands) with low charge-carrier concentration not contribute to the superconductivity. This result agrees with de Haas-van Alphen measurements on isostructural superconducting LuNi 2 B 2 C monocrystals, which suggest the many-band character of the superconductivity as well as a vanishing energy gap in one band. The fluctuation behaviour of the specific heat of YNi 2 B 2 C in the neighbourhood of the superconducting-normally conducting transition agrees well with that of the 3D-XY model. [de

  10. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of B4GALT7-spondylodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritelli, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Cinquina, Valeria; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Colombi, Marina

    2017-09-07

    Spondylodysplastic EDS (spEDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder that groups the phenotypes caused by biallelic B4GALT7, B3GALT6, and SLC39A13 mutations. In the 2017 EDS nosology, minimal criteria (general and gene-specific) for a clinical suspicion of spEDS have been proposed, but molecular analysis is required to reach a definite diagnosis. The majority of spEDS patients presented with short stature, skin hyperextensibility, facial dysmorphisms, peculiar radiological findings, muscle hypotonia and joint laxity and/or its complications. To date only 7 patients with β4GALT7-deficiency (spEDS-B4GALT7) have been described and their clinical data suggested that, in addition to short stature and muscle hypotonia, radioulnar synostosis, hypermetropia, and delayed cognitive development might be a hallmark of this specific type of spEDS. Additional 22 patients affected with an overlapping phenotype, i.e., Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome, all carrying a homozygous B4GALT7 mutation, are also recognized. Herein, we report on a 30-year-old Moroccan woman who fitted the minimal criteria to suspect spEDS, but lacked radioulnar synostosis and intellectual disability and presented with neurosensorial hearing loss and limb edema of lymphatic origin. Sanger sequencing of B4GALT7 was performed since the evaluation of the spEDS gene-specific minor criteria suggested this specific subtype. Mutational screening revealed the homozygous c.829G>T, p.Glu277* pathogenetic variant leading to aberrant splicing. Our findings expand both the clinical and mutational spectrum of this ultrarare connective tissue disorder. The comparison of the patient's features with those of the other spEDS and Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome patients reported up to now offers future perspectives for spEDS nosology and clinical research in this field.

  11. Specific heat of MgB_2 after irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuxing; Bouquet, Frederic; Sheikin, Ilya; Toulemonde, Pierre; Revaz, Bernard; Eisterer, Michael; Weber, Harald W.; Hinderer, Joerg; Junod, Alain

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of disorder on the superconducting properties of polycrystalline MgB_2 by specific-heat measurements. In the pristine state, these measurements give a bulk confirmation of the presence of two superconducting gaps with 2 Delta 0 / k_B T_c = 1.3 and 3.9 with nearly equal weights. The scattering introduced by irradiation suppresses T_c and tends to average the two gaps although less than predicted by theory. We also found that by a suitable irradiation process by fast neutr...

  12. Complementation pattern of lexB and recA mutations in Escherichia coli K12; mapping of tif-1, lexB and recA mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morand, P.; Goze, A.; Devoret, R.

    1977-01-01

    Three lexB mutations, whose phenotypes have been previously characterized, are studied here in relation to a few recA mutations as to their complementation pattern and relative location. The restoration of resistance to UV-light and to X-rays in the hetero-allelic diploid bacteria was used as a test for dominance and complementation. The wild type allele was always dominant over the mutant allele. Only partial complementation was found between lexB and two rexA alleles. There was no complementation between the recA alleles. All the data taken together strongly suggest that the complementations found are intragenic: lexB and recA mutations are in one gene. Mapping of lexB, recA and tif-1 mutations in relation to srl-1 and cysC by phage P1 transduction shows that lexB and the tif-1 mutations form a cluster proximal to srl-1 whereas recA mutations are located at the other extremity of the gene. Variability with temperature of cotransduction frequencies as well as their extended range of values prevent a meaningful calculation of the length of the recA gene. Our hypothesis is that the recA protein has two functional regions called A and B respectively defined at the genetical level by recA and lexB mutations and that it is, in vivo, an oligomeric protein forming a complex with the lexA protein. This complex is postulated to be multifunctional: recombination and control of exonuclease V are effected by the A region while the B region and lexA protein effect induced DNA repair and lysogenic induction. (orig.) [de

  13. hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in patients with "multisystem proteinopathy" and frontotemporal lobar degeneration phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Bortel, Inge; Nicolas, Gael; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Camuzat, Agnès; Wallon, David; De Septenville, Anne; Latouche, Morwena; Lattante, Serena; Kabashi, Edor; Jornea, Ludmila; Hannequin, Didier; Brice, Alexis

    2014-04-01

    hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations have been recently identified by exome sequencing in three families presenting with multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a rare complex phenotype associating frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy (IBM), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). No study has evaluated the exact frequency of these genes in cohorts of MSP or FTD patients so far. We sequenced both genes in 17 patients with MSP phenotypes, and in 60 patients with FTLD and FTLD-ALS to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of these disorders. No disease-causing mutation was identified. We conclude that hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in MSP and FTLD spectrum of diseases, although further investigations in larger populations are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The genetic characterization of lexB32, lexB33 and lexB35 mutations of Escherichia coli: location and complementation pattern for UV resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickman, B.W.; Guijt, N.; Morand, P.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1977-01-01

    Mutants of LexB have been isolated by their resistance to lysogenic induction by thymine starvation, their resistance to thymine starvation and on the basis of their UV sensitivity. Here, three mutations identified originally in strains lacking mutagenic response to UV-irradiation, unmB (Kato and Shinoura, 1977), have been further characterized, mapped by P1-mediated transduction with srl into the recA-tif-zab-lexB cluster at the lexB position and analysed for complementation with various lexB and recA mutations. From the results it was concluded that unmB mutations are identical to lexB mutations; consequently these mutations have been termed lexB32, lexB33 and lexB35. The mutations lexB33 and lexB35 do not complement any of the other lexB mutations and define therefore a new complementation type. The lexB32 mutation, which like the lexB34 mutation, results in moderate UV sensitivity has a complementation pattern similar to that of lexB34. However, unlike lexB34 the lexB32 behaves like a leaky mutation. The results are discussed in relation to the recA gene product and its control. (orig.) [de

  15. CSF neurofilament light concentration is increased in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Roos, Peter; Portelius, Erik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a mutation in the CHMP2B gene on chromosome 3 (FTD-3), described in a Danish family. Here we examine whether CSF biomarkers change in the preclinical phase of the disease. METHODS: In this cross-sectional explorative study, we...... analyzed CSF samples from 16 mutation carriers and 14 noncarriers from the Danish FTD-3 family. CSF biomarkers included total tau (t-tau) and neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a marker for neurodegeneration, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) as a marker for tau pathology, β-amyloid (Aβ) 38, 40, and 42 (Aβ38, Aβ......40, and Aβ42) to monitor Aβ metabolism, and YKL-40 as a marker of neuroinflammation. Aβ isoform concentrations were measured using a multiplexed immunoassay; t-tau, p-tau, NfL, and YKL-40 concentrations were measured using sandwich ELISAs. RESULTS: CSF NfL concentration was significantly increased...

  16. U2AF1 mutations alter splice site recognition in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Janine O; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Hayes, Brian; Murphy, Michele E; Zebari, Ahmad S; Bradley, Philip; Bradley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing studies have identified common mutations affecting genes encoding components of the RNA splicing machinery in hematological malignancies. Here, we sought to determine how mutations affecting the 3' splice site recognition factor U2AF1 alter its normal role in RNA splicing. We find that U2AF1 mutations influence the similarity of splicing programs in leukemias, but do not give rise to widespread splicing failure. U2AF1 mutations cause differential splicing of hundreds of genes, affecting biological pathways such as DNA methylation (DNMT3B), X chromosome inactivation (H2AFY), the DNA damage response (ATR, FANCA), and apoptosis (CASP8). We show that U2AF1 mutations alter the preferred 3' splice site motif in patients, in cell culture, and in vitro. Mutations affecting the first and second zinc fingers give rise to different alterations in splice site preference and largely distinct downstream splicing programs. These allele-specific effects are consistent with a computationally predicted model of U2AF1 in complex with RNA. Our findings suggest that U2AF1 mutations contribute to pathogenesis by causing quantitative changes in splicing that affect diverse cellular pathways, and give insight into the normal function of U2AF1's zinc finger domains. © 2015 Ilagan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Complementation of essential yeast GPI mannosyltransferase mutations suggests a novel specificity for certain Trypanosoma and Plasmodium PigB proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie K Cortes

    Full Text Available The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor is an essential glycolipid that tethers certain eukaryotic proteins to the cell surface. The core structure of the GPI anchor is remarkably well conserved across evolution and consists of NH2-CH2-CH2-PO4-6Manα1,2Manα1,6Manα1,4-GlcNα1,6-myo-inositol-PO4-lipid. The glycan portion of this structure may be modified with various side-branching sugars or other compounds that are heterogeneous and differ from organism to organism. One such modification is an α(1,2-linked fourth mannose (Man-IV that is side-branched to the third mannose (Man-III of the trimannosyl core. In fungi and mammals, addition of Man-III and Man-IV occurs by two distinct Family 22 α(1,2-mannosyltransferases, Gpi10/PigB and Smp3/PigZ, respectively. However, in the five protozoan parasite genomes we examined, no genes encoding Smp3/PigZ proteins were observed, despite reports of tetramannosyl-GPI structures (Man4-GPIs being produced by some parasites. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the Gpi10/PigB proteins produced by protozoan parasites have the ability to add both Man-III and Man-IV to GPI precursors. We used yeast genetics to test the in vivo specificity of Gpi10/PigB proteins from several Plasmodium and Trypanosoma species by examining their ability to restore viability to Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring lethal defects in Man-III (gpi10Δ or Man-IV (smp3Δ addition to GPI precursor lipids. We demonstrate that genes encoding PigB enzymes from T. cruzi, T. congolense and P. falciparum are each capable of separately complementing essential gpi10Δ and smp3Δ mutations, while PIGB genes from T. vivax and T. brucei only complement gpi10Δ. Additionally, we show the ability of T. cruzi PIGB to robustly complement a gpi10Δ/smp3Δ double mutant. Our data suggest that certain Plasmodium and Trypanosoma PigB mannosyltransferases can transfer more than one mannose to GPI precursors in vivo, and suggest a novel

  18. The rad2 mutation affects the molecular nature of UV and acridine-mustard-induced mutations in the ADE2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.L.; Kovaltzova, S.V.; Kassinova, G.V.; Gracheva, L.M.; Korolev, V.G.; Zakharov, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied the molecular nature of ade2 mutations induced by UV light and bifunctional acridine-mustard (BAM) in wild-type (RAD) and in excision-deficient (rad2) strains of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the RAD strain, UV causes 45% GC → AT transitions among all mutations; in the rad2 strain this value is 77%. BAM was shown to be highly specific for frameshift mutagenesis: 60% frameshifts in the RAD strain, and as many as 84% frameshifts in the rad2 strain were induced. Therefore, the rad2 mutation affects the specificity of UV- and BAM-induced mutagenesis in yeast. Experimental data agree with the view that the majority of mutations in the RAD strain are induced by a prereplicative mechanism, whereas mutations in the rad2 strain are predominantly postreplicative events. (Auth.)

  19. Active site mutations change the cleavage specificity of neprilysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Sexton

    Full Text Available Neprilysin (NEP, a member of the M13 subgroup of the zinc-dependent endopeptidase family is a membrane bound peptidase capable of cleaving a variety of physiological peptides. We have generated a series of neprilysin variants containing mutations at either one of two active site residues, Phe(563 and Ser(546. Among the mutants studied in detail we observed changes in their activity towards leucine(5-enkephalin, insulin B chain, and amyloid β(1-40. For example, NEP(F563I displayed an increase in preference towards cleaving leucine(5-enkephalin relative to insulin B chain, while mutant NEP(S546E was less discriminating than neprilysin. Mutants NEP(F563L and NEP(S546E exhibit different cleavage site preferences than neprilysin with insulin B chain and amyloid ß(1-40 as substrates. These data indicate that it is possible to alter the cleavage site specificity of neprilysin opening the way for the development of substrate specific or substrate exclusive forms of the enzyme with enhanced therapeutic potential.

  20. B-Raf mutation: a key player in molecular biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Salajegheh, A; Smith, R A; Lam, A K-Y

    2013-12-01

    B-Raf is one of the more commonly mutated proto-oncogenes implicated in the development of cancers. In this review, we consider the mechanisms and clinical impacts of B-Raf mutations in cancer and discuss the implications for the patient in melanoma, thyroid cancer and colorectal cancer, where B-Raf mutations are particularly common. © 2013.

  1. Role of specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for the assessment of tumor stage and residual disease following tumor resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcic, Gregor; Jelenc, Franc; Cerkovnik, Petra; Stegel, Vida; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the detection of tumor-specific KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at all stages and adenomas was used for the estimation of disease stage prior to surgery and for residual disease following surgery. A total of 65 CRC patients were enrolled. The primary tumor tested positive for the specific mutations (KRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, 117 or 146 and BRAF mutations in codon 600) in 35 patients. In all these patients, the specimen of normal bowel resected with the tumor was also tested for the presence of the same mutations in order to exclude the germ-line mutations. Only patients who tested positive for the specific mutation in the primary tumor were included in further analysis for the presence of tumor-specific mutation in the peripheral blood. No statistically significant differences were found between the detection rates of tumor mutations in the blood and different tumor stages (P=0.491). However, statistically significant differences in the proportions of patients with detected tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were found when comparing the groups of patients with R0 and R2 resections (P=0.038). Tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were more frequently detected in the patients with an incomplete surgical clearance of the tumor due to macroscopic residual disease (R2 resections). Therefore, the study concludes that the follow-up of somatic KRAS- and BRAF-mutated DNA in the peripheral blood of CRC patients may be useful in assessing the surgical clearance of the disease. PMID:27900004

  2. Stronger enhancer II/core promoter activities of hepatitis B virus isolates of B2 subgenotype than those of C2 subgenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanli; Zhou, Xueshi; Jia, Haodi; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhang, Jiming; Tong, Shuping

    2016-07-27

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C causes prolonged chronic infection and increased risk for liver cancer than genotype B. Our previous work revealed lower replication capacity of wild-type genotype C2 than B2 isolates. HBV DNA replication is driven by pregenomic RNA, which is controlled by core promoter (CP) and further augmented by enhancer I (ENI) and enhancer II (ENII). DNA fragments covering these regulatory elements were amplified from B2 and C2 isolates to generate luciferase reporter constructs. As ENII is fully embedded in CP, we inserted HBV DNA fragments in the sense orientation to determine their combined activities, and in the antisense orientation to measure enhancer activities alone. Genotype B2 isolates displayed higher ENI+ENII+CP, ENII+CP, and ENII activities, but not ENI or ENI+ENII activity, than C2 isolates. The higher ENII+CP activity was partly attributable to 4 positions displaying genotype-specific variability. Exchanging CP region was sufficient to revert the replication phenotypes of several B2 and C2 clones tested. These results suggest that a weaker ENII and/or CP at least partly accounts for the lower replication capacities of wild-type C2 isolates, which could drive the subsequent acquisition of CP mutations. Such mutations increase genome replication and are implicated in liver cancer development.

  3. Detection of MPL mutations by a novel allele-specific PCR-based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Larissa V; Weigelin, Helmut C; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2013-11-01

    MPL mutation testing is recommended in patients with suspected primary myelofibrosis or essential thrombocythemia who lack the JAK2 V617F mutation. MPL mutations can occur at allelic levels below 15%, which may escape detection by commonly used mutation screening methods such as Sanger sequencing. We developed a novel multiplexed allele-specific PCR assay capable of detecting most recurrent MPL exon 10 mutations associated with primary myelofibrosis and essential thrombocythemia (W515L, W515K, W515A, and S505N) down to a sensitivity of 2.5% mutant allele. Test results were reviewed from 15 reference cases and 1380 consecutive specimens referred to our laboratory for testing. Assay performance was compared to Sanger sequencing across a series of 58 specimens with MPL mutations. Positive cases consisted of 45 with W515L, 6 with S505N, 5 with W515K, 1 with W515A, and 1 with both W515L and S505N. Seven cases had mutations below 5% that were undetected by Sanger sequencing. Ten additional cases had mutation levels between 5% and 15% that were not consistently detected by sequencing. All results were easily interpreted in the allele-specific test. This assay offers a sensitive and reliable solution for MPL mutation testing. Sanger sequencing appears insufficiently sensitive for robust MPL mutation detection. Our data also suggest the relative frequency of S505N mutations may be underestimated, highlighting the necessity for inclusion of this mutation in MPL test platforms. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutations in COQ8B (ADCK4) found in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome alter COQ8B function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Doimo, Mara; Calderan, Cristina; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Acosta, Manuel J; Cerqua, Cristina; Cassina, Matteo; Ashraf, Shazia; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Sartori, Geppo; Navas, Placido; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2018-03-01

    Mutations in COQ8B cause steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome with variable neurological involvement. In yeast, COQ8 encodes a protein required for coenzyme Q (CoQ) biosynthesis, whose precise role is not clear. Humans harbor two paralog genes: COQ8A and COQ8B (previously termed ADCK3 and ADCK4). We have found that COQ8B is a mitochondrial matrix protein peripherally associated with the inner membrane. COQ8B can complement a ΔCOQ8 yeast strain when its mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is replaced by a yeast MTS. This model was employed to validate COQ8B mutations, and to establish genotype-phenotype correlations. All mutations affected respiratory growth, but there was no correlation between mutation type and the severity of the phenotype. In fact, contrary to the case of COQ2, where residual CoQ biosynthesis correlates with clinical severity, patients harboring hypomorphic COQ8B alleles did not display a different phenotype compared with those with null mutations. These data also suggest that the system is redundant, and that other proteins (probably COQ8A) may partially compensate for the absence of COQ8B. Finally, a COQ8B polymorphism, present in 50% of the European population (NM_024876.3:c.521A > G, p.His174Arg), affects stability of the protein and could represent a risk factor for secondary CoQ deficiencies or for other complex traits. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Investigation of FecB Mutation in Four Romanian Sheep Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu-Emil Georgescu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyperprolific phenotype of Booroola sheep was first discovered in the Australian Merino breed. This phenotype is due to the action of a single autosomal gene that influences the number of ovulations per estrogenic cycle. Recent discoveries have revealed that high prolificacy in Booroola Merino sheep is the result of a mutation (FecB in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1B (BMPR-1B gene. This mutation is located in the highly conserved kinase domain of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor IB, and is characterized by precocious differentiation of ovarian follicles, leading to the production of large numbers of ovulatory follicles. Our objective was to develop an easy method to identify the FecB mutation in order to screen sheep populations in terms of prolificacy. We designed primers to amplify a 190 bp fragment from the BMPR-1B gene containing or lacking the mutation. The PCR product was cut with AvaII endonuclease and the restriction products were analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Using the PCR-RFLP technique, we established an easy and efficient method that can be used to screen the FecB mutation. Therefore, these new methods increase the panel of molecular tools available for sheep breeders to choose the most prolific genotypes for improving artificial selection.

  6. Visualizing Mutation-Specific Differences in the Trafficking-Deficient Phenotype of Kv11.1 Proteins Linked to Long QT Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison R; Anderson, Corey L; Smith, Jennifer L; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Elayi, Claude S; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2018-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 α-subunit that underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K + current in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channel protein to the cell surface membrane. Several trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutations (e.g., G601S) generate Kv11.1 proteins that are sequestered in a microtubule-dependent quality control (QC) compartment in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that the QC mechanisms that regulate LQT2-linked Kv11.1 protein trafficking are mutation-specific. Confocal imaging analyses of HEK293 cells stably expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutation F805C showed that, unlike G601S-Kv11.1 protein, F805C-Kv11.1 protein was concentrated in several transitional ER subcompartments. The microtubule depolymerizing drug nocodazole differentially affected G601S- and F805C-Kv11.1 protein immunostaining. Nocodazole caused G601S-Kv11.1 protein to distribute into peripheral reticular structures, and it increased the diffuse immunostaining of F805C-Kv11.1 protein around the transitional ER subcompartments. Proteasome inhibition also affected the immunostaining of G601S- and F805C-Kv11.1 protein differently. Incubating cells in MG132 minimally impacted G601S-Kv11.1 immunostaining, but it dramatically increased the diffuse immunostaining of F805C-Kv11.1 protein in the transitional ER. Similar results were seen after incubating cells in the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Differences in the cellular distribution of G601S-Kv11.1 and F805C-Kv11.1 protein persisted in transfected human inducible pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. These are the first data to visually demonstrate mutation-specific differences in the trafficking-deficient LQT2 phenotype, and this study has identified a novel way to categorize trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutations based on differences in intracellular

  7. Making an Art of Creativity: The Cognitive Science of Duchamp and Dada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Phillip Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Dada is the infant terrible of art history, an anarchic movement that is typically referred to as nihilistic, pathological, and firmly enshrined within the modernist paradigm and the context of WWI. Through the lens of classical, romantic, and psychoanalytic notions, it certainly appears almost antithetical to creativity. Yet from a cognitive…

  8. JAK2 mutation in a patient with CLL with coexistent myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Srinivas; Chen, Chi; Rathnasabapathy, Chenthilmurugan; Wang, Jen Chin

    2009-12-01

    JAK2 mutation has not been described in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We found JAK2 mutation in a patient with CLL and coexisting myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). In this patient, we demonstrated the presence of the JAK2 mutation in CD34(+) progenitor cells, myeloid lineage cells, megakaryocytes, B lymphocytes but not in T lymphocytes. This case represents the first case report of JAK2 mutation in CLL and may also suggest that, JAK2 mutation most likely represents a secondary event from primary gene mutations involving the primitive stem cells which give rise to MPN and CLL. Furthermore, in this case, we believe that we are the first to demonstrate that JAK2 mutation in myeloid and B lymphoid cells but not T lymphocytes in a case of coexisting CLL and MPN.

  9. msbB deletion confers acute sensitivity to CO2 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that can be suppressed by a loss-of-function mutation in zwf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Kimberly

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogens tolerate stress conditions that include low pH, oxidative stress, high salt and high temperature in order to survive inside and outside their hosts. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, which forms the outer-leaflet of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria, acts as a permeability barrier. The lipid A moiety of LPS anchors it to the outer membrane bilayer. The MsbB enzyme myristoylates the lipid A precursor and loss of this enzyme, in Salmonella, is correlated with reduced virulence and severe growth defects that can both be compensated with extragenic suppressor mutations. Results We report here that msbB (or msbB somA Salmonella are highly sensitive to physiological CO2 (5%, resulting in a 3-log reduction in plating efficiency. Under these conditions, msbB Salmonella form long filaments, bulge and lyse. These bacteria are also sensitive to acidic pH and high osmolarity. Although CO2 acidifies LB broth media, buffering LB to pH 7.5 did not restore growth of msbB mutants in CO2, indicating that the CO2-induced growth defects are not due to the effect of CO2 on the pH of the media. A transposon insertion in the glucose metabolism gene zwf compensates for the CO2 sensitivity of msbB Salmonella. The msbB zwf mutants grow on agar, or in broth, in the presence of 5% CO2. In addition, msbB zwf strains show improved growth in low pH or high osmolarity media compared to the single msbB mutant. Conclusion These results demonstrate that msbB confers acute sensitivity to CO2, acidic pH, and high osmolarity. Disruption of zwf in msbB mutants restores growth in 5% CO2 and results in improved growth in acidic media or in media with high osmolarity. These results add to a growing list of phenotypes caused by msbB and mutations that suppress specific growth defects.

  10. Comparison of Detection Rate and Mutational Pattern of Drug-Resistant Mutations Between a Large Cohort of Genotype B and Genotype C Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Patients in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Yan; Xin, Shaojie; Ji, Dong; You, Shaoli; Hu, Jinhua; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Liao, Hao; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Xu, Dongping

    2017-06-01

    The study aimed to investigate the association of prevalent genotypes in China (HBV/C and HBV/B) with HBV drug-resistant mutations. A total of 13,847 nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA)-treated patients with chronic HBV infection from North China were enrolled. HBV genotypes and resistant mutations were determined by direct sequencing and confirmed by clonal sequencing if necessary. HBV/B, HBV/C, and HBV/D occupied 14.3%, 84.9%, and 0.8% across the study population, respectively. NA usage had no significant difference between HBV/B- and HBV/C-infected patients. Lamivudine-resistant mutations were more frequently detected in HBV/C-infected patients, compared with HBV/B-infected patients (31.67% vs. 25.26%, p M250 V/I/L substitution (0.67% vs. 1.46%, p < 0.01). Multidrug-resistant mutations (defined as coexistence of mutation to nucleoside and nucleotide analogues) were detected in 104 patients. HBV/C-infected patients had a higher detection rate of multidrug-resistant mutation than HBV/B-infected patients (0.83% vs. 0.35%, p < 0.05). The study for the first time clarified that HBV/C-infected patients had a higher risk to develop multidrug-resistant mutations, compared with HBV/B-infected patients; and HBV/C- and HBV/B-infected patients had different inclinations in the ETV-resistant mutational pattern.

  11. Mutations in COQ8B (ADCK4) found in patients with steroid‐resistant nephrotic syndrome alter COQ8B function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Doimo, Mara; Calderan, Cristina; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Acosta, Manuel J.; Cerqua, Cristina; Cassina, Matteo; Ashraf, Shazia; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Sartori, Geppo; Navas, Placido; Trevisson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in COQ8B cause steroid‐resistant nephrotic syndrome with variable neurological involvement. In yeast, COQ8 encodes a protein required for coenzyme Q (CoQ) biosynthesis, whose precise role is not clear. Humans harbor two paralog genes: COQ8A and COQ8B (previously termed ADCK3 and ADCK4). We have found that COQ8B is a mitochondrial matrix protein peripherally associated with the inner membrane. COQ8B can complement a ΔCOQ8 yeast strain when its mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is replaced by a yeast MTS. This model was employed to validate COQ8B mutations, and to establish genotype–phenotype correlations. All mutations affected respiratory growth, but there was no correlation between mutation type and the severity of the phenotype. In fact, contrary to the case of COQ2, where residual CoQ biosynthesis correlates with clinical severity, patients harboring hypomorphic COQ8B alleles did not display a different phenotype compared with those with null mutations. These data also suggest that the system is redundant, and that other proteins (probably COQ8A) may partially compensate for the absence of COQ8B. Finally, a COQ8B polymorphism, present in 50% of the European population (NM_024876.3:c.521A > G, p.His174Arg), affects stability of the protein and could represent a risk factor for secondary CoQ deficiencies or for other complex traits. PMID:29194833

  12. Quantum dots immunofluorescence histochemical detection of EGFR gene mutations in the non-small cell lung cancers using mutation-specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu YG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Gang Qu,1 Qian Zhang,2 Qi Pan,3 Xian-Da Zhao,4 Yan-Hua Huang,2 Fu-Chun Chen,3 Hong-Lei Chen41Department of Pathology, The Central Hospital of Enshi Autonomous Prefecture, Enshi, 2Department of Molecular Pathology, Wuhan Nano Tumor Diagnosis Engineering Research Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Thoracosurgery, Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital of Wenling, Wenling, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status plays an important role in therapeutic decision making for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Since EGFR mutation-specific antibodies (E746-A750del and L858R have been developed, EGFR mutation detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC is a suitable screening test. On this basis, we want to establish a new screening test, quantum dots immunofluorescence histochemistry (QDs-IHC, to assess EGFR gene mutation in NSCLC tissues, and we compared it to traditional IHC and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS.Materials and methods: EGFR gene mutations were detected by QDs-IHC, IHC, and ADx-ARMS in 65 cases of NSCLC composed of 55 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens and ten pleural effusion cell blocks, including 13 squamous cell carcinomas, two adenosquamous carcinomas, and 50 adenocarcinomas.Results: Positive rates of EGFR gene mutations detected by QDs-IHC, IHC, and ADx-ARMS were 40.0%, 36.9%, and 46.2%, respectively, in 65 cases of NSCLC patients. The sensitivity of QDs-IHC when detecting EGFR mutations, as compared to ADx-ARMS, was 86.7% (26/30; the specificity for both antibodies was 100.0% (26/26. IHC sensitivity was 80.0% (24/30 and the specificity was 92.31% (24/26. When detecting EGFR mutations, QDs-IHC and ADx-ARMS had perfect consistency (κ=0.882; P<0.01. Excellent agreement was observed

  13. Description of the L76V resistance protease mutation in HIV-1 B and "non-B" subtypes.

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    Charlotte Charpentier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of the L76V protease inhibitors resistance-associated mutation (PI-RAM in relation with patients' characteristics and protease genotypic background in HIV-1 B- and "non-B"-infected patients. METHODS: Frequency of the L76V mutation between 1998 and 2010 was surveyed in the laboratory database of 3 clinical centers. Major PI-RAMs were identified according to the IAS-USA list. Fisher's and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare variables. RESULTS: Among the overall 29,643 sequences analyzed, the prevalence of L76V was 1.50%, while was 5.42% in PI-resistant viruses. Since 2008 the prevalence of L76V was higher in "non-B"-infected than in B-infected patients each year. Median time since diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and median time under antiretroviral-based regimen were both shorter in "non-B"- than in B-infected patients (8 vs 11 years, P<0.0001; and 7 vs 8 years, P = 0.004. In addition, "non-B"-infected patients had been pre-exposed to a lower number of PI (2 vs 3, P = 0.016. The L76V was also associated with a lower number of major PI-RAMs in "non-B" vs B samples (3 vs 4, P = 0.0001, and thus it was more frequent found as single major PI-RAM in "non-B" vs B subtype (10% vs 2%, P = 0.014. CONCLUSIONS: We showed an impact of viral subtype on the selection of the L76V major PI-RAM with a higher prevalence in "non-B" subtypes observed since 2008. In addition, in "non-B"-infected patients this mutation appeared more rapidly and was associated with less PI-RAM.

  14. Description of the L76V resistance protease mutation in HIV-1 B and "non-B" subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Lambert-Niclot, Sidonie; Alteri, Claudia; Storto, Alexandre; Flandre, Philippe; Svicher, Valentina; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Descamps, Diane

    2013-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of the L76V protease inhibitors resistance-associated mutation (PI-RAM) in relation with patients' characteristics and protease genotypic background in HIV-1 B- and "non-B"-infected patients. Frequency of the L76V mutation between 1998 and 2010 was surveyed in the laboratory database of 3 clinical centers. Major PI-RAMs were identified according to the IAS-USA list. Fisher's and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare variables. Among the overall 29,643 sequences analyzed, the prevalence of L76V was 1.50%, while was 5.42% in PI-resistant viruses. Since 2008 the prevalence of L76V was higher in "non-B"-infected than in B-infected patients each year. Median time since diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and median time under antiretroviral-based regimen were both shorter in "non-B"- than in B-infected patients (8 vs 11 years, P<0.0001; and 7 vs 8 years, P = 0.004). In addition, "non-B"-infected patients had been pre-exposed to a lower number of PI (2 vs 3, P = 0.016). The L76V was also associated with a lower number of major PI-RAMs in "non-B" vs B samples (3 vs 4, P = 0.0001), and thus it was more frequent found as single major PI-RAM in "non-B" vs B subtype (10% vs 2%, P = 0.014). We showed an impact of viral subtype on the selection of the L76V major PI-RAM with a higher prevalence in "non-B" subtypes observed since 2008. In addition, in "non-B"-infected patients this mutation appeared more rapidly and was associated with less PI-RAM.

  15. Cis-regulatory somatic mutations and gene-expression alteration in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Lefebvre, Calvin; Zhang, Allen W; Arenillas, David J; Ding, Jiarui; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Shah, Sohrab P

    2015-04-23

    With the rapid increase of whole-genome sequencing of human cancers, an important opportunity to analyze and characterize somatic mutations lying within cis-regulatory regions has emerged. A focus on protein-coding regions to identify nonsense or missense mutations disruptive to protein structure and/or function has led to important insights; however, the impact on gene expression of mutations lying within cis-regulatory regions remains under-explored. We analyzed somatic mutations from 84 matched tumor-normal whole genomes from B-cell lymphomas with accompanying gene expression measurements to elucidate the extent to which these cancers are disrupted by cis-regulatory mutations. We characterize mutations overlapping a high quality set of well-annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), covering a similar portion of the genome as protein-coding exons. Our results indicate that cis-regulatory mutations overlapping predicted TFBSs are enriched in promoter regions of genes involved in apoptosis or growth/proliferation. By integrating gene expression data with mutation data, our computational approach culminates with identification of cis-regulatory mutations most likely to participate in dysregulation of the gene expression program. The impact can be measured along with protein-coding mutations to highlight key mutations disrupting gene expression and pathways in cancer. Our study yields specific genes with disrupted expression triggered by genomic mutations in either the coding or the regulatory space. It implies that mutated regulatory components of the genome contribute substantially to cancer pathways. Our analyses demonstrate that identifying genomically altered cis-regulatory elements coupled with analysis of gene expression data will augment biological interpretation of mutational landscapes of cancers.

  16. Molecular analysis of Hepatitis B virus sub-genotypes and incidence of preS1/preS2 region mutations in HBV-infected Egyptian patients from Mansoura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafy, Mohammed; Elgaml, Abdelaziz; El-Mesery, Mohamed; Elegezy, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major causes of viral hepatitis worldwide. Despite the prevalence of HBV infection in Egypt, few studies have focused on sub-genotyping of the virus. Moreover, no studies are available regarding the mutational analysis of the preS1/preS2 region of the viral genome, or its impact on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in Egypt. In this study, we have analyzed the sub-genotypes and incidence of mutations in the preS1/preS2 region of HBV present in HBV-infected patients, from Mansoura city (located in the center of Nile Delta region of Egypt), via partial sequencing of this specific region. Moreover, we have investigated the impact of these mutations on HCC development by measuring serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level and abdominal ultrasound examination of the HBV-infected patients. According to our results, all samples were genotype D in which sub-genotype D1 was predominant. In addition, the results revealed mutations in the preS1/preS2 region, which could result in either immature preS1 protein or completely inhibit the translation of the preS2 protein. However, there was no incidence of HCC development in patients infected with mutated HBV in the preS1/preS2 region. In summary, for the first time our work has proved the predominance of sub-genotype D1 among HBV-infected Egyptian patients in Mansoura city, Nile Delta region, Egypt, and incidence of mutations in the preS1/preS2 region of HBV genome. This current study opens up research opportunities to discuss the impact of HBV mutations on the development of HCC in Egypt. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. B-Lymphoblastic Lymphomas Evolving from Follicular Lymphomas Co-Express Surrogate Light Chains and Mutated Gamma Heavy Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, Linda M; Hoogeboom, Robbert; Smit, Laura A; Wormhoudt, Thera A M; Biemond, Bart J; Oud, Monique E C M; Schilder-Tol, Esther J M; Mulder, André B; Jongejan, Aldo; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Kluin, Philip M; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Bende, Richard J; van Noesel, Carel J M

    2016-12-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma able to transform into germinal center-type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We describe four extraordinary cases of FL, which progressed to TdT + CD20 - precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LBL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that all four B-LBLs had acquired a MYC translocation on transformation. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of one case demonstrated that in addition to 26 numerical aberrations that were shared between the FL and B-LBL, deletion of CDKN2A/B and 17q11, 14q32 amplification, and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity of 9p were gained in the B-LBL cells. Whole-exome sequencing revealed mutations in FMN2, NEB, and SYNE1 and a nonsense mutation in KMT2D, all shared by the FL and B-LBL, and TNFRSF14, SMARCA2, CCND3 mutations uniquely present in the B-LBL. Remarkably, all four FL-B-LBL pairs expressed IgG. In two B-LBLs, evidence was obtained for ongoing rearrangement of IG light chain variable genes and expression of the surrogate light chain. IGHV mutation analysis showed that all FL-B-LBL pairs harbored identical or near-identical somatic mutations. From the somatic gene alterations found in the IG and non-IG genes, we conclude that the FLs and B-LBLs did not develop in parallel from early t(14;18)-positive IG-unmutated precursors, but that the B-LBLs developed from preexistent FL subclones that accumulated additional genetic damage. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutation profile of all 49 exons of the human myosin VIIA gene, and haplotype analysis, in Usher 1B families from diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adato, A; Weil, D; Kalinski, H; Pel-Or, Y; Ayadi, H; Petit, C; Korostishevsky, M; Bonne-Tamir, B

    1997-10-01

    Usher syndrome types I (USH1A-USH1E) are a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. The human myosin VIIA gene, located on 11q14, has been shown to be responsible for Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B). Haplotypes were constructed in 28 USH1 families by use of the following polymorphic markers spanning the USH1B locus: D11S787, D11S527, D11S1789, D11S906, D11S4186, and OMP. Affected individuals and members of their families from 12 different ethnic origins were screened for the presence of mutations in all 49 exons of the myosin VIIA gene. In 15 families myosin VIIA mutations were detected, verifying their classification as USH1B. All these mutations are novel, including three missense mutations, one premature stop codon, two splicing mutations, one frameshift, and one deletion of >2 kb comprising exons 47 and 48, a part of exon 49, and the introns between them. Three mutations were shared by more than one family, consistent with haplotype similarities. Altogether, 16 USH1B haplotypes were observed in the 15 families; most haplotypes were population specific. Several exonic and intronic polymorphisms were also detected. None of the 20 known USH1B mutations reported so far in other world populations were identified in our families.

  19. Specific heat of MgB2 after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuxing; Bouquet, Frederic; Sheikin, Ilya; Toulemonde, Pierre; Revaz, Bernard; Eisterer, Michael; Weber, Harald W; Hinderer, Joerg; Junod, Alain

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effect of disorder on the superconducting properties of polycrystalline MgB 2 by specific-heat measurements. In the pristine state, these measurements give a bulk confirmation of the presence of two superconducting gaps with 2Δ 0 /k B T c =1.3 and 3.9 with nearly equal weights. The scattering introduced by irradiation suppresses T c and tends to average the two gaps although less than predicted by theory. We also found that by a suitable irradiation process by fast neutrons, a substantial bulk increase of dH c2 /dT at T c can be obtained without sacrificing more than a few degrees in T c . The upper critical field of the sample after irradiation exceeds 28 T at T→0

  20. Molecular IgV(H) analysis demonstrates highly somatic mutated B cells in synovialitis of osteoarthritis: a degenerative disease is associated with a specific, not locally generated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, V; Hensel, F; Kim, H J; Souto Carneiro, M M; Starostik, P; Ristow, G; König, A; Vollmers, H P; Müller-Hermelink, H K

    1999-11-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA), the synovial tissue exhibits a nonfollicular inflammatory infiltration with a characteristic arrangement of lymphocytes and plasma cells. These arrangements are either small perivascular aggregates with plasma cells surrounding the lymphocytes or small groups of plasma cells, located in the vicinity of small blood vessels. These patterns suggest that B lymphocytes directly differentiate into plasma cells. To understand the B-cell response in OA, we analyzed the V(H) genes from B cells of synovial tissue of nine OA patients (average age, 71.5+/-10.5 years; six female and three male). V(H) gene repertoires were determined from RNA prepared from tissue cryosections and from DNA of single isolated B lymphocytes and plasma cells. The inflammatory infiltrate was analyzed immunohistochemically by detecting CD20, Ki-M4 (follicular dendritic cells), CD4, IgG, IgM, IgA, Ki-67, and by simultaneous demonstration of the plasma-cell-specific antigen CD138 (syndecan-1) and factor VIII. The molecular data demonstrate B cells with a high number of somatic mutations (average, 16.5 to 19.8), and high ratios of replacement to silent mutations in the small lymphocytic/plasmacellular aggregates of OA. In the tissue cryosections, the values of the sigmaR/sigmaS at the complementarity determining regions were 5.3 and 2.0 in the framework regions. For both the isolated B lymphocytes and plasma cells, the value of this ratio in the complementarity determining regions was 3.5. In the framework regions, the values of this ratio were 2.0 for the isolated B cells and 1.8 for the plasma cells. B lymphocytes and plasma cells exhibited a distribution not described thus far. Two patterns of B-cell distribution could be observed: (a) Centrally located CD20+ B and CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were surrounded directly by IgG (predominantly) or IgA and IgM plasma cells. No proliferating Ki-67-positive cells and no follicular dendritic cells (germinal centers) could be detected in

  1. HNF1B mutations associate with hypomagnesemia and renal magnesium wasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adalat, Shazia; Woolf, Adrian S.; Johnstone, Karen A.; Wirsing, Andrea; Harries, Lorna W.; Long, David A.; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Ledermann, Sarah E.; Rees, Lesley; van't Hoff, William; Marks, Stephen D.; Trompeter, Richard S.; Tullus, Kjell; Winyard, Paul J.; Cansick, Janette; Mushtaq, Imran; Dhillon, Harjeeta K.; Bingham, Coralie; Edghill, Emma L.; Shroff, Rukshana; Stanescu, Horia; Ryffel, Gerhart U.; Ellard, Sian; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1B (HNF1B), which is a transcription factor expressed in tissues including renal epithelia, associate with abnormal renal development. While studying renal phenotypes of children with HNF1B mutations, we identified a teenager who presented with tetany and

  2. Vps33b pathogenic mutations preferentially affect VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornieri, Karine; Zlatic, Stephanie A; Mullin, Ariana P; Werner, Erica; Harrison, Robert; L'hernault, Steven W; Faundez, Victor

    2013-12-20

    Mutations in Vps33 isoforms cause pigment dilution in mice (Vps33a, buff) and Drosophila (car) and the neurogenic arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction and cholestasis syndrome in humans (ARC1, VPS33B). The later disease is also caused by mutations in VIPAS39, (Vps33b interacting protein, apical-basolateral polarity regulator, SPE-39 homolog; ARC2), a protein that interacts with the HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting (HOPS) complex, a tether necessary for endosome-lysosome traffic. These syndromes offer insight into fundamental endosome traffic processes unique to metazoans. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these mutant phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we investigate interactions of wild-type and disease-causing mutations in VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b by yeast two hybrid, immunoprecipitation and quantitative fluorescent microscopy. We find that although few mutations prevent interaction between VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b, some mutants fragment VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes, but all mutants alter the subcellular localization of Vps33b to VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes. Our data suggest that the ARC syndrome may result through impaired VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b-dependent endosomal maturation or fusion.

  3. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)); Cohen, M.P. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Sexauer, C.L. (Children' s Hospital, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. [Association between homozygous c.318A>GT mutation in exon 2 of the EIF2B5 gene and the infantile form of vanishing white matter leukoencephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Carmen; Blanco Hernández, Gabriela; Saavedra Alanís, Víctor; Reyes Vaca, Jorge Guillermo; Bravo Oro, Antonio

    Vanishing white matter disease is one of the most frequent leukodystrophies in childhood with an autosomal recessive inheritance. A mutation in one of the genes encoding the five subunits of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (EIF2B5) is present in 90% of the cases. The diagnosis can be accomplished by the clinical and neuroradiological findings and molecular tests. We describe a thirteen-month-old male with previous normal neurodevelopment, who was hospitalized for vomiting, hyperthermia and irritability. On examination, cephalic perimeter and cranial pairs were normal. Hypotonia, increased muscle stretching reflexes, generalized white matter hypodensity on cranial tomography were found. Fifteen days after discharge, he suffered minor head trauma presenting drowsiness and focal seizures. Magnetic resonance showed generalized hypointensity of white matter. Vanishing white matter disease was suspected, and confirmed by sequencing of the EIF2B5 gene, revealing a homozygous c.318A> T mutation in exon 2. Subsequently, visual acuity was lost and cognitive and motor deterioration was evident. The patient died at six years of age due to severe pneumonia. This case contributes to the knowledge of the mutational spectrum present in Mexican patients and allows to extend the phenotype associated to this mutation. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  5. Confirmation of mutations in PROSC as a novel cause of vitamin B 6 -dependent epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plecko, Barbara; Zweier, Markus; Begemann, Anaïs; Mathis, Deborah; Schmitt, Bernhard; Striano, Pasquale; Baethmann, Martina; Vari, Maria Stella; Beccaria, Francesca; Zara, Federico; Crowther, Lisa M; Joset, Pascal; Sticht, Heinrich; Papuc, Sorina Mihaela; Rauch, Anita

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin-B 6 -dependent epilepsies are a heterogenous group of treatable disorders due to mutations in several genes ( ALDH7A1, PNPO, ALPL or ALDH4A1 ). In neonatal seizures, defects in ALDH7A1 and PNPO explain a major fraction of cases. Very recently biallelic mutations in PROSC were shown to be a novel cause in five families. We identified four further unrelated patients harbouring a total of six different mutations, including four novel disease mutations. Vitamin B 6 plasma profiles on pyridoxine did not enable the differentiation of patients with PROSC mutations. All four patients were normocephalic and had normal cranial imaging. Pyridoxine monotherapy allowed complete seizure control in one, while two patients had occasional febrile or afebrile seizures and one needed additional valproate therapy for photosensitive seizures. Two patients underwent a controlled pyridoxine withdrawal with signs of encephalopathy within a couple of days. Three had favourable outcome with normal intellectual properties at age 12.5, 15.5 and 30 years, respectively, while one child had marked developmental delay at age 27 months. The clinical and electroencephalographic phenotype in patients with PROSC mutations was indistinguishable from ALDH7A1 and PNPO deficiency. We therefore confirm PROSC as a novel gene for vitamin-B 6 -dependent epilepsy and delineate a non-specific plasma vitamin B 6 profile under pyridoxine treatment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Anti-H-Y responses of H-2b mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E; Gordon, R D; Chandler, P R; Bailey, D

    1978-10-01

    Two strains of H-2b mutant mice, H-2ba and H-2bf, in which the mutational event took place at H-2K, make anti-H-Y cytotoxic T cell responses which are H-2-restricted, Db-associated and indistinguishable in target cell specificity from those of H-2b mice. Thus, alteration of the H-2K molecule affects neither the Ir gene controlling the response, nor the associative antigen. On the other hand, one H-2Db mutant strain, H-2bo, although it makes a good anti-H-Y cytotoxic response, shows target cell specificity restricted to its own Dbo antigen(s), and neither H-2b, H-2ba or H-2bf anti-H-Y cytotoxic cells kill H-2bo male target cells. Thus, the alteration of the H-2Db molecule does not affect the Ir gene of H-2b mice, but it does alter the H-2Db-associative antigen.

  7. The truncate mutation of Notch2 enhances cell proliferation through activating the NF-κB signal pathway in the diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxia Zhang

    Full Text Available The Notch2 is a critical membrane receptor for B-cell functions, and also displays various biological roles in lymphoma pathogenesis. In this article, we reported that 3 of 69 (4.3% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs exhibited a truncate NOTCH2 mutation at the nucleotide 7605 (G/A in the cDNA sequence, which led to partial deletion of the C-terminal of PEST (proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain. The truncate Notch2 activated both the Notch2 and the NF-κB signals and promoted the proliferation of B-cell lymphoma cell lines, including DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Moreover, the ectopic proliferation was completely inhibited by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor. Simultaneously, PDTC also reduced the expression level of Notch2. Based on these results, we conclude that the Notch2 receptor with PEST domain truncation enhances cell proliferation which may be associated with the activation of the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling. Our results are expected to provide a possible target for new DLBCL therapies by suppressing the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling.

  8. CYP1B1 and MYOC Mutations in Vietnamese Primary Congenital Glaucoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tan; Shei, William; Chau, Pham Thi Minh; Trang, Doan Le; Yong, Victor H K; Ng, Xiao Yu; Chen, Yue Ming; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga N

    2016-05-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG, OMIM 231300), the most common glaucoma in infancy, is caused by developmental defects in the anterior chamber angle. The 3 implicated genes are cytochrome P450 family I subfamily B polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1), latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein 2 (LTBP2), and myocilin (MYOC). In this study, we sought to determine CYP1B1 and MYOC sequence variations in a Vietnamese cohort of index cases with PCG and their families. Thirty Vietnamese subjects with PCG and 120 normal Vietnamese subjects were recruited. PCG was defined by the presence of at least 2 of the following clinical manifestations: increased corneal diameter (>10 mm at birth), corneal edema, Haab's striae, optic disc changes, and absence of other ocular or systemic diseases associated with childhood glaucoma. The coding exons, intron and exon boundaries, and untranslated regions of CYP1B1 and MYOC genes were PCR amplified and subjected to bidirectional sequencing in all subjects. We identified 2 homozygous and 3 heterozygous CYP1B1 sequence alterations in our study subjects. Among the 5 mutations identified, 2 (p.H279L and p.L283F) were novel mutations, whereas 3 (p.A121_S122insDRPAFA, p.L107V, and p.V320L) had been previously reported in PCG cases. None of these mutations was observed in any of the 120 controls. Haplotypes generated with 6 non-disease-causing intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms detected in CYP1B1 indicated that the most common haplotype in Vietnamese population is similar to that found in Chinese and Japanese. The genotype-phenotype correlation showed no significant difference between mutation and no-mutation groups for quantitative clinical features (presenting intraocular pressure, corneal diameter, number of surgeries performed, the cup-to-disc ratio) as well as for qualitative factors (bilateral cases, phenotype severity, and the prognosis) (P>0.05). Five out of 30 families with PCG (16.7%) had disease attributable to CYP1B1 alterations

  9. Heart-specific expression of laminopathic mutations in transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay D; Parnaik, Veena K

    2017-07-01

    Lamins are key determinants of nuclear organization and function in the metazoan nucleus. Mutations in human lamin A cause a spectrum of genetic diseases that affect cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle as well as other tissues. A few laminopathies have been modeled using the mouse. As zebrafish is a well established model for the study of cardiac development and disease, we have investigated the effects of heart-specific lamin A mutations in transgenic zebrafish. We have developed transgenic lines of zebrafish expressing conserved lamin A mutations that cause cardiac dysfunction in humans. Expression of zlamin A mutations Q291P and M368K in the heart was driven by the zebrafish cardiac troponin T2 promoter. Homozygous mutant embryos displayed nuclear abnormalities in cardiomyocyte nuclei. Expression analysis showed the upregulation of genes involved in heart regeneration in transgenic mutant embryos and a cell proliferation marker was increased in adult heart tissue. At the physiological level, there was deviation of up to 20% from normal heart rate in transgenic embryos expressing mutant lamins. Adult homozygous zebrafish were fertile and did not show signs of early mortality. Our results suggest that transgenic zebrafish models of heart-specific laminopathies show cardiac regeneration and moderate deviations in heart rate during embryonic development. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  10. The histone lysine methyltransferase KMT2D sustains a gene expression program that represses B cell lymphoma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Molina, Ana; Boss, Isaac W; Canela, Andres; Pan, Heng; Jiang, Yanwen; Zhao, Chunying; Jiang, Man; Hu, Deqing; Agirre, Xabier; Niesvizky, Itamar; Lee, Ji-Eun; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ennishi, Daisuke; Scott, David W; Mottok, Anja; Hother, Christoffer; Liu, Shichong; Cao, Xing-Jun; Tam, Wayne; Shaknovich, Rita; Garcia, Benjamin A; Gascoyne, Randy D; Ge, Kai; Shilatifard, Ali; Elemento, Olivier; Nussenzweig, Andre; Melnick, Ari M; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2015-10-01

    The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone methyltransferase KMT2D has emerged as one of the most frequently mutated genes in follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma; however, the biological consequences of KMT2D mutations on lymphoma development are not known. Here we show that KMT2D functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor and that its genetic ablation in B cells promotes lymphoma development in mice. KMT2D deficiency also delays germinal center involution and impedes B cell differentiation and class switch recombination. Integrative genomic analyses indicate that KMT2D affects methylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4) and expression of a set of genes, including those in the CD40, JAK-STAT, Toll-like receptor and B cell receptor signaling pathways. Notably, other KMT2D target genes include frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes such as TNFAIP3, SOCS3 and TNFRSF14. Therefore, KMT2D mutations may promote malignant outgrowth by perturbing the expression of tumor suppressor genes that control B cell-activating pathways.

  11. Peptide nucleic acid probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis for rapid screening of common JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonhong; Song, Minsik; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Lee, Gun Dong; Kim, KyungTak; Park, Heekyung; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo

    2017-02-01

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) to detect common mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We have set up two separate reactions of PNA-based FMCA: JAK2 V617F &CALR p.Leu367fs*46 (set A) and MPL W515L/K &CALR p.Lys385fs*47 (set B). Clinical usefulness was validated with allele-specific real-time PCR, fragment analysis, Sanger sequencing in 57 BCR-ABL1-negative MPNs. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-based FMCA was approximately 10% for each mutation and interference reactions using mixtures of different mutations were not observed. Non-specific amplification was not observed in normal control. PNA-based FMCA was able to detect all JAK2 V617F (n=20), CALR p.Leu367fs*46 (n=10) and p.Lys385fs*47 (n=8). Three of six MPL mutations were detected except three samples with low mutant concentration in out of LOD. JAK2 exon 12 mutations (n=7) were negative without influencing V617F results. Among six variant CALR exon 9 mutations, two were detected by this method owing to invading of probe binding site. PNA-based FMCA for detecting common JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations is a rapid, simple, and sensitive technique in BCR-ABL1-negative MPNs with >10% mutant allele at the time of initial diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Germline RAD51B truncating mutation in a family with cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A W; Aoude, Lauren G; Golmard, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Known melanoma predisposition genes only account for around 40% of high-density melanoma families. Other rare mutations are likely to play a role in melanoma predisposition. RAD51B plays an important role in DNA repair through homologous recombination, and inactivation of RAD51B has been implicated...... in tumorigenesis. Thus RAD51B is a good candidate melanoma susceptibility gene, and previously, a germline splicing mutation in RAD51B has been identified in a family with early-onset breast cancer. In order to find genetic variants associated with melanoma predisposition, whole-exome sequencing was carried out...... on blood samples from a three-case cutaneous melanoma family. We identified a novel germline RAD51B nonsense mutation, and we demonstrate reduced expression of RAD51B in melanoma cells indicating inactivation of RAD51B. This is only the second report of a germline truncating RAD51B mutation. While...

  13. Prognostic implications of mutation-specific QTc standard deviation in congenital long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Andrew; Moss, Arthur J; Lopes, Coeli M; Barsheshet, Alon; McNitt, Scott; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L; Locati, Emanuela H; Ackerman, Michael J; Benhorin, Jesaia; Kaufman, Elizabeth S; Platonov, Pyotr G; Qi, Ming; Shimizu, Wataru; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Michael Vincent, G; Wilde, Arthur A M; Zhang, Li; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2013-05-01

    Individual corrected QT interval (QTc) may vary widely among carriers of the same long QT syndrome (LQTS) mutation. Currently, neither the mechanism nor the implications of this variable penetrance are well understood. To hypothesize that the assessment of QTc variance in patients with congenital LQTS who carry the same mutation provides incremental prognostic information on the patient-specific QTc. The study population comprised 1206 patients with LQTS with 95 different mutations and ≥ 5 individuals who carry the same mutation. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to assess the effect of mutation-specific standard deviation of QTc (QTcSD) on the risk of cardiac events (comprising syncope, aborted cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death) from birth through age 40 years in the total population and by genotype. Assessment of mutation-specific QTcSD showed large differences among carriers of the same mutations (median QTcSD 45 ms). Multivariate analysis showed that each 20 ms increment in QTcSD was associated with a significant 33% (P = .002) increase in the risk of cardiac events after adjustment for the patient-specific QTc duration and the family effect on QTc. The risk associated with QTcSD was pronounced among patients with long QT syndrome type 1 (hazard ratio 1.55 per 20 ms increment; P<.001), whereas among patients with long QT syndrome type 2, the risk associated with QTcSD was not statistically significant (hazard ratio 0.99; P = .95; P value for QTcSD-by-genotype interaction = .002). Our findings suggest that mutations with a wider variation in QTc duration are associated with increased risk of cardiac events. These findings appear to be genotype-specific, with a pronounced effect among patients with the long QT syndrome type 1 genotype. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. [Clone, construct, expression and verification of lactoferricin B gene and several sequence mutations in yeast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong-qian; Zha, Xiao-jun; Zhai, Chao-yang

    2007-07-01

    To construct the eucaryotic recombinant plasmid of pYES2/LactoferricinB expressing in yeast of S. cerevisiae, of which the expressed protein antibacterial activity was verified in preliminary. By self-template PCR method, the gene of Lactoferricin B and its several sequence mutations were amplified with the parts of the pre-synthesized single chains. And then Lactoferricin B gene and its mutants were cloned into the vector of pYES2 to construct the recombined expression plasmid pYES2/Lactoferricin B etc. extracted and used to transform the yeast S. cerevisiae. The expressions of proteins were determined after induced by galactose. The expression proteins were collected and purified by hydronium-exchange column, and the bacterial inhibited test was applied to identify the protein antibacterial activities. The PCR amplifying and DNA sequencing tests indicated that the purpose plasmid contained the Lactoferricin B gene and several mutations. The induced target proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and mass spectrum test. The protein antibacterial activities of mutations were verified in preliminary. The recombined plasmid pYES2/Lactoferricin B etc. are successfully constructed and induced to express in yeast cell of S. cerevisiae; the obtained recombined protein of Lactoferricin B provides a basis for further research work on the biological function and antibacterial activity.

  15. Cytogenetic analysis of the 2B1-2-2B9-10 region of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. V. Changes in the pattern of polypeptide synthesis in salivary glands caused by mutations located in the 2B5 puff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrovskii, E.B.; Zhimulev, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have investigated the role of the 2B5 puff in the synthesis of ecdysone-inducible proteins. They showed that in mutants for the overlapping complementation complex (occ) located in the 2B5 puff the synthesis of these proteins is impaired: in mutants 1t336 and 1t366 to a lesser extent and in mutant t143 to a greater extent. Similarly to the deletion of the 2B5 puff, mutation t435 completely blocks the synthesis of ecdysone-inducible proteins. An increase in the dose of the 2B5 puff leads to an increase in the level of synthesis of two ecdysone-inducible polypeptides, for which evidence is available that they are encoded in the region of another ecdysone puff. The results obtained, together with the findings that the tissues of larvae mutant for the occ locus are not sensitive to the action of 20-hydroxy ecdysone and that the normal course of development of ecdysone-dependent puffing is impaired in the chromosomes of salivary glands of these mutants, suggest the presence of a key regulatory role of the 2B5 puff in metamorphosis

  16. 49 CFR 178.33b - Specification 2S; inner nonrefillable plastic receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 2S; inner nonrefillable plastic receptacles. 178.33b Section 178.33b Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... nonrefillable plastic receptacles. ...

  17. Identification of two novel SH3PXD2B gene mutations in Frank-Ter Haar syndrome by exome sequencing: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrhidri, Abdelali; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Lyahyai, Jaber; Raymond, Laure; Egéa, Grégory; Taoudi, Mohamed; El Mouatassim, Said; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-09-10

    Frank-Ter Haar syndrome (FTHS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by skeletal, cardio-vascular, and eye abnormalities, such as increased intraocular pressure, prominent eyes, and hypertelorism. The most common underlying genetic defect in Frank-Ter Haar syndrome appears to be due to mutations in the SH3PXD2B gene on chromosome 5q35.1. Until now, only six mutations in SH3PXD2B gene have been identified. A genetic heterogeneity of FTHS was suggested in previous studies. FTHS was suspected clinically in a girl of 2years old, born from non-consanguineous Moroccan healthy parents. The patient had been referred to a medical genetics outpatient clinic for dysmorphic facial features. Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) was performed in the patient and her parents, in addition to Sanger sequencing that was carried out to confirm the results. We report the first description of a Moroccan FTHS patient with two novel compound heterozygous mutations c.806G>A; p.Trp269* (maternal allele) and c.892delC; p.Asp299Thrfs*44 (paternal allele) in the SH3PXD2B gene. Sanger sequencing confirmed this mutation in the affected girl and demonstrated that her parents carry this mutation in heterozygous state. Our results confirm the clinical diagnosis of FTHS in this reported family and contribute to expand the mutational spectrum of this rare disease. Our study shows also, that exome sequencing is a powerful and a cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of a supposed genetically heterogeneous disorder such FTHS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD4 epitope mutations in the pre-core/core region of hepatitis B virus in chronic hepatitis B carriers in Northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhand, Sareh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Nazari, Amineh; Moradi, Abdolvahab

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vulnerable to many various mutations. Those within epitopes recognized by sensitized T cells may influence the re-emergence of the virus. This study was designed to investigate the mutation in immune epitope regions of HBV pre-core/core among chronic HBV patients of Golestan province, Northeast Iran. In 120 chronic HBV carriers, HBV DNA was extracted from blood plasma samples and PCR was done using specific primers. Direct sequencing and alignment of the pre-core/core region were applied using reference sequence from Gene Bank database (Accession Number AB033559). The study showed 27 inferred amino acid substitutions, 9 of which (33.3%) were in CD4 and 2 (7.4%) in cytotoxic T lymphocytes' (CTL) epitopes and 16 other mutations (59.2%) were observed in other regions. CTL escape mutations were not commonly observed in pre-core/core sequences of chronic HBV carriers in the locale of study. It can be concluded that most of the inferred amino acid substitutions occur in different immune epitopes other than CTL and CD4.

  19. Mutation Spectrum in the Large GTPase Dynamin 2, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Autosomal Dominant Centronuclear Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Bitoun, Marc; Pierson, Christopher R.; Schaefer, Elise; Karasoy, Hatice; Dempsey, Melissa A.; Klein, Fabrice; Dondaine, Nicolas; Kretz, Christine; Haumesser, Nicolas; Poirson, Claire; Toussaint, Anne; Greenleaf, Rebecca S.; Barger, Melissa A.; Mahoney, Lane J.; Kang, Peter B.; Zanoteli, Edmar; Vissing, John; Witting, Nanna; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Dowling, James; Merlini, Luciano; Oldfors, Anders; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Melki, Judith; Krause, Amanda; Jern, Christina; Oliveira, Acary S. B.; Petit, Florence; Jacquette, Aurélia; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Mowat, David; Leheup, Bruno; Cristofano, Michele; Aldea, Juan José Poza; Michel, Fabrice; Furby, Alain; Llona, Jose E. Barcena; Van Coster, Rudy; Bertini, Enrico; Urtizberea, Jon Andoni; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Béroud, Christophe; Prudhon, Bernard; Bedford, Melanie; Mathews, Katherine; Erby, Lori A. H.; Smith, Stephen A.; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Crowe, Carol A.; Spitale, Allison Brennan; Johal, Sheila C.; Amato, Anthony A.; Demmer, Laurie A.; Jonas, Jessica; Darras, Basil T.; Bird, Thomas D.; Laurino, Mercy; Welt, Selman I.; Trotter, Cynthia; Guicheney, Pascale; Das, Soma; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Beggs, Alan H.; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with general skeletal muscle weakness, type I fiber predominance and atrophy, and abnormally centralized nuclei. Autosomal dominant CNM is due to mutations in the large GTPase dynamin 2 (DNM2), a mechanochemical enzyme regulating cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking in cells. To date, 40 families with CNM-related DNM2 mutations have been described, and here we report 60 additional families encompassing a broad genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. In total, 18 different mutations are reported in 100 families and our cohort harbors nine known and four new mutations, including the first splice-site mutation. Genotype–phenotype correlation hypotheses are drawn from the published and new data, and allow an efficient screening strategy for molecular diagnosis. In addition to CNM, dissimilar DNM2 mutations are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy (CMTD1B and CMT2M), suggesting a tissue-specific impact of the mutations. In this study, we discuss the possible clinical overlap of CNM and CMT, and the biological significance of the respective mutations based on the known functions of dynamin 2 and its protein structure. Defects in membrane trafficking due to DNM2 mutations potentially represent a common pathological mechanism in CNM and CMT. PMID:22396310

  20. Biochemical characterization of the GM2 gangliosidosis B1 variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutor J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The deficiency of the A isoenzyme of ß-hexosaminidase (Hex produced by different mutations of the gene that codes for the alpha subunit (Tay-Sachs disease has two variants with enzymological differences: the B variant consists of the absence of Hex A isoenzyme and the B1 variant produces an inactive Hex A isoenzyme for the hydrolysis of the GM2 ganglioside and synthetic substrates with negative charge. In contrast to the early childhood form of the B variant, the B1 variant appears at a later clinical stage (3 to 7 years of age with neurodegenerative symptoms leading to the death of the patient in the second decade of life. The most frequent mutation responsible for the GM2 gangliosidosis B1 variant is R178H, which has a widespread geographic and ethnic distribution. The highest incidence has been described in Portugal, which has been suggested as the point of origin of this mutation. Biochemical characterization of this lysosomal disease is carried out using negatively charged synthetic alpha subunit-specific sulfated substrates, since Hex A isoenzyme heat-inactivation assays are not applicable. However, the determination of the apparent activation energy of Hex using the neutral substrate 3,3'-dichlorophenolsulfonphthaleinyl N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminide, may offer a valid alternative. The presence of an alpha subunit in the alphaß heterodimer Hex A means that its activation energy (41.8 kJ/mol is significantly lower than that of the ßß homodimer Hex B (75.1 kJ/mol; however, as mutation inactivates the alpha subunit, the Hex A of the B1 variant presents an activation energy that is similar to that of the Hex B isoenzyme.

  1. Common mutations of hepatitis B virus and their clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Airong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV tends to mutate easily due to its special structure and life cycle. Mutation changes the biological behavior of HBV and its sensitivity to antiviral drugs and even affects therapeutic effect and accelerate disease progression. The point mutations are commonly see in the pre-S/S open reading frame (ORF, which may be associated with immune escape and occult HBV infection. The G1896A mutation is often observed in the pre-C/C-ORF and is associated with the development of HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and severe chronic hepatitis (liver failure. The mutations in P-ORF mainly occur in the reverse transcriptase (RT domain and are closely related to the resistance to nucleos(tide analogues. The A1762T and G1764A mutations occur in the basal core promoter (BCP, which overlaps with X-ORF, and may be associated with HBeAg-negative CHB, HCC, and severe chronic hepatitis (liver failure. Clarification of the association between these mutations and diseases helps to develop tailor-made diagnostic and therapeutic regimens for patients with HBV infection.

  2. Avaliação de qualidade de vida e importância dada a espiritualidade/religiosidade/ crenças pessoais (SRPB em adultos com e sem problemas crônicos de saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Sica da Rocha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Não existem estudos avaliando a associação entre religiosidade e qualidade de vida, comparando pessoas doentes e saudáveis, independentemente do tipo de doença e da idade. OBJETIVO: Verificar a associação entre: (1 presença de uma doença crônica e a importância dada à espiritualidade/religiosidade/ crenças pessoais (SRPB; (2 presença de um problema crônico de saúde e qualidade de vida (QV, ajustada para fatores como idade, nível socioeconômico (NSE e sintomas depressivos; (3 QV e a importância dada à SRPB, também ajustada para os mesmos fatores. DELINEAMENTO: estudo transversal. Sujeitos: n = 241, sendo 122 pacientes internados e ambulatoriais com alguma doença crônica, provenientes de um hospital universitário, e 119 indivíduos saudáveis membros ativos de comunidades religiosas. Instrumentos: a WHOQOL-100 (QV; b BDI (sintomas depressivos; c WHOQOL-SRPBi - escala de importância dada às facetas do módulo de SRPB do WHOQOL-100 (importância dada à SRPB. RESULTADOS: Pacientes mostraram piores escores que os saudáveis na maioria dos domínios do WHOQOL-100, com exceção do domínio do SRPB. Os pacientes (média = 97,2 ± 13,0 tiveram escores mais altos que os saudáveis (média = 92,9 ± 16,4 na avaliação de importância dada à SRPB (P = 0,03. Usando um modelo de regressão múltipla, a importância dada à SRPB aparece positivamente associada com os domínios geral, psicológico, relacionamento social, ambiente e SRPB do WHOQOL-100 (beta = 0,10; beta = 0,17; beta = 0,12; beta = 0,11; beta = 0,72, respectivamente; P < 0,05, quando ajustado para idade, NSE, sintomas depressivos e a presença de um problema crônico de saúde. CONCLUSÃO: A importância da SRPB aparece positivamente associada com a QV na maioria de seus domínios, independentemente de outros fatores envolvidos. Esse achado pode ser considerado ao se planejarem intervenções para a melhoria da QV de pacientes acometidos por problemas cr

  3. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viteri Santiago

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93% patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients.

  4. Determining Y-STR mutation rates in deep-routing genealogies: Identification of haplogroup differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claerhout, Sofie; Vandenbosch, Michiel; Nivelle, Kelly; Gruyters, Leen; Peeters, Anke; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Decorte, Ronny

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) mutation rates is essential to determine the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in familial searching or genealogy research. Up to now, locus-specific mutation rates have been extensively examined especially for commercially available forensic Y-STRs, while haplogroup specific mutation rates have not yet been investigated in detail. Through 450 patrilineally related namesakes distributed over 212 deep-rooting genealogies, the individual mutation rates of 42 Y-STR loci were determined, including 27 forensic Y-STR loci from the Yfiler ® Plus kit and 15 additional Y-STR loci (DYS388, DYS426, DYS442, DYS447, DYS454, DYS455, DYS459a/b, DYS549, DYS607, DYS643, DYS724a/b and YCAIIa/b). At least 726 mutations were observed over 148,596 meiosis and individual Y-STR mutation rates varied from 2.83 × 10 -4 to 1.86 × 10 -2 . The mutation rate was significantly correlated with the average allele size, the complexity of the repeat motif sequence and the age of the father. Significant differences in average Y-STR mutations rates were observed when haplogroup 'I & J' (4.03 × 10 -3 mutations/generation) was compared to 'R1b' (5.35 × 10 -3 mutations/generation) and to the overall mutation rate (5.03 × 10 -3 mutations/generation). A difference in allele size distribution was identified as the only cause for these haplogroup specific mutation rates. The haplogroup specific mutation rates were also present within the commercially available Y-STR kits (Yfiler ® , PowerPlex ® Y23 System and Yfiler ® Plus). This observation has consequences for applications where an average Y-STR mutation rate is used, e.g. tMRCA estimations in familial searching and genealogy research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A case of recurrent encephalopathy with SCN2A missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Kubota, Tetsuo; Negoro, Tamiko; Saitoh, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ihara, Yukiko; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2015-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels regulate neuronal excitability, as well as survival and the patterning of neuronal connectivity during development. Mutations in SCN2A, which encodes the Na(+) channel Nav1.2, cause epilepsy syndromes and predispose children to acute encephalopathy. Here, we report the case of a young male with recurrent acute encephalopathy who carried a novel missense mutation in the SCN2A gene. He was born by normal delivery and developed repetitive apneic episodes at 2days of age. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed high-intensity areas in diffuse subcortical white matter, bilateral thalami, and basal nuclei. His symptoms improved gradually without any specific treatment, but he exhibited a motor milestone delay after the episode. At the age of 10months, he developed acute cerebellopathy associated with a respiratory syncytial viral infection. He received high-dose intravenous gammaglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy and seemed to have no obvious sequelae after the episode. He then developed severe diffuse encephalopathy associated with gastroenteritis at the age of 14months. He received high-dose intravenous gammaglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy but was left with severe neurological sequelae. PCR-based analysis revealed a novel de novo missense mutation, c.4979T>G (p.Leu1660Trp), in the SCN2A gene. This case suggests that SCN2A mutations might predispose children to repetitive encephalopathy with variable clinical and imaging findings. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Y-chromosome-specific microsatellite mutation rates re-examined using a minisatellite, MSY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, M A; Heyer, E; Dieltjes, P; de Knijff, P

    1999-10-01

    Polymorphic Y-chromosome-specific microsatellites are becoming increasingly used in evolutionary and forensic studies and, in particular, in dating the origins of Y-chromosomal lineages. Previously, haplotyping of Y chromosomes from males belonging to a set of deep-rooting pedigrees was used to estimate a conservative average Y-chromosomal microsatellite mutation rate of 2.1 x 10(-3)per locus per generation. A number of males showed multiple differences in haplotypes compared with other males within their pedigrees, and these were excluded from the calculation of this estimate, on the grounds that non-paternity was a more probable explanation than multiple mutation within a lineage. Here we reanalyse the pedigrees using an independent highly polymorphic system, the Y-specific minisatellite, MSY1. This supports the hypothesis of non-paternity where more than one microsatellite difference was observed, provides further support for the previously deduced microsatellite mutation rate and throws light on the mutation dynamics of MSY1 itself, suggesting that single-step changes are not the only mode of mutation.

  7. Discovery and prioritization of somatic mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by whole-exome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Jens G.; Stojanov, Petar; Lawrence, Michael S.; Auclair, Daniel; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sougnez, Carrie; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Knoechel, Birgit; Asmann, Yan W.; Slager, Susan L.; Novak, Anne J.; Dogan, Ahmet; Ansell, Stephen M.; Zou, Lihua; Gould, Joshua; Saksena, Gordon; Stransky, Nicolas; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Schwarz-Cruz y Celis, Angela; Imaz-Rosshandler, Ivan; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Jung, Joonil; Pedamallu, Chandra S.; Lander, Eric S.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Cerhan, James R.; Shipp, Margaret A.; Getz, Gad; Golub, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insight into the genomic basis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we performed massively parallel whole-exome sequencing of 55 primary tumor samples from patients with DLBCL and matched normal tissue. We identified recurrent mutations in genes that are well known to be functionally relevant in DLBCL, including MYD88, CARD11, EZH2, and CREBBP. We also identified somatic mutations in genes for which a functional role in DLBCL has not been previously suspected. These genes include MEF2B, MLL2, BTG1, GNA13, ACTB, P2RY8, PCLO, and TNFRSF14. Further, we show that BCL2 mutations commonly occur in patients with BCL2/IgH rearrangements as a result of somatic hypermutation normally occurring at the IgH locus. The BCL2 point mutations are primarily synonymous, and likely caused by activation-induced cytidine deaminase–mediated somatic hypermutation, as shown by comprehensive analysis of enrichment of mutations in WRCY target motifs. Those nonsynonymous mutations that are observed tend to be found outside of the functionally important BH domains of the protein, suggesting that strong negative selection against BCL2 loss-of-function mutations is at play. Last, by using an algorithm designed to identify likely functionally relevant but infrequent mutations, we identify KRAS, BRAF, and NOTCH1 as likely drivers of DLBCL pathogenesis in some patients. Our data provide an unbiased view of the landscape of mutations in DLBCL, and this in turn may point toward new therapeutic strategies for the disease. PMID:22343534

  8. Specific regulation of point-mutated K-ras-immortalized cell proliferation by a photodynamic antisense strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Maiko; Yamayoshi, Asako; Kato, Kiyoko; Kobori, Akio; Wake, Norio; Murakami, Akira

    2010-02-01

    It has been reported that point mutations in genes are responsible for various cancers, and the selective regulation of gene expression is an important factor in developing new types of anticancer drugs. To develop effective drugs for the regulation of point-mutated genes, we focused on photoreactive antisense oligonucleotides. Previously, we reported that photoreactive oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-psoralenylmethoxyethyl adenosine (2'-Ps-eom) showed drastic photoreactivity in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Here, we demonstrated the specific gene regulatory effects of 2'-Ps-eom on [(12)Val]K-ras mutant (GGT --> GTT). Photo-cross-linking between target mRNAs and 2'-Ps-eom was sequence-specific, and the effect was UVA irradiation-dependent. Furthermore, 2'-Ps-eom was able to inhibit K-ras-immortalized cell proliferation (K12V) but not Vco cells that have the wild-type K-ras gene. These results suggest that the 2'-Ps-eom will be a powerful nucleic acid drug to inhibit the expression of disease-causing point mutation genes, and has great therapeutic potential in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Flanking sequence determination and specific PCR identification of transgenic wheat B102-1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jijuan; Xu, Junyi; Zhao, Tongtong; Cao, Dongmei; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Piqiao; Luan, Fengxia

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous fragment sequence and flanking sequence between the exogenous fragment and recombinant chromosome of transgenic wheat B102-1-2 were successfully acquired using genome walking technology. The newly acquired exogenous fragment encoded the full-length sequence of transformed genes with transformed plasmid and corresponding functional genes including ubi, vector pBANF-bar, vector pUbiGUSPlus, vector HSP, reporter vector pUbiGUSPlus, promoter ubiquitin, and coli DH1. A specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification method for transgenic wheat B102-1-2 was established on the basis of designed primers according to flanking sequence. This established specific PCR strategy was validated by using transgenic wheat, transgenic corn, transgenic soybean, transgenic rice, and non-transgenic wheat. A specifically amplified target band was observed only in transgenic wheat B102-1-2. Therefore, this method is characterized by high specificity, high reproducibility, rapid identification, and excellent accuracy for the identification of transgenic wheat B102-1-2.

  10. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica K Akre

    Full Text Available Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80-90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells.

  11. Specific heat of MgB{sub 2} after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuxing [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique de la matiere condensee, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Bouquet, Frederic [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique de la matiere condensee, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Sheikin, Ilya [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique de la matiere condensee, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Toulemonde, Pierre [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique de la matiere condensee, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Revaz, Bernard [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique de la matiere condensee, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Eisterer, Michael [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Harald W [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Hinderer, Joerg [GHMFL, Max-Planck Institute Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble (France); Junod, Alain [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique de la matiere condensee, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2003-02-19

    We studied the effect of disorder on the superconducting properties of polycrystalline MgB{sub 2} by specific-heat measurements. In the pristine state, these measurements give a bulk confirmation of the presence of two superconducting gaps with 2{delta}{sub 0}/k{sub B}T{sub c}=1.3 and 3.9 with nearly equal weights. The scattering introduced by irradiation suppresses T{sub c} and tends to average the two gaps although less than predicted by theory. We also found that by a suitable irradiation process by fast neutrons, a substantial bulk increase of dH{sub c2}/dT at T{sub c} can be obtained without sacrificing more than a few degrees in T{sub c}. The upper critical field of the sample after irradiation exceeds 28 T at T{yields}0.

  12. HNF-1B specifically regulates the transcription of the {gamma}a-subunit of the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferre, Silvia [Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Veenstra, Gert Jan C. [Department of Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bouwmeester, Rianne; Hoenderop, Joost G.J. [Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Bindels, Rene J.M., E-mail: r.bindels@fysiol.umcn.nl [Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Defects in HNF-1B transcription factor affect Mg{sup 2+} handling in the distal kidney. {yields} {gamma}a- and {gamma}b- subunits of the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase colocalize in the distal convoluted tubule of the nephron. {yields} HNF-1B specifically activates {gamma}a expression. {yields} HNF-1B mutants have a dominant negative effect on wild type HNF-1B activity. {yields} Defective transcription of {gamma}a may promote renal Mg{sup 2+} wasting. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1B (HNF-1B) is a transcription factor involved in embryonic development and tissue-specific gene expression in several organs, including the kidney. Recently heterozygous mutations in the HNF1B gene have been identified in patients with hypomagnesemia due to renal Mg{sup 2+} wasting. Interestingly, ChIP-chip data revealed HNF-1B binding sites in the FXYD2 gene, encoding the {gamma}-subunit of the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. The {gamma}-subunit has been described as one of the molecular players in the renal Mg{sup 2+} reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). Of note, the FXYD2 gene can be alternatively transcribed into two main variants, namely {gamma}a and {gamma}b. In the present study, we demonstrated via two different reporter gene assays that HNF-1B specifically acts as an activator of the {gamma}a-subunit, whereas the {gamma}b-subunit expression was not affected. Moreover, the HNF-1B mutations H69fsdelAC, H324S325fsdelCA, Y352finsA and K156E, previously identified in patients with hypomagnesemia, prevented transcription activation of {gamma}a-subunit via a dominant negative effect on wild type HNF1-B. By immunohistochemistry, it was shown that the {gamma}a- and {gamma}b-subunits colocalize at the basolateral membrane of the DCT segment of mouse kidney. On the basis of these data, we suggest that abnormalities involving the HNF-1B gene may impair the relative abundance of {gamma}a and {gamma}b, thus affecting the transcellular Mg{sup 2

  13. Use of nfsB, encoding nitroreductase, as a reporter gene to determine the mutational spectrum of spontaneous mutations in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunham Stephen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organisms that are sensitive to nitrofurantoin express a nitroreductase. Since bacterial resistance to this compound results primarily from mutations in the gene encoding nitroreductase, the resulting loss of function of nitroreductase results in a selectable phenotype; resistance to nitrofurantoin. We exploited this direct selection for mutation to study the frequency at which spontaneous mutations arise (transitions and transversions, insertions and deletions. Results A nitroreductase- encoding gene was identified in the N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 genome by using a bioinformatic search with the deduced amino acid sequence derived from the Escherichia coli nitroreductase gene, nfsB. Cell extracts from N. gonorrhoeae were shown to possess nitroreductase activity, and activity was shown to be the result of NfsB. Spontaneous nitrofurantoin-resistant mutants arose at a frequency of ~3 × 10-6 - 8 × 10-8 among the various strains tested. The nfsB sequence was amplified from various nitrofurantoin-resistant mutants, and the nature of the mutations determined. Transition, transversion, insertion and deletion mutations were all readily detectable with this reporter gene. Conclusion We found that nfsB is a useful reporter gene for measuring spontaneous mutation frequencies. Furthermore, we found that mutations were more likely to arise in homopolymeric runs rather than as base substitutions.

  14. PMS2 monoallelic mutation carriers: the known unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Thomas, Brittany C; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas; Boland, C Richard; Plon, Sharon E; Clendenning, Mark; Win, Aung Ko; Senter, Leigha; Lipkin, Steven M; Stadler, Zsofia K; Macrae, Finlay A; Lynch, Henry T; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; de la Chapelle, Albert; Syngal, Sapna; Lynch, Patrick; Parry, Susan; Jenkins, Mark A; Gallinger, Steven; Holter, Spring; Aronson, Melyssa; Newcomb, Polly A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Pichurin, Pavel; Hampel, Heather; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Lu, Karen H; Thibodeau, Stephen; Lindor, Noralane M

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 have been shown to cause Lynch syndrome. The penetrance of the cancer and tumor spectrum has been repeatedly studied, and multiple professional societies have proposed clinical management guidelines for affected individuals. Several studies have demonstrated a reduced penetrance for monoallelic carriers of PMS2 mutations compared with the other mismatch repair (MMR) genes, but clinical management guidelines have largely proposed the same screening recommendations for all MMR gene carriers. The authors considered whether enough evidence existed to propose new screening guidelines specific to PMS2 mutation carriers with regard to age at onset and frequency of colonic screening. Published reports of PMS2 germ-line mutations were combined with unpublished cases from the authors' research registries and clinical practices, and a discussion of potential modification of cancer screening guidelines was pursued. A total of 234 monoallelic PMS2 mutation carriers from 170 families were included. Approximately 8% of those with colorectal cancer (CRC) were diagnosed before age 30, and each of these tumors presented on the left side of the colon. As it is currently unknown what causes the early onset of CRC in some families with monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations, the authors recommend against reducing cancer surveillance guidelines in families found having monoallelic PMS2 mutations in spite of the reduced penetrance.Genet Med 18 1, 13-19.

  15. [A study of PDE6B gene mutation and phenotype in Chinese cases with retinitis pigmentosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yun; Zhao, Kan-xing; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Wei-ying; Wang, Li-ming

    2003-01-01

    To identify the mutation spectrum of phosphodiesterase beta subunit (PDE6B) gene, the incidence in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and their clinical phenotypic characteristics. Screening of mutations within PDE6B gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction-heteroduplex-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequence in 35 autosomal recessive (AR) RP and 55 sporadic RP cases. The phenotypes of the patients with the gene mutation were examined and analyzed. Novel complex heterozygous variants of PDE6B gene in a sporadic case, a T to C transversion in codon 323 resulting in the substitution of Gly by Ser and 2 base pairs (bp: G and T) insert between the 27th-28th bp upstream of the 5'-end of exon 10 were both present in a same isolate RP. But they are not found in 100 unrelated healthy individuals. Ocular findings showed diffuse pigmentary retinal degeneration in the midperipheral and peripheral fundi, optic atrophy and vessel attenuation. Multi-focal ERG indicated that the rod function was more severely deteriorated. A mutation was found in a case with RP in a ARRP family, a G to A transversion at 19th base upstream 5'-end of exon 11 (within intron 10) of PDE6B gene. A sporadic RP carried a sequence variant of PDE6B gene, a G to C transition, at the 15th base adjacent to the 3'-end of exon l8. In another isolate case with RP was found 2 bp (GT) insert between 31st and 32nd base upstream 5'-end of exon 4 (in intron 3) of PDE6B gene. There are novel complex heterozygous mutations of PDE6B gene responsible for a sporadic RP patient in China. This gene mutation associated with rod deterioration and RP. Several DNA variants were found in introns of PDE6B gene in national population.

  16. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequency and cell survival of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 by treatment before irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.; Rinaldi, C.N.

    1984-01-01

    The UV radiation survival curve of exponentially growing cultures of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 was modified by pretreatment for short incubation periods (up to 20 min) with chloramphenicol such that an extended exponential section of intermediate slope appeared between the shoulder and the final exponential slope. Surges of mutation to tryptophan independence occurred with each increase in slope of the survival curve. These surges were separated by extended sections of little mutation. Nalidixic acid prevented both the changes in survival and mutation. Mutation curves obtained with overnight cultures had three extended sections of little mutation alternating with section of high mutation. Reincubation for 60 min in fresh medium reduced or eliminated the low-response sections. These reappeared after 80 to 90 min, when DNA had doubled in the culture and before the initial synchronous cell divisions had occurred. Nalidixic acid prevented this reappearance

  17. Spectrum of somatic mutations detected by targeted next-generation sequencing and their prognostic significance in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Feng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Target-specific next-generation sequencing technology was used to analyze 112 genes in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. This sequencing mainly focused on the specific mutational hotspots. Among the 121 patients, 93 patients were B-ALL (76.9%, and 28 patients (23.1% were T-ALL. Of the 121 patients, 110 (90.9% harbored at least one mutation. The five most frequently mutated genes in T-ALL are NOTCH1, JAK3, FBXW7, FAT1, and NRAS. In B-ALL, FAT1, SF1, CRLF2, TET2, and PTPN1 have higher incidence of mutations. Gene mutations are different between Ph+ALL and Ph−ALL patients. B-ALL patients with PTPN11 mutation and T-ALL patients with NOTCH1 and/or FBXW7 mutations showed better survival. But B-ALL with JAK1/JAK2 mutations showed worse survival. The results suggest that gene mutations exist in adult ALL patients universally, they are related with prognosis.

  18. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo; Tenca, Claudya; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Albesiano, Emilia; Bagnara, Davide; Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Chu, Charles C; Morabito, Fortunato; Bruno, Silvia; Ferrarini, Manlio; Tramontano, Anna; Fais, Franco; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV–diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation. PMID:21785810

  19. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV-diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥ 2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation.

  20. BAG3 directly interacts with mutated alphaB-crystallin to suppress its aggregation and toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hishiya

    Full Text Available A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin gene (CRYAB are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we demonstrate that BAG3 directly binds to wild-type αB-crystallin and the αB-crystallin mutant R120G, via the intermediate domain of BAG3. Peptides that inhibit this interaction in an in vitro binding assay indicate that two conserved Ile-Pro-Val regions of BAG3 are involved in the interaction with αB-crystallin, which is similar to results showing BAG3 binding to HspB8 and HspB6. BAG3 overexpression increased αB-crystallin R120G solubility and inhibited its intracellular aggregation in HEK293 cells. BAG3 suppressed cell death induced by αB-crystallin R120G overexpression in differentiating C2C12 mouse myoblast cells. Our findings indicate a novel function for BAG3 in inhibiting protein aggregation caused by the genetic mutation of CRYAB responsible for human myofibrillar myopathy.

  1. BAG3 Directly Interacts with Mutated alphaB-Crystallin to Suppress Its Aggregation and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishiya, Akinori; Salman, Mortada Najem; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.; Takayama, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin gene (CRYAB) are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we demonstrate that BAG3 directly binds to wild-type αB-crystallin and the αB-crystallin mutant R120G, via the intermediate domain of BAG3. Peptides that inhibit this interaction in an in vitro binding assay indicate that two conserved Ile-Pro-Val regions of BAG3 are involved in the interaction with αB-crystallin, which is similar to results showing BAG3 binding to HspB8 and HspB6. BAG3 overexpression increased αB-crystallin R120G solubility and inhibited its intracellular aggregation in HEK293 cells. BAG3 suppressed cell death induced by αB-crystallin R120G overexpression in differentiating C2C12 mouse myoblast cells. Our findings indicate a novel function for BAG3 in inhibiting protein aggregation caused by the genetic mutation of CRYAB responsible for human myofibrillar myopathy. PMID:21423662

  2. A role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility within Sardinian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomba, Grazia; Tanda, Francesco; Farris, Antonio; Orrù, Sandra; Floris, Carlo; Pisano, Marina; Lovicu, Mario; Santona, Maria Cristina; Landriscina, Gennaro; Crisponi, Laura; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Loi, Angela; Monne, Maria; Uras, Antonella; Fancello, Patrizia; Piras, Giovanna; Gabbas, Attilio; Cossu, Antonio; Budroni, Mario; Contu, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have assessed the prevalence of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in various cohorts. We here extensively investigated the prevalence and geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations in the entire genetically-homogeneous Sardinian population. The occurrence of phenotypic characteristics which may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations was also evaluated. Three hundred and forty-eight breast cancer patients presenting a familial recurrence of invasive breast or ovarian carcinoma with at least two affected family members were screened for BRCA1-2 mutations by DHPLC analysis and DNA sequencing. Association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational status with clinical and pathological parameters was evaluated by Pearson's Chi-Squared test. Overall, 8 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2 deleterious mutations were detected in 35/348 (10%) families; majority (23/35;66%) of mutations was found in BRCA2 gene. The geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations was related to three specific large areas of Sardinia, reflecting its ancient history: a) the Northern area, linguistically different from the rest of the island (where a BRCA2 c.8764-8765delAG mutation with founder effect was predominant); b) the Middle area, land of the ancient Sardinian population (where BRCA2 mutations are still more common than BRCA1 mutations); and c) the South-Western area, with many Phoenician and Carthaginian locations (where BRCA1 mutations are prevalent). We also found that phenotypic features such as high tumor grading and lack of expression of estrogen/progesterone receptors together with age at diagnosis and presence of ovarian cancer in the family may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations

  3. Absence of mutations in HCRT, HCRTR1 and HCRTR2 in patients with ROHHAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Sarah F; Rand, Casey M; Gray, Paul A; Gibson, William T; Wilson, Richard J A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Bech-Hansen, N Torben; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2016-01-15

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare pediatric disease of unknown cause. Here, in response to a recent case report describing a ROHHAD patient who suffered from secondary narcolepsy confirmed by an absence of hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid, we consider whether the ROHHAD phenotype is owing to one or more mutations in genes specific to hypocretin protein signalling. DNA samples from 16 ROHHAD patients were analyzed using a combination of next-generation and Sanger sequencing to identify exonic sequence variations in three genes: HCRT, HCRTR1, and HCRTR2. No rare or novel mutations were identified in the exons of HCRT, HCRTR1, or HCRTR2 genes in a set of 16 ROHHAD patients. ROHHAD is highly unlikely to be caused by mutations in the exons of the genes for hypocretin and its two receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. B3GALNT2 mutations associated with non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability reveal a lack of genotype-phenotype associations in the muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroofian, Reza; Riemersma, Moniek; Jae, Lucas T; Zhianabed, Narges; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M; Willemsen, Michèl A; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Mehrjardi, Mohammad Yahya Vahidi; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Kusters, Benno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nasseri, Mojila; Pfundt, Rolph; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Lefeber, Dirk J; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2017-12-22

    The phenotypic severity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (MDDG) syndromes associated with aberrant glycosylation of α-dystroglycan ranges from the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome or muscle-eye-brain disease to mild, late-onset, isolated limb-girdle muscular dystrophy without neural involvement. However, muscular dystrophy is invariably found across the spectrum of MDDG patients. Using linkage mapping and whole-exome sequencing in two families with an unexplained neurodevelopmental disorder, we have identified homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2. The first family comprises two brothers of Dutch non-consanguineous parents presenting with mild ID and behavioral problems. Immunohistochemical analysis of muscle biopsy revealed no significant aberrations, in line with the absence of a muscular phenotype in the affected siblings. The second family includes five affected individuals from an Iranian consanguineous kindred with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy without any notable neuroimaging, muscle, or eye abnormalities. Complementation assays of the compound heterozygous mutations identified in the two brothers had a comparable effect on the O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan as previously reported mutations that are associated with severe muscular phenotypes. In conclusion, we show that mutations in B3GALNT2 can give rise to a novel MDDG syndrome presentation, characterized by ID associated variably with seizure, but without any apparent muscular involvement. Importantly, B3GALNT2 activity does not fully correlate with the severity of the phenotype as assessed by the complementation assay.

  5. Genetic loss of SH2B3 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Hadler, Michael; Rigo, Isaura; LeDuc, Charles A; Kelly, Kara; Jalas, Chaim; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Tong, Wei; Chung, Wendy K; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2013-10-03

    The SH2B adaptor protein 3 (SH2B3) gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling with a critical role in the homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid progenitors. Here, we report the identification of germline homozygous SH2B3 mutations in 2 siblings affected with developmental delay and autoimmunity, one in whom B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed. Mechanistically, loss of SH2B3 increases Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling, promotes lymphoid cell proliferation, and accelerates leukemia development in a mouse model of NOTCH1-induced ALL. Moreover, extended mutation analysis showed homozygous somatic mutations in SH2B3 in 2 of 167 ALLs analyzed. Overall, these results demonstrate a Knudson tumor suppressor role for SH2B3 in the pathogenesis of ALL and highlight a possible link between genetic predisposition factors in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and leukemogenesis.

  6. Analysis of B Cell Repertoire Dynamics Following Hepatitis B Vaccination in Humans, and Enrichment of Vaccine-specific Antibody Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galson, Jacob D; Trück, Johannes; Fowler, Anna; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Münz, Márton; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Reinhard, Claudia; van der Most, Robbert; Pollard, Andrew J; Lunter, Gerton; Kelly, Dominic F

    2015-12-01

    Generating a diverse B cell immunoglobulin repertoire is essential for protection against infection. The repertoire in humans can now be comprehensively measured by high-throughput sequencing. Using hepatitis B vaccination as a model, we determined how the total immunoglobulin sequence repertoire changes following antigen exposure in humans, and compared this to sequences from vaccine-specific sorted cells. Clonal sequence expansions were seen 7 days after vaccination, which correlated with vaccine-specific plasma cell numbers. These expansions caused an increase in mutation, and a decrease in diversity and complementarity-determining region 3 sequence length in the repertoire. We also saw an increase in sequence convergence between participants 14 and 21 days after vaccination, coinciding with an increase of vaccine-specific memory cells. These features allowed development of a model for in silico enrichment of vaccine-specific sequences from the total repertoire. Identifying antigen-specific sequences from total repertoire data could aid our understanding B cell driven immunity, and be used for disease diagnostics and vaccine evaluation.

  7. Induction of specific-locus mutations in the mouse by tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Cumming, R.B.; Kelly, E.M.; Phipps, E.L.

    1978-01-01

    The results reported are the first obtained on transmtted gene mutations induced by tritium in any form in any mammal. They are, therefore, of obvious practical importance in the estimaton of the possible biological hazards of man-made tritium in the environment. Male mice were injected intraperitoneally with either 0.75 or 0.50 mCi per gram of body weight of tritiated water. They were then used in our standard specific-locus mutation test in which the treated wild-type stock of mice is mated to a stock homozygous for seven recessive marker genes. Mutations at any of the seven loci are scored in the offspring. The earlier matings provided information on the mutation frequency in germ cells irradiated in postspermatogonial stages, and the later matings gave the mutation frequency in treated spermatogonia. The spermatogonia are the important cells so far as human risks are concerned, and the mouse results for this germ-cell stage yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of approximately 2 for tritiated water compared with low-dose-rate gamma irradiation. There are various uncertainties involved in arriving at this figure, and the difference between it and l is probably not statistically significant. However, for risk estimation, it seems prudent to use the RBE value of 2, which is, after all, the best point estimate computed from the present data

  8. A naturally occurring mutation in ropB suppresses SpeB expression and reduces M1T1 group A streptococcal systemic virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hollands

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies of group A streptococcus (GAS have noted an inverse relationship between SpeB expression and invasive disease. However, the role of SpeB in the course of infection is still unclear. In this study we utilize a SpeB-negative M1T1 clinical isolate, 5628, with a naturally occurring mutation in the gene encoding the regulator RopB, to elucidate the role of RopB and SpeB in systemic virulence. Allelic exchange mutagenesis was used to replace the mutated ropB allele in 5628 with the intact allele from the well characterized isolate 5448. The inverse allelic exchange was also performed to replace the intact ropB in 5448 with the mutated allele from 5628. An intact ropB was found to be essential for SpeB expression. While the ropB mutation was shown to have no effect on hemolysis of RBC's, extracellular DNase activity or survival in the presence of neutrophils, strains with the mutated ropB allele were less virulent in murine systemic models of infection. An isogenic SpeB knockout strain containing an intact RopB showed similarly reduced virulence. Microarray analysis found genes of the SpeB operon to be the primary target of RopB regulation. These data show that an intact RopB and efficient SpeB production are necessary for systemic infection with GAS.

  9. MPL mutation profile in JAK2 mutation-negative patients with myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanlong; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiuqiang; Zhang, Zhong; Yeh, Chen-Hsiung; Uyeji, Jennifer; Albitar, Maher

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (myeloproliferative leukemia, MPL) have been reported in patients with JAK2 V617F-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs). We evaluated the prevalence of MPL mutations relative to JAK2 mutations in patients with suspected MPDs. A total of 2790 patient samples submitted for JAK2 mutation analysis were tested using real-time polymerase chain reaction and bidirectional sequencing of plasma RNA. JAK2 V617F-negative samples were tested for JAK2 exons 12 to 14 mutations, and those with negative results were then tested for mutations in MPL exons 10 and 11. Of the 2790 patients, 529 (18.96%) had V617F, 12 (0.43%) had small insertions or deletions in exon 12, and 7 (0.25%) had other JAK2 mutations in exons 12 to 14. Of the 2242 JAK2 mutation-negative patients, 68 (3.03%) had MPL mutations. W515L was the predominant MPL mutation (n=46; 68%), and 10 (15%) patients had other W515 variants. The remaining MPL mutations (n=12, 17%) were detected at other locations in exons 10 and 11 and included 3 insertion/deletion mutations. The S505N mutation, associated with familial MPD, was detected in 3 patients. Overall, for every 100 V617F mutations in patients with suspected MPDs, there were 12.9 MPL mutations, 2.3 JAK2 exon 12 mutations, and 1.3 JAK2 exons 13 to 14 mutations. These findings suggest that MPL mutation screening should be performed before JAK2 exons 12 to 14 testing in JAK2 V617F-negative patients with suspected MPDs.

  10. Patient-specific mutations impair BESTROPHIN1’s essential role in mediating Ca2+-dependent Cl- currents in human RPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yao [Jonas Children’s Vision Care, and Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology and Pathology & Cell Biology, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University, New York, United States; Zhang, Yu [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, United States; Xu, Yu [Jonas Children’s Vision Care, and Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology and Pathology & Cell Biology, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University, New York, United States; Department of Ophthalmology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Kittredge, Alec [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, United States; Ward, Nancy [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, United States; Chen, Shoudeng [Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Experimental Medicine, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, China; Tsang, Stephen H. [Jonas Children’s Vision Care, and Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology and Pathology & Cell Biology, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University, New York, United States; Yang, Tingting [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, United States

    2017-10-24

    Mutations in the human BEST1 gene lead to retinal degenerative diseases displaying progressive vision loss and even blindness. BESTROPHIN1, encoded by BEST1, is predominantly expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), but its physiological role has been a mystery for the last two decades. Using a patient-specific iPSC-based disease model and interdisciplinary approaches, we comprehensively analyzed two distinct BEST1 patient mutations, and discovered mechanistic correlations between patient clinical phenotypes, electrophysiology in their RPEs, and the structure and function of BESTROPHIN1 mutant channels. Our results revealed that the disease-causing mechanism of BEST1 mutations is centered on the indispensable role of BESTROPHIN1 in mediating the long speculated Ca2+-dependent Cl- current in RPE, and demonstrate that the pathological potential of BEST1 mutations can be evaluated and predicted with our iPSC-based ‘disease-in-a-dish’ approach. Moreover, we demonstrated that patient RPE is rescuable with viral gene supplementation, providing a proof-of-concept for curing BEST1-associated diseases.

  11. Two alanine racemase genes in Salmonella typhimurium that differ in structure and function.

    OpenAIRE

    Wasserman, S A; Walsh, C T; Botstein, D

    1983-01-01

    Mutations were isolated in a previously undescribed Salmonella typhimurium gene encoding an alanine racemase essential for utilization of L-alanine as a source of carbon, energy, and nitrogen. This new locus, designated dadB, lies within one kilobase of the D-alanine dehydrogenase locus (dadA), which is also required for alanine catabolism. The dadA and dadB genes are coregulated. Mutants (including insertions) lacking the dadB alanine racemase do not require D-alanine for growth unless a mut...

  12. The Val{sup 192}Leu mutation in the {alpha}-subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A is not associated with the B1-variant form of Tay-Sachs disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y.; Vavougios, G.; Hinek, A. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Substitution mutations adversely affecting the {alpha}-subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A ({alpha}{beta}) (EC 3.2.1.52) result in Tay-Sachs disease. The majority affect the initial folding of the pro-{alpha} chain in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in its retention and degradation. A much less common occurrence is a mutation that specifically affects an {open_quotes}active-site{close_quotes} residue necessary for substrate binding and/or catalysis. In this case, hexosaminidase A is present in the lysosome, but it lacks all {alpha}-specific activity. This biochemical phenotype is referred to as the {open_quotes}B1-variant form{close_quotes} of Tay-Sachs disease. Kinetic analysis of suspected B1-variant mutations is complex because hexosaminidase A is heterodimeric and both subunits possess similar active sites. In this report, we examine a previously identified B1-variant mutation, {alpha}-Val{sup 192}Leu. Chinese hamster ovary cells were permanently cotransfected with an {alpha}-cDNA-construct encoding the substitution and a mutant {beta}-cDNA ({beta}-Arg{sup 211}Lys), encoding a {beta}-subunit that is inactive but normal in all other respects. We were surprised to find that the Val{sup 192}Leu substitution produced a pro-{alpha} chain that did not form {alpha}-{beta} dimers and was not transported to the lysosome. Finally, we reexamined the hexosaminidase activity and protein levels in the fibroblasts from the original patient. These data were also not consistent with the biochemical phenotype of the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease previously reported to be present. Thus, we conclude that the Val{sup 192}Leu substitution does not specifically affect the {alpha}-active site. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mutation frequencies in male mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in men: (specific-locus mutations/dose-rate effect/doubling dose/risk estimation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Estimation of the genetic hazards of ionizing radiation in men is based largely on the frequency of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonial stem cells at low radiation dose rates. The publication of new data on this subject has permitted a fresh review of all the information available. The data continue to show no discrepancy from the interpretation that, although mutation frequency decreases markedly as dose rate is decreased from 90 to 0.8 R/min (1 R = 2.6 X 10 -4 coulombs/kg) there seems to be no further change below 0.8 R/min over the range from that dose rate to 0.0007 R/min. Simple mathematical models are used to compute: (a) a maximum likelihood estimate of the induced mutation frequency at the low dose rates, and (b) a maximum likelihood estimate of the ratio of this to the mutation frequency at high dose rates in the range of 72 to 90 R/min. In the application of these results to the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man, the former value can be used to calculate a doubling dose - i.e., the dose of radiation that induces a mutation frequency equal to the spontaneous frequency. The doubling dose based on the low-dose-rate data compiled here is 110 R. The ratio of the mutation frequency at low dose rate to that at high dose rate is useful when it becomes necessary to extrapolate from experimental determinations, or from human data, at high dose rates to the expected risk at low dose rates. The ratio derived from the present analysis is 0.33

  14. CYP2R1 mutations causing vitamin D-deficiency rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Levine, Michael A

    2017-10-01

    CYP2R1 is the principal hepatic 25-hydroxylase responsible for the hydroxylation of parent vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D reflect vitamin D status, because 25(OH)D is the major circulating metabolite of vitamin D. The 1α-hydroxylation of 25(OH)D in the kidney by CYP27B1 generates the fully active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D). The human CYP2R1 gene, located at 11p15.2, has five exons, coding for an enzyme with 501 amino acids. In Cyp2r1-/- knockout mice, serum 25(OH)D levels were reduced by more than 50% compared wild-type mice. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2R1 account for some of the individual variability of circulating 25(OH)D values in the population. We review the evidence that inactivating mutations in CYP2R1 can lead to a novel form of vitamin D-deficiency rickets resulting from impaired 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D. We sequenced the promoter, exons and intron-exon flanking regions of the CYP2R1 gene in members of 12 Nigerian families with rickets in more than one family member. We found missense mutations (L99P and K242N) in affected members of 2 of 12 families. The L99P mutation had previously been reported as a homozygous defect in an unrelated child of Nigerian origin with rickets. In silico analyses predicted impaired CYP2R1 folding or reduced interaction with substrate vitamin D by L99P and K242N mutations, respectively. In vitro studies of the mutant CYP2R1 proteins in HEK293 cells confirmed normal expression levels but completely absent or markedly reduced 25-hydroxylase activity by the L99P and K242N mutations, respectively. Heterozygous subjects had more moderate biochemical and clinical features of vitamin D deficiency than homozygous subjects. After an oral bolus dose of 50,000 IU of vitamin D 2 or vitamin D 3 , heterozygous subjects had lower increases in serum 25(OH)D than control subjects, and homozygous subjects had minimal increases, supporting a semidominant

  15. RAPID DETECTION OF -THALASSEMIA MUTATIONS IN THAILAND USING MULTIPLEX ARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shimbhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of mutations underlining b-thalassemia generate a wide variety of different clinical phenotypes. An understanding of the genotype is important for medical personnel in order to provide proper counseling to patients and their families. Characterization of these mutations should aid the planning of a prenatal diagnosis program for bthalassemia. The heterogeneity of the mutations makes it difficult and time consuming to identify the mutation in some individuals. We developed a single-tube multiplex amplification refractory mutation system (multiplex ARMS to identify common ethnic- specific b-thalassemia mutations. Confirmation of multiplex ARMS results was carried out using direct sequencing. Three thousand three hundred twenty two people from Phitsanulok province were screened for the b-thalassemia trait by quantitation of HbA2 with microcolumn chromatography and the genotypes of mutations were characterized using multiplex ARMS and direct sequencing. We found that the deletion at codons 41/42 (-TCTT was the most frequent (48%, codon 17 (A®T (30%, -28 (A®G (6% and IVS-I-1(G®T (6% were the second and third in frequency respectively. A -87 (C®A mutation (4%, IVS II-654 (C®T (2%, codons 71/72 (+A (2% and codon 35 (C®A mutations (2% were also found. These techniques were found to be a valuable tool for analysis of b-thalassemia mutations because they are accurate, simple, and speedy in operation. The application for the diagnosis of severe thalassemia in high-risk pregnancies is promising.

  16. A novel mutation in pmrB mediates colistin resistance during therapy of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Elias; Gómez-Gil, Rosa; Sanz, Sonia; González-Zorn, Bruno; Daoud, Ziad; Mingorance, Jesús; Suárez, Monica

    2017-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a highly versatile nosocomial pathogen. Multidrug resistance among A. baumannii isolates led to the use of colistin, subsequently giving rise to colistin-resistant strains. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic profiles of two colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates were investigated. Two A. baumannii isolates were obtained from Patient 1 (C071 and C440) and three isolates were obtained from Patient 2 (C080, C314 and C428). Susceptibility profiles were determined by VITEK ® 2 and Etest. Clonality was determined by RAPD analysis and trilocus multiplex PCR. The pmrCAB operon was sequenced and common carbapenemase genes were screened for by PCR. Doubling times, haemolysis, surface motility, biofilm formation, siderophore production and proteolytic activity were phenotypically determined. Finally, whole-genome sequencing was performed for all five isolates. Isolates C440 and C428 were resistant to colistin and were clonally identical to their sensitive counterparts. The cause of colistin resistance was traced to the previously described P233S mutation in pmrB of C440 and to a novel ΔI19 mutation in pmrB of C428. bla OXA-58-like and bla GES-5 from the strains of Patients 1 and 2, respectively, were also detected. C440 had attenuated proteolytic activity and was positive for siderophore production compared with C071. No difference in in vitro virulence was detected between isolates C080, C314 and C428. In conclusion, one common and one novel mutation were encountered in pmrB from two distinct colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates. These mutations caused colistin resistance during therapy in two distinct clones, and only one of them had altered in vitro virulence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin B recognizes its protein receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rongsheng; Rummel, Andreas; Binz, Thomas; Brunger, Axel T

    2006-12-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by Clostridium botulinum and cause the neuroparalytic syndrome of botulism. With a lethal dose of 1 ng kg(-1), they pose a biological hazard to humans and a serious potential bioweapon threat. BoNTs bind with high specificity at neuromuscular junctions and they impair exocytosis of synaptic vesicles containing acetylcholine through specific proteolysis of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors), which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The molecular details of the toxin-cell recognition have been elusive. Here we report the structure of a BoNT in complex with its protein receptor: the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) bound to the luminal domain of synaptotagmin II, determined at 2.15 A resolution. On binding, a helix is induced in the luminal domain which binds to a saddle-shaped crevice on a distal tip of BoNT/B. This crevice is adjacent to the non-overlapping ganglioside-binding site of BoNT/B. Synaptotagmin II interacts with BoNT/B with nanomolar affinity, at both neutral and acidic endosomal pH. Biochemical and neuronal ex vivo studies of structure-based mutations indicate high specificity and affinity of the interaction, and high selectivity of BoNT/B among synaptotagmin I and II isoforms. Synergistic binding of both synaptotagmin and ganglioside imposes geometric restrictions on the initiation of BoNT/B translocation after endocytosis. Our results provide the basis for the rational development of preventive vaccines or inhibitors against these neurotoxins.

  18. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; Paula, Lucas F. de; Soares, Marcia M.C.N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Specific oligonucleotide detection for hepatitis B based on poly-4-aminophenol matrix. • Electrochemical detection of the gene specific using ethidium bromide as indicator. • The detection limit was 2.61 nmol L −1 , with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (n = 3). • The system discriminates three-base mismatches and non-complementary target. - Abstract: An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L −1 . Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy

  19. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G. [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Paula, Lucas F. de [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Soares, Marcia M.C.N. [Adolfo Lutz Institute, Regional Laboratory in São José do Rio Preto (Brazil); Goulart, Luiz R. [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Madurro, João M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Brito-Madurro, Ana G., E-mail: agbrito@iqufu.ufu.br [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Specific oligonucleotide detection for hepatitis B based on poly-4-aminophenol matrix. • Electrochemical detection of the gene specific using ethidium bromide as indicator. • The detection limit was 2.61 nmol L{sup −1}, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (n = 3). • The system discriminates three-base mismatches and non-complementary target. - Abstract: An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L{sup −1}. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  20. Coffin-Siris Syndrome with obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, Mari-Anne; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Nõukas, Margit; Shor, Riina; Peet, Aleksandr; Kals, Mart; Kivistik, Paula Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-11-01

    Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS, MIM 135900) is a rare genetic disorder, and mutations in ARID1B were recently shown to cause CSS. In this study, we report a novel ARID1B mutation identified by whole-exome sequencing in a patient with clinical features of CSS. We identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.1584delG in exon 2 of ARID1B (NM_020732.3) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Leu528Phefs*65). Sanger sequencing confirmed the c.1584delG mutation as a de novo in the proband and that it was not present either in her parents, half-sister or half-brother. Clinically, the patient presented with extreme obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly, hyperinsulinism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), which have previously not been described in CSS patients. We suggest that obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and/or PCOS may be added to the list of clinical features of ARID1B mutations, but further clinical reports are required to make a definite conclusion.

  1. Analysis of the B-RAFV600E mutation in cutaneous melanoma patients with occupational sun exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANDIDO, SAVERIO; RAPISARDA, VENERANDO; MARCONI, ANDREA; MALAPONTE, GRAZIA; BEVELACQUA, VALENTINA; GANGEMI, PIETRO; SCALISI, AURORA; McCUBREY, JAMES A.; MAESTRO, ROBERTA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; FENGA, CONCETTINA; LIBRA, MASSIMO

    2014-01-01

    Sun-exposure is one of the risk factors associated with the development of a cutaneous neoplasm. In melanoma, the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK (MAPK) signaling pathway is constitutively activated through multiple mechanisms, including B-RAF mutation. It has been hypothesized that B-RAF mutations in melanocytic lesions arise from DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, it is still discussed if B-RAF mutations are associated with melanoma patients exposed to the sun. Therefore, in the present study, the known B-RAFV600E mutation was analysed in melanoma samples from 30 indoor and 38 outdoor workers. B-RAFV600E mutation was detected in 52 and 73% of outdoor workers and indoor workers, respectively. Of note, this mutation was identified in 12 of 14 (85%) melanoma of the trunk diagnosed in indoor workers and in 9 of 19 (47%) samples from outdoor workers (p=0.03). By analyzing melanomas of other body sites, no statistical difference in the frequency of B-RAFV600E mutation was identified between the groups of workers. It appears that the mutation detected among indoor workers may be associated with a recreational or intermittent exposure to the sun, as usually the trunk is a sun-protected body site. Overall, these data indicate that the B-RAFV600E mutation detected in melanoma is not associated with a chronic exposure to the sun. Mutations detected in other genes may also contribute to melanoma development in the subset of patients exposed to UV radiation. PMID:24424406

  2. Clinical relevance of precore mutations of hepatitis B virus in chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloska-Ivanova Viktorija

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B is one of the most frequent etiological factors for chronic liver diseases worldwide. Recent studies have suggested the important role of the genetic diversity of the virus on natural course of hepatitis B. Hepatitis B e-antigen negative type of chronic hepatitis is associated with mutations in the precore region and basic core promoter of hepatitis B viral genome. Aim of study was to identify precore mutations in viral genome of patients with chronic hepatitis B and to evaluate clinical patterns of liver disease related to this type of hepatitis B. Methods: Sixty seven patients with hepatitis B were included in the study. In order to evaluate the clinical patterns of chronic liver disease related to hepatitis B viral infection, biochemical and virological investigations were done, as well as a quantification of serum viral load. All patients underwent liver biopsy and semiquantification of necroinflammation and/or fibrosis according to Knodell scoring was done. In the group of e antigen-negative patients, molecular analysis was performed in order to identify presence of mutations in precore region of the virus. Results: Study group was divided in 25 HBeAg-positive and 42 HBeAg-negative subjects. Al anin-aminotransferase activity and level of viral load were higher in HBeAg-positive (p < 0.05, but average age and histology activity index were significantly higher in the HBeAg-negative patients (p < 0.01. Precore mutants were found in 38 of 42 patients with HBeAg-negative hepatitis (90%. Fibrosis was found in 30/38 cases with mutations. Discussion: Mutations in precore region of HBV in HBeAg-negative patients were more prevalent in older age and were associated with higher rate of fibrosis in liver tissue, meaning more advanced stage of the disease. This could be a consequence of longer duration of HBV infection or more severe clinical course of the disease. Conclusion: Our results suggest that precore mutations are

  3. Detection of sdhB Gene Mutations in SDHI-Resistant Isolates of Botrytis cinerea Using High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Anastasios; Madesis, Panagiotis; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea , is a high risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development. Pathogen' resistance to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in sdh gene. The diversity of mutations and their differential effect on cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs and the fitness of resistant strains necessitate the availability of a tool for their rapid identification. This study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the identification of P225H/F/L//T, N230I, and H272L/R/Y mutations. Based on the sequence of sdh B subunit of resistant and sensitive isolates, a universal primer pair was designed. The specificity of the HRM analysis primers was verified to ensure against the cross-reaction with other fungal species and its sensitivity was evaluated using concentrations of known amounts of mutant's DNA. The melting curve analysis generated nine distinct curve profiles, enabling the discrimination of all the four mutations located at codon 225, the N230I mutation, the three mutations located in codon 272, and the non-mutated isolates (isolates of wild-type sensitivity). Similar results were obtained when DNA was extracted directly from artificially inoculated strawberry fruit. The method was validated by monitoring the presence of sdh B mutations in samples of naturally infected strawberry fruits and stone fruit rootstock seedling plants showing damping-off symptoms. HRM analysis data were compared with a standard PIRA-PCR technique and an absolute agreement was observed suggesting that in both populations the H272R mutation was the predominant one, while H272Y, N230I, and P225H were detected in lower frequencies. The results of the study suggest that HRM analysis can be a useful tool for sensate, accurate, and rapid identification of several sdh B mutations in B. cinerea and it is expected to contribute in routine fungicide resistance monitoring or assessments of the effectiveness of anti-resistance strategies implemented in

  4. Detection of sdhB gene mutations in SDHI-resistant isolates of Botrytis cinerea using high resolution melting (HRM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Samaras

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea, is a high-risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development. Pathogen` resistance to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in sdh gene. The diversity of mutations and their differential effect on cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs and the fitness of resistant strains necessitate the availability of a tool for their rapid identification. This study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM analysis for the identification of P225H/F/L//T, N230I and H272L/R/Y mutations. Based on the sequence of sdhB subunit of resistant and sensitive isolates, a universal primer pair was designed. The specificity of the HRM analysis primers was verified to ensure against the cross-reaction with other fungal species and its sensitivity was evaluated using concentrations of known amounts of mutant`s DNA. The melting curve analysis generated nine distinct curve profiles, enabling the discrimination of all the 4 mutations located at codon 225, the N230I mutation, the 3 mutations located in codon 272 and the non mutated isolates (isolates of wild type sensitivity. Similar results were obtained when DNA was extracted directly from artificially inoculated strawberry fruit. The method was validated by monitoring the presence of sdhB mutations in samples of naturally infected strawberry fruits and stone fruit rootstock seedling plants showing damping off symptoms. HRM analysis data were compared with a standard PIRA-PCR technique and an absolute agreement was observed suggesting that in both populations the H272R mutation was the predominant one, while H272Y, N230I and P225H were detected in lower frequencies. The results of the study suggest that HRM analysis can be a useful tool for sensate, accurate and rapid identification of several sdhB mutations in B. cinerea and it is expected to contribute in routine fungicide resistance monitoring or assessments of the effectiveness of antiresistance strategies implemented in

  5. A single splice site mutation in human-specific ARHGAP11B causes basal progenitor amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Marta; Namba, Takashi; Pääbo, Svante; Hiller, Michael; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2016-01-01

    The gene ARHGAP11B promotes basal progenitor amplification and is implicated in neocortex expansion. It arose on the human evolutionary lineage by partial duplication of ARHGAP11A, which encodes a Rho guanosine triphosphatase–activating protein (RhoGAP). However, a lack of 55 nucleotides in ARHGAP11B mRNA leads to loss of RhoGAP activity by GAP domain truncation and addition of a human-specific carboxy-terminal amino acid sequence. We show that these 55 nucleotides are deleted by mRNA splicing due to a single C→G substitution that creates a novel splice donor site. We reconstructed an ancestral ARHGAP11B complementary DNA without this substitution. Ancestral ARHGAP11B exhibits RhoGAP activity but has no ability to increase basal progenitors during neocortex development. Hence, a single nucleotide substitution underlies the specific properties of ARHGAP11B that likely contributed to the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex. PMID:27957544

  6. nr0b1 (DAX1) mutation in zebrafish causes female-to-male sex reversal through abnormal gonadal proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Hefei; Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Gang

    2016-09-15

    Sex determinations are diverse in vertebrates. Although many sex-determining genes and pathways are conserved, the mechanistic roles of these genes and pathways in the genetic sex determination are not well understood. DAX1 (encoded by the NR0B1 gene) is a vertebrate specific orphan nuclear receptor that regulates gonadal development and sexual determination. In human, duplication of the NR0B1 gene leads to male-to-female sex reversal. In mice, Nr0b1 shows both pro-testis and anti-testis functions. We generated inheritable nr0b1 mutation in the zebrafish and found the nr0b1 mutation caused homozygous mutants to develop as fertile males due to female-to-male sex reversal. The nr0b1 mutation did not increase Caspase-3 labeling nor tp53 expression in the developing gonads. Introduction of a tp53 mutation into the nr0b1 mutant did not rescue the sex-reversal phenotype. Further examination revealed reduction in cell proliferation and abnormal somatic cell differentiation in the nr0b1 mutant gonads at the undifferentiated and bi-potential ovary stages. Together, our results suggest nr0b1 regulates somatic cell differentiation and cell proliferation to ensure normal sex development in the zebrafish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PRKAG2 mutation: An easily missed cardiac specific non-lysosomal glycogenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Dobrolet, Nancy; Fishberger, Steven; Zablah, Jenny; Jayakar, Parul; Ammous, Zineb

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in PRKAG2 gene that regulates the γ2 subunit of the adenosine monophosphate (AMP) dependent protein kinase have been associated with the development of atrioventricular (AV) accessory pathways, cardiac hypertrophy, and conduction system abnormalities. These patients can potentially be misdiagnosed as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) and/or Wolf-Parkinson White (WPW) syndrome due to similar clinical phenotype. Early recognition of this disease entity is very important as ablation of suspected accessory pathways is not effective and the natural history of the disease is very different from HOCM and WPW syndrome

  8. Mutations inside rifampicin-resistance determining region of rpoB gene associated with rifampicin-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Myo T; Emran, Nor A; Lin, Zaw

    2018-04-26

    Rifampicin (RIF) plays a pivotal role in the treatment of tuberculosis due to its bactericidal effects. Because the action of RIF is on rpoB gene encoding RNA polymerase β subunit, 95% of RIF resistant mutations are present in rpoB gene. The majority of the mutations in rpoB gene are found within an 81bp RIF-resistance determining region (RRDR). Literatures on RIF resistant mutations published between 2010 and 2016 were thoroughly reviewed. The most commonly mutated codons in RRDR of rpoB gene are 531, 526 and 516. The possibilities of absence of mutation in RRDR of rpoB gene in MDR-TB isolates in few studies was due to existence of other rare rpoB mutations outside RRDR or different mechanism of rifampicin resistance. Molecular methods which can identify extensive mutations associated with multiple anti-tuberculous drugs are in urgent need so that the research on drug resistant mutations should be extended. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. GFI1B mutation causes a bleeding disorder with abnormal platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, W S; Morel-Kopp, M-C; Chen, Q; Liang, H P; Bromhead, C J; Wright, S; Turakulov, R; Ng, A P; Roberts, A W; Bahlo, M; Ward, C M

    2013-11-01

    GFI1B is a transcription factor important for erythropoiesis and megakaryocyte development but previously unknown to be associated with human disease. A family with a novel bleeding disorder was identified and characterized. Genetic linkage analysis and massively parallel sequencing were used to localize the mutation causing the disease phenotype on chromosome 9. Functional studies were then performed in megakaryocytic cell lines to determine the biological effects of the mutant transcript. We have identified a family with an autosomal dominant bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia, red cell anisopoikilocytosis, and platelet dysfunction. The severity of bleeding is variable with some affected individuals experiencing spontaneous bleeding while other family members exhibit only abnormal bleeding with surgery. A single nucleotide insertion was identified in GFI1B that predicts a frameshift mutation in the fifth zinc finger DNA-binding domain. This mutation alters the transcriptional activity of the protein, resulting in a reduction in platelet α-granule content and aberrant expression of key platelet proteins. GFI1B mutation represents a novel human bleeding disorder, and the described phenotype identifies GFI1B as a critical regulator of platelet shape, number, and function. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Subgenotypes 1a and 1b in Japanese Patients: Ultra-Deep Sequencing Analysis of HCV NS5B Genotype-Specific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Nakatani, Sueli M.; Ono, Suzane Kioko; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Gonoi, Tohru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenotypes 1a and 1b have different impacts on the treatment response to peginterferon plus ribavirin with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against patients infected with HCV genotype 1, as the emergence rates of resistance mutations are different between these two subgenotypes. In Japan, almost all of HCV genotype 1 belongs to subgenotype 1b. Methods and Findings To determine HCV subgenotype 1a or 1b in Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1, real-time PCR-based method and Sanger method were used for the HCV NS5B region. HCV subgenotypes were determined in 90% by real-time PCR-based method. We also analyzed the specific probe regions for HCV subgenotypes 1a and 1b using ultra-deep sequencing, and uncovered mutations that could not be revealed using direct-sequencing by Sanger method. We estimated the prevalence of HCV subgenotype 1a as 1.2-2.5% of HCV genotype 1 patients in Japan. Conclusions Although real-time PCR-based HCV subgenotyping method seems fair for differentiating HCV subgenotypes 1a and 1b, it may not be sufficient for clinical practice. Ultra-deep sequencing is useful for revealing the resistant strain(s) of HCV before DAA treatment as well as mixed infection with different genotypes or subgenotypes of HCV. PMID:24069214

  11. Regulation of normal B-cell differentiation and malignant B-cell survival by OCT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Daniel J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Xiao, Wenming; Wright, George W; Schmitz, Roland; Phelan, James D; Yang, Yandan; Webster, Daniel E; Rui, Lixin; Kohlhammer, Holger; Nakagawa, Masao; Waldmann, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-04-05

    The requirement for the B-cell transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding protein 2, encoded by Pou2f2) in germinal center B cells has proved controversial. Here, we report that germinal center B cells are formed normally after depletion of OCT2 in a conditional knockout mouse, but their proliferation is reduced and in vivo differentiation to antibody-secreting plasma cells is blocked. This finding led us to examine the role of OCT2 in germinal center-derived lymphomas. shRNA knockdown showed that almost all diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines are addicted to the expression of OCT2 and its coactivator OCA-B. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and gene-expression profiling revealed the broad transcriptional program regulated by OCT2 that includes the expression of STAT3, IL-10, ELL2, XBP1, MYC, TERT, and ADA. Importantly, genetic alteration of OCT2 is not a requirement for cellular addiction in DLBCL. However, we detected amplifications of the POU2F2 locus in DLBCL tumor biopsies and a recurrent mutation of threonine 223 in the DNA-binding domain of OCT2. This neomorphic mutation subtly alters the DNA-binding preference of OCT2, leading to the transactivation of noncanonical target genes including HIF1a and FCRL3 Finally, by introducing mutations designed to disrupt the OCT2-OCA-B interface, we reveal a requirement for this protein-protein interface that ultimately might be exploited therapeutically. Our findings, combined with the predominantly B-cell-restricted expression of OCT2 and the absence of a systemic phenotype in our knockout mice, suggest that an OCT2-targeted therapeutic strategy would be efficacious in both major subtypes of DLBCL while avoiding systemic toxicity.

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in central and southern Italian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottini, Laura; Carlini, Sandro; Guadagni, Fiorella; Bianco, Angelo Raffaele; Frati, Luigi; Contegiacomo, Alma; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; D'Amico, Cristina; Noviello, Cristiana; Lauro, Salvatore; Lalle, Maurizio; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Colantuoni, Orsola Anna; Pizzi, Claudia; Cortesi, Enrico

    2000-01-01

    Protein truncation test (PTT) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay were used to scan the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 136 unrelated Italian breast/ovarian cancer patients. In the sample tested, BRCA1 and BRCA2 equally contributed to site-specific breast cancer patients who reported one to two breast cancer-affected first-/ second-degree relative(s) or who were diagnosed before age 40 years in the absence of a family history of breast/ovarian cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were mostly found in patients with disease diagnosis before and after age 50 years, respectively. Moreover, in cases with familial clustering of site-specific breast cancer, BRCA1 mostly accounted for tumours diagnosed before age 40 years and BRCA2 for tumours diagnosed after age 50 years. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation spectrum was consistent with a lack of significant founder effects in the sample of patients studied. Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for most hereditary breast/ovarian cancers and are associated with male breast cancer. Furthermore, constitutional mutations in these genes may occur in breast/ovarian cancer patients that do not meet stringent criteria of autosomal-dominant predisposition. The relevance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in such patients is still debated. We sought to determine the impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population of patients from central and southern Italy. We analyzed the BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding regions in 136 unrelated probands: 117 females with breast/ovarian cancer and 19 males with breast cancer. This population of patients was mostly representative of cases who are at risk for hereditary susceptibility, but who do not meet stringent criteria of autosomal-dominant predisposition. Probands, subclassified as follows, were consecutively recruited depending on informed consent from patients attending breast cancer clinics in Rome and Naples. Selection criteria for females were as follows: breast cancer with breast cancer

  13. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Plog

    Full Text Available The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype.

  14. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs...... arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). METHODS: We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1...

  15. Efficient introduction of specific homozygous and heterozygous mutations using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Dominik; Kwart, Dylan; Chen, Antonia; Sproul, Andrew; Jacob, Samson; Teo, Shaun; Olsen, Kimberly Moore; Gregg, Andrew; Noggle, Scott; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-05-05

    The bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system allows sequence-specific gene editing in many organisms and holds promise as a tool to generate models of human diseases, for example, in human pluripotent stem cells. CRISPR/Cas9 introduces targeted double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with high efficiency, which are typically repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) resulting in nonspecific insertions, deletions or other mutations (indels). DSBs may also be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) using a DNA repair template, such as an introduced single-stranded oligo DNA nucleotide (ssODN), allowing knock-in of specific mutations. Although CRISPR/Cas9 is used extensively to engineer gene knockouts through NHEJ, editing by HDR remains inefficient and can be corrupted by additional indels, preventing its widespread use for modelling genetic disorders through introducing disease-associated mutations. Furthermore, targeted mutational knock-in at single alleles to model diseases caused by heterozygous mutations has not been reported. Here we describe a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-editing framework that allows selective introduction of mono- and bi-allelic sequence changes with high efficiency and accuracy. We show that HDR accuracy is increased dramatically by incorporating silent CRISPR/Cas-blocking mutations along with pathogenic mutations, and establish a method termed 'CORRECT' for scarless genome editing. By characterizing and exploiting a stereotyped inverse relationship between a mutation's incorporation rate and its distance to the DSB, we achieve predictable control of zygosity. Homozygous introduction requires a guide RNA targeting close to the intended mutation, whereas heterozygous introduction can be accomplished by distance-dependent suboptimal mutation incorporation or by use of mixed repair templates. Using this approach, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells with heterozygous and homozygous dominant early onset Alzheimer's disease-causing mutations in

  16. Mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex gene ARID1B cause Coffin-Siris syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, G.W.; Aten, E.; Sun, Y; Almomani, R.; Gilissen, C.F.; Nielsen, M.; Kant, S.G.; Snoeck, I.N.; Peeters, E.A.; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Y.; Wessels, M.W.; Hollander, N.S. den; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; van Ommen, G.J.; Breuning, M.H.; den Dunnen, J.T.; van Haeringen, A.; Kriek, M.

    2012-01-01

    We identified de novo truncating mutations in ARID1B in three individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) by exome sequencing. Array-based copy-number variation (CNV) analysis in 2,000 individuals with intellectual disability revealed deletions encompassing ARID1B in 3 subjects with phenotypes

  17. Analysis of B Cell Repertoire Dynamics Following Hepatitis B Vaccination in Humans, and Enrichment of Vaccine-specific Antibody Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D. Galson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Generating a diverse B cell immunoglobulin repertoire is essential for protection against infection. The repertoire in humans can now be comprehensively measured by high-throughput sequencing. Using hepatitis B vaccination as a model, we determined how the total immunoglobulin sequence repertoire changes following antigen exposure in humans, and compared this to sequences from vaccine-specific sorted cells. Clonal sequence expansions were seen 7 days after vaccination, which correlated with vaccine-specific plasma cell numbers. These expansions caused an increase in mutation, and a decrease in diversity and complementarity-determining region 3 sequence length in the repertoire. We also saw an increase in sequence convergence between participants 14 and 21 days after vaccination, coinciding with an increase of vaccine-specific memory cells. These features allowed development of a model for in silico enrichment of vaccine-specific sequences from the total repertoire. Identifying antigen-specific sequences from total repertoire data could aid our understanding B cell driven immunity, and be used for disease diagnostics and vaccine evaluation.

  18. The occurrence and significance of V gene mutations in B cell-derived human malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, F K; Sahota, S S; Ottensmeier, C H; Zhu, D; Forconi, F; Hamblin, T J

    2001-01-01

    The classification of B cell tumors has relevance for refining and improving clinical strategies. However, consensus has been difficult to establish, and although a scheme is now available, objective criteria are desirable. Genetic technology will underpin and extend current knowledge, and it is certain to reveal further subdivisions of current tumor categories. The Ig variable region genes of B cell tumors present a considerable asset for this area of investigation. The unique sequences carried in neoplastic B cells are easily isolated and sequenced. In addition to acting as clone-specific markers of each tumor, they indicate where the cell has come from and track its history following transformation. There is emerging clinical value in knowing whether the cell of origin has encountered antigen and has moved from the naive compartment to the germinal center, where somatic mutation is activated. This is amply illustrated by the subdivision of chronic lymphocytic leukemia into two subsets, unmutated or mutated, each with very different prognosis. Other tumors may be subdivided in a similar way. Microarray technology is developing rapidly to probe gene expression and to further divide tumor categories. All these genetic analyses will provide objective data to enhance both our understanding of B cell tumors and our ability to treat them.

  19. Biochemical characterization of P4-ATPase mutations associated with Intrahepatic Cholestatic Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzel, Rasmus; Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Mikkelsen, Stine

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (BRIC1) are caused by mutation of the P4-ATPase ATP8B1 that flips phospholipid from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of canalicular membranes. It is hypothesized...... that PFIC1 mutations are the most disturbing with respect to expression, structural stability and/or function. Although recent data indicates that the specific phospholipid substrate of ATP8B1 is phosphatidylcholine (PC) [1] whereas ATP8A2 flips phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE......), there may be several mechanistic similarities between ATP8B1 and ATP8A2, and here we investigate known disease mutations using our well-functioning methodology for expression, affinity purification and assay of the partial reactions of ATP8A2. Mutations I91P (L127P in ATP8B1) and L308F (I344F) are located...

  20. Manual on mutation breeding. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The manual is a compilation of work done on the use of induced mutations in plant breeding, and presents general methods and techniques in this field. The use of chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations (X-rays, gamma rays, α- and β-particles, protons, neutrons) are described as well as the effects of these mutagens. The different types of mutations achieved can be divided into genome mutations, chromosome mutations and extra nuclear mutations. Separate chapters deal with mutation techniques in breeding seed-propagated species and asexually propagated plants (examples of development of cultivars given). Plant characters which can be improved by mutation breeding include yield, ripening time, growth habit, disease resistance and tolerance to environmental factors (temperature, salinity etc.). The use of mutagens for some specific plant breeding problems is discussed and attention is also paid to somatic cell genetics in connection with induced mutations. The manual contains a comprehensive bibliography (60 p. references) and a subject index

  1. Mutations in the nervous system--specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarabi, Masoud; Girard, Nathalie; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Dion, Patrick; Houle, Martin; Toulouse, André; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Vercauteren, Freya; Hince, Pascale; Laganiere, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Faivre, Laurence; Samuels, Mark; Rouleau, Guy A

    2008-07-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSANII) is an early-onset autosomal recessive disorder characterized by loss of perception to pain, touch, and heat due to a loss of peripheral sensory nerves. Mutations in hereditary sensory neuropathy type II (HSN2), a single-exon ORF originally identified in affected families in Quebec and Newfoundland, Canada, were found to cause HSANII. We report here that HSN2 is a nervous system-specific exon of the with-no-lysine(K)-1 (WNK1) gene. WNK1 mutations have previously been reported to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II but have not been studied in the nervous system. Given the high degree of conservation of WNK1 between mice and humans, we characterized the structure and expression patterns of this isoform in mice. Immunodetections indicated that this Wnk1/Hsn2 isoform was expressed in sensory components of the peripheral nervous system and CNS associated with relaying sensory and nociceptive signals, including satellite cells, Schwann cells, and sensory neurons. We also demonstrate that the novel protein product of Wnk1/Hsn2 was more abundant in sensory neurons than motor neurons. The characteristics of WNK1/HSN2 point to a possible role for this gene in the peripheral sensory perception deficits characterizing HSANII.

  2. Mutations in the nervous system–specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarabi, Masoud; Girard, Nathalie; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Dion, Patrick; Houle, Martin; Toulouse, André; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Vercauteren, Freya; Hince, Pascale; Laganiere, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Faivre, Laurence; Samuels, Mark; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSANII) is an early-onset autosomal recessive disorder characterized by loss of perception to pain, touch, and heat due to a loss of peripheral sensory nerves. Mutations in hereditary sensory neuropathy type II (HSN2), a single-exon ORF originally identified in affected families in Quebec and Newfoundland, Canada, were found to cause HSANII. We report here that HSN2 is a nervous system–specific exon of the with-no-lysine(K)–1 (WNK1) gene. WNK1 mutations have previously been reported to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II but have not been studied in the nervous system. Given the high degree of conservation of WNK1 between mice and humans, we characterized the structure and expression patterns of this isoform in mice. Immunodetections indicated that this Wnk1/Hsn2 isoform was expressed in sensory components of the peripheral nervous system and CNS associated with relaying sensory and nociceptive signals, including satellite cells, Schwann cells, and sensory neurons. We also demonstrate that the novel protein product of Wnk1/Hsn2 was more abundant in sensory neurons than motor neurons. The characteristics of WNK1/HSN2 point to a possible role for this gene in the peripheral sensory perception deficits characterizing HSANII. PMID:18521183

  3. Phenotypic spectrum of dynamin 2 mutations in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claeys, Kristl G.; Züchner, Stephan; Kennerson, Marina; Berciano, José; Garcia, Antonio; Verhoeven, Kristien; Storey, Elsdon; Merory, John R.; Bienfait, Henriette M. E.; Lammens, Martin; Nelis, Eva; Baets, Jonathan; de Vriendt, Els; Berneman, Zwi N.; de Veuster, Ilse; Vance, Jefferey M.; Nicholson, Garth; Timmerman, Vincent; de Jonghe, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B is caused by mutations in dynamin 2. We studied the clinical, haematological, electrophysiological and sural nerve biopsy findings in 34 patients belonging to six unrelated dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B

  4. Coffin–Siris Syndrome with obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, Mari-Anne; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Nõukas, Margit; Shor, Riina; Peet, Aleksandr; Kals, Mart; Kivistik, Paula Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Coffin–Siris Syndrome (CSS, MIM 135900) is a rare genetic disorder, and mutations in ARID1B were recently shown to cause CSS. In this study, we report a novel ARID1B mutation identified by whole-exome sequencing in a patient with clinical features of CSS. We identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.1584delG in exon 2 of ARID1B (NM_020732.3) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Leu528Phefs*65). Sanger sequencing confirmed the c.1584delG mutation as a de novo in the proband and that it was not present either in her parents, half-sister or half-brother. Clinically, the patient presented with extreme obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly, hyperinsulinism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), which have previously not been described in CSS patients. We suggest that obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and/or PCOS may be added to the list of clinical features of ARID1B mutations, but further clinical reports are required to make a definite conclusion. PMID:24569609

  5. Transcription-associated mutational pressure in the Parvovirus B19 genome: Reactivated genomes contribute to the variability of viral populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Ermalovich, Marina Anatolyevna; Hübschen, Judith M; Khrustaleva, Tatyana Aleksandrovna

    2017-12-21

    In this study we used non-overlapping parts of the two long open reading frames coding for nonstructural (NS) and capsid (VP) proteins of all available sequences of the Parvovirus B19 subgenotype 1a genome and found out that the rates of A to G, C to T and A to T mutations are higher in the first long reading frame (NS) of the virus than in the second one (VP). This difference in mutational pressure directions for two parts of the same viral genome can be explained by the fact of transcription of just the first long reading frame during the lifelong latency in nonerythroid cells. Adenine deamination (producing A to G and A to T mutations) and cytosine deamination (producing C to T mutations) occur more frequently in transcriptional bubbles formed by DNA "plus" strand of the first open reading frame. These mutations can be inherited only in case of reactivation of the infectious virus due to the help of Adenovirus that allows latent Parvovirus B19 to start transcription of the second reading frame and then to replicate its genome by the rolling circle mechanism using the specific origin. Results of this study provide evidence that the genomes reactivated from latency make significant contributions to the variability of Parvovirus B19. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Correction and Hepatic Differentiation of Hemophilia B-specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Wang, Hui-Hui; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Ma, Yu-Po; Jiang, Yong-Ping; Ren, Zhi-Hua

    2017-09-27

    Objective To genetically correct a disease-causing point mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a hemophilia B patient. Methods First, the disease-causing mutation was detected by sequencing the encoding area of human coagulation factor IX (F IX) gene. Genomic DNA was extracted from the iPSCs, and the primers were designed to amplify the eight exons of F IX. Next, the point mutation in those iPSCs was genetically corrected using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in the presence of a 129-nucleotide homologous repair template that contained two synonymous mutations. Then, top 8 potential off-target sites were subsequently analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Finally, the corrected clones were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells, and the secretion of F IX was validated by immunocytochemistry and ELISA assay. Results The cell line bore a missense mutation in the 6 th coding exon (c.676 C>T) of F IX gene. Correction of the point mutation was achieved via CRISPR/Cas9 technology in situ with a high efficacy at about 22% (10/45) and no off-target effects detected in the corrected iPSC clones. F IX secretion, which was further visualized by immunocytochemistry and quantified by ELISA in vitro, reached about 6 ng/ml on day 21 of differentiation procedure. Conclusions Mutations in human disease-specific iPSCs could be precisely corrected by CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and corrected cells still maintained hepatic differentiation capability. Our findings might throw a light on iPSC-based personalized therapies in the clinical application, especially for hemophilia B.

  7. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, José Luis; Cabrera, Carmen M; Serrano, Salvio; López-Nevot, Miguel Ángel

    2005-01-01

    The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP). The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5%) melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2) and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2). One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation). No defects were found in the remaining genes. These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied

  8. Specific heat of ceramic and single crystal MgB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junod, A.; Wang, Y.; Bouquet, F.; Sheikin, I.; Toulemonde, P.; Eskildsen, M.R.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H.W.; Lee, S.; Tajima, S

    2003-05-15

    The two-gap structure of MgB{sub 2} gives rise to unusual thermodynamic properties which depart markedly from the single-gap BCS model, both in their temperature- and field-dependence. We report measurements of the specific heat up to 16 T on ceramic and single crystal samples, which demonstrate these effects in bulk. The low-temperature mixed-state specific heat reveals a field-dependent anisotropy, and points to the existence of unusually large vortices, in agreement with local density-of-states measurements by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. It is finally shown that a suitable irradiation process nearly doubles H{sub c2} in the bulk.

  9. Profile of Mutations in the Reverse Transcriptase and Overlapping Surface Genes of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Treatment-Naïve Indonesian HBV Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani, Laura Navika; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Wasityastuti, Widya; Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Widasari, Dewiyani Indah; Juniastuti; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2017-11-22

    Mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome are an important factor in low therapeutic effectiveness. Nonetheless, the prevalence of these mutations in HBV strains isolated previously in Indonesia has not been systematically examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the profile of mutations in the RT region and the associations of these mutations with amino acid changes in the surface protein in the virus of treatment-naïve Indonesian HBV carriers. Overall, 96 sequences of the full-length Indonesian HBV genomes (genotype B, n = 54; genotype C, n = 42) were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Naturally occurring primary and/or compensatory drug resistance mutations were found in 6/54 (11.1%) genotype B strains and in 1/42 (2.4%) genotype C strains. The potential mutations underlying resistance to a nucleos(t)ide analog and/or pretreatment mutations were more frequent in both genotypes but more frequent in genotype C strains than in genotype B strains. The A-B interdomain region in the RT gene was more frequently mutated in genotype C than in genotype B (3.51 ± 2.53 vs. 1.08 ± 1.52, P < 0.001). Knowledge about the mutational profiles of the RT gene and changes in the surface protein may help clinicians to select the most appropriate antiviral drug and vaccination or HBV immunoglobulin regimen for management of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  10. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Pyrosequencing-Based Assays for Rapid Detection of HER2 and HER3 Mutations in Clinical Samples Uncover an E332E Mutation Affecting HER3 in Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula González-Alonso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (HER are associated with poor prognosis of several types of solid tumors. Although HER-mutation detection methods are currently available, such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS, alternative pyrosequencing allow the rapid characterization of specific mutations. We developed specific PCR-based pyrosequencing assays for identification of most prevalent HER2 and HER3 mutations, including S310F/Y, R678Q, L755M/P/S/W, V777A/L/M, 774-776 insertion, and V842I mutations in HER2, as well as M91I, V104M/L, D297N/V/Y, and E332E/K mutations in HER3. We tested 85 Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embbeded (FFPE samples and we detected three HER2-V842I mutations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC, ovarian carcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma patients, respectively, and a HER2-L755M mutation in a CRC specimen. We also determined the presence of a HER3-E332K mutation in an urothelial carcinoma sample, and two HER3-D297Y mutations, in both gastric adenocarcinoma and CRC specimens. The D297Y mutation was previously detected in breast and gastric tumors, but not in CRC. Moreover, we found a not-previously-described HER3-E332E synonymous mutation in a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma patient. The pyrosequencing assays presented here allow the detection and characterization of specific HER2 and HER3 mutations. These pyrosequencing assays might be implemented in routine diagnosis for molecular characterization of HER2/HER3 receptors as an alternative to complex NGS approaches.

  12. Influenza B viruses with mutation in the neuraminidase active site, North Carolina, USA, 2010-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Katrina; Sheu, Tiffany G; Moore, Zack; Kilpatrick, Susan; Garg, Shikha; Fry, Alicia M; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2011-11-01

    Oseltamivir is 1 of 2 antiviral medications available for the treatment of influenza B virus infections. We describe and characterize a cluster of influenza B viruses circulating in North Carolina with a mutation in the neuraminidase active site that may reduce susceptibility to oseltamivir and the investigational drug peramivir but not to zanamivir.

  13. Mutations in rpoB and katG genes of multidrug resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Tuberculosis remains the leading causes of death worldwide with frequencies of mutations in rifampicin and isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates varying according to geographical location. There is limited information in Zimbabwe on specific antibiotic resistance gene mutation patterns in ...

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator intracellular processing, trafficking, and opportunities for mutation-specific treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogan, Mark P

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in basic science have greatly expanded our understanding of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the chloride and bicarbonate channel that is encoded by the gene, which is mutated in patients with CF. We review the structure, function, biosynthetic processing, and intracellular trafficking of CFTR and discuss the five classes of mutations and their impact on the CF phenotype. The therapeutic discussion is focused on the significant progress toward CFTR mutation-specific therapies. We review the results of encouraging clinical trials examining orally administered therapeutics, including agents that promote read-through of class I mutations (premature termination codons); correctors, which overcome the CFTR misfolding that characterizes the common class II mutation F508del; and potentiators, which enhance the function of class III or IV mutated CFTR at the plasma membrane. Long-term outcomes from successful mutation-specific treatments could finally answer the question that has been lingering since and even before the CFTR gene discovery: Will therapies that specifically restore CFTR-mediated chloride secretion slow or arrest the deleterious cascade of events leading to chronic infection, bronchiectasis, and end-stage lung disease?

  15. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  16. Characterization of intravitreally delivered capsid mutant AAV2-Cre vector to induce tissue-specific mutations in murine retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langouet-Astrie, Christophe J; Yang, Zhiyong; Polisetti, Sraavya M; Welsbie, Derek S; Hauswirth, William W; Zack, Donald J; Merbs, Shannath L; Enke, Raymond A

    2016-10-01

    Targeted expression of Cre recombinase in murine retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by viral vector is an effective strategy for creating tissue-specific gene knockouts for investigation of genetic contribution to RGC degeneration associated with optic neuropathies. Here we characterize dosage, efficacy and toxicity for sufficient intravitreal delivery of a capsid mutant Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vector encoding Cre recombinase. Wild type and Rosa26 (R26) LacZ mice were intravitreally injected with capsid mutant AAV2 viral vectors. Murine eyes were harvested at intervals ranging from 2 weeks to 15 weeks post-injection and were assayed for viral transduction, transgene expression and RGC survival. 10(9) vector genomes (vg) were sufficient for effective in vivo targeting of murine ganglion cell layer (GCL) retinal neurons. Transgene expression was observed as early as 2 weeks post-injection of viral vectors and persisted to 11 weeks. Early expression of Cre had no significant effect on RGC survival, while significant RGC loss was detected beginning 5 weeks post-injection. Early expression of viral Cre recombinase was robust, well-tolerated and predominantly found in GCL neurons suggesting this strategy can be effective in short-term RGC-specific mutation studies in experimental glaucoma models such as optic nerve crush and transection experiments. RGC degeneration with Cre expression for more than 4 weeks suggests that Cre toxicity is a limiting factor for targeted mutation strategies in RGCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CYP1B1 Mutations in Individuals With Primary Congenital Glaucoma and Residing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Redó-Riveiro, Alba; Sandfeld, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG OMIM 231300) can be caused by pathogenic sequence variations in cytochrome P450, subfamily 1, polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1). The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of sequence variations in CYP1B1 in a cohort of individuals with PCG residing...... mutations, 5 of which were novel. The frequency of CYP1B1 mutations in this cohort was comparable with other populations. We also detected an individual heterozygous for p.(Tyr81Asn) mutation, previously suggested to cause autosomal dominant primary open-angle glaucoma....

  18. Surfactant protein B deficiency and gene mutations for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in China Han ethnic population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaojuan; Meng, Fanping; wang, Yan; Xie, Lu; Kong, Xiangyong; Feng, Zhichun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the SP-B deficiency and gene mutations in exon 4 is associated with neonatal RDS in China Han ethnic population. Methods: The study population consisted of 40 neonates with RDS and 40 neonates with other diseases as control in China Han ethnic population. We Compared SP-B expression in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with immunoblotting, and analyzed mutations in the SP-B gene with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Results: In RDS group, low mature Surfactant protein B was found in both lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in 8 neonates. In control group, only 4 neonates with low mature Surfactant protein B in both lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In RDS group, 20 neonates were found to have mutations in exon 4, 12 homozygous mutations with C/C genotype and 8 heterozygous mutations with C/T genotype in surfactant protein B gene+1580 polymorphism. There were 8 cases mutations in control group, 1 in C/C and 7 in C/T genotype. The frequency of homozygotes with C/C genotype was 0.3 and frequency of heterozygotes with C/T genotype was 0.02 in RDS group. In control group, frequency of homozygotes with C/C genotype was 0.025 and frequency of heterozygote with C/T genotype was 0.175. Conclusion: Low mature Surfactant protein B is associated with the pathogenesis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in China Han ethnic population. Mutations in exon 4 of the surfactant protein B gene demonstrate an association between homozygous mutations with C/C genotype in SP-B gene and neonatal RDS. PMID:23330012

  19. Novel de novo BRCA2 mutation in a patient with a family history of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Jønson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    whole blood. The paternity was determined by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis. Parental origin of the de novo mutation was determined by establishing mutation-SNP haplotypes by variant specific PCR, while de novo and mosaic status was investigated by sequencing of DNA from......BACKGROUND: BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Mutations are widespread and unclassified splice variants are frequently encountered. We describe the parental origin and functional characterization of a novel de novo BRCA2 splice site mutation found in a patient...... and synthesis of a truncated BRCA2 protein. The aberrant splicing was verified by RT-PCR analysis on RNA isolated from whole blood of the affected patient. The mutation was not found in any of the patient's parents or in the mother's carcinoma, showing it is a de novo mutation. Variant specific PCR indicates...

  20. Role of BRCA2 mutation status on overall survival among breast cancer patients from Sardinia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budroni, Mario; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Cesaraccio, Rosaria; Coviello, Vincenzo; Sechi, Ornelia; Pirino, Daniela; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Pisano, Marina; Palomba, Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Conversely, the impact of BRCA mutations on prognosis and survival of breast cancer patients is still debated. In this study, we investigated the role of such mutations on breast cancer-specific survival among patients from North Sardinia. Among incident cases during the period 1997–2002, a total of 512 breast cancer patients gave their consent to undergo BRCA mutation screening by DHPLC analysis and automated DNA sequencing. The Hakulinen, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression methods were used for both relative survival assessment and statistical analysis. In our series, patients carrying a germline mutation in coding regions and splice boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were 48/512 (9%). Effect on overall survival was evaluated taking into consideration BRCA2 carriers, who represented the vast majority (44/48; 92%) of mutation-positive patients. A lower breast cancer-specific overall survival rate was observed in BRCA2 mutation carriers after the first two years from diagnosis. However, survival rates were similar in both groups after five years from diagnosis. No significant difference was found for age of onset, disease stage, and primary tumour histopathology between the two subsets. In Sardinian breast cancer population, BRCA2 was the most affected gene and the effects of BRCA2 germline mutations on patients' survival were demonstrated to vary within the first two years from diagnosis. After a longer follow-up observation, breast cancer-specific rates of death were instead similar for BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers

  1. Analysis of the GCK gene in 79 MODY type 2 patients: A multicenter Turkish study, mutation profile and description of twenty novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Ayça; Karaca, Emin; Onay, Hüseyin; Gökşen, Damla; Çetinkalp, Şevki; Eren, Erdal; Ersoy, Betül; Çakır, Esra Papatya; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Anık, Ahmet; Kırel, Birgül; Özen, Samim; Atik, Tahir; Darcan, Şükran; Özkınay, Ferda

    2018-01-30

    Maturity onset diabetes is a genetic form of diabetes mellitus characterized by an early age at onset and several etiologic genes for this form of diabetes have been identified in many patients. Maturity onset diabetes type 2 [MODY2 (#125851)] caused by mutations in the glucokinase gene (GCK). Although its prevalence is not clear, it is estimated that 1%-2% of patients with diabetes have the monogenic form. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular spectrum of GCK gene mutations in 177 Turkish MODY type 2 patients. Mutations in the GCK gene were identified in 79 out of 177. All mutant alleles were identified, including 45 different GCK mutations, 20 of which were novel. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Host-specific adaptation of HIV-1 subtype B in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikata, Takayuki; Carlson, Jonathan M; Tamura, Yoshiko; Borghan, Mohamed Ali; Naruto, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masao; Murakoshi, Hayato; Le, Anh Q; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Brumme, Zabrina L; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    The extent to which HIV-1 clade B strains exhibit population-specific adaptations to host HLA alleles remains incompletely known, in part due to incomplete characterization of HLA-associated HIV-1 polymorphisms (HLA-APs) in different global populations. Moreover, it remains unknown to what extent the same HLA alleles may drive significantly different escape pathways across populations. As the Japanese population exhibits distinctive HLA class I allele distributions, comparative analysis of HLA-APs between HIV-1 clade B-infected Japanese and non-Asian cohorts could shed light on these questions. However, HLA-APs remain incompletely mapped in Japan. In a cohort of 430 treatment-naive Japanese with chronic HIV-1 clade B infection, we identified 284 HLA-APs in Gag, Pol, and Nef using phylogenetically corrected methods. The number of HLA-associated substitutions in Pol, notably those restricted by HLA-B*52:01, was weakly inversely correlated with the plasma viral load (pVL), suggesting that the transmission and persistence of B*52:01-driven Pol mutations could modulate the pVL. Differential selection of HLA-APs between HLA subtype members, including those differing only with respect to substitutions outside the peptide-binding groove, was observed, meriting further investigation as to their mechanisms of selection. Notably, two-thirds of HLA-APs identified in Japan had not been reported in previous studies of predominantly Caucasian cohorts and were attributable to HLA alleles unique to, or enriched in, Japan. We also identified 71 cases where the same HLA allele drove significantly different escape pathways in Japan versus predominantly Caucasian cohorts. Our results underscore the distinct global evolution of HIV-1 clade B as a result of host population-specific cellular immune pressures. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations in HIV-1 are broadly predictable based on the HLA class I alleles expressed by the host. Because HLA allele distributions differ among

  3. MicroRNA-142 is mutated in about 20% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwanhian, Wiyada; Lenze, Dido; Alles, Julia; Motsch, Natalie; Barth, Stephanie; Döll, Celina; Imig, Jochen; Hummel, Michael; Tinguely, Marianne; Trivedi, Pankaj; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Meister, Gunter; Renner, Christoph; Grässer, Friedrich A

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short 18–23 nucleotide long noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to mRNA. Our previous miRNA profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) revealed a mutation in the seed sequence of miR-142-3p. Further analysis now showed that miR-142 was mutated in 11 (19.64%) of the 56 DLBCL cases. Of these, one case had a mutation in both alleles, with the remainder being heterozygous. Four mutations were found in the mature miR-142-5p, four in the mature miR-142-3p, and three mutations affected the miR-142 precursor. Two mutations in the seed sequence redirected miR-142-3p to the mRNA of the transcriptional repressor ZEB2 and one of them also targeted the ZEB1 mRNA. However, the other mutations in the mature miR-142-3p did not influence either the ZEB1 or ZEB2 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR). On the other hand, the mutations affecting the seed sequence of miR-142-3p resulted in a loss of responsiveness in the 3′ UTR of the known miR-142-3p targets RAC1 and ADCY9. In contrast to the mouse p300 gene, the human p300 gene was not found to be a target for miR-142-5p. In one case with a mutation of the precursor, we observed aberrant processing of the miR-142-5p. Our data suggest that the mutations in miR-142 probably lead to a loss rather than a gain of function. This is the first report describing mutations of a miRNA gene in a large percentage of a distinct lymphoma subtype

  4. A synthetic combination of mutations, including fs(1)pyrSu(b), rSu(b) and b, causes female sterility and reduces embryonic viability in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Gojkovic, Zoran; Bahn, E.

    1999-01-01

    A Drosophila melangaster mutant, fs(1)pyr(Su(b)), carrying a mutation that maps to the tip of the X chromosome, has been isolated. The mutation, when present alone, does not confer a detectable phenotype. However, this mutation causes female sterility and reduces embryonic viability when combined...

  5. CYP1B1 and myocilin gene mutations in Egyptian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) accounts for 26–29% of childhood blindness in Egypt. The identification of disease causing mutations has not been extensively investigated. We aimed to examine the frequency of CYP1B1 and MYOC mutations in PCG Egyptian patients, and study a possible ...

  6. A dominant mutation in mediator of paramutation2, one of three second-largest subunits of a plant-specific RNA polymerase, disrupts multiple siRNA silencing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Dorweiler, Jane E; Cigan, A Mark; Arteaga-Vazquez, Mario; Vyas, Meenal; Kermicle, Jerry; Jurcin, Diane; Brzeski, Jan; Cai, Yu; Chandler, Vicki L

    2009-11-01

    Paramutation involves homologous sequence communication that leads to meiotically heritable transcriptional silencing. We demonstrate that mop2 (mediator of paramutation2), which alters paramutation at multiple loci, encodes a gene similar to Arabidopsis NRPD2/E2, the second-largest subunit of plant-specific RNA polymerases IV and V. In Arabidopsis, Pol-IV and Pol-V play major roles in RNA-mediated silencing and a single second-largest subunit is shared between Pol-IV and Pol-V. Maize encodes three second-largest subunit genes: all three genes potentially encode full length proteins with highly conserved polymerase domains, and each are expressed in multiple overlapping tissues. The isolation of a recessive paramutation mutation in mop2 from a forward genetic screen suggests limited or no functional redundancy of these three genes. Potential alternative Pol-IV/Pol-V-like complexes could provide maize with a greater diversification of RNA-mediated transcriptional silencing machinery relative to Arabidopsis. Mop2-1 disrupts paramutation at multiple loci when heterozygous, whereas previously silenced alleles are only up-regulated when Mop2-1 is homozygous. The dramatic reduction in b1 tandem repeat siRNAs, but no disruption of silencing in Mop2-1 heterozygotes, suggests the major role for tandem repeat siRNAs is not to maintain silencing. Instead, we hypothesize the tandem repeat siRNAs mediate the establishment of the heritable silent state-a process fully disrupted in Mop2-1 heterozygotes. The dominant Mop2-1 mutation, which has a single nucleotide change in a domain highly conserved among all polymerases (E. coli to eukaryotes), disrupts both siRNA biogenesis (Pol-IV-like) and potentially processes downstream (Pol-V-like). These results suggest either the wild-type protein is a subunit in both complexes or the dominant mutant protein disrupts both complexes. Dominant mutations in the same domain in E. coli RNA polymerase suggest a model for Mop2-1 dominance

  7. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    specific association between BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations with cancer type was seen, ... Materials and methods ..... KS is a Wellcome Trust International Senior Research .... of BRCA1/2 associated breast cancer: a systematic qualitative.

  8. First construction of infectious clone for newly emerging mutation porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) followed by comparison with PCV2a and PCV2b genotypes in biological characteristics in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Long J; Lu, Yue H; Huang, Li P; Wei, Yan W; Wu, Hong L; Liu, Chang M

    2011-06-10

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), the causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), is a serious economic problem in the swine industry. Different genotypes (PCV2a, PCV2b and PCV2d) of the virus are present in the clinical cases in China, and it is necessary to elucidate the pathogenic difference among different genotypes of PCV2. In this study, four strains of different genotypes were isolated, two were ordinary strains and another two were mutation strains, which there are one and two amino acids elongation in the capsid protein (Cap) of PCV2, respectively. Representative strains of different genotypes of the virus were constructed by infectious molecular clone and biological characterization of the rescued viruses were identified in vitro. Four PCV2 isolates (PCV2a/CL, PCV2b/YJ, PCV2b/JF and PCV2d/BDH) of different genotypes were isolated from the clinical cases of PMWS in China. Four infectious clones of PCV2 were constructed and the rescued viruses were harvested after transfection into PK15 cells. The rescued viruses were verified by nucleotide sequence analysis, morphology of the viruses and immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA). The rescued viruses propagated stably after consecutive incubation for more than ten passages, and virus propagation reached its peak 72h post infection (PI), and the virus titers were up to 10⁵·⁷ TCID₅₀/ml. By using neutralizing 1D2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) of PCV2, the antigen capture ELISA showed that only the PCV2a/rCL and PCV2b/rJF strains has immunoreactivity with the 1D2 mAb, however, another two rescued strains (PCV2b/rYJ and PCV2d/rBDH) do not, which indicated the antigenic difference among the rescued viruses of different genotypes. In addition, here is the first report of obtaining the newly emerging PCV2 with mutation in vitro by infectious molecular clone technology. Conclusions drawn from this study show that PCV2 has prevailing differences in genomic and ORF2 gene length and antigen

  9. First construction of infectious clone for newly emerging mutation porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 followed by comparison with PCV2a and PCV2b genotypes in biological characteristics in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hong L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, the causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS, is a serious economic problem in the swine industry. Different genotypes (PCV2a, PCV2b and PCV2d of the virus are present in the clinical cases in China, and it is necessary to elucidate the pathogenic difference among different genotypes of PCV2. In this study, four strains of different genotypes were isolated, two were ordinary strains and another two were mutation strains, which there are one and two amino acids elongation in the capsid protein (Cap of PCV2, respectively. Representative strains of different genotypes of the virus were constructed by infectious molecular clone and biological characterization of the rescued viruses were identified in vitro. Results Four PCV2 isolates (PCV2a/CL, PCV2b/YJ, PCV2b/JF and PCV2d/BDH of different genotypes were isolated from the clinical cases of PMWS in China. Four infectious clones of PCV2 were constructed and the rescued viruses were harvested after transfection into PK15 cells. The rescued viruses were verified by nucleotide sequence analysis, morphology of the viruses and immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA. The rescued viruses propagated stably after consecutive incubation for more than ten passages, and virus propagation reached its peak 72h post infection (PI, and the virus titers were up to 105.7 TCID50/ml. By using neutralizing 1D2 monoclonal antibody (mAb of PCV2, the antigen capture ELISA showed that only the PCV2a/rCL and PCV2b/rJF strains has immunoreactivity with the 1D2 mAb, however, another two rescued strains (PCV2b/rYJ and PCV2d/rBDH do not, which indicated the antigenic difference among the rescued viruses of different genotypes. In addition, here is the first report of obtaining the newly emerging PCV2 with mutation in vitro by infectious molecular clone technology. Conclusions Conclusions drawn from this study show that PCV2 has prevailing differences

  10. Germline CDKN1B/p27Kip1 mutation in multiple endocrine neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Raitila, Anniina; Karhu, Auli; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Sane, Timo; Vierimaa, Outi; Mäkinen, Markus J.; Tuppurainen, Karoliina; Paschke, Ralph; Gimm, Oliver; Koch, Christian A.; Gündogdu, Sadi; Lucassen, Anneke; Tischkowitz, Marc; Izatt, Louise; Aylwin, Simon; Bano, Gul; Hodgson, Shirley; de Menis, Ernesto; Launonen, Virpi; Vahteristo, Pia; Aaltonen, Lauri A.

    2007-01-01

    Germline mutations in the MEN1 gene predispose to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome, but in up to 20-25% of clinical MEN1 cases, no MEN1 mutations can be found. Recently, a germline mutation in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip1), was reported in one suspected MEN1 family with two

  11. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.

    2007-01-01

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL

  12. [Mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae characterized by enhanced induced mutagenesis. III. Effect of the him mutation on the effectiveness and specificity of UF-induced mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E L; Koval'tsova, S V; Korolev, V G

    1987-09-01

    We have studied the influence of him1-1, him2-1, him3-1 and himX mutations on induction frequency and specificity of UV-induced adenine-dependent mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Him mutations do not render haploid cells more sensitive to the lethal action of UV-light; however, in him strains adenine-dependent mutations (ade1, ade2) were induced more frequently (1.5--2-fold), as compared to the HIM strain. An analysis of the molecular nature of ade2 mutants revealed that him1-1, him2-1 and himX mutations increase specifically the yield of transitions (AT----GC and GC----AT), whereas in the him3-1 strain the yield of transversions was enhanced as well. We suggest him mutations analysed to affect specific repair pathway for mismatch correction.

  13. Expanding the clinical spectrum of hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy and pulmonary fibrosis due to FAM111B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Sandra; Küry, Sébastien; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Magot, Armelle; Agbim, Uchenna; Besnard, Thomas; Bodak, Nathalie; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Bréhéret, Flora; Brunelle, Perrine; Caillon, Florence; Chabrol, Brigitte; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; David, Albert; Eymard, Bruno; Faivre, Laurence; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Fleurence, Emmanuelle; Ganapathi, Mythily; Gherardi, Romain; Goldenberg, Alice; Hamel, Antoine; Igual, Jeanine; Irvine, Alan D; Israël-Biet, Dominique; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Laboisse, Christian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Mahé, Jean-Yves; Mallet, Stéphanie; MacGowan, Stuart; McAleer, Maeve A; McLean, Irwin; Méni, Cécile; Munnich, Arnold; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Nagy, Peter L; Odel, Jeffrey; O'Regan, Grainne M; Péréon, Yann; Perrier, Julie; Piard, Juliette; Puzenat, Eve; Sampson, Jacinda B; Smith, Frances; Soufir, Nadem; Tanji, Kurenai; Thauvin, Christel; Ulane, Christina; Watson, Rosemarie M; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P; Mayosi, Bongani M; Barbarot, Sébastien; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-10-15

    Hereditary Fibrosing Poikiloderma (HFP) with tendon contractures, myopathy and pulmonary fibrosis (POIKTMP [MIM 615704]) is a very recently described entity of syndromic inherited poikiloderma. Previously by using whole exome sequencing in five families, we identified the causative gene, FAM111B (NM_198947.3), the function of which is still unknown. Our objective in this study was to better define the specific features of POIKTMP through a larger series of patients. Clinical and molecular data of two families and eight independent sporadic cases, including six new cases, were collected. Key features consist of: (i) early-onset poikiloderma, hypotrichosis and hypohidrosis; (ii) multiple contractures, in particular triceps surae muscle contractures; (iii) diffuse progressive muscular weakness; (iv) pulmonary fibrosis in adulthood and (v) other features including exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, liver impairment and growth retardation. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging was informative and showed muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration. Histological examination of skeletal muscle revealed extensive fibroadipose tissue infiltration. Microscopy of the skin showed a scleroderma-like aspect with fibrosis and alterations of the elastic network. FAM111B gene analysis identified five different missense variants (two recurrent mutations were found respectively in three and four independent families). All the mutations were predicted to localize in the trypsin-like cysteine/serine peptidase domain of the protein. We suggest gain-of-function or dominant-negative mutations resulting in FAM111B enzymatic activity changes. HFP with tendon contractures, myopathy and pulmonary fibrosis, is a multisystemic disorder due to autosomal dominant FAM111B mutations. Future functional studies will help in understanding the specific pathological process of this fibrosing disorder.

  14. A site specific model and analysis of the neutral somatic mutation rate in whole-genome cancer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Juul, Malene; Besenbacher, Søren; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Hornshøj, Henrik; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hobolth, Asger

    2018-04-19

    Detailed modelling of the neutral mutational process in cancer cells is crucial for identifying driver mutations and understanding the mutational mechanisms that act during cancer development. The neutral mutational process is very complex: whole-genome analyses have revealed that the mutation rate differs between cancer types, between patients and along the genome depending on the genetic and epigenetic context. Therefore, methods that predict the number of different types of mutations in regions or specific genomic elements must consider local genomic explanatory variables. A major drawback of most methods is the need to average the explanatory variables across the entire region or genomic element. This procedure is particularly problematic if the explanatory variable varies dramatically in the element under consideration. To take into account the fine scale of the explanatory variables, we model the probabilities of different types of mutations for each position in the genome by multinomial logistic regression. We analyse 505 cancer genomes from 14 different cancer types and compare the performance in predicting mutation rate for both regional based models and site-specific models. We show that for 1000 randomly selected genomic positions, the site-specific model predicts the mutation rate much better than regional based models. We use a forward selection procedure to identify the most important explanatory variables. The procedure identifies site-specific conservation (phyloP), replication timing, and expression level as the best predictors for the mutation rate. Finally, our model confirms and quantifies certain well-known mutational signatures. We find that our site-specific multinomial regression model outperforms the regional based models. The possibility of including genomic variables on different scales and patient specific variables makes it a versatile framework for studying different mutational mechanisms. Our model can serve as the neutral null model

  15. X-ray induced specific locus mutations in the ad-3 region of two-component heterokaryons of neurospora crassa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, F.J. de; Miller, I.R.

    1988-01-01

    The basis for the reduced growth rates of heterokaryons between strains carrying nonallelic combinations of gene/point mutations and multilocus deletion mutations has been investigated by a simple genetic test. The growth rates of forced 2-component heterokaryons (dikaryons) between multilocus deletion mutations were compared with forced 3-component heterokaryons (trikaryons) containing an ad-3A R ad-3B R double mutant as their third component. Since the third component has no genetic damage at other loci immediately adjacent to the ad-3A or ad-3B locus, the growth rate on minimal medium depends on the functional activity of the unaltered ad-3A and ad-3B loci in the first two components. Tests in the present experiments have shown the ad-3 IR mutations result not only in inactivation of the ad-3 loci by multilocus deletion byt also, in many cases, in partial gene inactivation by an unknown mechanisms at other loci in the immediately adacent regions. The heterozygous effects observed in our present experiments with multilocus deletions in Neurospora can be explained either by a spreading-type position effect of the type found by others in Drosophila, mice, Oenothera and Aspergillus or by undetected genetic damage in the immediately adjacent genetic regions. (author). 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Direct detection of hemophilia B F9 gene mutation using multiplex PCR and conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Young Yoo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The F9 gene is known to be the causative gene for hemophilia B, but unfortunately the detection rate for restriction fragment length polymorphism-based linkage analysis is only 55.6%. Direct DNA sequencing can detect 98% of mutations, but this alternative procedure is very costly. Here, we conducted multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCRs and conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE to perform a screened DNA sequencing for the F9 gene, and we compared the results with direct sequencing in terms of accuracy, cost, simplicity, and time consumption. Methods : A total of 27 unrelated hemophilia B patients were enrolled. Direct DNA sequencing was performed for 27 patients by a separate institute, and multiplex PCR-CSGE screened sequencing was done in our laboratory. Results of the direct DNA sequencing were used as a reference, to which the results of the multiplex PCR-CSGE screened sequencing were compared. For the patients whose mutation was not detected by the 2 methods, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA was conducted. Results : With direct sequencing, the mutations could be identified from 26 patients (96.3%, whereas for multiplex PCR- CSGE screened sequencing, the mutations could be detected in 23 (85.2%. One patient’s mutation was identified by MLPA. A total of 21 different mutations were found among the 27 patients. Conclusion : Multiplex PCR-CSGE screened DNA sequencing detected 88.9% of mutations and reduced costs by 55.7% compared with direct DNA sequencing. However, it was more labor-intensive and time-consuming.

  17. Impact of somatic PI3K pathway and ERBB family mutations on pathological complete response (pCR) in HER2-positive breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant HER2-targeted therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Sinead

    2017-07-27

    The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis revealed that somatic EGFR, receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (ERBB2), Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 3 (ERBB3) and Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 4 (ERBB4) gene mutations (ERBB family mutations) occur alone or co-occur with somatic mutations in the gene encoding the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) in 19% of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers. Because ERBB family mutations can activate the PI3K\\/AKT pathway and likely have similar canonical signalling effects to PI3K pathway mutations, we investigated their combined impact on response to neoadjuvant HER2-targeted therapies.

  18. Characterization of Human Disease Phenotypes Associated with Mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Yanick J.; Chase, Diana S.; Schmidt, Johanna Lowenstein; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M.A.; Gornall, Hannah L.; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M.; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M.; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W.; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Blair, Edward M.; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B.; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E.; Chitayat, David A.; Collins, Abigail E.; Corcoles, Concepcion Sierra; Cordeiro, Nuno J.V.; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C.; D’Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G.E.L.; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M.H.; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C.; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D.; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R.; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D.; Kirk, Edwin P.; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre S.-M.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T.; Marom, Daphna R.; Lourenço, Charles Marques; McKee, Shane A.; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E.V.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J.; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R.; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S.; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A.; Sinha, Gyanranjan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I.; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y.; Naude, Johann te Water; Teik, Keng Wee; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B.; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J.; Whitehouse, William P.; Whitney, Robyn N.; Zaki, Maha S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Livingston, John H.; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I.

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

  19. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic NOTCH2 mutations in splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Mark J; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Betz, Bryan L; Zhao, Lili; Weigelin, Helmut G; Chiang, Mark Y; Huebner-Chan, David R; Bailey, Nathanael G; Yang, David T; Bhagat, Govind; Miranda, Roberto N; Bahler, David W; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J

    2012-08-27

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), the most common primary lymphoma of spleen, is poorly understood at the genetic level. In this study, using whole-genome DNA sequencing (WGS) and confirmation by Sanger sequencing, we observed mutations identified in several genes not previously known to be recurrently altered in SMZL. In particular, we identified recurrent somatic gain-of-function mutations in NOTCH2, a gene encoding a protein required for marginal zone B cell development, in 25 of 99 (∼25%) cases of SMZL and in 1 of 19 (∼5%) cases of nonsplenic MZLs. These mutations clustered near the C-terminal proline/glutamate/serine/threonine (PEST)-rich domain, resulting in protein truncation or, rarely, were nonsynonymous substitutions affecting the extracellular heterodimerization domain (HD). NOTCH2 mutations were not present in other B cell lymphomas and leukemias, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; n = 15), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL; n = 15), low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 44), hairy cell leukemia (HCL; n = 15), and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 14). NOTCH2 mutations were associated with adverse clinical outcomes (relapse, histological transformation, and/or death) among SMZL patients (P = 0.002). These results suggest that NOTCH2 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of SMZL and are associated with a poor prognosis.

  20. Patients with primary breast and primary female genital tract diffuse large B cell lymphoma have a high frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin-Xin; Li, Jian; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Ming-Hui; Zhou, Dao-Bin

    2017-11-01

    This study is to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of MYD88 and CD79B mutations and the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with primary diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the female genital tract and breast. The characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of 19 patients diagnosed with primary DLBCL of the female genital tract and breast, who had formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from diagnostic samples diagnosed between January 2004 and June 2016, were analyzed retrospectively. Nineteen female patients (7 with primary breast and 12 with primary female genital tract DLBCL) were included in this retrospective study. Eleven patients (57.9%) carried a MYD88 mutation, including 10 with MYD8 L265P and 1 with the MYD88 L265S mutation. Seven patients (36.8%) harbored a CD79B mutation, which included two cases with CD79B Y196H, two cases with CD79B Y196N, one case with CD79B Y196D, one case with CD79B Y196F, and one case with CD79B Y196X. Four cases had both MYD88 and CD79B mutations. The clinicopathologic parameters, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) of the MYD88 mutation-carrying group were not significantly different from those of the MYD88 wild-type group except for higher LDH levels. Six patients received cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP), while 13 patients received rituximab plus CHOP, and 13 patients received central nervous system prophylaxis. The median OS and PFS were 73 and 56 months, respectively. Patients with primary breast and primary female genital tract DLBCL have a high frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations. The presence of these mutations does not affect survival but may offer additional therapeutic options.

  1. IgV(H) and bcl6 somatic mutation analysis reveals the heterogeneity of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma, and indicates the presence of undisclosed local antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Renato; Camacho, Francisca I; Fernández-Vázquez, Amalia; Algara, Patrocinio; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L; De Rosa, Gaetano; Piris, Miguel A

    2004-06-01

    Our understanding of the ontology of B-cell lymphomas (BCL) has been improved by the study of mutational status of IgV(H) and bcl6 genes, but only a few cases of cutaneous BCL have been examined for this status. We analyzed IgV(H) and bcl6 somatic mutations in 10 cutaneous BCL, classified as follicular (three primary and one secondary), primary marginal zone (two cases), and diffuse large BCL (three primary and one secondary). We observed a lower rate (IgV(H) mutation in all marginal zone lymphomas, and a preferential usage of V(H)2-70 (one primary follicular and two primary diffuse large BCL). Fewer than expected replacement mutations in framework regions (FR) were observed in three primary follicular lymphomas (FLs) and in all diffuse large BCL, indicating a negative antigen selection pressure. Ongoing mutations were observed in eight of 10 cases. Only two primary FLs and two diffuse large BCL showed bcl6 somatic mutation. These data support the heterogeneous nature of the different cutaneous BCL, and specifically the distinction between cutaneous follicular and marginal zone lymphomas. The biased usage of V(H)2-70, the low rate of replacement mutation in the FR, and the presence of ongoing mutation imply that local antigens could modulate the growth of primary cutaneous BCL.

  2. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-20

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

  3. Mutations in ZIC2 in human holoprosencephaly: description of a Novel ZIC2 specific phenotype and comprehensive analysis of 157 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Mercier, Sandra; Clegg, Nancy J.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Dubourg, Christèle; David, Veronique; Olney, Ann Haskins; Wehner, Lars-Erik; Hehr, Ute; Bale, Sherri; Paulussen, Aimee; Smeets, Hubert J.; Hardisty, Emily; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Pronicka, Ewa; Clemens, Michelle; McPherson, Elizabeth; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Hahn, Jin; Stashinko, Elaine; Levey, Eric; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Roeder, Elizabeth; Schell-Apacik, Chayim Can; Booth, Carol W.; Thomas, Ronald L.; Kenwrick, Sue; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Bous, Sophia M.; Keaton, Amelia; Balog, Joan Z.; Hadley, Donald; Zhou, Nan; Long, Robert; Vélez, Jorge I.; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E.; Odent, Sylvie; Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the human forebrain, may be due to mutations in genes associated with non-syndromic HPE. Mutations in ZIC2, located on chromosome 13q32, are a common cause of non-syndromic, non-chromosomal HPE. OBJECTIVE: To characterise genetic

  4. A double mutation in exon 6 of the [beta]-hexosaminidase [alpha] subunit in a patient with the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, P.J. (Univ. of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada) Child Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)); Coulter-Mackie, M.B. (Univ. of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada) Child Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada) Children' s Psychiatric Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-10-01

    The B1 variant form of Tay-Sachs disease is enzymologically unique in that the causative mutation(s) appear to affect the active site in the [alpha] subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A without altering its ability to associate with the [beta] subunit. Most previously reported B1 variant mutations were found in exon 5 within codon 178. The coding sequence of the [alpha] subunit gene of a patient with the B1 variant form was examined with a combination of reverse transcription of mRNA to cDNA, PCR, and dideoxy sequencing. A double mutation in exon 6 has been identified: a G[sub 574][yields]C transversion causing a val[sub 192][yields]leu change and a G[sub 598][yields] A transition resulting in a val[sub 200][yields]met alteration. The amplified cDNAs were otherwise normal throughout their sequence. The 574 and 598 alterations have been confirmed by amplification directly from genomic DNA from the patient and her mother. Transient-expression studies of the two exon 6 mutations (singly or together) in COS-1 cells show that the G[sub 574][yields]C change is sufficient to cause the loss of enzyme activity. The biochemical phenotype of the 574 alteration in transfection studies is consistent with that expected for a B1 variant mutation. As such, this mutation differs from previously reported B1 variant mutations, all of which occur in exon 5. 31 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  6. Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene in Bacillus velezensis CC09 have Pleiotropic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xun-Chao; Xi, Huan; Liang, Li; Liu, Jia-Dong; Liu, Chang-Hong; Xue, Ya-Rong; Yu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Rifampicin resistance (Rif r ) mutations in the RNA polymerase β subunit ( rpoB ) gene exhibit pleiotropic phenotypes as a result of their effects on the transcription machinery in prokaryotes. However, the differences in the effects of the mutations on the physiology and metabolism of the bacteria remain unknown. In this study, we isolated seven Rif r mutations in rpoB , including six single point mutations (H485Y, H485C, H485D, H485R, Q472R, and S490L) and one double point mutation (S490L/S617F) from vegetative cells of an endophytic strain, Bacillus velezensis CC09. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain (CC09), the H485R and H485D mutants exhibited a higher degree of inhibition of Aspergillus niger spore germination, while the H485Y, S490L, Q472R, and S490L/S617F mutants exhibited a lower degree of inhibition due to their lower production of the antibiotic iturin A. These mutants all exhibited defective phenotypes in terms of pellicle formation, sporulation, and swarming motility. A hierarchical clustering analysis of the observed phenotypes indicated that the four mutations involving amino acid substitutions at H485 in RpoB belonged to the same cluster. In contrast, the S490L and Q472R mutations, as well as the WT strain, were in another cluster, indicating a functional connection between the mutations in B. velezensis and phenotypic changes. Our data suggest that Rif r mutations cannot only be used to study transcriptional regulation mechanisms, but can also serve as a tool to increase the production of bioactive metabolites in B. velezensis .

  7. Analysis of S gene mutation of the hepatitis B virus in adult liver transplant recipients showing resistance to hepatitis B immunoglobulin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, G-C; Hwang, S; Ahn, C-S; Kim, K-H; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Song, G-W; Jung, D-H; Shin, Y W; Kim, S-H; Chang, K-H; Namgoong, J-M; Park, C-S; Park, H-W; Park, Y-H; Kang, S-H; Jung, B-H; Lee, S-G

    2013-10-01

    A considerable proportion of recipients of liver transplantations who are presented hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) monotherapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) prophylaxis develop HBIG resistance. In this study, we investigated the mutation patterns in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of amino acid sequences 100 to 160. Using the gene sequence analyzer for amino acid sequences 0 to 226 in the S/pre-S region we analyzed blood samples of 15 patients showing HBIG resistance after high-dose HBIG prophylaxis. Various mutations in the MHR were observed in 14/15 samples: Gly145Arg mutation in 8/13 Adr subtype and 1/2 Ayw subtype samples (60%). The next most common mutation was Gly165Trp in 8/13 Adr subtype but neither of 2 Ayw subtype samples (53.3%). Concurrent antiviral resistance was noted in 5 patients: lamivudine (n = 5), or entecavir (n = 3), but not adefovir, suggesting the occurrence of simultaneous, antiviral cross-resistances. Two patients underwent retransplantation due to the progression of HBV infection despite vigorous antiviral therapy. At diagnosis of HBV recurrence, the mean HBV DNA load was 6.5 × 10(6) copies/mL; 4 patients showed paradoxical coexistence of anti-HBs and HBsAg. Currently, 2 subjects show low-level HBV DNA replication in peripheral blood, although the other 12 had no DNA replication after prolonged antiviral therapy. This study suggested that various mutations in the "a" determinant were associated with HBIG resistance. Since treatment failure to rescue antiviral therapy was often associated with delayed detection of HBV recurrence rather than concurrent antiviral resistance, frequent HBV surveillance using more sensitive screening tests, such as HBeAg and HBV DNA polymerase chain reaction assay, seems to be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutation of the SHP-2 binding site in growth hormone (GH) receptor prolongs GH-promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of GH receptor, JAK2, and STAT5B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stofega, M R; Herrington, J; Billestrup, Nils

    2000-01-01

    phosphorylation. Consistent with the effects on STAT5B phosphorylation, tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation of tyrosine 595 prolongs the duration of tyrosyl phosphorylation of GHR and JAK2. These data suggest that tyrosine 595 is a major site of interaction of GHR with SHP-2, and that GHR-bound SHP-2 negatively......Binding of GH to GH receptor (GHR) rapidly and transiently activates multiple signal transduction pathways that contribute to the growth-promoting and metabolic effects of GH. While the events that initiate GH signal transduction, such as activation of the Janus tyrosine kinase JAK2, are beginning...

  9. Age-related cancer mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Welch, John S.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. We analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals within The Cancer Genome Atlas, and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia/lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5–6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant, initiating events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion. PMID:25326804

  10. Specific heat of holmium and YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. Criticalbehaviour and superconducting properties; Spezifische Waerme von Holmium und YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. Kritisches Verhalten und supraleitende Eigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkali, Abdelhakim

    2010-01-04

    Object of the thesis is the study of the specific heat of holmium and YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C in the temperature ranges from 50 to 200 KI respectively from 380 mK to 20 K in magnetic fields up to 9 T. In the present thesis the criticalbehaviour of YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and properties of the superconducting state of tne non-magnetic rare-earth nickel borocarbide YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C are studied by means of a self-developed measurement apparatur of the specific heat using the quasi-adiabatic heating-pulse method as well as of holmium by means of the relaxation method. In this thesis reliable statements about the critical exponents on monocrystalline holmium could be made. The study on holmium proves that the critical behaviour of the specific heats cannot be described in the framework of the predictions of the chiral universality classes. By means of measurements of the specific heat in this thesis could be confirmed that YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C is a multiband superconductor. The positive curvature of the boundary line below T{sub c} in the phase diagram yields a first hint to the many-band character of YNI{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. In the zero-field the electronic specific heat in the superconducting state c{sub es}(T) can be not explained in the framework of the pure BCS theory. At low temperatures a residual contribution by normally conducting electrons could be detected, which hints to a not completely opened energy gap. A possible explanation would be that a band (or several bands) with low charge-carrier concentration not contribute to the superconductivity. This result agrees with de Haas-van Alphen measurements on isostructural superconducting LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C monocrystals, which suggest the many-band character of the superconductivity as well as a vanishing energy gap in one band. The fluctuation behaviour of the specific heat of YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C in the neighbourhood of the superconducting-normally conducting transition agrees well with that of the 3D-XY model. [German

  11. Nkx2-5 Mutations in Patients With Nonsyndromic Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Soheili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart diseases (CHD are the most common of all birth defects, affecting nearly 0.9% of all live births. Nkx2-5 mutations were reported to cause CHD but data in Kurdish populations of Iran are limited. Objectives In this experimental study, we performed high resolution melt (HRM mutation scanning of Nkx2-5 exons of non-syndrome patients. Patients and Methods Thirty nine patients with atrial septal defect and 57 patients with ventricular septal defect, 4 patients possessing both defects as case groups and 50 healthy controls. Then we grouped samples according to HRM graph and sequenced several samples from each group. Results HRM analysis showed 2 deviated curves for exon 1 and one group for exon 2A and exon 2B. Then, 2 samples of exon 1 that showed different HRM curves, 3 samples of another group from this exon and 5 samples of exon 2A, 2B and healthy controls were randomly sequenced. The results of sequencing confirmed the HRM analysis, and one polymorphism (A65G was identified in 2 atrial septal defects with deviated curves. Conclusions The environmental and effective factors on the heart development within embryonic evolution as well as the possibility of the existence of the mutation in coding genes of the other cardiac transcription factors such as GATA4 and TBX5 can be the reasons for the lack of the pathogenic mutation in this study. It is suggested in further related studies to investigate normal and abnormal cardiac tissue samples of these studied patients and coding genes of the other cardiac transcription factors.

  12. De novo mutations in ARID1B associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongguo; Yao, RuEn; Wang, Lili; Fan, Yanjie; Huang, Xiaodong; Hirschhorn, Joel; Dauber, Andrew; Shen, Yiping

    2015-09-16

    Human height is a complex trait with a strong genetic basis. Recently, a significant association between rare copy number variations (CNVs) and short stature has been identified, and candidate genes in these rare CNVs are being explored. This study aims to evaluate the association between mutations in ARID1B gene and short stature, both the syndromic and non-syndromic form. Based on a case-control study of whole genome chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), three overlapping CNVs were identified in patients with developmental disorders who exhibited short stature. ARID1B, a causal gene for Coffin Siris syndrome, is the only gene encompassed by all three CNVs. A following retrospective genotype-phenotype analysis based on a literature review confirmed that short stature is a frequent feature in those Coffin-Siris syndrome patients with ARID1B mutations. Mutation screening of ARID1B coding regions was further conducted in a cohort of 48 non-syndromic short stature patients,andfour novel missense variants including two de novo mutations were found. These results suggest that haploinsufficient mutations of ARID1B are associated with syndromic short stature including Coffin-Siris syndrome and intellectual disability, while rare missense variants in ARID1B are associated with non-syndromic short stature. This study supports the notion that mutations in genes related to syndromic short stature may exert milder effect and contribute to short stature in the general population.

  13. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (Lynch syndrome cases...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...

  14. Solution structure of the human Grb7-SH2 domain/erbB2 peptide complex and structural basis for Grb7 binding to ErbB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancic, Monika; Daly, Roger J.; Lyons, Barbara A.

    2003-01-01

    The solution structure of the hGrb7-SH2 domain in complex with a ten amino acid phosphorylated peptide ligand representative of the erbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase (pY1139) is presented as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The hGrb7-SH2 domain structure reveals the Src homology 2 domain topology consisting of a central β-sheet capped at each end by an α-helix. The presence of a four residue insertion in the region between β-strand E and the EF loop and resulting influences on the SH2 domain/peptide complex structure are discussed. The binding conformation of the erbB2 peptide is in a β-turn similar to that found in phosphorylated tyrosine peptides bound to the Grb2-SH2 domain. To our knowledge this is only the second example of an SH2 domain binding its naturally occurring ligands in a turn, instead of extended, conformation. Close contacts between residues responsible for binding specificity in hGrb7-SH2 and the erbB2 peptide are characterized and the potential effect of mutation of these residues on the hGrb7-SH2 domain structure is discussed

  15. [Mutation screening of MITF gene in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Shu-Zhi; Liu, Jun; Han, Bing; Wang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Dai, Pu; Young, Wie-Yen; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Warrgenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is the most common autosomal dominantly-inherited syndrome with hearing loss. MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor)is a basic-helix-loop-helix-luecine zipper (bHLHZip) factor which regulates expression of tyrosinase, and is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Mutations in MITF associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report a three-generation Chinese family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. The proband exhibits congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis and facial freckles. One of family members manifests sensorineural deafness, and the other patients show premature greying or/and freckles. This mutation, heterozygous deletion c.639delA, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking normal interaction with its target DNA motif. This mutation is a novel mutation and the third case identified in exon 7 of MITF in WS2. Though there is only one base pair distance between this novel mutation and the other two documented cases and similar amino acids change, significant difference is seen in clinical phenotype, which suggests genetic background may play an important role.

  16. Allele-Specific Chromatin Recruitment and Therapeutic Vulnerabilities of ESR1 Activating Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeselsohn, Rinath; Bergholz, Johann S; Pun, Matthew; Cornwell, MacIntosh; Liu, Weihan; Nardone, Agostina; Xiao, Tengfei; Li, Wei; Qiu, Xintao; Buchwalter, Gilles; Feiglin, Ariel; Abell-Hart, Kayley; Fei, Teng; Rao, Prakash; Long, Henry; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Zhang, Tinghu; Gray, Nathanael; Melchers, Diane; Houtman, Rene; Liu, X Shirley; Cohen, Ofir; Wagle, Nikhil; Winer, Eric P; Zhao, Jean; Brown, Myles

    2018-02-12

    Estrogen receptor α (ER) ligand-binding domain (LBD) mutations are found in a substantial number of endocrine treatment-resistant metastatic ER-positive (ER + ) breast cancers. We investigated the chromatin recruitment, transcriptional network, and genetic vulnerabilities in breast cancer models harboring the clinically relevant ER mutations. These mutants exhibit both ligand-independent functions that mimic estradiol-bound wild-type ER as well as allele-specific neomorphic properties that promote a pro-metastatic phenotype. Analysis of the genome-wide ER binding sites identified mutant ER unique recruitment mediating the allele-specific transcriptional program. Genetic screens identified genes that are essential for the ligand-independent growth driven by the mutants. These studies provide insights into the mechanism of endocrine therapy resistance engendered by ER mutations and potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutations in TET2 and DNMT3A genes are associated with changes in global and gene-specific methylation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponciano-Gómez, Alberto; Martínez-Tovar, Adolfo; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Centeno-Cruz, Federico; Garrido, Efraín

    2017-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by its high biological and clinical heterogeneity, which represents an important barrier for a precise disease classification and accurate therapy. While epigenetic aberrations play a pivotal role in acute myeloid leukemia pathophysiology, molecular signatures such as change in the DNA methylation patterns and genetic mutations in enzymes needed to the methylation process can also be helpful for classifying acute myeloid leukemia. Our study aims to unveil the relevance of DNMT3A and TET2 genes in global and specific methylation patterns in acute myeloid leukemia. Peripheral blood samples from 110 untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia and 15 healthy control individuals were collected. Global 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes were measured by using the MethylFlashTM Quantification kits. DNMT3A and TET2 expression levels were evaluated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The R882A hotspot of DNMT3A and exons 6-10 of TET2 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced using the Sanger method. Methylation patterns of 16 gene promoters were evaluated by pyrosequencing after treating DNA with sodium bisulfite, and their transcriptional products were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction.Here, we demonstrate altered levels of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and highly variable transcript levels of DNMT3A and TET2 in peripheral blood leukocytes from acute myeloid leukemia patients. We found a mutation prevalence of 2.7% for DNMT3A and 11.8% for TET2 in the Mexican population with this disease. The average overall survival of acute myeloid leukemia patients with DNMT3A mutations was only 4 months. In addition, we showed that mutations in DNMT3A and TET2 may cause irregular DNA methylation patterns and transcriptional expression levels in 16 genes known to be involved in acute myeloid leukemia pathogenesis

  18. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described...

  19. A trade-off in replication in mosquito versus mammalian systems conferred by a point mutation in the NS4B protein of dengue virus type 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Kathryn A.; Manlucu, Luella R.; Gilmore, Lara E.; Blaney, Joseph E.; Hanson, Christopher T.; Murphy, Brian R.; Whitehead, Stephen S.

    2003-01-01

    An acceptable live-attenuated dengue virus vaccine candidate should have low potential for transmission by mosquitoes. We have identified and characterized a mutation in dengue virus type 4 (DEN4) that decreases the ability of the virus to infect mosquitoes. A panel of 1248 mutagenized virus clones generated previously by chemical mutagenesis was screened for decreased replication in mosquito C6/36 cells but efficient replication in simian Vero cells. One virus met these criteria and contained a single coding mutation: a C-to-U mutation at nucleotide 7129 resulting in a Pro-to-Leu change in amino acid 101 of the nonstructural 4B gene (NS4B P101L). This mutation results in decreased replication in C6/36 cells relative to wild-type DEN4, decreased infectivity for mosquitoes, enhanced replication in Vero and human HuH-7 cells, and enhanced replication in SCID mice implanted with HuH-7 cells (SCID-HuH-7 mice). A recombinant DEN4 virus (rDEN4) bearing this mutation exhibited the same set of phenotypes. Addition of the NS4B P101L mutation to rDEN4 bearing a 30 nucleotide deletion (Δ30) decreased the ability of the double-mutant virus to infect mosquitoes but increased its ability to replicate in SCID-HuH-7 mice. Although the NS4B P101L mutation decreases infectivity of DEN4 for mosquitoes, its ability to enhance replication in SCID-HuH-7 mice suggests that it might not be advantageous to include this specific mutation in an rDEN4 vaccine. The opposing effects of the NS4B P101L mutation in mosquito and vertebrate systems suggest that the NS4B protein is involved in maintaining the balance between efficient replication in the mosquito vector and the human host

  20. JAK2 V617F, MPL W515L and JAK2 Exon 12 Mutations in Chinese Patients with Primary Myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Lu, Mi-Ze; Jiang, Yuan-Qiang; Yang, Guo-Hua; Zhuang, Yun; Sun, Hong-Li; Shen, Yun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    JAK2 V617F, MPL W515L and JAK2 exon 12 mutations are novel acquired mutations that induce constitutive cytokine-independent activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). The discovery of these mutations provides novel mechanism for activation of signal transduction in hematopoietic malignancies. This research was to investigate their prevalence in Chinese patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). We introduced allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) combined with sequence analysis to simultaneously screen JAK2 V617F, MPL W515L and JAK2 exon 12 mutations in 30 patients with PMF. Fifteen PMF patients (50.0%) carried JAK2 V617F mutation, and only two JAK2 V617F-negative patients (6.7%) harbored MPL W515L mutation. None had JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Furthermore, these three mutations were not detected in 50 healthy controls. MPL W515L and JAK2 V617F mutations existed in PMF patients but JAK2 exon 12 mutations not. JAK2 V617F and MPL W515L and mutations might contribute to the primary molecular pathogenesis in patients with PMF.

  1. Investigating the Impact of Asp181 Point Mutations on Interactions between PTP1B and Phosphotyrosine Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Sun, Xun; Zhao, Xian

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, which suggests that it is an attractive therapeutic target in type II diabetes and obesity. The aim of this research is to explore residues which interact with phosphotyrosine substrate can be affected by D181 point mutations and lead to increased substrate binding. To achieve this goal, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on wild type (WT) and two mutated PTP1B/substrate complexes. The cross-correlation and principal component analyses show that point mutations can affect the motions of some residues in the active site of PTP1B. Moreover, the hydrogen bond and energy decomposition analyses indicate that apart from residue 181, point mutations have influence on the interactions of substrate with several residues in the active site of PTP1B.

  2. JAK2 aberrations in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goffau-Nobel, Willemieke; Hoogkamer, Alex Q.; Boer, Judith M.; Boeree, Aurélie; van de Ven, Cesca; Koudijs, Marco J.; Besselink, Nicolle J.M.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; Zwaan, Christian Michel; Horstmann, Martin A.; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L.

    2017-01-01

    JAK2 abnormalities may serve as target for precision medicines in pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In the current study we performed a screening for JAK2 mutations and translocations, analyzed the clinical outcome and studied the efficacy of two JAK inhibitors in primary BCP-ALL cells. Importantly, we identify a number of limitations of JAK inhibitor therapy. JAK2 mutations mainly occurred in the poor prognostic subtypes BCR-ABL1-like and non- BCR-ABL1-like B-other (negative for sentinel cytogenetic lesions). JAK2 translocations were restricted to BCR-ABL1-like cases. Momelotinib and ruxolitinib were cytotoxic in both JAK2 translocated and JAK2 mutated cells, although efficacy in JAK2 mutated cells highly depended on cytokine receptor activation by TSLP. However, our data also suggest that the effect of JAK inhibition may be compromised by mutations in alternative survival pathways and microenvironment-induced resistance. Furthermore, inhibitors induced accumulation of phosphorylated JAK2Y1007, which resulted in a profound re-activation of JAK2 signaling upon release of the inhibitors. This preclinical evidence implies that further optimization and evaluation of JAK inhibitor treatment is necessary prior to its clinical integration in pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:29163799

  3. Spectrum of MECP2 gene mutations in a cohort of Indian patients with Rett syndrome: report of two novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Raha, Sarbani; Sanghavi, Daksha; Maitra, Anurupa; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-02-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting females and characterized by developmental regression, epilepsy, stereotypical hand movements, and motor abnormalities. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10,000 female births. Rett syndrome is caused by mutations within methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Over 270 individual nucleotide changes which cause pathogenic mutations have been reported. However, eight most commonly occurring missense and nonsense mutations account for almost 70% of all patients. We screened 90 individuals with Rett syndrome phenotype. A total of 19 different MECP2 mutations and polymorphisms were identified in 27 patients. Of the 19 mutations, we identified 7 (37%) frameshift, 6 (31%) nonsense, 14 (74%) missense mutations and one duplication (5%). The most frequent pathogenic changes were: missense p.T158M (11%), p.R133C (7.4%), and p.R306C (7.4%) and nonsense p.R168X (11%), p.R255X (7.4%) mutations. We have identified two novel mutations namely p.385-388delPLPP present in atypical patients and p.Glu290AlafsX38 present in a classical patient of Rett syndrome. Sequence homology for p.385-388delPLPP mutation revealed that these 4 amino acids were conserved across mammalian species. This indicated the importance of these 4 amino acids in structure and function of the protein. A novel variant p.T479T has also been identified in a patient with atypical Rett syndrome. A total of 62 (69%) patients remained without molecular genetics diagnosis that necessitates further search for mutations in other genes like CDKL5 and FOXG1 that are known to cause Rett phenotype. The majority of mutations are detected in exon 4 and only one mutation was present in exon 3. Therefore, our study suggests the need for screening exon 4 of MECP2 as first line of diagnosis in these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cubilin P1297L mutation associated with hereditary megaloblastic anemia 1 causes impaired recognition of intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) by cubilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Aminoff, M; Jacobsen, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Megaloblastic anemia 1 (MGA1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the selective intestinal malabsorption of intrinsic factor (IF) and vitamin B(12)/cobalamin (Cbl) in complex. Most Finnish patients with MGA1 carry the disease-specific P1297L mutation (FM1) in the IF-B(12) receptor, cubilin......-IF-Cbl in cubilin-expressing epithelial cells. In conclusion, the data presented show a substantial loss in affinity of the FM1 mutant form of the IF-Cbl binding region of cubilin. This now explains the malabsorption of Cbl and Cbl-dependent anemia in MGA1 patients with the FM1 mutation. (Blood. 2000...

  5. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenning, M; Senter, L; Hampel, H; Robinson, K Lagerstedt; Sun, S; Buchanan, D; Walsh, M D; Nilbert, M; Green, J; Potter, J; Lindblom, A; de la Chapelle, A

    2008-06-01

    When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based on immunohistochemical analysis. We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n = 61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population frequency 10 000 carriers of this mutation in the USA alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected in the probands' families, would suggest that this is a prevalent mutation with reduced penetrance.

  6. Molecular insight into mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome in two patients with novel mutations in the deoxyguanosine kinase and thymidine kinase 2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liya; Limongelli, Anna; Vila, Maya R; Carrara, Franco; Zeviani, Massimo; Eriksson, Staffan

    2005-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) are the two key enzymes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) precursor synthesis. Deficiencies in TK2 or dGK activity, due to genetic alteration, have been shown to cause tissue-specific depletion of mtDNA. In the case of TK2 deficiency, affected individuals suffer severe myopathy and, in the case of dGK deficiency, devastating liver or multi-systemic disease. Here, we report clinical and biochemical findings from two patients with mtDNA depletion syndrome. Patient A was a compound heterozygote carrying the previously reported T77M mutation and a novel mutation (R161K) in the TK2 gene. Patient B carried a novel mutation (L250S) in the dGK gene. The clinical symptoms of patient A included muscular weakness and exercise intolerance due to a severe mitochondrial myopathy associated with a 92% reduction in mtDNA. There was minimal involvement of other organs. Patient B suffered from rapidly progressive, early onset fatal liver failure associated with profoundly decreased mtDNA levels in liver and, to a lesser extent, in skeletal muscle. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce the mutations detected in patients A and B into the TK2 and dGK cDNAs, respectively. We then characterized each of these recombinant enzymes. Catalytic activities of the three mutant enzymes were reduced to about 2-4% for TK2 and 0.5% for dGK as compared to the wild-type enzymes. Altered competition between dCyd and dThd was observed for the T77M mutant. The residual activities of the two mitochondrial enzymes correlated directly with disease development.

  7. Gene-specific function prediction for non-synonymous mutations in monogenic diabetes genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    Full Text Available The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations.

  8. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Hase, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Ayako; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kikuo

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of γ-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by γ-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C → T:A, and all the transitions were G:C → A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by γ-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene

  9. Genome-first approach diagnosed Cabezas syndrome via novel CUL4B mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Cabezas syndrome is a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability primarily characterized by a short stature, hypogonadism and abnormal gait, with other variable features resulting from mutations in the CUL4B gene. Here, we report a clinically undiagnosed 5-year-old male with severe intellectual disability. A genome-first approach using targeted exome sequencing identified a novel nonsense mutation [NM_003588.3:c.2698G>T, p.(Glu900*)] in the last coding exon of CUL4B , thus diagnosing this patient with Cabezas syndrome.

  10. Urinary Tract Effects of HPSE2 Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, H; Roberts, N; Hilton, E; McKenzie, E; Daly, S; Hadfield, K; Rahal, J; Gardiner, N; Tanley, S; Lewis, M; Sites, E; Angle, B; Alves, C; Lourenço, T; Rodrigues, M

    2015-01-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease featuring grimacing and incomplete bladder emptying. Mutations of HPSE2, encoding heparanase 2, a heparanase 1 inhibitor, occur in UFS, but knowledge about the HPSE2 mutation spectrum is limited. Here, seven UFS kindreds with HPSE2 mutations are presented, including one with deleted asparagine 254, suggesting a role for this amino acid, which is conserved in vertebrate orthologs. HPSE2 mutations were absent in 23 non-neurog...

  11. Tuning the specificity of a Two-in-One Fab against three angiogenic antigens by fully utilizing the information of deep mutational scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Patrick; Sanowar, Sarah; Lee, Chingwei V; Fuh, Germaine

    Monoclonal antibodies developed for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes need to demonstrate highly defined binding specificity profiles. Engineering of an antibody to enhance or reduce binding to related antigens is often needed to achieve the desired biologic activity without safety concern. Here, we describe a deep sequencing-aided engineering strategy to fine-tune the specificity of an angiopoietin-2 (Ang2)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) dual action Fab, 5A12.1 for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. This antibody utilizes overlapping complementarity-determining region (CDR) sites for dual Ang2/VEGF interaction with K D in the sub-nanomolar range. However, it also exhibits significant (K D of 4 nM) binding to angiopoietin-1, which has high sequence identity with Ang2. We generated a large phage-displayed library of 5A12.1 Fab variants with all possible single mutations in the 6 CDRs. By tracking the change of prevalence of each mutation during various selection conditions, we identified 35 mutations predicted to decrease the affinity for Ang1 while maintaining the affinity for Ang2 and VEGF. We confirmed the specificity profiles for 25 of these single mutations as Fab protein. Structural analysis showed that some of the Fab mutations cluster near a potential Ang1/2 epitope residue that differs in the 2 proteins, while others are up to 15 Å away from the antigen-binding site and likely influence the binding interaction remotely. The approach presented here provides a robust and efficient method for specificity engineering that does not require prior knowledge of the antigen antibody interaction and can be broadly applied to antibody specificity engineering projects.

  12. Presymptomatic cerebral blood flow changes in CHMP2B mutation carriers of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD-3), measured with MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Line Andersen; Mouridsen, Kim; Rodell, Anders

    2012-01-01

    1 images. Perfusion data were then extracted from seven regions-of-interest, normalised to white matter and statistically compared between carriers and non-carriers. RESULTS: For SE, contrasts between carriers and non-carriers showed significant differences in temporal, occipital and parietal lobes...... and in hippocampus. There was no evidence of changes from baseline to follow-up. For GRE, there were no significant differences between carriers and non-carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly decreased CBF was found in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers in occipital-and parietal lobes. Comparing SE with GRE, data...

  13. A complex relationship between TRAF3 and non-canonical NF-κB2 activation in B lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Wai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The adaptor protein TRAF3 restrains BAFF receptor (BAFFR and CD40-mediated activation of the NF-κB2 pathway in B cells. Mice lacking TRAF3 specifically in B cells revealed the critical role of TRAF3 in restraining homeostatic B cell survival. Furthermore, loss- of-function mutations of the traf3 gene have been associated with human B cell malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM. It has been proposed that receptor-induced TRAF3 degradation leads to stabilization of the NF-B inducing kinase NIK, and subsequent NF-κB2 activation. However, it is unclear how receptor-mediated TRAF3 degradation or loss of function contributes to B cell-specific NF-κB2 activation. In the current study, we employed two complementary models to address this question. One utilized a mutant traf3 gene found in a human MM-derived cell line called LP1. The LP1 mutant TRAF3 protein lacks the TRAF-N and TRAF-C domains. Consistent with the paradigm described, expression of LP1 TRAF3 in B cells promoted higher basal levels of NF-κB2 activation compared to Wt TRAF3. However, LP1 did not associate with TRAF2, CD40, or BAFFR, and no LP1 degradation was observed following receptor engagement. Interestingly, LP1 showed enhanced NIK association. Thus, TRAF3 degradation becomes dispensable to activate NF-κB2 when it is unable to associate with TRAF2. In a second model, we examined several mutant forms of BAFFR that are unable to induce NF-κB2 activation in B cells. Signaling to B cells by each of these BAFFR mutants, however, induced levels of TRAF3 degradation similar to those induced by Wt BAFFR. Thus, in B cells, receptor-mediated TRAF3 degradation is not sufficient to promote NF-B2 activation. We thus conclude that there is not a simple linear relationship in B lymphocytes between relative levels of cellular TRAF3, induced TRAF3 degradation, NIK activation and NF-B2 activation.

  14. Benzo[a]pyrene, Aflatoxine B1 and Acetaldehyde Mutational Patterns in TP53 Gene Using a Functional Assay: Relevance to Human Cancer Aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Vincent; Lechevrel, Mathilde; André, Véronique; Le Goff, Jérémie; Pottier, Didier; Billet, Sylvain; Garçon, Guillaume; Shirali, Pirouz; Sichel, François

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are the most common alterations in human tumours. TP53 mutational patterns have sometimes been linked to carcinogen exposure. In hepatocellular carcinoma, a specific G>T transversion on codon 249 is classically described as a fingerprint of aflatoxin B1 exposure. Likewise G>T transversions in codons 157 and 158 have been related to tobacco exposure in human lung cancers. However, controversies remain about the interpretation of TP53 mutational pattern in tumours as the fingerprint of genotoxin exposure. By using a functional assay, the Functional Analysis of Separated Alleles in Yeast (FASAY), the present study depicts the mutational pattern of TP53 in normal human fibroblasts after in vitro exposure to well-known carcinogens: benzo[a]pyrene, aflatoxin B1 and acetaldehyde. These in vitro patterns of mutations were then compared to those found in human tumours by using the IARC database of TP53 mutations. The results show that the TP53 mutational patterns found in human tumours can be only partly ascribed to genotoxin exposure. A complex interplay between the functional impact of the mutations on p53 phenotype and the cancer natural history may affect these patterns. However, our results strongly support that genotoxins exposure plays a major role in the aetiology of the considered cancers. PMID:22319594

  15. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations in Asian and European Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hamann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA have markedly increased risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers during their lifetime. It has been estimated that their breast and ovarian cancer risks are in the range of 46-87% and 15-68%, respectively. Therefore it is of utmost clinical importance to identify BRCA mutation carriers in order to target unaffected women for prevention and/or close surveillance and to help affected women choose the best chemotherapy regimen. Genetic testing for BRCA germline mutations is expanding in clinical oncology centers worldwide. Given the high costs of complete BRCA gene screens, a lot of effort has been expended on deciding upon whom to test. Relevant issues involved in decision making include the prior probability of a woman having a BRCA mutation, which is a function of her age and her disease status, her ethnic group, and her family history of breast or ovarian cancer. The frequency and spectrum of mutations in these genes show considerable variation by ethnic groups and by geographic regions. Most studies have been conducted in European and North American populations, while studies in Asian, Hispanic, and African populations are fewer. In most populations, many BRCA mutations were identified, which were distributed all over the genes. However, in some populations, a relatively small number of specific BRCA mutations are recurrent and account for the majority of all mutations in that population. Many of the recurrent mutations are founder mutations, which were derived from a common ancestor. Founder mutations are present in Ashkenazi Jewish, European, and Islander (Faroe, Easter, and Pitcairn populations. Such mutations have also been identified in patients from several Asian, South American, and African countries. Population-specific genetic risk assessment and genetic mutation screening have been facilitated at low costs. Given that mutations

  16. Novel Mutations in the PC Gene in Patients with Type B Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Duno, Morten; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated seven patients with the type B form of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) deficiency. Mutation analysis revealed eight mutations, all novel. In a patient with exon skipping on cDNA analysis, we identified a homozygous mutation located in a potential branch point sequence, the first...... possible branch point mutation in PC. Two patients were homozygous for missense mutations (with normal protein amounts on western blot analysis), and two patients were homozygous for nonsense mutations. In addition, a duplication of one base pair was found in a patient who also harboured a splice site...... mutation. Another splice site mutation led to the activation of a cryptic splice site, shown by cDNA analysis.All patients reported until now with at least one missense mutation have had the milder type A form of PC deficiency. We thus report for the first time two patients with homozygous missense...

  17. Characterization of human disease phenotypes associated with mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Yanick J; Chase, Diana S; Lowenstein Schmidt, Johanna; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M A; Gornall, Hannah L; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Blair, Edward M; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E; Chitayat, David A; Collins, Abigail E; Sierra Corcoles, Concepcion; Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C; D'Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G E L; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M H; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D; Kirk, Edwin P; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T; Marom, Daphna R; Marques Lourenço, Charles; McKee, Shane A; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E V; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A; Sinha, Gyanranjan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y; te Water Naude, Johann; Wee Teik, Keng; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J; Whitehouse, William P; Whitney, Robyn N; Zaki, Maha S; Zuberi, Sameer M; Livingston, John H; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I

    2015-02-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related genes

  18. Mutation frequencies of the cytochrome CYP2D6 gene in Parkinson disease patients and in families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; Turpin, J.C. [CHR, Reims (France); Gerard, N. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    The frequencies of five mutations of the debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) gene (mutations D6-A, B, C, D, and T), corresponding to poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes, were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients with Parkinson disease, and compared with the findings in 47 healthy controls. These mutant alleles were about twice as frequent among patients as in controls, with an approximate relative risk ratio of 2.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.62). There seem to be no significant differences in frequencies of mutant genotypes in patients among gender and modalities of response with levodopa therapy; but frequency of the mutations was slightly enhanced after age-at-onset of 60 years. Mutations D6-B, D, and T were detected in 7 patients belonging to 10 Parkinson pedigrees. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Prognostic significance of P2RY8-CRLF2 and CRLF2 overexpression may vary across risk subgroups of childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hu; Chen, Xi; Huang, Yi; Su, Yongchun; Lu, Ling; Yu, Jie; Yin, Yibing; Bao, Liming

    2017-02-01

    The cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2) gene plays an important role in early B-cell development. Aberrations in CRLF2 activate the JAK-STAT signaling pathway that contributes to B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The prognostic significance of CRLF2 overexpression and P2RY8-CRLF2 fusion in various B-ALL risk subgroups has not been well established. Two hundred seventy-one patients with newly diagnosed childhood B-ALL were enrolled from a Chinese population. The prevalence of CRLF2 overexpression, CRLF2-P2RY8 fusion, CRLF2 F232C mutation, and JAK2 and IL7R mutational status were analyzed, and the prognostic impact of CRLF2 overexpression and P2RY8-CRLF2 on B-ALL was evaluated by assessing their influence on overall survival and event-free survival. CRLF2 overexpression and P2RY8-CRLF2 were found in 19% and 10%, respectively, in the whole cohort. No correlation between CRLF2 overexpression and P2RY8-CRLF2 was observed. CRLF2 F322C and IL7R mutations were not detected in B-ALL cases overexpressing CRLF2, and no JAK2 mutations were found in the whole cohort either. The results showed that CRLF2 overexpression and P2RY8-CRLF2 were associated with a poor outcome in unselected B-ALL. Moreover, in an intermediate risk B-ALL subgroup P2RY8-CRLF2 was correlated with worse survival, whereas in high- and low-risk subgroups, CRLF2 overexpression predicted a poor outcome. Our findings suggest that P2RY8-CRLF2 is an independent prognostic indicator in intermediate risk B-ALL, while CRLF2 overexpression is correlated with an inferior outcome in high- or low-risk B-ALL. Our study demonstrates that the impact of P2RY8-CRLF2 and CRLF2 overexpression on B-ALL survival may differ across risk subgroups. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mutations in the HFE, TFR2, and SLC40A1 genes in patients with hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Castillo-Rueda, Alejandro; Moreno-Carralero, María-Isabel; Cuadrado-Grande, Nuria; Alvarez-Sala-Walther, Luis-Antonio; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Rafael; Méndez, Manuel; Morán-Jiménez, María-Josefa

    2012-10-15

    Hereditary hemochromatosis causes iron overload and is associated with a variety of genetic and phenotypic conditions. Early diagnosis is important so that effective treatment can be administered and the risk of tissue damage avoided. Most patients are homozygous for the c.845G>A (p.C282Y) mutation in the HFE gene; however, rare forms of genetic iron overload must be diagnosed using a specific genetic analysis. We studied the genotype of 5 patients who had hyperferritinemia and an iron overload phenotype, but not classic mutations in the HFE gene. Two patients were undergoing phlebotomy and had no iron overload, 1 with metabolic syndrome and no phlebotomy had mild iron overload, and 2 patients had severe iron overload despite phlebotomy. The patients' first-degree relatives also underwent the analysis. We found 5 not previously published mutations: c.-408_-406delCAA in HFE, c.1118G>A (p.G373D), c.1473G>A (p.E491E) and c.2085G>C (p.S695S) in TFR2; and c.-428_-427GG>TT in SLC40A1. Moreover, we found 3 previously published mutations: c.221C>T (p.R71X) in HFE; c.1127C>A (p.A376D) in TFR2; and c.539T>C (p.I180T) in SLC40A1. Four patients were double heterozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations mentioned above, and the patient with metabolic syndrome was heterozygous for a mutation in the TFR2 gene. Our findings show that hereditary hemochromatosis is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and that acquired factors may modify or determine the phenotype. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Pre-existing mutations in reverse transcriptase of hepatitis B virus in treatment-naive Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xu

    Full Text Available High rate of viral replication and lacking of proofreading activity in hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase lead to the generation of mutations in HBV virus. Mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT region of HBV polymerase are demonstrated to be strongly associated with drug resistance during antiviral treatment. However, the presence of mutations as well as its clinical significance in treatment-naïve hepatitis patients (defined as pre-existing mutations need to be further investigated. In the present study, a total of 168 serum samples from treatment-naive chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients were collected, and the RT region of HBV polymerase was sequenced. The results showed that pre-existing mutations in the RT region of HBV polymerase were detected in 43 of 168 (25.6% treatment-naive CHB patients within which there were no well-characterized primary nucleotide analogs (NAs resistance sites. Three dominant sites at rt191, rt207 and rt226 were found mutant in 7(16.28%, 8(18.60%, and 14(32.56% samples respectively among these 43 patients. No significant correlation was found between pre-existing mutations and gender, age, HBV genotype, ALT, HBeAg or HBV DNA loads. However, patients with pre-existing RT mutations under HBeAg sero-negative status exhibited decreased HBV DNA loads, which contributed to the decreased HBV DNA loads in the total HBeAg sero-negative patients. The above investigation indicated that there was a prevalence of pre-existing mutations in RT region of HBV polymerase which might affect the serum HBV DNA level in treatment-naive CHB patients. Its effects on the occurrence of NAs resistance and the prognosis after treatment need to be further investigated.

  2. Mutations in the S gene region of hepatitis B virus genotype D in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gene region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the expression of surface antigens and includes the 'a'-determinant region. Thus, mutation(s) in this region would afford HBV variants a distinct survival advantage, permitting the mutant virus to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to ...

  3. Cell type-specific localization of Ephs pairing with ephrin-B2 in the rat postnatal pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Kanno, Naoko; Nishimura, Naoto; Nishihara, Hiroto; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kato, Yukio

    2017-10-01

    Sox2-expressing stem/progenitor cells in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland form two types of micro-environments (niches): the marginal cell layer and dense cell clusters in the parenchyma. In relation to the mechanism of regulation of niches, juxtacrine signaling via ephrin and its receptor Eph is known to play important roles in various niches. The ephrin and Eph families are divided into two subclasses to create ephrin/Eph signaling in co-operation with confined partners. Recently, we reported that ephrin-B2 localizes specifically to both pituitary niches. However, the Ephs interacting with ephrin-B2 in these pituitary niches have not yet been identified. Therefore, the present study aims to identify the Ephs interacting with ephrin-B2 and the cells that produce them in the rat pituitary gland. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated cell type-specific localization of candidate interacting partners for ephrin-B2, including EphA4 in cells located in the posterior lobe, EphB1 in gonadotropes, EphB2 in corticotropes, EphB3 in stem/progenitor cells and EphB4 in endothelial cells in the adult pituitary gland. In particular, double-immunohistochemistry showed cis-interactions between EphB3 and ephrin-B2 in the apical cell membranes of stem/progenitor cell niches throughout life and trans-interactions between EphB2 produced by corticotropes and ephrin-B2 located in the basolateral cell membranes of stem/progenitor cells in the early postnatal pituitary gland. These data indicate that ephrin-B2 plays a role in pituitary stem/progenitor cell niches by selective interaction with EphB3 in cis and EphB2 in trans.

  4. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuo, Youichirou [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishijima, Shigehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hase, Yoshihiro [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ayako [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tanaka, Atsushi [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimizu, Kikuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-4, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: shimizu@rirc.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of {gamma}-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by {gamma}-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C {sup {yields}} T:A, and all the transitions were G:C {sup {yields}} A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by {gamma}-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene.

  5. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); N. Mitra (Nandita); F. Wan (Fei); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); L. McGuffog (Lesley); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Kushnir (Anya); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); R. Berger (Raanan); J. Zidan (Jamal); E. Friedman (Eitan); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); D. Huo (Dezheng); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); S. Chan (Salina); K. Odunsi (Kunle); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.M. Domchek (Susan); B.K. Arun (Banu); K.H. Lu (Karen); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; E.B. Ross (Eric); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Ramon Y Cajal; A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); J. Godino (Javier); M.I. Tejada; M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); S.R. Sand (Sharon); A. Fontaine (Annette); A. Savarese (Antonella); B. Pasini (Barbara); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); F. Vignolo-Lutati (Francesca); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Genuardi (Maurizio); P. Radice (Paolo); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); V. Gismondi (Viviana); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); D. Torres (Diana); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); S. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Adlard; A. Donaldson (Alan); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P. Sharma (Priyanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Becker (Alexandra); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); C. Mundhenke (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); M.C. Fleisch (Markus); C. Sutter (Christian); C.R. Bartram (Claus); N. Dikow (Nicola); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); D. Steinemann (Doris); K. Kast (Karin); M. Beer (Marit); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); F. Damiola (Francesca); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Sobol (Hagay); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. de Paepe (Anne); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); K. De Leeneer (Kim); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakely (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); A. Romero (Atocha); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); J.J. Gille (Johan); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.M. Kets; M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P. Devilee (Peter); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Kwong (Ava); E. Olah; J. Papp (Janos); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Darder (Esther); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Menkiszak (Janusz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); J. Simard (Jacques); R. Laframboise (Rachel); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E. Alducci (Elisa); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.H. Lee (Min Hyuk); S.K. Park (Sue); S.-W. Kim (Sung-Won); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); L. Guidugli (Lucia); X. Wang (Xianshu); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Foretova (Lenka); J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); N. Kauff (Noah); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Andreas); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.E. Toland (Amanda); L. Senter (Leigha); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); P. Aretini (Paolo); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); C.G. Selkirk (Christina); P.J. Hulick (Peter); I.L. Andrulis (Irene)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. Objective: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study ofwomen whowere

  6. Evaluation of visual impairment in Usher syndrome 1b and Usher syndrome 2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Ronald J E; Huygen, Patrick L M; Orten, Dana J; Wagenaar, Mariette; van Aarem, Annelies; Kremer, Hannie; Kimberling, William J; Cremers, Cor W R J; Deutman, August F

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate visual impairment in Usher syndrome 1b (USH1b) and Usher syndrome 2a (USH2a). We carried out a retrospective study of 19 USH1b patients and 40 USH2a patients. Cross-sectional regression analyses of the functional acuity score (FAS), functional field score (FFS) and functional vision score (FVS) related to age were performed. Statistical tests relating to regression lines and Student's t-test were used to compare between (sub)groups of patients. Parts of the available individual longitudinal data were used to obtain individual estimates of progressive deterioration and compare these to those obtained with cross-sectional analysis. Results were compared between subgroups of USH2a patients pertaining to combinations of different types of mutations. Cross-sectional analyses revealed significant deterioration of the FAS (0.7% per year), FFS (1.0% per year) and FVS (1.5% per year) with advancing age in both patient groups, without a significant difference between the USH1b and USH2a patients. Individual estimates of the deterioration rates were substantially and significantly higher than the cross-sectional estimates in some USH2a cases, including values of about 5% per year (or even higher) for the FAS (age 35-50 years), 3-4% per year for the FFS and 4-5% per year for the FVS (age > 20 years). There was no difference in functional vision score behaviour detected between subgroups of patients pertaining to different biallelic combinations of specific types of mutations. The FAS, FFS and FVS deteriorated significantly by 0.7-1.5% per year according to cross-sectional linear regression analysis in both USH1b and USH2a patients. Higher deterioration rates (3-5% per year) in any of these scores were attained, according to longitudinal data collected from individual USH2a patients. Score behaviour was similar across the patient groups and across different biallelic combinations of various types of mutations. However, more elaborate studies, preferably covering

  7. Mutation analysis of the negative regulator cyclin G2 in gastric cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Key words: Cyclin G2, gastric cancer, negative regulator, mutation screen. INTRODUCTION ... cerebellum, thymus, spleen, prostate, kidney and the immune ..... and B cell antigen receptor-mediated cell cycle arrest. J. Biol.

  8. Gene Mutation Profiles in Primary Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Central Nervous System: Next Generation Sequencing Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic Balint, Milena; Jelicic, Jelena; Mihaljevic, Biljana; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Balint, Bela; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Tosic, Natasa; Marjanovic, Irena; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Raicevic, Sava; Bila, Jelena; Antic, Darko; Andjelic, Bosko; Pavlovic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a potential primary central nervous system lymphoma-specific genomic signature that differs from the systemic form of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been suggested, but is still controversial. We investigated 19 patients with primary DLBCL of central nervous system (DLBCL CNS) using the TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (TSACP) for 48 cancer-related genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analyses have revealed that over 80% of potentially protein-changing mutations were located in eight genes (CTNNB1, PIK3CA, PTEN, ATM, KRAS, PTPN11, TP53 and JAK3), pointing to the potential role of these genes in lymphomagenesis. TP53 was the only gene harboring mutations in all 19 patients. In addition, the presence of mutated TP53 and ATM genes correlated with a higher total number of mutations in other analyzed genes. Furthermore, the presence of mutated ATM correlated with poorer event-free survival (EFS) (p = 0.036). The presence of the mutated SMO gene correlated with earlier disease relapse (p = 0.023), inferior event-free survival (p = 0.011) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.017), while mutations in the PTEN gene were associated with inferior OS (p = 0.048). Our findings suggest that the TP53 and ATM genes could be involved in the molecular pathophysiology of primary DLBCL CNS, whereas mutations in the PTEN and SMO genes could affect survival regardless of the initial treatment approach. PMID:27164089

  9. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2......Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  10. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R; Ellis, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    Data from 8 breast cancer genome-sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized 13 HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture, and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGF receptor (EGFR) exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings show that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. We show that the majority of HER2 somatic mutations in breast cancer patients are activating mutations that likely drive tumorigenesis. Several patients had mutations that are resistant to the reversible HER2 inhibitor lapatinib, but are sensitive to the irreversible HER2 inhibitor, neratinib. Our results suggest that patients with HER2 mutation–positive breast cancers could benefit from existing HER2-targeted drugs.

  11. Age-related mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion and malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D; Johnson, Kimberly J; Wendl, Michael C; McMichael, Joshua F; Schmidt, Heather K; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Welch, John S; Link, Daniel C; Walter, Matthew J; Mardis, Elaine R; Dipersio, John F; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J; Ding, Li

    2014-12-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) provides a unique resource for comprehensive discovery of mutations and genes in blood that may contribute to the clonal expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Here, we analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals from TCGA and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia and/or lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5-6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion.

  12. Accelerated inactivation of the L-type calcium current due to a mutation in CACNB2b underlies Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Marieb, Mark; Pfeiffer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    S in which loss of function is caused by accelerated inactivation of I(Ca). The proband, a 32 year old male, displayed a Type I ST segment elevation in two right precordial ECG leads following a procainamide challenge. EP study was positive with induction of polymorphic VT/VF. Interrogation of implanted ICD...... significantly faster in mutant channels between 0 and + 20 mV. Action potential voltage clamp experiments showed that total charge was reduced by almost half compared to WT. We report the first BrS mutation in CaCNB2b resulting in accelerated inactivation of L-type calcium channel current. Our results suggest...

  13. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  14. Specific heat measurements of TiB2 and 6LiF from 0.5 to 30 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Brian E.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Woodfield, Brian F.; Burger, Arnold; Roy, Utupal N.; Lamberti, Vincent; Bell, Zane W.

    2005-01-01

    The specific heats of TiB 2 and 6 LiF have been measured from 0.5 to 30 K as part of a larger project in the construction of a neutron spectrometer. For this application, the measured specific heats were used to extrapolate the specific heats down to 0.1 K with lattice, electronic, and Schottky equations for the respective samples. The resultant specific heat values at 0.1 K for TiB 2 and 6 LiF are 4.08 x 10 -4 ± 0.27 x 10 -4 J/K/mol and 9.19 x 10 -9 ± 0.15 x 10 -9 J/K/mol, respectively

  15. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutated cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in the American quarter horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudko Sergei P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperelastosis cutis is an inherited autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder. Affected horses are characterized by hyperextensible skin, scarring, and severe lesions along the back. The disorder is caused by a mutation in cyclophilin B. Results The crystal structures of both wild-type and mutated (Gly6->Arg horse cyclophilin B are presented. The mutation neither affects the overall fold of the enzyme nor impairs the catalytic site structure. Instead, it locally rearranges the flexible N-terminal end of the polypeptide chain and also makes it more rigid. Conclusions Interactions of the mutated cyclophilin B with a set of endoplasmic reticulum-resident proteins must be affected.

  16. Doc2B acts as a calcium sensor for vesicle priming requiring synaptotagmin-1, Munc13-2 and SNAREs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houy, Sébastien; Groffen, Alexander J; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Doc2B is a cytosolic protein with binding sites for Munc13 and Tctex-1 (dynein light chain), and two C2-domains that bind to phospholipids, Ca2+ and SNAREs. Whether Doc2B functions as a calcium sensor akin to synaptotagmins, or in other calcium-independent or calcium-dependent capacities is debated....... We here show by mutation and overexpression that Doc2B plays distinct roles in two sequential priming steps in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells. Mutating Ca2+-coordinating aspartates in the C2A-domain localizes Doc2B permanently at the plasma membrane, and renders an upstream priming step Ca2......+-independent, whereas a separate function in downstream priming depends on SNARE-binding, Ca2+-binding to the C2B-domain of Doc2B, interaction with ubMunc13-2 and the presence of synaptotagmin-1. Another function of Doc2B - inhibition of release during sustained calcium elevations - depends on an overlapping...

  17. Association of Type and Location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations With Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Chan, Salina B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Arun, Banu K.; Lu, Karen H.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B.; Whittemore, Alice S.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Bobolis, Kristie A.; Sand, Sharon R.; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C. R.; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V.; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J. Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Kets, Carolien M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K.; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G.; Hulick, Peter J.; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study of women who were ascertained

  18. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Mitra, N.; Wan, F.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Healey, S.; McGuffog, L.; Mazoyer, S.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Nathanson, K.L.; Laitman, Y.; Kushnir, A.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Berger, R.; Zidan, J.; Friedman, E.; Ehrencrona, H.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Einbeigi, Z.; Loman, N.; Harbst, K.; Rantala, J.; Melin, B.; Huo, D.; Olopade, O.I.; Seldon, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Chan, S.B.; Odunsi, K.; Gayther, S.A.; Domchek, S.M.; Arun, B.K.; Lu, K.H.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Ross, E.; Daly, M.B.; Whittemore, A.S.; John, E.M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Hansen, T.; Ramon Y Cajal, T.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Godino, J.; Tejada, M.I.; Duran, M.; Weitzel, J.N.; Bobolis, K.A.; Sand, S.R.; Fontaine, A.; Savarese, A.; Pasini, B.; Peissel, B.; Bonanni, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Vignolo-Lutati, F.; Scuvera, G.; Giannini, G.; Bernard, L.; Genuardi, M.; Radice, P.; Dolcetti, R.; Manoukian, S.; Pensotti, V.; Gismondi, V.; Yannoukakos, D.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.; Torres, D.; Rashid, M.U.; Hamann, U.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Kets, M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained

  19. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained...

  20. Mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex gene ARID1B cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Gijs W E; Aten, Emmelien; Sun, Yu; Almomani, Rowida; Gilissen, Christian; Nielsen, Maartje; Kant, Sarina G; Snoeck, Irina N; Peeters, Els A J; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Wessels, Marja W; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Breuning, Martijn H; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Haeringen, Arie; Kriek, Marjolein

    2012-03-18

    We identified de novo truncating mutations in ARID1B in three individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) by exome sequencing. Array-based copy-number variation (CNV) analysis in 2,000 individuals with intellectual disability revealed deletions encompassing ARID1B in 3 subjects with phenotypes partially overlapping that of CSS. Taken together with published data, these results indicate that haploinsufficiency of the ARID1B gene, which encodes an epigenetic modifier of chromatin structure, is an important cause of CSS and is potentially a common cause of intellectual disability and speech impairment.

  1. JAK2V617F mutation in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Secondary malignancies, particularly solid tumors, are common in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, but association of myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the same patient is very rare. Case Outline. We report of a 67-year-old man with B-cell chronic lymphoid leukemia (B-CLL who developed primary myelofibrosis (PMF nine years after initial diagnosis. Patient received alkylation agents and purine analogue, which can be a predisposing factor for the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK2V617F mutation was not present initially at the time of CLL diagnosis, but was found after nine years when PMF occurred, which indicates that B-CLL and PMF represent two separate clonal origin neoplasms. Conclusion. Pathogenic mechanisms for the development of myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative neoplasms in the same patient are unknown. Further research is needed to determine whether these malignancies originate from two different cell clones or arise from the same pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41004

  2. A Novel Mutation in Isoform 3 of the Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump Impairs Cellular Ca2+ Homeostasis in a Patient with Cerebellar Ataxia and Laminin Subunit 1α Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Shimony, Joshua; Vineyard, Marisa; Frizzarin, Martina; Zanni, Ginevra; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Brini, Marisa; Shinawi, Marwan; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2015-06-26

    The particular importance of Ca(2+) signaling to neurons demands its precise regulation within their cytoplasm. Isoform 3 of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (the PMCA3 pump), which is highly expressed in brain and cerebellum, plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal Ca(2+). A genetic defect of the PMCA3 pump has been described in one family with X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia. Here we describe a novel mutation in the ATP2B3 gene in a patient with global developmental delay, generalized hypotonia and cerebellar ataxia. The mutation (a R482H replacement) impairs the Ca(2+) ejection function of the pump. It reduces the ability of the pump expressed in model cells to control Ca(2+) transients generated by cell stimulation and impairs its Ca(2+) extrusion function under conditions of low resting cytosolic Ca(2+) as well. In silico analysis of the structural effect of the mutation suggests a reduced stabilization of the portion of the pump surrounding the mutated residue in the Ca(2+)-bound state. The patient also carries two missense mutations in LAMA1, encoding laminin subunit 1α. On the basis of the family pedigree of the patient, the presence of both PMCA3 and laminin subunit 1α mutations appears to be necessary for the development of the disease. Considering the observed defect in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and the previous finding that PMCAs act as digenic modulators in Ca(2+)-linked pathologies, the PMCA3 dysfunction along with LAMA1 mutations could act synergistically to cause the neurological phenotype. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A Novel Mutation in Isoform 3 of the Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump Impairs Cellular Ca2+ Homeostasis in a Patient with Cerebellar Ataxia and Laminin Subunit 1α Mutations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Shimony, Joshua; Vineyard, Marisa; Frizzarin, Martina; Zanni, Ginevra; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Brini, Marisa; Shinawi, Marwan; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The particular importance of Ca2+ signaling to neurons demands its precise regulation within their cytoplasm. Isoform 3 of the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (the PMCA3 pump), which is highly expressed in brain and cerebellum, plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal Ca2+. A genetic defect of the PMCA3 pump has been described in one family with X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia. Here we describe a novel mutation in the ATP2B3 gene in a patient with global developmental delay, generalized hypotonia and cerebellar ataxia. The mutation (a R482H replacement) impairs the Ca2+ ejection function of the pump. It reduces the ability of the pump expressed in model cells to control Ca2+ transients generated by cell stimulation and impairs its Ca2+ extrusion function under conditions of low resting cytosolic Ca2+ as well. In silico analysis of the structural effect of the mutation suggests a reduced stabilization of the portion of the pump surrounding the mutated residue in the Ca2+-bound state. The patient also carries two missense mutations in LAMA1, encoding laminin subunit 1α. On the basis of the family pedigree of the patient, the presence of both PMCA3 and laminin subunit 1α mutations appears to be necessary for the development of the disease. Considering the observed defect in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis and the previous finding that PMCAs act as digenic modulators in Ca2+-linked pathologies, the PMCA3 dysfunction along with LAMA1 mutations could act synergistically to cause the neurological phenotype. PMID:25953895

  4. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence JN; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAKS2580F or ERBB2H473Y or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IPE805G were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ+ T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27−CD45RA−) and less-differentiated (CD27+CD45RA+) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens. PMID:26945006

  5. Vaccination with canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) protects against challenge with virulent CPV-2b and CPV-2c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedek, Elisabeth M; Schmidt, Holger; Sture, Gordon H; Raue, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in canine parvovirus (CPV) field isolates have created concerns regarding the ability of vaccines containing CPV-2 to protect against infection with the newly identified antigenic types CPV-2b and CPV-2c. To address this concern, the efficacy of CPV-2 strain NL-35-D currently in use as a commercial vaccine was demonstrated against an oral challenge with CPV-2b and CPV-2c, respectively. Clinically healthy specific pathogen free Beagle dogs were either vaccinated or treated with water for injection first at 8-9 weeks of age and again at 11-12 weeks of age. All dogs were challenged either with CPV-2b or CPV-2c three weeks after the second vaccination. During the two week period following challenge, clinical signs, white blood cell counts, serology by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and serum neutralisation tests, and virus shedding by haemagglutination test were assessed. All control dogs developed clinical signs of parvovirosis (including pyrexia and leucopenia) and shed virus. Vaccinated dogs seroconverted (HI titres > or =80), remained healthy throughout the study and shed more than 100 times less virus than controls. In conclusion, vaccination with the low passage, high titre CPV-2 strain NL-35-D cross-protects dogs against virulent challenges with CPV-2b or CPV-2c by preventing disease and substantially reducing viral shedding.

  6. Quantification of sequence exchange events between PMS2 and PMS2CL provides a basis for improved mutation scanning of Lynch syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Klift, Heleen M; Tops, Carli M J; Bik, Elsa C; Boogaard, Merel W; Borgstein, Anne-Marijke; Hansson, Kerstin B M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Green, Andrew; Hes, Frederik J; Izatt, Louise; van Hest, Liselotte P; Alonso, Angel M; Vriends, Annette H J T; Wagner, Anja; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Vasen, Hans F A; Morreau, Hans; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T

    2010-05-01

    Heterozygous mutations in PMS2 are involved in Lynch syndrome, whereas biallelic mutations are found in Constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency syndrome patients. Mutation detection is complicated by the occurrence of sequence exchange events between the duplicated regions of PMS2 and PMS2CL. We investigated the frequency of such events with a nonspecific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy, co-amplifying both PMS2 and PMS2CL sequences. This allowed us to score ratios between gene and pseudogene-specific nucleotides at 29 PSV sites from exon 11 to the end of the gene. We found sequence transfer at all investigated PSVs from intron 12 to the 3' end of the gene in 4 to 52% of DNA samples. Overall, sequence exchange between PMS2 and PMS2CL was observed in 69% (83/120) of individuals. We demonstrate that mutation scanning with PMS2-specific PCR primers and MLPA probes, designed on PSVs, in the 3' duplicated region is unreliable, and present an RNA-based mutation detection strategy to improve reliability. Using this strategy, we found 19 different putative pathogenic PMS2 mutations. Four of these (21%) are lying in the region with frequent sequence transfer and are missed or called incorrectly as homozygous with several PSV-based mutation detection methods. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A novel CYP27B1 mutation causes a feline vitamin D-dependent rickets type IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Robert A; Ellis, Melanie R; Grahn, Jennifer C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-08-01

    A 12-week-old domestic cat presented at a local veterinary clinic with hypocalcemia and skeletal abnormalities suggestive of rickets. Osteomalacia (rickets) is a disease caused by impaired bone mineralization leading to an increased prevalence of fractures and deformity. Described in a variety of species, rickets is most commonly caused by vitamin D or calcium deficiencies owing to both environmental and or genetic abnormalities. Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR-1A) is a result of the enzymatic pathway defect caused by mutations in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3)-1-alpha-hydroxylase gene [cytochrome P27 B1 (CYP27B1)]. Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D(3), regulates calcium homeostasis, which requires sufficient dietary calcium availability and correct hormonal function for proper bone growth and maintenance. Patient calcitriol concentrations were low while calcidiol levels were normal suggestive of VDDR-1A. The entire DNA coding sequencing of CYP27B1 was evaluated. The affected cat was wild type for previously identified VDDR-1A causative mutations. However, six novel mutations were identified, one of which was a nonsense mutation at G637T in exon 4. The exon 4 G637T nonsense mutation results in a premature protein truncation, changing a glutamic acid to a stop codon, E213X, likely causing the clinical presentation of rickets. The previously documented genetic mutation resulting in feline VDDR-1A rickets, as well as the case presented in this research, result from novel exon 4 CYP27B1 mutations, thus exon 4 should be the initial focus of future sequencing efforts.

  8. A novel gene for Usher syndrome type 2: mutations in the long isoform of whirlin are associated with retinitis pigmentosa and sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebermann, Inga; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Becirovic, Elvir; Lamprecht, Jürgen; Jurklies, Bernhard; Millán, José M; Aller, Elena; Mitter, Diana; Bolz, Hanno

    2007-04-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, variable vestibular dysfunction, and visual impairment due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The seven proteins that have been identified for Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) and type 2 (USH2) may interact in a large protein complex. In order to identify novel USH genes, we followed a candidate strategy, assuming that mutations in proteins interacting with this "USH network" may cause Usher syndrome as well. The DFNB31 gene encodes whirlin, a PDZ scaffold protein with expression in both hair cell stereocilia and retinal photoreceptor cells. Whirlin represents an excellent candidate for USH2 because it binds to Usherin (USH2A) and VLGR1b (USH2C). Genotyping of microsatellite markers specific for the DFNB31 gene locus on chromosome 9q32 was performed in a German USH2 family that had been excluded for all known USH loci. Patients showed common haplotypes. Sequence analysis of DFNB31 revealed compound heterozygosity for a nonsense mutation, p.Q103X, in exon 1, and a mutation in the splice donor site of exon 2, c.837+1G>A. DFNB31 mutations appear to be a rare cause of Usher syndrome, since no mutations were identified in an additional 96 USH2 patients. While mutations in the C-terminal half of whirlin have previously been reported in non-syndromic deafness (DFNB31), both alterations identified in our USH2 family affect the long protein isoform. We propose that mutations causing Usher syndrome are probably restricted to exons 1-6 that are specific for the long isoform and probably crucial for retinal function. We describe a novel genetic subtype for Usher syndrome, which we named USH2D and which is caused by mutations in whirlin. Moreover, this is the first case of USH2 that is allelic to non-syndromic deafness.

  9. Surface Expression, Function, and Pharmacology of Disease-Associated Mutations in the Membrane Domain of the Human GluN2B Subunit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyklický, Vojtěch; Krausová, Barbora; Černý, Jiří; Ladislav, Marek; Smejkalová, Tereza; Kysilov, Bohdan; Kořínek, Miloslav; Danačíková, Šárka; Horák, Martin; Chodounská, Hana; Kudová, Eva; Vyklický ml., Ladislav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 11, Apr 6 (2018), č. článku 110. ISSN 1662-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-02300S; GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-03913Y; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29370A; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMDA receptor * GluN2B * de novo missense mutations * neuropsychiatric disorder * neurosteroids Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.076, year: 2016

  10. Discovery and prioritization of somatic mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by whole-exome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Lohr, Jens G.; Stojanov, Petar; Lawrence, Michael S.; Auclair, Daniel; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sougnez, Carrie; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Knoechel, Birgit; Asmann, Yan W.; Slager, Susan L.; Novak, Anne J.; Dogan, Ahmet; Ansell, Stephen M.; Link, Brian K.; Zou, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    To gain insight into the genomic basis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we performed massively parallel whole-exome sequencing of 55 primary tumor samples from patients with DLBCL and matched normal tissue. We identified recurrent mutations in genes that are well known to be functionally relevant in DLBCL, including MYD88, CARD11, EZH2, and CREBBP. We also identified somatic mutations in genes for which a functional role in DLBCL has not been previously suspected. These genes include...

  11. A novel mutation in the nerve-specific 5'UTR of the GJB1 gene causes X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common cause of CMT, and is usually caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene which codes for connexin 32 (CX32). CX32 has three tissue-specific promoters, P1 which is specific for liver and pancreas, P1a specific for liver, oocytes and embryonic stem cells, and P2 which is nerve-specific. Over 300 mutations have been described in GJB1, spread throughout the coding region. We describe two families with X-linked inheritance and a phenotype consistent with CMT1X who did not have mutations in the GJB1 coding region. The non-coding region of GJB1 was sequenced and an upstream exon-splicing variant found at approximately - 373G>A which segregated with the disease in both families and was not present in controls. This substitution is located at the last base of the nerve-specific 5\\'UTR and thus may disrupt splicing of the nerve-specific transcript. Online consensus splice-site programs predict a reduced score for the mutant sequence vs. the normal sequence. It is likely that other mutations within the GJB1 non-coding regions account for the CMT1X families who do not have coding region mutations.

  12. Ia-restricted B-B cell interaction. I. The MHC haplotype of bone marrow cells present during B cell ontogeny dictates the self-recognition specificity of B cells in the polyclonal B cell activation by a B cell differentiation factor, B151-TRF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hamaoka, T.

    1987-01-01

    We have demonstrated that B cell recognition of Ia molecules is involved in polyclonal B cell differentiation by B151-TRF2. The present study was undertaken to examine the Ia recognition specificity of B151-TRF2-responsive B cells in fully major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-allogeneic P1----P2, semiallogeneic P1----(P1 x P2)F1, and double donor (P1 + P2)----(P1 x P2)F1 and (P1 + P2)----P1 radiation bone marrow chimeras. The B cells from both P1----P2 and P1----(P1 x P2)F1 chimeras could give rise to in vitro immunoglobulin M-producing cells upon stimulation with B151-TRF2 comparable in magnitude to that of normal P1 B cells, and their responses were inhibited by anti-I-AP1 but not by anti-I-AP2 monoclonal antibody even in the presence of mitomycin C-treated T cell-depleted P2 spleen cells as auxiliary cells. In contrast, the B151-TRF2 responses of P1 B cells isolated from both (P1 + P2)----(P1 x P2)F1 and (P1 + P2)----P1 double bone marrow chimeras became sensitive to the inhibition of not only anti-I-AP1 but also anti-I-AP2 monoclonal antibody only when the culture was conducted in the presence of P2 auxiliary cells, demonstrating that they adaptively differentiate to recognize as self-structures allogeneic as well as syngeneic Ia molecules. Moreover, the experiments utilizing B cells from H-2-congenic mice and B cell hybridoma clones as auxiliary cells revealed that B151-TRF2-responsive B cells recognize Ia molecules expressed on B cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that B151-TRF2-responsive B cells recognize Ia molecules expressed by B cells as self-structures and that their self-recognition specificity is dictated by the MHC haplotype of bone marrow cells present during the B cell ontogeny but not by the MHC haplotype of a radiation-resistant host environment

  13. A mitochondrial cytochrome b mutation causing severe respiratory chain enzyme deficiency in humans and yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakely, E.L.; Mitchell, A.L.; Fisher, N.; Meunier, B.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Schaefer, A.M.; Jackson, M.J.; Turnbull, D.M.; Taylor, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the majority of disease-related mitochondrial DNA mutations exhibit significant biochemical and clinical heterogeneity, mutations within the mitochondrially encoded human cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) are almost exclusively associated with isolated complex III deficiency in muscle and a clinical

  14. Alteration of the SETBP1 gene and splicing pathway genes SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hye-Ran; Baek, Hee-Jo; Kook, Hoon; Cho, Duck; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent somatic SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) and splicing pathway gene mutations have recently been found in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. These mutations have been comprehensively analyzed in adult AML, but not in childhood AML. We investigated possible alteration of the SETBP1, splicing factor 3B subunit 1 (SF3B1), U2 small nuclear RNA auxiliary factor 1 (U2AF1), and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) genes in childhood AML. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed to reveal chromosomal and genetic alterations. Sequence alterations in the SETBP1, SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes were examined by using direct sequencing in a cohort of 53 childhood AML patients. Childhood AML patients did not harbor any recurrent SETBP1 gene mutations, although our study did identify a synonymous mutation in one patient. None of the previously reported aberrations in the mutational hotspot of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were identified in any of the 53 patients. Alterations of the SETBP1 gene or SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes are not common genetic events in childhood AML, implying that the mutations are unlikely to exert a driver effect in myeloid leukemogenesis during childhood.

  15. Clone-specific MYD88 L265P and CXCR4 mutation status can provide clinical utility in suspected Waldenström macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnworth, Bettina; Wang, Zhixing; Singleton, Timothy P; Bennington, Angela; Fritschle, Wayne; Bennington, Richard; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R; Zehentner, Barbara K

    2016-12-01

    MYD88 L265P, a diagnostic marker for lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) can also be detected in other hematopoietic malignancies. We demonstrate a novel approach to increase the specificity of this marker for WM/LPL diagnosis by combining flow cytometric cell sorting with molecular analysis. Clonal B-lymphocyte and co-occurring clonal plasma cell populations of low-grade B-cell lymphomas were sorted by flow cytometry and analyzed for immunoglobulin gene rearrangements (PCR), and for MYD88 and CXCR4 mutations. Identical clonal origin was confirmed by PCR for 21 LPL/WM cases and MYD88 L265P was detected in both B-cell and plasma cell fractions. 9/20 other B-cell lymphomas with identical light chain restriction on B-cells and plasma cells were genotypically identical by PCR and MYD88 L265P was detected in both cell fractions in 7/9 whereas in 11/20 specimens with different clonal origin, MYD88 L265P was absent (5/11), or only found in B-lymphocytes (4/11), or plasma cells (2/11). CXCR4 mutations were detected in 17/39 cases, but missed in 63% of these without cell sorting. Confirming MYD88L265P in both B-cells and plasma cell fractions can provide a novel and powerful discriminator to distinguish LPL/WM from phenotypically similar disorders. Furthermore, this approach significantly increases CXCR4 detection sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The M142T mutation causes B3 phenotype: three cases and an in vitro expression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Duck; Shin, Dong-Jun; Yazer, Mark Harris; Ihm, Chun-Hwa; Hur, Young-Moon; Kee, Seung-Jung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Shin, Myung-Geun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook

    2010-02-01

    The B3 phenotype is the most common B subtype in Korea. The B305 allele (425 T>C, M142T) was first reported in 2 Chinese individuals; however, it has not yet been reported in the Koreans, and the impact of the M142T mutation on the expression of the B3 phenotype has also not been studied. To resolve an ABO discrepancy between a group O neonate and her group O father and A(1)B(3) mother, blood samples from these individuals and other family members were referred to our laboratory for ABO gene analysis. The B305 allele was discovered in the neonate (B305/O01), her mother (A102/ B305), and her maternal aunt (B305/O02), while her father was typed as O01/O02. Transient transfection experiments were performed in HeLa cells using the B305 allele synthesized by site-directed mutagenesis; flow cytometric analysis revealed that this transfect expressed 35.5% of the total B antigen produced by the B101 allele transfect. For comparison, Bx01 allele transfects were also created, and they expressed 11.4% of the total B antigen expressed on the surface of B101 transfects. These experiments demonstrate that the M142T (425 T>C) mutation is responsible for the B subtype phenotype produced by the B305 allele.

  17. Mutations in rpoB and katG genes in Mycobacterium isolates from the Southeast of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Zenteno-Cuevas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent mutations associated with rifampin and isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium are the substitutions at codons 531 and 315 in the rpoB and katG genes, respectively. Hence, the aim of this study was to characterize these mutations in Mycobacterium isolates from patients suspected to be infected with drug-resistant (DR pulmonary tuberculosis (TB in Veracruz, Mexico. Drug susceptibility testing of 25 clinical isolates revealed that five were susceptible while 20 (80% were DR (15% of the annual prevalence for Veracruz. Of the DR isolates, 15 (75% were resistant to rifampin, 17 (85% to isoniazid and 15 (75% were resistant to both drugs (MDR. Sequencing analysis performed in the isolates showed that 14 (93% had mutations in the rpoB gene; seven of these (47% exhibited a mutation at 531 (S[L. Ten (58% of the 20 resistant isolates showed mutations in katG; nine (52% of these 10 exhibited a mutation at 315 (S[T. In conclusion, the DR profile of the isolates suggests a significant number of different DR-TB strains with a low frequency of mutation at codons 531 and 315 in rpoB and katG, respectively. This result leads us to consider different regions of the same genes, as well as other genes for further analysis, which is important if a genetic-based diagnosis of DR-TB is to be developed for this region.

  18. Spectrum of mutations in RARS-T patients includes TET2 and ASXL1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna M; Makishima, Hideki; Bodo, Juraj; Bejanyan, Nelli; Hsi, Eric D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2010-08-01

    While a majority of patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis harbor JAK2V617F and rarely MPLW515L, JAK2/MPL-negative cases constitute a diagnostic problem. 23 RARS-T cases were investigated applying immunohistochemical phospho-STAT5, sequencing and SNP-A-based karyotyping. Based on the association of TET2/ASXL1 mutations with MDS/MPN we studied molecular pattern of these genes. Two patients harbored ASXL1 and another 2 TET2 mutations. Phospho-STAT5 activation was present in one mutated TET2 and ASXL1 case. JAK2V617F/MPLW515L mutations were absent in TET2/ASXL1 mutants, indicating that similar clinical phenotype can be produced by various MPN-associated mutations and that additional unifying lesions may be present in RARS-T. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The PTPN11 loss-of-function mutation Q510E-Shp2 causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by dysregulating mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Christine; Fine, Deborah M; Edwards, Michelle A; Reeb, Ashley N; Krenz, Maike

    2012-01-01

    The identification of mutations in PTPN11 (encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2) in families with congenital heart disease has facilitated mechanistic studies of various cardiovascular defects. However, the roles of normal and mutant Shp2 in the developing heart are still poorly understood. Furthermore, it remains unclear how Shp2 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations cause LEOPARD Syndrome (also termed Noonan Syndrome with multiple lentigines), which is characterized by congenital heart defects such as pulmonary valve stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In normal hearts, Shp2 controls cardiomyocyte size by regulating signaling through protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We hypothesized that Shp2 LOF mutations dysregulate this pathway, resulting in HCM. For our studies, we chose the Shp2 mutation Q510E, a dominant-negative LOF mutation associated with severe early onset HCM. Newborn mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of Q510E-Shp2 starting before birth displayed increased cardiomyocyte sizes, heart-to-body weight ratios, interventricular septum thickness, and cardiomyocyte disarray. In 3-mo-old hearts, interstitial fibrosis was detected. Echocardiographically, ventricular walls were thickened and contractile function was depressed. In ventricular tissue samples, signaling through Akt/mTOR was hyperactivated, indicating that the presence of Q510E-Shp2 led to upregulation of this pathway. Importantly, rapamycin treatment started shortly after birth rescued the Q510E-Shp2-induced phenotype in vivo. If rapamycin was started at 6 wk of age, HCM was also ameliorated. We also generated a second mouse model in which cardiomyocyte-specific Q510E-Shp2 overexpression started after birth. In contrast to the first model, these mice did not develop HCM. In summary, our studies establish a role for mTOR signaling in HCM caused by Q510E-Shp2. Q510E-Shp2 overexpression in the cardiomyocyte population alone was sufficient to

  20. Identification of three subgroups of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia based upon mutations of BCL-6 and IgV genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, D; Fais, F; Vivenza, D; Migliaretti, G; Chiorazzi, N; Gaidano, G; Ferrarini, M

    2000-05-01

    Although B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) has been traditionally viewed as a tumor of virgin B cells, this notion has been recently questioned by data suggesting that a fraction of B-CLL derives from antigen experienced B cells. In order to further clarify the histogenetic derivation of this lymphoproliferation, we have analyzed the DNA sequences of the 5' non-coding region of BCL-6 proto-oncogene in 28 cases of B-CLL. Mutations of BCL-6 proto-oncogene, a zinc finger transcription factor implicated in lymphoma development, represent a histogenetic marker of B cell transit through the germinal center (GC) and occur frequently in B cell malignancies derived from GC or post-GC B cells. For comparison, the same tumor panel was analyzed for somatic mutations of the rearranged immunoglobulin variable (IgV) genes, which are known to be acquired at the time of B cell transit through the GC. Sequence analyses of BCL-6 and IgV genes allowed the definition of three groups of B-CLL. Group I B-CLL displayed mutations of both BCL-6 and IgV genes (10/28; 36%). Group II B-CLL displayed mutated IgV genes, but a germline BCL-6 gene (5/28; 18%). Finally, group III B-CLL included the remaining cases (13/28; 46%) that were characterized by the absence of somatic mutations of both BCL-6 and IgV genes. Overall, the distribution of BCL-6 and IgV mutations in B-CLL reinforce the notion that this leukemia is histogenetically heterogeneous and that a substantial subgroup of these lymphoproliferations derives from post-germinal center B cells.

  1. Production of infectious genotype 1b virus particles in cell culture and impairment by replication enhancing mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pietschmann

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV replicons, studies of the intracellular steps of the viral replication cycle became possible. These RNAs are capable of self-amplification in cultured human hepatoma cells, but save for the genotype 2a isolate JFH-1, efficient replication of these HCV RNAs requires replication enhancing mutations (REMs, previously also called cell culture adaptive mutations. These mutations cluster primarily in the central region of non-structural protein 5A (NS5A, but may also reside in the NS3 helicase domain or at a distinct position in NS4B. Most efficient replication has been achieved by combining REMs residing in NS3 with distinct REMs located in NS4B or NS5A. However, in spite of efficient replication of HCV genomes containing such mutations, they do not support production of infectious virus particles. By using the genotype 1b isolate Con1, in this study we show that REMs interfere with HCV assembly. Strongest impairment of virus formation was found with REMs located in the NS3 helicase (E1202G and T1280I as well as NS5A (S2204R, whereas a highly adaptive REM in NS4B still allowed virus production although relative levels of core release were also reduced. We also show that cells transfected with the Con1 wild type genome or the genome containing the REM in NS4B release HCV particles that are infectious both in cell culture and in vivo. Our data provide an explanation for the in vitro and in vivo attenuation of cell culture adapted HCV genomes and may open new avenues for the development of fully competent culture systems covering the therapeutically most relevant HCV genotypes.

  2. Holoprosencephaly: ZIC2 mutation in a case with panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Cayır, Atilla; Doneray, Hakan; Solomon, Benjamin D; Muenke, Maximilian; Yuce, Ihsan; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2014-07-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the brain, results from failed or incomplete separation of the embryonic forebrain (prosencephalon). HPE occurs in approximately 1 in 250 embryos and in about 1 in 10,000 births. It is etiologically heterogeneous, and may be caused by cytogenetic anomalies and teratogenic influences; it occurs as part of a syndrome, or due to heterozygous mutations in 1 of over 10 HPE-associated genes. ZIC2 mutations are the second-most common cause of non-syndromic non-chromosomal HPE (after sonic hedgehog) and occur de novo in 74% of the affected probands. The objective of the study was to describe the first case of ZIC2-related HPE with both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiencies. We report about a 2-year-8-month-old boy who was born as a second child in a non-consanguineous healthy Turkish family. He has the characteristic ZIC2 phenotype: bitemporal narrowing, upslanting palpebral fissures, large ears, short nose with anteverted nares and broad and deep philtrum. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed alobar HPE. During laboratory investigation, his blood sodium level was 158 mmol/L and the specific gravity of his urine was 1.002. Serum osmolarity was 336 mOsm/L and urine osmolality was 135 mOsm/kg. His FT4 was 0.8 ng/dL and TSH was 0.79 mLU/mL. Response to vasopressin confirmed the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus and TRH-stimulating test supported the central hypothyroidism. A frameshift mutation (NM_007129.2:c1091_1092 del, p.Gln364Leufs*2) in the ZIC2 gene was detected. Pituitary insufficiency other than isolated diabetes insipidus is a rare finding of HPE, and occurs most frequently in patients with GLI2 mutations (the phenotype of which typically does not include frank neuroanatomic anomalies such as HPE); ours is the only described patient with a ZIC2 mutation and both anterior and posterior pituitary dysfunction.

  3. A mutation in the HLA-B*2705-restricted NP383-391 epitope affects the human influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia); A.C.M. Boon (Adrianus); N.J. Nieuwkoop; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractViruses can exploit a variety of strategies to evade immune surveillance by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), including the acquisition of mutations in or adjacent to CTL epitopes. Recently, an amino acid substitution (R384G) in an HLA-B*2705-restricted CTL epitope in the influenza A virus

  4. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasquale, Elena B

    2007-01-01

    Mutations have been recently identified in the EphB2 receptor gene in prostate cancer suggesting that EphB2, a member of the large Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family, is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer...

  5. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasquale, Elena B

    2006-01-01

    Mutations have been recently identified in the EphB2 receptor gene in prostate cancer suggesting that EphB2, a member of the large Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family, is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer...

  6. Frequency of CNKSR2 mutation in the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, John A; Burgess, Rosemary; Kivity, Sara; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Afawi, Zaid; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2017-03-01

    Synaptic proteins are critical to neuronal function in the brain, and their deficiency can lead to seizures and cognitive impairments. CNKSR2 (connector enhancer of KSR2) is a synaptic protein involved in Ras signaling-mediated neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation. Mutations in the X-linked gene CNKSR2 have been described in patients with seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits, especially those affecting language. In this study, we sequenced 112 patients with phenotypes within the epilepsy-aphasia spectrum (EAS) to determine the frequency of CNKSR2 mutation within this complex set of disorders. We detected a novel nonsense mutation (c.2314 C>T; p.Arg712*) in one Ashkenazi Jewish family, the male proband of which had a severe epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in sleep (ECSWS). His affected brother also had ECSWS with better outcome, whereas the sister had childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. This mutation segregated in the three affected siblings in an X-linked manner, inherited from their mother who had febrile seizures. Although the frequency of point mutation is low, CNKSR2 sequencing should be considered in families with suspected X-linked EAS because of the specific genetic counseling implications. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Selection and Neutral Mutations Drive Pervasive Mutability Losses in Long-Lived Anti-HIV B-Cell Lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marcos C; Zinder, Daniel; Cobey, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Abstract High-affinity antibodies arise within weeks of infection from the evolution of B-cell receptors under selection to improve antigen recognition. This rapid adaptation is enabled by the distribution of highly mutable “hotspot” motifs in B-cell receptor genes. High mutability in antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions [CDRs]) creates variation in binding affinity, whereas low mutability in structurally important regions (framework regions [FRs]) may reduce the frequency of destabilizing mutations. During the response, loss of mutational hotspots and changes in their distribution across CDRs and FRs are predicted to compromise the adaptability of B-cell receptors, yet the contributions of different mechanisms to gains and losses of hotspots remain unclear. We reconstructed changes in anti-HIV B-cell receptor sequences and show that mutability losses were ∼56% more frequent than gains in both CDRs and FRs, with the higher relative mutability of CDRs maintained throughout the response. At least 21% of the total mutability loss was caused by synonymous mutations. However, nonsynonymous substitutions caused most (79%) of the mutability loss in CDRs. Because CDRs also show strong positive selection, this result suggests that selection for mutations that increase binding affinity contributed to loss of mutability in antigen-binding regions. Although recurrent adaptation to evolving viruses could indirectly select for high mutation rates, we found no evidence of indirect selection to increase or retain hotspots. Our results suggest mutability losses are intrinsic to both the neutral and adaptive evolution of B-cell populations and might constrain their adaptation to rapidly evolving pathogens such as HIV and influenza. PMID:29688540

  8. Human aldolase B subunit-specific radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, M.; Alpert, E.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the direct quantification of aldolase B in human serum and tissues. The method is a double-antibody radioimmunoassay technique using radioiodinated aldolase B homopolymer as ligand, chicken antibodies to aldolase B and rabbit antibodies to chicken IgG. This radioimmunoassay was shown to be specific for the aldolase B subunit, with no cross-reactivity with either human aldolase A subunit or homopolymeric human aldolase C (C 4 ). The lowest measurable amount by this method was 2 ng/ml. Aldolase B is predominantly found in normal liver tissue, with relatively-high aldolase B levels also observed in kidney. Aldolase B levels in the serum obtained from 11 normal subjects ranged from 23 to 38 ng/ml, with a mean of 28.5 +- 9.2 (S.D.) ng/ml. Almost all of patients with hepatitis had serum aldolase B levels greater than 30 ng/ml. In cancer patients, serum aldolase B was slightly elevated in patients with metastatic liver cancer and primary lever cell carcinoma, whereas no elevation of serum aldolase B was shown in patients without liver metastasis. (Auth.)

  9. The cytochrome b p.278Y>C mutation causative of a multisystem disorder enhances superoxide production and alters supramolecular interactions of respiratory chain complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelli, Anna; Tropeano, Concetta V; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    , the examination of respiratory supercomplexes revealed that the amounts of CIII dimer and III2IV1 were reduced, whereas those of I1III2IVn slightly increased. We therefore suggest that the deleterious effects of p.278Y>C mutation on cytochrome b are palliated when CIII is assembled into the supercomplexes I1III2......IVn, in contrast to when it is found alone. These findings underline the importance of supramolecular interactions between complexes for maintaining a basal respiratory chain activity and shed light to the molecular basis of disease manifestations associated with this mutation.......Cytochrome b is the only mtDNA-encoded subunit of the mitochondrial complex III (CIII), the functional bottleneck of the respiratory chain. Previously, the human cytochrome b missense mutation m.15579A>G, which substitutes the Tyr 278 with Cys (p.278Y>C), was identified in a patient with severe...

  10. amamutdb.no: A relational database for MAN2B1 allelic variants that compiles genotypes, clinical phenotypes, and biochemical and structural data of mutant MAN2B1 in α-mannosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riise Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad; Frantzen, Gabrio; Kuokkanen, Elina; Buvang, Elisabeth Kjeldsen; Klenow, Helle Bagterp; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Malm, Dag; Nilssen, Øivind

    2015-06-01

    α-Mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene, encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase. The disorder is characterized by a range of clinical phenotypes of which the major manifestations are mental impairment, hearing impairment, skeletal changes, and immunodeficiency. Here, we report an α-mannosidosis mutation database, amamutdb.no, which has been constructed as a publicly accessible online resource for recording and analyzing MAN2B1 variants (http://amamutdb.no). Our aim has been to offer structured and relational information on MAN2B1 mutations and genotypes along with associated clinical phenotypes. Classifying missense mutations, as pathogenic or benign, is a challenge. Therefore, they have been given special attention as we have compiled all available data that relate to their biochemical, functional, and structural properties. The α-mannosidosis mutation database is comprehensive and relational in the sense that information can be retrieved and compiled across datasets; hence, it will facilitate diagnostics and increase our understanding of the clinical and molecular aspects of α-mannosidosis. We believe that the amamutdb.no structure and architecture will be applicable for the development of databases for any monogenic disorder. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. Establishment of a novel monoclonal antibody SMab-1 specific for IDH1-R132S mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Mika Kato; Tian, Wei [Molecular Tumor Marker Research Team, The Oncology Research Center, Advanced Molecular Epidemiology Research Institute, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Takano, Shingo [Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroyuki [Department of Experimental Pathology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Sawa, Yoshihiko [Section of Functional Structure, Department of Morphological Biology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Fukuoka Dental College, 2-15-1 Tamura, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Yamazaki, Kentaro [Department of Forensic Medicine, Yamagata University School of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kitanaka, Chifumi [Department of Molecular Cancer Science, Yamagata University School of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kato, Yukinari, E-mail: yukinari-k@bea.hi-ho.ne.jp [Molecular Tumor Marker Research Team, The Oncology Research Center, Advanced Molecular Epidemiology Research Institute, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-nishi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} IDH1 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas. {yields} We newly established an anti-IDH1-R132S-specific mAb SMab-1. {yields} SMab-1 reacted with the IDH1-R132S peptide, but not with other IDH1 mutants. {yields} SMab-1 specifically stained the IDH1-R132S-expressing glioblastoma cells in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. {yields} SMab-1 should be useful in diagnosis of mutation-bearing gliomas. -- Abstract: Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations, which are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas, are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arginine 132 (R132) in IDH1. We earlier established a monoclonal antibody (mAb), IMab-1, which is specific for R132H-containing IDH1 (IDH1-R132H), the most frequent IDH1 mutation in gliomas. To establish IDH1-R132S-specific mAb, we immunized mice with R132S-containing IDH1 (IDH1-R132S) peptide. After cell fusion using Sendai virus envelope, IDH1-R132S-specific mAbs were screened in ELISA. One mAb, SMab-1, reacted with the IDH1-R132S peptide, but not with other IDH1 mutants. Western-blot analysis showed that SMab-1 reacted only with the IDH1-R132S protein, not with IDH1-WT protein or IDH1 mutants, indicating that SMab-1 is IDH1-R132S-specific. Furthermore, SMab-1 specifically stained the IDH1-R132S-expressing glioblastoma cells in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry, but did not react with IDH1-WT or IDH1-R132H-containing glioblastoma cells. We newly established an anti-IDH1-R132S-specific mAb SMab-1 for use in diagnosis of mutation-bearing gliomas.

  12. Heterozygous NPR2 Mutations Cause Disproportionate Short Stature, Similar to Léri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisado-Oliva, Alfonso; Garre-Vázquez, Ana I; Santaolalla-Caballero, Fabiola; Belinchón, Alberta; Barreda-Bonis, Ana C; Vasques, Gabriela A; Ramirez, Joaquin; Luzuriaga, Cristina; Carlone, Gianni; González-Casado, Isabel; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Jorge, Alexander A; Campos-Barros, Angel; Heath, Karen E

    2015-08-01

    SHOX mutations have been detected in approximately 70% of Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) and approximately 2.5% of idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, suggesting the implication of other genes or loci. The recent identification of NPR2 mutations in ISS suggested that NPR2 mutations may also be involved in disproportionate short stature. The objective of the study was to investigate whether NPR2 mutations can account for a proportion of the cases referred for LWD and ISS in whom no SHOX mutation was detected. We undertook NPR2 mutation screening in 173 individuals referred for suspected LWD and 95 for ISS, with no known defect in SHOX or its enhancers. Intracellular localization and natriuretic peptide precursor C-dependent guanylate cyclase activity were determined for the identified NPR2 variants. Eight NPR2 variants were identified in nine individuals, seven referred for suspected LWD and two for ISS. Six were demonstrated to affect NPR-B cell trafficking and/or its ability to synthesize cyclic GMP (cGMP) under response to natriuretic peptide precursor C/brain natriuretic peptide stimulation. All pathogenic mutations were detected in the suspected LWD referral group (∼3%). Interestingly, one of these patients is currently being treated with recombinant human GH and in contrast to previous reports is showing a positive response to the treatment. NPR2 mutations account for approximately 3% of patients with disproportionate short stature and/or clinical or radiographic indicators of SHOX deficiency and in whom no SHOX defect has been identified. However, no patient has yet presented with Madelung deformity. Thus, NPR2 should be screened in the SHOX-negative LWD referrals.

  13. Wilson's disease in Southern Brazil: genotype-phenotype correlation and description of two novel mutations in ATP7B gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schmitt de Bem

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Wilson's disease (WD is an inborn error of metabolism caused by abnormalities of the copper-transporting protein encoding gene ATP7B. In this study, we examined ATP7B for mutations in a group of patients living in southern Brazil. METHODS: 36 WD subjects were studied and classified according to their clinical and epidemiological data. In 23 subjects the ATP7B gene was analyzed. RESULTS: Fourteen distinct mutations were detected in at least one of the alleles. The c.3207C>A substitution at exon 14 was the most common mutation (allelic frequency=37.1% followed by the c.3402delC at exon 15 (allelic frequency=11.4%. The mutations c.2018-2030del13 at exon 7 and c.4093InsT at exon 20 are being reported for the first time. CONCLUSION: The c.3207C>A substitution at exon 14, was the most common mutation, with an allelic frequency of 37.1%. This mutation is the most common mutation described in Europe.

  14. Axial level-specific regulation of neuronal development: lessons from PITX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mindy R; Martin, Donna M

    2015-02-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression is vital for proper control of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of developing neurons. Pitx2 encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is highly expressed in the developing and adult mammalian brain. In humans, mutations in PITX2 result in Rieger syndrome, characterized by defects in the development of the eyes, umbilicus, and teeth and variable abnormalities in the brain, including hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia. Alternative splicing of Pitx2 in the mouse results in three isoforms, Pitx2a, Pitx2b, and Pitx2c, each of which is expressed symmetrically along the left-right axis of the brain throughout development. Here, we review recent evidence for axial and brain region-specific requirements for Pitx2 during neuronal migration and differentiation, highlighting known isoform contributions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of T- and C-loop mutations on the Herbaspirillum seropedicae GlnB protein in nitrogen signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, Ana C; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Yates, M Geoffrey; Benelli, Elaine M

    2005-01-01

    Proteins of the PII family are found in species of all kingdoms. Although these proteins usually share high identity, their functions are specific to the different organisms. Comparison of structural data from Escherichia coli GlnB and GlnK and Herbaspirillum seropedicae GlnB showed that the T-loop and C-terminus were variable regions. To evaluate the role of these regions in signal transduction by the H. seropedicae GlnB protein, four mutants were constructed: Y51F, G108A/P109a, G108W and Q3R/T5A. The activities of the native and mutated proteins were assayed in an E. coli background constitutively expressing the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA operon. The results suggested that the T-loop and C-terminus regions of H. seropedicae GlnB are involved in nitrogen signal transduction.

  16. BRAF mutation-specific promoter methylation of FOX genes in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.J. van Roon (Eddy); A. Boot (Arnoud); A.A. Dihal (Ashwin); R.F. Ernst (Robert); T. van Wezel (Tom); H. Morreau (Hans); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cancer-specific hypermethylation of (promoter) CpG islands is common during the tumorigenesis of colon cancer. Although associations between certain genetic aberrations, such as BRAF mutation and microsatellite instability, and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), have

  17. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaney, S.F.; Oldridge, M.; Wilkie, A.O.M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel SfiI and BstUI restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. 54 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Frequency of janus associated kinase 2 (jak2) mutation in patients of bcr-abl negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.A.; Ahmed, S.; Ali, N.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Janus associated kinase 2 mutation in the patients of BCR-ABL negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Molecular Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi from Jul 2011 to Jul 2012. Patients and Methods: Ninety three consecutive patients of Polycythaemia vera (PV), Essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and Idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) diagnosed by the conventional haematological criteria were included in the study. All patients were screened for G-T point mutation (V617F) in the JAK2 gene on chromosome 9 by an allele specific PCR. Results: Out of the 93 myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients, 33(35%) had polycythaemia vera, 36(39%) had essential thrombocythaemia and 24(26%) had idiopathic myelofibrosis. JAK2 mutation was seen in 64/93 (69%) patients including 33/33(100%) in PV, 19/36(52.6%) in ET and 12/24(50%) in IMF. Conclusion: Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms are an important group of heamatological disorder in our country. JAK2 gene mutation is seen in significant proportion of these disorders (69%). JAK2 mutation analysis can be used to differentiate between polycythemia vera and secondary polycythemia in most cases with near certainty, where it was found in 100% of the cases. (author)

  19. Treatable childhood neuronopathy caused by mutations in riboflavin transporter RFVT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, A. Reghan; Menezes, Manoj P.; Pandraud, Amelie; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Al-Odaib, Ahmad; Abrams, Alexander J.; Sugano, Kumiko; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Burns, Joshua; Hughes, Imelda; McCullagh, B. Gary; Jungbluth, Heinz; Lim, Ming J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Megarbane, Andre; Urtizberea, J. Andoni; Shah, Ayaz H.; Antony, Jayne; Webster, Richard; Broomfield, Alexander; Ng, Joanne; Mathew, Ann A.; O’Byrne, James J.; Forman, Eva; Scoto, Mariacristina; Prasad, Manish; O’Brien, Katherine; Olpin, Simon; Oppenheim, Marcus; Hargreaves, Iain; Land, John M.; Wang, Min X.; Carpenter, Kevin; Horvath, Rita; Straub, Volker; Lek, Monkol; Gold, Wendy; Farrell, Michael O.; Brandner, Sebastian; Phadke, Rahul; Matsubara, Kazuo; McGarvey, Michael L.; Scherer, Steven S.; Baxter, Peter S.; King, Mary D.; Clayton, Peter; Rahman, Shamima; Reilly, Mary M.; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Christodoulou, John; Züchner, Stephan; Muntoni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Childhood onset motor neuron diseases or neuronopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. A particularly severe subgroup first described in 1894, and subsequently called Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, is characterized by progressive pontobulbar palsy, sensorineural hearing loss and respiratory insufficiency. There has been no treatment for this progressive neurodegenerative disorder, which leads to respiratory failure and usually death during childhood. We recently reported the identification of SLC52A2, encoding riboflavin transporter RFVT2, as a new causative gene for Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome. We used both exome and Sanger sequencing to identify SLC52A2 mutations in patients presenting with cranial neuropathies and sensorimotor neuropathy with or without respiratory insufficiency. We undertook clinical, neurophysiological and biochemical characterization of patients with mutations in SLC52A2, functionally analysed the most prevalent mutations and initiated a regimen of high-dose oral riboflavin. We identified 18 patients from 13 families with compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SLC52A2. Affected individuals share a core phenotype of rapidly progressive axonal sensorimotor neuropathy (manifesting with sensory ataxia, severe weakness of the upper limbs and axial muscles with distinctly preserved strength of the lower limbs), hearing loss, optic atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. We demonstrate that SLC52A2 mutations cause reduced riboflavin uptake and reduced riboflavin transporter protein expression, and we report the response to high-dose oral riboflavin therapy in patients with SLC52A2 mutations, including significant and sustained clinical and biochemical improvements in two patients and preliminary clinical response data in 13 patients with associated biochemical improvements in 10 patients. The clinical and biochemical responses of this SLC52A2-specific cohort suggest that riboflavin supplementation can

  20. [A novel homozygous mutation p.E25X in the HSD3B2 gene causing salt wasting 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases deficiency in a Chinese pubertal girl: a delayed diagnosis until recurrent ovary cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yonglan; Zheng, Jipeng; Xie, Ting; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shaomei; Li, Xiuzhen; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Lihe; Liu, Li

    2014-12-01

    3β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3βHSD), a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) resulted from mutations in the HSD3B2 gene that impair steroidogenesis in both adrenals and gonads. We report clinical features and the results of HSD3B2 gene analysis of a Chinese pubertal girl with salt wasting 3βHSD deficiency. We retrospectively reviewed clinical presentations and steroid profiles of the patient diagnosed in Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center in 2013. PCR and direct sequencing were used to identify any mutation in the HSD3B2 gene. A 13-year-old girl was diagnosed as CAH after birth because of salt-wasting with mild clitorimegaly and then was treated with glucocorticoid replacement. Breast and pubic hair development were normal, and menarche occurred at 12 yr, followed by menstrual bleeding about every 45 days. In the last one year laparoscopic operation and ovariocentesis were performed one after another for recurrent ovary cysts. Under corticoid acetate therapy, ACTH 17.10 pmol/L (normal 0-10.12), testosterone 1.31 nmol/L (normal T (p.E25X) was identified in HSD3B2 gene. The girl was homozygous and her mother was heterozygous, while her father was not identified with this mutation. A classic 3βHSD deficiency is characterized by salt wasting and mild virilization in female. Ovary cysts may be the one of features of gonad phenotype indicating ovary 3βHSD deficiency. A novel homozygous mutation c.73G >T(p.E25X) was related to the classical phenotype.

  1. Glucokinase gene mutations (MODY 2) in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthimathi, Sekar; Jahnavi, Suresh; Balamurugan, Kandasamy; Ranjani, Harish; Sonya, Jagadesan; Goswami, Soumik; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Mohan, Viswanathan; Radha, Venkatesan

    2014-03-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the glucokinase (GCK) gene cause a hyperglycemic condition termed maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) 2 or GCK-MODY. This is characterized by mild, stable, usually asymptomatic, fasting hyperglycemia that rarely requires pharmacological intervention. The aim of the present study was to screen for GCK gene mutations in Asian Indian subjects with mild hyperglycemia. Of the 1,517 children and adolescents of the population-based ORANGE study in Chennai, India, 49 were found to have hyperglycemia. These children along with the six patients referred to our center with mild hyperglycemia were screened for MODY 2 mutations. The GCK gene was bidirectionally sequenced using BigDye(®) Terminator v3.1 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) chemistry. In silico predictions of the pathogenicity were carried out using the online tools SIFT, Polyphen-2, and I-Mutant 2.0 software programs. Direct sequencing of the GCK gene in the patients referred to our Centre revealed one novel mutation, Thr206Ala (c.616A>G), in exon 6 and one previously described mutation, Met251Thr (c.752T>C), in exon 7. In silico analysis predicted the novel mutation to be pathogenic. The highly conserved nature and critical location of the residue Thr206 along with the clinical course suggests that the Thr206Ala is a MODY 2 mutation. However, we did not find any MODY 2 mutations in the 49 children selected from the population-based study. Hence prevalence of GCK mutations in Chennai is MODY 2 mutations from India and confirms the importance of considering GCK gene mutation screening in patients with mild early-onset hyperglycemia who are negative for β-cell antibodies.

  2. Bi-directional SIFT predicts a subset of activating mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lee

    Full Text Available Advancements in sequencing technologies have empowered recent efforts to identify polymorphisms and mutations on a global scale. The large number of variations and mutations found in these projects requires high-throughput tools to identify those that are most likely to have an impact on function. Numerous computational tools exist for predicting which mutations are likely to be functional, but none that specifically attempt to identify mutations that result in hyperactivation or gain-of-function. Here we present a modified version of the SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant algorithm that utilizes protein sequence alignments with homologous sequences to identify functional mutations based on evolutionary fitness. We show that this bi-directional SIFT (B-SIFT is capable of identifying experimentally verified activating mutants from multiple datasets. B-SIFT analysis of large-scale cancer genotyping data identified potential activating mutations, some of which we have provided detailed structural evidence to support. B-SIFT could prove to be a valuable tool for efforts in protein engineering as well as in identification of functional mutations in cancer.

  3. Assessment of interferon-related biomarkers in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, and ADAR: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian I; Forte, Gabriella M A; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Chase, Diana S; Aeby, Alec; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Ackroyd, Sam; Allcock, Rebecca; Bailey, Kathryn M; Balottin, Umberto; Barnerias, Christine; Bernard, Genevieve; Bodemer, Christine; Botella, Maria P; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C; De Laet, Corinne; De Goede, Christian G E L; Del Toro, Mireia; Effat, Laila; Enamorado, Noemi Nunez; Fazzi, Elisa; Gener, Blanca; Haldre, Madli; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Marques, Wilson; Oades, Patrick; Peterson, Pärt; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Roubertie, Agathe; Schmidt, Johanna Loewenstein; Shalev, Stavit A; Simon, Rogelio; Spiegel, Ronen; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Temtamy, Samia A; Vassallo, Grace; Vilain, Catheline N; Vogt, Julie; Wermenbol, Vanessa; Whitehouse, William P; Soler, Doriette; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Aglan, Mona S; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Vanderver, Adeline; Kisand, Kai; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2013-12-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an inflammatory disorder caused by mutations in any of six genes (TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, and ADAR). The disease is severe and effective treatments are urgently needed. We investigated the status of interferon-related biomarkers in patients with AGS with a view to future use in diagnosis and clinical trials. In this case-control study, samples were collected prospectively from patients with mutation-proven AGS. The expression of six interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) was measured by quantitative PCR, and the median fold change, when compared with the median of healthy controls, was used to create an interferon score for each patient. Scores higher than the mean of controls plus two SD (>2·466) were designated as positive. Additionally, we collated historical data for interferon activity, measured with a viral cytopathic assay, in CSF and serum from mutation-positive patients with AGS. We also undertook neutralisation assays of interferon activity in serum, and looked for the presence of autoantibodies against a panel of interferon proteins. 74 (90%) of 82 patients had a positive interferon score (median 12·90, IQR 6·14-20·41) compared with two (7%) of 29 controls (median 0·93, IQR 0·57-1·30). Of the eight patients with a negative interferon score, seven had mutations in RNASEH2B (seven [27%] of all 26 patients with mutations in this gene). Repeat sampling in 16 patients was consistent for the presence or absence of an interferon signature on 39 of 41 occasions. Interferon activity (tested in 147 patients) was negatively correlated with age (CSF, r=-0·604; serum, r=-0·289), and was higher in CSF than in serum in 104 of 136 paired samples. Neutralisation assays suggested that measurable antiviral activity was related to interferon α production. We did not record significantly increased concentrations of autoantibodies to interferon subtypes in patients with AGS, or an association between the presence

  4. Critical role of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of neuronal SH2B1 in the regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David L; Cho, Kae Won; Rui, Liangyou

    2010-08-01

    SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein that plays a key role in the regulation of energy and glucose metabolism in both rodents and humans. Genetic deletion of SH2B1 in mice results in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SH2B1 loci and chromosomal deletions of the SH2B1 loci associate with obesity and insulin resistance in humans. In cultured cells, SH2B1 promotes leptin and insulin signaling by binding via its SH2 domain to phosphorylated tyrosines in Janus kinase 2 and the insulin receptor, respectively. Here we generated three lines of mice to analyze the role of the SH2 domain of SH2B1 in the central nervous system. Transgenic mice expressing wild-type, SH2 domain-defective (R555E), or SH2 domain-alone (DeltaN503) forms of SH2B1 specifically in neurons were crossed with SH2B1 knockout mice to generate KO/SH2B1, KO/R555E, or KO/DeltaN503 compound mutant mice. R555E had a replacement of Arg(555) with Glu within the SH2 domain. DeltaN503 contained an intact SH2 domain but lacked amino acids 1-503. Neuron-specific expression of recombinant SH2B1, but not R555E or DeltaN503, corrected hyperphagia, obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in SH2B1 null mice. Neuron-specific expression of R555E in wild-type mice promoted obesity and insulin resistance. These results indicate that in addition to the SH2 domain, N-terminal regions of neuronal SH2B1 are also required for the maintenance of normal body weight and glucose metabolism. Additionally, mutations in the SH2 domain of SH2B1 may increase the susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes in a dominant-negative manner.

  5. BAG3 Directly Interacts with Mutated alphaB-Crystallin to Suppress Its Aggregation and Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hishiya, Akinori; Salman, Mortada Najem; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.; Takayama, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein aB-crystallin gene ( CRYAB) are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we

  6. ORM-based semantics of B2B transactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balsters, H.; van Blommestein, F.; Meersman, R; Herrero, P; Dillon, T

    2009-01-01

    After widespread implementation of Enterprise Resource Planning and Personal Information Management, the next wave in the application of ICT is headed towards business to business (B2B) communication. B2B has a number of specific aspects, one of them being negotiation. This aspect has been largely

  7. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiaroli, Annamaria; Kelberman, Daniel; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Drury, Suzanne; Islam, Lily; Giangiobbe, Sara; Ironi, Gabriele; Lench, Nicholas; Sowden, Jane C; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario; Cavallo, Luciano; Gasperi, Maurizio; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2014-01-25

    Heterozygous de novo mutations in SOX2 have been reported in approximately 10-20% of patients with unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia or microphthalmia. An additional phenotype of hypopituitarism, with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, has been reported in patients carrying SOX2 alterations. We report a novel heterozygous mutation in the SOX2 gene in a male affected with congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation we describe is a cytosine deletion in position 905 (c905delC) which causes frameshift and an aberrant C-terminal domain. Our report highlights the fact that subjects affected with eye anomalies and harboring SOX2 mutations are at high risk for gonadotropin deficiency, which has important implications for their clinical management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutations in the small GTPase gene RAB39B are responsible for X-linked mental retardation associated with autism, epilepsy, and macrocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannandrea, Maila; Bianchi, Veronica; Mignogna, Maria Lidia; Sirri, Alessandra; Carrabino, Salvatore; D'Elia, Errico; Vecellio, Matteo; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Larizza, Lidia; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Tzschach, Andreas; Kalscheuer, Vera; Oehl-Jaschkowitz, Barbara; Skinner, Cindy; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Van Esch, Hilde; Raynaud, Martine; Chelly, Jamel; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Toniolo, Daniela; D'Adamo, Patrizia

    2010-02-12

    Human Mental Retardation (MR) is a common and highly heterogeneous pediatric disorder affecting around 3% of the general population; at least 215 X-linked MR (XLMR) conditions have been described, and mutations have been identified in 83 different genes, encoding proteins with a variety of function, such as chromatin remodeling, synaptic function, and intracellular trafficking. The small GTPases of the RAB family, which play an essential role in intracellular vesicular trafficking, have been shown to be involved in MR. We report here the identification of mutations in the small GTPase RAB39B gene in two male patients. One mutation in family X (D-23) introduced a stop codon seven amino acids after the start codon (c.21C > A; p.Y7X). A second mutation, in the MRX72 family, altered the 5' splice site (c.215+1G > A) and normal splicing. Neither instance produced a protein. Mutations segregate with the disease in the families, and in some family members intellectual disabilities were associated with autism spectrum disorder, epileptic seizures, and macrocephaly. We show that RAB39B, a novel RAB GTPase of unknown function, is a neuronal-specific protein that is localized to the Golgi compartment. Its downregulation leads to an alteration in the number and morphology of neurite growth cones and a significant reduction in presynaptic buttons, suggesting that RAB39B is required for synapse formation and maintenance. Our results demonstrate developmental and functional neuronal alteration as a consequence of downregulation of RAB39B and emphasize the critical role of vesicular trafficking in the development of neurons and human intellectual abilities. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Contribute to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Patient iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes with MT-RNR2 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishi Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young individuals. A potential role of mtDNA mutations in HCM is known. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms linking mtDNA mutations to HCM remain poorly understood due to lack of cell and animal models. Here, we generated induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (HCM-iPSC-CMs from human patients in a maternally inherited HCM family who carry the m.2336T>C mutation in the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene (MT-RNR2. The results showed that the m.2336T>C mutation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunctions and ultrastructure defects by decreasing the stability of 16S rRNA, which led to reduced levels of mitochondrial proteins. The ATP/ADP ratio and mitochondrial membrane potential were also reduced, thereby elevating the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which was associated with numerous HCM-specific electrophysiological abnormalities. Our findings therefore provide an innovative insight into the pathogenesis of maternally inherited HCM. : In this article, Yan Q, Liu Z, Huang W, and colleagues show that patient-specific iPSCs as well as their derived cardiomyocytes carrying the m.2336T>C mutation in MT-RNR2 were generated to understand the pathogenic mechanism of maternally inherited HCM. MT-RNR2 mutation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunctions and ultrastructure defects, which induced abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis, then HCM-specific cellular and electrophysiological characteristics in iPSC-CMs. Keywords: mitochondrion, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, induced pluripotent stem cells, MT-RNR2, maternal inheritance

  10. Bactobolin resistance is conferred by mutations in the L2 ribosomal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Josephine R; Truong, Thao T; Silva, Patricia M; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Carr, Gavin; Radey, Matthew; Jacobs, Michael A; Sims, Elizabeth H; Clardy, Jon; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-12-18

    Burkholderia thailandensis produces a family of polyketide-peptide molecules called bactobolins, some of which are potent antibiotics. We found that growth of B. thailandensis at 30°C versus that at 37°C resulted in increased production of bactobolins. We purified the three most abundant bactobolins and determined their activities against a battery of bacteria and mouse fibroblasts. Two of the three compounds showed strong activities against both bacteria and fibroblasts. The third analog was much less potent in both assays. These results suggested that the target of bactobolins might be conserved across bacteria and mammalian cells. To learn about the mechanism of bactobolin activity, we isolated four spontaneous bactobolin-resistant Bacillus subtilis mutants. We used genomic sequencing technology to show that each of the four resistant variants had mutations in rplB, which codes for the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein. Ectopic expression of a mutant rplB gene in wild-type B. subtilis conferred bactobolin resistance. Finally, the L2 mutations did not confer resistance to other antibiotics known to interfere with ribosome function. Our data indicate that bactobolins target the L2 protein or a nearby site and that this is not the target of other antibiotics. We presume that the mammalian target of bactobolins involves the eukaryotic homolog of L2 (L8e). Currently available antibiotics target surprisingly few cellular functions, and there is a need to identify novel antibiotic targets. We have been interested in the Burkholderia thailandensis bactobolins, and we sought to learn about the target of bactobolin activity by mapping spontaneous resistance mutations in the bactobolin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis. Our results indicate that the bactobolin target is the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein or a region of the ribosome affected by L2. Bactobolin-resistant mutants are not resistant to other known ribosome inhibitors. Our evidence indicates that bactobolins

  11. JAK2V617F mutation is associated with special alleles in essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Lee, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Jui-Feng; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2011-03-01

    Janus kinase 2 mutation (JAK2V617F) has been identified in myeloproliferative neoplasms. Furthermore, special single nucleoside polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. Therefore, the associations among JAK2V617F and special SNPs and the allelic location between them were investigated in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET). A total of 61 patients with ET and 106 healthy individuals were enrolled. The PCR-RFLP method was applied to investigate the pattern of three SNPs, rs10974944, rs12343867, and rs12340895. Allele-specific PCR was used to examine the allelic location between rs10974944 and JAK2V617F. Among the patients with ET, 34 (55.7%, 34/61) were JAK2V617F positive (heterozygous) while the other 27 (44.3%, 27/61) were negative, and there were no MPLW515L/K mutations noted. The pattern of special SNPs in JAK2V617F(+) was significantly different from that in normal individuals (p <0.05), while there was no difference between JAK2V617F(-) patients and normal individuals. Allele-specific PCR showed high association of a cis-location between the special G-allele of rs10974944 and JAK2V617F(+). Based on this small numbered study, the results show the association between special SNPs and JAK2V617F mutation and a cis-location between the special G-allelic form of rs10974944 and the JAK2V617F mutation. These data highlight a close relationship between them in patients with ET.

  12. Recurrent and founder mutations in the PMS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, J; Senter, L; Liyanarachchi, S; Clendenning, M; Vaughn, C P; Jenkins, M A; Hopper, J L; Young, J; Samowitz, W; de la Chapelle, A

    2013-03-01

    Germline mutations in PMS2 are associated with Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common known cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Mutation detection in PMS2 has been difficult due to the presence of several pseudogenes, but a custom-designed long-range PCR strategy now allows adequate mutation detection. Many mutations are unique. However, some mutations are observed repeatedly across individuals not known to be related due to the mutation being either recurrent, arising multiple times de novo at hot spots for mutations, or of founder origin, having occurred once in an ancestor. Previously, we observed 36 distinct mutations in a sample of 61 independently ascertained Caucasian probands of mixed European background with PMS2 mutations. Eleven of these mutations were detected in more than one individual not known to be related and of these, six were detected more than twice. These six mutations accounted for 31 (51%) ostensibly unrelated probands. Here, we performed genotyping and haplotype analysis in four mutations observed in multiple probands and found two (c.137G>T and exon 10 deletion) to be founder mutations and one (c.903G>T) a probable founder. One (c.1A>G) could not be evaluated for founder mutation status. We discuss possible explanations for the frequent occurrence of founder mutations in PMS2. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Nuclear envelope alterations in fibroblasts from LGMD1B patients carrying nonsense Y259X heterozygous or homozygous mutation in lamin A/C gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchir, A.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Mislow, J.M.; McNally, E.; Schwartz, K.; Bonne, G.

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding nuclear lamins A and C are responsible for seven inherited disorders affecting specific tissues. We have analyzed skin fibroblasts from a patient with type 1B limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and from her deceased newborn grandchild carrying, respectively, a

  14. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena

    2014-01-01

    AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng......BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening....../ml were offered prostate biopsy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We...

  15. Mutations of dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) gene among patients with permanent and transient congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostampour, N.; Tajaddini, M.H.; Hashemipour, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is high in Isfahan, Iran. In addition, it has different etiologies compared with other countries. The rate of parental consanguinity is also high in the city. Moreover, DUOX2 gene is effective in transient CH and permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the mutations of DUOX2 gene in patients with transient CH and permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis. Methodology: In this descriptive, prospective study, patients diagnosed with transient and permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis during CH screening program were selected. Venous blood samples were obtained to determine the 3 mutations (Q36H, R376W, and D506N) of DUOX2 gene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method by specific primers and complementary methods such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Results: In this study, 25 patients with transient CH and 33 subjects with permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis were studied. In addition, 30 children were studied as the control group. We did not find any mutations of the 3 mentioned mutations of DUOX2 gene. Conclusion: Considering the findings of the current study, further studies with other methods are required to evaluate other gene mutations such as pendrin, sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroglobulin. (author)

  16. Evaluation of current prediction models for Lynch syndrome: updating the PREMM5 model to identify PMS2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverde, A; Spaander, M C W; Nieboer, D; van den Ouweland, A M W; Dinjens, W N M; Dubbink, H J; Tops, C J; Ten Broeke, S W; Bruno, M J; Hofstra, R M W; Steyerberg, E W; Wagner, A

    2018-07-01

    Until recently, no prediction models for Lynch syndrome (LS) had been validated for PMS2 mutation carriers. We aimed to evaluate MMRpredict and PREMM5 in a clinical cohort and for PMS2 mutation carriers specifically. In a retrospective, clinic-based cohort we calculated predictions for LS according to MMRpredict and PREMM5. The area under the operator receiving characteristic curve (AUC) was compared between MMRpredict and PREMM5 for LS patients in general and for different LS genes specifically. Of 734 index patients, 83 (11%) were diagnosed with LS; 23 MLH1, 17 MSH2, 31 MSH6 and 12 PMS2 mutation carriers. Both prediction models performed well for MLH1 and MSH2 (AUC 0.80 and 0.83 for PREMM5 and 0.79 for MMRpredict) and fair for MSH6 mutation carriers (0.69 for PREMM5 and 0.66 for MMRpredict). MMRpredict performed fair for PMS2 mutation carriers (AUC 0.72), while PREMM5 failed to discriminate PMS2 mutation carriers from non-mutation carriers (AUC 0.51). The only statistically significant difference between PMS2 mutation carriers and non-mutation carriers was proximal location of colorectal cancer (77 vs. 28%, p PMS2 mutation carriers (AUC 0.77) and overall (AUC 0.81 vs. 0.72). We validated these results in an external cohort of 376 colorectal cancer patients, including 158 LS patients. MMRpredict and PREMM5 cannot adequately identify PMS2 mutation carriers. Adding location of colorectal cancer to PREMM5 may improve the performance of this model, which should be validated in larger cohorts.

  17. Founder effect of the RET C611Y mutation in multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Kroustrup, Jens Peter; Vestergaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and 2B are caused by REarranged during Transfection (RET) germline mutations. In a recent nationwide study we reported of an unusually high prevalence (33%) of families with the C611Y mutation and hypothesized that this might be due to a founder...... effect. We conducted the first nationwide study of haplotypes in MEN2A families aiming to investigate the relatedness and occurrence of de novo mutations among Danish families carrying similar mutations. METHODS: The study included 21 apparently unrelated MEN2A families identified from a nationwide...... Danish RET cohort from 1994 to 2014. Twelve, two, two, three and two families carried the C611Y, C618F, C618Y, C620R and C634R mutation, respectively. Single nucleotide polymorphism chip data and identity by descent analysis were used to assess relatedness. RESULTS: A common founder mutation was found...

  18. Identification of FASTKD2 compound heterozygous mutations as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive MELAS-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Da Hye; Choi, Young-Chul; Nam, Da Eun; Choi, Sun Seong; Kim, Ji Won; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a condition that affects many parts of the body, particularly the brain and muscles. This study examined a Korean MELAS-like syndrome patient with seizure, stroke-like episode, and optic atrophy. Target sequencing of whole mtDNA and 73 nuclear genes identified compound heterozygous mutations p.R205X and p.L255P in the FASTKD2. Each of his unaffected parents has one of the two mutations, and both mutations were not found in 302 controls. FASTKD2 encodes a FAS-activated serine-threonine (FAST) kinase domain 2 which locates in the mitochondrial inner compartment. A FASTKD2 nonsense mutation was once reported as the cause of a recessive infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. The present case showed relatively mild symptoms with a late onset age, compared to a previous patient with FASTKD2 mutation, implicating an inter-allelic clinical heterogeneity. Because this study is the second report of an autosomal recessive mitochondrial encephalomyopathy patient with a FASTKD2 mutation, it will extend the phenotypic spectrum of the FASTKD2 mutation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A magic bullet to specifically eliminate mutated mitochondrial genomes from patients' cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Carlos T

    2014-01-01

    When mitochondrial diseases result from mutations found in the mitochondrial DNA, engineered mitochondrial-targeted nucleases such as mitochondrial-targeted zinc finger nucleases are shown to specifically eliminate the mutated molecules, leaving the wild-type mitochondrial DNA intact to replicate and restore normal copy number. In this issue, Gammage and colleagues successfully apply this improved technology on patients' cells with two types of genetic alterations responsible for neuropathy ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) syndrome and Kearns Sayre syndrome and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). PMID:24623377

  20. New mutation in the mouse Xpd/Ercc2 gene leads to recessive cataracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kunze

    Full Text Available Cataracts are the major eye disorder and have been associated mainly with mutations in lens-specific genes, but cataracts are also frequently associated with complex syndromes. In a large-scale high-throughput ENU mutagenesis screen we analyzed the offspring of paternally treated C3HeB/FeJ mice for obvious dysmorphologies. We identified a mutant suffering from rough coat and small eyes only in homozygotes; homozygous females turned out to be sterile. The mutation was mapped to chromosome 7 between the markers 116J6.1 and D7Mit294;4 other markers within this interval did not show any recombination among 160 F2-mutants. The critical interval (8.6 Mb contains 3 candidate genes (Apoe, Six5, Opa3; none of them showed a mutation. Using exome sequencing, we identified a c.2209T>C mutation in the Xpd/Ercc2 gene leading to a Ser737Pro exchange. During embryonic development, the mutant eyes did not show major changes. Postnatal histological analyses demonstrated small cortical vacuoles; later, cortical cataracts developed. Since XPD/ERCC2 is involved in DNA repair, we checked also for the presence of the repair-associated histone γH2AX in the lens. During the time, when primary lens fiber cell nuclei are degraded, γH2AX was strongly expressed in the cell nuclei; later, it demarcates clearly the border of the lens cortex to the organelle-free zone. Moreover, we analyzed also whether seemingly healthy heterozygotes might be less efficient in repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation than wild types. Peripheral lymphocytes irradiated by 1Gy Cs137 showed 6 hrs after irradiation significantly more γH2AX foci in heterozygotes than in wild types. These findings demonstrate the importance of XPD/ERCC2 not only for lens fiber cell differentiation, but also for the sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Based upon these data, we hypothesize that variations in the human XPD/ERCC2 gene might increase the susceptibility for several disorders besides Xeroderma

  1. Novel USH2A mutations in Japanese Usher syndrome type 2 patients: marked differences in the mutation spectrum between the Japanese and other populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Usami, Shin-Ichi; Mizuta, Kunihiro; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Minoshima, Shinsei

    2011-07-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa and hearing loss. USH type 2 (USH2) is the most common type of USH and is frequently caused by mutations in USH2A. In a recent mutation screening of USH2A in Japanese USH2 patients, we identified 11 novel mutations in 10 patients and found the possible frequent mutation c.8559-2A>G in 4 of 10 patients. To obtain a more precise mutation spectrum, we analyzed further nine Japanese patients in this study. We identified nine mutations, of which eight were novel. This result indicates that the mutation spectrum for USH2A among Japanese patients largely differs from Caucasian, Jewish and Palestinian patients. Meanwhile, we did not find the c.8559-2A>G in this study. Haplotype analysis of the c.8559-2G (mutated) alleles using 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms surrounding the mutation revealed an identical haplotype pattern of at least 635 kb in length, strongly suggesting that the mutation originated from a common ancestor. The fact that all patients carrying c.8559-2A>G came from western Japan suggests that the mutation is mainly distributed in that area; indeed, most of the patients involved in this study came from eastern Japan, which contributed to the absence of c.8559-2A>G.

  2. Altered Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Metabolism and Physiology Associated With RpoB Mutation H526D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Campodónico

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb rpoB mutations are associated with global metabolic remodeling. However, the net effects of rpoB mutations on Mtb physiology, metabolism and function are not completely understood. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that changes in the expression of cell wall molecules in Mtb mutant RpoB 526D lead to changes in cell wall permeability and to altered resistance to environmental stresses and drugs.Methods: The phenotypes of a fully drug-susceptible clinical strain of Mtb and its paired rifampin-monoresistant, RpoB H526D mutant progeny strain were compared.Results: The rpoB mutant showed altered colony morphology, bacillary length and cell wall thickness, which were associated with increased cell wall permeability and susceptibility to the cell wall detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS after exposure to nutrient starvation. Relative to the isogenic rifampin-susceptible strain, the RpoB H526D mutant showed altered bacterial cellular metabolic activity and an eightfold increase in susceptibility to the cell-wall acting drug vancomycin.Conclusion: Our data suggest that RpoB mutation H526D is associated with altered cell wall physiology and resistance to cell wall-related stress. These findings are expected to contribute to an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis infections.

  3. Prevalence of Janus kinase 2 mutations in patients with unusual site venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lisa Basquiera

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to study patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT and cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT searching for JAK2 mutations. We evaluated 14 patients (median age: 41.5 years with portal vein thrombosis (PVT = 7; mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT = 3; and CVT = 4. JAK2 V617F was assessed by allele specific PCR of peripheral blood DNA. In addition, DNA was sequenced for other JAK2 mutations. Other inherited and acquired thrombophilia risk factors were evaluated. JAK2 V617F was positive in four out of seven patients with PVT and in one CVT patient. These five patients had a diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorder (MPD at the moment of the occurrence of thrombosis (n = 2 or later (n = 2. Patients with MVT and CVT were negative for JAK2 V617F, except one patient with CVT and a diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia. No other JAK2 mutations were found in this cohort. Besides MPD, other thrombophilia risk factors were identified in five patients. One patient had MPD as well as thrombophilia risk factor. In this group, 4 out of 7 of the patients with PVT carried the JAK2 V617F mutation with or without overt MPD. However, the investigation of other JAK2 mutations may not be necessary in patients with thrombosis at unusual sites.

  4. Microsatellite instability and B-type Raf proto-oncogene mutation in colorectal cancer: Clinicopathological characteristics and effects on survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem Batur

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic significance of microsatellite instability (MSI status and B-type Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and pathological characteristics associated with microsatellite stability and the effect of MSI and BRAF mutation on the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. The study included 145 colorectal cancer cases. All the patients were examined for DNA mismatch repair (MMR proteins with an immunohistochemical method. Molecular assessment of MSI was available in a subset of 41 patients. In addition, BRAF mutation analysis was performed in 30 cases. Immunohistochemically, MMR deficiency was present in 28 (19.3% patients. Female gender (p = 0.001, lesion size ≥5 cm (p = 0.013, Crohn-like response (p = 0.035, and right-sided localization (p < 0.001 were significantly more frequent among MMR-deficient patients. The overall survival was 44.1 ± 5.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.7-54.4. Multivariate analyses identified only high tumor grade as an independent predictor of poor overall survival: odd ratio, 6.7 (95% CI 2.1-21.7, p = 0.002. In the subset of patients with available BRAF assessment (n = 30, a negative BRAF status was associated with better survival when compared to a positive BRAF status (36.7 ± 2.1 vs. 34.1 ± 7.2 months, p = 0.048. The sensitivity and specificity of the immunohistochemical method in predicting positive MSI status, with the molecular method as a reference, were 85.7% (95% CI: 56.2%-97.5% and 88.9% (95% CI: 69.7%-97.1%, respectively. BRAF appears to be a significant predictor of a worse outcome in patients with colorectal cancer. Further studies with a large spectrum of clinical and biological variables are warranted.

  5. Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation

    OpenAIRE

    JORDI SALAS; NURIA LASO; SERGI MAS; M. JOSE LAFUENTE; XAVIER CASTERAD; MANUEL TRIAS; ANTONIO BALLESTA; RAFAEL MOLINA; CARLOS ASCASO; SHICHUN ZHENG; JOHN K. WIENCKE; AMALIA LAFUENTE

    2004-01-01

    Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation BACKGROUND: The diversity of the Mediterranean diet and the heterogeneity of acquired genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) led us to examine the possible association between dietary factors and mutations, such as Ki-ras mutations, in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was based on 246 cases and 296 controls. For th...

  6. PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type IX: prevalence of deletion mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-04-21

    Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) is important to enable accurate diagnoses and make appropriate therapeutic plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD type IX. Thirteen Korean patients were tested for PHKA2 mutations using direct sequencing and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. A comprehensive review of the literature on previously reported PHKA2 mutations in other ethnic populations was conducted for comparison. Among 13 patients tested, six unrelated male patients with GSD IX aged 2 to 6 years at the first diagnostic work-up for hepatomegaly with elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were found to have PHKA2 mutations. These patients had different PHKA2 mutations: five were known mutations (c.537 + 5G > A, c.884G > A [p.Arg295His], c.3210_3212delGAG [p.Arg1072del], exon 8 deletion, and exons 27-33 deletion) and one was a novel mutation (exons 18-33 deletion). Notably, the most common type of mutation was gross deletion, in contrast to other ethnic populations in which the most common mutation type was sequence variant. This study expands our knowledge of the PHKA2 mutation spectrum of GSD IX. Considering the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD IX, molecular diagnostic methods for deletions should be conducted in conjunction with direct sequence analysis to enable accurate molecular diagnosis of this disease in the Korean population.

  7. Coffin-Siris syndrome with café-au-lait spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Uctepe, Eyyup; Gunduz, Mehmet; Gormez, Zeliha; Erpolat, Seval; Oznur, Murat; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Demirci, Huseyin; Gunduz, Esra

    2016-08-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) (MIM 135900) is characterized by developmental delay, severe speech impairment, distinctive facial features, hypertrichosis, aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth digit and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, it was shown that mutations in the ARID1B gene are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. Here, we report a 15 year-old female patient who was admitted to our clinic with seizures, speech problems, dysmorphic features, bilaterally big, large thumb, café-au-lait (CAL) spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism. First, the patient was thought to have an association of neurofibromatosis and Rubinstein Taybi syndrome. Because of the large size of the NF1 gene for neurofibromatosis and CREBBP gene for Rubinstein Taybi syndrome, whole exome sequence analysis (WES) was conducted and a novel ARID1B mutation was identified. The proband WES test identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.3394_3395insTA in exon 13 of ARID1B (NM_017519.2) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Tyr1132Leufs*67). Sanger sequencing confirmed the heterozygous c.3394_3395insTA mutation in the proband and that it was not present in her parents indicating de novo mutation. Further investigation and new cases will help to understand this phenomenon better.

  8. ERBB4 Mutations that Disrupt the Neuregulin-ErbB4 Pathway Cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Type 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuji; Fukuda, Yoko; Yoshimura, Jun; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kurppa, Kari; Moritoyo, Hiroyoko; Belzil, Veronique V.; Dion, Patrick A.; Higasa, Koichiro; Doi, Koichiro; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Mitsui, Jun; Date, Hidetoshi; Ahsan, Budrul; Matsukawa, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Moritoyo, Takashi; Ikoma, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Tsukasa; Kimura, Fumiharu; Murayama, Shigeo; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Yoshida, Mari; Atsuta, Naoki; Sobue, Gen; Fifita, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Blair, Ian P.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Gonzalez-Perez, Paloma; Brown, Robert H.; Nomoto, Masahiro; Elenius, Klaus; Rouleau, Guy A.; Fujiyama, Asao; Morishita, Shinichi; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disorder characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons and typically results in death within 3–5 years from onset. Familial ALS (FALS) comprises 5%–10% of ALS cases, and the identification of genes associated with FALS is indispensable to elucidating the molecular pathogenesis. We identified a Japanese family affected by late-onset, autosomal-dominant ALS in which mutations in genes known to be associated with FALS were excluded. A whole- genome sequencing and parametric linkage analysis under the assumption of an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance revealed the mutation c.2780G>A (p. Arg927Gln) in ERBB4. An extensive mutational analysis revealed the same mutation in a Canadian individual with familial ALS and a de novo mutation, c.3823C>T (p. Arg1275Trp), in a Japanese simplex case. These amino acid substitutions involve amino acids highly conserved among species, are predicted as probably damaging, and are located within a tyrosine kinase domain (p. Arg927Gln) or a C-terminal domain (p. Arg1275Trp), both of which mediate essential functions of ErbB4 as a receptor tyrosine kinase. Functional analysis revealed that these mutations led to a reduced autophosphorylation of ErbB4 upon neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) stimulation. Clinical presentations of the individuals with mutations were characterized by the involvement of both upper and lower motor neurons, a lack of obvious cognitive dysfunction, and relatively slow progression. This study indicates that disruption of the neuregulin-ErbB4 pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of ALS and potentially paves the way for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies such using NRGs or their agonists to upregulate ErbB4 functions. PMID:24119685

  9. Prevalence of PALB2 mutations in breast cancer patients in multi-ethnic Asian population in Malaysia and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuah, Sze Yee; Lee, Sheau Yee; Kang, Peter; Kang, In Nee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hartman, Mikael; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The partner and localizer of breast cancer 2 (PALB2) is responsible for facilitating BRCA2-mediated DNA repair by serving as a bridging molecule, acting as the physical and functional link between the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) proteins. Truncating mutations in the PALB2 gene are rare but are thought to be associated with increased risks of developing breast cancer in various populations. We evaluated the contribution of PALB2 germline mutations in 122 Asian women with breast cancer, all of whom had significant family history of breast and other cancers. Further screening for nine PALB2 mutations was conducted in 874 Malaysian and 532 Singaporean breast cancer patients, and in 1342 unaffected Malaysian and 541 unaffected Singaporean women. By analyzing the entire coding region of PALB2, we found two novel truncating mutations and ten missense mutations in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations. One additional novel truncating PALB2 mutation was identified in one patient through genotyping analysis. Our results indicate a low prevalence of deleterious PALB2 mutations and a specific mutation profile within the Malaysian and Singaporean populations.

  10. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  11. Assessing somatic hypermutation in Ramos B cells after overexpression or knockdown of specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dana C; Unniraman, Shyam

    2011-11-01

    B cells start their life with low affinity antibodies generated by V(D)J recombination. However, upon detecting a pathogen, the variable (V) region of an immunoglobulin (Ig) gene is mutated approximately 100,000-fold more than the rest of the genome through somatic hypermutation (SHM), resulting in high affinity antibodies. In addition, class switch recombination (CSR) produces antibodies with different effector functions depending on the kind of immune response that is needed for a particular pathogen. Both CSR and SHM are initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which deaminates cytosine residues in DNA to produce uracils. These uracils are processed by error-prone forms of repair pathways, eventually leading to mutations and recombination. Our current understanding of the molecular details of SHM and CSR come from a combination of studies in mice, primary cells, cell lines, and cell-free experiments. Mouse models remain the gold standard with genetic knockouts showing critical roles for many repair factors (e.g. Ung, Msh2, Msh6, Exo1, and polymerase η). However, not all genes are amenable for knockout studies. For example, knockouts of several double-strand break repair proteins are embryonically lethal or impair B-cell development. Moreover, sometimes the specific function of a protein in SHM or CSR may be masked by more global defects caused by the knockout. In addition, since experiments in mice can be lengthy, altering expression of individual genes in cell lines has become an increasingly popular first step to identifying and characterizing candidate genes. Ramos - a Burkitt lymphoma cell line that constitutively undergoes SHM - has been a popular cell-line model to study SHM. One advantage of Ramos cells is that they have a built-in convenient semi-quantitative measure of SHM. Wild type cells express IgM and, as they pick up mutations, some of the mutations knock out IgM expression. Therefore, assaying IgM loss by fluorescence

  12. A dominant-negative mutation of mouse Lmx1b causes glaucoma and is semi-lethal via LDB1-mediated dimerization [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally H Cross

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor LMX1B cause nail-patella syndrome, an autosomal dominant pleiotrophic human disorder in which nail, patella and elbow dysplasia is associated with other skeletal abnormalities and variably nephropathy and glaucoma. It is thought to be a haploinsufficient disorder. Studies in the mouse have shown that during development Lmx1b controls limb dorsal-ventral patterning and is also required for kidney and eye development, midbrain-hindbrain boundary establishment and the specification of specific neuronal subtypes. Mice completely deficient for Lmx1b die at birth. In contrast to the situation in humans, heterozygous null mice do not have a mutant phenotype. Here we report a novel mouse mutant Icst, an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced missense substitution, V265D, in the homeodomain of LMX1B that abolishes DNA binding and thereby the ability to transactivate other genes. Although the homozygous phenotypic consequences of Icst and the null allele of Lmx1b are the same, heterozygous Icst elicits a phenotype whilst the null allele does not. Heterozygous Icst causes glaucomatous eye defects and is semi-lethal, probably due to kidney failure. We show that the null phenotype is rescued more effectively by an Lmx1b transgene than is Icst. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that both wild-type and Icst LMX1B are found in complexes with LIM domain binding protein 1 (LDB1, resulting in lower levels of functional LMX1B in Icst heterozygotes than null heterozygotes. We conclude that Icst is a dominant-negative allele of Lmx1b. These findings indicate a reassessment of whether nail-patella syndrome is always haploinsufficient. Furthermore, Icst is a rare example of a model of human glaucoma caused by mutation of the same gene in humans and mice.

  13. Identification of coexistence of BRAF V600E mutation and EZH2 gain specifically in melanoma as a promising target for combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan; Ma, Meng; Yan, Junya; Xu, Longwen; Yu, Jiayi; Dai, Jie; Xu, Tianxiao; Tang, Huan; Wu, Xiaowen; Li, Siming; Lian, Bin; Mao, Lili; Chi, Zhihong; Cui, Chuanliang; Guo, Jun; Kong, Yan

    2017-12-04

    Coexistence of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and BRAF gene aberrations has been described in many cancer types. In this study, we aim to explore the coexistence status of BRAF V600E mutation and the copy number variation of EZH2 and explore the potential of this combination as a therapeutic target. A total of 138 cases of melanoma samples harboring BRAF V600E mutation were included, and EZH2 copy numbers were examined by QuantiGenePlex DNA Assays. Clinical pathological distinction between patient groups with or without EZH2 amplification (hereafter referred to as EZH2 gain) was statistically analyzed. The sensitivity of melanoma cell lines and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models containing BRAF V600E mutation with or without EZH2 gain to vemurafenib (BRAF inhibitor), GSK2816126 (EZH2 inhibitor) and a combination of both agents was evaluated. In our cohort, the coexistence rate of BRAF V600E mutation and EZH2 gain was up to 29.0%, and significant differences in overall survival and disease-free survival were found between no EZH2 copy number gain and gain groups (P = 0.038, P = 0.030), gain and high EZH2 copy number gain groups (P = 0.006, P = 0.010). Combination with BRAF and EZH2 inhibition showed better inhibitory efficacy in melanoma prevention compared with vemurafenib monotherapy. More importantly, this improved therapeutic effect was observed especially in melanoma cell lines and PDX models containing concurrently BRAF V600E mutation and EZH2 gain. Coexistence of BRAF V600E mutation and EZH2 gain is rather prevalent in melanoma. Our findings provided evidence for the feasibility of combination therapy with EZH2 and BRAF inhibitors in melanoma with concurrent BRAF V600E mutation and EZH2 gain.

  14. Ela2 mutations and clinical manifestations in familial congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohara, Masaaki; Shigemura, Tomonari; Saito, Shoji; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Sakashita, Kazuo; Asada, Hiroshi; Ishii, Eizaburo; Koike, Kazutoshi; Chin, Motoaki; Kobayashi, Masao; Koike, Kenichi

    2009-05-01

    Three familial cases of each of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and cyclic neutropenia (CN) in addition to 3 sporadic cases of SCN were analyzed for neutrophil elastase (Ela2) gene mutation. The contents of the neutrophil-specific granule proteins cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were also analyzed in SCN. Genomic DNA was extracted from the patients' peripheral blood or bone marrow, and the coding sequence of the Ela2 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing. The contents of antimicrobial peptides were analyzed by flow cytometry. Three cases of familial SCN (P13L, R52P, and S97L), 2 of familial CN (W212stop and P110L), and 1 of sporadic SCN (V72M) were shown to have heterozygous mutations in the Ela2 gene. W212stop found in a familial CN case was a novel mutation of Ela2. Prophylactic treatment for growth factors or antibiotic prophylaxis against bacterial infection was useful for lowering the frequency of infectious episodes. Adult patients tended to have less frequent infections compared with minors in the same family. The contents of both cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were significantly reduced in SCN compared with healthy controls. Prophylaxis by growth factor or antibiotics is useful for decreasing risks of bacterial infections in SCN and CN. Adults were likely to have less frequent infections than children in familial cases of SCN and CN with the same mutation of Ela2.

  15. Activating and deactivating mutations in the receptor interaction site of GDF5 cause symphalangism or brachydactyly type A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Petra; Schwappacher, Raphaela; Kjær, Klaus Wilbrandt

    2005-01-01

    Here we describe 2 mutations in growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) that alter receptor-binding affinities. They cause brachydactyly type A2 (L441P) and symphalangism (R438L), conditions previously associated with mutations in the GDF5 receptor bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1b...

  16. CYP1B1 and myocilin gene mutations in Egyptian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmoud R. Fassad

    2016-08-09

    Aug 9, 2016 ... Abstract Purpose: Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) accounts for 26–29% of childhood ... Conclusion: The current study further endorses the role of CYP1B1 mutations in the etiology of ..... There is no conflict of interest.

  17. NF-kappaB specifically activates BMP-2 gene expression in growth plate chondrocytes in vivo and in a chondrocyte cell line in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian Q; Xing, Lianping; Zhang, Jiang-Hong; Zhao, Ming; Horn, Diane; Chan, Jeannie; Boyce, Brendan F; Harris, Stephen E; Mundy, Gregory R; Chen, Di

    2003-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulates growth plate chondrogenesis during development and postnatal bone growth, but the control mechanisms of BMP-2 expression in growth plate chondrocytes are unknown. Here we have used both in vitro and in vivo approaches to demonstrate that transcription factor, NF-kappaB, regulates BMP-2 gene expression in chondrocytes. Two putative NF-kappaB response elements were found in the -2712/+165 region of the BMP-2 gene. Cotransfection of mutant I-kappaBalpha expression plasmids with BMP-2 promoter-luciferase reporters into TMC-23 chondrocyte cell line suppressed BMP-2 transcription. Mutations in NF-kappaB response elements in the BMP-2 gene lead to decreases in BMP-2 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using nuclear extracts from TMC-23 chondrocytic cells revealed that the NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65 bound to the NF-kappaB response elements of the BMP-2 gene. Thus, NF-kappaB may positively regulate BMP-2 gene transcription. Consistent with these findings, expression of BMP-2 mRNA was significantly reduced in growth plate chondrocytes in NF-kappaB p50/p52 dKO mice, which associated with decreased numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd)-positive cells in the proliferating zone of growth plate in these mice. Therefore, in postnatal growth plate chondrocytes, expression of BMP-2 is regulated by NF-kappaB, which may play an important role in chondrogenesis.

  18. [Multiple facets of ADA2 deficiency: Vasculitis, auto-inflammatory disease and immunodeficiency: A literature review of 135 cases from literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayand, A; Sarrabay, G; Belot, A; Hentgen, V; Kone-Paut, I; Grateau, G; Melki, I; Georgin-Lavialle, S

    2018-04-01

    Deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2) is a recently described auto-inflammatory disorder. It is an autosomal recessive inherited disease, caused by mutations in the ADA2 gene (formerly known as CECR1) encoding ADA2 enzyme. Besides its role in the purine metabolism, it has been postulated that ADA2 may act as a growth factor for endothelial cells and in the differenciation of monocytes. Thus, deficiency of ADA2 would lead to endothelial damage and a skewing of monocytes into M1 pro-inflammatory macrophage, causing DADA2 manifestations. Three core clinical features have been described: inflammatory-vascular signs, hematologic abnormalities and immunodeficiency. Clinically, patients display intermittent fever, cutaneous vascular manifestations, such as livedo, ischemic strokes, arthralgia and abdominal pain crisis. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents (i.e. cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, ciclosporin, methotrexate) appear to be poorly effective. Although the mechanism has not been elucidated, anti-TNF agents have been proven efficient in DADA2 and should therefore be used as first line therapy for vasculitis. Role of anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapies in stroke-prophylaxis remains to be discussed, as those patients display a high risk of intracranial bleeding. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of TMEM106B gene polymorphism with age at onset in granulin mutation carriers and plasma granulin protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Wang, Jun; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Spiegel, Noah; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Norton, Joanne B; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison

    2011-05-01

    To test whether rs1990622 (TMEM106B) is associated with age at onset (AAO) in granulin (GRN) mutation carriers and with plasma GRN levels in mutation carriers and healthy, elderly individuals. Rs1990622 (TMEM106B) was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP) in a recent genome-wide association. Rs1990622 was genotyped in GRN mutation carriers and tested for association with AAO using the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards model. Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Subjects  We analyzed 50 affected and unaffected GRN mutation carriers from 4 previously reported FTLD-TDP families (HDDD1, FD1, HDDD2, and the Karolinska family). The GRN plasma levels were also measured in 73 healthy, elderly individuals. Age at onset and GRN plasma levels. The risk allele of rs1990622 was associated with a mean decrease of the AAO of 13 years (P = 9.9 × 10(-7)) and with lower plasma GRN levels in both healthy older adults (P = 4 × 10(-4)) and GRN mutation carriers (P = .0027). Analysis of the HapMap database identified a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3173615 (T185S) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622. The association of rs1990622 with AAO explains, in part, the wide range in the AAO of disease among GRN mutation carriers. We hypothesize that rs1990622 or another variant in linkage disequilibrium could act in a manner similar to APOE in Alzheimer disease, increasing risk for disease in the general population and modifying AAO in mutation carriers. Our results also suggest that genetic variation in TMEM106B may influence risk for FTLD-TDP by modulating secreted levels of GRN.

  20. Mutational screening of CHX10, GDF6, OTX2, RAX and SOX2 genes in 50 unrelated microphthalmia-anophthalmia-coloboma (MAC) spectrum cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J; Pelcastre, E L; Tovilla-Canales, J L; Garcia-Ortiz, J E; Amato-Almanza, M; Villanueva-Mendoza, C; Espinosa-Mattar, Z; Zenteno, J C

    2010-08-01

    Microphthalmia-anophthalmia-coloboma (MAC) are congenital eye malformations causing a significant percentage of visually impairments in children. Although these anomalies can arise from prenatal exposure to teratogens, mutations in well-defined genes originate potentially heritable forms of MAC. Mutations in genes such as CHX10, GDF6, RAX, SOX2 and OTX2, among others, have been recognised in dominant or recessive MAC. SOX2 and OTX2 are the two most commonly mutated genes in monogenic MAC. However, as more numerous samples of MAC subjects would be analysed, a better estimation of the actual involvement of specific MAC-genes could be made. Here, a comprehensive mutational analysis of the CHX10, GDF6, RAX, SOX2 and OTX2 genes was performed in 50 MAC subjects. PCR amplification and direct automated DNA sequencing of all five genes in 50 unrelated subjects. Eight mutations (16% prevalence) were recognised, including four GDF6 mutations (one novel), two novel RAX mutations, one novel OTX2 mutation and one SOX2 mutation. Anophthalmia and nanophthalmia, not previously associated with GDF6 mutations, were observed in two subjects carrying defects in this gene, expanding the spectrum of GDF6-linked ocular anomalies. Our study underscores the importance of genotyping large groups of patients from distinct ethnic origins for improving the estimation of the global involvement of particular MAC-causing genes.

  1. Significance of combined detection of JAK2V617F, MPL and CALR gene mutations in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liying; Qian, Mengyao; Wu, Nana; Wu, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the mutation rate of JAK2V617F, MPLW515L/K and CALR genes in adult patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and the accuracy of the combined detection by the receiver operating curve. Three hundred and forty-two cases with high-platelets (≥300×10 9 /l) were consecutively selected. The patients were analyzed for routine blood examination, bone marrow biopsy and genetic testing. One hundred and fifty-four cases (45.03%) were diagnosed with ET and 188 cases of secondary thrombocythemia according to the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue tumor classification standards of 2008. It was found that the mutant type of three genes showed three bands, whereas only one band for wild-type. The JAK2V617F and MPL mutations did not cause a change in the open reading frame and the CALR mutation resulted in its change. The mutation rate of JAK2V617F and CALR in ET group was significantly higher than that in the secondary thrombocythemia group (p<0.05). The positive mutation rate of MPL was only 4.55%. JAK2V617F-positive mutation alone was used to diagnose with ET. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.721. The sensitivity was 72.4%, the specificity was 79.5% and the cut-off value was 0.25. When CALR-positive mutation alone was used to diagnose ET, the AUC, sensitivity, specificity and cut-off value were 0.664, 68.4, 82.4 and 0.09%, respectively. JAK2V617F combined with CALR mutation were used for diagnosis of ET. The AUC was 0.862, the sensitivity was 85.9%, the specificity was 87.8%, and the cut-off values were 0.21 and 0.07. In conclusion, the positive mutation rate of JAK2V617F and CALR in ET was higher, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the diagnosis of ET were significantly improved using the detection of JAK2V617F and CALR.

  2. Five recurrent BRCA1/2 mutations are responsible for cancer predisposition in the majority of Slovenian breast cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novakovic Srdjan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both recurrent and population specific mutations have been found in different areas of the world and more specifically in ethnically defined or isolated populations. The population of Slovenia has over several centuries undergone limited mixing with surrounding populations. The current study was aimed at establishing the mutation spectrum of BRCA1/2 in the Slovenian breast/ovarian cancer families taking advantage of a complete cancer registration database. A second objective was to determine the cancer phenotype of these families. Methods The original population database was composed of cancer patients from the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in Slovenia which also includes current follow-up status on these patients. The inclusion criteria for the BRCA1/2 screening were: (i probands with at least two first degree relatives with breast and ovarian cancer; (ii probands with only two first degree relatives of breast cancer where one must be diagnosed less than 50 years of age; and (iii individual patients with breast and ovarian cancer, bilateral breast cancer, breast cancer diagnosed before the age of 40 and male breast cancer without any other cancer in the family. Results Probands from 150 different families met the inclusion criteria for mutation analysis of which 145 consented to testing. A BRCA1/2 mutation was found in 56 (39%. Two novel large deletions covering consecutive exons of BRCA1 were found. Five highly recurrent specific mutations were identified (1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 5382insC in the BRCA1 gene and IVS16-2A>G in the BRCA2 gene. The IVS16-2A>G in the BRCA2 gene appears to be a unique founder mutation in the Slovenian population. A practical implication is that only 4 PCR fragments can be used in a first screen and reveal the cancer predisposing mutation in 67% of the BRCA1/2 positive families. We also observed an exceptionally high frequency of 4 different pathogenic missense mutations, all affecting one of

  3. p.H1069Q mutation in ATP7B and biochemical parameters of copper metabolism and clinical manifestation of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromadzka, Graznya; Schmidt, Harmut H J; Genschel, Janine; Bochow, Bettina; Rodo, M; Tarnacka, Beatek; Litwin, Thomas; Chabik, Grzegorz; Członkowska, Anna

    2006-02-01

    We compared the effect of the p.H1069Q mutation and other non-p.H1069Q mutations in ATP7B on the phenotypic expression of Wilson's disease (WD), and assessed whether the clinical phenotype of WD in compound heterozygotes depends on the type of mutation coexisting with the p.H1069Q. One hundred forty-two patients with clinically, biochemically, and genetically diagnosed WD were studied. The mutational analysis of ATP7B was performed by direct sequencing. A total number of 26 mutations in ATP7B were identified. The p.His1069Gln was the most common mutation (allelic frequency: 72%). Seventy-three patients were homozygous for this mutation. Of compound heterozygotes, 37 had frameshift/nonsense mutation, and 20 had other missense mutation on one of their ATP7B alleles. Twelve patients had two non-p.H1069Q mutations. Patients homozygous for the p.H1069Q mutation had the less severe disturbances of copper metabolism and the latest presentation of first WD symptoms. The most severely disturbed copper metabolism and the earliest age at initial disease manifestation was noticed in non-p.H1069Q patients. In compound heterozygotes, the type of mutation coexisting with the p.H1069Q to a small extent influenced WD phenotype. The phenotype of WD varied considerably among patients with the same genotype. The p.H1069Q mutation is associated with late WD manifestation and with a mild disruption of copper metabolism. In compound heterozygotes, the phenotype of WD to a small extent depends on the type of mutation coexisting with the p.H1069Q. Besides genotype, additional modifying factors seem to determine WD manifestations. Copyright (c) 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Neonatal pulmonary arterial hypertension and Noonan syndrome: two fatal cases with a specific RAF1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Rachel K; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Manning, Melanie A; Benitz, William; Hudgins, Louanne

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in RAF1 are associated with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We present two infants with Noonan syndrome and an identical RAF1 mutation, p.Ser257Leu (c.770C>T), who developed severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) that proved to be fatal. The RAF1 gene encodes Raf-1 kinase, part of the Ras/mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, which has been linked to the development of PAH. This specific mutation has been associated with dephosphorylation of a critical serine residue and constitutive activation of the Raf-1 kinase. These two cases suggest that abnormal activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway may play a significant role in the development of pulmonary vascular disease in the subset of patients with Noonan syndrome and a specific RAF1 mutation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Germline mutations in lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) confer susceptibility to multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaomu; Calvo-Vidal, M Nieves; Chen, Siwei; Wu, Gang; Revuelta, Maria V; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Jinghui; Walsh, Michael F; Nichols, Kim E; Joseph, Vijai; Snyder, Carrie; Vachon, Celine M; McKay, James D; Wang, Shu-Ping; Jayabalan, David S; Jacobs, Lauren M; Becirovic, Dina; Waller, Rosalie G; Artomov, Mykyta; Viale, Agnes; Patel, Jayeshkumar; Phillip, Jude M; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Curtin, Karen; Salama, Mohamed; Atanackovic, Djordje; Niesvizky, Ruben; Landgren, Ola; Slager, Susan L; Godley, Lucy A; Churpek, Jane; Garber, Judy E; Anderson, Kenneth C; Daly, Mark J; Roeder, Robert G; Dumontet, Charles; Lynch, Henry T; Mullighan, Charles G; Camp, Nicola J; Offit, Kenneth; Klein, Robert J; Yu, Haiyuan; Cerchietti, Leandro; Lipkin, Steven M

    2018-03-20

    Given the frequent and largely incurable occurrence of multiple myeloma (MM), identification of germline genetic mutations that predispose cells to MM may provide insight into disease etiology and the developmental mechanisms of its cell of origin, the plasma cell. Here we identified familial and early-onset MM kindreds with truncating mutations in lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A), an epigenetic transcriptional repressor that primarily demethylates histone H3 on lysine 4 and regulates hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. Additionally, we found higher rates of germline truncating and predicted deleterious missense KDM1A mutations in MM patients unselected for family history compared to controls. Both monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) and MM cells have significantly lower KDM1A transcript levels compared with normal plasma cells. Transcriptome analysis of MM cells from KDM1A mutation carriers shows enrichment of pathways and MYC target genes previously associated with myeloma pathogenesis. In mice, antigen challenge followed by pharmacological inhibition of KDM1A promoted plasma cell expansion, enhanced secondary immune response, elicited appearance of serum paraprotein, and mediated upregulation of MYC transcriptional targets. These changes are consistent with the development of MGUS. Collectively, our findings show KDM1A is the first autosomal dominant MM germline predisposition gene, providing new insights into its mechanistic roles as a tumor suppressor during post-germinal center B cell differentiation. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. A retrospective study to rule out possible association of genetic and non-genetic risk factors with specific brca mutation positive breast cancers is some Pakistani females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Imran, M.; Hanif, A.; Bilal, M.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among Asian women including Pakistan where recurrent mutations among certain sub-ethnic groups predisposing to breast cancer have recently been established. Study Design: The current retrospective study involves identification of genetic and non-genetic risk factors in 27 specific mutation positive females out of a. total of 100 females diagnosed with breast cancer, representing a sample from the Punjabi ethnic population of the city of Lahore. The study has been carried out by telephonic communication with the mutation positive patients or their relatives. Results: Out of the total 27% patients positive for specific BRCA mutations, 23% were positive for BRCAI mutations and 4% for BRCA2. Among a total of 100 breast cancer patients the BRCAI-IVS14, lG>A mutation was identified in 5 Punjabi ethnic females with Rajput sub ethnicity, BRCAI-3889delAG in 10 (8 with Mughal and 2 with Khan sub ethnicity), BRCAI-2080insA in 8 (Rajput sub ethnics) and BRCA2-3337C>T in 4 (Minhas sub ethnic) subjects. Two BRCAI mutations, namely 3889delAG and 2080insA were found to coexist in only one study case (with Mughal sub ethnicity). All the mutation positive breast cancers had unilateral ductal carcinoma. Of the 23 cases positive for screened BRCAI mutations, 17 were diagnosed for breast cancer at a relatively early age (age<40) and 6 were diagnosed at late age (age<41) whereas all cases positive for single BRCA2 mutation under consideration were diagnosed at late age. Furthermore, 24 of 27 patients with specific BRCA mutations had a positive family history of breast cancer. The high prevalence of the screened BRCA mutations in certain Punjabi sub-ethnicities indicates the importance of counseling. It is suggested that consanguinity may be a risk factor for recurrent population specific mutations. Hormonal factors including use of oral contraceptives, polycystic ovaries, central obesity, nulliparity, late age at first pregnancy, lack of

  7. Novel nonsense mutation of the endothelin-B receptor gene in a family with Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrris, P; Carter, N D; Patton, M A

    1999-11-05

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) comprises sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmentation of skin and hair, and pigmentary disturbances of the irides. Four types of WS have been classified to date; in WS type IV (WS4), patients additionally have colonic aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease, HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-3 (EDN3), endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB), and Sox10 genes have been identified as causative for WS type IV. We screened a family with a combined WS-HSCR phenotype for mutations in the EDNRB locus using standard DNA mutation analysis and sequencing techniques. We have identified a novel nonsense mutation at codon 253 (CGA-->TGA, Arg-->STOP). This mutation leads to a premature end of the translation of EDNRB at exon 3, and it is predicted to produce a truncated and nonfunctional endothelin-B receptor. All affected relatives were heterozygous for the Arg(253)-->STOP mutation, whereas it was not observed in over 50 unrelated individuals used as controls. These data confirm the role of EDNRB in the cause of the Waardenburg-Hirschsprung syndrome and demonstrate that in WS-HSCR there is a lack of correlation between phenotype and genotype and a variable expression of disease even within the same family. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Multiple Recurrent Paraganglioma in a Pediatric Patient with Germline SDH-B Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan McGowan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET are recognized approaches for locating paragangliomas. Recently, gallium-68 DOTA-octreotate (DOTATATE scans have shown promise detecting neuroendocrine tumors missed by FDG-PET and MRI. 13-year-old male with SDH-B mutation presented with symptoms of paraganglioma and elevated catecholamines. MRI did not demonstrate the T2 hyper intense signal typical of paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma; FDG-PET scan did not reveal increased foci of uptake. DOTATATE scan revealed a signal consistent only with residual adrenal tissue. Resection of the right adrenal bed revealed paraganglioma. Following surgery, no further symptoms were reported and biochemical tests normalized.

  9. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  10. Naturally occurring mutations in large surface genes related to occult infection of hepatitis B virus genotype C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms related to occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, particularly those based on genotype C infection, have rarely been determined thus far in the ongoing efforts to determine infection mechanisms. Therefore, we aim to elucidate the mutation patterns in the surface open reading frame (S ORF underlying occult infections of HBV genotype C in the present study. Nested PCRs were applied to 624 HBV surface antigen (HBsAg negative Korean subjects. Cloning and sequencing of the S ORF gene was applied to 41 occult cases and 40 control chronic carriers. Forty-one (6.6% of the 624 Korean adults with HBsAg-negative serostatus were found to be positive for DNA according to nested PCR tests. Mutation frequencies in the three regions labeled here as preS1, preS2, and S were significantly higher in the occult subjects compared to the carriers in all cases. A total of two types of deletions, preS1 deletions in the start codon and preS2 deletions as well as nine types of point mutations were significantly implicated in the occult infection cases. Mutations within the "a" determinant region in HBsAg were found more frequently in the occult subjects than in the carriers. Mutations leading to premature termination of S ORF were found in 16 occult subjects (39.0% but only in one subject from among the carriers (2.5%. In conclusion, our data suggest that preS deletions, the premature termination of S ORF, and "a" determinant mutations are associated with occult infections of HBV genotype C among a HBsAg-negative population. The novel mutation patterns related to occult infection introduced in the present study can help to broaden our understanding of HBV occult infections.

  11. Autosomal dominant epidermodysplasia verruciformis lacking a known EVER1 or EVER2 mutation

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, David H.; Gammon, Bryan; Snijders, Peter J.; Mbata, Ihunanya; Phifer, Beth; Hartley, A. Howland; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Murphy, Philip M.; Hwang, Sam T.

    2009-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by abnormal susceptibility to infection with specific human papillomavirus (HPV) serotypes. EV is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been reported. Nonsense mutations in the genes EVER1 and EVER2 have been identified in over 75% of cases. We present EV in a father and son with typical histologic and clinical findings that occur in the absence of mutation...

  12. ARID1B is a specific vulnerability in ARID1A-mutant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Katherine C; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wilson, Boris G; Vazquez, Francisca; Haswell, Jeffrey R; Manchester, Haley E; Kim, Youngha; Kryukov, Gregory V; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Aguirre, Andrew J; Jagani, Zainab; Wang, Zhong; Garraway, Levi A; Hahn, William C; Roberts, Charles W M

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed that ARID1A, encoding AT-rich interactive domain 1A (SWI-like), is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers and also has bona fide tumor suppressor properties. Consequently, identification of vulnerabilities conferred by ARID1A mutation would have major relevance for human cancer. Here, using a broad screening approach, we identify ARID1B, an ARID1A homolog whose gene product is mutually exclusive with ARID1A in SWI/SNF complexes, as the number 1 gene preferentially required for the survival of ARID1A-mutant cancer cell lines. We show that loss of ARID1B in ARID1A-deficient backgrounds destabilizes SWI/SNF and impairs proliferation in both cancer cells and primary cells. We also find that ARID1A and ARID1B are frequently co-mutated in cancer but that ARID1A-deficient cancers retain at least one functional ARID1B allele. These results suggest that loss of ARID1A and ARID1B alleles cooperatively promotes cancer formation but also results in a unique functional dependence. The results further identify ARID1B as a potential therapeutic target for ARID1A-mutant cancers.

  13. Novel SCARB2 mutation in action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome and evaluation of SCARB2 mutations in isolated AMRF features

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    Hopfner Franziska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome is a hereditary form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with renal failure. It is considered to be an autosomal-recessive disease related to loss-of-function mutations in SCARB2. We studied a German AMRF family, additionally showing signs of demyelinating polyneuropathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. To test the hypothesis whether isolated appearance of individual AMRF syndrome features could be related to heterozygote SCARB2 mutations, we screened for SCARB2 mutations in unrelated patients showing isolated AMRF features. Methods In the AMRF family all exons of SCARB2 were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The mutation screening of unrelated patients with isolated AMRF features affected by either epilepsy (n = 103, progressive myoclonus epilepsy or generalized epilepsy, demyelinating polyneuropathy (n = 103, renal failure (n = 192 or dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 85 was performed as high resolution melting curve analysis of the SCARB2 exons. Results A novel homozygous 1 bp deletion (c.111delC in SCARB2 was found by sequencing three affected homozygous siblings of the affected family. A heterozygous sister showed generalized seizures and reduction of nerve conduction velocity in her legs. No mutations were found in the epilepsy, renal failure or dilated cardiomyopathy samples. In the polyneuropathy sample two individuals with demyelinating disease were found to be carriers of a SCARB2 frameshift mutation (c.666delCCTTA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that demyelinating polyneuropathy and dilated cardiomyopathy are part of the action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome. Moreover, they raise the possibility that in rare cases heterozygous SCARB2 mutations may be associated with PNP features.

  14. Specific and Efficient Regression of Cancers Harboring KRAS Mutation by Targeted RNA Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Ju Hyun; Yang, Bitna; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2017-02-01

    Mutations in the KRAS gene, which persistently activate RAS function, are most frequently found in many types of human cancers. Here, we proposed and verified a new approach against cancers harboring the KRAS mutation with high cancer selectivity and efficient anti-cancer effects based on targeted RNA replacement. To this end, trans-splicing ribozymes from Tetrahymena group I intron were developed, which can specifically target and reprogram the mutant KRAS G12V transcript to induce therapeutic gene activity in cells. Adenoviral vectors containing the specific ribozymes with downstream suicide gene were constructed and then infection with the adenoviruses specifically downregulated KRAS G12V expression and killed KRAS G12V-harboring cancer cells additively upon pro-drug treatment, but it did not affect the growth of wild-type KRAS-expressing cells. Minimal liver toxicity was noted when the adenoviruses were administered systemically in vivo. Importantly, intratumoral injection of the adenoviruses with pro-drug treatment specifically and significantly impeded the growth of xenografted tumors harboring KRAS G12V through a trans-splicing reaction with the target RNA. In contrast, xenografted tumors harboring wild-type KRAS were not affected by the adenoviruses. Therefore, RNA replacement with a mutant KRAS-targeting trans-splicing ribozyme is a potentially useful therapeutic strategy to combat tumors harboring KRAS mutation. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exome sequencing identifies a novel SMCHD1 mutation in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Boyden, Steven E; Estrella, Elicia A; Jones, Takako I; Rahimov, Fedik; Yu, Timothy W; Darras, Basil T; Amato, Anthony A; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Jones, Peter L; Kunkel, Louis M; Kang, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    FSHD2 is a rare form of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) characterized by the absence of a contraction in the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat region on chromosome 4q35 that is the hallmark of FSHD1. However, hypomethylation of this region is common to both subtypes. Recently, mutations in SMCHD1 combined with a permissive 4q35 allele were reported to cause FSHD2. We identified a novel p.Lys275del SMCHD1 mutation in a family affected with FSHD2 using whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis. This mutation alters a highly conserved amino acid in the ATPase domain of SMCHD1. Subject III-11 is a male who developed asymmetrical muscle weakness characteristic of FSHD at 13 years. Physical examination revealed marked bilateral atrophy at biceps brachii, bilateral scapular winging, some asymmetrical weakness at tibialis anterior and peroneal muscles, and mild lower facial weakness. Biopsy of biceps brachii in subject II-5, the father of III-11, demonstrated lobulated fibers and dystrophic changes. Endomysial and perivascular inflammation was found, which has been reported in FSHD1 but not FSHD2. Given the previous report of SMCHD1 mutations in FSHD2 and the clinical presentations consistent with the FSHD phenotype, we conclude that the SMCHD1 mutation is the likely cause of the disease in this family. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Granzyme B mediated function of Parvovirus B19-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Perdomo, Maria F; Kantele, Anu; Hedman, Lea; Hedman, Klaus; Franssila, Rauli

    2015-01-01

    A novel conception of CD4+ T cells with cytolytic potential (CD4+ CTL) is emerging. These cells appear to have a part in controlling malignancies and chronic infections. Human parvovirus B19 can cause a persistent infection, yet no data exist on the presence of B19-specific CD4+ CTLs. Such cells could have a role in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune disorders reported to be associated with B19. We explored the cytolytic potential of human parvovirus B19-specific T cells by stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) with recombinant B19-VP2 virus-like particles. The cytolytic potential was determined by enzyme immunoassay-based quantitation of granzyme B (GrB) and perforin from the tissue culture supernatants, by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) and by detecting direct cytotoxicity. GrB and perforin responses with the B19 antigen were readily detectable in B19-seropositive individuals. T-cell depletion, HLA blocking and ICS experiments showed GrB and perforin to be secreted by CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells with strong GrB responses were found to exhibit direct cytotoxicity. As anticipated, ICS of B19-specific CD4+ T cells showed expected co-expression of GrB, perforin and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Unexpectedly, also a strong co-expression of GrB and interleukin 17 (IL-17) was detected. These cells expressed natural killer (NK) cell surface marker CD56, together with the CD4 surface marker. To our knowledge, this is the first report on virus-specific CD4+ CTLs co-expressing CD56 antigen. Our results suggest a role for CD4+ CTL in B19 immunity. Such cells could function within both immune regulation and triggering of autoimmune phenomena such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26246896

  17. SLC26A4 mutations are associated with a specific inner ear malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoz, Suat; Sennaroğlu, Levent; Incesulu, Armağan; Cengiz, Filiz Başak; Koç, Yasemin; Tekin, Mustafa

    2007-03-01

    Inner ear anomalies have been reported in approximately 30% of children with early onset deafness. Identification of causative genetic factors in a large proportion of these patients was not successful. Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene have been detected in individuals with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) or Mondini dysplasia. We aimed to characterize the inner ear anomalies associated with SLC26A4 mutations. The SLC26A4 gene has been screened for mutations in 16 subjects from 14 unrelated Turkish families with a variety of inner ear anomalies ranging from Michel aplasia to incomplete partition-II and EVA. None of the patients was diagnosed to have a recognizable genetic syndrome. Additional four patients with Pendred syndrome from three families were included. Only one patient with EVA was found to have a heterozygous mutation (c.1586delT) in SLC26A4. All patients with Pendred syndrome had homozygous mutations and were noted to have either EVA or EVA associated with incomplete partition-II on the computed tomography of the temporal bone. SLC26A4 mutations are not associated with a large spectrum of inner ear anomalies. They, instead, result in a specific morphological appearance consistent with EVA or incomplete partition-II.

  18. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Erdem-Eraslan (Lale); D. Heijsman (Daphne); M. De Wit (Maurice); A.E. Kremer (Andreas); A. Sacchetti (Andrea); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); P.J. French (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCausal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes

  19. The L2b real-time PCR targeting the pmpH gene of Chlamydia trachomatis used for the diagnosis of lymphogranuloma venereum is not specific to L2b strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, A; Peuchant, O; Hénin, N; Bébéar, C; de Barbeyrac, B

    2016-06-01

    The French Reference Centre for chlamydiae uses two real-time PCRs targeting the pmpH gene of Chlamydia trachomatis to differentiate between L strains and variant L2b, responsible for a lymphogranuloma venereum outbreak in Europe. We compared the results obtained for 122 L2b C. trachomatis-positive specimens, using the two real-time PCRs, with the sequencing of the ompA gene. Only 91 specimens were confirmed as L2b. Our results demonstrate that the lymphogranuloma venereum outbreak is no longer dominated by the variant L2b, and that many L-positive specimens were misidentified as L2b with the method used, which raises the question of its specificity. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+ T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Sara Y; Kang, Sohyeong; Ford, Mandy L; Harder, Kenneth W; Priatel, John J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8 + T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8 + T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8 + T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8 + T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8 + T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas.

  1. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+ T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8+ T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a−/− CD8+ T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a−/− CD8+ T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8+ T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8+ T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8+ T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8+ T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas. PMID:28344876

  2. Loss of function mutations in PTPN6 promote STAT3 deregulation via JAK3 kinase in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demosthenous, Christos; Han, Jing Jing; Hu, Guangzhen; Stenson, Mary; Gupta, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    PTPN6 (SHP1) is a tyrosine phosphatase that negatively controls the activity of multiple signaling pathways including STAT signaling, however role of mutated PTPN6 is not much known. Here we investigated whether PTPN6 might also be a potential target for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and performed Sanger sequencing of the PTPN6 gene. We have identified missense mutations within PTPN6 (N225K and A550V) in 5% (2/38) of DLBCL tumors. Site directed mutagenesis was performed to mutate wild type (WT) PTPN6 and stable cell lines were generated by lentiviral transduction of PTPN6WT, PTPN6N225K and PTPN6A550V constructs, and effects of WT or mutated PTPN6 on STAT3 signaling were analyzed. WT PTPN6 dephosphorylated STAT3, but had no effect on STAT1, STAT5 or STAT6 phosphorylation. Both PTPN6 mutants were unable to inhibit constitutive, as well as cytokines induced STAT3 activation. Both PTPN6 mutants also demonstrated reduced tyrosine phosphatase activity and exhibited enhanced STAT3 transactivation activity. Intriguingly, a lack of direct binding between STAT3 and WT or mutated PTPN6 was observed. However, compared to WT PTPN6, cells expressing PTPN6 mutants exhibited increased binding between JAK3 and PTPN6 suggesting a more dynamic interaction of PTPN6 with upstream regulators of STAT3. Consistent with this notion, both the mutants demonstrated increased resistance to JAK3 inhibitor, WHIP-154 relative to WT PTPN6. Overall, this is the first study, which demonstrates that N225K and A550V PTPN6 mutations cause loss-of-function leading to JAK3 mediated deregulation of STAT3 pathway and uncovers a mechanism that tumor cells can use to control PTPN6 substrate specificity. PMID:26565811

  3. Haemophilia B caused by mutation of a potential thrombin cleavage site in factor IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winship, P.R. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

    1990-03-11

    Haemophilia B is a blood coagulation disorder caused by mutations in the factor IX gene giving functionally defective or reduced levels of factor IX protein circulating in the plasma. The mutation in the Caucasian patient under investigation, Haemophilia B Oxford h5 (Oxh5), was characterized at the DNA level by constructing a genomic library using leucocyte-derived DNA from the patient. Overlapping recombinant clones spanning the entire factor IX locus were isolated which then allowed the generation of a series of sub-clones across all eight exons (a-h) plus the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences known to be important in regulation of the gene and polyadenylation of the mRNA species.

  4. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks....... Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52...

  5. Heterozygote FANCD2 mutations associated with childhood T Cell ALL and testicular seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetsers, Stephanie; Muter, Joanne; Bristow, Claire; Patel, Leena; Chandler, Kate; Bonney, Denise; Wynn, Robert F; Whetton, Anthony D; Will, Andrew M; Rockx, Davy; Joenje, Hans; Strathdee, Gordon; Shanks, Jonathan; Klopocki, Eva; Gille, Johan J P; Dorsman, Josephine; Meyer, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities characterised by cellular cross linker hypersensitivity. FA is caused by mutations in any of so far 15 identified FANC genes, which encode proteins that interact in a common DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Individuals with FA have a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and squamous cell carcinoma. An increased cancer risk has been firmly established for carriers of mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCN/PALB2, RAD51C/FANCO and link the FA pathway to inherited breast and ovarian cancer. We describe a pedigree with FANCD2 mutations c.458T > C (p.Leu153Ser) and c.2715 + 1G > A (p.Glu906LeufsX4) with mild phenotype FA in the index case, T cell ALL in the Leu153Ser heterozygous brother and testicular seminoma in the p.Glu906LeufsX4 heterozygous father. Both FANCD2 alleles were present in the T Cell ALL and the seminoma. This links specific FANCD2 mutations to T cell ALL and seminoma without evidence of allelic loss in the tumour tissue.

  6. Assessing the contribution of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase to spontaneous mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leary Jeffry J

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thymidine kinase (tk mutagenesis assay is often utilized to determine the frequency of herpes simplex virus (HSV replication-mediated mutations. Using this assay, clinical and laboratory HSV-2 isolates were shown to have a 10- to 80-fold higher frequency of spontaneous mutations compared to HSV-1. Methods A panel of HSV-1 and HSV-2, along with polymerase-recombinant viruses expressing type 2 polymerase (Pol within a type 1 genome, were evaluated using the tk and non-HSV DNA mutagenesis assays to measure HSV replication-dependent errors and determine whether the higher mutation frequency of HSV-2 is a distinct property of type 2 polymerases. Results Although HSV-2 have mutation frequencies higher than HSV-1 in the tk assay, these errors are assay-specific. In fact, wild type HSV-1 and the antimutator HSV-1 PAAr5 exhibited a 2–4 fold higher frequency than HSV-2 in the non-HSV DNA mutatagenesis assay. Furthermore, regardless of assay, HSV-1 recombinants expressing HSV-2 Pol had error rates similar to HSV-1, whereas the high mutator virus, HSV-2 6757, consistently showed signficant errors. Additionally, plasmid DNA containing the HSV-2 tk gene, but not type 1 tk or LacZ DNA, was shown to form an anisomorphic DNA stucture. Conclusions This study suggests that the Pol is not solely responsible for the virus-type specific differences in mutation frequency. Accordingly, it is possible that (a mutations may be modulated by other viral polypeptides cooperating with Pol, and (b the localized secondary structure of the viral genome may partially account for the apparently enhanced error frequency of HSV-2.

  7. Small Interfering RNA Specific for N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor 2B Offers Neuroprotection to Dopamine Neurons through Activation of MAP Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia T.W. Ng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B-specific siRNA was applied in parkinsonian models. Our previous results showed that reduction in expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1, the key subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, by antisense oligos amelio-rated the motor symptoms in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned rat, an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD [Lai et al.: Neurochem Int 2004;45:11-22]. To further the investigation on the efficacy of gene silencing, small interference RNA (siRNA specific for the NR2B subunit was designed and administered in the striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The present results show that administration of NR2B-specific siRNA decreased the number of apomorphine-induced rotations in the lesioned rats and that there was a significant reduction in NR2B proteins levels after NR2B-specific siRNA administration. Furthermore, attenuation of the loss of dopaminergic neurons was found in both the striatal and substantia nigra regions of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that had been continuously infused with siRNA for 7 days. In addition, a significant upregulation of p-p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2; Thr202/Tyr204 and p-CREB (Ser133 in striatal neurons was found. These results suggest that application of the gene silencing targeting NR2B could be a potential treatment of PD, and they also revealed the possibility of NR2B-specific siRNA being involved in the prosurvival pathway.

  8. Mutation analysis of the CHK2 gene in breast carcinoma and other cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingvarsson, Sigurdur; Sigbjornsdottir, Bjarnveig I; Huiping, Chen; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigridur H; Ragnarsson, Gisli; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arason, Adalgeir; Egilsson, Valgardur; Bergthorsson, Jon TH

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the CHK2 gene at chromosome 22q12.1 have been reported in families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Chk2 is an effector kinase that is activated in response to DNA damage and is involved in cell-cycle pathways and p53 pathways. We screened 139 breast tumors for loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 22q, using seven microsatellite markers, and screened 119 breast tumors with single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing for mutations in the CHK2 gene. Seventy-four of 139 sporadic breast tumors (53%) show loss of heterozygosity with at least one marker. These samples and 45 tumors from individuals carrying the BRCA2 999del5 mutation were screened for mutations in the CHK2 gene. In addition to putative polymorphic regions in short mononucleotide repeats in a non-coding exon and intron 2, a germ line variant (T59K) in the first coding exon was detected. On screening 1172 cancer patients for the T59K sequence variant, it was detected in a total of four breast-cancer patients, two colon-cancer patients, one stomach-cancer patient and one ovary-cancer patient, but not in 452 healthy individuals. A tumor-specific 5' splice site mutation at site +3 in intron 8 (TTgt [a → c]atg) was also detected. We conclude that somatic CHK2 mutations are rare in breast cancer, but our results suggest a tumor suppressor function for CHK2 in a small proportion of breast tumors. Furthermore, our results suggest that the T59K CHK2 sequence variant is a low-penetrance allele with respect to tumor growth

  9. Identification of two new mutations in the GPR98 and the PDE6B genes segregating in a Tunisian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmani-Aifa, Mounira; Benzina, Zeineb; Zulfiqar, Fareeha; Dhouib, Houria; Shahzadi, Amber; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Rebaï, Ahmed; Söderkvist, Peter; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kimberling, William J; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2009-04-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. ARRP could be associated with extraocular manifestations that define specific syndromes such as Usher syndrome (USH) characterized by retinal degeneration and congenital hearing loss (HL). The USH type II (USH2) associates RP and mild-to-moderate HL with preserved vestibular function. At least three genes USH2A, the very large G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR98, and DFNB31 are responsible for USH2 syndrome. Here, we report on the segregation of non-syndromic ARRP and USH2 syndrome in a consanguineous Tunisian family, which was previously used to define USH2B locus. With regard to the co-occurrence of these two different pathologies, clinical and genetic reanalysis of the extended family showed (i) phenotypic heterogeneity within USH2 patients and (ii) excluded linkage to USH2B locus. Indeed, linkage analysis disclosed the cosegregation of the USH2 phenotype with the USH2C locus markers, D5S428 and D5S618, whereas the ARRP perfectly segregates with PDE6B flanking markers D4S3360 and D4S2930. Molecular analysis revealed two new missense mutations, p.Y6044C and p.W807R, occurring in GPR98 and PDE6B genes, respectively. In conclusion, our results show that the USH2B locus at chromosome 3p23-24.2 does not exist, and we therefore withdraw this locus designation. The combination of molecular findings for GPR98 and PDE6B genes enable us to explain the phenotypic heterogeneity and particularly the severe ocular affection first observed in one USH2 patient. This report presents an illustration of how consanguinity could increase familial clustering of multiple hereditary diseases within the same family.

  10. A specific box switches the cell fate determining activity of XOTX2 and XOTX5b in the Xenopus retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Rong-Qiao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Otx genes, orthologues of the Drosophila orthodenticle gene (otd, play crucial roles in vertebrate brain development. In the Xenopus eye, Xotx2 and Xotx5b promote bipolar and photoreceptor cell fates, respectively. The molecular basis of their differential action is not completely understood, though the carboxyl termini of the two proteins seem to be crucial. To define the molecular domains that make the action of these proteins so different, and to determine whether their retinal abilities are shared by Drosophila OTD, we performed an in vivo molecular dissection of their activity by transfecting retinal progenitors with several wild-type, deletion and chimeric constructs of Xotx2, Xotx5b and otd. Results We identified a small 8–10 amino acid divergent region, directly downstream of the homeodomain, that is crucial for the respective activities of XOTX2 and XOTX5b. In lipofection experiments, the exchange of this 'specificity box' completely switches the retinal activity of XOTX5b into that of XOTX2 and vice versa. Moreover, the insertion of this box into Drosophila OTD, which has no effect on retinal cell fate, endows it with the specific activity of either XOTX protein. Significantly, in cell transfection experiments, the diverse ability of XOTX2 and XOTX5b to synergize with NRL, a cofactor essential for vertebrate rod development, to transactivate the rhodopsin promoter is also switched depending on the box. We also show by GST-pull down that XOTX2 and XOTX5b differentially interact with NRL, though this property is not strictly dependent on the box. Conclusion Our data provide molecular evidence on how closely related homeodomain gene products can differentiate their functions to regulate distinct cell fates. A small 'specificity box' is both necessary and sufficient to confer on XOTX2 and XOTX5b their distinct activities in the developing frog retina and to convert the neutral orthologous OTD protein of Drosophila

  11. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement...... individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 +/- 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...... HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement....

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing Investigation of a Tuberculosis Outbreak in Port-au-Prince, Haiti Caused by a Strain with a "Low-Level" rpoB Mutation L511P - Insights into a Mechanism of Resistance Escalation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Ocheretina

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recommends diagnosing Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB in high burden countries by detection of mutations in Rifampin (RIF Resistance Determining Region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis rpoB gene with rapid molecular tests GeneXpert MTB/RIF and Hain MTBDRplus. Such mutations are found in >95% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to RIF by conventional culture-based drug susceptibility testing (DST. However routine diagnostic screening with molecular tests uncovered specific "low level" rpoB mutations conferring resistance to RIF below the critical concentration of 1 μg/ml in some phenotypically susceptible strains. Cases with discrepant phenotypic (susceptible and genotypic (resistant results for resistance to RIF account for at least 10% of resistant diagnoses by molecular tests and urgently require new guidelines to inform therapeutic decision making. Eight strains with a "low level" rpoB mutation L511P were isolated by GHESKIO laboratory between 2008 and 2012 from 6 HIV-negative and 2 HIV-positive patients during routine molecular testing. Five isolates with a single L511P mutation and two isolates with double mutation L511P&M515T had MICs for RIF between 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml and tested susceptible in culture-based DST. The eighth isolate carried a double mutation L511P&D516C and was phenotypically resistant to RIF. All eight strains shared the same spoligotype SIT 53 commonly found in Haiti but classic epidemiological investigation failed to uncover direct contacts between the patients. Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS revealed that L511P cluster isolates resulted from a clonal expansion of an ancestral strain resistant to Isoniazid and to a very low level of RIF. Under the selective pressure of RIF-based therapy the strain acquired mutation in the M306 codon of embB followed by secondary mutations in rpoB and escalation of resistance level. This scenario highlights the importance of subcritical

  13. A IMPORTÂNCIA DA DESTINAÇÃO DADA EM MEDICAMENTOS VENCIDOS NAS RESIDÊNCIAS URBANAS

    OpenAIRE

    Bonfim, Emerson Soares; Orssatto, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho é abordar sobre a problemática da geração de resíduos, em especifico os resíduos de medicamentos vencidos nas residências urbanos, e conhecer qual a destinação dada aos mesmos. Para entender os motivos e se aprofundar em relação ao destino dado aos medicamentos vencidos utilizou-se um questionário sócio - ambiental com 17 questões, aplicado em 150 clientes de três farmácias da rede farmacêutica do município de Foz do Iguaçu no período de 19 á 23 de dezembro de 2012. ...

  14. Double mutation of cell wall proteins CspB and PBP1a increases secretion of the antibody Fab fragment from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Among other advantages, recombinant antibody-binding fragments (Fabs) hold great clinical and commercial potential, owing to their efficient tissue penetration compared to that of full-length IgGs. Although production of recombinant Fab using microbial expression systems has been reported, yields of active Fab have not been satisfactory. We recently developed the Corynebacterium glutamicum protein expression system (CORYNEX®) and demonstrated improved yield and purity for some applications, although the system has not been applied to Fab production. Results The Fab fragment of human anti-HER2 was successfully secreted by the CORYNEX® system using the conventional C. glutamicum strain YDK010, but the productivity was very low. To improve the secretion efficiency, we investigated the effects of deleting cell wall-related genes. Fab secretion was increased 5.2 times by deletion of pbp1a, encoding one of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBP1a), mediating cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis. However, this Δpbp1a mutation did not improve Fab secretion in the wild-type ATCC13869 strain. Because YDK010 carries a mutation in the cspB gene encoding a surface (S)-layer protein, we evaluated the effect of ΔcspB mutation on Fab secretion from ATCC13869. The Δpbp1a mutation showed a positive effect on Fab secretion only in combination with the ΔcspB mutation. The ΔcspBΔpbp1a double mutant showed much greater sensitivity to lysozyme than either single mutant or the wild-type strain, suggesting that these mutations reduced cell wall resistance to protein secretion. Conclusion There are at least two crucial permeability barriers to Fab secretion in the cell surface structure of C. glutamicum, the PG layer, and the S-layer. The ΔcspBΔpbp1a double mutant allows efficient Fab production using the CORYNEX® system. PMID:24731213

  15. Synergistic effects of UdgB and Ung in mutation prevention and protection against commonly encountered DNA damaging agents in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malshetty, Vidyasagar S; Jain, Ruchi; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Kurthkoti, Krishna; Varshney, Umesh

    2010-03-01

    The incorporation of dUMP during replication or the deamination of cytosine in DNA results in the occurrence of uracils in genomes. To maintain genomic integrity, uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) excise uracil from DNA and initiate the base-excision repair pathway. Here, we cloned, purified and biochemically characterized a family 5 UDG, UdgB, from Mycobacterium smegmatis to allow us to use it as a model organism to investigate the physiological significance of the novel enzyme. Studies with knockout strains showed that compared with the wild-type parent, the mutation rate of the udgB( -) strain was approximately twofold higher, whereas the mutation rate of a strain deficient in the family 1 UDG (ung(- )) was found to be approximately 8.4-fold higher. Interestingly, the mutation rate of the double-knockout (ung(-)/ udgB(-)) strain was remarkably high, at approximately 19.6-fold. While CG to TA mutations predominated in the ung(-) and ung(-)/udgB(-) strains, AT to GC mutations were enhanced in the udgB(-) strain. The ung(-)/udgB(-) strain was notably more sensitive to acidified nitrite and hydrogen peroxide stresses compared with the single knockouts (ung(-) or udgB(-)). These observations reveal a synergistic effect of UdgB and Ung in DNA repair, and could have implications for the generation of attenuated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Screening for duplications, deletions and a common intronic mutation detects 35% of second mutations in patients with USH2A monoallelic mutations on Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Luxon, Linda M; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2013-08-08

    Usher Syndrome is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is divided into three subtypes, of which the most common is Usher type 2, and the USH2A gene accounts for 75-80% of cases. Despite recent sequencing strategies, in our cohort a significant proportion of individuals with Usher type 2 have just one heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A, or no convincing disease-causing mutations across nine Usher genes. The purpose of this study was to improve the molecular diagnosis in these families by screening USH2A for duplications, heterozygous deletions and a common pathogenic deep intronic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. Forty-nine Usher type 2 or atypical Usher families who had missing mutations (mono-allelic USH2A or no mutations following Sanger sequencing of nine Usher genes) were screened for duplications/deletions using the USH2A SALSA MLPA reagent kit (MRC-Holland). Identification of USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was achieved by Sanger sequencing. Mutations were confirmed by a combination of reverse transcription PCR using RNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells or fibroblasts, and by array comparative genomic hybridisation with sequencing across the genomic breakpoints. Eight mutations were identified in 23 Usher type 2 families (35%) with one previously identified heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A. These consisted of five heterozygous deletions, one duplication, and two heterozygous instances of the pathogenic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. No variants were found in the 15 Usher type 2 families with no previously identified disease-causing mutations. In 11 atypical families, none of whom had any previously identified convincing disease-causing mutations, the mutation USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was identified in a heterozygous state in one family. All five deletions and the heterozygous duplication we report here are novel. This is the first time that a duplication in USH2A has been reported as a cause of Usher syndrome. We found that 8 of

  17. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Kunst, Henricus P M; Cascon, Alberto; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gaal, José; Korpershoek, Esther; Hinojar-Gutierrez, Adolfo; Timmers, Henri J L M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Hermsen, Mario A; Suárez, Carlos; Hussain, A Karim; Vriends, Annette H J T; Hes, Frederik J; Jansen, Jeroen C; Tops, Carli M; Corssmit, Eleonora P; de Knijff, Peter; Lenders, Jacques W M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Devilee, Peter; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R; Robledo, Mercedes

    2010-04-01

    Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation carriers, assess the clinical genetic significance of SDHAF2, and describe the associated clinical phenotype. We undertook a multicentre study in Spain and The Netherlands in 443 apparently sporadic patients with paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas who did not have mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB. We analysed DNA of 315 patients for germline mutations of SDHAF2; a subset (n=200) was investigated for gross gene deletions. DNA from a group of 128 tumours was studied for somatic mutations. We also examined a Spanish family with head and neck paragangliomas with a young age of onset for the presence of SDHAF2 mutations, undertook haplotype analysis in this kindred, and assessed their clinical phenotype. We did not identify any germline or somatic mutations of SDHAF2, and no gross gene deletions were noted in the subset of apparently sporadic patients analysed. Investigation of the Spanish family identified a pathogenic germline DNA mutation of SDHAF2, 232G-->A (Gly78Arg), identical to the Dutch kindred. SDHAF2 mutations do not have an important role in phaeochromocytoma and are rare in head and neck paraganglioma. Identification of a second family with the Gly78Arg mutation suggests that this is a crucial residue for the function of SDHAF2. We conclude that SDHAF2 mutation analysis is justified in very young patients with isolated head and neck paraganglioma without mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB, and in individuals with familial antecedents who are negative for mutations in all other risk genes. Dutch Cancer Society, European Union 6th Framework Program, Fondo Investigaciones Sanitarias, Fundación Mutua Madrileña, and Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer. 2010

  18. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  19. A novel TNNI2 mutation causes Freeman-Sheldon syndrome in a Chinese family with an affected adult with only facial contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefu; Jiang, Miao; Han, Weitian; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Wei; Sui, Yu; Lu, Yongping; Li, Jianxin

    2013-09-25

    Distal arthrogryposes (DAs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by congenital contractures with predominant involvement of the hands and feet, can be classified into at least 12 different forms. These autosomal dominant disorders are of variable expressivity and reduced penetrance. Mutations in sarcomeric protein genes, including troponin I2 (TNNI2), troponin T3 (TNNT3), tropomyosin 2 (TPM2), embryonic myosin heavy chain 3 (MYH3), and myosin binding protein C1 (MYBPC1), have been identified in distal arthrogryposis type 1 (DA1, MIM 108120), type 2B (DA2B, MIM 601680) and type 2A (DA2A)/Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS, MIM 193700). However, mutations causing FSS have only been reported in MYH3. Herein we describe a Chinese DA family whose members meet classical strict criteria for FSS, as well as one member of the family who has isolated facial features consistent with FSS. No disease-causing mutation was found in MYH3. Segregation of microsatellite markers flanking the TNNI2 and TNNT3 genes at 11p15.5 was compatible with linkage. Subsequent sequencing of TNNI2 revealed a novel mutation, c.A493T (p.I165F), located in the C-terminal region, which is critical for proper protein function. This mutation was found to cosegregate with the FSS phenotype in this family, and assessment using SIFT and PolyPhen-2 predicted a damaging effect. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first TNNI2 mutation in classical FSS and describe an atypical adult FSS case with only facial contractures resulting from somatic mosaicism. We infer that DA1, DA2B and FSS represent a phenotypic continuum of the same disorder and provide further genetic evidence for this hypothesis. © 2013.

  20. A splice acceptor mutation in C. elegans daf-19/Rfx disrupts functional specialization of male-specific ciliated neurons but does not affect ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kristen L; Rowneki, Mazhgan; Killian, Darrell J

    2015-04-01

    RFX transcription factors are master regulators of ciliogenesis in diverse animal species. The sole Caenorhabditis elegans RFX homolog, DAF-19, plays at least two roles in the formation of functional cilia. The DAF-19(C) isoform is required for ciliogenesis and the DAF-19(M) isoform is required for the functional specialization of a subset of male-specific ciliated neurons called PKD neurons. Here we report the identification of a novel mutation, daf-19(sm129), which disrupts the functional specification of PKD neurons and thus suggests that daf-19m activity is compromised. However, ciliogenesis is not disrupted in daf-19(sm129) mutants suggesting that daf-19c activity is retained. The sm129 mutation disrupts a splice acceptor site adjacent to an exon common to the daf-19c and daf-19m isoforms resulting in aberrant splicing in a proportion of transcripts. While aberrant splicing of daf-19c to upstream cryptic sites results in in-frame and functional products, a large proportion of daf-19m mRNAs include the entire upstream intron, which introduces a frameshift and stop codons. At least 15% of disease-causing mutations affect splicing of the gene bearing the mutation, thus it is important to understand the consequences of splice site mutations on gene function. However, predicting the effects of a splice site mutation remains difficult and experimental determination is still required. Using daf-19(sm129) as a model, our results suggest that this problem is exacerbated when a splice acceptor mutation is used by multiple isoforms of the same gene because the effects on each isoform can be dramatically different. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutations in sodium channel {beta}-subunit SCN3B are associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Salling; Jespersen, Thomas; Nielsen, Jonas Bille

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent arrhythmia. Screening of SCN5A-the gene encoding the a-subunit of the cardiac sodium channel-has indicated that disturbances of the sodium current may play a central role in the mechanism of lone AF. We tested the hypothesis that lone AF in young...... across species. Electrophysiological studies on the SCN3B mutation were carried out and all three SCN3B mutations caused a functionally reduced sodium channel current. One synonymous variant was found in SCN4B. CONCLUSION: In 192 young lone AF patients, we found three patients with suspected disease...

  2. Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasimi, Soma; Wibom, Carl; Dahlin, Anna M; Brännström, Thomas; Golovleva, Irina; Andersson, Ulrika; Melin, Beatrice

    2016-05-01

    During the last years, genome wide association studies have discovered common germline genetic variants associated with specific glioma subtypes. We aimed to study the association between these germline risk variants and tumor phenotypes, including copy number aberrations and protein expression. A total of 91 glioma patients were included. Thirteen well known genetic risk variants in TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, PHLDB1, TP53, and RTEL1 were selected for investigation of possible correlations with the glioma somatic markers: EGFR amplification, 1p/19q codeletion and protein expression of p53, Ki-67, and mutated IDH1. The CDKN2A/B risk variant, rs4977756, and the CDKN2B risk variant, rs1412829 were inversely associated (p = 0.049 and p = 0.002, respectively) with absence of a mutated IDH1, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele showed no or low expression of mutated IDH1. The RTEL1 risk variant, rs6010620 was associated (p = 0.013) with not having 1p/19q codeletion, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele did not show 1p/19q codeletion. In addition, the EGFR risk variant rs17172430 and the CDKN2B risk variant rs1412829, both showed a trend for association (p = 0.055 and p = 0.051, respectively) with increased EGFR copy number, i.e., the majority of patients homozygote for the risk alleles showed chromosomal gain or amplification of EGFR. Our findings indicate that CDKN2A/B risk genotypes are associated with primary glioblastoma without IDH mutation, and that there is an inverse association between RTEL1 risk genotypes and 1p/19q codeletion, suggesting that these genetic variants have a molecular impact on the genesis of high graded brain tumors. Further experimental studies are needed to delineate the functional mechanism of the association between genotype and somatic genetic aberrations.

  3. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations...... subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s)....

  4. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation

  5. Krüppel-like factor 1 mutations and expression of hemoglobins F and A2 in homozygous hemoglobin E syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan