WorldWideScience

Sample records for ds activation tagging

  1. An active ac/ds transposon system for activation tagging in tomato cultivar m82 using clonal propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jared D; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W; Veilleux, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar.

  2. An Active Ac/Ds Transposon System for Activation Tagging in Tomato Cultivar M82 Using Clonal Propagation1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jared D.; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar. PMID:23569107

  3. Suppression of the barley uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene by a Ds activation tagging element generates developmental photosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Agostino, Anthony; Clarke, Bryan C; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Pryor, Anthony J

    2009-03-01

    Chlorophyll production involves the synthesis of photoreactive intermediates that, when in excess, are toxic due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A novel, activation-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant is described that results from antisense suppression of a uroporphyrinogen III synthase (Uros) gene, the product of which catalyzes the sixth step in the synthesis of chlorophyll and heme. In homozygous mutant plants, uroporphyrin(ogen) I accumulates by spontaneous cyclization of hydroxyl methylbilane, the substrate of Uros. Accumulation of this tetrapyrrole intermediate results in photosensitive cell death due to the production of ROS. The efficiency of Uros gene suppression is developmentally regulated, being most effective in mature seedling leaves compared with newly emergent leaves. Reduced transcript accumulation of a number of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis genes occurs in the mutant, even under 3% light conditions, consistent with a retrograde plastid-nuclear signaling mechanism arising from Uros gene suppression. A similar set of nuclear genes was repressed in wild-type barley following treatment with a singlet oxygen-generating herbicide, but not by a superoxide generating herbicide, suggesting that the retrograde signaling apparent in the mutant is specific to singlet oxygen.

  4. Shark Tagging Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  5. Construction and Application of Efficient Ac-Ds Transposon Tagging Vectors in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohong Qu; Jong-Seong Jeon; Pieter B.F.Ouwerkerk; Maria Bellizzi; Jan Leach; Pamela Ronald; Guo-Liang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Transposons are effective mutagens alternative to T-DNA for the generation of insertional mutants in many plant species including those whose transformation is inefficient. The current strategies of transposon tagging are usually slow and labor-intensive and yield low frequency of tagged lines. We have constructed a series of transposon tagging vectors based on three approaches: (ⅰ) AcTPase controlled by glucocorticoid binding domainNP16 acidic activation domain/Gal4 DNA-binding domain (GVG) chemical-inducible expression system; (ⅱ) deletion of AcTPase via Cre-lox site-specific recombination that was initially triggered by Ds excision; and (ⅲ) suppression of early transposition events in transformed rice callus through a dual.functional hygromycin resistance gene in a novel Ds element (HPT-Ds). We tested these vectors in transgenic rice and characterized the transposition events. Our results showed that these vectors are useful resources for functional genomics of rice and other crop plants. The vectors are freely available for the community.

  6. Web News Extraction via Tag Path Feature Fusion Using DS Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong-Qing Wu; Lei Li; Li Li; Xindong Wu

    2016-01-01

    Contents, layout styles, and parse structures of web news pages differ greatly from one page to another. In addition, the layout style and the parse structure of a web news page may change from time to time. For these reasons, how to design features with excellent extraction performances for massive and heterogeneous web news pages is a challenging issue. Our extensive case studies indicate that there is potential relevancy between web content layouts and their tag paths. Inspired by the observation, we design a series of tag path extraction features to extract web news. Because each feature has its own strength, we fuse all those features with the DS (Dempster-Shafer) evidence theory, and then design a content extraction method CEDS. Experimental results on both CleanEval datasets and web news pages selected randomly from well-known websites show that the F1-score with CEDS is 8.08%and 3.08%higher than existing popular content extraction methods CETR and CEPR-TPR respectively.

  7. Measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs using charm-tagged events in e+e- collisions at square root s=10.58 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-04-06

    Using 230.2 fb-1 of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Upsilon(4S) resonance, 489+/-55 events containing the pure leptonic decay Ds+-->micro;+numicro have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D+-->micro+numicro)/Gamma(Ds+-->phipi+) is measured to be 0.143+/-0.018+/-0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs=(283+/-17+/-7+/-14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the Ds+-->phipi+ branching ratio, respectively.

  8. Ds tagging of BRANCHED FLORETLESS 1 (BFL1 that mediates the transition from spikelet to floret meristem in rice (Oryza sativa L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoque Mohammad

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of spikelet formation, a feature unique to grasses such as rice and maize, is yet to be fully understood, although a number of meristem and organ identity mutants have been isolated and investigated in Arabidopsis and maize. Using a two-element Ac/Ds transposon tagging system we have isolated a rice mutant, designated branched floretless 1 (bfl1 which is defective in the transition from spikelet meristem to floret meristem. Results The bfl1 mutant shows normal differentiation of the primary rachis-branches leading to initial spikelet meristem (bract-like structure equivalent to rudimentary glumes formation but fails to develop empty glumes and florets. Instead, axillary meristems in the bract-like structure produce sequential alternate branching, thus resulting in a coral shaped morphology of the branches in the developing panicle. The bfl1 mutant harbours a single Ds insertion in the upstream region of the BFL1 gene on chromosome 7 corresponding to PAC clone P0625E02 (GenBank Acc No. message URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=nucleotide&list_uids=34395191&dopt=GenBank&term=ap004570AP004570. RT-PCR analyses revealed a drastic reduction of BFL1 transcript levels in the bfl1 mutant compared to that in the wild-type. In each of the normal panicle-bearing progeny plants, from occasional revertant seeds of the vegetatively-propagated mutant plant, Ds was shown to be excised from the bfl1 locus. BFL1 contains an EREBP/AP2 domain and is most likely an ortholog of the maize transcription factor gene BRANCHED SILKLESS1 (BD1. Conclusions bfl1 is a Ds-tagged rice mutant defective in the transition from spikelet meristem (SM to floret meristem (FM. BFL1 is most probably a rice ortholog of the maize ERF (EREBP/AP2 transcription factor gene BD1. Based on the similarities in mutant phenotypes bfl1 is likely to be an allele of the previously reported frizzy panicle locus.

  9. Study of Inclusive B- and Bbar0 Decays to Flavor-Tagged D, D_s and Lambda_c

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Pappagallo, A; Palano, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Yu K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, S; Abachi, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, 3J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Schott, M; Fritsch, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, D N; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Lo Secco, C P; Jessop, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, 5M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, V; Azzolini, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We report on a study of inclusive $B^-$ and $\\bar{B}^0$ meson decays to ${D^0 X}$, ${\\bar{D}^0 X}$, ${D^+ X}$, ${D^- X}$, ${D_s^+ X}$, ${D_s^- X}$, ${\\Lambda_c^+ X}$, ${\\bar{\\Lambda}_c^- X}$, based on a sample of 231 million $B\\bar{B}$ events recorded with the BABAR detector at the $\\Upsilon{(4S)}$ resonance. Events are selected by completely reconstructing one $B$ and searching for a reconstructed charm particle in the rest of the event. From the measured branching fractions of these decays, we infer the number of charm and anti-charm particles per $\\bar{B}$ decay, separately for charged and neutral parents. We derive the total charm yield per $B^-$ decay, $n_c^- = 1.202 \\pm 0.023\\pm 0.040^{+0.035}_{-0.029} $, and per $\\bar{B}^0$ decay, $n_c^0 = 1.193 \\pm 0.030\\pm 0.034^{+0.044}_{-0.035}$ where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third reflects the charm branching-fraction uncertainties. We also present the charm momentum distributions measured in the $\\bar{B}$ rest frame.

  10. Study of inclusive B- and B¯0 decays to flavor-tagged D, Ds, and Λc+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Petzold, A.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Bard, D. J.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Kelly, M. P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S. Y.; Cowan, R.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; Patel, P. M.; Potter, C. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Del Re, D.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Bulten, H.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Galeazzi, F.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; John, M. J. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Mayer, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Tan, P.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2007-04-01

    We report on a study of inclusive B- and B¯0 meson decays to D0X, D¯0X, D+X, D-X, Ds+X, Ds-X, Λc+X, Λ¯c-X, based on a sample of 231×106 BB¯ events recorded with the BABAR detector at the Υ(4S) resonance. Events are selected by completely reconstructing one B and searching for a reconstructed charm particle in the rest of the event. From the measured branching fractions of these decays, we infer the number of charm and anticharm particles per B¯ decay, separately for charged and neutral parents. We derive the total charm yield per B- decay, nc-=1.208±0.023±0.040-0.029+0.035, and per B¯0 decay, nc0=1.203±0.030±0.034-0.035+0.044 where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third reflects the charm branching-fraction uncertainties. We also present the charm momentum distributions measured in the B¯ rest frame.

  11. RIG-I and dsRNA-induced IFNbeta activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Hausmann

    Full Text Available Except for viruses that initiate RNA synthesis with a protein primer (e.g., picornaviruses, most RNA viruses initiate RNA synthesis with an NTP, and at least some of their viral (pppRNAs remain unblocked during the infection. Consistent with this, most viruses require RIG-I to mount an innate immune response, whereas picornaviruses require mda-5. We have examined a SeV infection whose ability to induce interferon depends on the generation of capped dsRNA (without free 5' tri-phosphate ends, and found that this infection as well requires RIG-I and not mda-5. We also provide evidence that RIG-I interacts with poly-I/C in vivo, and that heteropolymeric dsRNA and poly-I/C interact directly with RIG-I in vitro, but in different ways; i.e., poly-I/C has the unique ability to stimulate the helicase ATPase of RIG-I variants which lack the C-terminal regulatory domain.

  12. SERS-active nanoparticle aggregate technology for tags and seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-03

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to create a modern tagging and sealing technology for international safeguards application. Our passive tagging methods are based on SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates; SERS: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering). These SANAs offer robust spectral barcoding capability in an inexpensive tag/seal, with the possibility of rapid in-field verification that requires no human input. At INMM 2009, we introduced SANAs, and showed approaches to integrating our technology with tags under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Here, we will focus on recent LANL development work, as well as adding additional dimensionality to the barcoding technique. The field of international safeguards employs a broad array of tags, seals, and tamper-indicating devices to assist with identification, tracking, and verification of components and materials. These devices each have unique strengths suited to specific applications, and span a range of technologies from passive metal cup seals and adhesive seals to active, remotely monitored fiber optic seals. Regardless of the technology employed, essential characteristics center around security, environmental and temporal stability, ease of use, and the ability to provide confidence to all parties. Here, we present a new inexpensive tagging technology that will deliver these attributes, while forming the basis of either a new seal, or as a secure layer added to many existing devices. Our approach uses the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) response from SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates, Figure 1) to provide a unique identifier or signature for tagging applications. SANAs are formed from gold or silver nanoparticles in the 40-80 nm size range. A chemical dye is installed on the nanoparticle surface, and the nanoparticles are then aggregated into ensembles of {approx}100 to 500 nm diameter, prior to being coated with silica. The silica shell protects the finished SANA from

  13. PKR is activated by cellular dsRNAs during mitosis and acts as a mitotic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosik; Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, Jong-Eun; Cho, Jun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, V Narry

    2014-06-15

    dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme well known for its roles in immune response. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation, and the phosphorylated PKR (pPKR) regulates translation and multiple signaling pathways in infected cells. Here, we found that PKR is activated in uninfected cells, specifically during mitosis, by binding to dsRNAs formed by inverted Alu repeats (IRAlus). While PKR and IRAlu-containing RNAs are segregated in the cytosol and nucleus of interphase cells, respectively, they interact during mitosis when nuclear structure is disrupted. Once phosphorylated, PKR suppresses global translation by phosphorylating the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). In addition, pPKR acts as an upstream kinase for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and regulates the levels of multiple mitotic factors such as cyclins A and B and Polo-like kinase 1 and phosphorylation of histone H3. Disruption of PKR activation via RNAi or expression of a transdominant-negative mutant leads to misregulation of the mitotic factors, delay in mitotic progression, and defects in cytokinesis. Our study unveils a novel function of PKR and endogenous dsRNAs as signaling molecules during the mitosis of uninfected cells.

  14. High Avidity dsDNA Autoantibodies in Brazilian Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Correlation with Active Disease and Renal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo C. Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated in Brazilian women with SLE the prevalence and levels of high avidity (HA dsDNA antibodies and tested their correlation with lupus activity and biomarkers of renal disease. We also compared these correlations to those observed with total dsDNA antibodies and antibodies against nucleosome (ANuA. Autoantibodies were detected by ELISA, while C3 and C4 levels were determined by nephelometry. Urine protein/creatinine ratio was determined, and lupus activity was measured by SLEDAI-2K. The prevalence of total and HA dsDNA antibodies was similar to but lower than that verified for ANuA. The levels of the three types of antibodies were correlated, but the correlation was more significant between HA dsDNA antibodies and ANuA. High avidity dsDNA antibodies correlated positively with ESR and SLEDAI and inversely with C3 and C4. Similar correlations were observed for ANuA levels, whereas total dsDNA antibodies only correlated with SLEDAI and C3. The levels of HA dsDNA antibodies were higher in patients with proteinuria, but their levels of total dsDNA antibodies and ANuA were unaltered. High avidity dsDNA antibodies can be found in high prevalence in Brazilian women with SLE and are important biomarkers of active disease and kidney dysfunction.

  15. Tag4M, a Wi-Fi RFID Active Tag Optimized for Sensor Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Folea, Silviu; Ghercioiu, Marius

    2010-01-01

    This presentation introduces a Wi-Fi tag named Tag4M. The novelty of the design is Wi-Fi with ultra-low power, in a very small package that is running on a battery for years and offers a platform for sensor measurements using the existing (Internet) network

  16. Characterization of enhancer trap and gene trap harboring Ac/Ds transposon in transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金维正; 汪少敏; 徐敏; 段瑞君; 吴平

    2004-01-01

    Insertion mutagenesis has become one of the most popular methods for gene functions analysis.Here we report a two-element Ac/Ds transposon system containing enhancer trap and gene trap for gene tagging in rice.The excision of Ds element was examined by PCR amplification.The excision frequency of Ds element varied from 0% to 40% among 20 F2 populations derived from 11 different Ds parents.Southern blot analysis revealed that more than 70% of excised Ds elements reinserted into rice genome and above 70% of the reinserted Ds elements were located at different positions of the chromosome in rice.The result of histochemical GUS analysis indicated that 28% of enhancer trap and 22% of gene trap tagging plants displayed GUS activity in leaves, roots,flowers or seeds.The GUS positive lines will be useful for identifying gene function in rice.

  17. Measurement of the Pseudoscalar Decay Constant fDs Using Charm-Tagged Events in e+e- Collisions at \\sqrt{s}=10.58GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le, F; Diberder; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    Using 230.2 fb^(-1) of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Y(4S) resonance, 489 +/- 55 events containing the pure leptonic decay D_s^+ --> mu^+ nu_mu have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D_s^+ --> mu^+ nu_mu)/Gamma(D_s^+ --> phi pi^+) is measured to be 0.143 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant f_{D_s} = (283 +/- 17 +/- 7 +/- 14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the D_s^+ --> phi pi^+ branching ratio, respectively.

  18. Imaging of caspase-3 activation by a novel FRET probe composed of CFP and DsRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juquiang; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Bifeng; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    Caspases-3 is a kind of cysteine proteases and plays an important role in cell apoptosis. It has been reported that caspase-3 activation can be real-time detected in living cells by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. However, the large spectral overlap between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) emission and the highly sensitivity to pH of YFP restricted their detecting sensitivity and reliability. CFP and red fluorescent protein (DsRed) possess superb wavelength separation of donor and acceptor emission spectra and DsRed was insensitive to pH, so the FRET probe composed of CFP and DsRed would be more suitable for imaging caspase-3 activation than the FRET probe composed of CFP and YFP. We constructed a vector that encoded CRS (caspase-3 recognition site) fused with CFP and DsRed (CFP-CRS-DsRed). In CFP-CRS-DsRed expressing tumor cells, FRET from CFP to DsRed could be detected. In the Clinical applications of cancer chemotherapy, cisplatin is one of the most broadly used drugs. It was already confirmed that caspase-3 was activated in HeLa cell treated by cisplatin. When the cells were stimulated with cisplatin, we found that the FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared. It indicated that actived caspase-3 cleaved the CFP-CRS-DsRed fusion protein at CRS site. Thus, the FRET probe of CFP-CRS-DsRed could sensitively and reliably monitor caspase-3 activation in living cell. This probe will be highly useful for rapid-screening potential drugs that may target the apoptotic process and for imaging tumors in vivo.

  19. Molecular biology of maize Ac/Ds elements: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarow, Katina; Doll, My-Linh; Kunze, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Maize Activator (Ac) is one of the prototype transposable elements of the hAT transposon superfamily, members of which were identified in plants, fungi, and animals. The autonomous Ac and nonautonomous Dissociation (Ds) elements are mobilized by the single transposase protein encoded by Ac. To date Ac/Ds transposons were shown to be functional in approximately 20 plant species and have become the most widely used transposable elements for gene tagging and functional genomics approaches in plants. In this chapter we review the biology, regulation, and transposition mechanism of Ac/Ds elements in maize and heterologous plants. We discuss the parameters that are known to influence the functionality and transposition efficiency of Ac/Ds transposons and need to be considered when designing Ac transposase expression constructs and Ds elements for application in heterologous plant species.

  20. In vivo antianaerobe activity of DS-8587, a new fluoroquinolone, against Fusobacterium necrophorum in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kurosaka, Yuichi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Kohno, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    DS-8587 is a novel parenteral fluoroquinolone, which has an activity equivalent to sitafloxacin against various pathogens including anaerobes. We examined the in vivo anti-anaerobic activity of DS-8587, and compared it with that of levofloxacin (LVFX), using a murine model of Fusobacterium necrophorum-induced liver abscess developed via blood borne infection. Mice with liver abscess infection caused by F. necrophorum were treated with saline (control), DS-8587 (0.8, 4, and 20 mg/kg twice daily), or LVFX (20 and 100 mg/kg) for a day. After treatment, the number of viable bacteria in liver was analyzed. We also analyzed the pharmacokinetics of these agents in plasma and the liver after initial treatment. The MICs of DS-8587 and LVFX were 0.015 and 1 mg/mL, respectively. DS-8587 eradicated the viable bacteria in the liver even at doses as low as 4 mg/kg. In contrast, the liver bacteria were not eradicated in any of the LVFX-treated mice even at a dose of 100 mg/kg (P DS-8587, 4 or 20 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameter AUC/MIC ratios for DS-8587 (4 mg/kg) and LVFX (100 mg/kg) were 96.7 and 60.8 in plasma and 600 and 145.6 in the liver, respectively. The AUC/MIC ratio showed the best correlation with efficacy of DS-8587. DS-8587 significantly reduced the number of viable bacteria in a murine model of F. necrophorum-induced liver abscess compared to LVFX. Our study demonstrated that the anti-anaerobic activity of quinolones in vivo was different from the MICs in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL.

  2. Laboratory Testing of Active and Passive UHF RFID Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarovszki Peter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with research of laboratory testing by active and passive UHF tags and therefore mutual coexistence of active and passive RFID technology, which is a part of automatic identification and data capture. In this article we would like to describe an identification of transport unit based on passive technology and also by active technology. We would like to specify, how this technologies can work together and in which application focuses on postal and logistics. All results are verified by measurement in our AIDC laboratory, which is located at the University of Žilina. Our research contains different types of measurements in order to point out the possible influence of these two technologies. The results of our research bring the new point of view and indicate the ways using of UHF RFID technology in postal and logistics applications. At the end of this article is characterized the utilization of the RFID technology in postal logistics chain by using both passive and active technologies.

  3. Noninvasive and real-time monitoring of molecular targeting therapy for lymph node and peritoneal metastasis in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colorectal cancer cells tagged with GFP and DsRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hayao; Hara, Masayasu; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-02-01

    We have developed an in vivo imaging system consisting of GFP- and DsRed-tagged human colonic cancer cell line, which has peritoneal and lymph node metastatic potential and show high sensitivity to EGFR targeting drugs, and convenient detection devices for GFP and DsRed. The latter includes a small handy fluorescence detection device for external monitoring of the therapeutic effect of the drug and a convenient stereo fluorescent microscope for internal visualization of micrometastases. We applied this imaging system to investigate anti-metastatic effects of EGFR targeting drugs such as gefitinib (Iressa). This system allowed sensitive detection of the development of peritoneal and lymph node metastases from the micrometastasis stage at the cellular level and also permited noninvasive, non-anesthetic monitoring of anti-metastatic effect of the drug in an animal facility without any pretreatment. Significant decreases in the intraabdominal metastatic tumor growth and prevention of inguinal lymph node metastasis by gefitinib treatment could be clearly monitored. These results suggest that convenient, low-cost, true real-time monitoring of therapeutic effect using such a fluorescence-mediated whole body imaging system seems to enhance the speed of preclinical study for novel anti-cancer agents and will allow us to understand the action mechanism of molecular targeting drugs.

  4. Measurement of the Branching Fractions for Inclusive $B^-$ and $\\bar B^0$ Decays to Flavor-tagged $D$, $D_s$ and $\\Lambda_c$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We report on the inclusive branching fractions of $B^-$ and of ${\\bar B}^0$ mesons decaying to ${D^0 X}$, ${{\\bar D}^0 X}$, ${D^+ X}$, ${D^- X}$, ${D_s^+ X}$, ${D_s^- X}$, ${\\Lambda_c^+ X}$, ${{\\bar \\Lambda}_c^- X}$, based on a sample of 88.9 million $B \\bar B$ events recorded with the $BABAR$ detector at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance. Events are selected by completely reconstructing one $B$ and searching for a reconstructed charmed particle in the rest of the event. We measure the number of charmed and of anti-charmed particles per $B$ decay and derive the total charm yield per $B^-$ decay, $n_c^- = 1.313 \\pm 0.037 \\pm 0.062 ^{+0.063}_{-0.042} $, and per ${\\bar B}^0$ decay, $n_c^0 = 1.276 \\pm 0.062 \\pm 0.058 ^{+0.066}_{-0.046}$ where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third reflects the charm branching-fraction uncertainties.

  5. An information theory criteria based blind method for enumerating active users in DS-CDMA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsami Khodadad, Farid; Abed Hodtani, Ghosheh

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a new and blind algorithm for active user enumeration in asynchronous direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) in multipath channel scenario is proposed. The proposed method is based on information theory criteria. There are two main categories of information criteria which are widely used in active user enumeration, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Minimum Description Length (MDL) information theory criteria. The main difference between these two criteria is their penalty functions. Due to this difference, MDL is a consistent enumerator which has better performance in higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) but AIC is preferred in lower SNRs. In sequel, we propose a SNR compliance method based on subspace and training genetic algorithm to have the performance of both of them. Moreover, our method uses only a single antenna, in difference to the previous methods which decrease hardware complexity. Simulation results show that the proposed method is capable of estimating the number of active users without any prior knowledge and the efficiency of the method.

  6. Molecular analysis of plant architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana using activation tagging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfun Junior, A.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: Arabidopsisthaliana, activation tagging, T-DNA, transposon, mutants, enhancer, DNA methylation, plant architecture, development, forward/reverse genetics, lateral organs, flower, vascular tissue, HLH, transmembrane, transcription factorsPlant development is one of the mos

  7. Mutagenesis of barley malting quality QTLs with Ds transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surinder; Tan, Han Qi; Singh, Jaswinder

    2012-03-01

    Various functional genomic tools are being used to identify and characterize genes in plants. The Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposon-based approach offers great potential, especially in barley, due to its limited success of genetic transformation and its large genome size. The bias of the Ac/Ds system towards genic regions and its tendency toward localized transpositions can greatly enhance the discovery and tagging of genes linked to Ds. Barley is a key ingredient in malting and brewing industry; therefore, gene discovery in relation to malting has an industrial perspective. Malting quality in barley is a complex and quantitatively inherited trait. Two major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting malting quality traits have been located on chromosome 4H. In this study, Ds was reactivated from parent transposants (TNP) lines, TNP-29 and TNP-79, where Ds was mapped in the vicinity of important malting QTLs. Reactivation of Ds was carried out both by conventional breeding and in vitro approaches. A threefold increase in reactivation frequency through the in vitro approach enabled the development of a new genomic resource for the dissection of malting QTL and gene discovery in barley. Identification of unique flanking sequences, using high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR and inverse PCR from these populations, has further emphasized the new location of Ds in the barley genome and provided new transposon mutants especially in β-GAL1, β-amylase-like gene and ABC transporter for functional genomic studies.

  8. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Eszter C.; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only...

  9. Histidine tag fusion increases expression levels of active recombinant amelogenin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Johan; Andersson, Christer; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Petter; Bülow, Leif

    2006-07-01

    Amelogenin is a dental enamel matrix protein involved in formation of dental enamel. In this study, we have expressed two different recombinant murine amelogenins in Escherichia coli: the untagged rM179, and the histidine tagged rp(H)M180, identical to rM179 except that it carries the additional N-terminal sequence MRGSHHHHHHGS. The effects of the histidine tag on expression levels, and on growth properties of the amelogenin expressing cells were studied. Purification of a crude protein extract containing rp(H)M180 was also carried out using IMAC and reverse-phase HPLC. The results of this study showed clearly that both growth properties and amelogenin expression levels were improved for E. coli cells expressing the histidine tagged amelogenin rp(H)M180, compared to cells expressing the untagged amelogenin rM179. The positive effect of the histidine tag on amelogenin expression is proposed to be due to the hydrophilic nature of the histidine tag, generating a more hydrophilic amelogenin, which is more compatible with the host cell. Human osteoblasts treated with the purified rp(H)M180 showed increased levels of secreted osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. This response was similar to cells treated with enamel matrix derivate, mainly composed by amelogenin, suggesting that the recombinant protein is biologically active. Thus, the histidine tag favors expression and purification of biologically active recombinant amelogenin.

  10. A first-in-human study of DS-1040, an inhibitor of the activated form of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J; Kochan, J; Yin, O; Warren, V; Zamora, C; Atiee, G; Pav, J; Orihashi, Y; Vashi, V; Dishy, V

    2017-05-01

    Essentials DS-1040 inhibits the activated form of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa). Infusion of DS-1040 was safe and well tolerated in healthy young and elderly subjects. DS-1040 substantially decreased TAFIa activity but had no impact on bleeding time. DS-1040 may provide an option of safer thrombolytic therapy. Background Current treatments for acute ischemic stroke and venous thromboembolism, such as recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator and thrombectomy, are limited by a narrow time window and the risk of bleeding. DS-1040 is a novel low molecular weight compound that inhibits the activated form of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa), and was developed as a fibrinolysis enhancer for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Objectives This first-in-human, randomized, placebo-controlled, three-part, phase 1 study was conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of DS-1040 in healthy subjects. Subjects/Methods Young (18-45 years) or elderly (65-75 years) subjects (N = 103) were randomized to receive single ascending doses of DS-1040 ranging from 0.1 mg to 40 mg, or placebo, administered either as a 0.5-h intravenous infusion or as a 24-h continuous infusion. Results All doses of DS-1040 were tolerated, and no serious adverse events (AEs) or discontinuations resulting from AEs occurred during the study. Bleeding time remained within the normal range for all doses tested in all subjects. Plasma exposure of DS-1040 increased proportionally with increase in dose. Elderly subjects had higher exposures to DS-1040 and prolonged elimination times, probably because of decreased renal clearance. DS-1040 caused a substantial dose-dependent and time-dependent decrease in TAFIa activity and in 50% clot lysis time. The levels of D-dimer, indicative of endogenous fibrinolysis, increased in some individuals following DS-1040 treatment. No effects of DS-1040 on coagulation parameters or platelet

  11. Small, N-terminal tags activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity by disrupting its autoinhibited conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Burchell

    Full Text Available Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, mutations in which cause Autosomal Recessive Parkinson's Disease. Many studies aimed at understanding Parkin function, regulation and dysfunction are performed using N-terminal epitope tags. We report here that the use of small tags such as FLAG, cMyc and HA, influence the physical stability and activity of Parkin in and out of cells, perturbing the autoinhibited native state of Parkin, resulting in an active-for-autoubiquitination species.

  12. Status and achievements of the EURISOL DS in the first year of activity

    CERN Document Server

    Fortuna, Graziano

    Following the results and recommendations of the EURISOL RTD conceptual design study performed within the 5th EC-framework programme, the EURISOL-DS design study will produce engineering-oriented studies and technical prototyping work for the next-generation ISOL-RIB facility in Europe. Such a world-class facility, complementary to the “in-flight” facility under construction at GSI (FAIR facility) is expected to come into operation at the end of next decade.

  13. Unique action of sodium tanshinone II-A sulfonate (DS-201) on the Ca(2+) dependent BK(Ca) activation in mouse cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoqiu; Yang, Yan; Cheng, Jun; Li, Pengyun; Inoue, Isao; Zeng, Xiaorong

    2011-04-10

    Sodium tanshinone II-A sulfonate (DS-201) is a water-soluble derivative of tanshinone IIA, a main active constituent of Salvia miltiorrhiza which has been used for treatments of cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases. DS-201 activates large conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in arterial smooth muscle cells, and reduces the vascular tone. Here we investigated the effect of DS-201 on the BK(Ca) channel kinetics by analyzing single channel currents. Smooth muscle cells were freshly isolated from mouse cerebral arteries. Single channel currents of BK(Ca) were recorded by patch clamp. DS-201 increased the total open probability (NPo) of BK(Ca) in a concentration-dependent manner. But this action required intracellular Ca(2+), and the effect depended on the Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](free)). DS-201 activated BK(Ca) with the half maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) of 111.5μM at 0.01μM [Ca(2+)](free), and 68.5μM at 0.1μM [Ca(2+)](free.) The effect of DS-201 on NPo was particularly strong in the range of [Ca(2+)](free) between 0.1 and 1μM. Analysis of the channel kinetics revealed that DS-201 had only the effect on the channel closing without affecting the channel opening, which was a striking contrast to the effect of [Ca(2+)](free), that is characterized by changing the channel opening without changing the channel closing. DS-201 may be bound to the open state of BK(Ca), and have an inhibitory effect on the transition from the open to closed state. By this way DS-201 may enhance the activity of BK(Ca), and exhibit a strong vasodilating effect against vasoconstriction in the range of [Ca(2+)](free) between 0.1 and 1μM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Eszter C; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-21

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture.

  15. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE19_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE19_DS1 Identification of triacylglycerols with 2D maps Two-dimensional (2D) maps were constructed for effe...ctive profiling of triacylglycerols (TAGs), and individual structures of TAGs were correctly identified by the elution profile and MS/MS. ...

  16. Tanshinone II-A sodium sulfonate (DS-201) enhances human BKCa channel activity by selectively targeting the pore-forming α subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao-qiu; Cheng, Xiu-li; Yang, Yan; Yan, Li; Gu, Jing-li; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao-rong; Cao, Ji-min

    2014-11-01

    Tanshinone II-A sodium sulfonate (DS-201), a water-soluble derivative of Tanshinone II-A, has been found to induce vascular relaxation and activate BKCa channels. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying the action of DS-201 on BKCa channels. Human BKCa channels containing α subunit alone or α plus β1 subunits were expressed in HEK293 cells. BKCa currents were recorded from the cells using patch-clamp technique. The expression and trafficking of BKCa subunits in HEK293 cells or vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were detected by Western blotting, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. DS-201 (40-160 μmol/L) concentration-dependently increased the total open probability of BKCa channels in HEK293 cells, associated with enhancements of Ca(2+) and voltage dependence as well as a delay in deactivation. Coexpression of β1 subunit did not affect the action of DS-201: the values of EC50 for BKCa channels containing α subunit alone and α plus β1 subunit were 66.6±1.5 and 62.0±1.1 μmol/L, respectively. In both HEK293 cells and VSMCs, DS-201 (80 μmol/L) markedly increased the expression of α subunit without affecting β1 subunit. In HEK293 cells, DS-201 enriched the membranous level of α subunit, likely by accelerating the trafficking and suppressing the internalization of α subunit. In both HEK293 cells and VSMCs, DS-201 (≥320 μmol/L) induced significant cytotoxicity. DS-201 selectively targets the pore-forming α subunit of human BKCa channels, thus enhancing the channel activities and increasing the subunit expression and trafficking, whereas the β1 subunit does not contribute to the action of DS-201.

  17. Active Collection of Land Cover Sample Data from Geo-Tagged Web Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Hou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sample data plays an important role in land cover (LC map validation. Traditionally, they are collected through field survey or image interpretation, either of which is costly, labor-intensive and time-consuming. In recent years, massive geo-tagged texts are emerging on the web and they contain valuable information for LC map validation. However, this kind of special textual data has seldom been analyzed and used for supporting LC map validation. This paper examines the potential of geo-tagged web texts as a new cost-free sample data source to assist LC map validation and proposes an active data collection approach. The proposed approach uses a customized deep web crawler to search for geo-tagged web texts based on land cover-related keywords and string-based rules matching. A data transformation based on buffer analysis is then performed to convert the collected web texts into LC sample data. Using three provinces and three municipalities directly under the Central Government in China as study areas, geo-tagged web texts were collected to validate artificial surface class of China’s 30-meter global land cover datasets (GlobeLand30-2010. A total of 6283 geo-tagged web texts were collected at a speed of 0.58 texts per second. The collected texts about built-up areas were transformed into sample data. User’s accuracy of 82.2% was achieved, which is close to that derived from formal expert validation. The preliminary results show that geo-tagged web texts are valuable ancillary data for LC map validation and the proposed approach can improve the efficiency of sample data collection.

  18. Increased motor preparation activity during fluent single word production in DS: A correlate for stuttering frequency and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Sarah; Santens, Patrick; Cosyns, Marjan; van Mierlo, Pieter; Batens, Katja; Corthals, Paul; De Letter, Miet; Van Borsel, John

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal speech motor preparation is suggested to be a neural characteristic of stuttering. One of the neurophysiological substrates of motor preparation is the contingent negative variation (CNV). The CNV is an event-related, slow negative potential that occurs between two defined stimuli. Unfortunately, CNV tasks are rarely studied in developmental stuttering (DS). Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate motor preparation in DS by use of a CNV task. Twenty five adults who stutter (AWS) and 35 fluent speakers (FS) were included. They performed a picture naming task while an electro-encephalogram was recorded. The slope of the CNV was evaluated at frontal, central and parietal electrode sites. In addition, a correlation analysis was performed with stuttering severity and frequency measures. There was a marked increase in CNV slope in AWS as compared to FS. This increase was observed over the entire scalp with respect to stimulus onset, and only over the right hemisphere with respect to lip movement onset. Moreover, strong positive correlations were found between CNV slope and stuttering frequency and severity. As the CNV is known to reflect the activity in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical-network, the present findings confirm an increased activation of this loop during speech motor preparation in stuttering. The more a person stutters, the more neurons of this cortical-subcortical network seem to be activated. Because this increased CNV slope was observed during fluent single word production, it is discussed whether or not this observation refers to a successful compensation strategy.

  19. In vitro antifungal activity of synthetic dsRNA molecules against two pathogens of banana, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense and Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumbanza, Francis M; Kiggundu, Andrew; Tusiime, Geoffrey; Tushemereirwe, Wilberforce K; Niblett, Chuck; Bailey, Anna

    2013-10-01

    A key challenge for designing RNAi-based crop protection strategies is the identification of effective target genes in the pathogenic organism. In this study, in vitro antifungal activities of a set of synthetic double-stranded RNA molecules on spore germination of two major pathogenic fungi of banana, Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht f. sp. cubense WC Snyder & HN Hans (Foc) and Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet (Mf) were evaluated. All the tested synthetic dsRNAs successfully triggered the silencing of target genes and displayed varying degrees of potential to inhibit spore germination of both tested banana pathogens. When Foc dsRNAs were applied to Foc spores, inhibition ranged from 79.8 to 93.0%, and from 19.9 to 57.8% when Foc dsRNAs were applied to Mf spores. However, when Mf dsRNAs were applied on Mf spores, inhibition ranged from 34.4 to 72.3%, and from 89.7 to 95.9% when Mf dsRNAs were applied to Foc spores. The dsRNAs for adenylate cyclase, DNA polymerase alpha subunit and DNA polymerase delta subunit showed high levels of spore germination inhibition during both self- and cross-species tests, making them the most promising targets for RNA-mediated resistance in banana against these fungal pathogens. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Characteristics of antibiotic resistance and sequence type of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in Japan and the antibacterial activity of DS-8587.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Saito; Shikata, Mototsugu; Chiba, Megumi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Gotoh, Naomasa

    2014-04-01

    DS-8587 is a novel broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with extended antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of DS-8587 in 31 quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates. Efflux pump and qnr genes, mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions of target enzymes, and sequence types determined by multilocus sequence typing were analyzed. Forty-two quinolone-susceptible clinical isolates were analyzed for comparison. For susceptibility testing, DS-8587 exhibited more effective antibacterial activity when compared with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. When combined with the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine, the MIC of DS-8587 was less affected when compared with the MIC exhibited by combined ciprofloxacin and 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine. The efflux pump genes adeA/adeB/adeC and regulatory elements adeR/adeS were detected in 23 of 31 quinolone-resistant isolates. The qnrA/qnrB/qnrS genes were not detected in any A. baumannii isolates analyzed. Mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions were observed in all 31 quinolone-resistant isolates. Multilocus sequence typing analyses revealed that 22 of 31 quinolone-resistant isolates belonged to ST-2, corresponding to international clonal lineage II. In conclusion, DS-8587 exhibits potent antibacterial activity against quinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates that harbor mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. In the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine, no significant changes were observed in the MIC for DS-8587. DS-8587 should be considered as a treatment option for A. baumannii including ST-2 strains that are predominant among the quinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates found in Japan. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  1. 76 FR 10421 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576, Overseas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576, Overseas Schools--Grant... Number: DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576. Respondents: Recipients of grants. Estimated Number of.... Department of State, Room H-328, 2401 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20037. You must include the DS form...

  2. The exonuclease ISG20 is directly induced by synthetic dsRNA via NF-kappaB and IRF1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espert, Lucile; Rey, Clémence; Gonzalez, Laure; Degols, Geneviève; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira Kmar; Mechti, Nadir; Gongora, Céline

    2004-06-03

    Many interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes are also induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a component closely associated with the IFN system in the context of virus-host interactions. Recently, we demonstrated that the IFN-induced 3' --> 5' exonuclease ISG20 possesses antiviral activities against RNA viruses. Here we show that ISG20 induction by synthetic dsRNA (pIpC) is stronger and faster than its induction by IFN. Two families of transcription factors are implicated in the transcriptional activation of ISG20 by dsRNA. Initially, the NF-kappaB factors p50 and p65 bind and activate the kappaB element of the Isg20 promoter. This is followed by IRF1 binding to the ISRE. As pIpC often induces protein movements in the cells, we questioned whether it could influence ISG20 localization. Interestingly and contrary to IFN, dsRNA induces a nuclear matrix enrichment of the ISG20 protein. dsRNA induction of ISG20 via NF-kappaB and its antiviral activity led us to suggest that ISG20 could participate in the cellular response to virus infection.

  3. Anti-cancer effects of p21WAF1/CIP1 transcriptional activation induced by dsRNAs in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-ming WU; Gang CHEN; Chun DAI; Ying HUANG; Cui-fang ZHENG; Qiong-zhu DONG; Guan WANG; Xiao-wen LI; Xiao-fei ZHANG; Bin LI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anti-cancer effects of p21WAF1/CIP1 transcriptional activation induced by dsRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines.Methods: HCC cell lines BEL7402, SMMC-7721, MHCC97L, MHCC97H, and MHCCLM3 were used. HCC ceils were treated with dsP21322 (50 nmol/L), dsControl (50 nmol/L), siP21 (50 nmol/L), or mock transfection. The expression of p21 was detected using quantitative PCR and Western blot. The effects of RNA activation on HCC cells were determined using cell viability assays, apoptosis analyses and clonogenic survival assays. Western blot was also conducted to detect the expression of Bcl-xL, survivin, cleaved caspase-3,cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP.Results: At 72 to 120 h following the transfection, dsP21-322 markedly inhibited the viability of HCC cells and clone formation. At the same times, dsP21-322 caused a significant increase in HCC cell apoptosis, as demonstrated with cytometric analysis. The phenomena were correlated with decreased expression levels of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xL, surviving, and increased expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP.Conclusion: RNA-induced activation of p21 gene expression may have significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers.

  4. Use of the fluorescent timer DsRED-E5 as reporter to monitor dynamics of gene activity in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabella, R.; Franken, C.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins, such as green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein (DsRED), have become frequently used reporters in plant biology. However, their potential to monitor dynamic gene regulation is limited by their high stability. The recently made DsRED-E5 variant overcame this

  5. Use of the fluorescent timer DsRED-E5 as reporter to monitor dynamics of gene activity in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabella, R.; Franken, C.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins, such as green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein (DsRED), have become frequently used reporters in plant biology. However, their potential to monitor dynamic gene regulation is limited by their high stability. The recently made DsRED-E5 variant overcame this proble

  6. 76 FR 39465 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576, Overseas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576, Overseas Schools--Grant... Collection. Originating Office: Office of Overseas Schools, A/OPR/OS. Form Number: DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576. Respondents: Recipients of grants. Estimated Number of Respondents: 196. Estimated Number...

  7. Antitumor activity and induction of TP53-dependent apoptosis toward ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma by the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor DS-7423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Tomoko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Shiose, Yoshinobu; Hirota, Yasuhide; Inaba, Kanako; Makii, Chinami; Kurikawa, Reiko; Miyasaka, Aki; Koso, Takahiro; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Shoji, Keiko; Sone, Kenbun; Arimoto, Takahide; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Kawana, Kei; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Koichi; McCormick, Frank; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Yano, Tetsu; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    DS-7423, a novel, small-molecule dual inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is currently in phase I clinical trials for solid tumors. Although DS-7423 potently inhibits PI3Kα (IC50 = 15.6 nM) and mTOR (IC50 = 34.9 nM), it also inhibits other isoforms of class I PI3K (IC50 values: PI3Kβ = 1,143 nM; PI3Kγ = 249 nM; PI3Kδ = 262 nM). The PI3K/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in ovarian clear cell adenocarcinomas (OCCA) through various mutations that activate PI3K-AKT signaling. Here, we describe the anti-tumor effect of DS-7423 on a panel of nine OCCA cell lines. IC50 values for DS-7423 were DS-7423 suppressed the tumor growth of OCCA in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a decrease in S-phase cell populations in all the cell lines and an increase in sub-G1 cell populations following treatment with DS-7423 in six of the nine OCCA cell lines tested. DS-7423-mediated apoptosis was induced more effectively in the six cell lines without TP53 mutations than in the three cell lines with TP53 mutations. Concomitantly with the decreased phosphorylation level of MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog), the level of phosphorylation of TP53 at Ser46 was increased by DS-7423 in the six cell lines with wild-type TP53, with induction of genes that mediate TP53-dependent apoptosis, including p53AIP1 and PUMA at 39 nM or higher doses. Our data suggest that the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor DS-7423 may constitute a promising molecular targeted therapy for OCCA, and that its antitumor effect might be partly obtained by induction of TP53-dependent apoptosis in TP53 wild-type OCCAs.

  8. Billfish Tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SWFSC's constituent-based Billfish Tagging Program began in 1963 and since that time has provided conventional spaghetti type tags and tagging supplies to...

  9. [Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kumi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2014-06-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) are a new class of anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic agents that have structural and functional similarities with their prototype compound, thalidomide. Although thalidomide and its derivatives, lenalidomide and pomalidomide, are widely used as an essential component in the treatment of selected hematologic neoplasms including multiple myeloma, the precise mechanisms by which these agents exert anti-tumor effects have yet to be clarified. Recently, a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cereblon (CRBN), has been identified as a direct molecular target for anti-neoplastic activities of IMiDs. CRBN has also been shown to be involved in IMiDs-mediated T-cell co-stimulation and cytokine production. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the CRBN-related molecular pathways that are essential for antitumor and immunomodulatory activities of IMiDs.

  10. Tag questions Tag questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Brazil

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The so-called 'tag' structures of English have received a lot of attention in language teaching programmes, attention that is not hard to justify when one considers the problems and anxiety they can occasion for many foreign learners. Most teachers one speaks to seem fairly willing to agree, however, that traditional treatments of the topic leave much to be desired. It happens, also, that, when considered collectively, the tags and some related phenomena have a special heoretical interest. For they constitute a field in which it seems essential to bring together insights that derive from the study of several aspects of linguistic organisation, aspects which in some recent work have been held to need distinctive kinds of descriptive category to handle. Traditional treatments have found it necessary to recognise different syntactic types (e.g. 'same polarity' and 'reversed polarity' tags and ifferent intonational treatments ("falling'and 'rising' tag; while the way the communicative significance of the various permutations is described normally requires reference to the expectations they signal regarding the immediately following behaviour of the other party (in the common phrase, 'What kind of answer they expect'. This last consideration places the matter squarely in the arena of recent work on the analysis of interactive discourse. The so-called 'tag' structures of English have received a lot of attention in language teaching programmes, attention that is not hard to justify when one considers the problems and anxiety they can occasion for many foreign learners. Most teachers one speaks to seem fairly willing to agree, however, that traditional treatments of the topic leave much to be desired. It happens, also, that, when considered collectively, the tags and some related phenomena have a special heoretical interest. For they constitute a field in which it seems essential to bring together insights that derive from the study of several aspects

  11. Integral test on activation cross section of tag gas nuclides using fast neutron spectrum fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    Activation cross sections of tag gas nuclides, which will be used for the failed fuel detection and location in FBR plants, were evaluated by the irradiation tests in the fast neutron spectrum fields in JOYO and YAYOI. The comparison of their measured radioactivities and the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 cross section set showed that the C/E values ranged from 0.8 to 2.8 for the calibration tests in YAYOI and that the present accuracies of these cross sections were confirmed. (author)

  12. Activation tagging of ATHB13 in Arabidopsis thaliana confers broad-spectrum disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongli; Appiano, Michela; Huibers, Robin P; Chen, Xi; Loonen, Annelies E H M; Visser, Richard G F; Wolters, Anne-Marie A; Bai, Yuling

    2014-12-01

    Powdery mildew species Oidium neolycopersici (On) can cause serious yield losses in tomato production worldwide. Besides on tomato, On is able to grow and reproduce on Arabidopsis. In this study we screened a collection of activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutants and identified one mutant, 3221, which displayed resistance to On, and in addition showed a reduced stature and serrated leaves. Additional disease tests demonstrated that the 3221 mutant exhibited resistance to downy mildew (Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis) and green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), but retained susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. The resistance trait and morphological alteration were mutually linked in 3221. Identification of the activation tag insertion site and microarray analysis revealed that ATHB13, a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor, was constitutively overexpressed in 3221. Silencing of ATHB13 in 3221 resulted in the loss of both the morphological alteration and resistance, whereas overexpression of the cloned ATHB13 in Col-0 and Col-eds1-2 backgrounds resulted in morphological alteration and resistance. Microarray analysis further revealed that overexpression of ATHB13 influenced the expression of a large number of genes. Previously, it was reported that ATHB13-overexpressing lines conferred tolerance to abiotic stress. Together with our results, it appears that ATHB13 is involved in the crosstalk between abiotic and biotic stress resistance pathways.

  13. MDA DS COI Spiral 3 - NOA, SILO and ABAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    with vessel of interest (VOI) tag ( CARNIVAL PARADISE). ........................................... 23 Figure 17. ABAC return of the crew information...depicts the Baja Peninsula Channel in GMMS, and the list of vessels on the left illustrates a ship with a VOI tag on it ( CARNIVAL PARADISE), indicating...June 2009 22 MDA DS COI Spiral 3 – NOA, SILO and ABAC - Final Report Figure 16. Ship with vessel of interest (VOI) tag ( CARNIVAL

  14. HEASARC SAOImage DS9

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SAOImage DS9 is an astronomical imaging and data visualization application. DS9 supports FITS images and binary tables, multiple frame buffers, region manipulation,...

  15. Semantic Wavelet-Induced Frequency-Tagging (SWIFT) Periodically Activates Category Selective Areas While Steadily Activating Early Visual Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Robert, Roger; VanRullen, Rufin; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Primate visual systems process natural images in a hierarchical manner: at the early stage, neurons are tuned to local image features, while neurons in high-level areas are tuned to abstract object categories. Standard models of visual processing assume that the transition of tuning from image features to object categories emerges gradually along the visual hierarchy. Direct tests of such models remain difficult due to confounding alteration in low-level image properties when contrasting distinct object categories. When such contrast is performed in a classic functional localizer method, the desired activation in high-level visual areas is typically accompanied with activation in early visual areas. Here we used a novel image-modulation method called SWIFT (semantic wavelet-induced frequency-tagging), a variant of frequency-tagging techniques. Natural images modulated by SWIFT reveal object semantics periodically while keeping low-level properties constant. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we indeed found that faces and scenes modulated with SWIFT periodically activated the prototypical category-selective areas while they elicited sustained and constant responses in early visual areas. SWIFT and the localizer were selective and specific to a similar extent in activating category-selective areas. Only SWIFT progressively activated the visual pathway from low- to high-level areas, consistent with predictions from standard hierarchical models. We confirmed these results with criterion-free methods, generalizing the validity of our approach and show that it is possible to dissociate neural activation in early and category-selective areas. Our results provide direct evidence for the hierarchical nature of the representation of visual objects along the visual stream and open up future applications of frequency-tagging methods in fMRI.

  16. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine M Pompey

    Full Text Available Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  17. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Justine M; Foda, Bardees; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  19. The Arabidopsis thaliana rlp mutations revert the ectopic leaf blade formation conferred by activation tagging of the LEP gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Nussbaumer, C; Keller, Bente

    2003-01-01

    Activation tagging of the gene LEAFY PETIOLE (LEP) with a T-DNA construct induces ectopic leaf blade formation in Arabidopsis, which results in a leafy petiole phenotype. In addition, the number of rosette leaves produced prior to the onset of bolting is reduced, and the rate of leaf initiation...... is retarded by the activation tagged LEP gene. The ectopic leaf blade results from an invasion of the petiole region by the wild-type leaf blade. In order to isolate mutants that are specifically disturbed in the outgrowth of the leaf blade, second site mutagenesis was performed using ethane methanesulphonate...

  20. Construction of new GFP-tagged fusants for Trichoderma harzianum with enhanced biocontrol activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowsari Mojegan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma is one of the most exploited biocontrol agents for the management of plant diseases. In biocontrol ecology, the critical factors are detection, and the monitoring and recovery of specific biocontrol agents either naturally present or deliberately released into the environment. Protoplast fusion is an appropriate tool for the improvement of biocontrol Trichoderma strains. Protoplast isolation from Trichoderma harzianum was achieved using 24 h culture age, 6.6 mg/ml Novazym L 1412 at 30°C which resulted the maximum protoplast yield of 5 × 108/ml. The self-fused protoplasts were regenerated and 12 fusants were selected based on their growth rate on 2% colloidal chitin medium. Next, a comparison was done for chitinase and antagonistic activity. Transcriptomic analysis based on quantitative real-time RT-PCR, demonstrated that T8-05 fusant expressed 1.5 fold of chit42 transcript as compared with the parental line. This fusant with 7.02±0.15U chitinase activity showed a higher growth inhibition rate (100% than the parent strain, against Rhizoctonia solani. To obtain a genetically marked fusant that can be used as a biomonitor, the fusant was cotransformed with the gfp and amdS genes. The morphology and viability of selected cotransformant (FT8-7MK-05-2 was similar to the parent. Green fluorescing conidia were observed within the first 2 days of incubation in the soil, and this was followed by the formation of chlamydopores after 60 days. The colonisation of the gfp-tagged fusant was also monitored visually on R. solani sclerotia by scanning electron microscopy. Production of gfp-tagged fusant of Trichoderma spp. provides a potentially useful tool for monitoring hyphal growth patterns and the population of biocontrol agent isolates introduced into environmental systems.

  1. Transpositional behaviour of the Ds element in the Ac/Ds system in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis based on maize Activator/Dissociator (Ac/Ds) transposons is becoming a major approach used to produce a saturated mutant collection in rice. In this research, Ds-T-DNA transformed homozygotes were crossed with Ac-T-DNA transformed homozygotes in order to establish an Ac/Ds transposon system in rice. The successive investigation of Ds transposition from F1 to F5 generations indicated that the frequencies of germinal transposition increased over successive generations and reached 54.2% in F3 generation. The Ds transposition pattern revealed that a Ds transposition induced an approximately 170-bp deletion of T-DNA sequence and another Ds transposition carried a 272-bp T-DNA sequence. Using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR), some flanking sequences of the Ds element were amplified. Analyses of 17 Ds-flanking sequences showed that five Ds were inserted into gene regions. The Ds could transpose not only to the linked sites but also to the unlinked sites. The frequency of inter-chromosomal transposition of Ds was 33.3%.

  2. Tag Gardening for Folksonomy Enrichment and Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Weller

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As social tagging applications continuously gain in popularity, it becomes more and more accepted that models and tools for (re-organizing tags are needed. Some first approaches are already practically implemented. Recently, activities to edit and organize tags have been described as "tag gardening". We discuss different ways to subsequently revise and reedit tags and thus introduce different "gardening activities"; among them models that allow gradually adding semantic structures to folksonomies and/or that combine them with more complex forms of knowledge organization systems. Moreover, power tags are introduced as tag gardening candidates and the personal tag repository TagCare is presented.

  3. Increased expression of the dsRNA-activated protein kinase PKR in breast cancer promotes sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Bennett

    Full Text Available It has been reported that the expression and activity of the interferon-inducible, dsRNA-dependent protein kinase, PKR, is increased in mammary carcinoma cell lines and primary tumor samples. To extend these findings and determine how PKR signaling may affect breast cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy, we measured PKR expression by immunohistochemical staining of 538 cases of primary breast cancer and normal tissues. Significantly, PKR expression was elevated in ductal, lobular and squamous cell carcinomas or lymph node metastases but not in either benign tumor specimens or cases of inflammation compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, PKR expression was increased in precancerous stages of mammary cell hyperplasia and dysplasia compared to normal tissues, indicating that PKR expression may be upregulated by the process of tumorigenesis. To test the function of PKR in breast cancer, we generated MCF7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with significantly reduced PKR expression by siRNA knockdown. Importantly, while knockdown of PKR expression had no effect on cell proliferation under normal growth conditions, MCF7, T-47D or MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced PKR expression or treated with a small molecule PKR inhibitor were significantly less sensitive to doxorubicin or H(2O(2-induced toxicity compared to control cells. In addition, the rate of eIF2α phosphorylation following treatment with doxorubicin was delayed in breast cancer cell lines with decreased PKR expression. Significantly, treatment of breast cancer lines with reduced PKR expression with either interferon-α, which increases PKR expression, or salubrinal, which increases eIF2α phosphorylation, restored doxorubicin sensitivity to normal levels. Taken together these results indicate that increased PKR expression in primary breast cancer tissues may serve as a biomarker for response to doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy and that future therapeutic approaches to promote PKR

  4. Analysis of the SHP2 enhancer for the use of tissue specific activation tagging in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfun Junior, A.; Mes, J.J.; Busscher, M.; Angenent, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Activation tagging is a powerful tool to identify new mutants and to obtain information about possible biological functions of the overexpressed genes. The quadruple cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S enhancer fragment is a strong enhancer, which is most commonly used for this purpose. However, the

  5. Spectral Tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2003-05-01

    This research examines the feasibility of spectral tagging, which involves modifying the spectral signature of a target, e.g. by mixing an additive with the target's paint. The target is unchanged to the human eye, but the tag is revealed when viewed with a spectrometer. This project investigates a layer of security that is not obvious, and therefore easy to conceal. The result is a tagging mechanism that is difficult to counterfeit. Uniquely tagging an item is an area of need in safeguards and security and non-proliferation. The powdered forms of the minerals lapis lazuli and olivine were selected as the initial test tags due to their availability and uniqueness in the visible to near-infrared spectral region. They were mixed with paints and applied to steel. In order to verify the presence of the tags quantitatively, the data from the spectrometer was input into unmixing models and signal detection algorithms. The mixture with the best results was blue paint mixed with lapis lazuli and olivine. The tag had a 0% probability of false alarm and a 100% probability of detection. The research proved that spectral tagging is feasible, although certain tag/paint mixtures are more detectable than others.

  6. SERS-active nanoparticles as a barcoding technology for tags and seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merkle, Peter B [SNL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present our work to modernize tagging and sealing technologies for international safeguards applications. Our work combines technologies developed at both Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), to offer a passive tag and seal system that can be applied and verified in field, with minimal training for on-site personnel, along with a low per-seal cost. Here, we focus primarily on LANL technology: the use of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) as an inexpensive verification tool. Our nanoparticles offer unique SERS responses, which we can then use to incorporate robust barcoding into tag materials. We describe this technology in more detail, offer preliminary results, and outline integration with SNL developments.

  7. 76 FR 56271 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P and DS-1843P...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P and DS-1843P: Medical History...: Office of Medical Services, M/MED/C/ MC. Form Number: DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P....gov . You must include the DS form number, information collection title, and OMB control number in the...

  8. DS/EN 1997

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carsten Steen; Hansen, Per Bjerregaard; Jensen, Lars Ravn

    Dette nationale anneks omhandler de punkter i DS/EN 1997-1, hvor det er tilladt at foretage nationale valg. De anførte nationale valg gælder for geotekniske konstruktioner, der opføres i Danmark. De nationale valg kan være i form af nationalt gældende værdier, valgte metoder mellem de i DS/EN 1997......-1 angivne metoder eller tilføjelse af supplerende informationer. I dette nationale anneks er kun anført punkter, hvor der er foretaget valg, der adskiller sig fra de i DS/EN 1997-1 anbefalede værdier, metoder eller lignende. Det betyder, at for de punkter, hvor der intet er anført i dette dokument, gælder...... de i DS/EN 1997-1 anbefalede værdier, metoder eller lignende....

  9. Characterization of soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from dengue virus serotype 2: The polyhistidine tag compromises the polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Maliwan; Chimnaronk, Sarin

    2015-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase is an attractive target for inhibition in the treatment of viral infections. In the case of dengue virus (DENV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity resides in the C-terminal two-thirds of non-structural protein (NS) 5 responsible for the de novo synthesis of the viral RNA genome. Among four distinct, but closely related dengue serotypes, serotype 2 (DENV-2) produces more severe diseases than other serotypes. It has been reported that bacterial production of the recombinant DENV-2 RdRp was difficult due to its low expression and solubility levels. To facilitate functional and structural analyses, we here demonstrate complete protocols for overexpression and purification of soluble DENV-2 RdRp, increasing protein yields by a remarkable 10 times compared to earlier reports. Three different forms of DENV-2 RdRp as either N- or C-terminally His-tagged fusions, or without tag, were purified to homogeneity. We show here that the presence of both the N- and C-terminal His-tag had a deleterious effect on polymerase activity and, in contrast to earlier studies, our non-tagged RdRp did not require manganese ions to activate RNA polymerization. We also determined an apparent Kd value of 53nM for binding to the 5'-UTR RNA by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our work provide a more suitable material for basic research of viral RdRp and for drug development.

  10. The IMiDs targets IKZF-1/3 and IRF4 as novel negative regulators of NK cell-activating ligands expression in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fionda, Cinzia; Abruzzese, Maria Pia; Zingoni, Alessandra; Cecere, Francesca; Vulpis, Elisabetta; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Soriani, Alessandra; Molfetta, Rosa; Paolini, Rossella; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Cippitelli, Marco

    2015-09-15

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) have potent anti-tumor activities in multiple myeloma (MM) and are able to enhance the cytotoxic function of natural killer (NK) cells, important effectors of the immune response against MM. Here, we show that these drugs can enhance the expression of the NKG2D and DNAM-1 activating receptor ligands MICA and PVR/CD155 in human MM cell lines and primary malignant plasma cells. Depletion of cereblon (CRBN) by shRNA interference strongly impaired upregulation of these ligands and, more interestingly, IMiDs/CRBN-mediated downregulation of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1), Aiolos (IKZF3) and IRF4 was critical for these regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, shRNA knockdown of IKZF1 or IKZF3 expression was both necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 expression, suggesting that these transcription factors can repress these genes; accordingly, the direct interaction and the negative role of IKZF1 and IKZF3 proteins on MICA and PVR/CD155 promoters were demonstrated. Finally, MICA expression was enhanced in IRF4-silenced cells, indicating a specific suppressive role of this transcription factor on MICA gene expression in MM cells.Taken together, these findings describe novel molecular pathways involved in the regulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 gene expression and identify the transcription factors IKZF-1/IKZF-3 and IRF4 as repressors of these genes in MM cells.

  11. A novel serine protease, Sep1, from Bacillus firmus DS-1 has nematicidal activity and degrades multiple intestinal-associated nematode proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ce; Nie, Xiangtao; Tang, Zhichao; Zhang, Yuyang; Lin, Jian; Sun, Ming; Peng, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs) cause serious harm to agricultural production. Bacillus firmus shows excellent control of PPNs and has been produced as a commercial nematicide. However, its nematicidal factors and mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we showed that B. firmus strain DS-1 has high toxicity against Meloidogyne incognita and soybean cyst nematode. We sequenced the whole genome of DS-1 and identified multiple potential virulence factors. We then focused on a peptidase S8 superfamily protein called Sep1 and demonstrated that it had toxicity against the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and M. incognita. The Sep1 protein exhibited serine protease activity and degraded the intestinal tissues of nematodes. Thus, the Sep1 protease of B. firmus is a novel biocontrol factor with activity against a root-knot nematode. We then used C. elegans as a model to elucidate the nematicidal mechanism of Sep1, and the results showed that Sep1 could degrade multiple intestinal and cuticle-associated proteins and destroyed host physical barriers. The knowledge gained in our study will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of B. firmus against PPNs and will aid in the development of novel bio-agents with increased efficacy for controlling PPNs. PMID:27118554

  12. Measurement of the branching fraction Br(Bs -> Ds(*) Ds(*))

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Böhnlein, A; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; De, K; Degenhardt, J D; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Déliot, F; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Gómez, B; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Käfer, D; Kühl, T; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Lévêque, J; Cwiok, M; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Mättig, P; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nöding, C; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Wang, M H L; Sajot, G; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Ströhmer, R; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Van den Berg, P J; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Walder, J; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; de Jong, P; van Eijk, B; Åsman, B

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction Br(Bs -> Ds(*) Ds(*)) using a data sample corresponding to 1.3 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. One Ds(*) meson was partially reconstructed in the decay Ds -> phi mu nu, and the other Ds(*) meson was identified using the decay Ds -> phi pi where no attempt was made to distinguish Ds and Ds* states. The resulting measurement is Br(Bs -> Ds(*) Ds(*)) = 0.039 +0.019 -0.017 (stat) +0.016 -0.015 (syst). This was subsequently used to estimate the width difference Delta Gamma^{CP}_s in the Bs-Bsbar system: Delta Gamma^{CP}_s / Gamma_s = 0.079 +0.038 -0.035 (stat) +0.031 -0.030 (syst).

  13. Improved Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of the Ds+ Meson

    CERN Document Server

    Onyisi, P U E; Cinabro, D; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Libby, J; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Powell, A; Thomas, C; Wilkinson, G; Asner, D M; Tatishvili, G; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M

    2013-01-01

    The branching fractions of Ds meson decays serve to normalize many measurements of processes involving charm quarks. Using 586 pb^-1 of e+ e- collisions recorded at a center of mass energy of 4.17 GeV, we determine absolute branching fractions for 13 Ds decays in 16 reconstructed final states with a double tag technique. In particular we make a precise measurement of the branching fraction B(Ds -> K- K+ pi+) = (5.55 +- 0.14 +- 0.13)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic respectively. We find a significantly reduced value of B(Ds -> pi+ pi0 eta') compared to the world average, and our results bring the inclusively and exclusively measured values of B(Ds -> eta' X)$ into agreement. We also search for CP-violating asymmetries in Ds decays and measure the cross-section of e+ e- -> Ds* Ds at Ecm = 4.17 GeV.

  14. An active site–tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph, E-mail: kappock@purdue.edu [Purdue University, 175 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2063 (United States)

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 Å resolution contains tail–active site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that ‘close’ the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an ‘open’ structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site–tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  15. Assessment of the Fusion Tags on Increasing Soluble Production of the Active TEV Protease Variant and Other Target Proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Sun, Jiaqi; Wang, Weiyu; Jiang, Li; Cheng, Beijiu; Fan, Jun

    2016-12-17

    In this study, five fusion tags affecting soluble production and cleavage activity of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (TEVp) variant in Escherichia coli strains BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta™ (DE3) are investigated. Combination of the augmenting rare transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and the fused expressivity tag (N-terminal seven amino acid residues of E. coli translation initiation factor II) promotes the soluble TEVp partner expressed at relatively high level. Attachment of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) tag increases soluble expression of the protease released from the fusion protein in E. coli cells, but the incorporated TEVp recognition sequence slightly decreases expressivity of the fusion construct. Except for the green fluorescent protein, the attached expressivity tag shows less efficiency than the MBP tag in enhancing expression levels of the selected five target proteins in the Rosetta™ (DE3) cells under different induction conditions. Our results identified that high-level production of the functional target protein as the fusion partner in E. coli is combined with the intrinsic property of fusion tag, fusion protein stability, inherent folding of target protein, rare tRNA abundance, and the incorporated linker. Purified TEVp fusion constructs with the N-terminal expressivity tag, as well as the MBP partner, are the ideal alternatives for removing fusion tag.

  16. Activation tagging of the two closely linked genes LEP and VAS independently affects vascular cell number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Hooykaas, Paul J J; Keller, Beat

    2002-01-01

    report that in addition to this leafy petiole phenotype, the size of the vascular bundles is increased in all aerial organs in let as a result of an increase in the number of xylem, phloem (pro)cambial and pericycle cells. This vascular phenotype is caused by activation tagging of the two genes VASCULAR...... TISSUE SIZE (VAS) and LEP. These genes are closely linked and arranged in tandem. Activation tagging of LEP only caused a specific increase in the number of xylem cells. This increased xylem cell number, together with the ectopic leaf blade formation, indicates that LEP functions as a cell division......-promoting factor. The activation tagging of VAS only resulted in a specific increase in phloem (pro)cambial and pericycle cells. We conclude that activation tagging of LEP and VAS results in additive phenotypes. Insertional mutants for LEP and VAS display wild-type vascular development, indicating the relevance...

  17. Activity Profiles and Physiological Responses of Representative Tag Football Players in Relation to Playing Position and Physical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the physical fitness, match-activity profiles and physiological responses of representative tag football players and examined the relationship between physical fitness and the match-activity profile. Microtechnology devices and heart rate (HR) chest straps were used to determine the match-activity profiles of sixteen tag football players for five matches during the 2014 Australian National Championships. The relationships between lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) and the match-activity profile were examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Outside players had greater lower body muscular power (ES = 0.98) and straight line running speed (ES = 1.03–1.18) than inside players, and also covered greater very high-speed running (VHSR) distance/min (ES = 0.67) and reached higher peak running speeds (ES = 0.95) during matches. Inside and outside players performed a similar number of repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE) bouts and reported similar mean and maximum efforts per RHIE bout. However, there were differences between playing positions for mean and maximal RHIE effort durations (ES = 0.69–1.15) and mean RHIE bout recovery (ES = 0.56). Inside and outside players also reported small to moderate differences (ES = 0.43–0.80) for times spent in each HR zone. There were a number of moderate to very large correlations between physical fitness measures and match-activity profile variables. This study found lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo IR2 to be related to the match-activities of representative tag football players, although differences between inside and outside players suggest that athlete testing and training practices should be modified for different playing positions. PMID:26642320

  18. Activity Profiles and Physiological Responses of Representative Tag Football Players in Relation to Playing Position and Physical Fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke W Hogarth

    Full Text Available This study determined the physical fitness, match-activity profiles and physiological responses of representative tag football players and examined the relationship between physical fitness and the match-activity profile. Microtechnology devices and heart rate (HR chest straps were used to determine the match-activity profiles of sixteen tag football players for five matches during the 2014 Australian National Championships. The relationships between lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2 and the match-activity profile were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Outside players had greater lower body muscular power (ES = 0.98 and straight line running speed (ES = 1.03-1.18 than inside players, and also covered greater very high-speed running (VHSR distance/min (ES = 0.67 and reached higher peak running speeds (ES = 0.95 during matches. Inside and outside players performed a similar number of repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE bouts and reported similar mean and maximum efforts per RHIE bout. However, there were differences between playing positions for mean and maximal RHIE effort durations (ES = 0.69-1.15 and mean RHIE bout recovery (ES = 0.56. Inside and outside players also reported small to moderate differences (ES = 0.43-0.80 for times spent in each HR zone. There were a number of moderate to very large correlations between physical fitness measures and match-activity profile variables. This study found lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo IR2 to be related to the match-activities of representative tag football players, although differences between inside and outside players suggest that athlete testing and training practices should be modified for different playing positions.

  19. 75 FR 36463 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P: Medical History... Collection. Originating Office: Office of Medical Services, M/MED/C/ MC. Form Number: DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P. Respondents: Foreign Service Officers, State Department Employees, Other Government...

  20. 75 FR 55625 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P: Medical History... Collection. Originating Office: Office of Medical Services, M/MED/C/ MC. Form Number: DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P. Respondents: Foreign Service Officers, State Department Employees, Other Government...

  1. The complete Ac/Ds transposon family of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunguang; Hoffman, Andrew; He, Limei; Caronna, Jason; Dooner, Hugo K

    2011-12-01

    The nonautonomous maize Ds transposons can only move in the presence of the autonomous element Ac. They comprise a heterogeneous group that share 11-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and some subterminal repeats, but vary greatly in size and composition. Three classes of Ds elements can cause mutations: Ds-del, internal deletions of the 4.6-kb Ac element; Ds1, ~400-bp in size and sharing little homology with Ac, and Ds2, variably-sized elements containing about 0.5 kb from the Ac termini and unrelated internal sequences. Here, we analyze the entire complement of Ds-related sequences in the genome of the inbred B73 and ask whether additional classes of Ds-like (Ds-l) elements, not uncovered genetically, are mobilized by Ac. We also compare the makeup of Ds-related sequences in two maize inbreds of different origin. We found 903 elements with 11-bp Ac/Ds TIRs flanked by 8-bp target site duplications. Three resemble Ac, but carry small rearrangements. The others are much shorter, once extraneous insertions are removed. There are 331 Ds1 and 39 Ds2 elements, many of which are likely mobilized by Ac, and two novel classes of Ds-l elements. Ds-l3 elements lack subterminal homology with Ac, but carry transposase gene fragments, and represent decaying Ac elements. There are 44 such elements in B73. Ds-l4 elements share little similarity with Ac outside of the 11-bp TIR, have a modal length of ~1 kb, and carry filler DNA which, in a few cases, could be matched to gene fragments. Most Ds-related elements in B73 (486/903) fall in this class. None of the Ds-l elements tested responded to Ac. Only half of Ds insertion sites examined are shared between the inbreds B73 and W22. The majority of Ds-related sequences in maize correspond to Ds-l elements that do not transpose in the presence of Ac. Unlike actively transposing elements, many Ds-l elements are inserted in repetitive DNA, where they probably become methylated and begin to decay. The filler DNA present in most elements

  2. Measurement of Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- branching ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-05-18

    The decays Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8  fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron pp[over ¯] collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10σ, and we measure the Bs0 production rate times Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B0→Ds+D-to be 0.183±0.021±0.017 for Bs0→Ds+Ds-, 0.424±0.046±0.035 for Bs0→Ds*±Ds^∓, 0.654±0.072±0.065 for Bs0→Ds*+Ds*-, and 1.261±0.095±0.112 for the inclusive decay Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)-, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for nonstandard model physics in Bs0 mixing.

  3. Upper Tag Ontology (UTO) For Integrating Social Tagging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Ying; Fried, Michael; Toma, Ioan; Yan, Erjia; Foo, Schubert

    2010-01-01

    Data integration and mediation have become central concerns of information technology over the past few decades. With the advent of the Web and the rapid increases in the amount of data and the number of Web documents and users, researchers have focused on enhancing the interoperability of data through the development of metadata schemes. Other researchers have looked to the wealth of metadata generated by bookmarking sites on the Social Web. While several existing ontologies capitalize on the semantics of metadata created by tagging activities, the Upper Tag Ontology (UTO) emphasizes the structure of tagging activities to facilitate modeling of tagging data and the integration of data from different bookmarking sites as well as the alignment of tagging ontologies. UTO is described and its utility in harvesting, modeling, integrating, searching and analyzing data is demonstrated with metadata harvested from three major social tagging systems (Delicious, Flickr and YouTube).

  4. Tag team simulation: An innovative approach for promoting active engagement of participants and observers during group simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Andersen, Patrea; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Guinea, Stephen; McAllister, Margaret; Lapkin, Samuel; Palmer, Lorinda; Niddrie, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Active participation in immersive simulation experiences can result in technical and non-technical skill enhancement. However, when simulations are conducted in large groups, maintaining the interest of observers so that they do not disengage from the learning experience can be challenging. We implemented Tag Team Simulation with the aim of ensuring that both participants and observers had active and integral roles in the simulation. In this paper we outline the features of this innovative approach and provide an example of its application to a pain simulation. Evaluation was conducted using the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale. A total of 444 year nursing students participated from a population of 536 (response rate 83%). Cronbach's alpha for the Scale was .94 indicating high internal consistency. The mean satisfaction score for participants was 4.63 compared to 4.56 for observers. An independent sample t test revealed no significant difference between these scores (t (300) = -1.414, p = 0.16). Tag team simulation is an effective approach for ensuring observers' and participants' active involvement during group-based simulations and one that is highly regarded by students. It has the potential for broad applicability across a range of leaning domains both within and beyond nursing.

  5. Improved quantification of brain perfusion using FAIR with active suppression of superior tagging (FAIR ASST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N; Purdy, David E; Haley, Robert W; Briggs, Richard W

    2011-11-01

    To address two problems for perfusion studies in the middle or inferior brain regions: (1) to reduce venous artifacts due to the intrinsic superior labeling of FAIR; (2) to alleviate the discrepancy of the existence of both superior and inferior boluses, but with only the inferior bolus having a temporally defined bolus width with Q2TIPs or QUIPSS. Superior tagging suppression methods for FAIR with different combinations of pre- and postinversion superior saturation pulses were evaluated and compared with FAIR with Q2TIPS for producing perfusion maps of superior, middle, and inferior brain regions. One preinversion plus two postinversion superior saturation radio frequency pulses effectively suppressed the superior tagging of FAIR and sufficiently eliminated venous artifacts without negative effects, avoiding the overestimations of cerebral blood flow that can occur in FAIR. FAIR ASST improves FAIR with Q2TIPS and provides more reliable and accurate blood flow estimations for perfusion studies of middle and lower brain regions. FAIR ASST confers the advantages of asymmetric PASL techniques, such as PICORE, in which only the inferiorly labeled blood is used for perfusion quantification, to the symmetric PASL technique FAIR, while preserving the robustness of FAIR against MT effects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Colorimetric Microplate Assay for DNA-Binding Activity of His-Tagged MutS Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, Michał; Sachadyn, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    A simple microplate method was designed for rapid testing DNA-binding activity of proteins. The principle of the assay involves binding of tested DNA by his-tagged protein immobilized on a nickel-coated ELISA plate, following colorimetric detection of biotinylated DNA with avidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The method was used to compare DNA mismatch binding activities of MutS proteins from three bacterial species. The assay required relatively low amounts of tested protein (approximately 0.5-10 pmol) and DNA (0.1-10 pmol) and a relatively short time of analysis (up to 60 min). The method is very simple to apply and convenient to test different buffer conditions of DNA-protein binding. Sensitive colorimetric detection enables naked eye observations and quantitation with an ELISA reader. The performance of the assay, which we believe is a distinguishing trait of the method, is based on two strong and specific molecular interactions: binding of a his-tagged protein to a nickel-coated microplate and binding of biotinylated DNA to avidin. In the reported experiments, the solution was used to optimize the conditions for DNA mismatch binding by MutS protein; however, the approach could be implemented to test nucleic acids interactions with any protein of interest.

  7. Fissuring near the TAG active hydrothermal mound, 26°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Kleinrock, M. C.

    2000-05-01

    Analysis of 12,000 electronic still camera images collected with the ARGO II vehicle near the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) active hydrothermal mound, 26°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has made possible the first quantitative in situ assessment of both fissure orientation and width within the median valley of a slow-spreading ridge. Fissures near the TAG mound are partially rubble-filled extensional fractures that cut lightly sedimented seafloor and in ∼1% of our observations host pillow lavas. Fissure widths range from 0.15 to 3.5 m, with a mean of 0.7 m, and do not vary systematically within the survey area. First-order estimates of crack depth, based on these width measurements and reasonable elastic moduli, indicate that fissures are restricted to depths 45° from the strike of the ridge axis. The formation of obliquely oriented fissures requires that the local least compressive stress direction varies (at least temporarily) from that predicted by the regional tectonic stress field associated with plate separation. This stress field reorientation may be facilitated by variations in the style of magma emplacement within the rift. The close spatial association of long-term hydrothermal activity, fissure-hosted lava flows, and faults and fissures trending oblique to the spreading axis suggests a causal relationship between the impact of dike intrusion and the maintenance of localized hydrothermal flow.

  8. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion [Nanobiophotonics Center, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Nanobioscience, Babes-Bolyai University, Treboniu Laurian 42, 400271 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela [Department of Biochemistry, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur 3-5, 400372, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian, E-mail: sanda.boca@phys.ubbcluj.ro, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Electron Microscopy Center, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-02-04

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  9. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Sanda; Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Astilean, Simion

    2011-02-01

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  10. Extending and Customising DS9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, D.; Allen, S. L.; Joye, W. A.

    2005-12-01

    UCO/Lick Observatory adopted SAOImage DS9 as the standard real-time and quick-look display for DEIMOS (commissioned Summer 2002) and subsequent instruments. Lick software staff made several modifications and extensions to DS9, taking advantage of its open architecture and the ease of adding Tcl/Tk code to the DS9 core at runtime. We worked in close collaboration with DS9 author Bill Joye on both core modifications and external `plug-ins'. Our poster describes features added to DS9 (in the core or externally), and a strategy for integrating DS9 with real-time image acquisition. The Lick software team invites other DS9 users to form a community and discuss code-sharing, APIs and other DS9 issues.

  11. Observation of the DsJ(2317) and DsJ(2457) in B decays

    OpenAIRE

    Krokovny, P.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first observation of the B --> Dbar DsJ(2317) and B --> Dbar DsJ(2457) decays based on 123.8 10^6 BBar events collected with the Belle detector at KEKB. We observe the DsJ(2317) decay to Ds pi0 and DsJ(2457) decay to the Ds* pi0 and Ds gamma final states. We also set 90% CL upper limits for the decays DsJ(2317) --> Ds* gamma, DsJ(2457) --> Ds* gamma, DsJ(2457) --> Ds pi0 and DsJ(2457) --> Ds pi+ pi-.

  12. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns.

  13. Reconstitution of F1-ATPase activity from Escherichia coli subunits alpha, beta and subunit gamma tagged with six histidine residues at the C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuni, A; Watanabe, H; Kuroda, N; Sawada, K; Murakami, H; Kanazawa, H

    1998-05-01

    An engineered gamma subunit of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase with extra 14 and 20 amino acid residues at the N- and C-termini (His-tag gamma), respectively, was overproduced in E. coli and purified. Six histidines are included in the C-terminal extension. The reconstituted F1 containing alpha, beta, and His-tagged gamma exhibited sixty percent of the wild-type ATPase activity. The reconstituted alphabeta His-tag gamma complex was subjected to affinity chromatography with nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin. ATPase activity was eluted specifically with imidazole. These results implied that the tag sequence protruded to the surface of the complex and did not seriously impair the activity. The reconstituted alphabeta His-tag gamma complex, even after its binding to the resin, exhibited ATPase activity suggesting that the gamma subunit, when fixed to a solid phase, may rotate the alphabeta complex. This system may provide a new approach for analysis of the rotation mechanisms in F1-ATPase.

  14. Locatable-body temperature monitoring based on semi-active UHF RFID tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangwei; Mao, Luhong; Chen, Liying; Xie, Sheng

    2014-03-26

    This paper presents the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology for the real-time remote monitoring of body temperature, while an associated program can determine the location of the body carrying the respective sensor. The RFID chip's internal integrated temperature sensor is used for both the human-body temperature detection and as a measurement device, while using radio-frequency communication to broadcast the temperature information. The adopted RFID location technology makes use of reference tags together with a nearest neighbor localization algorithm and a multiple-antenna time-division multiplexing location system. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for collecting temperature and location data for the data fusion by using RFID protocols. With a puppy as test object, temperature detection and localization experiments were carried out. The measured results show that the applied method, when using a mercury thermometer for comparison in terms of measuring the temperature of the dog, has a good consistency, with an average temperature error of 0.283 °C. When using the associated program over the area of 12.25 m2, the average location error is of 0.461 m, which verifies the feasibility of the sensor-carrier location by using the proposed program.

  15. Exploring how musical rhythm entrains brain activity with electroencephalogram frequency-tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaradan, Sylvie

    2014-12-19

    The ability to perceive a regular beat in music and synchronize to this beat is a widespread human skill. Fundamental to musical behaviour, beat and meter refer to the perception of periodicities while listening to musical rhythms and often involve spontaneous entrainment to move on these periodicities. Here, we present a novel experimental approach inspired by the frequency-tagging approach to understand the perception and production of rhythmic inputs. This approach is illustrated here by recording the human electroencephalogram responses at beat and meter frequencies elicited in various contexts: mental imagery of meter, spontaneous induction of a beat from rhythmic patterns, multisensory integration and sensorimotor synchronization. Collectively, our observations support the view that entrainment and resonance phenomena subtend the processing of musical rhythms in the human brain. More generally, they highlight the potential of this approach to help us understand the link between the phenomenology of musical beat and meter and the bias towards periodicities arising under certain circumstances in the nervous system. Entrainment to music provides a highly valuable framework to explore general entrainment mechanisms as embodied in the human brain.

  16. A new tagged-TEV protease: construction, optimisation of production, purification and test activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Baligh; Bouallagui, Hassib; Dridi, Cyrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Boeuf, Guilhem; Di Martino, Patrick; Dufour, Florence; Elm'Selmi, Abdellatif

    2011-01-01

    The Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease is frequently used in the cleavage of recombinant fusion proteins because of its efficiency and high specificity. In this work, we present a new recombinant form of TEV termed Streptag II-TEV for high-level production and purification of TEV protease from Escherichia coli and compare it to the hexahistidine (6xHis) tagged version of TEV. The effects of varying the host strain, the bacterial induction temperature (25, 30 and 37°C) and the IPTG inducer concentration on production and solubility of the two recombinant TEV proteases have been examined. Optimal Streptag II-TEV protein expression were obtained in the E. coli KRX strain under an induction temperature of 25°C in the presence of IPTG at 0.5 mM. In these conditions, soluble Streptag II-TEV and 6xHis-TEV proteases accounted for about 25% and 18% of total soluble proteins, respectively. About 70% of Streptag II-TEV and 60% of 6xHis-TEV were detected in the supernatant. Streptag II-TEV protease purifies to near homogeneity (approximately 99%) via a simple, single step Strep-Tactin chromatography purification protocol based on the presence of Streptag II. The higher production of Streptag II-TEV coupled to its purification and cleavage efficiencies make it an attractive alternate to 6xHis-TEV.

  17. Reprint of: A new tagged-TEV protease: Construction, optimisation of production, purification and test activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Baligh; Bouallagui, Hassib; Dridi, Cyrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Boeuf, Guilhem; Di Martino, Patrick; Dufour, Florence; Elm'selmi, Abdellatif

    2011-09-02

    The Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease is frequently used in the cleavage of recombinant fusion proteins because of its efficiency and high specificity. In this work, we present a new recombinant form of TEV termed Streptag II-TEV for high-level production and purification of TEV protease from Escherichia coli and compare it to the hexahistidine (6xHis) tagged version of TEV. The effects of varying the host strain, the bacterial induction temperature (25, 30 and 37°C) and the IPTG inducer concentration on production and solubility of the two recombinant TEV proteases have been examined. Optimal Streptag II-TEV protein expression were obtained in the E. coli KRX strain under an induction temperature of 25°C in the presence of IPTG at 0.5mM. In these conditions, soluble Streptag II-TEV and 6xHis-TEV proteases accounted for about 25% and 18% of total soluble proteins, respectively. About 70% of Streptag II-TEV and 60% of 6xHis-TEV were detected in the supernatant. Streptag II-TEV protease purifies to near homogeneity (approximately 99%) via a simple, single step Strep-Tactin chromatography purification protocol based on the presence of Streptag II. The higher production of Streptag II-TEV coupled to its purification and cleavage efficiencies make it an attractive alternate to 6xHis-TEV.

  18. Activation tagging of the LEAFY PETIOLE gene affects leaf petiole development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Dulk-Ras, A D; Hooykaas, P J

    2000-01-01

    In a screen for leaf developmental mutants we have isolated an activator T-DNA-tagged mutant that produces leaves without a petiole. In addition to that leafy petiole phenotype this lettuce (let) mutant shows aberrant inflorescence branching and silique shape. The LEAFY PETIOLE (LEP) gene is loca...... activity in the marginal meristem or patterning along the proximodistal axis....

  19. Explore the relationship between ANA spectrum, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibody, anti-ds-DNA levels and activity of SLE%探讨ANA谱、抗心磷脂抗体、抗核抗体、抗ds-DNA水平与SLE活动性的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华宏

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate ANA spectrum anti-cardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibody anti-ds-DNA levels and the relationship between the activity of SLE.Methods:from January 2013 to June 2014 in our hospital Rheumatology SLE patients hospitalized for a total of 125 cases of SLE group, and select the corresponding period in our hospital for examination of a total of 30 cases of healthy people healthy group. Observed active SLE, SLE and healthy inactive group of anti-cardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibody, anti-ds-DNA positive rate case, SLE active, SLE and healthy inactive group anticardiolipin antibody concentrations.Results: Health group and inactive SLE anti-cardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, anti-ds-DNA positive rate, the difference was not statistically significant (P> 0.05). ACA- IgG SLE activity period (19.21 ± 0.79) RU / ml, ACA- IgM (17.01 ± 0.76) RU / ml were significantly higher than the healthy group and inactive SLE, the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05). Anti-U1-nRNP antibody of active SLE, anti-Sm antibodies.Conclusions:ANA spectrum, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, anti-ds-DNA levels measured for patients with active SLE can effectively detect the disease, and thus a better prediction of relapse, and help guide treatment.%目的:研究探讨ANA谱﹑抗心磷脂抗体﹑抗核抗体﹑抗ds-DNA水平与SLE活动性的关系。方法:选择2013年1月至2014年6月我院风湿免疫科住院的SLE患者共125例为SLE组,同时选择同期在我院进行体检的健康者共30例为健康组。观察SLE活动期、SLE非活动期与健康组抗心磷脂抗体、抗核抗体、抗ds-DNA阳性率情况,SLE活动期、SLE非活动期与健康组抗心磷脂抗体浓度情况。结果: SLE活动期的ACA- IgG(19.21±0.79) RU/ml、ACA- IgM(17.01±0.76)RU/ml水平均显著高于健康组和SLE非活动期,差异有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论:ANA谱、抗心磷脂抗

  20. A Review on Chipless RFID Tag Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hashemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for RFID tags has recently increased due to the development of the RFID. Over the past decade, great efforts have been devoted to the design of RFID tags without chip inside. The concept of chipless RFID tags appears to be a promising solution for low cost item tagging because the cost of active RFID tag depends mainly on the chip used in them. This paper presents the progress of the chipless RFID tag and introduces major studies in this filed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are pointed out.

  1. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D_s^+ --> tau^+ nu_tau Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Ecklund, K M; Savinov, V; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G

    2007-01-01

    Using a sample of tagged D_s decays collected near the D^*_s D_s peak production energy with the CLEO-c detector, we study the leptonic decay D^+_s to tau^+ nu_tau via the decay channel tau^+ to e^+ nu_e bar{nu}_tau. We measure B(D^+_s to tau^+ nu_tau) = (6.17 +- 0.71 +- 0.34) %. Combining with our measurements of D^+_s to mu^+ nu_mu and D^+_s to tau^+ nu_tau (via tau^+ to pi^+ bar{nu}_tau), we determine f_{D_s} = 274 +- 10 +- 5 MeV.

  2. Building Calculations - According to DS 409 and DS 410

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian

    Bogen er en oversættelse af dele af Bygningsberegninger efter DS 409 og DS 410. Den beskæftiger sig med statisk bestemte og statisk ubestemte skivekonstruktioner, samt den praktiske beregning af bygningskonstruktioner udsat for vandret last i form af vind- eller masselast.......Bogen er en oversættelse af dele af Bygningsberegninger efter DS 409 og DS 410. Den beskæftiger sig med statisk bestemte og statisk ubestemte skivekonstruktioner, samt den praktiske beregning af bygningskonstruktioner udsat for vandret last i form af vind- eller masselast....

  3. Detection and characterization of estrus in dairy cattle with an electronic heatmount detector and an electronic activity tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    At-Taras, E E; Spahr, S L

    2001-04-01

    The length and onset of estrus was studied in 71 lactating dairy cows using an electronic heatmount sensor (HeatWatch; DDx Inc., Boulder, CO, DeForest, WI) and an electronic activity tag (Heat Seeker, Boumatic, Madison, WI). Three methods were used to determine estrus: 1) the electronic heatmount system, 2) an increased activity ratio algorithm determined by the Heat Seeker, and 3) an increased activity count algorithm calculated for each estrous period. Mounting and physical activity variables were characterized, and the effects of synchrony, parity, and weather on these variables were determined with data from two different trials. Cows in trial 1 were not synchronized, while cows in trial 2 were synchronized. The results of the study were consistent as follows: mean numbers of mounts were 6.70 +/- 0.7 and 5.42 +/- 0.80 for trials 1 and 2, respectively; each mount lasted 3.20 +/- 0.19 s (trial 1) and 3.36 +/- 0.42 s (trial 2). Total mounting activity averaged 5.83 +/- 0.78 h per estrous period in trial 1 and 5.57 +/- 1.02 h in trial 2. Estrus identified by the increased activity count algorithm corresponded more closely to standing mount activity (determined by the HeatWatch System) than did the increased activity ratio algorithm. Synchrony, parity, and weather did not have a direct effect on physical activity. Hot weather decreased the duration of standing mount activity significantly, but did not affect the number or duration of individual mounts. All three methods of estrus detection employed improved the efficiency of detection over visual observation.

  4. Tag Correspondence Model for User Tag Suggestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂存超; 刘知远; 孙茂松

    2015-01-01

    Some microblog services encourage users to annotate themselves with multiple tags, indicating their attributes and interests. User tags play an important role for personalized recommendation and information retrieval. In order to better understand the semantics of user tags, we propose Tag Correspondence Model (TCM) to identify complex correspondences of tags from the rich context of microblog users. The correspondence of a tag is referred to as a unique element in the context which is semantically correlated with this tag. In TCM, we divide the context of a microblog user into various sources (such as short messages, user profile, and neighbors). With a collection of users with annotated tags, TCM can automatically learn the correspondences of user tags from multiple sources. With the learned correspondences, we are able to interpret implicit semantics of tags. Moreover, for the users who have not annotated any tags, TCM can suggest tags according to users’ context information. Extensive experiments on a real-world dataset demonstrate that our method can effciently identify correspondences of tags, which may eventually represent semantic meanings of tags.

  5. Search for B --> Ds(*) Phi

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bakel, N; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bomben, M; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cristinziani, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cunha, A; Curry, S; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dickopp, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Graziani, G; Green, M G; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Koeneke, K; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Levesque, J A; Lewandowski, B; Li, H; Li, L; Li, X; Libby, J; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lü, C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Messner, R; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Rodier, S; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, M T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Ryd, A; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schindler, R H; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schröder, H; Schröder, T; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spitznagel, M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stocchi, A; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Tan, P; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, J M; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Vazquez, W P; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Viaud, B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Yi, K; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H

    2005-01-01

    We report on searches for B- --> Ds- Phi and B- --> Ds*- Phi. In the context of the Standard Model, the branching fractions for these decays are expected to be highly suppressed, since they proceed through annhilation of the b and u-bar quarks in the B- meson. Our results are based on 234 million Upsilon(4S) --> B Bbar decays collected with the BaBar detector at SLAC. We find no evidence for these decays, and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions BF(B- --> Ds- Phi) Ds*- Phi) < 1.1x10^(-5). These results are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  6. Why activity based costing (ABC) is still tagging behind the traditional costing in Malaysia?

    OpenAIRE

    Rasiah, Devinaga

    2011-01-01

    This study compares activity-based costing (ABC) model and traditional costing method in Malaysia. Activity based costing (ABC) which was developed into the manufacturing/service sectors in Malaysia. It calculates the cost and performance of activities, resources and cost objects. It can be considered as an alternative model to Traditional Cost-based accounting systems. In this study the results indicated that most operations managers believed that their present cost systems were adequate for...

  7. The biological activity of a recombinantly expressed (His)(6)-tagged peanut allergen (rAra h 1) is unaffected by endotoxin removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Bjerremann; Torp, Anna Maria; Andersen, Sven Bode

    2008-01-01

    The application of recombinant (His)(6)-tagged proteins in cell culture assays is associated with problems due to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. LPS stimulates cells of the immune system, thereby masking antigen-specific activation of T cells. Due to the affinity of LPS for histidine it ...

  8. Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Glahn, Christian; Chatti, Amine; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Glahn, C., Chatti, A., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils. International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education, 2(1), 276-284.

  9. Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Glahn, Christian; Chatti, Amine; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Glahn, C., Chatti, A., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils. International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education, 2(1), 276-284.

  10. Tags, micro-tags and tag editing: improving internet search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Topkara, Mercan

    2009-02-01

    Social tagging is an emerging methodology that allows individual users to assign semantic keywords to content on the web. Popular web services allow the community of users to search for content based on these user-defined tags. Tags are typically attached to a whole entity such as a web page (e.g., del.icio.us), a video (e.g., YouTube), a product description (e.g., Amazon) or a photograph (e.g., Flickr). However, finding specific information within a whole entity can be a difficult, time-intensive process. This is especially true for content such as video, where the information sought may be a small segment within a very long presentation. Moreover, the tags provided by a community of users may be incorrect, conflicting, or incomplete when used as search terms. In this paper we introduce a system that allows users to create "micro-tags," that is, semantic markers that are attached to subsets of information. These micro-tags give the user the ability to direct attention to specific subsets within a larger and more complex entity, and the set of micro-tags provides a more nuanced description of the full content. Also, when these micro-tags are used as search terms, there is no need to do a serial search of the content, since micro-tags draw attention to the semantic content of interest. This system also provides a mechanism that allows users in the community to edit and delete each others' tags, using the community to refine and improve tag quality. We will also report on empirical studies that demonstrate the value of micro-tagging and tag editing and explore the role micro-tags and tag editing will play in future applications.

  11. Building Calculations - According to DS 409 and DS 410

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian

    Bogen er en oversættelse af dele af Bygningsberegninger efter DS 409 og DS 410. Den beskæftiger sig med statisk bestemte og statisk ubestemte skivekonstruktioner, samt den praktiske beregning af bygningskonstruktioner udsat for vandret last i form af vind- eller masselast....

  12. Folding and activity of mutant cystathionine β-synthase depends on the position and nature of the purification tag: characterization of the R266K CBS mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtan, Tomas; Kraus, Jan P

    2012-04-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), a heme-containing pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the condensation of serine and homocysteine to yield cystathionine. Missense mutations in CBS, the most common cause of homocystinuria, often result in misfolded proteins. Arginine 266, where the pathogenic missense mutation R266K was identified, appears to be involved in the communication between heme and the PLP-containing catalytic center. Here, we assessed the effect of a short affinity tag (6xHis) compared to a bulky fusion partner (glutathione S-transferase - GST) on CBS wild type (WT) and R266K mutant enzyme properties. While WT CBS was successfully expressed either in conjunction with a GST or with a 6xHis tag, the mutant R266K CBS had no activity, did not form native tetramers and did not respond to chemical chaperone treatment when expressed with a GST fusion partner. Interestingly, expression of R266K CBS constructs with a 6xHis tag at either end yielded active enzymes. The purified, predominantly tetrameric, R266K CBS with a C-terminal 6xHis tag had ∼82% of the activity of a corresponding WT CBS construct. Results from thermal pre-treatment of the enzyme and the denaturation profile of R266K suggests a lower thermal stability of the mutant enzyme compared to WT, presumably due to a disturbed heme environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Observation of the DsJ(2317) and DsJ(2460) in B decays

    OpenAIRE

    The Belle Collaboration

    2003-01-01

    We report on a study of the B --> D DsJ(2317) and B --> D DsJ(2460) decays based on 123.7 x 10^6 BBar events collected with the Belle detector at KEKB. The B --> D DsJ(2317) and B --> D DsJ(2460) decays have been observed for the first time. We observe the DsJ(2317) decay to Ds pi0 and DsJ(2460) decay to the Ds* pi0 and Ds gamma final states. We also set the 90% CL upper limits for the decays DsJ(2317) --> Ds* gamma, DsJ(2460) --> Ds* gamma, DsJ(2460) --> Ds pi0 and DsJ(2460) --> Ds pi+ pi-.

  14. Yellowtail Tagging Data (MRDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Yellowtail Flounder Tagging Program began in 2003 and works with commercial fishermen to tag and release yellowtaiI flounder with pink and yellow disc tags or...

  15. 3ds Max 2012 Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Murdock, Kelly L

    2011-01-01

    Updated version of the bestselling 3ds Max book on the market 3ds Max 2012 Bible is one of the most popular 3ds Max how-tos on the market. If you're a beginner just itching to create something right away, the Quick Start project in Part 1 is for you. If you're an experienced user checking out 3ds Max 2012's latest and greatest features, you'll love the fact that the 3ds Max 2012 Bible continues to be the most comprehensive reference on this highly complex application.Find out what's new, what's tried and true, and how creative you can get using the tips, tricks, and techniques in this must-hav

  16. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Taken together, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes.

  17. Mixed sand and gravel beaches: accurate measurement of active layer depth and sediment transport volumes using PIT tagged tracer pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A.; Moses, C.; Sear, D. A.; Cope, S.

    2016-12-01

    As sediments containing significant gravel portions are increasingly used for beach replenishment projects globally, the total number of beaches classified as `mixed sand and gravel' (MSG) increases. Calculations for required replenishment sediment volumes usually assume a uniform layer of sediment transport across and along the beach, but research into active layer (AL) depth has shown variations both across shore and according to sediment size distribution. This study addresses the need for more accurate calculations of sediment transport volumes on MSG beaches by using more precise measurements of AL depth and width, and virtual velocity of tracer pebbles. Variations in AL depth were measured along three main profile lines (from MHWS to MLWN) at Eastoke, Hayling Island (Hampshire, UK). Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged pebbles were deployed in columns, and their new locations repeatedly surveyed with RFID technology. These data were combined with daily dGPS beach profiles and sediment sampling for detailed analysis of the influence of beach morphodynamics on sediment transport volumes. Data were collected over two consecutive winter seasons: 2014-15 (relatively calm, average wave height sandy lower foreshore reduced the AL to 10% of wave height in this area. The disparity in AL depth across the beach profile indicates that traditional models are not accurately representing bulk sediment transport on MSG beaches. It is anticipated that by improving model inputs, beach managers will be better able to predict necessary volumes and sediment grain size proportions of replenishment material for effective management of MSG beaches.

  18. Biodegradation of furfural by Bacillus subtilis strain DS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Lv, Quanxi

    2015-07-01

    An aerobic bacterial strain DS3, capable of growing on furfural as sole carbon source, was isolated from actived sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory after enrichment. Based on morphological physiological tests as well as 16SrDNA sequence and Biolog analyses it was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The study revealed that strain DS3 utilized furfural, as analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Under following conditions: pH 8.0, temperature 35 degrees C, 150 rpm and 10% inoculum, strain DS3 showed 31.2% furfural degradation. Furthermore, DS3 strain was found to tolerate furfural concentration as high as 6000 mg(-1). The ability of Bacillus subtilis strain DS3 to degrade furfural has been demonstrated for the first time in the present study.

  19. Ds+ Exclusive Hadronic Decays Involving omega

    OpenAIRE

    The CLEO Collaboration; Ge, J. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using data collected near the Ds*+ Ds- peak production energy Ecm=4170 MeV by the CLEO-c detector, we search for Ds+ exclusive hadronic decays involving omega. We find B(Ds+ -> pi+ omega) = (0.21 +- 0.09 +- 0.01)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi0 omega) = (2.78 +- 0.65 +- 0.25)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi+ pi- omega) = (1.58 +- 0.45 +- 0.09)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ eta omega) = (0.85 +- 0.54 +- 0.06)%, B(Ds+ -> K+ omega) K+ pi0 omega) K+ pi+ pi- omega) K+ eta omega)

  20. Production of biologically active IgG hinge-tag soluble epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Takayuki; Hashizume, Toshihiro; Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Fukuda, Tomoko; Tang, Careen K; Salomon, David S; Seno, Masaharu

    2010-03-01

    The extracellular domains (ECD) of epidermal growth factor receptors, ErbB1, 2, 3 and 4, were designed as soluble dimeric forms. Each ECD was fused to a short hinge region derived from IgG, such that the stable dimer could be formed with disulfide bridges. This hinge-tagged design minimized the molecular weight to approximately 50% of the conventional Fc-fusion design without an Fc domain of IgG. The refolded dimers could be easily analyzed and characterized by SDS-PAGE. Hinge-tagged soluble ErbBs demonstrated significant affinity for betacellulin and heregulin. The IgG hinge-tag should be a simple method to design soluble dimers that would be useful for high throughput screening of ligands, antagonists or derivatives.

  1. Baggage Tags for Learning Out of Doors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Lib

    The manual provides teachers with not only educational outdoor activities, but also with activities that can be provided on an individual level. The only equipment needed for most of these activities is a bought or homemade "baggage tag". These tags are used for a variety of purposes such as plant and animal identification, nature quiz games, and…

  2. Use of RNAlater in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS reduces the fluorescence from GFP but not from DsRed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epstein Miles L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry utilizes signals from fluorescent markers to separate targeted cell populations for gene expression studies. However, the stress of the FACS process could change normal gene expression profiles. RNAlater could be used to stop such changes in original gene expression profiles through its ability to denature RNase and other proteins. The normal conformational structure of fluorescent proteins must be maintained in order to fluoresce. Whether or not RNAlater would affect signals from different types of intrinsic fluorescent proteins is crucial to its use in flow cytometry; this question has not been investigated in detail. Findings To address this question, we analyzed the effect of RNAlater on fluorescence intensity of GFP, YFP, DsRed and small fluorescent molecules attached to secondary antibodies (Cy2 and Texas-Red when used in flow cytometry. FACS results were confirmed with fluorescence microscopy. Our results showed that exposure of YFP and GFP containing cells to RNAlater reduces the intensity of their fluorescence to such an extent that separation of such labeled cells is difficult if not impossible. In contrast, signals from DsRed2, Cy2 and Texas-Red were not affected by RNAlater treatment. In addition, the background fluorescence and clumping of dissociated cells are altered by RNAlater treatment. Conclusions When considering gene expression studies using cell sorting with RNAlater, DsRed is the fluorescent protein of choice while GFP/YFP have severe limitations because of their reduced fluorescence. It is necessary to examine the effects of RNAlater on signals from fluorescent markers and the physical properties (e.g., clumping of the cells before considering its use in cell sorting.

  3. Investigations on the activation of recombinant microbial pro-transglutaminase: in contrast to proteinase K, dispase removes the histidine-tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Hertel, Thomas C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Pietzsch, Markus

    2012-02-01

    In order to produce recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG) which is free of the activating protease, dispase was used to activate the pro-rMTG followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). As shown by MALDI-MS, the dispase does not only cleave the pro-sequence, but unfortunately also cleaves within the C-terminal histidine-tag. Hence, the active rMTG cannot properly bind to the IMAC material. As an alternative, proteinase K was investigated. This protease was successfully applied for the activation of purified pro-rMTG either as free or immobilized enzyme and the free enzyme was also applicable directly in the crude cell extract of E. coli. Thus, it enables a simple two-step activation/purification procedure resulting in protease-free and almost pure transglutaminase preparations. The protocol has been successfully applied to both, wild-type transglutaminase of Streptomyces mobaraensis as well as to the highly active variant S2P. Proteinase K activates the pro-rMTG without unwanted degradation of the histidine-tag. It turned out to be very important to inhibit proteinase K activity, e.g., by PMSF, prior to protein separation by SDS-PAGE.

  4. Gillnet Tag Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Certain fishery management programs require vessels to obtain gillnet tags to be used with their gillnet gear. Gillnet tag data is a collection of requests and...

  5. North Pacific Albacore Tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conventional tagging data are available from 1971 to 1996. Electronic tagging data are available from 2000 to present. The data are managed by SWFSC in Access...

  6. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  7. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  8. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  9. Synthesis of novel 1,2,3-triazole tagged pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives and their cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumurthy, Chavva; Veeraswamy, Banda; Sambasiva Rao, Pillalamarri; Santhosh Kumar, Gautham; Shanthan Rao, Pamulaparthy; Loka Reddy, Velaturu; Venkateswara Rao, Janapala; Narsaiah, Banda

    2014-02-01

    A series of novel 1,2,3-triazole tagged pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives 3 and 4 were prepared respectively starting from 6-phenyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-amine 1 via selective N-propargylation, followed by reaction with diverse substituted alkyl/perfluoroalkyl/aryl/aryl amide azides under Sharpless conditions. All the synthesized compounds 3 and 4 were screened for cytotoxic activity against four human cancer cell lines such as U937, THP-1, HL60 and B16-F10. Compounds 3e, 4g, 4i and 4j which showed promising activity have been identified.

  10. An approach to sequence DNA without tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sanjun; Saraf, Ravi F.

    2002-10-01

    Microarray technology is playing an increasingly important role in biology and medicine and its application to genomics for gene expression analysis has already reached the market with a variety of commercially available instruments. In these combinatorial analysis methods, known probe single-strand DNA (ssDNA) 'primers' are attached in clusters of typically 100 µm × 100 µm pixels. Each pixel of the array has a slightly different sequence. On exposure to 'unknown' target ssDNA, the pixels with the right complementary probe ssDNA sequence convert to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by a hybridization reaction. To transduct the conversion of the pixel to dsDNA, the target ssDNA is labelled with a photoluminescent tag during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification process. Due to the statistical distribution of the tags in the target ssDNA, it becomes significantly difficult to implement these methods as a diagnostic tool in a pathology laboratory. A method to sequence DNA without tagging the molecule is developed. The fabrication process is compatible with current microelectronics and (emerging) soft-material fabrication technologies, allowing the method to be integrable with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip devices. An estimated sensitivity of 10-12 g on a 1 cm2 device area is obtained.

  11. 75 FR 39322 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Retail Price Schedule, DS-2020 Parts 1-4, DS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Retail Price Schedule, DS-2020 Parts 1-4, DS-2020I, DS-2021, DS-1996, 1405-XXXX ACTION: Notice of request for public comments. SUMMARY: The Department of State is... Allowances (A/OPR/ALS). Form Number: DS-2020, DS-2020I, DS-2021, DS-1996. Respondents: Respondents are...

  12. Cutaneous skin tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  13. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging in plants – Theoretical considerations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Phogat; Pradeep Kumar Burma; Deepak Pental

    2000-03-01

    The two-element transposon constructs, utilizing either Ac/Ds or Spm/dSpm, allow random tagging of genes in heterologous model species, but are inadequate for directed tagging of specific alleles of agronomic importance. We propose the use of Ac/Ds in conjunction with Spm/dSpm to develop a four-element system for directed tagging of crop-specific alleles. The four-element based construct would include both Ds and dSpm along with relevant marker genes and would function in two steps. In the first step dSpm(Ds) stocks (a minimum of two) would be crossed to a line containing transposases of Spm and unlinked integrations would be selected from segregating population by the use of a negative selection marker to develop stocks representing integration of dSpm(Ds) at a large number of locations in the genome. Selections would be made for a line in which dSpm(Ds) shows partial or complete linkage to the allele of interest. In the second step selected line would be crossed to a line containing Ac transposase to induce transpositions of Ds element to linked sites thereby exploiting the natural tendency of Ds element to jump to linked sites. Unlinked jumps of dSpm(Ds) and linked jumps of Ds could be monitored by appropriate marker genes. The proposed model would allow tagging of allele of interest in chromosome addition lines and also help in the efficient use of genic male sterility systems for hybrid seed production by tightly marking the fertility restorer gene with a negative selection marker.

  14. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Tibély

    Full Text Available Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of

  15. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search. Moreover

  16. Extracting Tag Hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the “flat” organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search

  17. Search for the W-exchange decays B0 --> Ds(*)- Ds(*)+

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Best, D; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Minamora, J S; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J I; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le, F; Diberder; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côte, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    We report a search for the decays $B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{-} D_{s}^{+}$, $B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{+}$, $B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{*+}$ in a sample of 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays to \\BBb ~pairs collected with the \\babar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $e^+ e^-$ storage ring. We find no significant signal and set upper bounds for the branching fractions: ${\\cal B}(B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{-} D_{s}^{+}) < 1.0 \\times 10^{-4}, {\\cal B}(B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{+}) < 1.3 \\times 10^{-4}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{*+}) < 2.4 \\times 10^{-4}$ at 90% confidence level.

  18. Precise measurement of the branching fractions for Bs->Ds(*)+ Ds(*)- and first measurement of the Ds*+ Ds*- polarization using e+e- collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Esen, S; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Belous, K; Bhuyan, B; Bozek, A; Braçko, M; Browder, T E; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, I -S; Cho, K; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dolezal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Feindt, M; Gaur, V; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayashii, H; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Julius, T; Kang, J H; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, H O; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koblitz, S; Kodys, P; Korpar, S; Kouzes, R T; Kriczan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, S -H; Li, J; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Louvot, R; McOnie, S; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Muramatsu, N; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Ng, C; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petriç, M; Piilonen, L E; Röhrken, M; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Schneider, O; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Smerkol, P; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Staniç, S; Stariç, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Vahsen, S E; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V

    2012-01-01

    We have made a precise measurement of the absolute branching fractions of Bs->Ds(*)+ Ds(*)- decays using 121.4 fb-1 of data recorded by the Belle experiment running on the Upsilon(5S) resonance. The results are B(Bs0->Ds+ Ds-) = (0.58 +0.11 -0.09 +-0.13)%, B(Bs0->Ds*+- Ds-+) = (1.8 +-0.2 +-0.4)%, and B(Bs0->Ds*+ Ds*-) = (2.0 +-0.3 +-0.5)%; the sum is B(Bs0->Ds(*)+ Ds(*)- = (4.3 +-0.4 +-1.0)%. Assuming Bs->Ds(*)+ Ds(*)- saturates decays to CP-even final states, the branching fraction constrains the ratio Delta(Gamma_s)/cos(phi_s), where Delta(Gamma_s) is the difference in widths between the two Bs0-Bs0bar mass eigenstates, and phi_s is the CP-violating phase in Bs0-Bs0bar mixing. For phi_s=0 we obtain Delta(Gamma_s)/Gamma_s = 0.090 +-0.009 (stat.) +-0.023 (syst.), where Gamma_s is the mean decay width. We also measure for the first time the longitudinal polarization fraction of Bs->Ds*+ Ds*-; the result is 0.12 +0.30 -0.28 +0.04 -0.05.

  19. Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D_s Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, N; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Li, Z; López, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Brock, I; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of absolute hadronic branching fractions of Ds mesons determined using a double tag technique. These measurements are from 195 pb^{-1} of e+e- collisions recorded at center of mass energies near 4.17 GeV with the CLEO-c detector at CESR. We obtain absolute branching fractions for Ds+ decays to KS0 K+, K- K+ pi+, K- K+ pi+ pi-, pi+ pi+ pi-, pi+ eta, and pi+ etaprime. We discuss the problems inherent in measuring accurately the branching fraction for Ds+ to phi pi+, which is often used as a reference mode for measurement of other Ds+ branching fractions, and provide a measurement of a branching fraction that may be useful for this purpose.

  20. Norm for betonkonstruktioner DS411

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the structural use of concrete DS 411 contains methods and data for design of fire exposed concrete structures, all of them derived and documented by Kristian Hertz, who is a member of the two project teams writing the chapter. A considerable...

  1. Norm for betonkonstruktioner DS411

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the structural use of concrete DS 411 contains methods and data for design of fire exposed concrete structures, all of them derived and documented by Kristian Hertz, who is a member of the two project teams writing the chapter. A considerable...

  2. Leptonic decays of the Ds meson

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-02-01

    The purely leptonic decays Ds-->τν and Ds-->μν are studied in a sample of four million hadronic /Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at the LEP e+e- collider from 1991 to 1995. The branching fractions are extracted from a combination of two analyses, one optimized to select Ds-->τν decays with /τ-->eνν¯ or /μνν¯, and the other optimized for Ds-->μν decays. The results are used to evaluate the Ds decay constant, within the Standard Model: fDs=[285+/-19(stat)+/-40(syst)] MeV.

  3. 可伸缩TAGS%Scalable TAGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵帆; 张君雁; 杨国纬

    2003-01-01

    In a distributed Web server system where tasks are unpreemptible,the most important issue for improving quality of service (QoS) is how to realize fairness and reduce average slow down. In this paper we present an algorithm named Scalable TAGS by integrating Central Queue algorithm and Task Assignment by Guessing Size (TAGS), together with its performance analysis, system parameter setting algorithm subject to fairness requirement, and optimal grouping method.

  4. 一种射频有源标签充电器的设计与实现%Design and implementation of a RF active tag charger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石封茶; 余剑; 杨广

    2012-01-01

    Active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology with the advantages of long working distance and low reading and writing power consumption, has been widely used in civilian and military fields Due to the limitations of some special applications, the active RFID tags need to implement a hermetically enclosed package with performance of waterproof and dustproof and so on. To solve the charging problem of the fidly sealed active RFID tags, a design and implementation of a wireless charging circuit is presented.Firstly the paper introdues the principle of the whole circuit and analyzes the implementation of transmitter and receiver circuit; Secondly, the charging circuit that can charge to 40 tags at the same time is designed and implemented; finally, the charge and discharge experiments of the tags are done.The results show that the performance of the charging circuit is stable and the charging time is shorter%有源射频识别(RFID)技术因其工作距离远、读写功耗低等优势,在民用和军事领域中得到了广泛的应用。由于某些特殊应用场合的限制,有源RFID标签需要实现具有防水、防尘等性能的全密闭封装。为解决全密封的有源RFID标签电池充电问题,提出了一种无线充电电路的设计与实现方案。首先,介绍了整个电路的实现原理,分析了发射和接收电路的实现方式;其次,设计并实现了可对40个标签同时充电的电路;最后进行了标签的充电和放电实验。实验结果表明,所设计的充电电路性能稳定,充电时间较短。

  5. A compact transmit/receive switch for 2.4 GHz reader-less active RFID tag transceiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Arif Sobhan Bhuiyan; Mamun Bin Ibne Reaz; Jubayer Jalil; Labonnah Farzana Rahman; Tae Gyu Chang

    2015-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) is a ubiquitous identification technology nowadays. An on-chip high-performance transmit/receive (T/R) switch is designed and simulated in 0.13-µm CMOS technology for reader-less RFID tag. The switch utilizes only the transistor width and length (W/L) optimization, proper gate bias resistor and resistive body floating technique and therefore, exhibits 1 dB insertion loss, 31.5 dB isolation and 29.2 dBm 1-dB compression point (P1dB). Moreover, the switch dissipates only 786.7 nW power for 1.8/0 V control voltages and is capable of switching in 794 fs. Above all, as there is no inductor or capacitor used in the circuit, the size of the switch is 0.00208 mm2 only. This switch will be appropriate for reader-less RFID tag transceiver front-end as well as other wireless transceivers operated at 2.4 GHz band.

  6. Main: 1DS5 [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1DS5 トウモロコシ Corn Zea mays L. Casein Kinase Ii, Alpha Chain Name=Ack2; Zea Mays Mole...YDYSLDMWSLGCMFAGMIFRKEPFFYGHDNHDQLVKIAKVLGTDGLNVYLNKYRIELDPQLEALVGRHSRKPWLKFMNADNQHLVSPEAIDFLDKLLRYDHQERLTALEAMTHPYFQQVRAAENSRTRA corn_1DS5.jpg ...

  7. Kommentarer og supplement til DS 418

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Saxhof, Bjarne

    1999-01-01

    Comments and Supplement for DS 418. Lecture note for DTU course 64040 Basic Course in Building Energy Technology.......Comments and Supplement for DS 418. Lecture note for DTU course 64040 Basic Course in Building Energy Technology....

  8. Kommentarer og supplement til DS 418

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Saxhof, Bjarne

    1999-01-01

    Comments and Supplement for DS 418. Lecture note for DTU course 64040 Basic Course in Building Energy Technology.......Comments and Supplement for DS 418. Lecture note for DTU course 64040 Basic Course in Building Energy Technology....

  9. Electrochemical biosensor for protein kinase A activity assay based on gold nanoparticles-carbon nanospheres, phos-tag-biotin and β-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunlei; Yin, Huanshun; Li, Xue; Li, Zhi; Ai, Shiyun; Lin, Hai

    2016-12-15

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor was fabricated for protein kinase A (PKA) activity assay. Multiple signal amplification techniques were employed including the nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres (Au@C), the biocomposite of SiO2 and streptavidin (SiO2-SA), the composite of AuNPs and biotinylated β-galactosidase (AuNPs-B-Gal) and in situ enzymatic generation of electrochemical activity molecule of p-aminophenol. After peptides were assembled on Au@C modified electrode surface, they were phosphorylated by PKA in the presence of ATP. Then, biotinylated Phos-tag was modified on electrode surface through the specific interaction between Phos-tag and phosphate group. Finally, SiO2-SA and AuNPs-B-Gal were captured through the specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Because the electrochemical response of p-aminophenol was directly related to PKA concentration, an innovative electrochemical assay could be realized for PKA detection. The detection limit was 0.014unit/mL. The developed method showed high detection sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, the fabricated biosensor can be also applied to detect PKA in human normal gastricepithelial cell line and human gastric carcinoma cell line with satisfactory results.

  10. Extracting tag hierarchies

    CERN Document Server

    Tibély, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy betwe...

  11. Emergent Community Structure in Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cattuto, Ciro; Servedio, Vito D P; Loreto, Vittorio

    2008-01-01

    A distributed classification paradigm known as collaborative tagging has been widely adopted in new Web applications designed to manage and share online resources. Users of these applications organize resources (Web pages, digital photographs, academic papers) by associating with them freely chosen text labels, or tags. Here we leverage the social aspects of collaborative tagging and introduce a notion of resource distance based on the collective tagging activity of users. We collect data from a popular system and perform experiments showing that our definition of distance can be used to build a weighted network of resources with a detectable community structure. We show that this community structure clearly exposes the semantic relations among resources. The communities of resources that we observe are a genuinely emergent feature, resulting from the uncoordinated activity of a large number of users, and their detection paves the way for mapping emergent semantics in social tagging systems.

  12. Tagging vs. Controlled Vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Petras, Vivien

    2015-01-01

    elements like core bibliographic data, controlled vocabulary terms, reviews, and tags to the retrieval performance. Our comparison is done using a test collection of over 2 million book records with information elements from Amazon, the British Library, the Library of Congress, and LibraryThing. We find...... that tags and controlled vocabulary terms do not actually outperform each other consistently, but seem to provide complementary contributions: some information needs are best addressed using controlled vocabulary terms whereas other are best addressed using tags....

  13. Characterization of dsRed2-positive cells in the doublecortin-dsRed2 transgenic adult rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, A; Schroedl, F; Marschallinger, J; Rivera, F J; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Couillard-Despres, S; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2014-12-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is predominantly expressed in neuronal precursor cells and young immature neurons of the developing and adult brain, where it is involved in neuronal differentiation, migration and plasticity. Moreover, its expression pattern reflects neurogenesis, and transgenic DCX promoter-driven reporter models have been previously used to investigate adult neurogenesis. In this study, we characterize dsRed2 reporter protein-expressing cells in the adult retina of the transgenic DCX promoter-dsRed2 rat model, with the aim to identify cells with putative neurogenic activity. Additionally, we confirmed the expression of the dsRed2 protein in DCX-expressing cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult DCX-dsRed2 rat retinas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of DCX, NF200, Brn3a, Sox2, NeuN, calbindin, calretinin, PKC-a, Otx2, ChAT, PSA-NCAM and the glial markers GFAP and CRALBP, followed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. In addition, brain sections of transgenic rats were analyzed for dsRed2 expression and co-localization with DCX, NeuN, GFAP and Sox2 in the cortex and dentate gyrus. Endogenous DCX expression in the adult retina was confined to horizontal cells, and these cells co-expressed the DCX promoter-driven dsRed2 reporter protein. In addition, we encountered dsRed2 expression in various other cell types in the retina: retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a subpopulation of amacrine cells, a minority of bipolar cells and in perivascular cells. Since also RGCs expressed dsRed2, the DCX-dsRed2 rat model might offer a useful tool to study RGCs in vivo under various conditions. Müller glial cells, which have previously been identified as cells with stem cell features and with neurogenic potential, did express neither endogenous DCX nor the dsRed2 reporter. However, and surprisingly, we identified a perivascular glial cell type expressing the dsRed2 reporter, enmeshed with the glia/stem cell marker GFAP and colocalizing with the

  14. Absolute Measurement of Hadronic Branching Fractions of the D_s^+ Meson

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, J; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L

    2008-01-01

    The branching fractions of D_s meson decays serve to normalize many measurements of processes involving charm quarks. Using 298 /pb of e+ e- collisions recorded at a center of mass energy of 4.17 GeV, we determine absolute branching fractions for eight D_s decays with a double tag technique. In particular we determine the branching fraction B(D_s -> K- K+ pi+) = (5.50 +- 0.23 +- 0.16)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic respectively. We also provide partial branching fractions for kinematic subsets of the K- K+ pi+ decay mode.

  15. First observation of the decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ and measurement of its branching ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-01-18

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)/B(B0-->D-Ds+)=1.44(-0.44)(+0.48). Using the world average value for B(B0-->D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)=(9.4(-4.2)(+4.4))x10(-3). This provides a lower bound DeltaGammasCP/Gammas>or=2B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)>1.2x10(-2) at 95% C.L.

  16. Search for the W-exchange decays B0 --> Ds(*)- Ds(*)+

    OpenAIRE

    The BABAR Collaboration; Aubert, B.

    2005-01-01

    We report a search for the decays $B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{-} D_{s}^{+}$, $B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{+}$, $B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{*+}$ in a sample of 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays to \\BBb ~pairs collected with the \\babar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $e^+ e^-$ storage ring. We find no significant signal and set upper bounds for the branching fractions: ${\\cal B}(B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{-} D_{s}^{+}) < 1.0 \\times 10^{-4}, {\\cal B}(B^{0} \\to D_{s}^{*-} D_{s}^{+}) < 1.3 \\times 10^{-4}$ a...

  17. Measurement of B(Ds -> munu)

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakaue, H; Sasao, N; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    We present preliminary results for the branching fraction B(Ds -> munu) using a 548 fb^-1 data sample collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e+e- collider. The Ds momentum is determined by full reconstruction of the recoil system in events of the type e+e- -> D*sDKX, D*s -> Ds gamma where X is any number of additional pions or photons from fragmentation. The full reconstruction method provides high resolution in the neutrino momentum and thus good background separation, equivalent to that reached at experiments at the tau-charm factories such as CLEO-c or BES. We obtain the preliminary branching fraction B(Ds -> munu) = (6.44 +- 0.76 (stat) +- 0.52 (syst)) x 10^(-3), implying a Ds decay constant of f_Ds = 275 +- 16 (stat) +- 12 (syst) MeV.

  18. Self-organization in social tagging systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2011-01-01

    Individuals often imitate each other to fall into the typical group, leading to a self-organized state of typical behaviors in a community. In this paper, we model self-organization in social tagging systems and illustrate the underlying interaction and dynamics. Specifically, we introduce a model in which individuals adjust their own tagging tendency to imitate the average tagging tendency. We found that when users are of low confidence, they tend to imitate others and lead to a self-organized state with active tagging. On the other hand, when users are of high confidence and are stubborn for changes, tagging becomes inactive. We observe a phase transition at a critical level of user confidence when the system changes from one regime to the other. The distributions of post length obtained from the model are compared to real data which show good agreements.

  19. Study of B -> DsJ(*)+ Dbar(*) Decays

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, B.; Collaboration, BABAR

    2004-01-01

    We report a study of DsJ*(2317)+ and DsJ(2460)+ meson production in B decays. We observe the decays B+ -> DsJ(*)+ Dbar(*)0 and B0 -> DsJ(*)+ D(*)- with the subsequent decays DsJ*(2317)+ -> Ds+ pi0, DsJ(2460)+ -> Ds+ gamma, and DsJ(2460)+ -> Ds*+ pi0. Based on a data sample of 122.1 million BBbar pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory, we obtain branching fractions for these modes, including the previously unseen decays B -> DsJ(*)+ D*. In addition, we perform an angul...

  20. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7

  1. 75 FR 25911 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant; DS- 3030, Chest X-Ray and Classification Worksheet; OMB Control Number 1405-0113 ACTION... Affairs, Office of Visa Services (CA/VO). Form Number: DS-2053, DS-2054, DS-3030. Respondents: Immigrant...

  2. 75 FR 77936 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant; DS- 3024, DS-3030, Chest X-Ray and Classification Worksheet; DS-3025, Vaccination Documentation Worksheet; DS-3026; Medical History and Physical Examination Worksheet; OMB Control Number 1405...

  3. IC-tagged proteins are able to interact with each other and perform complex reactions when integrated into muNS-derived inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Otero-Romero, Iria; Benavente, Javier; Martinez-Costas, Jose M

    2011-09-20

    We have recently developed a versatile tagging system (IC-tagging) that causes relocation of the tagged proteins to ARV muNS-derived intracellular globular inclusions. In the present study we demonstrate (i) that the IC-tag can be successfully fused either to the amino or carboxyl terminus of the protein to be tagged and (ii) that IC-tagged proteins are able to interact between them and perform complex reactions that require such interactions while integrated into muNS inclusions, increasing the versatility of the IC-tagging system. Also, our studies with the DsRed protein add some light on the structure/function relationship of the evolution of DsRed chromophore.

  4. Flavour Tagging at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Grabalosa Gandara, M

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the most possible accurate knowledge of the flavour at production of the reconstructed B meson is required. This poster summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. We use same side an opposite side algorithms to establish wheter the meson contained a b or a b\\bar quark. The final decision is obtained through a combination of several methods. The use of control channels, decays to a flavour specific final state, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction \\omega (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as input for the determination of CKM unitary triangle angles.

  5. The use of external electronic tags on fish: an evaluation of tag retention and tagging effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Niels; Thorstad, Eva B.; Havn, Torgeir

    2015-01-01

    External tagging of fish with electronic tags has been used for decades for a wide range of marine and freshwater species. In the early years of fish telemetry research, it was the most commonly used attachment method, but later internal implants became preferred. Recently, the number of telemetry...... studies using external tagging has increased, especially with the development of archival tags (data storage tags, DSTs), pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) and other environment-sensing tags. Scientific evaluations of the tagging method are rather scarce for most species. We identified 89...... growth and survival have also been recorded, but direct mortality caused by external tagging seems rare. Most of the studies reviewed evaluate tag retention, survival, and tissue reactions. There is a general need for more research on the effects of external tagging of fish with electronic tags...

  6. Cloning and expressing DBT (dibenzothiophene) monooxygenase gene(dszC) from Rhodococcus sp.DS-3 in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ting; LI Shanshan; LI Guoqiang; WANG Renjing; LIANG Fenglai; LIU Rulin

    2006-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT) monooxygenase (DszC)catalysis,the first and also the key step in the microbial DBT desulfurization,is the conversion of DBT to DBT sulfone (DBTO2).In this study,dszC of a DBT-desulfiaizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp.DS-3 was cloned by PCR.The sequence cloned was 99% homologous to Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 that was reported in the Genebank.The gene dszC could be overexpressed effectively after being inserted into plasmid pET28a and transformed into E.coli BL21 strain.The expression amount of DszC was about 20% of total supernatant at low temperature.The soluble DszC in the supematant was purified by Ni2+ chelating His-Tag resin column and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to electronics purity.Only one band was detected by Western-blotting,which is for the antibody released in mouse against purified DszC in the expression product of BL21 (DE3,paC5) and Rhodococcus sp.DS-3.The activity of purified DszC was 0.36 U.DszC can utilize the organic compound such as DBT and methyl-DBT,hut not DBT derivates such as DBF,which has no sulfur or inorganic sulfur.

  7. Human ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E1. Indication of potential nuclear and cytoplasmic subpopulations using epitope-tagged cDNA constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley-Gearhart, P M; Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-12-30

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 catalyzes the first step in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway. Previously, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA for human E1. Expression of the E1 cDNA in the ts20 cell line, which harbors a thermolabile E1, abrogated the phenotypic defects associated with this line. However, little is known of the cell biology of the E1 protein or the nature of the E1 doublet. Thus, we constructed epitope-tagged E1 cDNAs in which the HA monoclonal antibody epitope tag sequence (from influenza hemagglutinin and recognized by the 12CA5 monoclonal antibody) was fused to the amino terminus of E1. Because the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of E1 is unknown, three constructs were made in which the HA tag was placed at each of the first three ATGs in the open reading frame (HA-1E1, HA-2E1, and HA-3E1). Western analysis of HeLa cells transfected with the constructs revealed that HA-1E1 closely comigrated with the upper band of the E1 doublet, and HA-2E1 comigrated with the lower band of the E1 doublet; HA-3E1 appeared smaller than either of the E1 bands. Metabolic labeling with 32P and immunoprecipitation with anti-HA antibody revealed that only the HA-1E1 protein product is phosphorylated; polyclonal anti-E1 antibody showed that only the upper band of the endogenous E1 doublet is phosphorylated. Each of the constructs was able to rescue the mutant phenotype of the ts20 cell line. Immunofluorescence studies showed that HA-2E1 and HA-3E1 were distributed in the cytoplasm with both negative and positive nuclei. This pattern of distribution has also been observed when immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody to E1 (1C5). However, the staining pattern associated with a polyclonal anti-E1 antibody (JJJ) is characterized by positive staining cytoplasm and nuclei in all cells. The HA-1E1 construct exhibited apparently exclusive nuclear distribution in HeLa cells. The difference between the staining patterns of the polyclonal and monoclonal anti-E1

  8. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Tibely, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamas; Palla, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary topic with great actuality and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely "flat", while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organisation of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other type of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organised into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the "is a sub-category of" type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various r...

  9. Mastering Autodesk 3ds Max 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Harper, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Get professional training in 3ds Max from this Autodesk Official Training Guide Extremely popular with video game designers as well as architects, 3ds Max offers integrated 3D modeling, animation, rendering, and compositing tools designed to streamline production. If you already have a working knowledge of 3ds Max basics, this official guide will take your skills to the next level. Detailed tutorials cover all the latest features of 3ds Max. From modeling, texturing, animation, and architectural visualization to high-level techniques for film, television, games, and more, this book provides

  10. TAG Advertisement Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    LaRc SI Material Overall photograph showing the material specimens, the graphite composite, the gold composite and the molded gears on a black background. These photos were used for the TAG CO-OP Public Relations and promotions

  11. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  12. b Tagging in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tomalin, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Many of the exotic particles expected at the LHC, such as SUSY, Higgs bosons and top quarks, will decay to b quarks. This paper presents the methods used to identify b-jets at CMS. The algorithms exploit the long B hadron lifetime, semi-leptonic B decays and jet kinematics. The prospect for measuring the performance of these b-tags directly from CMS data is examined. Finally, the use of b-tagging in the High-Level Trigger is explained.

  13. Study of B -> DsJ(*)+ Dbar(*) Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We report a study of DsJ*(2317)+ and DsJ(2460)+ meson production in B decays. We observe the decays B+ -> DsJ(*)+ Dbar(*)0 and B0 -> DsJ(*)+ D(*)- with the subsequent decays DsJ*(2317)+ -> Ds+ pi0, DsJ(2460)+ -> Ds+ gamma, and DsJ(2460)+ -> Ds*+ pi0. Based on a data sample of 122.1 million BBbar pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory, we obtain branching fractions for these modes, including the previously unseen decays B -> DsJ(*)+ D*. In addition, we perform an angular analysis of DsJ(2460)+ -> Ds+ gamma decays to test the different DsJ(2460)+ spin hypotheses.

  14. Several Affinity Tags Commonly Used in Chromatographic Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Affinity tags have become powerful tools from basic biological research to structural and functional proteomics. They were widely used to facilitate the purification and detection of proteins of interest, as well as the separation of protein complexes. Here, we mainly discuss the benefits and drawbacks of several affinity or epitope tags frequently used, including hexahistidine tag, FLAG tag, Strep II tag, streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP tag, calmodulin-binding peptide (CBP, glutathione S-transferase (GST, maltose-binding protein (MBP, S-tag, HA tag, and c-Myc tag. In some cases, a large-size affinity tag, such as GST or MBP, can significantly impact on the structure and biological activity of the fusion partner protein. So it is usually necessary to excise the tag by protease. The most commonly used endopeptidases are enterokinase, factor Xa, thrombin, tobacco etch virus, and human rhinovirus 3C protease. The proteolysis features of these proteases are described in order to provide a general guidance on the proteolytic removal of the affinity tags.

  15. Design of Low Power Active RFID Tag Based on IEEE802.15.4%基于IEEE802.15.4低功耗有源电子标签的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶为戈; 贾子彦; 钱志文

    2012-01-01

    针对有源电子标签功耗和防碰撞问题,给出了一种基于IEEE802.15.4标准和MG245X片上系统的2.4 GHz低功耗有源电子标签实现方法.从硬件电路和软件程序两个方面联合优化,设计了有源电子标签和标签读写器,分析了标签休眠时间与功耗及标签最大移动速度的关系.测试结果表明,该标签休眠模式下工作电流小于1.7 μA,空旷环境下有效通信距离大于60m,满足低功耗和远距离读写实用要求.%To the problems of power consumption and data collision avoidance for active RFID tag, based on IEEE 802. 15. 4 standard and MG245X on-chip system, a low power 2.4 GHz active RFID tag realization approach is proposed- With combined optimization of the hardware circuit and software program, the active RFID tag and corresponding tag reader is designed. Then the relationship among tag sleep time , power consumption and maximum moving speed is analyzed. Test results show that, the working current of RFID tag is less than 1. 7 μA in sleep mode, the effective communication distance in open environment is more than 60 m, therefore the practical requirements of low power consumption and long reading and writing distance can be satisfied.

  16. Measurement of Ds+ to mu+ nu and the Decay constant f_Ds

    CERN Document Server

    Artuso, M; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Brock, I; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Li, Z; López, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F

    2007-01-01

    We examine e+e- to Ds- Ds*+ or Ds-* Ds+ collisions at 4170 MeV using the CLEO-c detector in order to measure the decay constant f_Ds+. We use the Ds+ to ell+ nu channel, where the ell+ designates either a mu+ or a tau+. Analyzing both modes simultaneously, we determine B(D_s^+ to mu+ nu)= (0.657 +- 0.090 +- 0.028)%, B(D_s^+ to tau+ nu)= (7.1 +- 1.4 +- 0.3)%, and extract f_Ds+ = 282 +- 16 +- 7 MeV. Combining with our previous determination of B(D+ to mu+ nu), we find that the ratio f_Ds+/f_D+ = 1.27 +- 0.12 +- 0.03. (All new results here are preliminary.) We compare with current theoretical estimates.

  17. Identification of transmitter systems and learning tag molecules involved in behavioral tagging during memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Martinez, María Cecilia; Frey, Julietta U; Viola, Haydee

    2011-08-02

    Long-term memory (LTM) consolidation requires the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). In addition, we have shown recently that LTM formation also requires the setting of a "learning tag" able to capture those PRPs. Weak training, which results only in short-term memory, can set a tag to use PRPs derived from a temporal-spatial closely related event to promote LTM formation. Here, we studied the involvement of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenergic inputs on the setting of an inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning tag and the synthesis of PRPs. Rats explored an open field (PRP donor) followed by weak (tag inducer) or strong (tag inducer plus PRP donor) IA training. Throughout pharmacological interventions around open-field and/or IA sessions, we found that hippocampal dopamine D1/D5- and β-adrenergic receptors are specifically required to induce PRP synthesis. Moreover, activation of the glutamatergic NMDA receptors is required for setting the learning tags, and this machinery further required α-Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PKA but not ERK1/2 activity. Together, the present findings emphasize an essential role of the induction of PRPs and learning tags for LTM formation. The existence of only the PRP or the tag was insufficient for stabilization of the mnemonic trace.

  18. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of benzophenone tagged pyridine analogues towards activation of caspase activated DNase mediated nuclear fragmentation in Dalton's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghorbani, Mohammed; Thirusangu, Prabhu; Gurupadaswamy, H D; Girish, V; Shamanth Neralagundi, H G; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2016-04-01

    A series of benzophenones possessing pyridine nucleus 8a-l were synthesized by multistep reaction sequence and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against DLA cells by in vitro and in vivo studies. The results suggested that, compounds 8b with fluoro group and 8e with chloro substituent at the benzoyl ring of benzophenone scaffold as well as pyridine ring with hydroxy group exhibited significant activity. Further investigation in mouse model suggests that compounds 8b and 8e have the potency to activate caspase activated DNase (endonuclease) which is responsible for DNA fragmentation, a primary hallmark of apoptosis and thereby inhibits the Dalton's lymphoma ascites tumour growth.

  19. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps.

  20. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  1. The helical domain of the EcoR124I motor subunit participates in ATPase activity and dsDNA translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Bialevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multisubunit, multifunctional molecular machines that recognize specific DNA target sequences, and their multisubunit organization underlies their multifunctionality. EcoR124I is the archetype of Type I restriction-modification family IC and is composed of three subunit types: HsdS, HsdM, and HsdR. DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities are housed in the distinct domains of the endonuclease/motor subunit HsdR. Because the multiple functions are integrated in this large subunit of 1,038 residues, a large number of interdomain contacts might be expected. The crystal structure of EcoR124I HsdR reveals a surprisingly sparse number of contacts between helicase domain 2 and the C-terminal helical domain that is thought to be involved in assembly with HsdM. Only two potential hydrogen-bonding contacts are found in a very small contact region. In the present work, the relevance of these two potential hydrogen-bonding interactions for the multiple activities of EcoR124I is evaluated by analysing mutant enzymes using in vivo and in vitro experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide structural interpretation of the functional data. The results indicate that the helical C-terminal domain is involved in the DNA translocation, cleavage, and ATPase activities of HsdR, and a role in controlling those activities is suggested.

  2. The helical domain of the EcoR124I motor subunit participates in ATPase activity and dsDNA translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Guzanova, Alena; Řeha, David; Csefalvay, Eva; Carey, Jannette; Weiserova, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multisubunit, multifunctional molecular machines that recognize specific DNA target sequences, and their multisubunit organization underlies their multifunctionality. EcoR124I is the archetype of Type I restriction-modification family IC and is composed of three subunit types: HsdS, HsdM, and HsdR. DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities are housed in the distinct domains of the endonuclease/motor subunit HsdR. Because the multiple functions are integrated in this large subunit of 1,038 residues, a large number of interdomain contacts might be expected. The crystal structure of EcoR124I HsdR reveals a surprisingly sparse number of contacts between helicase domain 2 and the C-terminal helical domain that is thought to be involved in assembly with HsdM. Only two potential hydrogen-bonding contacts are found in a very small contact region. In the present work, the relevance of these two potential hydrogen-bonding interactions for the multiple activities of EcoR124I is evaluated by analysing mutant enzymes using in vivo and in vitro experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide structural interpretation of the functional data. The results indicate that the helical C-terminal domain is involved in the DNA translocation, cleavage, and ATPase activities of HsdR, and a role in controlling those activities is suggested. PMID:28133570

  3. Norm for sikkerhedsbestemmelser for konstruktioner DS409

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety of Structures DS409 contains definitions and models for the assessment of the fire safety of structures.......The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety of Structures DS409 contains definitions and models for the assessment of the fire safety of structures....

  4. Norm for sikkerhedsbestemmelser for konstruktioner DS409

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety of Structures DS409 contains definitions and models for the assessment of the fire safety of structures.......The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety of Structures DS409 contains definitions and models for the assessment of the fire safety of structures....

  5. Deep Explosive Volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and Seismological Constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    in the mantle, where rigid tectonic plates move apart and new seafloor material rises to fill the vacant space. The generation of new plate material...focus on shallow seismic activity beneath the hydrothermal mound. The OBS network also detected a large number of local and regional tectonic events...hydrothermal mound with the larger-scale seismicity associated with tectonic extension on the active detachment fault [deMartin et al., 2007]. Thermal

  6. DS/EN 1520 FU:2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per; Cornelius, Thomas

    DS/EN 1520 FU er en sammenskrivning af de væsentligste afsnit af standarden med tilhørende dansk anneks, hvor de danske værdier er angivet. Sammenskrivningen gør det lettere for den projekterende at beregne de fleste konstruktioner efter DS/EN 1520-systemet. En konstruktion, der opfylder kravene i...... DS/EN 1520 FU, vil også tilfredsstille de tilsvarende krav i DS/EN 1520. DS/INF 168, Supplerende vejledning ved brug af EN 1520, Præfabrikerede armerede elementer af letbeton med lette tilslag og åben struktur er også en del af sammenskrivningen. Denne udgave er også opdateret med seneste nationale...

  7. Production of D$^{**}_{s}$ mesons in hadronic Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    The production rates of the orbitally excited Ds** mesons, Ds1 and Ds2*, are measured with the 4.1 million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector during 1991--1995. The Ds** mesons are reconstructed in the decay modes Ds1+ -> D*+ K0, Ds1+ -> D*0 K+ and Ds2*+ -> D0 K+. The production rate of the Ds1 is measured to be n(Z->Ds1+-)=(0.52+-0.09+-0.06)%, under the assumption that the two considered decay modes of the Ds1 saturate the branching ratio. The production rate of the Ds2* is determined to be n(Z->Ds2*+-)=(0.83+-0.29+0.07-0.13)%, assuming that the branching fraction of the decay Ds2*+ -> D0 K+ is 45%. The production rates in Z->cc and Z->bbar decays are measured separately.

  8. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US.

  9. Tagging SNPs in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes and response of renin activity, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations to antihypertensive treatment in Kazakans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weili; Zhang, Yuanming; Shan, Zimei; Wang, Qian; Huang, Yongdi; Wang, Chenchen; Yan, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Polymorphisms of REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 may be associated with responses of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activity phenotypes to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) antihypertensive treatment. A total of 400 first diagnosed Kazak hypertensives were randomly allocated to two groups and received a 3-week course of either captopril and atenolol as monotherapy under double blinding. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed by covariance analyses between baseline level and responses of blood pressure, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations with tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes. A false discovery rate method was used to adjust multiple testing. After adjustment for multiple testing, we found that the G allele of rs6676670 (T/G) in intron 1 of REN was significantly associated with higher baseline aldosterone concentrations (p < 0.0001, explained variance (EV) = 2.3%). Significant associations after adjustments were also found between the A allele of rs2887284, with higher baseline renin activity (p = 0.022, EV = 1.0%), higher responses of renin (p = 0.018 EV = 5.4%), and higher responses of angiotensin II (p = 0.0255, EV = 3.13%) to the treatment of ACEI. The carriers of the A allele of rs2887284 appeared to be more sensitive to the ACEI treatment. rs2887284 in intron 9 of REN is associated with the response of renin and angiotensin II levels to ACEI treatment.

  10. EURISOL-DS multi-MW target unit: Neutronics performance and shielding assessment, dose rate and material activation calculations for the MAFF configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanets, Y; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Goncalves, I F; Tecchio, L; Kharoua, C; Vaz, P; Ene, D; David, J C; Rocca, R; Negoita, F

    2010-01-01

    One of the objectives of the EURISOL (EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) Design Study consisted of providing a safe and reliable facility layout and design for the following operational parameters and characteristics: (a) a 4 MW proton beam of 1 GeV energy impinging on a mercury target (the converter); (b) high neutron fluxes (similar to 3 x 10(16) neutrons/s) generated by spallation reactions of the protons impinging in the converter and (c) fission rate on fissile U-235 targets in excess of 10(15) fissions/s. In this work, the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (Pelowitz, 2005) and FLUKA (Vlachoudis, 2009; Ferrari et al., 2008) were used to characterize the neutronics performance and to perform the shielding assessment (Herrera-Martinez and Kadi, 2006; Cornell, 2003) of the EURISOLTarget Unit and to provide estimations of dose rate and activation of different components, in view of the radiation safety assessment of the facility. Dosimetry and activation calculations were perfor...

  11. New library of aminosulfonyl-tagged Hoveyda–Grubbs type complexes: Synthesis, kinetic studies and activity in olefin metathesis transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Borré

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven novel Hoveyda–Grubbs precatalysts bearing an aminosulfonyl function are reported. Kinetic studies indicate an activity enhancement compared to Hoveyda’s precatalyst. A selection of these catalysts was investigated with various substrates in ring-closing metathesis of dienes or enynes and cross metathesis. The results demonstrate that these catalysts show a good tolerance to various chemical functions.

  12. New library of aminosulfonyl-tagged Hoveyda–Grubbs type complexes: Synthesis, kinetic studies and activity in olefin metathesis transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borré, Etienne; Caijo, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Summary Seven novel Hoveyda–Grubbs precatalysts bearing an aminosulfonyl function are reported. Kinetic studies indicate an activity enhancement compared to Hoveyda’s precatalyst. A selection of these catalysts was investigated with various substrates in ring-closing metathesis of dienes or enynes and cross metathesis. The results demonstrate that these catalysts show a good tolerance to various chemical functions. PMID:21165173

  13. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  14. 76 FR 25733 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7001 and DS-7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7001 and DS- 7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic Exchange Program... Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, ECA/A/E/EUR. Form Number: DS-7001, DS-7005. Respondents: Applicants for the Academic Exchange Program. Estimated Number of Respondents: 7160 (For DS-7001...

  15. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes. PMID:26896849

  16. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Louise F; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D G; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-04-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen PstDC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes.

  17. 杜氏盐藻促有丝分裂活化蛋白激酶 DsMAPK的原核表达及纯化%Prokaryotic Expression and Purification of DsMAPK from Dunaliella salina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳文静; 柴晓杰; 刘丽颖; 武天祥; 刘艺琼

    2015-01-01

    Dunaliel a salina is an important model organism for investigating the salt tolerance mechanism of plant. MAPK is the key gene in the molecular pathway of salt tolerance of plant. ln this experiment, the open reading frame (ORF) of DsMAPK gene was amplified by PCR. The target fragment was cloned in pGS-21a, a prokaryotic expression vector with GST-tag. The recombinant plasmid pGS-21a-DsMAPK was then transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). The expression was in-duced with lPTG. Then the expression form of the recombinant protein was ana-lyzed. The expression products were purified with GST-SefinoseTM Kit and identified with SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The results showed the recombinant expression vector pGS-21a-DsMAPK was constructed successful y, and the molecular weight of the expressed recombinant protein was as same as expected. Western blot analysis showed the purified recombinant protein could be identified special y by the anti-GST antibody and had a good immunological activity. The successful expression of DsMAPK wil lay a basis for the further research on the role of DsMAPK in the salt tolerance mechanism at the protein level.%盐藻是研究植物耐盐机制的重要模式生物,而 MAPK基因在植物耐盐分子途径中起重要作用。该试验通过PCR扩增DsMAPK基因的开放阅读框(ORF),并将其克隆至带有GST标签的原核表达载体 pGS-21a,得到重组表达载体pGS-21a-MAPK。将重组表达载体转化 E. coli BL21(DE3),IPTG诱导表达,然后对融合蛋白进行表达形式分析,利用 GST-SefinoseTM Kit进行纯化,所得产物进行 SDS-PAGE和Western blot鉴定。结果表明,该试验成功构建了重组表达载体 pGS-21a-MAPK,经IPTG诱导后表达的融合蛋白与预期相符,纯化后的上清蛋白经 Western blot检测显示该融合蛋白能与抗 GST单克隆抗体特异性结合,具有良好的免疫学活性, DsMAPK的成功表达为进一步在蛋白质水平上研究其在盐藻耐盐

  18. SLAP deficiency decreases dsDNA autoantibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K; Pennington, Luke F; Shaw, Laura A; Brown, Meredith; Treacy, Eric C; Friend, Samantha F; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Rubtsova, Kira; Rubtsov, Anatoly V; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-02-01

    Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) adapts c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to activated components of the BCR signaling complex regulating BCR levels and signaling in developing B cells. Based on this function, we asked whether SLAP deficiency could decrease the threshold for tolerance and eliminate development of autoreactive B cells in two models of autoantibody production. First, we sensitized mice with a dsDNA mimetope that causes an anti-dsDNA response. Despite equivalent production of anti-peptide antibodies compared to BALB/c controls, SLAP(-/-) mice did not produce anti-dsDNA. Second, we used the 56R tolerance model. SLAP(-/-) 56R mice had decreased levels of dsDNA-reactive antibodies compared to 56R mice due to skewed light chain usage. Thus, SLAP is a critical regulator of B-cell development and function and its deficiency leads to decreased autoreactive B cells that are otherwise maintained by inefficient receptor editing or failed negative selection.

  19. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:28243248

  20. Accumulation of FlAsH/Lumio Green in active mitochondria can be reversed by beta-mercaptoethanol for specific staining of tetracysteine-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Matthias F; Genisyuerek, Selda; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2006-06-01

    Recent advances in the field of small molecule labels for live cell imaging promise to overcome some of the limitations set by the size of fluorescent proteins. We tested the tetracysteine-biarsenical labeling system in live cell fluorescence microscopy of reggie-1/flotillin-2 in HeLa and N2a cells. In both cell types, the biarsenical staining reagent FlAsH/Lumio Green accumulated in active mitochondria and led to mitochondrial swelling. This is indicative of toxic side effects caused by arsenic, which should be considered when this labeling system is to be used in live cell imaging. Mitochondrial accumulation of FlAsH/Lumio Green was reversed by addition of low concentrations of thiol-containing reagents during labeling and a subsequent high stringency thiol wash. Both ethanedithiol and beta-mercaptoethanol proved to be effective. We therefore established a staining protocol using beta-mercaptoethanol as thiol binding site competitor resulting in a specific staining of tetracysteine-tagged reggie-1/flotillin-2 of adequate signal to noise ratio, so that the more toxic and inconvenient ethanedithiol could be avoided. Furthermore, we show that staining efficiency was greatly enhanced by introducing a second tetracysteine sequence in tandem.

  1. Visualization of Protonation/Deprotonation of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient in Solid State by Vapor Phase Amine-Selective Alkyne Tagging and Raman Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kei; Yasuhara, Yukiko; Ota, Hiromi

    2017-07-01

    Here, we report a simple and direct method to visualize the protonation/deprotonation of an amine active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in the solid state using a solid-vapor reaction with propargyl bromide and Raman imaging for the assessment of the API during the manufacturing process of solid formulations. An alkyne tagging occurred on the free form of solid haloperidol by the vapor phase reaction, and a distinct Raman signal of alkyne was detected. Alkyne signal monitoring by Raman imaging enabled us to visualize the distribution of the free-form haloperidol in a solid formulation. On the other hand, haloperidol hydrochloride did not react with propargyl bromide in the solid-vapor reaction, and the alkyne signal was not observed. Using the difference in reactivity, the protonation/deprotonation of the amine API in the solid state could be visualized. As an example of application, we tried to visually assess the protonation/deprotonation state when the free-form haloperidol was ground with acids using the solid-vapor reaction and Raman imaging and found that haloperidol was partially protonated when ground with 2 equivalents of hydrogen chloride. Furthermore, we demonstrated the relationship between the degree of protonation and the amount of water added as a medium for grinding haloperidol with succinic acid. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Production of Ds** mesons in hadronic Z decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    The production rates of the orbitally excited Ds** mesons, Ds1+/- and Ds2*+/-, are measured with the 4.1 million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector during 1991-1995. The Ds** mesons are reconstructed in the decay modes Ds1+-->D*+K0, Ds1+-->D*0K+ and Ds2*+-->D0K+. The production rate of the Ds1+/- is measured to be f(Z-->Ds1+/-)=(0.52+/-0.09+/-0.06)%, under the assumption that the two considered decay modes of the Ds1+/- saturate the branching ratio. The production rate of the Ds2*+/- is determined to be /f=%, assuming that the branching fraction of the decay Ds2*+-->D0K+ is 45%. The production rates in /Z-->cc¯ and /Z-->bb¯ decays are measured separately.

  3. Identification of transmitter systems and learning tag molecules involved in behavioral tagging during memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Martinez, María Cecilia; Frey, Julietta U.; Viola, Haydee

    2011-01-01

    Long-term memory (LTM) consolidation requires the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). In addition, we have shown recently that LTM formation also requires the setting of a “learning tag” able to capture those PRPs. Weak training, which results only in short-term memory, can set a tag to use PRPs derived from a temporal-spatial closely related event to promote LTM formation. Here, we studied the involvement of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenergic inputs on the setting of an inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning tag and the synthesis of PRPs. Rats explored an open field (PRP donor) followed by weak (tag inducer) or strong (tag inducer plus PRP donor) IA training. Throughout pharmacological interventions around open-field and/or IA sessions, we found that hippocampal dopamine D1/D5- and β-adrenergic receptors are specifically required to induce PRP synthesis. Moreover, activation of the glutamatergic NMDA receptors is required for setting the learning tags, and this machinery further required α-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PKA but not ERK1/2 activity. Together, the present findings emphasize an essential role of the induction of PRPs and learning tags for LTM formation. The existence of only the PRP or the tag was insufficient for stabilization of the mnemonic trace. PMID:21768371

  4. RATC: A Robust Automated Tag Clustering Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratto, Ludovico; Carta, Salvatore; Vargiu, Eloisa

    Nowadays, the most dominant and noteworthy web information sources are developed according to the collaborative-web paradigm, also known as Web 2.0. In particular, it represents a novel paradigm in the way users interact with the web. Users (also called prosumers) are no longer passive consumers of published content, but become involved, implicitly and explicitly, as they cooperate by providing their own resources in an “architecture of participation”. In this scenario, collaborative tagging, i.e., the process of classifying shared resources by using keywords, becomes more and more popular. The main problem in such task is related to well-known linguistic phenomena, such as polysemy and synonymy, making effective content retrieval harder. In this paper, an approach that monitors users activity in a tagging system and dynamically quantifies associations among tags is presented. The associations are then used to create tags clusters. Experiments are performed comparing the proposed approach with a state-of-the-art tag clustering technique. Results -given in terms of classical precision and recall- show that the approach is quite effective in the presence of strongly related tags in a cluster.

  5. Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Murdock, Kelly L

    2012-01-01

    Updated version of the bestselling 3ds Max book on the market Autodesk 3ds Max is top animation software used by developers, visual effects artists, and graphic designers in film, television, and the game industry. One place designers turn for crucial information on how to use 3ds Max is this in-depth book. Whether you're a beginner just itching to create something right away or an experienced user checking out the latest and greatest features, you'll find it here. See what's new, what's tried and true, and just how creative you can get using the tips, tricks, and techniques in this essential

  6. Tagging behaviour with support from controlled vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Høj, Anne Lyhne; Madsen, Line Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates how knowledge structures from a controlled vocabulary affect tagging. The study is a comparative analysis of tags assigned in two tagging systems, a simple tagging system (control system) that provides suggestions from two tag clouds (all users tags and my tags) and an enha...

  7. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of the Ds+- meson

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Dragic, J; Fujii, H; Gershon, T; Haba, J; Hazumi, M; Higuchi, T; Igarashi, Y; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Katayama, N; Kichimi, H; Krokovnyi, P P; Limosani, A; Nakamura, I; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nozaki, T; Ozaki, H; Ronga, F J; Saitoh, S; Sakai, Y; Stamen, R; Sumisawa, K; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Ushiroda, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, J; Hoshi, Y; Neichi, K; Aihara, H; Hastings, N C; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, K; Iwasaki, M; Kakuno, H; Kusaka, A; Nakahama, Y; Tanabe, K; Anipko, D; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Bedny, I; Bondar, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D A; Gabyshev, N; Kuzmin, A; Poluektov, A; Root, N; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Usov, Yu; Zhilich, V; Aoki, K; Enari, Y; Hara, K; Hayasaka, K; Hokuue, T; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Kishimoto, N; Kozakai, Y; Kubota, T; Miyazaki, Y; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Sato, N; Senyo, K; Yoshino, S; Arakawa, T; Kawasaki, T; Miyata, H; Tamura, N; Watanabe, M; Asano, Y; Aso, T; Aushev, T; Bay, A; Hinz, L; Jacoby, C; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Villa, S; Wicht, J; Zürcher, D; Aziz, T; Banerjee, S; Gokhroo, G; Majumder, G; Bahinipati, S; Drutskoy, A; Goldenzweig, P; Kinoshita, K; Kulasiri, R; Sayeed, K; Schwartz, A J; Somov, A; Bakich, A M; Cole, S; McOnie, S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Stöck, H; Varvell, K E; Yabsley, B D; Balagura, V; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Liventsev, D; Medvedeva, T; Mizuk, R; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Tikhomirov, I; Uglov, T; Tian, Y BanX C; Barberio, E; Dalseno, J; Dowd, R; Moloney, G R; Sevior, M E; Taylor, G N; Tse, Y F; Urquijo, P; Barbero, M; Browder, T E; Guler, H; Jones, M; Li, J; Nishimura, K; Olsen, S L; Peters, M; Rorie, J; Sahoo, H; Uchida, K; Varner, G; Belous, K S; Shapkin, M; Sokolov, A; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Fratina, S; Gorisek, A; Pestotnik, R; Staric, M; Zupanc, A; Blyth, S; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Hou, S; Kuo, C C; Bozek, A; Kapusta, P; Lesiak, T; Matyja, A; Natkaniec, Z; Ostrowicz, W; Palka, H; Rózanska, M; Wiechczynski, J; Bracko, M; Korpar S; Brodzicka, J; Chang, M C; Kikuchi, N; Mikami, Y; Nagamine, T; Schonmeier, P; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Lee, Y J; Lin, C Y; Lin, S W; Shen, Y T; Tsai, Y T; Ueno, K; Wang, C C; Wang, M Z; Wu, C H; Cheon, B G; Choi, J H; Ha, H; Kang, J S; Won, E; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Park, C W; Park, K S; Chuvikov, A; Garmash, A; Marlow, D; Ziegler, T; Dash, M; Mohapatra, D; Piilonen, L E; Yusa, Y; Fujikawa, M; Hayashii, H; Imoto, A; Kataoka, S U; Miyabayashi, K; Noguchi, S; Krizan, P; Golob, B; Seidl, R; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Hara, T; Heffernan, D; Miyake, H; Hasegawa, Y; Satoyama, N; Takada, N; Nitoh, O; Hoshina, K; Ishino, H; Khan, H R; Kibayashi, A; Mori, T; Ono, S; Watanabe, Y; Iwabuchi, M; Kim, Y J; Liu, Y; Sarangi, T R; Uchida, Y; Kang, J H; Kim, T H; Kwon, Y J; Kurihara, E; Kawai, H; Park, H; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Yang He Young; Kumar, R; Singh, J B; Soni, N; Lange, J S; Leder, G; MacNaughton, J; Mandl, F; Mitaroff, W A; Pernicka, M; Schwanda, C; Widhalm, L; Matsumoto, T; Nakagawa, T; Seki, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yamamoto, S; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Sakaue, H; Teramoto, Y; Ogawa, A; Shibuya, H; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Sakamoto, H; Wang, C H; Schümann, J; Stanic, S; Xie, Q L; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zhang, C C; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P

    2006-01-01

    The Ds+- -> K+-K-+pi+- absolute branching fraction is measured using e+e- -> Ds*+- Ds1-+(2536) events collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB e+e- asymmetric energy collider. Using the ratio of yields when either the Ds1 or Ds* is fully reconstructed, we find Br(Ds+- -> K+-K-+pi+-)= (4.0+-0.4(stat)+-0.4(sys))%.

  8. Personalization of tagging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Clements, M.; Yang, J.; Vries, A.P. de; Reinders, M.J.T.

    2010-01-01

    Social media systems have encouraged end user participation in the Internet, for the purpose of storing and distributing Internet content, sharing opinions and maintaining relationships. Collaborative tagging allows users to annotate the resulting user-generated content, and enables effective retrie

  9. Tagging the Teleman Corpus

    CERN Document Server

    Brants, T; Brants, Thorsten; Samuelsson, Christer

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out comparing the Swedish Teleman and the English Susanne corpora using an HMM-based and a novel reductionistic statistical part-of-speech tagger. They indicate that tagging the Teleman corpus is the more difficult task, and that the performance of the two different taggers is comparable.

  10. Tagging Grammatical Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Brants, T; Krenn, B; Brants, Thorsten; Skut, Wojciech; Krenn, Brigitte

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses issues in automated treebank construction. We show how standard part-of-speech tagging techniques extend to the more general problem of structural annotation, especially for determining grammatical functions and syntactic categories. Annotation is viewed as an interactive process where manual and automatic processing alternate. Efficiency and accuracy results are presented. We also discuss further automation steps.

  11. LHCb flavour tagging performance

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Musy, M

    2003-01-01

    In CP violation measurements, the most accurate determination of the B flavour of neutral and charged B-mesons is necessary. In this note we summarize the tagging performances for the LHCb experiment, using different approaches and studying different decay channels.

  12. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  13. Stream Habitat Reach Summary - NCWAP [ds158

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Stream Habitat - NCWAP - Reach Summary [ds158] shapefile contains in-stream habitat survey data summarized to the stream reach level. It is a derivative of the...

  14. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  15. Symmetric Encryption Based Privacy using Lightweight Cryptography for RFID Tags

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    RFID technology emerged as the promising technology for its ease of use and implementation in the ubiquitous computing world. RFID is deployed widely in various applications that use automatic identification and processing for information retrieval. The primary components of an RFID system are the RFID tag (active and passive), the reader and the back-end server (database). Cost is the main factor that drove RFID tags to its immense utilization in which passive tags dominate in...

  16. A Personalized Tag-Based Recommendation in Social Web Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Tagging activity has been recently identified as a potential source of knowledge about personal interests, preferences, goals, and other attributes known from user models. Tags themselves can be therefore used for finding personalized recommendations of items. In this paper, we present a tag...... to study and evaluate the recommender system, we have conducted an experiment involving 38 people from 12 countries using data from Del.icio.us , a social bookmarking web system on which users can share their personal bookmarks...

  17. DS-2 Mars Microprobe Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, H.; Kindler, A.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Blankevoort, J.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    1999-01-01

    In January of 1999 the NM DS-2 Mars microprobe will be launched to impact on Mars in December. The technical objectives of the missions are to demonstrate: key technologies, a passive atmospheric entry, highly integrated microelectronics which can withstand both low temperatures and high decelerations, and the capability to conduct in-situ, surface and subsurface science data acquisition. The scientific objectives are to determine if ice is present below the Martian surface, measure the local atmospheric pressure, characterize the thermal properties of the martian subsurface soil, and to estimate the vertical temperature gradient of the Martian soil. The battery requirements are 2-4 cell batteries, with voltage of 6-14 volts, capacity of 550 mAh at 80C, and 2Ah at 25C, shelf life of 2.5 years, an operating temperature of 60C and below, and the ability to withstand shock impact of 80,000 g's. The technical challenges and the approach is reviewed. The Li-SOCL2 system is reviewed, and graphs showing the current and voltage is displayed, along with the voltage over discharge time. The problems encountered during the testing were: (1) impact sensitivity, (2) cracking of the seals, and (3) delay in voltage. A new design resulted in no problems in the impact testing phase. The corrective actions for the seal problems involved: (1) pre weld fill tube, (2) an improved heat sink during case to cover weld and (3) change the seal dimensions to reduce stress. To correct the voltage delay problem the solutions involved: (1) drying the electrodes to reduce contamination by water, (2) assemblage of the cells within a week of electrode manufacture, (3) ensure electrolyte purity, and (4) provide second depassivation pulse after landing. The conclusions on further testing were that the battery can: (1) withstand anticipated shock of up to 80,000 g, (2) meet the discharge profile post shock at Mars temperatures, (3) meet the required self discharge rate and (4) meet environmental

  18. Measurement of the Ds l(+)ve branching fractions and the decay constant fDs+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Andersson, W. Ikegami; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Koehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Using 482 pb(-1) of e(+) e(-) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of root s = 4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the branching fractions of the decays D-s(+) -> u(+)v(u) and D-s(+) -> tau(+)v(tau). By constraining the ratio of decay rates of Ds(+) to tau(+)v(u) and to u(+

  19. Influences of V5-epitope tag on the metabolic activation of AFB1 by human cytochrome P450 2A13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shoulin Wang; Xiaoyang He; Xinru Wang; Junyan Hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the impact of V5-epitope tag inserted in the commercial pcDNA5/FRT/V5-His TOPO expression vector on the metabolic activation of AFB1 by human CYP2A13. Methods: A C-terminal 6×Histag was first introduced into CYP2A13 cDNA by PCR and subsequently transferred into the expressing vector pcDNA5/FRT. Another commercial pcDNA5/FRT/V5-His TOPO expression vector was used to develop the construct directly via PCR. Both of the constructs were then transfected into Flp-In CHO and allowed for the stable expression of CYP2A13. The mouse CYP2A5 and the vector alone were used as positive and negative control, respectively. The presence of CYP2A5 and CYP2A13 cDNA and their protein expression in the stable transfectant cells were determined by immunoblotting assay using a monoclonal antibody against 6×Histag. The AFB1-induced cytotoxicity in these tranfected CHO cells were conducted by MTS assay and the IC50 of cell viability was used to compare the CYP enzyme metabolic activity in AFB1 metabolism among these cells. Results: In accordance with the Flp-In system working mechanism, all the transfectant cells presented same protein expression level. The CHO cells expressing CYP2A5 was more sensitive to AFB1 treatment than those cells expressing CYP2A13, there was about 30-fold IC50 difference between the two cells (2.1 nmol/L vs 58 nmol/L). Interestingly, CYP2A13 fused with V5-Histag had the lost of metabolic activity to AFB1 than that fused with Histag alone, the IC50 of the viability in CHO-2A13-His-V5 cells was about 20-fold less than CHO-2A13-His (>1 000 nmol/L vs 58 nmol/L). However, there was no change between CYP2A5 fused with V5-Histag and Histag alone (2.4 nmol/L vs 2.1 nmol/L). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that CYP2A13 fused with V5-epitope has a significant impact on its metabolic activation to AFB1, which indicated that it should be careful to select a new expressing vector for evaluating the enzyme activity in carcinogen metabolism.

  20. Observation of the Dalitz Decay $D_{s}^{*+} \\to D_{s}^{+} e^{+} e^{-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Ricciardi, S; Thomas, C; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Zhu, J; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Randrianarivony, K; Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Libby, J; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Tarbert, C M; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K

    2011-01-01

    Using 586 $\\textrm{pb}^{-1}$ of $e^{+}e^{-}$ collision data acquired at $\\sqrt{s}=4.170$ GeV with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we report the first observation of $D_{s}^{*+} \\to D_{s}^{+} e^{+} e^{-}$ with a significance of $5.3 \\sigma$. The ratio of branching fractions $\\calB(D_{s}^{*+} \\to D_{s}^{+} e^{+} e^{-}) / \\calB(D_{s}^{*+} \\to D_{s}^{+} \\gamma)$ is measured to be $[ 0.72^{+0.15}_{-0.13} (\\textrm{stat}) \\pm 0.10 (\\textrm{syst})]%$, which is consistent with theoretical expectations.

  1. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  2. From the Cover: Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattuto, C.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag co-occurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory - or aging of resources - in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features, with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users, who - despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity - appear to follow simple activity patterns.

  3. First observation of the decay Bs --> Ds K and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(Bs --> DsK)/Br(Bs --> Ds pi)

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodríguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salto, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobuev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-01-01

    A combined mass and particle identification fit is used to make the first observation of the decay Bs --> Ds K and measure the branching fraction of Bs --> Ds K relative to Bs --> Ds pi. This analysis uses 1.2 fb^-1 integrated luminosity of pbar-p collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We observe a Bs --> Ds K signal with a statistical significance of 8.1 sigma and measure Br(Bs --> Ds K)/Br(Bs --> Ds pi) = 0.097 +- 0.018(stat) +- 0.009(sys).

  4. Recommending Tags for New Resources in Social Bookmarking Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Yagnik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Social bookmarking system is a web-based resource sharing system that allows users to upload, share and organize their resources i.e. bookmarks and publications. The system has shifted the paradigm of bookmarking from an individual activity limited to desktop to a collective activity on the web. It also facilitates user to annotate his resource with free form tags that leads to large communities of users to collaboratively create accessible repositories of web resources. Tagging process has its own challenges like ambiguity, redundancy or misspelled tags and sometimes user tends to avoid it as he has to describe tag at his own. The resultant tag space is noisy or very sparse and dilutes the purpose of tagging. The effective solution is Tag Recommendation System that automatically suggests appropriate set of tags to user while annotating resource. In this paper, we propose a framework that does not depend on tagging history of the resource or user and thereby capable of suggesting tags to the resources which are being submitted to the system first time. We model tag recommendation task as multi-label text classification problem and use Naive Bayes classifier as the baselearner of the multilabel classifier. We experiment with Boolean, bag-of-words and term frequency-inverse document frequency (TFIDF representation of the resources and fit appropriate distribution to the data based on the representation used. Impact of featureselection on the effectiveness of the tag recommendation is also studied. Effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated through precision, recall and f-measure metrics.

  5. Transposition pattern of a modified Ds element in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommens, Caius M.T.; Munyikwa, Tichafa R.I.; Overduin, Bert; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    Several aspects of transposition of an in vitro modified Ds element are described. This Ds element, designated Ds-r, is equipped with bacterial plasmid sequences and can, therefore, be rescued from the plant genome. Our results indicate that the Ds-r element has a 'late' timing of transposition from

  6. 22 CFR 62.12 - Control of Forms DS-2019.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control of Forms DS-2019. 62.12 Section 62.12... Provisions § 62.12 Control of Forms DS-2019. Forms DS-2019 shall be used only for authorized purposes. To maintain adequate control of Forms DS-2019, responsible officers or alternate responsible officers shall...

  7. Tag-elese or The Language of Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Simons

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The core "meme" of Web 2.0 from which almost all other memes radiated was: 'You control your own data' (O'Reilly, 2005, 3. Key instruments for this user control are tagging systems that allow users to freely assign keywords of their own choosing to Internet resources of their own making as well as to documents produced by others. Of course, freely chosen keywords tags do not necessarily follow prefixed taxonomies or classification systems. But going by the maxim that interaction creates similarity and similarity creates interaction, the idea - or hope - is, however, that the tagging practices of individual users will eventually converge into an emergent common vocabulary or folksonomy (Merholz, 2004; Shirky, 2005; Vander Wal, 2005b; Mika, 2007. It is far from clear, however, that free tagging systems will eventually yield controlled vocabularies, and there are many incentives for idiosyncratic, ambiguous, and inconsistent uses of tags. Left to themselves, free tagging systems seem to be too wild and too chaotic for any order to emerge. But are these free tagging systems really as "feral" as they seem to be, or do they only look uncontrolled because one has been looking for order in the wrong place? I have done a quick-and-dirty" analysis of Flickr's tag cloud. The concept was: if folksonomies encourage users to tap on their own vernacular, everyday natural language must somehow "guide" the tagging practices of users of tagging systems. Flickr's tag cloud has been choosen because it may teach us something about tagging systems and folksonomies, and not - or not primarily - because of what tags may tell us about pictures.

  8. Positive Parity $D_s$ Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovec, Luka [Stefan Inst., Ljubljana; Lang, C. B. [Graz U.; Mohler, Daniel [Fermilab; Prelovsek, Sasa [Stefan Inst., Ljubljana; Woloshyn, R. M. [TRIUMF

    2015-11-12

    We study the positive parity charmed strange mesons using lattice QCD, the only reliable ab initio method to study QCD at low energies. Especially the experimentally observed $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ have challenged theory for quite some time. The dynamical lattice QCD simulations are performed at two distinct pion masses, $m_{\\pi}$ = 266 MeV and 156 MeV, using both $\\bar{c}s$ as well as $DK$ and $D^*K$ scattering operators in the construction of the correlation matrix in order to take into the account threshold effects. While the $J^P = 0^+$ channel benefited most from the inclusion of scattering operators, it was also crucial for the case of the $D_{s1}(2460)$. Using the L\\"uscher method, which relates the finite volume spectrum to the infinite volume scattering matrix, we were able to determine the near threshold behavior of the scattering amplitude. From it we extracted the binding momenta and the masses of the below-threshold bound states $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ by determining the pole positions of the scattering amplitudes. Our results compare well with experiment, resolving a long standing discrepancy between theory and experiment.

  9. Positive parity $D_s$ mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa; Woloshyn, R M

    2015-01-01

    We study the positive parity charmed strange mesons using lattice QCD, the only reliable ab initio method to study QCD at low energies. Especially the experimentally observed $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ have challenged theory for quite some time. The dynamical lattice QCD simulations are performed at two distinct pion masses, $m_{\\pi}$ = 266 MeV and 156 MeV, using both $\\bar{c}s$ as well as $DK$ and $D^*K$ scattering operators in the construction of the correlation matrix in order to take into the account threshold effects. While the $J^P = 0^+$ channel benefited most from the inclusion of scattering operators, it was also crucial for the case of the $D_{s1}(2460)$. Using the L\\"uscher method, which relates the finite volume spectrum to the infinite volume scattering matrix, we were able to determine the near threshold behavior of the scattering amplitude. From it we extracted the binding momenta and the masses of the below-threshold bound states $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ by determining the ...

  10. Social Tagging in a Scholarly Digital Library Environment: Users' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorhidawati, A.; Hanum, N. Fariza; Zohoorian-Fooladi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports an exploratory study examining how users participate in social tagging activities in a scholarly digital library environment to learn about their motivations, behaviour, and practices. Method: This study was conducted in two phases: a survey to investigate usage and attitudes of social tagging tool, and a…

  11. 物联网应用中有源RFID标签的EAL4安全要求%Assurance level 4 security requirements of active radio frequency identification tags in the Internet of Things

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高金萍; 石竑松; 王宇航; 杨永生; 张翀斌

    2012-01-01

    A framework is given for evaluation assurance level 4(EAL4) security requirements for radio frequency identification(RFID) active tags in applications for the Internet of Things(IOT).The evaluation assurance level and the security assurance requirements are chosen based on ISO/IEC standard 15 408 and an analysis of the asset value and potential threat.Then,the potential threats are related to the active tags to set security objectives for the target to resist potential attacks.A minimal set of security function requirements is given to specify the functionality of active tags.Finally,the consistency between the Abstractions is analyzed to justify the rationale behind the framework.This work provides a reference for designers of security mechanisms for active tags and a basis for the evaluation and procurement of active tags.%该文为物联网应用中安全要求较高的有源RFID标签类产品建立了一套满足评估保证级(EAL)4级的一组安全要求。此安全要求的建立,以通用评估准则(ISO15408)为依据,通过对有源标签保护的资产价值和潜在威胁的分析,为有源标签界定了合理的评估保证级别及相应的安全保证要求,并通过分析其在物联网应用中可能面临的潜在威胁,导出了有源标签需要满足的安全目的,进一步得出了需要满足的最小安全功能要求,并论证了它们之间的对应性。建立的安全要求框架可以作为指引研发者对有源标签进行全面安全性设计考量的重要参考,也可以为有源标签类产品的采购、测评提供依据。

  12. 76 FR 58074 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7001 and DS-7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7001 and DS- 7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic Exchange Program... Collection. Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, ECA/A/E/EUR. Form Number: DS-7001, DS-7005. Respondents: Applicants for the Academic Exchange Program. Estimated Number of Respondents...

  13. A Search for Time-Dependent B0s-B0sbar Oscillations Using Exclusively Reconstructed Ds+/- Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Adam, I; Akimoto, H; Aston, D; Baird, K G; Baltay, C; Band, H R; Barklow, T L; Bauer, J M; Bellodi, G; Berger, R; Blaylock, G; Bogart, J R; Bower, G R; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Bugg, W M; Burnett, T H; Burrows, P N; Calcaterra, A; Cassell, R; Chou, A; Cohn, H O; Coller, J A; Convery, M R; Cowan, R F; Crawford, G; Damerell, C J S; Daoudi, M; De Groot, N; De Sangro, R; Dong, D N; Doser, Michael; Dubois, R; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fernández, J P; Flood, K; Frey, R; Hart, E L; Hasuko, K; Hertzbach, S S; Huffer, M E; Iwasaki, M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kang, H J; Kofler, R R; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; McKemey, A K; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Moore, T B; Morii, M; Müller, D; Murzin, V; Narita, S; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Nesom, G; Oishi, N; Onoprienko, D; Panvini, R S; Park, C H; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Plano, R J; Prepost, R; Prescott, C Y; Ratcliff, B N; Reidy, J; Reinertsen, P L; Rochester, L S; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Saxton, O H; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Shapiro, G; Sinev, N B; Snyder, J A; Stängle, H; Stahl, A; Stamer, P; Steiner, H; Su, D; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, S; Swartz, M; Taylor, F E; Thom, J; Torrence, E; Usher, T; Vavra, J; Verdier, R; Wagner, D L; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Wright, T R; Yamamoto, R K; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H

    2002-01-01

    A search for Bs0-Bs0bar oscillations is performed using a sample of 400,000 hadronic Z0 decays collected by the SLD experiment. The Bs0 candidates are reconstructed in the Bs0 to Ds-,X channel with Ds- to phi,pi- or K*0K-. The Bs0 production flavor is determined using the large forward-backward asymmetry of polarized Z0 to b,bbar decays and charge information in the hemisphere opposite that of the Bs0 candidate. The decay flavor is tagged by the charge of the Ds+/-. From a sample of 361 candidates with an average Bs0 purity of 40%, we exclude the following values of the oscillation frequency: Delta m_s < 1.4 ps^{-1} and 2.4 < Delta m_s < 5.3 ps^{-1} at the 95% confidence level.

  14. Social Tagging of Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Abramyan, Lucy; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Fox, Jason M.; Pyrzak, Guy; Vaughn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Mars missions will generate a large amount of data in various forms, such as daily plans, images, and scientific information. Often, there is a semantic linkage between images that cannot be captured automatically. Software is needed that will provide a method for creating arbitrary tags for this mission data so that items with a similar tag can be related to each other. The tags should be visible and searchable for all users. A new routine was written to offer a new and more flexible search option over previous applications. This software allows users of the MSLICE program to apply any number of arbitrary tags to a piece of mission data through a MSLICE search interface. The application of tags creates relationships between data that did not previously exist. These tags can be easily removed and changed, and contain enough flexibility to be specifically configured for any mission. This gives users the ability to quickly recall or draw attention to particular pieces of mission data, for example: Give a semantic and meaningful description to mission data; for example, tag all images with a rock in them with the tag "rock." Rapidly recall specific and useful pieces of data; for example, tag a plan as"driving template." Call specific data to a user s attention; for example, tag a plan as "for:User." This software is part of the MSLICE release, which was written in Java. It will run on any current Windows, Macintosh, or Linux system.

  15. First Observation of the Decay Bs0→Ds-Ds+ and Measurement of Its Branching Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyria, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-01-01

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0→Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0→Ds-Ds+)/B(B0→D-Ds+)=1.44-0.44+0.48. Using the world average value for B(B0→D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0→Ds-Ds+)=(9.4-4.2+4.4)×10-3. This provides a lower bound ΔΓsCP/Γs≥2B(Bs0→Ds-Ds+)>1.2×10-2 at 95% C.L.

  16. Northern Pintail - Flight Path Telemetry [ds117

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — North-south flight paths of radio-tagged female northern pintails were monitored in a section of Highway 152 near Los Banos, California during 4 and 11 November and...

  17. Towards an "Intelligent" Tagging Tool for Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Juraj; Motschnig, Renate; Homola, Martin

    Tagging allows people to effectively organize web resources such as images, bookmarks or blog articles. Things are found easier by browsing tag clouds relying on the tags that have been assigned before. The success is by large determined by the quality and relevance of tags assigned to content - and so it is dependent on people who do the tagging. We investigate mental processes that underlie tagging. In order to improve quality of tagging, we provide guidelines for users of tagging systems and in addition we suggest features that an "intelligent" tagging tool should bear in order to facilitate the tagging process.

  18. Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    A four-color, task-based Autodesk Official Training Guide covering the core features of 3ds Max Beginning users of this popular 3D animation and effects software will find everything they need for a thorough understanding of the software's key features and functions in this colorful guide. The authors break down the complexities of learning 3D software and get you going right away with interesting, job-related projects. You'll learn the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, lighting, visualization, and visual effects with 3ds Max, exploring the methods and why they are used as they are.

  19. Autodesk 3ds Max 2012 Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Randi L

    2011-01-01

    Get a jump-start on Autodesk 3ds Max 2012 essentials-with the Essentials! The new Essentials books from Sybex are beautiful, task-based, full-color Autodesk Official Training Guides that help you get up to speed on Autodesk topics quickly and easily. Autodesk 3ds Max 2012 Essentials thoroughly covers the fundamentals of this popular 3D animation effects, and visualization software, teaching you what you need to become quickly productive. By following the book's clear explanations, practical tutorials, and step-by-step exercises, you'll cover all the bases. Topics include modeling, animation,

  20. Autodesk 3ds Max 2014 bible

    CERN Document Server

    Murdock, Kelly L

    2013-01-01

    A complete reference covering the newest version of 3ds Max software Autodesk 3ds Max is the popular 3D modeling, animation, rendering, and compositing software preferred by game developers and graphic designers in film and television. This comprehensive reference not only introduces beginners to this pricey and complex software, but also serves as a reference for experienced users. Packed with expert advice from popular author Kelly Murdock, it begins with a Quick Start tutorial to get you up and running, then continues with more than 150 step-by-step tutorials, advanced coverage, and plenty

  1. Molecular components in D*s0(2317 and Ds1(2460 mesons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Pablo G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different experiments have confirmed that the D*s0(2317 and Ds1(2460 mesons are very narrow states located, respectively, below the DK and D*K thresholds. This is markedly in contrast with the expectations of naive quark models and heavy quark symmetry. We address the mass shifts of the cs̄ ground states with quantum numbers JP = 0+ (D*s0(2317 and JP = 1+ (Ds1(2460 using a nonrelativistic constituent quark model in which quark-antiquark and meson-meson degrees of freedom are incorporated. The quark model has been applied to a wide range of hadronic observables and thus the model parameters are completely constrained. We observe that the coupling of the 0+ (1+ meson sector to the DK (D*K threshold is a key feature in lowering the masses of the corresponding D*s0(2317 and Ds1(2460 states predicted by the naive quark model, but also in describing the Ds1(2536 meson as the 1+ state of the jPq = 3/2+ doublet predicted by heavy quark symmetry and thus reproducing its strong decay properties. Two features of our formalism cannot be address nowadays by other approaches: the coupling of the D-wave D*K threshold in the JP = 1+ cs̄ channel and the computation of the probabilities associated with different Fock components in the physical state.

  2. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deland, Sharon M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  3. Inducing RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans by Injection of dsRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammell, Christopher M; Hannon, Gregory J

    2016-01-04

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are overwhelmingly the trigger of choice for inducing RNA interference (RNAi). Although injection of dsRNA into the somatic or germline tissues of animals requires both specific equipment and technical skills, the ability of C. elegans to amplify the initial dsRNA trigger and to transmit the RNAi activity to other somatic tissues and to the progeny of injected animals is one of the main advantages of using C. elegans as a model system. The direct injection of dsRNA into parental animals is the most reliable method for RNAi and also presents the least experiment-to-experiment and animal-to-animal variability.

  4. Leptonic decays of the $D_s$ meson

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    The purely leptonic decays Ds -> tau nu and Ds -> mu nu are studied in a sample of four million hadronic Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at the LEP e+e- collider from 1991 to 1995. The branching fractions are extracted from a combination of two analyses, one optimized to select Ds -> tau nu decays with tau -> e nu nubar or mu nu nubar, and the other optimized for Ds-> mu nu decays. The results are used to evaluate the Ds decay constant, within the Standard Model: fDs = [285 +- 19(stat) +- 40 (syst)] MeV.

  5. [Archival tags and geolocation methods for marine animals: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-feng; Fan, Wei; Dai, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Archival tags, a group of data storable electronic tags, are widely used as strong tools for obtaining long term and large scale activity information of marine animals, specifically highly migratory oceanic fishes, and corresponding environmental data. Though retrieving tags is an indispensable step for obtaining data, which is a shortage of archival tags, a series of achievements have been made on marine animals by using archival tags since the 1990s. With the appearance of pop-up satellite tag, which solved the problem of data retrieving and was fully independent of the fishing, both breadth and depth of marine animals' studies are extended by the end of the 1990s. Geolocation based on light intensity is the key to estimate marine animals' movement and has achieved some progress in the past 20 years. However, the accuracy of geolocation for latitude is not high enough, and there is still much room for improvement. To date, most geolocation methods that use ambient daylight involve identifying the times when the sun is at a precisely known zenith angle (e.g., sunrise and sunset). The problem of estimating longitude has been proved easy to solve, but accurate latitude estimates remain elusive. This paper mainly introduced two tags, i. e., archival tags and pop-up tags, and three geolocation methods, i.e. , 1) the "fixed reference" method, 2) the "variable reference" method, and 3) the "reflection" method. We also presented a prospect analysis on archival tags and possible research direction of geolocation methods. We believed that miniaturization and multi-sensor integration are the trends for electronic tags while more environmental factors such as depth, SST (sea surface temperature) or magnetic field intensity, instead of single factor, as auxiliary parameters would be used for improving the geolocation accuracy in the future.

  6. LHCb Tag Collector

    CERN Document Server

    Fuente Fernàndez, P; Cousin, N

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with software management and Nightly Build programs is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  7. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE57_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE57_DS01 Analysis of metabolite accumulation patterns Quantitative data for metabo...lite accumulation in the seeds or seed coats of the 14 accessions or species were obtained by UPLC-TQMS. Pea

  8. Tagging for Subject Access: A Glimpse into Current Practice by Vendors, Libraries, and Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sharon Q.

    2012-01-01

    The study looked into the 307 Koha libraries listed in Breeding's Library Technology Guides. Since all the tag clouds in Koha are user-contributed, their adoption and usage can shed light on the extent to which libraries are supporting user tagging. The research also revealed that public library users are more actively involved in tagging than…

  9. Tagging for Subject Access: A Glimpse into Current Practice by Vendors, Libraries, and Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sharon Q.

    2012-01-01

    The study looked into the 307 Koha libraries listed in Breeding's Library Technology Guides. Since all the tag clouds in Koha are user-contributed, their adoption and usage can shed light on the extent to which libraries are supporting user tagging. The research also revealed that public library users are more actively involved in tagging than…

  10. An Overview of Social Tagging and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish; Li, Rui; Yin, Zhijun; Han, Jiawei

    Social tagging on online portals has become a trend now. It has emerged as one of the best ways of associating metadata with web objects. With the increase in the kinds of web objects becoming available, collaborative tagging of such objects is also developing along new dimensions. This popularity has led to a vast literature on social tagging. In this survey paper, we would like to summarize different techniques employed to study various aspects of tagging. Broadly, we would discuss about properties of tag streams, tagging models, tag semantics, generating recommendations using tags, visualizations of tags, applications of tags, integration of different tagging systems and problems associated with tagging usage. We would discuss topics like why people tag, what influences the choice of tags, how to model the tagging process, kinds of tags, different power laws observed in tagging domain, how tags are created and how to choose the right tags for recommendation. Metadata generated in the form of tags can be efficiently used to improve web search, for web object classification, for generating ontologies, for enhanced browsing etc. We would discuss these applications and conclude with thoughts on future work in the area.

  11. Lightweight Mutual Authentication Protocol for Low Cost RFID Tags

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Eslam Gamal; Hashem, Mohamed; 10.5121/ijnsa.2010.2203

    2010-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology one of the most promising technologies in the field of ubiquitous computing. Indeed, RFID technology may well replace barcode technology. Although it offers many advantages over other identification systems, there are also associated security risks that are not easy to be addressed. When designing a real lightweight authentication protocol for low cost RFID tags, a number of challenges arise due to the extremely limited computational, storage and communication abilities of Low-cost RFID tags. This paper proposes a real mutual authentication protocol for low cost RFID tags. The proposed protocol prevents passive attacks as active attacks are discounted when designing a protocol to meet the requirements of low cost RFID tags. However the implementation of the protocol meets the limited abilities of low cost RFID tags.

  12. Keep on Blockin’ in the Free World: Personal Access Control for Low-Cost RFID Tags

    OpenAIRE

    Rieback, Melanie; Crispo, Bruno; Tanenbaum, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces an off-tag RFID access control mechanism called “Selective RFID Jamming”. Selective RFID Jamming protects low-cost RFID tags by enforcing access control on their behalf, in a similar manner to the RFID Blocker Tag. However, Selective RFID Jamming is novel because it uses an active mobile device to enforce centralized ACL-based access control policies. Selective RFID Jamming also solves a Differential Signal Analysis attack to which the RFID Blocker Tag is susceptible.

  13. Keep on Blockin’ in the Free World: Personal Access Control for Low-Cost RFID Tags

    OpenAIRE

    Rieback, Melanie; Crispo, Bruno; Tanenbaum, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces an off-tag RFID access control mechanism called “Selective RFID Jamming”. Selective RFID Jamming protects low-cost RFID tags by enforcing access control on their behalf, in a similar manner to the RFID Blocker Tag. However, Selective RFID Jamming is novel because it uses an active mobile device to enforce centralized ACL-based access control policies. Selective RFID Jamming also solves a Differential Signal Analysis attack to which the RFID Blocker Tag is susceptible.

  14. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary services a...

  15. Transposon Ac/Ds-induced chromosomal rearrangements at the rice OsRLG5 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Piao, Hai Long; Je, Byoung Il; Park, Soon Ju; Park, Su Hyun; Huang, Jin; Zhang, Jian Bo; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-deok

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that pairs of closely-linked Ac/Ds transposable elements can induce various chromosomal rearrangements in plant genomes. To study chromosomal rearrangements in rice, we isolated a line (OsRLG5-161) that contains two inversely-oriented Ds insertions in OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa Receptor like kinase Gene 5). Among approximately 300 plants regenerated from OsRLG5-161 heterozygous seeds, 107 contained rearrangements including deletions, duplications and inversions of various sizes. Most rearrangements were induced by previously identified alternative transposition mechanism. Furthermore, we also detected a new class of rearrangements that contain juxtaposed inversions and deletions on the same chromosome. We propose that these novel alleles were generated by a previously unreported type of alternative transposition reactions involving the 5' and 3' termini of two inversely-oriented Ds elements located on the same chromatid. Finally, 11% of rearrangements contained inversions resulting from homologous recombination between the two inverted Ds elements in OsRLG5-161. The high frequency inheritance and great variety of rearrangements obtained suggests that the rice regeneration system results in a burst of transposition activity and a relaxation of the controls which normally limit the transposition competence of individual Ds termini. Together, these results demonstrate a greatly enlarged potential of the Ac/Ds system for plant chromosome engineering. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Genome-wide survey of ds exonization to enrich transcriptomes and proteomes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Charng, Yuh-Chyang

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of transposable elements (TEs) into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization which can enrich the complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes. Previously, we performed the first experimental assessment of TE exonization by inserting a Ds element into each intron of the rice epsps gene. Exonization of Ds in plants was biased toward providing splice donor sites from the beginning of the inserted Ds sequence. Additionally, Ds inserted in the reverse direction resulted in a continuous splice donor consensus region by offering 4 donor sites in the same intron. The current study involved genome-wide computational analysis of Ds exonization events in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocot Oryza sativa (rice). Up to 71% of the exonized transcripts were putative targets for the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway. The insertion patterns of Ds and the polymorphic splice donor sites increased the transcripts and subsequent protein isoforms. Protein isoforms contain protein sequence due to unspliced intron-TE region and/or a shift of the reading frame. The number of interior protein isoforms would be twice that of C-terminal isoforms, on average. TE exonization provides a promising way for functional expansion of the plant proteome.

  17. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT

  18. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  19. Multichannel calculation for Ds* vector states and the Ds(2632) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Beveren, E; Beveren, Eef van; Rupp, George

    2004-01-01

    We study bound states below threshold and resonances above threshold in the D0-K+ and Ds-eta systems, using a many-coupled-channel model for non-exotic meson-meson scattering applied to states with the quantum numbers of c-sbar quark-antiquark vector mesons. We fit the ground state at 2.112 GeV, whence the lowest resonances in D0-K+ come out at 2.43, 2.61, 2.73, 3.06, and 3.11 GeV. The resonance at 2.61 GeV acquires a width of about 3 MeV, while its partial P-wave cross section is up to six times larger in Ds-eta than in D0-K+, provided a mechanism accounting for Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka--forbidden decays is included. The latter finding is in agreement with the observations of the SELEX collaboration with respect to the recently reported Ds(2632) resonance. Therefore, we conclude that the Ds(2632) is most probably the first radial excitation of the Ds*(2112) meson.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-binding alkylpolyamine DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis infection by blocking attachment and entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Ichie; Hefty, P Scott

    2014-06-01

    Vaginally delivered microbicides are being developed to offer women self-initiated protection against transmission of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis. A small molecule, DS-96, rationally designed for high affinity to Escherichia coli lipid A, was previously demonstrated to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria (D. Sil et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 51: 2811-2819, 2007, doi:10.1128/AAC.00200-07). Aside from the lack of the repeating O antigen, chlamydial lipooligosaccharide (LOS) shares general molecular architecture features with E. coli LPS. Importantly, the portion of lipid A where the interaction with DS-96 is expected to take place is well conserved between the two organisms, leading to the hypothesis that DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia infection by binding to LOS and compromising the function. In this study, antichlamydial activity of DS-96 was examined in cell culture. DS-96 inhibited the intercellular growth of Chlamydia in a dose-dependent manner and offered a high level of inhibition at a relatively low concentration (8 μM). The data also revealed that infectious elementary bodies (EBs) were predominantly blocked at the attachment step, as indicated by the reduced number of EBs associated with the host cell surface following pretreatment. Of those EBs that were capable of attachment, the vast majority was unable to gain entry into the host cell. Inhibition of EB attachment and entry by DS-96 suggests that Chlamydia LOS is critical to these processes during the developmental cycle. Importantly, given the low association of host toxicity previously reported by Sil et al., DS-96 is expected to perform well in animal studies as an active antichlamydial compound in a vaginal microbicide. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Tagging behaviour with support from controlled vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Høj, Anne Lyhne; Madsen, Line Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates how knowledge structures from a controlled vocabulary affect tagging. The study is a comparative analysis of tags assigned in two tagging systems, a simple tagging system (control system) that provides suggestions from two tag clouds (all users tags and my tags) and an enha......The paper investigates how knowledge structures from a controlled vocabulary affect tagging. The study is a comparative analysis of tags assigned in two tagging systems, a simple tagging system (control system) that provides suggestions from two tag clouds (all users tags and my tags...... vocabulary might help taggers in being more specific in their tagging, allowing more precise information searching based on user tags. In addition, the results indicate that structured controlled suggestions might encourage taggers to add synonym variations enhancing the variety and number of access points....... Furthermore, controlled vocabularies might be useful for automatic spell checking. Future study should explore in what direction the different kinds of suggestions lead the tagger and whether it is possible to identify scope or patterns between related tags from the two systems....

  2. Integrated differential transcriptome maps of Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (AMKL) in children with or without Down Syndrome (DS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Berardi, Anna Concetta; Vitale, Lorenza; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2014-12-05

    The incidence of Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (AMKL) is 500-fold higher in children with Down Syndrome (DS) compared with non-DS children, but the relevance of trisomy 21 as a specific background of AMKL in DS is still an open issue. Several Authors have determined gene expression profiles by microarray analysis in DS and/or non-DS AMKL. Due to the rarity of AMKL, these studies were typically limited to a small group of samples. We generated integrated quantitative transcriptome maps by systematic meta-analysis from any available gene expression profile dataset related to AMKL in pediatric age. This task has been accomplished using a tool recently described by us for the generation and the analysis of quantitative transcriptome maps, TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which allows effective integration of data obtained from different experimenters, experimental platforms and data sources. This allowed us to explore gene expression changes involved in transition from normal megakaryocytes (MK, n=19) to DS (n=43) or non-DS (n=45) AMKL blasts, including the analysis of Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder (TMD, n=20), a pre-leukemia condition. We propose a biological model of the transcriptome depicting progressive changes from MK to TMD and then to DS AMKL. The data indicate the repression of genes involved in MK differentiation, in particular the cluster on chromosome 4 including PF4 (platelet factor 4) and PPBP (pro-platelet basic protein); the gene for the mitogen-activated protein kinase MAP3K10 and the thrombopoietin receptor gene MPL. Moreover, comparing both DS and non-DS AMKL with MK, we identified three potential clinical markers of progression to AMKL: TMEM241 (transmembrane protein 241) was the most over-expressed single gene, while APOC2 (apolipoprotein C-II) and ZNF587B (zinc finger protein 587B) appear to be the most discriminant markers of progression, specifically to DS AMKL. Finally, the chromosome 21 (chr21) genes resulted to be the most over

  3. Compilation of HPSG to TAG

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, R; Netter, K; Vijay-Shanker, K; Kasper, Robert; Kiefer, Bernd; Netter, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    We present an implemented compilation algorithm that translates HPSG into lexicalized feature-based TAG, relating concepts of the two theories. While HPSG has a more elaborated principle-based theory of possible phrase structures, TAG provides the means to represent lexicalized structures more explicitly. Our objectives are met by giving clear definitions that determine the projection of structures from the lexicon, and identify maximal projections, auxiliary trees and foot nodes.

  4. EXPRESSION OF SV40 Tag AND FORMATION Tag-p53 AND Tag-Rb COMPLEXES IN CHINESE BRAIN TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of SV40 Tag andformation of Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes in Chinese brain tumors. Methods: SV40 large tumor antigen (Tag) were investigated by immunoprecipitation, silver staining and Western blot in 65 cases of Chinese brain tumors and 8 cases of normal brain tissues. Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes were screened by the same way in 20 and 15 Tag positive tumor tissues respectively. Results: Tag was found in all of 8 ependymomas and 2 choroid plexus papillomas, 90% (9/10) of pituitary adenomas, 73% (11/15) of astrocytomas, 70% (7/10) of meningiomas, 50% (4/8) of glioblastoma multiform, 33% (2/6) of medulloblastomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 1 pineocytoma and 8 normal brain tissues were negative for Tag. Tag-p53 complex was detected in all of 20 Tag positive tumors as well as Tag-Rb complex in all of 15 Tag positive tumors. Conclusion: SV40 Tag is not only expressed in human brain tumors, but also it can form specific complexes with tumor suppressors p53 and Rb. SV40 is correlated to human brain tumorigenesis. The inactivation of p53 and Rb due to the formation of Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes is possibly an important mechanism in the etiopathogenesis of human brain tumors.

  5. Does the KIR2DS5 gene protect from some human diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Nowak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KIR2DS5 gene encodes an activating natural killer cell receptor whose ligand is not known. It was recently reported to affect the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our studies on KIR2DS5 gene associations with human diseases, we compared the frequencies of this gene in patients and relevant controls. Typing for KIR2DS5 gene was performed by either individual or multiplex polymerase chain reactions which, when compared in the same samples, gave concordant results. We noted an apparently protective effect of KIR2DS5 gene presence in several clinical conditions, but not in others. Namely, this effect was observed in ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.003, odds ratio [OR]=0.47, confidence interval [CI]=0.28-0.79, endometriosis (p=0.03, OR=0.25, CI = 0.07-0.82 and acute rejection of kidney graft (p=0.0056, OR=0.44, CI=0.24-0.80, but not in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis, spontaneous abortion, or leukemia (all p>0.05. In addition, the simultaneous presence of KIR2DS5 gene and HLA-C C1 allotype exhibited an even stronger protective effect on ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.0003, OR=0.35, CI=0.19-0.65, whereas a lack of KIR2DS5 and the presence of the HLA-C C2 allotype was associated with ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.0017, OR=1.92, CI=1.28-2.89, whereas a lack of KIR2DS5 and presence of C1 allotype was associated with rheumatoid arthritis (p=0.005, OR=1.47, CI=1.13-1.92. The presence of both KIR2DS5 and C1 seemed to protect from acute kidney graft rejection (p=0.017, OR=0.47, CI=0.25-0.89, whereas lack of KIR2DS5 and presence of C2 seemed to favor rejection (p=0.0015, OR=2.13, CI=1.34-3.37. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that KIR2DS5 may protect from endometriosis, ankylosing spondylitis, and acute rejection of kidney graft.

  6. High-Performance Annotation Tagging over Solr Full-text Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Manghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we focus on the problem of “annotation tagging” over Information Spaces of objects stored in a full-text index. In such a scenario, tags are assigned to objects by “data curator” users with the purpose of classification, while generic end-users will perceive tags as searchable and browsable object properties. To carry out their activities, data curators need “annotation tagging tools” which allow them to “bulk” tag or untag large sets of objects in temporary work sessions, where they can “virtually” and in “real-time” experiment the effect of their actions before making the changes visible to end-users. The implementation of these tools over full-text indexes is a challenge, since bulk object updates in this context are far from being real-time and in critical cases may slow down index performance. We devised TagTick, a tool which offers to data curators a fully functional annotation tagging environment over the full-text index Apache Solr, regarded as a “de-facto standard” in this area. TagTick consists of a TagTick Virtualizer module, which extends the APIs of Solr to support real-time, virtual, bulk-tagging operations, and a TagTick User Interface module, which offers end-user functionalities for annotation tagging. The tool scales optimally with the number and size of bulk tag operations, without compromising index performance.

  7. Silencing of DS2 aminoacylase-like genes confirms basal resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahito; Nishihara, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana is a potential host to several plant pathogens, and immature leaves of N. benthamiana are susceptible to Phytophthora infestans. In contrast, mature leaves of N. benthamiana are weakly susceptible and show basal resistance to P. infestans. We screened a gene-silenced mature plant showing high resistance to P. infestans, designated as DS2 (Disease suppression 2). The deduced amino acid sequence of cDNA responsible for DS2 encoded a putative aminoacylase. Growth of P. infestans decreased in DS2 plants. Trypan blue staining revealed inhibited hyphae growth of P. infestans with an increased number of dead cells under the penetration site in DS2 plants. Consistent with growth inhibition of P. infestans, defense responses such as reactive oxygen generation and expression of a salicylic acid-dependent PR-1a increased markedly in DS2 plants compared with that of control plants. DS2 phenotype was compromised in NahG plants, suggesting DS2 phenotype depends on the salicylic acid signaling pathway. Accelerated defense response was observed in DS2 plants elicited by INF1 elicitin as well as by NbMEK2(DD), which is the constitutive active form of NbMEK2, and act as a downstream regulator of INF1 perception. On the other hand, INF1- and NbMEK2(DD)-induced defense responses were prevented by DS2-overexpressing transgenic tobacco. These results suggest that DS2 negatively regulates plant defense responses against P. infestans via NbMEK2 and SA-dependent signaling pathway in N. benthamiana.

  8. Simplified, Enhanced Protein Purification Using an Inducible, Autoprocessing Enzyme Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Aimee; Lupardus, Patrick J.; Morell, Montse; Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Sadaghiani, A. Masoud; Garcia, K. Christopher; Bogyo, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new method for purifying recombinant proteins expressed in bacteria using a highly specific, inducible, self-cleaving protease tag. This tag is comprised of the Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin cysteine protease domain (CPD), an autoprocessing enzyme that cleaves exclusively after a leucine residue within the target protein-CPD junction. Importantly, V. cholerae CPD is specifically activated by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), a eukaryotic-specific small molecule that is absent from the bacterial cytosol. As a result, when His6-tagged CPD is fused to the C-terminus of target proteins and expressed in Escherichia coli, the full-length fusion protein can be purified from bacterial lysates using metal ion affinity chromatography. Subsequent addition of InsP6 to the immobilized fusion protein induces CPD-mediated cleavage at the target protein-CPD junction, releasing untagged target protein into the supernatant. This method condenses affinity chromatography and fusion tag cleavage into a single step, obviating the need for exogenous protease addition to remove the fusion tag(s) and increasing the efficiency of tag separation. Furthermore, in addition to being timesaving, versatile, and inexpensive, our results indicate that the CPD purification system can enhance the expression, integrity, and solubility of intractable proteins from diverse organisms. PMID:19956581

  9. Simplified, enhanced protein purification using an inducible, autoprocessing enzyme tag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    Full Text Available We introduce a new method for purifying recombinant proteins expressed in bacteria using a highly specific, inducible, self-cleaving protease tag. This tag is comprised of the Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin cysteine protease domain (CPD, an autoprocessing enzyme that cleaves exclusively after a leucine residue within the target protein-CPD junction. Importantly, V. cholerae CPD is specifically activated by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6, a eukaryotic-specific small molecule that is absent from the bacterial cytosol. As a result, when His(6-tagged CPD is fused to the C-terminus of target proteins and expressed in Escherichia coli, the full-length fusion protein can be purified from bacterial lysates using metal ion affinity chromatography. Subsequent addition of InsP(6 to the immobilized fusion protein induces CPD-mediated cleavage at the target protein-CPD junction, releasing untagged target protein into the supernatant. This method condenses affinity chromatography and fusion tag cleavage into a single step, obviating the need for exogenous protease addition to remove the fusion tag(s and increasing the efficiency of tag separation. Furthermore, in addition to being timesaving, versatile, and inexpensive, our results indicate that the CPD purification system can enhance the expression, integrity, and solubility of intractable proteins from diverse organisms.

  10. RNA editing by ADAR1 prevents MDA5 sensing of endogenous dsRNA as nonself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Brian J; Piskol, Robert; Chalk, Alistair M; Ramaswami, Gokul; Higuchi, Miyoko; Hartner, Jochen C; Li, Jin Billy; Seeburg, Peter H; Walkley, Carl R

    2015-09-04

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is a highly prevalent posttranscriptional modification of RNA, mediated by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes. In addition to RNA editing, additional functions have been proposed for ADAR1. To determine the specific role of RNA editing by ADAR1, we generated mice with an editing-deficient knock-in mutation (Adar1(E861A), where E861A denotes Glu(861)→Ala(861)). Adar1(E861A/E861A) embryos died at ~E13.5 (embryonic day 13.5), with activated interferon and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-sensing pathways. Genome-wide analysis of the in vivo substrates of ADAR1 identified clustered hyperediting within long dsRNA stem loops within 3' untranslated regions of endogenous transcripts. Finally, embryonic death and phenotypes of Adar1(E861A/E861A) were rescued by concurrent deletion of the cytosolic sensor of dsRNA, MDA5. A-to-I editing of endogenous dsRNA is the essential function of ADAR1, preventing the activation of the cytosolic dsRNA response by endogenous transcripts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Oriented Immobilization of His-Tagged Protein on a Redox Active Thiol Derivative of DPTA-Cu(II Layer Deposited on a Gold Electrode—The Base of Electrochemical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the development of an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of Aβ16–23' and Aβ1–40 peptides. The His-tagged V and VC1 domains of Receptor for Advanced Glycation end Products (RAGE immobilized on a gold electrode surface were used as analytically active molecules. The immobilization of His6–RAGE domains consists of: (i formation of a mixed layer of N-acetylcysteamine (NAC and the thiol derivative of pentetic acid (DPTA; (ii complexation of Cu(II by DPTA; (iii oriented immobilization of His6–RAGE domains via coordination bonds between Cu(II sites from DPTA–Cu(II complex and imidazole nitrogen atoms of a histidine tag. Each modification step was controlled by cyclic voltammetry (CV, Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The applicability of the proposed biosensor was tested in the presence of human plasma, which had no influence on its performance. The detection limits for Aβ1–40 determination were 1.06 nM and 0.80 nM, in the presence of buffer and human plasma, respectively. These values reach the concentration level of Aβ1–40 which is relevant for determination of its soluble form in human plasma, as well as in brain. This indicates the promising future application of biosensor presented for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Time-Tag Generation Script

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan E.

    2010-01-01

    Time-Tag Generation Script (TTaGS) is an application program, written in the AWK scripting language, for generating commands for aiming one Ku-band antenna and two S-band antennas for communicating with spacecraft. TTaGS saves between 2 and 4 person-hours per every 24 hours by automating the repetitious process of building between 150 and 180 antenna-control commands. TTaGS reads a text database of communication satellite schedules and a text database of satellite rise and set times and cross-references items in the two databases. It then compares the scheduled start and stop with the geometric rise and set to compute the times to execute antenna control commands. While so doing, TTaGS determines whether to generate commands for guidance, navigation, and control computers to tell them which satellites to track. To help prevent Ku-band irradiation of the Earth, TTaGS accepts input from the user about horizon tolerance and accordingly restricts activation and effects deactivation of the transmitter. TTaGS can be modified easily to enable tracking of additional satellites and for such other tasks as reading Sun-rise/set tables to generate commands to point the solar photovoltaic arrays of the International Space Station at the Sun.

  13. Affinity Purification of Protein Complexes Using TAP Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2016-01-01

    This protocol is used for the isolation and analysis of protein complexes using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag system. The protocol describes the purification of a protein fused to a TAP tag comprised of two protein A domains and the calmodulin binding peptide separated by a TEV cleavage site. This is a powerful technique for rapid purification of protein complexes and the analysis of their stoichiometric composition, posttranslational modifications, structure, and functional activities. PMID:26096502

  14. Radiative and Pionic transitions from the $D_{s1}(2460)$ to the $D_{s0}^\\ast(2317)$

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, cheng-Jian; Ma, Yong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the partial widths for the radiative and pionic transitions from the $D_{s1}(2460)$ to the $D_{s0}(2317)$ in a molecule scenario, in which the $D_{s1}(2460)$ and $D_{s0}^\\ast(2317)$ are considered as hadronic molecule states of $DK$ and $D^\\ast K$, respectively. The partial widths for the $D_{s1}(2460) \\to D_{s0}^\\ast(2317) \\pi^0$ and $D_{s1}(2460) \\to D_{s0}^\\ast(2317) \\gamma$ are evaluated to be about $0.19 \\sim 0.22$ keV and $3.0 \\sim 3.1$ keV, respectively. In addition, the ratio of the $D_{s1}(2460) \\to D_{s0}(2317) \\gamma$ and $D_{s1}(2460) \\to D_{s}^\\ast \\pi^0$ is estimated to be about $(6.6\\sim 10.6) \\times 10^{-2}$, which is safely under the measured upper limit.

  15. dsRNA sensing during viral infection: lessons from plants, worms, insects, and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Isaque João da Silva; Olmo, Roenick Proveti; Silva, Emanuele Guimarães; Marques, João Trindade

    2013-05-01

    Host defense systems often rely on direct and indirect pattern recognition to sense the presence of invading pathogens. Patterns can be molecules directly produced by the pathogen or indirectly generated by changes in host parameters as a consequence of infection. Viruses are intracellular pathogens that hijack the cellular machinery to synthesize their own molecules making direct recognition of viral molecules a great challenge. Antiviral systems in prokaryotes and eukaryotes commonly exploit aberrant nucleic acid sensing to recognize virus infection as host and viral nucleic acid metabolism can greatly differ. Indeed, the generation of dsRNA is often associated with viral infection. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on the mechanisms of viral dsRNA sensing utilized by 2 important antiviral defense systems, RNA interference (RNAi) and the vertebrate immune system. The major viral sensors of the vertebrate immune systems are RIG-like receptors, while RNAi pathways depend on Dicer proteins. These 2 families of sensors share a similar helicase domain with high specificity for dsRNA, which is necessary, but not sufficient for efficient recognition by these receptors. Additional intrinsic features to the dsRNA molecule are also necessary for activation of antiviral systems. Studies utilizing synthetic ligands, in vitro biochemistry and reporter systems have greatly helped increase our knowledge on intrinsic features of dsRNA recognition. However, characteristics such as subcellular localization are extrinsic to the dsRNA itself, but certainly influence the recognition in vivo. Thus, mechanisms of viral dsRNA recognition must address how cellular sensors are recruited to nucleic acids or vice versa. Accessory proteins are likely important for in vivo recognition of extrinsic features of viral RNA, but have mostly remained undiscovered due to the limitations of previous strategies. Hence, the identification of novel components of antiviral systems must take

  16. Proteomic Analyses Reveal the Mechanism of Dunaliella salina Ds-26-16 Gene Enhancing Salt Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Wang

    Full Text Available We previously screened the novel gene Ds-26-16 from a 4 M salt-stressed Dunaliella salina cDNA library and discovered that this gene conferred salt tolerance to broad-spectrum organisms, including E. coli (Escherichia coli, Haematococcus pluvialis and tobacco. To determine the mechanism of this gene conferring salt tolerance, we studied the proteome of E. coli overexpressing the full-length cDNA of Ds-26-16 using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification approach. A total of 1,610 proteins were identified, which comprised 39.4% of the whole proteome. Of the 559 differential proteins, 259 were up-regulated and 300 were down-regulated. GO (gene ontology and KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes enrichment analyses identified 202 major proteins, including those involved in amino acid and organic acid metabolism, energy metabolism, carbon metabolism, ROS (reactive oxygen species scavenging, membrane proteins and ABC (ATP binding cassette transporters, and peptidoglycan synthesis, as well as 5 up-regulated transcription factors. Our iTRAQ data suggest that Ds-26-16 up-regulates the transcription factors in E. coli to enhance salt resistance through osmotic balance, energy metabolism, and oxidative stress protection. Changes in the proteome were also observed in E. coli overexpressing the ORF (open reading frame of Ds-26-16. Furthermore, pH, nitric oxide and glycerol content analyses indicated that Ds-26-16 overexpression increases nitric oxide content but has no effect on glycerol content, thus confirming that enhanced nitric oxide synthesis via lower intercellular pH was one of the mechanisms by which Ds-26-16 confers salt tolerance to E. coli.

  17. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

    2002-02-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from

  18. Semantic Analysis of Tag Similarity Measures in Collaborative Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cattuto, Ciro; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Social bookmarking systems allow users to organise collections of resources on the Web in a collaborative fashion. The increasing popularity of these systems as well as first insights into their emergent semantics have made them relevant to disciplines like knowledge extraction and ontology learning. The problem of devising methods to measure the semantic relatedness between tags and characterizing it semantically is still largely open. Here we analyze three measures of tag relatedness: tag co-occurrence, cosine similarity of co-occurrence distributions, and FolkRank, an adaptation of the PageRank algorithm to folksonomies. Each measure is computed on tags from a large-scale dataset crawled from the social bookmarking system del.icio.us. To provide a semantic grounding of our findings, a connection to WordNet (a semantic lexicon for the English language) is established by mapping tags into synonym sets of WordNet, and applying there well-known metrics of semantic similarity. Our results clearly expose differe...

  19. Immunomodulatory Drugs (IMiDs) in Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Shahzad; Safyan, Rachael A; Suzanne, Lentzsch

    2017-02-13

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that is incurable with conventional therapy. However, the treatment of MM has dramatically changed since the emergence of immunomodulatory drugs and proteasome inhibitors. The improvements in survival are linked to a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the disease. Thalidomide, although highly active in MM, is associated with considerable toxicity, particularly in older patients. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) are structural and functional analogues of thalidomide that represent a promising new class of immunomodulators for treatment of a variety of inflammatory, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. Lenalidomide, a second generation IMiD, is more potent and has a better toxicity profile than thalidomide. It is commonly used in newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma, relapse refractory myeloma and as maintenance therapy after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Pomalidomide, a third generation IMiD, is 10 times more potent than lenalidomide and has already shown impressive results in patients who are heavily pre-treated and refractory to both lenalidomide and bortezomib. Here we provide a comprehensive review on IMiDs including molecular mechanisms, recent advances in therapeutic applications and management of toxicities in the treatment of MM.

  20. A Novel Triethylphosphonium Charge Tag on Peptides: Synthesis, Derivatization, and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Ward, Sarah A.; Reilly, James P.

    2017-09-01

    Charge tagging is a peptide derivatization process that commonly localizes a positive charge on the N-terminus. Upon low energy activation (e.g., collision-induced dissociation or post-source decay) of charge tagged peptides, relatively few fragment ions are produced due to the absence of mobile protons. In contrast, high energy fragmentation, such as 157 nm photodissociation, typically leads to a series of a-type ions. Disadvantages of existing charge tags are that they can produce mobile protons or that they are undesirably large and bulky. Here, we investigate a small triethylphosphonium charge tag with two different linkages: amide (158 Da) and amidine bonds (157 Da). Activation of peptides labeled with a triethylphosphonium charge tag through an amide bond can lead to loss of the charge tag and the production of protonated peptides. This enables low intensity fragment ions from both the protonated and charge tagged peptides to be observed. Triethylphosphonium charge tagged peptides linked through an amidine bond are more stable. Post-source decay and photodissociation yield product ions that primarily contain the charge tag. Certain amidine induced fragments are also observed. The previously reported tris(trimethoxyphenyl) phosphonium acetic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester charge tag shows a similar fragment ion distribution, but the mass of the triethylphosphonium tag label is 415 Da smaller. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Tempting To Tag: An Experimental Comparison Of Four Tagging Input Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Melenhorst

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tagging helps achieve improved indexing and recommendation of resources (e.g., videos or pictures in large data collections. In order to reap the benefits of tagging, people must be persuaded to label the resources they consume. This paper reports on a study in which four different tagging input mechanisms and their effect on users' motivation to tag were compared. The mechanisms consisted of a standard tag input box, a chatbot-like environment, a bookmarking mechanism, and a "tag and vote" game. The results of our experiment show that the use of the nonstandard tagging input mechanisms does not affect users' motivation to tag. In some instances tagging mechanisms were found to distract users from their primary task: consuming resources. Persuading people to tag might be accomplished more effectively by using other motivating tagging mechanisms (e.g., tagging games, or motivation could be created by explaining the usefulness of tagging.

  2. Measurement of the branching fractions of Ds+→η′X and Ds+→η′ρ+ in e+e−→Ds+Ds−

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ablikim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We study Ds+ decays to final states involving the η′ with a 482 pb−1 data sample collected at s=4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. We measure the branching fractions B(Ds+→η′X=(8.8±1.8±0.5% and B(Ds+→η′ρ+=(5.8±1.4±0.4% where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. In addition, we estimate an upper limit on the non-resonant branching ratio B(Ds+→η′π+π0<5.1% at the 90% confidence level. Our results are consistent with CLEO's recent measurements and help to resolve the disagreement between the theoretical prediction and CLEO's previous measurement of B(Ds+→η′ρ+.

  3. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE55_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE55_DS01 Profiling by MetAlign and MS2T-based peak annotation The scans were repea...ensity values were divided with those of the internal standards (lidocaine: m/z =...aries using previously described methods (Matsuda et al., 2009). Each MS2T entry

  4. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE56_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE56_DS01 Profiling by METALIGN and MS2T-based peak annotation The data matrix was ...in-house software written in Perl/Tk (‘N toolbox', Appendix S3). Detailed methods for processing and interpr

  5. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE37_DS4 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE37_DS4 Labeled peak search by ShiftedIonsFinder The candidate labeled peaks were ...n unlabeled sample using ShiftedIonsFinder. The prepared basic sample and shifted samples were imported to ShiftedIonsFind...sing the Join function. The exported file from ShiftedIonsFinder was arranged by Excel. ...

  6. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE50_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Lynx ver. 4.1 (Waters). After alignment, de-isotoping, and cutoff of the low-intensity peaks (<500 counts) a...SE50_DS01 Untargeted profiling by LC‒QTOF‒MS The data matrix was aligned using Mass

  7. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE40_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tware without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by PowerFT ...SE40_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks Raw data files are converted to text file by MSGet sof

  8. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE41_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tware without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by PowerFT ...SE41_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks Raw data files are converted to text file by MSGet sof

  9. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE13_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE13_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  10. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE30_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE30_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  11. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE1_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE1_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C2) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  12. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE35_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE35_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  13. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE5_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE5_DS1 PowerGet analysis for annotation of peaks with MS/MS (A3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files

  14. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE10_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE10_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  15. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE29_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE29_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  16. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE8_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE8_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  17. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE31_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE31_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  18. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE33_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE33_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  19. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE7_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE7_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C4) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  20. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE12_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE12_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  1. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE36_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE36_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  2. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE6_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE6_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C4) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  3. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE12_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE12_DS1 PowerGet analysis for annotation of peaks with MS/MS (A3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text file

  4. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE16_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE16_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  5. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE14_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE14_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  6. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE17_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE17_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  7. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE27_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE27_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  8. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE17_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE17_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  9. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE4_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE4_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  10. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE13_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE13_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  11. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE14_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE14_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  12. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE11_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE11_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  13. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE4_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE4_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  14. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE9_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE9_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  15. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE12_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE12_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  16. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE16_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE16_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  17. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE9_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE9_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  18. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE10_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE10_DS1 PowerGet analysis for annotation of peaks with MS/MS (A3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text file

  19. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE15_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE15_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C5) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  20. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE26_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE26_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  1. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE25_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE25_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  2. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE2_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE2_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C2) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  3. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE5_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE5_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  4. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE5_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE5_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  5. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE34_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE34_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  6. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE3_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE3_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C2) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  7. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE32_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE32_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  8. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE10_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE10_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  9. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE25_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE25_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  10. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE7_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE7_DS1 PowerGet analysis for annotation of peaks with MS/MS (A4) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files

  11. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE11_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE11_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Pow

  12. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE8_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE8_DS3 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (C3) Raw data files are converted to text... file by MSGet software without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by Powe

  13. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE37_DS3 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE37_DS3 Peak alignment and database search Peaks were aligned using PowerMatch. After editing the data manu...ally, common peaks among SE37_S01_M1_D1, SE37_S02_M1_D1, and SE37_S03_M1_D1 were se

  14. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE48_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE48_DS01 Data upload Data acquisition and processing were performed with the MassL...ynx 4.1 software. > All data acquired by LC–QTOF-MS/MS were uploaded to DROP Met in PRIMe (http://prime.psc.riken.jp/) and are freely available. ...

  15. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE6_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE6_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B4) Raw data files are conver...rFT with parameters (intensity cut off in peak detection=20000, margin of ion grouping in peak detection=5,

  16. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE7_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE7_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B4) Raw data files are conver...rFT with parameters (intensity cut off in peak detection=20000, margin of ion grouping in peak detection=5,

  17. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE15_DS2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE15_DS2 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks (B5) Raw data files are conve...erFT with parameters (intensity cut off in peak detection=30000, margin of ion grouping in peak detection=5,

  18. Virus and dsRNA-triggered transcriptional responses reveal key components of honey bee antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M; Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2017-07-25

    Recent high annual losses of honey bee colonies are associated with many factors, including RNA virus infections. Honey bee antiviral responses include RNA interference and immune pathway activation, but their relative roles in antiviral defense are not well understood. To better characterize the mechanism(s) of honey bee antiviral defense, bees were infected with a model virus in the presence or absence of dsRNA, a virus associated molecular pattern. Regardless of sequence specificity, dsRNA reduced virus abundance. We utilized next generation sequencing to examine transcriptional responses triggered by virus and dsRNA at three time-points post-infection. Hundreds of genes exhibited differential expression in response to co-treatment of dsRNA and virus. Virus-infected bees had greater expression of genes involved in RNAi, Toll, Imd, and JAK-STAT pathways, but the majority of differentially expressed genes are not well characterized. To confirm the virus limiting role of two genes, including the well-characterized gene, dicer, and a probable uncharacterized cyclin dependent kinase in honey bees, we utilized RNAi to reduce their expression in vivo and determined that virus abundance increased, supporting their involvement in antiviral defense. Together, these results further our understanding of honey bee antiviral defense, particularly the role of a non-sequence specific dsRNA-mediated antiviral pathway.

  19. Generation and Analysis of Transposon Ac/Ds-Induced Chromosomal Rearrangements in Rice Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Closely-located transposable elements (TEs) have been known to induce chromosomal breakage and rearrangements via alternative transposition. To study genome rearrangements in rice, an Ac/Ds system has been employed. This system comprises an immobile Ac element expressed under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, and a modified Ds element. A starter line carried Ac and a single copy of Ds at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). To enhance the transpositional activity, seed-derived calli were cultured and regenerated into plants. Among 270 lines regenerated from the starter, one line was selected that contained a pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). The selected line was again subjected to tissue culture to obtain a regenerant population. Among 300 regenerated plants, 107 (36 %) contained chromosomal rearrangements including deletions, duplications, and inversions of various sizes. From 34 plants, transposition mechanisms leading to such genomic rearrangements were analyzed. The rearrangements were induced by sister chromatid transposition (SCT), homologous recombination (HR), and single chromatid transposition (SLCT). Among them, 22 events (65 %) were found to be transmitted to the next generation. These results demonstrate a great potential of tissue culture regeneration and the Ac/Ds system in understanding alternative transposition mechanisms and in developing chromosome engineering in plants.

  20. Measurements of branching fractions of leptonic and hadronic Ds+ meson decays and extraction of the Ds+ meson decay constant

    CERN Document Server

    Zupanc, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhuyan, B; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H O; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, S -H; Li, J; Libby, J; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Prim, M; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of absolute branching fractions of hadronic and leptonic Ds+ decays to K- K+ pi+, anti-K0 K+, eta pi+, mu+ nu_mu and tau+ nu_tau and report a search for the leptonic Ds+ to e+ nu_e decays. The results are obtained from a large data sample collected at or near the Y(4S) and Y(5S) resonances with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The branching fractions of hadronic decays are measured to be Br(Ds+ -> K- K+ pi+) = (5.06 +- 0.15 +- 0.21)%, Br(Ds+ -> anti-K0 K+) = (2.95 +- 0.11 +- 0.09)%, and Br(Ds+ -> eta pi+) = (1.82 +- 0.14 +- 0.07)%, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The branching fractions of leptonic decays are measured to be Br(Ds+ -> mu+ nu_mu) = (0.531 +- 0.028 +- 0.020)%, and Br(Ds+ -> tau+ nu_tau) = (5.70 +- 0.21 +0.31-0.30)%, which are combined to determine the Ds+ meson decay constant f_Ds = (255.5 +- 4.2 +- 5.1) MeV. We find no significant signal for Ds+ -> e+ nu_e decays and set an upper limit ...

  1. Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Viola, Haydée

    2015-01-01

    Similar molecular machinery is activated in neurons following an electrical stimulus that induces synaptic changes and after learning sessions that trigger memory formation. Then, to achieve perdurability of these processes protein synthesis is required for the reinforcement of the changes induced in the network. The synaptic tagging and capture theory provided a strong framework to explain synaptic specificity and persistence of electrophysiological induced plastic changes. Ten years later, the behavioral tagging hypothesis (BT) made use of the same argument, applying it to learning and memory models. The hypothesis postulates that the formation of lasting memories relies on at least two processes: the setting of a learning tag and the synthesis of plasticity related proteins, which once captured at tagged sites allow memory consolidation. BT explains how weak events, only capable of inducing transient forms of memories, can result in lasting memories when occurring close in time with other behaviorally relevant experiences that provide proteins. In this review, we detail the findings supporting the existence of BT process in rodents, leading to the consolidation, persistence, and interference of a memory. We focus on the molecular machinery taking place in these processes and describe the experimental data supporting the BT in humans. PMID:26380117

  2. Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Moncada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar molecular machinery is activated in neurons following an electrical stimulus that induces synaptic changes and after learning sessions that trigger memory formation. Then, to achieve perdurability of these processes protein synthesis is required for the reinforcement of the changes induced in the network. The synaptic tagging and capture theory provided a strong framework to explain synaptic specificity and persistence of electrophysiological induced plastic changes. Ten years later, the behavioral tagging hypothesis (BT made use of the same argument, applying it to learning and memory models. The hypothesis postulates that the formation of lasting memories relies on at least two processes: the setting of a learning tag and the synthesis of plasticity related proteins, which once captured at tagged sites allow memory consolidation. BT explains how weak events, only capable of inducing transient forms of memories, can result in lasting memories when occurring close in time with other behaviorally relevant experiences that provide proteins. In this review, we detail the findings supporting the existence of BT process in rodents, leading to the consolidation, persistence, and interference of a memory. We focus on the molecular machinery taking place in these processes and describe the experimental data supporting the BT in humans.

  3. Increased effect of IMiDs by addition of cytokine-induced killer cells in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullok, Katharina F; Sippel, Christoph; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-12-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide, represent the basic principle of multiple myeloma treatment. However, the development of resistance is a limiting factor. Over the last years, the efficient application of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells has been reported as an alternative strategy to treat hematological neoplasms. In this study, we tested for a potential synergistic effect by combining the IMiDs thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide with CIK cells in different myeloma cell lines in vitro. Myeloma cells tested with CIK cells were significantly reduced. In the combination, myeloma cells were significantly reduced compared with cells only tested with IMiDs but not to the cells tested with CIK cells. Otherwise, the number of CIK cells was significantly reduced when treated with IMiDs. Because IMiDs are active in patients with myeloma, these results lead to the expectation that combination of IMiDs and CIK cells achieve better results in the treatment of multiple myeloma compared with the single use of IMiDs. Therefore, further examinations in an in vivo setting are necessary to have a closer look on the cellular interactions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A set of GFP-based organelle marker lines combined with DsRed-based gateway vectors for subcellular localization study in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Meng; Lin, Ke-Chun; Liau, Wei-Shiang; Chao, Yun-Yang; Yang, Ling-Hung; Chen, Szu-Yun; Lu, Chung-An; Hong, Chwan-Yang

    2016-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, many useful tools have been developed to accelerate the investigation of gene functions. Fluorescent proteins have been widely used as protein tags for studying the subcellular localization of proteins in plants. Several fluorescent organelle marker lines have been generated in dicot plants; however, useful and reliable fluorescent organelle marker lines are lacking in the monocot model rice. Here, we developed eight different GFP-based organelle markers in transgenic rice and created a set of DsRed-based gateway vectors for combining with the marker lines. Two mitochondrial-localized rice ascorbate peroxidase genes fused to DsRed and successfully co-localized with mitochondrial-targeted marker lines verified the practical use of this system. The co-localization of GFP-fusion marker lines and DsRed-fusion proteins provide a convenient platform for in vivo or in vitro analysis of subcellular localization of rice proteins.

  5. Intercalation of Epinephrine with Calf-thymus ds-DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A strong interaction between double stranded calf-thymus DNA (ds-DNA) and epinephrine but no interaction between single stranded calf-thymus DNA (ss-DNA) and epinephrine were observed by the use of UV-spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. It is suggested that the interaction leads to an intercalation of EP molecules into the groove of ds-DNA and the formation of ds-DNA(EP)n complex.

  6. Tag Based Audio Search Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswaran Vellachu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The volume of the music database is increasing day by day. Getting the required song as per the choice of the listener is a big challenge. Hence, it is really hard to manage this huge quantity, in terms of searching, filtering, through the music database. It is surprising to see that the audio and music industry still rely on very simplistic metadata to describe music files. However, while searching audio resource, an efficient "Tag Based Audio Search Engine" is necessary. The current research focuses on two aspects of the musical databases 1. Tag Based Semantic Annotation Generation using the tag based approach.2. An audio search engine, using which the user can retrieve the songs based on the users choice. The proposed method can be used to annotation and retrieve songs based on musical instruments used , mood of the song, theme of the song, singer, music director, artist, film director, instrument, genre or style and so on.

  7. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector.

  8. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R J

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector. (8 refs).

  9. The HaloTag: Improving Soluble Expression and Applications in Protein Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Peterson, Scott; Kwon, Keehwan

    2012-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances have been critical for the rapidly evolving field of proteomics. The development of fusion tag systems is essential for purification and analysis of recombinant proteins. The HaloTag is a 34 KDa monomeric protein derived from a bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase. The majority of fusion tags in use today utilize a reversible binding interaction with a specific ligand. The HaloTag system is unique in that it forms a covalent linkage to its chloroalkane ligand. This linkage permits attachment of the HaloTag to a variety of functional reporters, which can be used to label and immobilize recombinant proteins. The success rate for HaloTag expression of soluble proteins is very high and comparable to maltose binding protein (MBP) tag. Furthermore, cleavage of the HaloTag does not result in protein insolubility that often is observed with the MBP tag. In the present report, we describe applications of the HaloTag system in our ongoing investigation of protein-protein interactions of the Y. pestis Type 3 secretion system on a custom protein microarray. We also describe the utilization of affinity purification/mass spectroscopy (AP/MS) to evaluate the utility of the Halo Tag system to characterize DNA binding activity and protein specificity.

  10. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower

  11. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower

  12. γ-Tocotrienol does not substantially protect DS neurons from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Then Sue-Mian

    2012-01-01

    without H2O2 as well as pre-treatment of γT3 and αT induced changes in cPKC and PKC-δ expression in DS neurons suggesting interaction of γT3 and αT with PKC activity. Conclusion Our study suggests that γT3 pre-treatment are not sufficient to protect DS neurons from H2O2-induced oxidative assault, instead induced the apoptosis process.

  13. Search for rare quark-annihilation decays, B --> Ds(*) Phi

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Bulten, H; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Côté, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Diberder; Dickopp, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Graziani, G; Green, M G; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Höcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Koeneke, K; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le, F; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Li, X; Libby, J; Lista, L; Liu, R; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Messner, R; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Minamora, J S; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; Nugent, I M; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rahmat, R; Rama, M; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Rodier, S; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Ryd, A; Röthel, W; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schindler, R H; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schröder, T; Schröder, H; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spitznagel, M; Spradlin, P; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stocchi, A; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stängle, H; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Tan, P; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, J M; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Van Bakel, N; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Viaud, F B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wang, W F; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S Y; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yi, J I; Yi, K; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yushkov, A N; Yéche, C; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Ziegler, V; Zito, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T

    2006-01-01

    We report on searches for B- --> Ds- Phi and B- --> Ds*- Phi. In the context of the Standard Model, these decays are expected to be highly suppressed since they proceed through annihilation of the b and u-bar quarks in the B- meson. Our results are based on 234 million Upsilon(4S) --> B Bbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We find no evidence for these decays, and we set Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions BF(B- --> Ds- Phi) Ds*- Phi)<1.2x10^(-5). These results are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  14. Measurements of $B \\to D_{s^{(*)+}} D^{*(*)}$ Branching Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; McGee, S A; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Nelson, H N; Richman, J D; Witherell, M S; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J

    2000-01-01

    This article describes improved measurements by CLEO of the $B^0 \\to D_s^+ D^{*-}$ and $B^0 \\to D_s^{*+} D^{*-}$ branching fractions, and first evidence for the decay $B^+ \\to D_s^{(*)+} \\bar{D}^{**0}$, where $\\bar{D}^{**0}$ represents the sum of the $\\bar{D}_1(2420)^0$, $\\bar{D}_2^*(2460)^0 $, and $\\bar{D}_1(j=1/2)^0$ L=1 charm meson states. Also reported is the first measurement of the $D_s^{*+}$ polarization in the decay $B^0 \\to D_s^{*+} D^{*-}$. A partial reconstruction technique, employing only the fully reconstructed $D_s^+$ and slow pion $\\pi_s^-$ from the $D^{*-} \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^-_s$ decay, enhances sensitivity. The observed branching fractions are $ {\\mathcal B} (B^0 \\to D_s^+ D^{*-}) = (1.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.10 \\pm 0.28)%$, $ {\\mathcal B} (B^0 \\to D_s^{*+} D^{*-}) = (1.82 \\pm 0.37 \\pm 0.24 \\pm 0.46)%$, and $ {\\mathcal B} (B^+ \\to D_s^{(*)+} \\bar{D}^{**0}) = (2.73 \\pm 0.78 \\pm 0.48 \\pm 0.68)%$, where the first error is statistical, the second systematic, and the third is due to the uncertainty in th...

  15. Tagging, Encoding, and Jones Optimality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Lopez, Pablo E. Martinez

    2003-01-01

    A partial evaluator is said to be Jones-optimal if the result of specializing a self-interpreter with respect to a source program is textually identical to the source program, modulo renaming. Jones optimality has already been obtained if the self-interpreter is untyped. If the selfinterpreter...... is typed, however, residual programs are cluttered with type tags. To obtain the original source program, these tags must be removed. A number of sophisticated solutions have already been proposed. We observe, however, that with a simple representation shift, ordinary partial evaluation is already Jones-optimal...

  16. WebTag: Web browsing into sensor tags over NFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Alvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  17. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jose Echevarria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.. This work presents a novel solution (WebTag for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  18. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Álvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  19. Social image tagging with diverse semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueming; Hua, Xian-Sheng; Tang, Yuan Yan; Mei, Tao

    2014-12-01

    We have witnessed the popularity of image-sharing websites for sharing personal experiences through photos on the Web. These websites allow users describing the content of their uploaded images with a set of tags. Those user-annotated tags are often noisy and biased. Social image tagging aims at removing noisy tags and suggests new relevant tags. However, most existing tag enrichment approaches predominantly focus on tag relevance and overlook tag diversity problem. How to make the top-ranked tags covering a wide range of semantic is still an opening, yet challenging, issue. In this paper, we propose an approach to retag social images with diverse semantics. Both the relevance of a tag to image as well as its semantic compensations to the already determined tags are fused to determine the final tag list for a given image. Different from existing image tagging approaches, the top-ranked tags are not only highly relevant to the image but also have significant semantic compensations with each other. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Tagging the European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.) with coded wire tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, S.; Pedersen, Michael Ingemann; Holdensgaard, G.

    2000-01-01

    The coded wire tag (CWT) system was examined as a possible tool for tagging European eels (Anguilla anguilla). Two size groups of eels (3.8 and 10.2 g) were tagged with CWTs in the dorsal musculature, Tag loss 28 days after tagging was 3.1% for the small and 0.7% for the large groups of eels....... Of the tag loss in the small eels, 61% were lost during the first 2 h after tagging. In the small group, eels that lost tags were significantly (P...

  1. Graph based techniques for tag cloud generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leginus, Martin; Dolog, Peter; Lage, Ricardo Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Tag cloud is one of the navigation aids for exploring documents. Tag cloud also link documents through the user defined terms. We explore various graph based techniques to improve the tag cloud generation. Moreover, we introduce relevance measures based on underlying data such as ratings or citat......Tag cloud is one of the navigation aids for exploring documents. Tag cloud also link documents through the user defined terms. We explore various graph based techniques to improve the tag cloud generation. Moreover, we introduce relevance measures based on underlying data such as ratings...

  2. KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS4 Promoter hypomethylation patterns in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)

    OpenAIRE

    Gallez-Hawkins, Ghislaine M.; Li, Xiuli; Franck, Anne E.; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Forman, Stephen J.; Senitzer, David; Zaia, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR)-MHC class I pathway is an integral part of natural killer cell immunity, and its role in host protection from both cancer and infection is important In addition, we have shown elevated KIR2DS2 and 2DS4 expression in PBMCs of patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) [1]. Since all inhibitory KIR promoters are known to be heavily methylated, the question asked here is how and when KIR2DS2 and 2DS4 promoters had changed their methylation...

  3. Genetic tagging of humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsbøll, P J; Allen, J; Bérubé, M; Clapham, P J; Feddersen, T P; Hammond, P S; Hudson, R R; Jørgensen, H; Katona, S; Larsen, A H; Larsen, F; Lien, J; Mattila, D K; Sigurjónsson, J; Sears, R; Smith, T; Sponer, R; Stevick, P; Oien, N

    1997-08-21

    The ability to recognize individual animals has substantially increased our knowledge of the biology and behaviour of many taxa. However, not all species lend themselves to this approach, either because of insufficient phenotypic variation or because tag attachment is not feasible. The use of genetic markers ('tags') represents a viable alternative to traditional methods of individual recognition, as they are permanent and exist in all individuals. We tested the use of genetic markers as the primary means of identifying individuals in a study of humpback whales in the North Atlantic Ocean. Analysis of six microsatellite loci among 3,060 skin samples collected throughout this ocean allowed the unequivocal identification of individuals. Analysis of 692 'recaptures', identified by their genotype, revealed individual local and migratory movements of up to 10,000 km, limited exchange among summer feeding grounds, and mixing in winter breeding areas, and also allowed the first estimates of animal abundance based solely on genotypic data. Our study demonstrates that genetic tagging is not only feasible, but generates data (for example, on sex) that can be valuable when interpreting the results of tagging experiments.

  4. Genetic tagging of humpback whales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palsboll, PJ; Allen, J; Berube, M; Clapham, PJ; Feddersen, TP; Hammond, PS; Hudson, RR; Jorgensen, H; Katona, S; Larsen, AH; Larsen, F; Lien, J; Mattila, DK; Sigurjonsson, J; Sears, R; Smith, T; Sponer, R; Stevick, P; Oien, N

    1997-01-01

    The ability to recognize individual animals has substantially increased our knowledge of the biology and behaviour of many taxa(1). However, not all species lend themselves to this approach, either because of insufficient phenotypic variation or because tag attachment is not feasible. The use of gen

  5. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE53_DS03 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE53_DS03 In-house software An original data file (.wiff) was converted to an uniqu...e binary file (.kiff) using in-house software (nondisclosure). Peak picking and alignment were performed usi...s including internal standards, peaks were annotated automatically using the same software. For normalizatio...ng the another in-house software (nondisclosure), peaks were picked and aligned among samples automatically.

  6. 3Ds Max Courses Teaching Reform%3DsMax课程教学改革

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈国钧

    2011-01-01

    阐述3dsMax课程在计算机动漫教学中存在动手能力差的问题,根据3dmax课程在设计教学中的现状,提出了相应的教学改革方法,着重论述在教学实践中的经验,重点探讨3dsMax课程的定位,在专业上要培养学生具有发现问题、分析问题与解决问题的综合能力,同时具有一技之长。因此,传统的强调概念、系统性强的学科教学的课程体系已不能满足上述核心培养目标的实现,必须进行以能力为本位的项目式教学的课程改革。%The 3ds Max courses in computer animation teaching ability, according to the status of 3dmax courses in design teaching,the teaching reform,focuses on the experience in teaching practice,and focus on the positioning of 3ds Max courses professional students identify problems,analyze problems,and problem-solving ability, but also has skills.Therefore,the traditional emphasis on the concept of systemic strong disciplinary program system can not meet the above core training goals must be project-based teaching competency-based curriculum reform.

  7. $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow D_{s}^{+(*)} D_{s}^{-(*)}$ decays in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Pritchard, A

    2014-01-01

    The decay of a $B_{s}^{0}$ meson to two oppositely charged $D_{s}$ mesons is one that is postulated to be almost exclusively CP even. Measuring the properties of this decay can therefore give important information about the behaviour of the $B_{s}^{0}$ system. This poster presents two of these measurements, made by LHCb, using data from run 1 of the LHC.

  8. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  9. Optimization and calibration of the same-side kaon tagging algorithm using hadronic $B_{s}^{0}$ decays in 2011 data

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We report on the optimization and calibration of the same-side kaon tagging algorithm using the decay $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow D_{s}^{- \\pi^{+}}$ with 1.0~$\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data from the LHCb 2011 physics run. After a data-driven optimization and calibration, we measured an effective tagging efficiency for the same-side tagger of $(1.5\\pm0.4)%$ using event-by-event predicted mistag for $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow D_{s}^{- \\pi^{+}}$ decays. For the combination of same-side kaon and opposite-side taggers the corresponding effective tagging efficiency is $(3.8\\pm0.7)%$ using event-by-event predicted mistag in this channel.

  10. Quantifying Visual-Representativeness of Social Image Tags Using Image Tag Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixin; Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    Tags associated with images in various social media sharing web sites are valuable information source for superior image retrieval experiences. Due to the nature of tagging, many tags associated with images are not visually descriptive. In this chapter, we propose Image Tag Clarity to evaluate the effectiveness of a tag in describing the visual content of its annotated images, which is also known as the image tag visual-representativeness. It is measured by computing the zero-mean normalized distance between the tag language model estimated from the images annotated by the tag and the collection language model. The tag/collection language models are derived from the bag of visual-word local content features of the images. The visual-representative tags that are commonly used to annotate visually similar images are given high tag clarity scores. Evaluated on a large real-world dataset containing more than 269K images and their associated tags, we show that the image tag clarity score can effectively identify the visual-representative tags from all tags contributed by users. Based on the tag clarity scores, we have made a few interesting observations that could be used to support many tag-based applications.

  11. Dynamics of dsRNA mycoviruses in black Aspergillus population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 10% of all examined 668 representatives of black Aspergillus species, independent of worldwide location, were infected with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses. These isometric viruses (25-40 nm diameter) contained a variety of often multiple segments of different dsRNA sizes rangi

  12. Norm for betonkonstruktioner, DS411, 9 Brand, Høringsudgave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    1999-01-01

    The fire part of Code of Practice for the Structural Use of Concrete, DS411 of an edition for public comments.......The fire part of Code of Practice for the Structural Use of Concrete, DS411 of an edition for public comments....

  13. DS read-out transcription in transgenic tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudenko, George N.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1994-01-01

    To select for Ds transposition in transgenic tomato plants a phenotypic excision assay, based on restoration of hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT II) gene expression, was employed. Some tomato plants, however, expressed the marker gene even though the Ds had not excised. Read-out transcriptional

  14. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Hastie

    Full Text Available Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  15. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; King, Liam B; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  16. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  17. The Complex Dynamics of Collaborative Tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, H.; Robu, V.; Shepherd, H.

    2007-01-01

    The debate within the Web community over the optimal means by which to organize information often pits formalized classifications against distributed collaborative tagging systems. A number of questions remain unanswered, however, regarding the nature of collaborative tagging systems including wheth

  18. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Tag Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all tags applied to Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These tags were applied by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of...

  19. Satellite Tags- Guam/CNMI EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  20. Delay-Modulated RF Tag System Concept Using Ultrawideband Noise Radar Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) tags have been widely used in inventory tracking, environmental monitoring, battlefield situational awareness, and combat identification due to their low cost, small size, and wireless functionality. This paper explores the application of active RF tags in outdoor environments responding to random noise radar interrogations with predetermined messages. A conceptual system design for communication between radar and RF tags using ultrawideband (UWB) noise waveforms is propo...

  1. Multilabel Learning for Automatic Web Services Tagging

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha AZNAG; Mohamed QUAFAFOU; Jarir, Zahi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, some web services portals and search engines as Biocatalogue and Seekda!, have allowed users to manually annotate Web services using tags. User Tags provide meaningful descriptions of services and allow users to index and organize their contents. Tagging technique is widely used to annotate objects in Web 2.0 applications. In this paper we propose a novel probabilistic topic model (which extends the CorrLDA model - Correspondence Latent Dirichlet Allocation-) to automatically tag we...

  2. ON THE INTERACTIVE FUNCTIONS OF TAG QUESTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Tag questions are a distinctive feature in spokenEnglish,but seldom used by the non-native speakers.Studies show that tags are employed by native speakersmainly to express their interactive and interpersonalmeaning.In this paper,the writer explores the natureof tag questions,mainly their interactive and inter-personal functions in daily coversation.Suggestionsare made with regard to the teaching of tags in theclassroom.

  3. An Ac transposon system based on maize chromosome 4S for isolating long-distance-transposed Ac tags in the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Li, Zhaoying; Fan, Jun; Li, Pengfei; Hu, Wei; Wang, Gang; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2010-12-01

    Transposon tagging is an important tool for gene isolation and functional studies. In maize, several transposon-tagging systems have been developed, mostly using Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) and Mutator systems. Here, we establish another Ac-based transposon system with the donor Ac tightly linked with sugary1 (su1) on maize chromosome 4S. Newly transposed Ac (tr-Acs) were detected based on a negative dosage effect, and long-distance-transposed Ac events were identified and isolated from the donor Ac by a simple backcross scheme. In this study, we identified 208 independent long-distance-transposed Ac lines. Thirty-one flanking sequences of these tr-Acs were isolated and localized in the maize genome. As found in previous studies, the tr-Acs preferentially inserted into genic sequences. The distribution of tr-Acs is not random. In our study, the tr-Acs preferentially transposed into chromosomes 1, 2, 9 and 10. We discuss the preferential distribution of tr-Acs from Ac systems. Our system is complementary to two other Ac-based regional-mutagenesis systems in maize, and the combined use of these systems will achieve an even and high-density distribution of Ac elements throughout the maize genome for functional-genomics studies.

  4. Towards EPC compatible plastic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    A target application for plastic RFID tags is Electronic Product Coding (EPC). The EPC-specifications set some demanding requirements for RFID tags. In this work, we review the work that has been done to fulfill some of these specifications. We describe a complete 64-bit RFID tag that is inductively

  5. Towards EPC compatible plastic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    A target application for plastic RFID tags is Electronic Product Coding (EPC). The EPC-specifications set some demanding requirements for RFID tags. In this work, we review the work that has been done to fulfill some of these specifications. We describe a complete 64-bit RFID tag that is inductively

  6. Towards EPC compatible plastic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    A target application for plastic RFID tags is Electronic Product Coding (EPC). The EPC-specifications set some demanding requirements for RFID tags. In this work, we review the work that has been done to fulfill some of these specifications. We describe a complete 64-bit RFID tag that is

  7. LHCb: Search for $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^+$ decays

    CERN Multimedia

    Greening, E

    2013-01-01

    A search for non-resonant $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^+$ decays is performed using 1.0 $fb^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at s = 7 TeV recorded by the LHCb experiment. No signals are observed and the world's best limits on the branching fractions are set.

  8. Radiation effects on communication performance of radio frequency identification tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuyuki; Meng, Zhaowu; Kikuchi, Hirosumi; Kataoka, Yasuhide; Nakazato, Kazuhisa; Deji, Shizuhiko; Ito, Shigeki; Saze, Takuya; Hirota, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2010-11-01

    Radioactive materials (sources) are managed by bookkeeping and stocktaking. The radiation protection section staffs should check the sources manually. Annual effective dose concerning stocktaking of them are estimated at some mSv concerning fingers. A radio frequency identification (RFID) tag's absorbed dose is estimated at some dozen Gy. RFID for stocktaking automatically was devised. Radiation effects on the communication performance of RFID tags were investigated by using response times and read ranges as indices. The RFID system was composed of a computer, a detector, and transponders (tag) consisting of an integrated circuit chip and an antenna. The tag is joined to the source for identification. The tags were irradiated at doses between 5 and 5,000 Gy by an x-ray irradiator. The response times and the read ranges were tracked from 40 to 23,200 min after irradiation. Relative read ranges fluctuated between 0.9 and 1.1 in the dose region less than 2,000 Gy, but fluctuated greatly in the dose region beyond 2,000 Gy. Malfunctioning tags appeared from 3,000 Gy, and all tags malfunctioned in the dose region over 4,500 Gy. The threshold dose leading to malfunction was determined to be 2,100 Gy. Time variation of relative read ranges was classified into four patterns. The pattern shifted from pattern 1 to 4 when the dose was increased. The relative read ranges lengthened in pattern 1. The relative read rages were approximately 1.0 in pattern 2. The read ranges tentatively shortened, then recovered in pattern 3. The tags malfunctioned in pattern 4. Once the tags malfunctioned, they never recovered their performance. Radiation enhances or deteriorates communication performance depending on dosage. Tags can spontaneously recover from radiation deterioration. The time variation of the read ranges can be illustrated by enhancement, deterioration, and recovery. The mechanism of four patterns is explained based on the variation of the frequency harmonization strength and

  9. ATLAS boosted object tagging 2

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Julien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study into the optimal techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. Various algorithms for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets are compared for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 8 TeV data and 8 TeV and 13 TeV MC simulations. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons. The modeling of the tagging variables used in this technique is studied using 8 TeV pp collision data and systematic uncertainties for the tagger efficiency and fake rates are evaluated.

  10. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):dextran sulfate (PEDOT:DS) - a highly processable conductive organic biopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, David G; Gorkin, Robert; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna; Wagner, Klaudia; Weng, Bo; Chung, Johnson H Y; In Het Panhuis, Marc; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-03-01

    A novel water-dispersible conducting polymer analogous to poly(3,4-dioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has been chemically synthesized in a single reaction in high yield. PEDOT:DS, a new member of the polythiophene family, is composed of a complex between PEDOT and the sulfonated polysaccharide polyanion dextran sulfate. Drop-cast films of aqueous suspensions of the material display a native conductivity of up to 7 ± 1 S cm(-1), increasing to 20 ± 2 S cm(-1) after treatment with ethylene glycol and thermal annealing. Mass ratios of the precursors NaDS and EDOT were varied from 5:1 to 2:1 and a decrease in the NaDS:EDOT ratio produces tougher, less hygroscopic films of higher conductivity. Ultraviolet-visible spectroelectrochemistry yields spectra typical of PEDOT complexes. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that PEDOT:DS is electrochemically active from -1.0 to 0.8 V vs. Ag/Ag(+) in acetonitrile, with similar characteristics to PEDOT:PSS. Water dispersions of PEDOT:DS are successfully processed by drop casting, spray coating, inkjet printing and extrusion printing. Furthermore, laser etching of dried films allows the creation of patterns with excellent definition. To assess the cytotoxicity of PEDOT:DS, L-929 cells were cultured with a polymer complex concentration range of 0.002 to 0.2 g l(-1) in cell culture medium. No significant difference is found between the proliferation rates of L-929 cells exposed to PEDOT:DS and those in plain medium after 96h. However, PEDOT:PSS shows around 25% less cell growth after 4 days, even at the lowest concentration. Taken together, these results suggest PEDOT:DS has exceptional potential as an electromaterial for the biointerface.

  11. POS Tagging Using Relaxation Labelling

    CERN Document Server

    Padro, L

    1995-01-01

    Relaxation labelling is an optimization technique used in many fields to solve constraint satisfaction problems. The algorithm finds a combination of values for a set of variables such that satisfies -to the maximum possible degree- a set of given constraints. This paper describes some experiments performed applying it to POS tagging, and the results obtained. It also ponders the possibility of applying it to word sense disambiguation.

  12. Measurement of jet activity produced in top-quark events with an electron, a muon and two b-tagged jets in the final state in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adachi, S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alshehri, A A; Alstaty, M; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Piqueras, D Álvarez; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antrim, D J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Baines, J T; Bajic, M; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barranco Navarro, L; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethani, A; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bielski, R; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Billoud, T R V; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bisanz, T; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blue, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Boerner, D; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bokan, P; Bold, T; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Bortfeldt, J; Bortoletto, D; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossio Sola, J D; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Broughton, J H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, L S; Brunt, B H; Bruschi, M; Bruscino, N; Bryant, P; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgard, C D; Burger, A M; Burghgrave, B; Burka, K; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Burr, J T P; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calace, N; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Callea, G; Caloba, L P; Calvente Lopez, S; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Calvet, T P; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminal Armadans, R; Camincher, C; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Camplani, A; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Carbone, R M; Cardarelli, R; Cardillo, F; Carli, I; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carlson, B T; Carminati, L; Carney, R M D; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Casolino, M; Casper, D W; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelijn, R; Castelli, A; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Caudron, J; Cavaliere, V; Cavallaro, E; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerda Alberich, L; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, S K; Chan, Y L; Chang, P; Chapman, J D; Charlton, D G; Chatterjee, A; Chau, C C; Chavez Barajas, C A; Che, S; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, H J; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cheremushkina, E; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiarelli, G; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Choi, K; Chomont, A R; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christodoulou, V; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chudoba, J; Chuinard, A J; Chwastowski, J J; Chytka, L; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Cioara, I A; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirotto, F; Citron, Z H; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, B L; Clark, M R; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Colasurdo, L; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Connell, S H; Connelly, I A; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cormier, F; Cormier, K J R; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cottin, G; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Crawley, S J; Cree, G; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Crescioli, F; Cribbs, W A; Crispin Ortuzar, M; Cristinziani, M; Croft, V; Crosetti, G; Cueto, A; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Cummings, J; Curatolo, M; Cúth, J; Czirr, H; Czodrowski, P; D'amen, G; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M J; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dado, T; Dai, T; Dale, O; Dallaire, F; Dallapiccola, C; Dam, M; Dandoy, J R; Dang, N P; Daniells, A C; Dann, N S; Danninger, M; Dano Hoffmann, M; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darmora, S; Dassoulas, J; Dattagupta, A; Davey, W; David, C; Davidek, T; Davies, M; Davison, P; Dawe, E; Dawson, I; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Benedetti, A; De Castro, S; De Cecco, S; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De la Torre, H; De Lorenzi, F; De Maria, A; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; Dearnaley, W J; Debbe, R; Debenedetti, C; Dedovich, D V; Dehghanian, N; Deigaard, I; Del Gaudio, M; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delgove, D; Deliot, F; Delitzsch, C M; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Dell'Orso, M; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delsart, P A; DeMarco, D A; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demilly, A; Denisov, S P; Denysiuk, D; Derendarz, D; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deterre, C; Dette, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Clemente, W K; Di Donato, C; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Micco, B; Di Nardo, R; Di Petrillo, K F; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Di Valentino, D; Diaconu, C; Diamond, M; Dias, F A; Diaz, M A; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Díez Cornell, S; Dimitrievska, A; Dingfelder, J; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Djuvsland, J I; do Vale, M A B; Dobos, D; Dobre, M; Doglioni, C; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Donadelli, M; Donati, S; Dondero, P; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Doyle, A T; Drechsler, E; Dris, M; Du, Y; Duarte-Campderros, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Ducu, O A; Duda, D; Dudarev, A; Dudder, A Chr; Duffield, E M; Duflot, L; Dührssen, M; Dumancic, M; Duncan, A K; Dunford, M; Duran Yildiz, H; Düren, M; Durglishvili, A; Duschinger, D; Dutta, B; Dyndal, M; Eckardt, C; Ecker, K M; Edgar, R C; Edwards, N C; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellajosyula, V; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Elliot, A A; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Emeliyanov, D; Enari, Y; Endner, O C; Ennis, J S; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Ernis, G; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Esch, H; Escobar, C; Esposito, B; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Ezhilov, A; Ezzi, M; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Facini, G; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falla, R J; Faltova, J; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farina, C; Farina, E M; Farooque, T; Farrell, S; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Faucci Giannelli, M; Favareto, A; Fawcett, W J; Fayard, L; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, W; Feigl, S; Feligioni, L; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Feng, H; Fenyuk, A B; Feremenga, L; Fernandez Martinez, P; Fernandez Perez, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira de Lima, D E; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Fiedler, F; Filipčič, A; Filipuzzi, M; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Finelli, K D; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Fischer, A; Fischer, C; Fischer, J; Fisher, W C; Flaschel, N; Fleck, I; Fleischmann, P; Fletcher, G T; Fletcher, R R M; Flick, T; Flierl, B M; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Forcolin, G T; Formica, A; Forti, A; Foster, A G; Fournier, D; Fox, H; Fracchia, S; Francavilla, P; Franchini, M; Francis, D; Franconi, L; Franklin, M; Frate, M; Fraternali, M; Freeborn, D; Fressard-Batraneanu, S M; Friedrich, F; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fusayasu, T; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gabrielli, A; Gabrielli, A; Gach, G P; Gadatsch, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, L G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Galhardo, B; Gallas, E J; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galster, G; Gan, K K; Ganguly, S; Gao, J; Gao, Y; Gao, Y S; Garay Walls, F M; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garonne, V; Gascon Bravo, A; Gasnikova, K; Gatti, C; Gaudiello, A; Gaudio, G; Gauthier, L; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gazis, E N; Gecse, Z; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Geisen, M; Geisler, M P; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Geng, C; Gentile, S; Gentsos, C; George, S; Gerbaudo, D; Gershon, A; Ghasemi, S; Ghneimat, M; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, S M; Gignac, M; Gilchriese, M; Gillam, T P S; Gillberg, D; Gilles, G; Gingrich, D M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giorgi, F M; Giraud, P F; Giromini, P; Giugni, D; Giuli, F; Giuliani, C; Giulini, M; Gjelsten, B K; Gkaitatzis, S; Gkialas, I; Gkougkousis, E L; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glatzer, J; Glaysher, P C F; Glazov, A; Goblirsch-Kolb, M; Godlewski, J; Goldfarb, S; Golling, T; Golubkov, D; Gomes, A; Gonçalo, R; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J; Gonella, G; Gonella, L; Gongadze, A; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorišek, A; Goshaw, A T; Gössling, C; Gostkin, M I; Goudet, C R; Goujdami, D; Goussiou, A G; Govender, N; Gozani, E; Graber, L; Grabowska-Bold, I; Gradin, P O J; Grafström, P; Gramling, J; Gramstad, E; Grancagnolo, S; Gratchev, V; Gravila, P M; Gray, H M; Graziani, E; Greenwood, Z D; Grefe, C; Gregersen, K; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Grevtsov, K; Griffiths, J; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groh, S; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grossi, G C; Grout, Z J; Guan, L; Guan, W; Guenther, J; Guescini, F; Guest, D; Gueta, O; Gui, B; Guido, E; Guillemin, T; Guindon, S; Gul, U; Gumpert, C; Guo, J; Guo, W; Guo, Y; Gupta, R; Gupta, S; Gustavino, G; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez Ortiz, N G; Gutschow, C; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haber, C; Hadavand, H K; Haddad, N; Hadef, A; Hageböck, S; Hagihara, M; Hakobyan, H; Haleem, M; Haley, J; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G D; Hamacher, K; Hamal, P; Hamano, K; Hamilton, A; Hamity, G N; Hamnett, P G; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanawa, K; Hance, M; Haney, B; Hanke, P; Hanna, R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, M C; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Hard, A S; Harenberg, T; Hariri, F; Harkusha, S; Harrington, R D; Harrison, P F; Hartjes, F; Hartmann, N M; Hasegawa, M; Hasegawa, Y; Hasib, A; Hassani, S; Haug, S; Hauser, R; Hauswald, L; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hayakawa, D; Hayden, D; Hays, C P; Hays, J M; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; Head, S J; Heck, T; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heim, T; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J J; Heinrich, L; Heinz, C; Hejbal, J; Helary, L; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Henderson, J; Henderson, R C W; Heng, Y; Henkelmann, S; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Herbert, G H; Herde, H; Herget, V; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hesketh, G G; Hessey, N P; Hetherly, J W; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, E; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hladik, O; Hoad, X; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoenig, F; Hohn, D; Holmes, T R; Homann, M; Honda, S; Honda, T; Hong, T M; Hooberman, B H; Hopkins, W H; Horii, Y; Horton, A J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hou, S; Hoummada, A; Howarth, J; Hoya, J; Hrabovsky, M; Hristova, I; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hrynevich, A; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Hu, Q; Hu, S; Huang, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Huffman, T B; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Huhtinen, M; Huo, P; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ideal, E; Idrissi, Z; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Iizawa, T; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Ilic, N; Introzzi, G; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Iordanidou, K; Ippolito, V; Ishijima, N; Ishino, M; Ishitsuka, M; Issever, C; Istin, S; Ito, F; Iturbe Ponce, J M; Iuppa, R; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jabbar, S; Jackson, B; Jackson, P; Jain, V; Jakobi, K B; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakoubek, T; Jamin, D O; Jana, D K; Jansky, R; Janssen, J; Janus, M; Janus, P A; Jarlskog, G; Javadov, N; Javůrek, T; Jeanneau, F; Jeanty, L; Jejelava, J; Jeng, G-Y; Jenni, P; Jeske, C; Jézéquel, S; Ji, H; Jia, J; Jiang, H; Jiang, Y; Jiang, Z; Jiggins, S; Jimenez Pena, J; Jin, S; Jinaru, A; Jinnouchi, O; Jivan, H; Johansson, P; Johns, K A; Johnson, C A; Johnson, W J; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, S; Jones, T J; Jongmanns, J; Jorge, P M; Jovicevic, J; Ju, X; Juste Rozas, A; Köhler, M K; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kahn, S J; Kaji, T; Kajomovitz, E; Kalderon, C W; Kaluza, A; Kama, S; Kamenshchikov, A; Kanaya, N; Kaneti, S; Kanjir, L; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kaplan, L S; Kapliy, A; Kar, D; Karakostas, K; Karamaoun, A; Karastathis, N; Kareem, M J; Karentzos, E; Karnevskiy, M; Karpov, S N; Karpova, Z M; Karthik, K; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kasahara, K; Kashif, L; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kataoka, Y; Kato, C; Katre, A; Katzy, J; Kawade, K; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kazanin, V F; Keeler, R; Kehoe, R; Keller, J S; Kempster, J J; Keoshkerian, H; Kepka, O; Kerševan, B P; Kersten, S; Keyes, R A; Khader, M; Khalil-Zada, F; Khanov, A; Kharlamov, A G; Kharlamova, T; Khoo, T J; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kido, S; Kilby, C R; Kim, H Y; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kind, O M; King, B T; King, M; Kirk, J; Kiryunin, A E; Kishimoto, T; Kisielewska, D; Kiss, F; Kiuchi, K; Kivernyk, O; Kladiva, E; Klein, M H; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klimek, P; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klioutchnikova, T; Kluge, E-E; Kluit, P; Kluth, S; Knapik, J; Kneringer, E; Knoops, E B F G; Knue, A; Kobayashi, A; Kobayashi, D; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kocian, M; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Köhler, N M; Koi, T; Kolanoski, H; Kolb, M; Koletsou, I; Komar, A A; Komori, Y; Kondo, T; Kondrashova, N; Köneke, K; König, A C; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kopeliansky, R; Koperny, S; Kopp, A K; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korol, A A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Kortner, O; Kortner, S; Kosek, T; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotwal, A; Koulouris, A; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouskoura, V; Kowalewska, A B; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, T Z; Kozakai, C; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasnopevtsev, D; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kravchenko, A; Kretz, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kreutzfeldt, K; Krieger, P; Krizka, K; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M C; Kruskal, M; Kubota, T; Kucuk, H; Kuday, S; Kuechler, J T; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuger, F; Kuhl, T; Kukhtin, V; Kukla, R; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kuna, M; Kunigo, T; Kupco, A; Kuprash, O; Kurashige, H; Kurchaninov, L L; Kurochkin, Y A; Kurth, M G; Kus, V; Kuwertz, E S; Kuze, M; Kvita, J; Kwan, T; Kyriazopoulos, D; La Rosa, A; La Rosa Navarro, J L; La Rotonda, L; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacey, J; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Lammers, S; Lampl, W; Lançon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lanfermann, M C; Lang, V S; Lange, J C; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Lasagni Manghi, F; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavrijsen, W; Law, A T; Laycock, P; Lazovich, T; Lazzaroni, M; Le, B; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Le Quilleuc, E P; LeBlanc, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, C A; Lee, S C; Lee, L; Lefebvre, B; Lefebvre, G; Lefebvre, M; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehan, A; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Leight, W A; Leister, A G; Leite, M A L; Leitner, R; Lellouch, D; Lemmer, B; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzi, B; Leone, R; Leone, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Leontsinis, S; Lerner, G; Leroy, C; Lesage, A A J; Lester, C G; Levchenko, M; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Levy, M; Lewis, D; Leyton, M; Li, B; Li, C; Li, H; Li, L; Li, L; Li, Q; Li, S; Li, X; Li, Y; Liang, Z; Liberti, B; Liblong, A; Lichard, P; Lie, K; Liebal, J; Liebig, W; Limosani, A; Lin, S C; Lin, T H; Lindquist, B E; Lionti, A E; Lipeles, E; Lipniacka, A; Lisovyi, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, B; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, K; Liu, L; Liu, M; Liu, Y L; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Lleres, A; Llorente Merino, J; Lloyd, S L; Lo Sterzo, F; Lobodzinska, E M; Loch, P; Loebinger, F K; Loew, K M; Loginov, A; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Long, B A; Long, J D; Long, R E; Longo, L; Looper, K A; Lopez Lopez, J A; Lopez Mateos, D; Lopez Paredes, B; Lopez Paz, I; Lopez Solis, A; Lorenz, J; Lorenzo Martinez, N; Losada, M; Lösel, P J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Love, J; Love, P A; Lu, H; Lu, N; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Luedtke, C; Luehring, F; Lukas, W; Luminari, L; Lundberg, O; Lund-Jensen, B; Luzi, P M; Lynn, D; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Lyubushkin, V; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Ma, Y; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Macdonald, C M; Maček, B; Machado Miguens, J; Madaffari, D; Madar, R; Maddocks, H J; Mader, W F; Madsen, A; Maeda, J; Maeland, S; Maeno, T; Maevskiy, A; Magradze, E; Mahlstedt, J; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maier, A A; Maier, T; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makovec, N; Malaescu, B; Malecki, Pa; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Malone, C; Maltezos, S; Malyukov, S; Mamuzic, J; Mancini, G; Mandelli, L; Mandić, I; Maneira, J; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L; Manjarres Ramos, J; Mann, A; Manousos, A; Mansoulie, B; Mansour, J D; Mantifel, R; Mantoani, M; Manzoni, S; Mapelli, L; Marceca, G; March, L; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marjanovic, M; Marley, D E; Marroquim, F; Marsden, S P; Marshall, Z; Marti-Garcia, S; Martin, B; Martin, T A; Martin, V J; Martin Dit Latour, B; Martinez, M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Martin-Haugh, S; Martoiu, V S; Martyniuk, A C; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massa, I; Massa, L; Mastrandrea, P; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Mättig, P; Mattmann, J; Maurer, J; Maxfield, S J; Maximov, D A; Mazini, R; Maznas, I; Mazza, S M; Mc Fadden, N C; Mc Goldrick, G; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCarthy, T G; McClymont, L I; McDonald, E F; Mcfayden, J A; Mchedlidze, G; McMahon, S J; McPherson, R A; Medinnis, M; Meehan, S; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meineck, C; Meirose, B; Melini, D; Mellado Garcia, B R; Melo, M; Meloni, F; Menary, S B; Meng, L; Meng, X T; Mengarelli, A; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Mergelmeyer, S; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Messina, A; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, C; Meyer, C; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H; Miano, F; Middleton, R P; Miglioranzi, S; Mijović, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikestikova, M; Mikuž, M; Milesi, M; Milic, A; Miller, D W; Mills, C; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Minaenko, A A; Minami, Y; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Minegishi, Y; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mistry, K P; Mitani, T; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Miucci, A; Miyagawa, P S; Mizukami, A; Mjörnmark, J U; Mlynarikova, M; Moa, T; Mochizuki, K; Mogg, P; Mohapatra, S; Molander, S; Moles-Valls, R; Monden, R; Mondragon, M C; Mönig, K; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montalbano, A; Montejo Berlingen, J; Monticelli, F; Monzani, S; Moore, R W; Morange, N; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morgenstern, S; Mori, D; Mori, T; Morii, M; Morinaga, M; Morisbak, V; Moritz, S; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morris, J D; Mortensen, S S; Morvaj, L; Moschovakos, P; Mosidze, M; Moss, H J; Moss, J; Motohashi, K; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Moyse, E J W; Muanza, S; Mudd, R D; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, R S P; Mueller, T; Muenstermann, D; Mullen, P; Mullier, G A; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Murillo Quijada, J A; Murray, W J; Musheghyan, H; Muškinja, M; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nachman, B P; Nackenhorst, O; Nagai, K; Nagai, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Nagata, K; Nagel, M; Nagy, E; Nairz, A M; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Nakano, I; Naranjo Garcia, R F; Narayan, R; Narrias Villar, D I; Naryshkin, I; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Nechaeva, P Yu; Neep, T J; Negri, A; Negrini, M; Nektarijevic, S; Nellist, C; Nelson, A; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neumann, M; Neves, R M; Nevski, P; Newman, P R; Nguyen, D H; Nguyen Manh, T; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, J; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsen, J K; Nilsson, P; Ninomiya, Y; Nisati, A; Nisius, R; Nobe, T; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Nooney, T; Norberg, S; Nordberg, M; Norjoharuddeen, N; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, S; Nozaki, M; Nozka, L; Ntekas, K; Nurse, E; Nuti, F; O'grady, F; O'Neil, D C; O'Rourke, A A; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Obermann, T; Ocariz, J; Ochi, A; Ochoa, I; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohman, H; Oide, H; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Okuyama, T; Olariu, A; Oleiro Seabra, L F; Olivares Pino, S A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Onogi, K; Onyisi, P U E; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlando, N; Orr, R S; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Otero Y Garzon, G; Otono, H; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Oussoren, K P; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, R E; Ozcan, V E; Ozturk, N; Pachal, K; Pacheco Pages, A; Pacheco Rodriguez, L; Padilla Aranda, C; Pagáčová, M; Pagan Griso, S; Paganini, M; Paige, F; Pais, P; Pajchel, K; Palacino, G; Palazzo, S; Palestini, S; Palka, M; Pallin, D; St Panagiotopoulou, E; Pandini, C E; Panduro Vazquez, J G; Pani, P; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Paolozzi, L; Papadopoulou, Th D; Papageorgiou, K; Paramonov, A; Paredes Hernandez, D; Parker, A J; Parker, M A; Parker, K A; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pascuzzi, V R; Pasqualucci, E; Passaggio, S; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Pater, J R; Pauly, T; Pearce, J; Pearson, B; Pedersen, L E; Pedersen, M; Pedraza Lopez, S; Pedro, R; Peleganchuk, S V; Penc, O; Peng, C; Peng, H; Penwell, J; Peralva, B S; Perego, M M; Perepelitsa, D V; Perez Codina, E; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrella, S; Peschke, R; Peshekhonov, V D; Peters, K; Peters, R F Y; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridis, A; Petridou, C; Petroff, P; Petrolo, E; Petrov, M; Petrucci, F; Pettersson, N E; Peyaud, A; Pezoa, R; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Pickering, M A; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pin, A W J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pires, S; Pirumov, H; Pitt, M; Plazak, L; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Pluth, D; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Polesello, G; Poley, A; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Pollard, C S; Polychronakos, V; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Poppleton, A; Pospisil, S; Potamianos, K; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Pozo Astigarraga, M E; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Puddu, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Raine, J A; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Ratti, M G; Rauch, D M; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Ravinovich, I; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Reale, M; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reed, R G; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reichert, J; Reiss, A; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rifki, O; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rimoldi, M; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Rizzi, C; Roberts, R T; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Rodina, Y; Rodriguez Perez, A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D; Roe, S; Rogan, C S; Røhne, O; Roloff, J; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romano Saez, S M; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosien, N-A; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, J H N; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Russell, H L; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryu, S; Ryzhov, A; Rzehorz, G F; Saavedra, A F; Sabato, G; Sacerdoti, S; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Saha, P; Sahinsoy, M; Saimpert, M; Saito, T; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Salazar Loyola, J E; Salek, D; Sales De Bruin, P H; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sammel, D; Sampsonidis, D; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sanchez Pineda, A; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sato, K; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Savic, N; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schachtner, B M; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, L; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schier, S; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K R; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, S; Schneider, B; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schott, M; Schouwenberg, J F P; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schuh, N; Schulte, A; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shaikh, N W; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shirabe, S; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shope, D R; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sickles, A M; Sidebo, P E; Sideras Haddad, E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simon, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Siral, I; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Slovak, R; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smiesko, J; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, J W; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snyder, I M; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Solans Sanchez, C A; Solar, M; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Son, H; Song, H Y; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; St Denis, R D; Stabile, A; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, G H; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stärz, S; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Suster, C J E; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Swift, S P; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanioka, R; Tannenwald, B B; Tapia Araya, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, B; Tornambe, P; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Trofymov, A; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tu, Y; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tulbure, T T; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turgeman, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Ucchielli, G; Ueda, I; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usui, J; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valdes Santurio, E; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Ferrer, J A Valls; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasquez, J G; Vasquez, G A; Vazeille, F; Schroeder, T Vazquez; Veatch, J; Veeraraghavan, V; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Boeriu, O E Vickey; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigani, L; Villa, M; Perez, M Villaplana; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vittori, C; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Milosavljevic, M Vranjes; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wallangen, V; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Weber, S A; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M D; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Whallon, N L; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilk, F; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winston, O J; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wolf, T M H; Wolff, R; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Worm, S D; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xi, Z; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Wong, K H Yau; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zakharchuk, N; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Nedden, M Zur; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of jet activity in top-quark pair events produced in proton-proton collisions are presented, using 3.2 fb[Formula: see text] of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are chosen by requiring an opposite-charge [Formula: see text] pair and two b-tagged jets in the final state. The normalised differential cross-sections of top-quark pair production are presented as functions of additional-jet multiplicity and transverse momentum, [Formula: see text]. The fraction of signal events that do not contain additional jet activity in a given rapidity region, the gap fraction, is measured as a function of the [Formula: see text] threshold for additional jets, and is also presented for different invariant mass regions of the [Formula: see text] system. All measurements are corrected for detector effects and presented as particle-level distributions compared to predictions with different theoretical approaches for QCD radiation. While the kinematics of the jets from top-quark decays are described well, the generators show differing levels of agreement with the measurements of observables that depend on the production of additional jets.

  13. Measurement of jet activity produced in top-quark events with an electron, a muon and two b-tagged jets in the final state in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-04-15

    Measurements of jet activity in top-quark pair events produced in proton-proton collisions are presented, using 3.2 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are chosen by requiring an opposite-charge eμ pair and two b-tagged jets in the final state. The normalised differential cross-sections of top-quark pair production are presented as functions of additional-jet multiplicity and transverse momentum, p{sub T}. The fraction of signal events that do not contain additional jet activity in a given rapidity region, the gap fraction, is measured as a function of the p{sub T} threshold for additional jets, and is also presented for different invariant mass regions of the eμb anti b system. All measurements are corrected for detector effects and presented as particle-level distributions compared to predictions with different theoretical approaches for QCD radiation. While the kinematics of the jets from top-quark decays are described well, the generators show differing levels of agreement with the measurements of observables that depend on the production of additional jets. (orig.)

  14. Measurement of jet activity produced in top-quark events with an electron, a muon and two $b$-tagged jets in the final state in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello

    2017-04-07

    Measurements of jet activity in top-quark pair events produced in proton--proton collisions are presented, using 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are chosen by requiring an opposite-charge $e\\mu$ pair and two $b$-tagged jets in the final state. The normalised differential cross-sections of top-quark pair production are presented as functions of additional-jet multiplicity and transverse momentum, $p_T$. The fraction of signal events that do not contain additional jet activity in a given rapidity region, the gap fraction, is measured as a function of the $p_T$ threshold for additional jets, and is also presented for different invariant mass regions of the $e\\mu b\\bar{b}$ system. All measurements are corrected for detector effects and presented as particle-level distributions compared to predictions with different theoretical approaches for QCD radiation. While the kinematics of the jets from top-qua...

  15. Approximation properties of haplotype tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreiseitl Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are locations at which the genomic sequences of population members differ. Since these differences are known to follow patterns, disease association studies are facilitated by identifying SNPs that allow the unique identification of such patterns. This process, known as haplotype tagging, is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem and analyzed in terms of complexity and approximation properties. Results It is shown that the tagging problem is NP-hard but approximable within 1 + ln((n2 - n/2 for n haplotypes but not approximable within (1 - ε ln(n/2 for any ε > 0 unless NP ⊂ DTIME(nlog log n. A simple, very easily implementable algorithm that exhibits the above upper bound on solution quality is presented. This algorithm has running time O((2m - p + 1 ≤ O(m(n2 - n/2 where p ≤ min(n, m for n haplotypes of size m. As we show that the approximation bound is asymptotically tight, the algorithm presented is optimal with respect to this asymptotic bound. Conclusion The haplotype tagging problem is hard, but approachable with a fast, practical, and surprisingly simple algorithm that cannot be significantly improved upon on a single processor machine. Hence, significant improvement in computatational efforts expended can only be expected if the computational effort is distributed and done in parallel.

  16. Predicting floods with Flickr tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Nataliya; Jarvis, Stephen; Procter, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, user generated content (UGC) in social media postings and their associated metadata such as time and location stamps are being used to provide useful operational information during natural hazard events such as hurricanes, storms and floods. The main advantage of these new sources of data are twofold. First, in a purely additive sense, they can provide much denser geographical coverage of the hazard as compared to traditional sensor networks. Second, they provide what physical sensors are not able to do: By documenting personal observations and experiences, they directly record the impact of a hazard on the human environment. For this reason interpretation of the content (e.g., hashtags, images, text, emojis, etc) and metadata (e.g., keywords, tags, geolocation) have been a focus of much research into social media analytics. However, as choices of semantic tags in the current methods are usually reduced to the exact name or type of the event (e.g., hashtags '#Sandy' or '#flooding'), the main limitation of such approaches remains their mere nowcasting capacity. In this study we make use of polysemous tags of images posted during several recent flood events and demonstrate how such volunteered geographic data can be used to provide early warning of an event before its outbreak.

  17. Statistical Properties of Inter-arrival Times Distribution in Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Capocci, Andrea; Servedio, Vito D P; Loreto, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Folksonomies provide a rich source of data to study social patterns taking place on the World Wide Web. Here we study the temporal patterns of users' tagging activity. We show that the statistical properties of inter-arrival times between subsequent tagging events cannot be explained without taking into account correlation in users' behaviors. This shows that social interaction in collaborative tagging communities shapes the evolution of folksonomies. A consensus formation process involving the usage of a small number of tags for a given resources is observed through a numerical and analytical analysis of some well-known folksonomy datasets.

  18. Tag Clusters as Information Retrieval Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Knautz, Kathrin; Stock, Wolfgang G

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents our design of a next generation information retrieval system based on tag co-occurrences and subsequent clustering. We help users getting access to digital data through information visualization in the form of tag clusters. Current problems like the absence of interactivity and semantics between tags or the difficulty of adding additional search arguments are solved. In the evaluation, based upon SERVQUAL and IT systems quality indicators, we found out that tag clusters are perceived as more useful than tag clouds, are much more trustworthy, and are more enjoyable to use.

  19. b-tagging in DELPHI at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bates, M; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bibby, J; Biffi, P; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Couchot, F; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Almagne, B; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dijkstra, H; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hernando, J A; Herr, H; Heuser, J M; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jalocha, P; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Kucewicz, W; Kurowska, J; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomerotski, A; Norman, A; Nygren, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stavitski, I; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The standard method used for tagging b-hadrons in the DELPHI experiment at the CERN LEP Collider is discussed in detail. The main ingredient of b-tagging is the impact parameters of tracks, which relies mostly on the vertex detector. Additional information, such as the mass of particles associated to a secondary vertex, significantly improves the selection efficiency and the background suppression. The paper describes various discriminating variables used for the tagging and the procedure of their combination. In addition, applications of b-tagging to some physics analyses, which depend crucially on the performance and reliability of b-tagging, are described briefly.

  20. EEG frequency tagging using ultra-slow periodic heat stimulation of the skin reveals cortical activity specifically related to C fiber thermonociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Elisabeth; Liberati, Giulia; Mouraux, André

    2017-01-01

    The recording of event-related brain potentials triggered by a transient heat stimulus is used extensively to study nociception and diagnose lesions or dysfunctions of the nociceptive system in humans. However, these responses are related exclusively to the activation of a specific subclass of nociceptive afferents: quickly-adapting thermonociceptors. In fact, except if the activation of Aδ fibers is avoided or if A fibers are blocked, these responses specifically reflect activity triggered by the activation of Type 2 quickly-adapting A fiber mechano-heat nociceptors (AMH-2). Here, we propose a novel method to isolate, in the human electroencephalogram (EEG), cortical activity related to the sustained periodic activation of heat-sensitive thermonociceptors, using very slow (0.2 Hz) and long-lasting (75 s) sinusoidal heat stimulation of the skin between baseline and 50°C. In a first experiment, we show that when such long-lasting thermal stimuli are applied to the hand dorsum of healthy volunteers, the slow rises and decreases of skin temperature elicit a consistent periodic EEG response at 0.2 Hz and its harmonics, as well as a periodic modulation of the magnitude of theta, alpha and beta band EEG oscillations. In a second experiment, we demonstrate using an A fiber block that these EEG responses are predominantly conveyed by unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors. The proposed approach constitutes a novel mean to study C fiber function in humans, and to explore the cortical processing of tonic heat pain in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27871921

  1. Binary De Bruijn sequences for DS-CDMA systems: analysis and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinsante Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Code division multiple access (CDMA using direct sequence (DS spread spectrum modulation provides multiple access capability essentially thanks to the adoption of proper sequences as spreading codes. The ability of a DS-CDMA receiver to detect the desired signal relies to a great extent on the auto-correlation properties of the spreading code associated to each user; on the other hand, multi-user interference rejection depends on the cross-correlation properties of all the spreading codes in the considered set. As a consequence, the analysis of new families of spreading codes to be adopted in DS-CDMA is of great interest. This article provides results about the evaluation of specific full-length binary sequences, the De Bruijn ones, when applied as spreading codes in DS-CDMA schemes, and compares their performance to other families of spreading codes commonly used, such as m-sequences, Gold, OVSF, and Kasami sequences. While the latter sets of sequences have been specifically designed for application in multi-user communication contexts, De Bruijn sequences come from combinatorial mathematics, and have been applied in completely different scenarios. Considering the similarity of De Bruijn sequences to random sequences, we investigate the performance resulting by applying them as spreading codes. The results herein presented suggest that binary De Bruijn sequences, when properly selected, may compete with more consolidated options, and encourage further investigation activities, specifically focused on the generation of longer sequences, and the definition of correlation-based selection criteria.

  2. Comparison between RYGB, DS, and VSG effect on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslin, Mitchell S; Dudiy, Yuriy; Weiskopf, Joanne; Damani, Tanuja; Shah, Paresh

    2012-08-01

    Our group has reported a high incidence of reactive hypoglycemia following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with specific interest in postprandial insulin and the ratio of 1- to 2-h serum glucose levels. The purpose of this study is to compare the 6-month response to oral glucose challenge in patients undergoing RYGB, duodenal switch (DS), and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). Thirty-eight patients meeting the NIH criteria for bariatric surgery who have reached the 6-month postoperative mark are the basis of this report. Preoperatively and at 6 months follow-up, patients underwent blood draw to determine levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c, C peptide, and 2 h oral liquid glucose challenge test (OGTT). HOMA-IR and 1 to 2 h ratios of glucose and fasting to 1 h ratio of insulin were calculated. All patients underwent a successful laparoscopic bariatric procedure (VSG =13, DS =13, and RYGB = 12). All operations reduced BMI, HgbA1c, fasting glucose, and fasting insulin. HOMA IR and glucose tolerance improved with all procedures. In response to OGTT at 6 months, there was a 20-fold increase in insulin at 1 h in RYGB, which was not seen in DS. At 6 months, 1-h insulin was markedly lower in DS (p DS (p DS (p DS causes a much lower rise in 1-h insulin, with this difference being statistically significant at p DS results in a less abrupt reduction in blood glucose. Although 1-h insulin is lower, DS patients had the lowest HbA1C at 6 months (p < .05). We believe that these findings have important implications for the choice of bariatric procedure for both diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  3. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE51_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE51_DS01 ReSpect The literature used for the MS/MS data we...re obtained from PubMed and Google Scholar, and the MS/MS data were manually digitalized. All literature use...the heights of the MS peaks in the figures were manually measured and calculated. For literature data that h...se contains 163 selected literature reports (3341 records corresponding to 2741 metabolites), Q-TOF/MS data ... data type selection (ignores all single fragments and one major fragment spectrum) and data set selection (literature, Q-TOF/MS and QqQ/MS). ...

  4. Parsing of Myanmar sentences with function tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Thant, Win Win; Thein, Ni Lar

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Naive Bayes to address the task of assigning function tags and context free grammar (CFG) to parse Myanmar sentences. Part of the challenge of statistical function tagging for Myanmar sentences comes from the fact that Myanmar has free-phrase-order and a complex morphological system. Function tagging is a pre-processing step for parsing. In the task of function tagging, we use the functional annotated corpus and tag Myanmar sentences with correct segmentation, POS (part-of-speech) tagging and chunking information. We propose Myanmar grammar rules and apply context free grammar (CFG) to find out the parse tree of function tagged Myanmar sentences. Experiments show that our analysis achieves a good result with parsing of simple sentences and three types of complex sentences.

  5. Enhancing Navigation on Wikipedia with Social Tags

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, Arkaitz

    2012-01-01

    Social tagging has become an interesting approach to improve search and navigation over the actual Web, since it aggregates the tags added by different users to the same resource in a collaborative way. This way, it results in a list of weighted tags describing its resource. Combined to a classical taxonomic classification system such as that by Wikipedia, social tags can enhance document navigation and search. On the one hand, social tags suggest alternative navigation ways, including pivot-browsing, popularity-driven navigation, and filtering. On the other hand, it provides new metadata, sometimes uncovered by documents' content, that can substantially improve document search. In this work, the inclusion of an interface to add user-defined tags describing Wikipedia articles is proposed, as a way to improve article navigation and retrieval. As a result, a prototype on applying tags over Wikipedia is proposed in order to evaluate its effectiveness.

  6. MIL-STD-1660-Tests of DS2 Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    AD-A253 400 9 FINAL REPORT JUNE 1991 REPORT NO. EVT 13-90 MIL- STD -1660 TESTS OF DS2 CONTAINERS VIC’ -~ ~ UL P.7~9a Prepared for: Distribution...Classification) MIL- STD - 1660 Tests of DS2 Containers 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Jason B. Solberg 1,U. TYPE OF REPORT I1ft. TIME COVERED 114. DATE OF REPORT...tests conducted. As tested, the DS2 container passed MIL- STD - 1660, Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads. 20. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT

  7. Observation of the decays B- to Ds(*)+ K- pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We report first observations of the decays B- to Ds(*)+ K- pi-, using 292 fb^-1 of data collected at Upsilon(4S) resonance energy by the BaBar detector at the PEP II e+ e- collider. The branching fractions are measured to be B(B- to Ds+ K- pi-) = (1.88 +- 0.13 +- 0.41) x 10^-4 and B(B- to Ds*+ K- pi-) = (1.84 +- 0.19 +- 0.40) X 10^-4.

  8. Assessment of Modeled Received Sound Pressure Levels and Movements of Satellite-Tagged Odontocetes Exposed to Mid-Frequency Active Sonar at the Pacific Missile Range Facility: February 2011 Through February 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-30

    Brandon L. Southall3 1Cascadia Research Collective, 218 ½ W. 4th Avenue, Olympia, WA 98501 2Marine Mammal Scientific and Veterinary Support...location data from satellite tags and available acoustic recordings and selected a subset of data for which there was sufficient overlap. The MFAS...location data from satellite- tagged individuals and modeling to estimate received levels from acoustic recordings from the PMRF hydrophones is a viable and

  9. AtDsPTP1 acts as a negative regulator in osmotic stress signalling during Arabidopsis seed germination and seedling establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Guohui; Chen, Moxian; Jia, Liguo; Xia, Yiji; Shi, Lu; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DsPTPs) target both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues and play roles in plant growth and development. We have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, dsptp1, which shows a higher seed germination rate and better root elongation under osmotic stress than the wild type. By contrast, its overexpression line, DsPTP1-OE, shows inhibited seed germination and root elongation; and its complemented line, DsPTP1-Com, resembles the wild type and rescues DsPTP1-OE under osmotic stress. Expression of AtDsPTP1 is enhanced by osmotic stress in seed coats, bases of rosette leaves, and roots. Compared with the wild type, the dsptp1 mutant shows increased proline accumulation, reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) content and ion leakage, and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity in response to osmotic stress. AtDsPTP1 regulates the transcript levels of various dehydration-responsive genes under osmotic stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in dsptp1 under osmotic stress is reduced with reduced expression of the ABA-biosynthesis gene NCED3 and increased expression of the ABA-catabolism gene CYP707A4. AtDsPTP1 also regulates the expression of key components in the ABA-signalling pathway. In conclusion, AtDsPTP1 regulates ABA accumulation, and acts as a negative regulator in osmotic stress signalling during Arabidospsis seed germination and seedling establishment.

  10. Chromatin modification contributes to the expression divergence of three TaGS2 homoeologs in hexaploid wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Fan, Xiaoli; Gao, Yingjie; Liu, Lei; Sun, Lijing; Su, Qiannan; Han, Jie; Zhang, Na; Cui, Fa; Ji, Jun; Tong, Yiping; Li, Junming

    2017-01-01

    Plastic glutamine synthetase (GS2) is responsible for ammonium assimilation. The reason that TaGS2 homoeologs in hexaploid wheat experience different selection pressures in the breeding process remains unclear. TaGS2 were minimally expressed in roots but predominantly expressed in leaves, and TaGS2-B had higher expression than TaGS2-A and TaGS2-D. ChIP assays revealed that the activation of TaGS2-B expression in leaves was correlated with increased H3K4 trimethylation. The transcriptional silencing of TaGS2 in roots was correlated with greater cytosine methylation and less H3K4 trimethylation. Micrococcal nuclease and DNase I accessibility experiments indicated that the promoter region was more resistant to digestion in roots than leaves, which indicated that the closed nucleosome conformation of the promoter region was important to the transcription initiation for the spatial-temporal expression of TaGS2. In contrast, the transcribed regions possess different nuclease accessibilities of three TaGS2 homoeologs in the same tissue, suggesting that nucleosome conformation of the transcribed region was part of the fine adjustment of TaGS2 homoeologs. This study provides evidence that histone modification, DNA methylation and nuclease accessibility coordinated the control of the transcription of TaGS2 homoeologs. Our results provided important evidence that TaGS2-B experienced the strongest selection pressures during the breeding process. PMID:28300215

  11. OSIRIS-REx Touch-And-Go (TAG) Navigation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kevin; Antreasian, Peter; Moreau, Michael C.; May, Alex; Sutter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is a NASA New Frontiers mission launching in 2016 to rendezvous with the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu in late 2018. Following an extensive campaign of proximity operations activities to characterize the properties of Bennu and select a suitable sample site, OSIRIES-REx will fly a Touch-And-Go (TAG) trajectory to the asteroid's surface to obtain a regolith sample. The paper summarizes the mission design of the TAG sequence, the propulsive required to achieve the trajectory, and the sequence of events leading up to the TAG event. The paper will summarize the Monte-Carlo simulation of the TAG sequence and present analysis results that demonstrate the ability to conduct the TAG within 25 meters of the selected sample site and +-2 cms of the targeted contact velocity. The paper will describe some of the challenges associated with conducting precision navigation operations and ultimately contacting a very small asteroid.

  12. OSIRI-REx Touch and Go (TAG) Navigation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kevin; Antreasian, Peter; Moreau, Michael C.; May, Alex; Sutter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is a NASA New Frontiers mission launching in 2016 to rendezvous with the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu in late 2018. Following an extensive campaign of proximity operations activities to characterize the properties of Bennu and select a suitable sample site, OSIRIS-REx will fly a Touch-And-Go (TAG) trajectory to the asteroid's surface to obtain a regolith sample. The paper summarizes the mission design of the TAG sequence, the propulsive maneuvers required to achieve the trajectory, and the sequence of events leading up to the TAG event. The paper also summarizes the Monte-Carlo simulation of the TAG sequence and presents analysis results that demonstrate the ability to conduct the TAG within 25 meters of the selected sample site and 2 cm/s of the targeted contact velocity. The paper describes some of the challenges associated with conducting precision navigation operations and ultimately contacting a very small asteroid.

  13. The Collective Knowledge of Social Tags: Direct and Indirect Influences on Navigation, Learning, and Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Ulrike; Held, Christoph; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Tag clouds generated in social tagging systems can capture the collective knowledge of communities. Using as a basis spreading activation theories, information foraging theory, and the co-evolution model of cognitive and social systems, we present here a model for an "extended information scent," which proposes that both collective and individual…

  14. The Collective Knowledge of Social Tags: Direct and Indirect Influences on Navigation, Learning, and Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Ulrike; Held, Christoph; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Tag clouds generated in social tagging systems can capture the collective knowledge of communities. Using as a basis spreading activation theories, information foraging theory, and the co-evolution model of cognitive and social systems, we present here a model for an "extended information scent," which proposes that both collective and individual…

  15. Research on C/DS/C network computing model%C/DS/C网络计算模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟周令; 卢雷

    2004-01-01

    阐明了网络计算模型的演变及C/DS/C模型的提出,详细给出了基于C/DS/C的企业级信息交互系统模型,其中包括C/DS/C结构的提出,企业级信息交互系统模型的组成,以及客户间通信应该解决的问题.最后阐述了它的实现.

  16. Assessment of PIT tag retention and post-tagging survival in metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Lee G; Sotola, V Alex; Marsden, J Ellen; Miehls, Scott M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags have been used to document and monitor the movement or behavior of numerous species of fishes. Data on short-term and long-term survival and tag retention are needed before initiating studies using PIT tags on a new species or life stage. We evaluated the survival and tag retention of 153 metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus tagged with 12 mm PIT tags on three occasions using a simple surgical procedure. Results: Tag retention was 100% and 98.6% at 24 h and 28-105 d post-tagging. Of the lamprey that retained their tags, 87.3% had incisions sufficiently healed to prevent further loss. Survival was 100% and 92.7% at 24 h and 41-118 d post-tagging with no significant difference in survival between tagged and untagged control lamprey. Of the 11 lamprey that died, four had symptoms that indicated their death was directly related to tagging. Survival was positively correlated with Sea Lamprey length. Conclusions: Given the overall high level of survival and tag retention in this study, future studies can utilize 12 mm PIT tags to monitor metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey movement and migration patterns.

  17. Novel feeding strategies for Saccharomyces cerevisiae DS2155 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... DS2155, using glucose limited exponential fedbatch ... Seven values of µ were selected and fed into the feed flow rate equation, at different time intervals, .... Biomass concentration were determined at the beginning and at.

  18. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  19. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  20. Professor DS Kothari and the University of Delhi .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Panchapakesan

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses contributions of Prof. D.S. Kothari to the Department of Physics, University of Delhi. Under Prof. Kothari's guidance the physics department acquired a name and became a leading centre of learning.

  1. Ds(0±) Meson Spectroscopy in Gaussian Sum Rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Shui-Guo; LIU Jue-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Masses of the Ds(0±) mesons are investigated from a view-point of ordinary light-heavy system in the framework of the Gaussian sum rules, which are worked out by means of the Laplacian transformation to the usual Borel sum rules. Using the standard input of QCD non-perturbative parameters, the corresponding mass spectra and couplings of the currents to the Ds(0±) mesons are obtained. Our results are mDs(O-) = 1.968±0.016±0.003 GeV and mDs(0+) = 2.320±0.014v0.003 GeV, which are in good accordance with the experimental data, 1.969 GeV and 2.317 GeV.

  2. Improving genetic evaluation using a multitrait single-step genomic model for ability to resume cycling after calving, measured by activity tags in Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Ahmed; Løvendahl, Peter; Fogh, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the improvement of the accuracy of estimated breeding values for ability to recycle after calving by using information of genomic markers and phenotypic information of correlated traits. The traits in this study were the interval from calving to first...... to first high activity, and the genetic correlation between both traits was strong (0.87). Breeding values were obtained using 4 models: conventional single-trait BLUP; conventional multitrait BLUP with pedigree-based relationship matrix; single-trait single-step genomic BLUP; and multitrait single......-step genomic BLUP model with joint relationship matrix combining pedigree and genomic information. The results showed that reliabilities of estimated breeding values (EBV) from single-step genomic BLUP models were about 40% higher than those from conventional BLUP models for both traits. Furthermore, using...

  3. Efficient heterologous expression and one-step purification of fully active c-terminal histidine-tagged uridine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penpassakarn, Praweenuch; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2011-11-01

    Tuberculosis has long been recognized as one of the most significant public health problems. Finding novel antituberculous drugs is always a necessary approach for controlling the disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrH gene (Rv2883c) encodes for uridine monophosphate kinase (UMK), which is a key enzyme in the uridine nucleotide interconversion pathway. The enzyme is essential for M. tuberculosis to sustain growth and hence is a potential drug target. In this study, we have developed a rapid protocol for production and purification of M. tuberculosis UMK by cloning pyrH (Rv2883c) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv with the addition of 6-histidine residues to the C-terminus of the protein, and expressing in E. coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIPL using an auto-induction medium. The enzyme was efficiently purified by a single-step TALON cobalt affinity chromatography with about 8 fold increase in specific activity, which was determined by a coupled assay with the pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The molecular mass of monomeric UMK was 28.2 kDa and that of the native enzyme was 217 kDa. The enzyme uses UMP as a substrate but not CMP and TMP and activity was enhanced by GTP. Measurements of enzyme kinetics revealed the kcat value of 7.6 +/- 0.4 U mg(-1) or 0.127 +/- 0.006 sec(-1).The protocol reported here can be used for expression of M. tuberculosis UMK in large quantity for formulating a high throughput target-based assay for screening anti-tuberculosis UMK compounds.

  4. Development of RAP Tag, a Novel Tagging System for Protein Detection and Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuki; Kaneko, Mika K; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Nakamura, Takuro; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Honma, Ryusuke; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Affinity tag systems, possessing high affinity and specificity, are useful for protein detection and purification. The most suitable tag for a particular purpose should be selected from many available affinity tag systems. In this study, we developed a novel affinity tag called the "RAP tag" system, which comprises a mouse antirat podoplanin monoclonal antibody (clone PMab-2) and the RAP tag (DMVNPGLEDRIE). This system is useful not only for protein detection in Western blotting, flow cytometry, and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, but also for protein purification.

  5. Evidence for the decay Bs0-->Ds(*)Ds(*) and a measurement of DeltaGammasCP/Gammas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-03-06

    We search for the semi-inclusive process Bs0-->Ds(*)Ds(*) using 2.8 fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We observe 26.6+/-8.4 signal events with a significance above background of 3.2 standard deviations yielding a branching ratio of B(Bs0-->Ds(*)Ds(*))=0.035+/-0.010(stat.)+/-0.011(syst.). Under certain theoretical assumptions, these double-charm final states saturate CP-even eigenstates in the Bs0 decays resulting in a width difference of DeltaGammasCP/Gammas=0.072+/-0.021(stat.)+/-0.022(syst.).

  6. A Phase 1 Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Single Oral Doses of DS-3801b, a Motilin Receptor Agonist, in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennie, Justin; Atiee, George; Warren, Vance; Tao, Ben; Morimoto, Kiyoshi; Senaldi, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    DS-3801b is an orally active, nonmacrolide, selective motilin receptor agonist. The aim of this 2-part first-in-human study was to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic effects on proximal and distal gastrointestinal (GI) motility of single oral doses of DS-3801b in healthy subjects. The (13) C-octanoate breath test was used to assess gastric emptying (GE), a measure of proximal GI motility. The time to first bowel movement (TTFBM) and the consistency of the first bowel movement according to the Bristol Stool Scale (BSS) were recorded to assess distal GI motility. In part A, 48 subjects received single oral doses of DS-3801b from 1 to 100 mg or placebo (6 DS-3801b, 2 placebo per cohort). In part B, 12 subjects received 50 mg of DS-3801b or placebo to assess GE. DS-3801b is safe and generally well tolerated after doses up to 50 mg, resulting in mild, predominantly GI adverse events. DS-3801a plasma concentrations increase with increasing doses; however, Cmax increases greater than dose-proportionally, whereas AUC increases less than dose-proportionally. The double peaks observed are consistent with multiple absorption sites. Results of the (13) C-octanoate breath test indicate that DS-3801b accelerates GE. Fifty milligrams of DS-3801b resulted in a 20.8% median reduction in GE T1/2 and a 20.6% median reduction in GE Tlag compared with placebo. However, this increase in proximal GI motility was not accompanied by an effect on distal GI motility, as indicated by no significant differences in TTFBM and BSS values across DS-3801b dose levels or compared with placebo. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. DS-8201a, A Novel HER2-Targeting ADC with a Novel DNA Topoisomerase I Inhibitor, Demonstrates a Promising Antitumor Efficacy with Differentiation from T-DM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogitani, Yusuke; Aida, Tetsuo; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Yamaguchi, Junko; Ishii, Chiaki; Harada, Naoya; Soma, Masako; Okamoto, Hiromi; Oitate, Masataka; Arakawa, Shingo; Hirai, Takehiro; Atsumi, Ryo; Nakada, Takashi; Hayakawa, Ichiro; Abe, Yuki; Agatsuma, Toshinori

    2016-10-15

    An anti-HER2 antibody-drug conjugate with a novel topoisomerase I inhibitor, DS-8201a, was generated as a new antitumor drug candidate, and its preclinical pharmacologic profile was assessed. In vitro and in vivo pharmacologic activities of DS-8201a were evaluated and compared with T-DM1 in several HER2-positive cell lines and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. The mechanism of action for the efficacy was also evaluated. Pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys and the safety profiles in rats and cynomolgus monkeys were assessed. DS-8201a exhibited a HER2 expression-dependent cell growth-inhibitory activity and induced tumor regression with a single dosing at more than 1 mg/kg in a HER2-positive gastric cancer NCI-N87 model. Binding activity to HER2 and ADCC activity of DS-8201a were comparable with unconjugated anti-HER2 antibody. DS-8201a also showed an inhibitory activity to Akt phosphorylation. DS-8201a induced phosphorylation of Chk1 and Histone H2A.X, the markers of DNA damage. Pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of DS-8201a were favorable and the highest non-severely toxic dose was 30 mg/kg in cynomolgus monkeys, supporting DS-8201a as being well tolerated in humans. DS-8201a was effective in a T-DM1-insensitive PDX model with high HER2 expression. DS-8201a, but not T-DM1, demonstrated antitumor efficacy against several breast cancer PDX models with low HER2 expression. DS-8201a exhibited a potent antitumor activity in a broad selection of HER2-positive models and favorable pharmacokinetics and safety profiles. The results demonstrate that DS-8201a will be a valuable therapy with a great potential to respond to T-DM1-insensitive HER2-positive cancers and low HER2-expressing cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 22(20); 5097-108. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Onboard tagging for smart medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kejia; Warren, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Most medical devices are 'dumb:' their role is to acquire, display, and forward data. They make few if any operational decisions based on those data. Onboard tagging is a means whereby a device can embed information about itself, its data, and the sensibility of those data into its data stream. This diagnostic add-on offers a move toward 'smart' devices that will have the ability to affect changes in operational modes based on onboard contextual decision making, such as decisions to avoid needless wireless transmission of corrupt data. This paper presents a description of three types of onboard tags that relate to device hardware (type I tag), signal statistics (type II tag), and signal viability for the intended application (type III tag). A custom wireless pulse oximeter is presented as a use case to show how type II and III tags that convey photoplethysmogram (PPG) statistics and usability specifiers can be calculated and embedded into the data stream without degrading performance.

  9. Hypergraph model of social tagging networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of a new family of paradigms, so-called folksonomy, which allows users to freely associate tags to resources and efficiently manage them. In order to uncover the underlying structures and user behaviors in folksonomy, in this paper, we propose an evolutionary hypergrah model to explain the emerging statistical properties. The present model introduces a novel mechanism that one can not only assign tags to resources, but also retrieve resources via collaborative tags. We then compare the model with a real-world dataset: \\emph{Del.icio.us}. Indeed, the present model shows considerable agreement with the empirical data in following aspects: power-law hyperdegree distributions, negtive correlation between clustering coefficients and hyperdegrees, and small average distances. Furthermore, the model indicates that most tagging behaviors are motivated by labeling tags to resources, and tags play a significant role in effectively retrieving interesting resources and ...

  10. Building Tag Clouds in Perl and PHP

    CERN Document Server

    Bumgardner, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Tag clouds are everywhere on the web these days. First popularized by the web sites Flickr, Technorati, and del.icio.us, these amorphous clumps of words now appear on a slew of web sites as visual evidence of their membership in the elite corps of "Web 2.0." This PDF analyzes what is and isn't a tag cloud, offers design tips for using them effectively, and then goes on to show how to collect tags and display them in the tag cloud format. Scripts are provided in Perl and PHP. Yes, some have said tag clouds are a fad. But as you will see, tag clouds, when used properly, have real merits. More

  11. Some comments on narrow resonances D_{s_1}^* (2.46GeV/c^2) and D_{s0} (2.317GeV/c^2)

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2003-01-01

    The newly observed resonances D_{s_1}^* and D_{s_0} are discussed in a potential model. The relationship between the mass difference between p-states D_{s_1}^*(1^+), D_{s_0}(0^+) and s-states D_s^*(1^-), D_s(0^-) is also examined.

  12. Understanding why users tag: A survey of tagging motivation literature and results from an empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmaier, Markus; Körner, Christian; Kern, Roman

    2012-01-01

    While recent progress has been achieved in understanding the structure and dynamics of social tagging systems, we know little about the underlying user motivations for tagging, and how they influence resulting folksonomies and tags. This paper addresses three issues related to this question. (1) What distinctions of user motivations are identified by previous research, and in what ways are the motivations of users amenable to quantitative analysis? (2) To what extent does tagging motivation vary across different social tagging systems? (3) How does variability in user motivation influence resulting tags and folksonomies? In this paper, we present measures to detect whether a tagger is primarily motivated by categorizing or describing resources, and apply these measures to datasets from seven different tagging systems. Our results show that (a) users’ motivation for tagging varies not only across, but also within tagging systems, and that (b) tag agreement among users who are motivated by categorizing resources is significantly lower than among users who are motivated by describing resources. Our findings are relevant for (1) the development of tag-based user interfaces, (2) the analysis of tag semantics and (3) the design of search algorithms for social tagging systems. PMID:23471473

  13. Oriented and vectorial immobilization of linear M13 dsDNA between interdigitated electrodes--towards single molecule DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Ralph; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Bier, Frank F

    2003-05-01

    The ability to control molecules at a resolution well below that offered by photolithography has gained much interest recently. DNA is a promising candidate for this task since it offers excellent specificity in base-pairing combined with addressability at the nanometer scale. New applications in biosensing, e.g. interaction analysis at the single molecule level, or nanobiotechnology, e.g. ultradense DNA microarrays, have been devised that rely on stretched DNA bridges. The basic technology required is the ability to deposit spatially defined, stretched DNA-bridges between anchoring structures on surfaces. In this paper we present two techniques for spanning 2 microm long dsDNA bridges between neighboring interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). The extended DNA used was linearized M13 dsDNA (M13mp18 7231 bp, ca. 2.5 microm length), either unmodified, or with chemical modifications at both ends. The first approach is based on the dielectrophoretic (DEP) concentration and alignment of linearized wild-type dsDNA. IDEs with 1.7 microm spacing are driven with an AC voltage around 1 MHz leading to field strengths in the order of 1 MV m(-1). The dsDNA is polarized and linearized by the force field and accumulates in the gap between two neighboring electrodes. This process is reversible and was visualized by fluorescence staining of M13 DNA using PicoGreen, as intercalating dye. The resulting dsDNA bridges and their orientation are discernible under the fluorescence microscope using fluorescent particles of different color. The particles are tagged with sequence specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes that bind to the DNA double strand at specific sites. The second approach is based on asymmetric electrochemical modification of a gold IDE with 2.0 microm spacings followed by spontaneous or stimulated deposition of a chemically modified M13-DNA. One side of the IDE was selectively coated with streptavidin by electropolymerization of a novel hydrophilic conductive polymer in

  14. Learner Corpora without Error Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastelli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the possibility of adopting a form-to-function perspective when annotating learner corpora in order to get deeper insights about systematic features of interlanguage. A split between forms and functions (or categories is desirable in order to avoid the "comparative fallacy" and because – especially in basic varieties – forms may precede functions (e.g., what resembles to a "noun" might have a different function or a function may show up in unexpected forms. In the computer-aided error analysis tradition, all items produced by learners are traced to a grid of error tags which is based on the categories of the target language. Differently, we believe it is possible to record and make retrievable both words and sequence of characters independently from their functional-grammatical label in the target language. For this purpose at the University of Pavia we adapted a probabilistic POS tagger designed for L1 on L2 data. Despite the criticism that this operation can raise, we found that it is better to work with "virtual categories" rather than with errors. The article outlines the theoretical background of the project and shows some examples in which some potential of SLA-oriented (non error-based tagging will be possibly made clearer.

  15. Security Tagged Architecture Co-Design (STACD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    software that uses tagged information. We will develop a tag enabled Operating System (OS) that permits the simplification and reduction in size of...The Security Tagged Architecture Co-Design (STACD) initiative focuses on eliminating inherent software vulnerabilities by redesigning the underlying...hardware and the operating system to enforce software security policies and semantics. The new approach will use a metadata processing unit known as

  16. Strong and radiative decays of the $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$

    CERN Document Server

    Cleven, Martin; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery in 2003, the open charm states $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ provide a challenge to the conventional quark model. In recent years, theoretical evidence has been accumulated for both states in favor of a predominantly $DK$ and $D^*K$ molecular nature, respectively. However, a direct experimental proof of this hypothesis still needs to be found. Since radiative decays are generally believed to be sensitive to the inner structure of the decaying particles, we study in this work the radiative and strong decays of both the $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$, as well as of their counterparts in the bottom sector. While the strong decays are indeed strongly enhanced for molecular states, the radiative decays are of similar order of magnitude in different pictures. Thus, the experimental observable that allows one to conclusively quantify the molecular components of the $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ is the hadronic width, and not the radiative one, in contradistinction to common bel...

  17. Discovery of novel dsRNA viral sequences by in silico cloning and implications for viral diversity, host range and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiquan Liu

    Full Text Available Genome sequence of viruses can contribute greatly to the study of viral evolution, diversity and the interaction between viruses and hosts. Traditional molecular cloning methods for obtaining RNA viral genomes are time-consuming and often difficult because many viruses occur in extremely low titers. DsRNA viruses in the families, Partitiviridae, Totiviridae, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, and other related unclassified dsRNA viruses are generally associated with symptomless or persistent infections of their hosts. These characteristics indicate that samples or materials derived from eukaryotic organisms used to construct cDNA libraries and EST sequencing might carry these viruses, which were not easily detected by the researchers. Therefore, the EST databases may include numerous unknown viral sequences. In this study, we performed in silico cloning, a procedure for obtaining full or partial cDNA sequence of a gene by bioinformatics analysis, using known dsRNA viral sequences as queries to search against NCBI Expressed Sequence Tag (EST database. From this analysis, we obtained 119 novel virus-like sequences related to members of the families, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, and Totiviridae. Many of them were identified in cDNA libraries of eukaryotic lineages, which were not known to be hosts for these viruses. Furthermore, comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these newly discovered virus-like sequences with known dsRNA viruses revealed that these dsRNA viruses may have co-evolved with respective host supergroups over a long evolutionary time while potential horizontal transmissions of viruses between different host supergroups also is possible. We also found that some of the plant partitiviruses may have originated from fungal viruses by horizontal transmissions. These findings extend our knowledge of the diversity and possible host range of dsRNA viruses and offer insight into the origin and evolution of relevant viruses with

  18. Effective Personalized Recommendation in Collaborative Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2009-01-01

    Recently, collaborative tagging systems have attracted more and more attention and have been widely applied in web systems. Tags provide highly abstracted information about personal preferences and item content, and are therefore potential to help in improving better personalized recommendations. In this paper, we propose a tag-based recommendation algorithm considering the personal vocabulary and evaluate it in a real-world dataset: Del.icio.us. Experimental results demonstrate that the usage of tag information can significantly improve the accuracy of personalized recommendations.

  19. Using Interference to Block RFID Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Rasmus; Popovski, Petar; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag.......We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag....

  20. Using Interference to Block RFID Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Rasmus; Popovski, Petar; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag.......We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag....

  1. The translation research in a dental setting (TRiaDS programme protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKee Lorna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well documented that the translation of knowledge into clinical practice is a slow and haphazard process. This is no less true for dental healthcare than other types of healthcare. One common policy strategy to help promote knowledge translation is the production of clinical guidance, but it has been demonstrated that the simple publication of guidance is unlikely to optimise practice. Additional knowledge translation interventions have been shown to be effective, but effectiveness varies and much of this variation is unexplained. The need for researchers to move beyond single studies to develop a generalisable, theory based, knowledge translation framework has been identified. For dentistry in Scotland, the production of clinical guidance is the responsibility of the Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme (SDCEP. TRiaDS (Translation Research in a Dental Setting is a multidisciplinary research collaboration, embedded within the SDCEP guidance development process, which aims to establish a practical evaluative framework for the translation of guidance and to conduct and evaluate a programme of integrated, multi-disciplinary research to enhance the science of knowledge translation. Methods Set in General Dental Practice the TRiaDS programmatic evaluation employs a standardised process using optimal methods and theory. For each SDCEP guidance document a diagnostic analysis is undertaken alongside the guidance development process. Information is gathered about current dental care activities. Key recommendations and their required behaviours are identified and prioritised. Stakeholder questionnaires and interviews are used to identify and elicit salient beliefs regarding potential barriers and enablers towards the key recommendations and behaviours. Where possible routinely collected data are used to measure compliance with the guidance and to inform decisions about whether a knowledge translation intervention is

  2. Ac/Ds-induced chromosomal rearrangements in rice genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2012-03-01

    A closely-linked pair of Ac/Ds elements induces chromosomal rearrangements in Arabidopsis and maize. This report summarizes the Ac/Ds systems that generate an exceptionally high frequency of chromosomal rearrangements in rice genomes. From a line containing a single Ds element inserted at the OsRLG5 locus, plants containing a closely-linked pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements were obtained at 1% frequency among the population regenerated from tissue culture. Subsequent regeneration of the lines containing cis-paired Ds elements via tissue culture led to a high frequency (35.6%) of plants containing chromosomal rearrangements at the OsRLG5 locus. Thirty-four rearrangement events were characterized, revealing diverse chromosomal aberrations including deletions, inversions and duplications. Many rearrangements could be explained by sister chromatid transposition (SCT) and homologous recombination (HR), events previously demonstrated in Arabidopsis and maize. In addition, novel events were detected and presumably generated via a new alternative transposition mechanism. This mechanism, termed single chromatid transposition (SLCT), resulted in juxtaposed inversions and deletions on the same chromosome. This study demonstrated that the Ac/Ds system coupled with tissue culture-mediated plant regeneration could induce higher frequencies and a greater diversity of chromosomal rearrangements than previously reported. Understanding transposon-induced chromosomal rearrangements can provide new insights into the relationship between transposable elements and genome evolution, as well as a means to perform chromosomal engineering for crop improvement. Rice is a staple cereal crop worldwide. Complete genome sequencing and rich genetic resources are great advantages for the study of the genomic complexity induced by transposable elements.(1) (-) (2) The combination of tissue culture with genetic lines carrying a pair of closely located Ac/Ds elements greatly increases the

  3. The Human dsRNA binding protein PACT is unable to functionally substitute for the Drosophila dsRNA binding protein R2D2 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K Dickerman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary function of the dsRNA binding protein (dsRBP PACT/RAX is to activate the dsRNA dependent protein kinase PKR in response to stress signals.  Additionally, it has been identified as a component of the small RNA processing pathway.  A role for PACT/RAX in this pathway represents an important interplay between two modes of post-transcriptional gene regulation.  The function of PACT/RAX in this context is poorly understood.  Thus, additional models are required to clarify the mechanism by which PACT/RAX functions.  In this study, Drosophila melanogaster was employed to identify functionally orthologous dsRNA-binding proteins.  Transgenic Drosophila expressing human PACT were generated to determine whether PACT is capable of functionally substituting for the Drosophila dsRBP R2D2, which has a well-defined role in small RNA biogenesis.  Results presented here indicate that PACT is unable to substitute for R2D2 at the whole organism level.

  4. Unique Thermal Stability of Unnatural Hydrophobic Ds Bases in Double-Stranded DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-07-26

    Genetic alphabet expansion technology, the introduction of unnatural bases or base pairs into replicable DNA, has rapidly advanced as a new synthetic biology area. A hydrophobic unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and 2-nitro-4-propynylpyrrole (Px) exhibited high fidelity as a third base pair in PCR. SELEX methods using the Ds-Px pair enabled high-affinity DNA aptamer generation, and introducing a few Ds bases into DNA aptamers extremely augmented their affinities and selectivities to target proteins. Here, to further scrutinize the functions of this highly hydrophobic Ds base, the thermal stabilities of double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) containing a noncognate Ds-Ds or G-Ds pair were examined. The thermal stability of the Ds-Ds self-pair was as high as that of the natural G-C pair, and apart from the generally higher stability of the G-C pair than that of the A-T pair, most of the 5'-pyrimidine-Ds-purine-3' sequences, such as CDsA and TDsA, exhibited higher stability than the 5'-purine-Ds-pyrimidine-3' sequences, such as GDsC and ADsC, in dsDNAs. This trait enabled the GC-content-independent control of the thermal stability of the designed dsDNA fragments. The melting temperatures of dsDNA fragments containing the Ds-Ds pair can be predicted from the nearest-neighbor parameters including the Ds base. In addition, the noncognate G-Ds pair can efficiently distinguish its neighboring cognate natural base pairs from noncognate pairs. We demonstrated that real-time PCR using primers containing Ds accurately detected a single-nucleotide mismatch in target DNAs. These unique properties of the Ds base that affect the stabilities of the neighboring base pairs could impart new functions to DNA molecules and technologies.

  5. Suppressed Decays of D_s^+ Mesons to Two Pseudoscalar Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, G S; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V; López, A; Mehrabyan, S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected near the Ds*+ Ds- peak production energy Ecm = 4170 MeV by the CLEO-c detector, we study the decays of Ds+ mesons to two pseudoscalar mesons. We report on searches for the singly-Cabibbo-suppressed Ds+ decay modes K+ eta, K+ eta', pi+ K0S, K+ pi0, and the isospin-forbidden decay mode Ds+ to pi+ pi0. We normalize with respect to the Cabibbo-favored Ds+ modes pi+ eta, pi+ eta', and K+ K0S, and obtain ratios of branching fractions: Ds+ to K+ eta / Ds+ to pi+ eta = (8.9 +- 1.5 +- 0.4)%, Ds+ to K+ eta' / Ds+ to pi+ eta' = (4.2 +- 1.3 +- 0.3)%, Ds+ to pi+ K0S / Ds+ to K+ K0S = (8.2 +- 0.9 +- 0.2)%, Ds+ to K+ pi0 / Ds+ to K+ K0S = (5.0 +- 1.2 +- 0.6)%, and Ds+ to pi+ pi0 / Ds+ to K+ K0S < 4.1% at 90% CL, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  6. Improving Recommendations in Tag-based Systems with Spectral Clustering of Tag Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Rong; Xu, Guandong; Dolog, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tag as a useful metadata reflects the collaborative and conceptual features of documents in social collaborative annotation systems. In this paper, we propose a collaborative approach for expanding tag neighbors and investigate the spectral clustering algorithm to filter out noisy tag neighbors i...

  7. TagCombine:Recommending Tags to Contents in Software Information Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新宇; 夏鑫; David Lo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, software engineers use a variety of online media to search and become informed of new and interesting technologies, and to learn from and help one another. We refer to these kinds of online media which help software engineers improve their performance in software development, maintenance, and test processes as software information sites. In this paper, we propose TagCombine, an automatic tag recommendation method which analyzes objects in software information sites. TagCombine has three different components: 1) multi-label ranking component which considers tag recommendation as a multi-label learning problem; 2) similarity-based ranking component which recommends tags from similar objects; 3) tag-term based ranking component which considers the relationship between different terms and tags, and recommends tags after analyzing the terms in the objects. We evaluate TagCombine on four software information sites, Ask Different, Ask Ubuntu, Freecode, and Stack Overflow. On averaging across the four projects, TagCombine achieves recall@5 and recall@10 to 0.619 8 and 0.762 5 respectively, which improves TagRec proposed by Al-Kofahi et al. by 14.56% and 10.55% respectively, and the tag recommendation method proposed by Zangerle et al. by 12.08% and 8.16% respectively.

  8. Improving Recommendations in Tag-based Systems with Spectral Clustering of Tag Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Rong; Xu, Guandong; Dolog, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tag as a useful metadata reflects the collaborative and conceptual features of documents in social collaborative annotation systems. In this paper, we propose a collaborative approach for expanding tag neighbors and investigate the spectral clustering algorithm to filter out noisy tag neighbors...

  9. Multilabel Learning for Automatic Web Services Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha AZNAG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some web services portals and search engines as Biocatalogue and Seekda!, have allowed users to manually annotate Web services using tags. User Tags provide meaningful descriptions of services and allow users to index and organize their contents. Tagging technique is widely used to annotate objects in Web 2.0 applications. In this paper we propose a novel probabilistic topic model (which extends the CorrLDA model - Correspondence Latent Dirichlet Allocation- to automatically tag web services according to existing manual tags. Our probabilistic topic model is a latent variable model that exploits local correlation labels. Indeed, exploiting label correlations is a challenging and crucial problem especially in multi-label learning context. Moreover, several existing systems can recommend tags for web services based on existing manual tags. In most cases, the manual tags have better quality. We also develop three strategies to automatically recommend the best tags for web services. We also propose, in this paper, WS-Portal; An Enriched Web Services Search Engine which contains 7063 providers, 115 sub-classes of category and 22236 web services crawled from the Internet. In WS-Portal, severals technologies are employed to improve the effectiveness of web service discovery (i.e. web services clustering, tags recommendation, services rating and monitoring. Our experiments are performed out based on real-world web services. The comparisons of Precision@n, Normalised Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCGn values for our approach indicate that the method presented in this paper outperforms the method based on the CorrLDA in terms of ranking and quality of generated tags.

  10. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  11. Evaluation of KIR3DL1/KIR3DS1 polymorphism in Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, B; Takeuchi, M; Ustek, D; Tugal-Tutkun, I; Seyahi, E; Özyazgan, Y; Duymaz-Tozkir, J; Gül, A; Kastner, D L; Remmers, E F; Ombrello, M J

    2016-12-01

    The Behçet's disease (BD)-associated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele, HLA-B*51 (B*51), encodes a ligand for a pair of allelic killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) present on cytotoxic cells-KIR3DL1, which inhibits their cytotoxicity, and KIR3DS1, which activates their cytotoxic activity. We tested whether KIR-regulated mechanisms contribute to BD by testing for association of KIR3DL1/KIR3DS1 genotypes with disease in 1799 BD patients and 1710 healthy controls from Turkey, as well as in different subsets of individuals with HLA-type-defined ligands for the KIR3D receptors. HLA types were imputed from single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes determined with the Immunochip. The presence of inhibitory KIR3DL1 or activating KIR3DS1 alleles did not differ significantly between cases and controls (KIR3DL1: 92.9% vs 93.4%, Pdominant=0.55; KIR3DS1: 42.7% vs 41.0%, Pdominant=0.29). The KIR3DL1/KIR3DS1 alleles were also present at similar frequencies among cases and controls bearing HLA-B with a Bw4 motif; HLA-B with a Bw4 motif with isoleucine at position 80; and HLA-B*51. Our results suggest that pathogenic mechanisms associated with HLA-B*51 do not primarily involve differential interactions with KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1 receptors. However, due to the complexity of this locus (that is, sequence variation and copy number variation), we cannot exclude a role for other types of KIR variation in the pathogenesis of BD.

  12. KIR genotype distribution among patients with multiple myeloma: Higher prevalence of KIR 2DS4 and KIR 2DS5 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hoteit

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The interesting observation of the significant presence of KIR2DS4 and KIR2DS5 genes more among multiple myeloma patients than controls is worth further clinical, translational as well as survival research studies in these cases.

  13. To tag or not to tag: animal welfare, conservation and stakeholder considerations in fish tracking studies that use electronic tags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Murchie, Karen J.; Thiem, Jason D.; Donaldson, Michael R.; Hinch, Scott G.; Brown, Richard S.; Fisk, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    The advent and widespread adoption of electronic tags (including biotelemetry and biologging devices) for tracking animals has provided unprecedented information on the biology, management, and conservation of fish in the world’s oceans and inland waters. However, use of these tools is not without controversy. Even when scientific and management objectives may best be achieved using electronic tags, it is increasingly important to further consider other factors such as the welfare of tagged animals (i.e., the role of training and science-based surgical guidelines, anesthetic use, inability to maintain sterile conditions in field environments), the ethics of tagging threatened species vs. using surrogates, stakeholder perspectives on tagging (including aboriginals), as well as use of data emanating from such studies (e.g., by fishers to facilitate exploitation). Failure to do so will have the potential to create conflict and undermine scientific, management and public confidence in the use of this powerful tool. Indeed, there are already a number of examples of where tracking studies using electronic tags have been halted based on concerns raised by researchers, authorities, or stakeholders. Here we present a candid evaluation of several factors that should be considered when determining when to tag or not to tag fish with electronic devices. It is not our objective to judge the merit of previous studies. Rather, we hope to stimulate debate and discussion regarding the use of electronic tags to study fish. Relatedly, there is a need for more research to address these questions (e.g., what level of cleanliness is needed when conducting surgeries, what type of training should be required for fish surgery) including human dimensions studies to understand perspectives of different actors including society as a whole with respect to tagging and tracking studies.

  14. The chimeric genes AML1/DS1 and AML1/EAP inhibit AML1B activation at the CSF1R promoter, but only AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoter properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zent, C.S.; Matheiu, C.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-06

    The (3;21)(q26;q22) translocation associated with treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome, treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, and blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia results in the expression of the chimeric genes AML1/EAP, AML1MDS1, and AML1/EVI1. AML1 (CBFA2), which codes for the {alpha} subunit of the heterodimeric transcription factor CBF, is also involved in the t(8;21), and the gene coding for the {beta} subunit (CBFB) is involved in the inv(16). These are two of the most common recurring chromosomal rearrangements in acute myeloid leukemia. CBF corresponds to the murine Pebp2 factor, and CBF binding sites are found in a number of eukaryotic and viral enhancers and promoters. We studied the effects of AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 at the AML1 binding site of the CSF1R (macrophage-colony-stimulating factor receptor gene) promoter by using reporter gene assays, and we analyzed the consequences of the expression of both chimeric proteins in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line (Rat1A) in culture and after injection into athymic nude mice. Unlike AML1, which is an activator of the CSF1R promoter, the chimeric proteins did not transactivate the CSF1R promoter site but acted as inhibitors of AMLI (CBFA2). AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 expressed in adherent Rat1A cells decreased contact inhibition of growth, and expression of AML1/MDS1 was associated with acquisition of the ability to grow in suspension culture. Expression of AML1/MDS1 increased the tumorigenicity of Rat1A cells injected into athymic nude mice, whereas AML1/EAP expression provented tumor growth. These results suggest that expression of AML1/MDS1 can interfere with normal AML1 function, and that AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoting properties in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Harnessing Collective Knowledge Inherent in Tag Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, U.; Held, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tagging systems represent the conceptual knowledge of a community. We experimentally tested whether people harness this collective knowledge when navigating through the Web. As a within-factor we manipulated people's prior knowledge (no knowledge vs. prior knowledge that was congruent/incongruent to the collective knowledge inherent in the tags).…

  16. A Radio Tag for Big Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Radio tags to track wildlife have been used for years. However, such tagging of whales has been more complicated and less successful. This article explores the latest technology that is designed to give information over a long period of time. (MA)

  17. A Radio Tag for Big Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Radio tags to track wildlife have been used for years. However, such tagging of whales has been more complicated and less successful. This article explores the latest technology that is designed to give information over a long period of time. (MA)

  18. Towards EPC-compatible organic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, fully integrated organic RFID tags are demonstrated. These tags are inductively-coupled at a base frequency of 13.56 MHz and can be read out at distances up to 10 cm, which is the expected readout distance for proximity readers. We also demonstrate next generation transponder chips,

  19. Mitochondria-targeted DsRed2 protein expression during the early stage of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Min, Sung-Hun; Choi, Hoonsung; Park, Junghyung; Kim, Sun-Uk; Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kong, Il-Keun; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2016-09-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been widely used as an efficient tool in biomedical research for the generation of transgenic animals from somatic cells with genetic modifications. Although remarkable advances in SCNT techniques have been reported in a variety of mammals, the cloning efficiency in domestic animals is still low due to the developmental defects of SCNT embryos. In particular, recent evidence has revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction is detected during the early development of SCNT embryos. However, there have been relatively few or no studies regarding the development of a system for evaluating mitochondrial behavior or dynamics. For the first time, in mitochondria of bovine SCNT embryos, we developed a method for the visualization of mitochondria and expression of fluorescence proteins. To express red fluorescence in mitochondria of cloned embryos, bovine ear skin fibroblasts, nuclear donor, were stably transfected with a vector carrying mitochondria-targeting DsRed2 gene tagged with V5 epitope (mito-DsRed2-V5 tag) using lentivirus-mediated gene transfer because of its ability to integrate in the cell genome and the potential for long-term transgene expression in the transduced cells and their dividing cells. From western blotting analysis of V5 tag protein using mitochondrial fraction and confocal microscopy of red fluorescence using SCNT embryos, we found that the mitochondrial expression of the mito-DsRed2 protein was detected until the blastocyst stage. In addition, according to image analysis, it may be suggested possible use of the system for visualization of mitochondrial localization and evaluation of mitochondrial behaviors or dynamics in early development of bovine SCNT embryos.

  20. Residual radioactivity measurement in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for the evaluation of DS86 neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, K.; Endo, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima Univ., Kasumi, Hiroshima (JP)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    Residual {sup 152}Eu activity produced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured in seven mineral samples located up to 1142 m from the epicenter. Europium was chemically separated from the sample and gamma-ray measurement was carried out with a well-type Ge detector. Deduced specific activities were compared with previous measurements and with activation calculation based on the DS86 neutron fluence. Present results are slightly higher than the calculation at far distances. However, systematic discrepancy as has been observed in Hiroshima is not clear. Further measurements for samples beyond 1000 m from the hypocenter are necessary to ensure the discrepancy problem. (author)

  1. Intrinsic-surface-tag image authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; DeVolpi, A.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of a unique treaty limited item (TLI) intrinsic surface tag for arms control applications. This tag`s unique feature is the ability to capture the sub-micron scale topography of the TLI surface. The surface topography is captured by plastic castings of the surface as digitally imaged by an electron microscope. Tag authentication is accomplished by comparing digital castings images obtained in two different inspections. Surface replication experiments are described, as these experiments from the basis for the authentication algorithm. Both the experiments and the authentication algorithm are analyzed using the modulation transfer function. Recommendations for future improvements in tag authentication are also suggested by the modulation transfer function analysis. 4 refs.

  2. Smart-tag Based Data Dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe; Beaufour, Allan; Leopold, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring wide, hostile areas requires disseminating data between fixed, disconnected clusters of sensor nodes. It is not always possible to install long-range radios in order to cover the whole area. We propose to leverage the movement of mobile individuals, equipped with smart......-tags, to disseminate data across disconnected static nodes spread across a wide area. Static nodes and mobile smart-tags exchange data when they are in the vicinity of each other; smart-tags disseminate data as they move around. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for update propagation and a model for smart......-tag based data dissemination. We use simulation to study the characteristics of the model we propose. Finally, we present an implementation based on Bluetooth smart-tags....

  3. The Ds1 Transposon Provides Messages That Yield Unique Profiles of Protein Isoforms and Acts Synergistically With Ds to Enrich Proteome Complexity via Exonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charng, Yuh-Chyang; Hsu, Lung-Hsin; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy

    2017-01-01

    In exonization events, Ds1 may provide donor and/or acceptor sites for splicing after inserting into genes and be incorporated into new transcripts with new exon(s). In this study, the protein variants of Ds1 exonization yielding additional functional profile(s) were studied. Unlike Ds exonization, which creates new profiles mostly by incorporating flanking intron sequences with the Ds message, Ds1 exonization additionally creates new profiles through the presence or absence of Ds1 messages. The number of unique functional profiles harboring Ds1 messages is 1.3-fold more than that of functional profiles without Ds1 messages. The highly similar 11 protein isoforms at a single insertion site also contribute to proteome complexity enrichment by exclusively creating new profiles. Particularly, Ds1 exonization produces 459 unique profiles, of which 129 cannot be built by Ds. We thus conclude that Ds and Ds1 are independent but synergistic in their capacity to enrich proteome complexity through exonization.

  4. Measurement of B -> D_s K pi branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the exclusive $B^+$ meson decay to the final state $D_s^- K^+\\pi^+$ using $520 \\times 10^{6} B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance, with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. Using the $D_S^- \\to \\phi \\pi^-$ decay mode to reconstruct $D_s^-$ mesons, we obtain the branching fraction ${\\cal B}(B^+\\to D_s^-K^+\\pi^+)= (1.77^{+0.12}_{-0.12} {\\mathrm (stat)} \\pm 0.16 {\\mathrm (syst)} \\pm 0.23 {\\cal(B)})\\times 10^{-4}$. We also present preliminary results of a study of the two-body $D_sK$, $D_s\\pi$ and $K\\pi$ subsystems observed in this final state.

  5. Evidence for the Rare Decay B+ --> Ds+ pi0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Martin, E C; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Kaiser, S; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F R; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We have searched for the rare decay B+ --> Ds+ pi0. The analysis is based on a sample of 232 million Upsilon(4S) --> B anti-B decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+ e- storage ring. We find 19.6 signal events, corresponding to a significance of 4.7 sigma. The extracted signal yield including statistical and systematic uncertainties is 20.1+6.8+0.4 -6.0-1.5, and we measure B(B+ --> Ds+ pi0) =(1.5 +0.5 -0.4 +- 0.1 +- 0.2) 10^-5, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the last is due to the uncertainty on the Ds+ decay and its daughter decay branching fractions.

  6. Dalitz plot analysis of Ds+→π+π-π+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa,