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Sample records for dryas cold event

  1. PALEOCLIMATE: The Younger Dryas: Cold, Cold Everywhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbell, D T

    2000-10-13

    The transition from the last ice age to the current warm period was interupted by a ~1000-year return to glacial conditions. Most of the evidence for this Younger Dryas (YD) event comes from in and around the North Atlantic, and the geographical extent of the event remains uncertain. In his Perspective, Rodbell reviews the evidence for and against a YD event in the Southern Hemisphere and highlights the study by Bennett et al., who have found no evidence for a YD event in four lake records from southern Chile.

  2. Arctic freshwater forcing of the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Lev; Peltier, W R

    2005-06-02

    The last deglaciation was abruptly interrupted by a millennial-scale reversal to glacial conditions, the Younger Dryas cold event. This cold interval has been connected to a decrease in the rate of North Atlantic Deep Water formation and to a resulting weakening of the meridional overturning circulation owing to surface water freshening. In contrast, an earlier input of fresh water (meltwater pulse 1a), whose origin is disputed, apparently did not lead to a reduction of the meridional overturning circulation. Here we analyse an ensemble of simulations of the drainage chronology of the North American ice sheet in order to identify the geographical release points of freshwater forcing during deglaciation. According to the simulations with our calibrated glacial systems model, the North American ice sheet contributed about half the fresh water of meltwater pulse 1a. During the onset of the Younger Dryas, we find that the largest combined meltwater/iceberg discharge was directed into the Arctic Ocean. Given that the only drainage outlet from the Arctic Ocean was via the Fram Strait into the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian seas, where North Atlantic Deep Water is formed today, we hypothesize that it was this Arctic freshwater flux that triggered the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

  3. Warm summers during Younger Dryas cold reversal over Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Frederik; Muschitiello, Francesco; Heikkilä, Miaja; Väliranta, Minna; Tarasov, Lev; Brandefelt, Jenny; Johansson, Arne; Näslund, Jens-Ove; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas cold reversal (GS-1) sticks out as a major stadial interrupting the mid to late deglaciation with a sharp temperature drop of several degrees around the North Atlantic with global teleconnections. The abrupt return to a very cold glacial-like ocean state introduces a strong temperature anomaly to the climate system contrasting the high solar radiation received by northern summers. Here we show that, in contrast to earlier coarse resolution climate simulations of the Younger Dryas, these competing factors result in rather warm summer conditions over Eurasia comparable to the preceding warm period of the late Allerød (GI-1a). Despite up to 10 K colder sea-surface-temperatures in summer, our high resolution simulation with the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1.0.5) suggests that the presence of large ice sheets over Scandinavia, Spitsbergen and the Kara Sea significantly modifies atmospheric flow in summer preventing cold westerly winds from the Atlantic to impact the continent. Instead, fluid dynamics around ice sheets deflect winds to the north or south along the coasts supported by divergent flow from ice domes, stratification and increased tendency to high pressure and atmospheric blocking. Consistent with our model simulation, we show that temperature reconstructions derived from an extended compilation of multi-proxy lake records (chironomids, aquatic pollen, macrofossils) suggest warm July conditions of 13-17° C for continental Europe with exception of coastal and high elevation sites. The analysis of simulated growing degree days, season length and first results from paleo lake modelling driven by climate model output suggests that severe winter to spring conditions significantly delay and shorten the vegetation season but do not produce cold summers as previously simulated.

  4. Younger Dryas Event and Cold Events in Early-Mid Holocene: Record from the sediment of Erhai Lake%新仙女木事件及全新世早中期降温事件——来自洱海湖泊沉积的记录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周静; 王苏民; 杨桂山

    2007-01-01

    Three cold events (the Younger Dryas, 9.4 ka cal BP, 5.8 ka cal BP) since the 13 ka cal BP in Erhai (EH) Lake catchment, Yunnan Province, were analyzed using the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) series of the EH core. By comparison of the EH core, Qinghai Lake core and Guliya ice core, differences of these cold events were determined. Erhai Lake's responses to the global cold events were lagged in time and weakened in intensity in comparison with Qinghai Lake's. The latitude location of Erhai Lake and the obstruction of Tibetan Plateau may in part explain the differences. However, the remarkable cold event of 8.2 ka cal BP in the Guliya ice core was absent in the records of Erhai Lake and Qinghai Lake. Power spectrum analysis of the TOC proxy series shows that there were three kinds of millennial cycles, i.e. 5 ka, 2.3 ka, and 1.5 ka, in climate changes in Erhai Lake, which reveal the responses of climate to suborbit cycles.

  5. Subtropical freshwater event at the onset of Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinelt, M.; Repschläger, J.; Balmer, S.; Schwab, C.; Andersen, N.; Blanz, T.; Sarnthein, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) (12.79-11.6 ka BP) cold spell during the last deglaciation is associated with a major breakdown of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), the details of which are still controversial. Catastrophic events like a bolide impact or a major outflow of meltwater stored in the proglacial Lake Agassiz, which led to the capping of North Atlantic deep water convection sites, have been suggested to trigger the AMOC shutdown. However the geomorphological evidence for such a meltwater flood is not in agreement with the timing of the YD. Also, the YD was postulated to be part of a deglacial sequence of events generally characteristic of glacial terminations involving the displacement of major climatic zones and oceanographic fronts. We present detailed paleoceanographic records from sediment cores MD08-3180/ GEOFAR KF16 (38°N; 31.13°W, 3050 m w.d.) retrieved immediately east of the Mid Atlantic ridge south of the Azores Islands. At present, this site is located at the northern rim of the Azores Current, which delineates the subtropical gyre, recirculating warm waters of the North Atlantic Current. Due to its position at the boundary between temperate North East Atlantic waters and subtropical gyre waters, the site is ideally suited to trace past changes in the alternating influence of both water masses. Parallel stable-oxygen isotope records of surface water dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber w. (habitat depth 0-25m) and Globigerina bulloides (habitat depth 0-300m) may document the structure of surface waters. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) were derived from the UK'37 index and from planktonic foraminifera (PF) assemblages using transfer functions. d18Ow-ice and Sea Surface Salinities were estimated using the d18O G.ruber w. record corrected for SST and changes in global ice volume. The d18O records of G.ruber w. and G.bulloides diverge between 13.4 ka and 12.95 ka BP. d18Ow data show a gradual increase in the freshening of

  6. Atlantic Warm Pool Trigger for the Younger Dryas Climate Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, N. A.; Mortlock, R. A.; Wright, J. D.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Teneva, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence that variability in the size and heat content of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool impacts circum-North Atlantic climate via the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation mode (Wang et al., 2008). The Atlantic Warm Pool spans the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the western tropical North Atlantic. Barbados is located near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool and coupled ocean models suggest that Barbados remains near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool under varying wind stress simulations. Measurements of the oxygen isotope paleothermometer in Acropora palmata coral species recovered from cores offshore Barbados, show a 3oC monotonic decrease in sea surface temperature from 13106 ± 83 to 12744 ± 61 years before present (errors given as 2 sigma). This interval corresponds to a sea level rise from 71.4 meters to 67.1 meters below present levels at Barbados. The 3oC temperature decrease is captured in eight A. palmata specimens that are in stratigraphic sequence, 230Th/234U dated, and analyzed for oxygen isotopes. All measurements are replicated. We are confident that this is the warm pool equivalent of the Younger Dryas climate event. The initiation of this temperature drop in the Atlantic Warm Pool predates the Younger Dryas start in Greenland ice cores, reported to start at 12896 ± 138 years (relative to AD 2000) (Rasmussen et al., 2006), while few other Younger Dryas climate records are dated with similar accuracy to make the comparison. Rasmussen, S.O., Andersen, K.K., Svensson, A.M., Steffensen, J.P., Vinther, B.M., Clausen, H.B., Siggaard-Andersen, M.L., Johnsen, S.J., Larsen, L.B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Bigler, M., Röthlisberger, R., Fischer, H., Goto-Azuma, K., Hansson, M.E., and Ruth, U., 2006, A new Greenland ice core chronology for the last glacial termination: J. Geophys. Res., v. 111, p. D06102. Wang, C., Lee, S.-K., and Enfield, D.B., 2008, Atlantic Warm Pool acting as a link between Atlantic Multidecadal

  7. The Tintah-Campbell gap and implications for glacial Lake Agassiz drainage during the Younger Dryas cold interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Andy

    2015-06-01

    Reconstructions of glacial Lake Agassiz paleogeography and drainage have been an important contribution to formulating a hypothesis in which glacial Lake Agassiz drainage to the Atlantic Ocean initiated the Younger Dryas cold interval. This study evaluates the lake level and outlet history of Lake Agassiz as recorded by strandlines visible on lidar digital elevation models from North Dakota and Minnesota. The former lake levels are warped due to glacial isostatic adjustment. Older levels have experienced more uplift and therefore have more curvature. The strandline data establish that the Moorhead lowstand of Lake Agassiz was bracketed by the strongly diverging Campbell and Tintah lake levels, which creates a vertical gap between the former lake levels. This gap exists due to a lake level drop of ˜90 m when the Laurentide Ice Sheet retreat opened a lower outlet, which must have been a northwest outlet to the Arctic Ocean. By applying an exponential decay rebound model, this event dates to 12,180 ± 480 cal yr BP, post-dating the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 12,900 cal yr BP. Eastern drainage outlets to the Atlantic Ocean through the Laurentian Great Lakes that were contemporaneous with the onset of the Younger Dryas cannot be ruled out, but if these outlets existed, their duration of occupation was short-lived and not characterized by significant drawdown events within glacial Lake Agassiz.

  8. Late-glacial climatic oscillation in Atlantic Canada equivalent to the Allerod/younger Dryas event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, R.J.; Grant, D.R.; Stea, R.; Occhietti, S.

    1986-09-18

    Attempts to relate late-glacial events in northeastern North America to the well-documented climato- and chrono-stratigraphy of Europe and the British Isles have not been considered convincing because the evidence presented was from isolated sites, and could therefore be interpreted as local fluctuations not related to a general, widespread climatic change. However, recent palynologial studies in northeastern North America postulating a late-glacial climatic oscillation have caused renewed interest in relating such an oscillation to the Allerod/younger Dryas event. The authors have extended their preliminary results from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and here present the evidence for a climatic event in Atlantic Canada. This event involved a warming trend before 11,000 yr BP that was interrupted by a cold period which persisted until the abrupt Holocene warming at approx.10,000 yr BP. They propose a possible mechanism to link this event with that of Europe. 41 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  9. Gradual onset and recovery of the Younger Dryas abrupt climate event in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, J W; Quinn, T M; Shen, C-C; Okumura, Y; Cardenas, M B; Siringan, F P; Banner, J L; Lin, K; Hu, H-M; Taylor, F W

    2015-01-01

    Proxy records of temperature from the Atlantic clearly show that the Younger Dryas was an abrupt climate change event during the last deglaciation, but records of hydroclimate are underutilized in defining the event. Here we combine a new hydroclimate record from Palawan, Philippines, in the tropical Pacific, with previously published records to highlight a difference between hydroclimate and temperature responses to the Younger Dryas. Although the onset and termination are synchronous across the records, tropical hydroclimate changes are more gradual (>100 years) than the abrupt (10-100 years) temperature changes in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The abrupt recovery of Greenland temperatures likely reflects changes in regional sea ice extent. Proxy data and transient climate model simulations support the hypothesis that freshwater forced a reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, thereby causing the Younger Dryas. However, changes in ocean overturning may not produce the same effects globally as in Greenland.

  10. Oxygen Isotopes and Meltwater: Younger Dryas and 8.2 ka Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigwin, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Delta 18-O is one of our most powerful and widely used proxies, with, arguably, the fewest likely unknown unknowns. Here I will consider the d18-O evidence for the two best-known floods of mostly liquid water to the ocean, the Younger Dryas (YD) and the 8.2 ka event. The first d18-O signal of a meltwater flood in the ocean was reported 40 years ago by Kennett and Shackleton (1975) and that paper led directly to the meltwater diversion hypothesis for the origin of the YD cooling. It was later suggested by Rooth (1982) that such a flood could interrupt Nordic seas convection and trigger the YD cold episode. It was reported at this meeting last year that a candidate flood has been found in the Mackenzie River region of the western Arctic based on low d18-O and multiple other lines of evidence. The 8.2 ka event was about one-tenth the duration of the YD but with possibly higher transport, and is more difficult to detect in open marine sediments. As with the YD, it has been modeled by hosing and low salinities have been derived by temperature correcting the d18-O. The resulting low salinity was shown not to follow the prediction of the highest resolution modeling, and theory, that the fresh water would be transported mostly equatorward along the continental shelf. However, I report here that the low d18-O signal of the 8.2 ka flooding is present in new cores from near Logan Canyon on the Scotian shelf break, and in Jordan Basin, Gulf of Maine. These results substantially validate the modeling of Condron and Winsor that fresh water transport must have been along the continental shelf.

  11. Stable isotope record from Seneca Lake, New York: Evidence for a cold paleoclimate following the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William T.; Mullins, Henry T.; Ito, Emi

    1997-02-01

    A radiocarbon controlled stable isotope record from Seneca Lake, New York, has defined a relatively cold paleoclimate (10.1 8.2 ka) that was younger, and regionally of greater magnitude, than the well-known Younger Dryas cold interval. These new isotope results are supported by published pollen records, from throughout the Great Lakes region, that also define a relatively cold paleoclimate at this time. This cold paleoclimate occurred during global meltwater pulse IB when large volumes of cold, isotopically light (low δ18O) meltwater flowed into the Great Lakes from the rapidly retreating Laurentide ice sheet. The discharge of cold glacial meltwaters into the Great Lakes during pulse IB suppressed downwind summer temperatures in the Finger Lakes region and provided a source of isotopically light precipitation. Published proxy data from Greenland, Norway, and Alaska also record relatively cold paleoclimates following the Younger Dryas, suggesting widespread Northern Hemisphere cooling as a direct result of the rapid melting of the Laurentide ice sheet between 10 and 8 ka.

  12. Exploring the Human Ecology of the Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, D. J.; Erlandson, J. M.; Braje, T. J.; Culleton, B. J.

    2007-05-01

    Several lines of evidence now exist for a major extraterrestrial impact event in North America at 12.9 ka (the YDB). This impact partially destabilized the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets, triggered abrupt Younger Dryas cooling and extensive wildfires, and contributed to megafaunal extinction. This event also occurred soon after the well established colonization of the Americas by anatomically modern humans. Confirmation of this event would represent the first near-time extraterrestrial impact with significant effects on human populations. These likely included widespread, abrupt human mortality, population displacement, migration into less effected or newly established habitats, loss of cultural traditions, and resource diversification in the face of the massive megafaunal extinction and population reductions in surviving animal populations. Ultimately, these transformations established the context for the special character of plant and animal domestication and the emergence of agricultural economies in North America. We explore the Late Pleistocene archaeological record in North America within the context of documented major biotic changes associated with the YDB in North America and of the massive ecological affects hypothesized for this event.

  13. Cometary airbursts and atmospheric chemistry: Tunguska and a candidate Younger Dryas event

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Dreschhoff, Gisela; Johnson, Carey K

    2009-01-01

    We estimate atmospheric chemistry changes from ionization at the 1908 Tunguska airburst event, finding agreement with nitrate enhancement in GIS2PH and GISP2 ice cores and noting an unexplained accompanying ammonium spike. We then consider the candidate Younger Dryas comet impact. The estimated NOx production and O3 depletion are large, beyond accurate extrapolation. A modest nitrate deposition signal exists in ice core data. The predicted very large impulsive deposition might be visible in higher resolution data. Ammonium has been attributed to biomass burning, and found coincident with nitrate spikes at YD onset in both the GRIP and GISP2 ice cores. A similar result is well-resolved in Tunguska ice core data, but the Tunguska forest fire was far too small to account for this. Direct input of ammonia from a comet into the atmosphere is consistent with the spike for the candidate YD object, but also inadequate for Tunguska. An analog of the Haber process with hydrogen contributed by the cometary or surface wa...

  14. Youger Dryas and Heinrich events recorded by magnetic susceptibility of sediments from the central temperature area of Western Pacific Warm Pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Three short geomagnetic excursions, the Go thenburg, Mono Lake and Mungo (or Maelifell) in the Brunhes Positive Polarity period, were revealed based on the studies of magnetostratigraphy, susceptibility (x) and δ18O of sediments in core WP 92-5 from the central temperature area of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), and the ages of them are 12.1-11.3 kaBP, 25.0-24.0 kaBP, and 31.0-28.0 kaBP respectively. Furthermore, the Younger Dryas (YD) and Heinrich (H) cold events were also discov-ered in this core by the susceptibility record. The YD cold event occurred at the depth of 30-22 cm with an age of 11.5-10.6 kaBP; H1, H2 and H3 cold events occurred at depths of 51-39 cm, 108-91 cm and 140-126 cm with ages of 15.1-13.0 kaBP, 25.0-22.1 kaBP and 30.6-28.2 kaBP respectively, which well correspond to the H1, H2, H3 events recorded by susceptibility of core SU90-09 from middle At-lantic, indicating that the susceptibility change of marine sediments can be an important sign of climatic frequent fluc- tuations.

  15. Absence of geochemical evidence for an impact event at the Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquay, François S; Goderis, Steven; Ravizza, Greg; Vanhaeck, Frank; Boyd, Matthew; Surovell, Todd A; Holliday, Vance T; Haynes, C Vance; Claeys, Philippe

    2009-12-22

    High concentrations of iridium have been reported in terrestrial sediments dated at 12.9 ka and are interpreted to support an extraterrestrial impact event as the cause of the observed extinction in the Rancholabrean fauna, changes in the Paleoindian cultures, and the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:16016-16021]. Here, we report platinum group element (PGE: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd), gold (Au) concentrations, and (187)Os/(188)Os ratios in time-equivalent terrestrial, lacustrine, and marine sections to seek robust evidence of an extraterrestrial contribution. First, our results do not reproduce the previously reported elevated Ir concentrations. Second, (187)Os/(188)Os isotopic ratios in the sediment layers investigated are similar to average crustal values, indicating the absence of a significant meteoritic Os contribution to these sediments. Third, no PGE anomalies distinct from crustal signatures are present in the marine record in either the Gulf of California (DSDP 480, Guaymas Basin) or the Cariaco Basin (ODP 1002C). Our data show no evidence of an extraterrestrial (ET)-PGE enrichment anomaly in any of the investigated depositional settings investigated across North America and in one section in Belgium. The lack of a clear ET-PGE signature in this sample suite is inconsistent with the impact of a large chondritic projectile at the Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas transition.

  16. Carbon isotopes from fossil packrat pellets and elevational movements of Utah agave plants reveal the Younger Dryas cold period in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth L.; Arundel, Samantha T.

    2005-09-01

    Carbon isotopes in rodent fecal pellets were measured on packrat (Neotoma spp.) middens from the Grand Canyon, Arizona. The pellet samples reflect the abundance of cold-intolerant C4 and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant species relative to the predominant C3 vegetation in the packrat diet. The temporal sequence of isotopic results suggests a temperature decline followed by a sharp increase corresponding to the Bølling/ Allerød Younger Dryas early Holocene sequence. This pattern was then tested using the past distribution of Utah agave (Agave utahensis). Spatial analyses of the range of this temperature-sensitive CAM species demonstrate that its upper elevational limit is controlled by winter minimum temperature. Applying this paleotemperature proxy to the past elevational limits of Utah agave suggests that minimum winter temperatures were ˜8 °C below modern values during the Last Glacial Maximum, 4.5 6.5 °C below modern during the Bølling/Allerød, and 7.5 8.7 °C below modern during the early Younger Dryas. As the Younger Dryas terminated, temperatures warmed ˜4 °C between ca. 11.8 ka and 11.5 ka. These extreme fluctuations in winter minimum temperature have not been generally accepted for terrestrial paleoecological records from the arid southwestern United States, likely because of large statistical uncertainties of older radiocarbon results and reliance on proxies for summer temperatures, which were less affected.

  17. No support from osmium isotopes for an impact event at the Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquay, F.; Ravizza, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    The hypothesis that an extraterrestrial (ET) impact as a triggering mechanism for the abrupt Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas climatic transition, the North American megafaunal extinction and the demise of the Clovis culture still remains controversial. Reports of elevated iridium concentrations (> several ng/g) measured in magnetic grains and bulk sediments are used in previous work to argue that a chondritic bolide vaporized upon impact, or fully exploded into the atmosphere. If such a scenario is correct, high Ir concentrations are expected to be accompanied by a systematic decrease in the 187Os/188Os ratios toward unradiogenic, chondrite-like values, reflecting an ET platinum group element (PGE) component. In our study, Os, Ir and Pt were pre-concentrated from 5-20g of powdered samples by NiS fire assay after spiking the samples with a tracer solution enriched in 190Os, 191Ir and 198Pt. Large sample weights were used in order to minimize the nugget effect. Analyses of seven of the same black mat layers investigated in the original reports (Firestone et al. 2007), failed to reproduce previously reported high Ir concentrations, and yielded high 187Os/188Os ratios (1.00-1.90) that are typical of a crustal signature rather than an extraterrestrial one. In addition, a high-resolution study of 187Os/188Os ratios and Os and Ir concentrations in bulk sediments from two ocean margin sites where the Younger Dryas (YD) onset is clearly established by multiple proxies (DSDP 480, Guaymas Basin; ODP 1002C, Cariaco Basin) failed to detect any ET-PGE enrichment anomaly or systematic 187Os/188Os excursion to low ratios at the onset of the YD. Rather measured 187Os/188Os ratios remained within a few percent of present-day seawater 187Os/188Os across the BA/YD transition at both of the marine sites. These results undermine previous claims of a chondritic projectile. Moreover they are difficult to reconcile with the impact of a body from any known meteorite class because

  18. A detailed comparison of Asian Monsoon intensity and Greenland temperature during the Allerød and Younger Dryas events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dianbing; Wang, Yongjin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Xianfeng; Wu, Jiangying; Chen, Shitao

    2008-08-01

    An annual layer-counted and 230Th-dated stalagmite oxygen isotope record from Qingtian Cave in Hubei province, central China, provides an Asian Monsoon (AM) history across the Allerød to Younger Dryas (YD) transition, with an average 2.5-year resolution. Seasonal δ18O profiles indicate that the calcite δ18O is a sensitive proxy for AM changes, and the close similarity between the Qingtian and other cave records from eastern China suggests a large-scale regional coherence of monsoonal precipitation δ18O variations associated with the temperature changes in high-northern latitudes. The annually-resolved chronology with a U-Th age uncertainty of less than 100 yr defines the timing, duration and transition of the early Allerød, the intra-Allerød cold period (IACP), the late Allerød, and the start of the YD. The 160-yr-long IACP, with two brief reversals, is clearly shown in both δ18O and lamina thickness records. The early and late Allerød, separated by the IACP, are characterized by several decadal to centennial cycles of δ18O variations, each punctuated by sub-cycles. These decadal to centennial monsoon variations correlate with the Greenland temperature changes, supporting a model simulation that the decadal North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) are coupled via atmospheric circulation under glacial boundary conditions, perhaps affecting tropical/subtropical monsoon changes. However, the monsoon transition between the late Allerød and YD lasted 380 yr, longer than the analogous Greenland temperature shift by at least 130 yr [Stuiver, M., Grootes, P.M., GISP2 oxygen isotope ratios. Quat. Res. 53 (2000) 277-284]. This implicates other links besides the direct link between Greenland and the AM, which is now well documented. One possibility is the influence by Southern Hemisphere climate via cross-equatorial air flow [An, Z.S., The history and variability of the East Asian paleomonsoon climate. Quat. Sci. Rev. 19 (2000) 171-187].

  19. Paleoclimate and paleoceanographic reconstruction in the southern Iberian Mediterranean and Atlantic margins across the Younger Dryas event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Gámiz, Marta; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca

    2017-04-01

    The Alboran Sea basin in the Mediterranean and the Gulf of Cadiz in the Atlantic have provided excellent paleoarchives for reconstructing past climate variability in southern Iberian regions. Particularly interesting has been the study of the paleoclimate evolution of abrupt climate events from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the onset of the Holocene such as the Younger Dryas (YD). A diverse range of geochemical proxies, integrating inorganic and organic, has been used for paleoclimate reconstructions in these regions. Elemental concentrations and elemental ratios have been used for determining detrital inputs and bottom water oxygen conditions while organic molecular biomarkers as algal and archaea derived lipids have been used for estimating sea surface temperature (SST). Al-ratios mirroring eolian input, such as Zr/Al and Si/Al ratios, record enhanced dust input at the end of the LGM, during the last Heinrich event (H1) and at the onset of the YD in the Alboran Sea. For this latest interval, these ratios suggest an initial dry phase followed by a progressive aridity decrease throughout the YD. In the Gulf of Cadiz, these variations are not similarly recorded, probably due to less sensitive open ocean records in comparison to the restricted nature of the Alboran Sea basin. Selected redox proxies, Fe/Al and Mn/Al ratios, show peaks of oxidation fronts during the LGM and the H1 in the Alboran Sea and during the Bölling-Alleröd and the onset of the Holocene in the Gulf of Cadiz, derived from variations in ventilation and oxygen conditions that differ in the Mediterranean and Atlantic regions. SST records have also showed remarkable differences between both basins with minima temperature estimated values during the YD of ca. 12°C in the Alboran Sea and ca. 18°C in the Gulf of Cadiz, according to the freshening of the Atlantic jet along the Alboran basin. In general, a different paleoclimate and oceanographic evolution with a different YD response is recorded

  20. Enhanced sea-ice export from the Arctic during the Younger Dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not, Christelle; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2012-01-31

    The Younger Dryas cold spell of the last deglaciation and related slowing of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation have been linked to a large array of processes, notably an influx of fresh water into the North Atlantic related to partial drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz. Here we observe a major drainage event, in marine sediment cores raised from the Lomonosov Ridge, in the central Arctic Ocean marked by a pulse in detrital dolomitic-limestones. This points to an Arctic-Canadian sediment source area with about fivefold higher Younger Dryas ice-rafting deposition rate, in comparison with the Holocene. Our findings thus support the hypothesis of a glacial drainage event in the Canadian Arctic area, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, enhancing sea-ice production and drifting through the Arctic, then export through Fram Strait, towards Atlantic meridional overturning circulation sites of the northern North Atlantic.

  1. Glacier retreat in New Zealand during the Younger Dryas stadial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Michael R; Schaefer, Joerg M; Denton, George H; Barrell, David J A; Chinn, Trevor J H; Putnam, Aaron E; Andersen, Bjørn G; Finkel, Robert C; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M

    2010-09-09

    Millennial-scale cold reversals in the high latitudes of both hemispheres interrupted the last transition from full glacial to interglacial climate conditions. The presence of the Younger Dryas stadial (approximately 12.9 to approximately 11.7 kyr ago) is established throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, but the global timing, nature and extent of the event are not well established. Evidence in mid to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, in particular, has remained perplexing. The debate has in part focused on the behaviour of mountain glaciers in New Zealand, where previous research has found equivocal evidence for the precise timing of increased or reduced ice extent. The interhemispheric behaviour of the climate system during the Younger Dryas thus remains an open question, fundamentally limiting our ability to formulate realistic models of global climate dynamics for this time period. Here we show that New Zealand's glaciers retreated after approximately 13 kyr bp, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, and in general over the subsequent approximately 1.5-kyr period. Our evidence is based on detailed landform mapping, a high-precision (10)Be chronology and reconstruction of former ice extents and snow lines from well-preserved cirque moraines. Our late-glacial glacier chronology matches climatic trends in Antarctica, Southern Ocean behaviour and variations in atmospheric CO(2). The evidence points to a distinct warming of the southern mid-latitude atmosphere during the Younger Dryas and a close coupling between New Zealand's cryosphere and southern high-latitude climate. These findings support the hypothesis that extensive winter sea ice and curtailed meridional ocean overturning in the North Atlantic led to a strong interhemispheric thermal gradient during late-glacial times, in turn leading to increased upwelling and CO(2) release from the Southern Ocean, thereby triggering Southern Hemisphere warming during the northern Younger Dryas.

  2. Beringian Megafaunal Extinctions at ~37 ka B.P.: Do Micrometeorites Embedded in Fossil Tusks and Skulls Indicate an Extraterrestial Precursor to the Younger Dryas Event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Firestone, R. B.; West, A.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of Late Pleistocene megafaunal fossils and their ancient DNA from Beringia (eastern Siberia, Alaska, and the emerged Bering Strait) indicate sharp declines in steppe bison population diversity and horse body size, extinction of the Alaskan wild ass, and local extinctions of brown bear and woolly mammoth genetic lines beginning at about 37 ka B.P. Beringia is also well known for its remarkably preserved Late Pleistocene frozen animal mummies. 14C ages of these mummies are bimodally distributed, having peaks coincident with the earlier ~37 ka B.P., and ~13 ka B.P. Younger Dryas, onset extinction events. Associated with the ~37 ka B.P. event are, for example, the Berezovka mammoth, headless Selerikan horse, steppe bison “Blue Babe”, and baby mammoths “Dima” and “Lyuba”. Analyses of these and other mummies indicate that they died instantly, in mostly healthy condition, with gut contents and high fat reserves indicative of a late summer to autumn season. An assortment of uneaten limbs and other body parts from a variety of species have also been found. Uniformitarian death scenarios inadequately account for the lack of evidence of normal predation and scavenging. Extensive internal injuries (e.g. large bone fractures, hemorrhaging) and apparent rapid burial of the mummies also indicate that something truly unusual happened at the time of these extinction events. We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites embedded in seven Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull acquired from commercial sources. 14C ages for five of these fossils have a weighted mean age of 33 ± 2 ka B.P. Laser ablation ICP-MS and XRF analyses of the particles indicate high Fe contents with compositions enriched in Ni and depleted in Ti, similar to Fe meteorites and unlike any natural terrestrial sources. Microprobe analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain from tusk 2 also show that it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. SEM images and XRF analyses of a bison

  3. The atmosphere during the younger dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayewski, P A; Meeker, L D; Whitlow, S; Twickler, M S; Morrison, M C; Alley, R B; Bloomfield, P; Taylor, K

    1993-07-09

    One of the most dramatic climate change events observed in marine and ice core records is the Younger Dryas, a return to near-glacial conditions that punctuated the last deglaciation. High-resolution, continuous glaciochemical records, newly retrieved from central Greenland, record the chemical composition of the arctic atmosphere at this time. This record shows that both the onset and the termination of the Younger Dryas occurred within 10 to 20 years and that massive, frequent, and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event. Changes in atmospheric composition are attributable to changes in the size of the polar atmospheric cell and resultant changes in source regions and to the growth and decay of continental biogenic source regions.

  4. What caused the 2009 cold event in the Atlantic cold tongue region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Kristin; Brandt, Peter; Lübbecke, Joke F.

    2016-04-01

    The tropical Atlantic (TA) exhibits sea surface temperature (SST) variability on seasonal to inter-annual time scales. This variability is associated with changes of atmospheric dynamics, linking it to severe flooding or droughts in South America and West Africa. This study investigates processes in the TA that might have caused the extreme cold event in the Atlantic cold tongue (ACT) region in 2009. During boreal spring, a strong negative Atlantic meridional mode event developed in the TA associated with northwesterly wind anomalies along the equator. Contrary to what would be expected from ENSO-like dynamics, these wind anomalies did not lead to a warming in the eastern equatorial Atlantic in boreal summer. Instead, from May to August 2009, an abrupt cooling took place in the ACT region resulting in the coldest August ACT SST on record. In the literature, two processes - equatorial wave reflection and meridional advection of subsurface temperatures - are discussed as potential causes of such an event. Whereas previous studies are mainly based on satellite data, reanalysis products and model output, we here use in situ measurements (data from Argo floats, PIRATA buoys, and TACE moorings, as well as CTD data of various ship cruises) in addition to satellite and reanalysis products to investigate the contribution of both processes to the strong surface cooling in the ACT region in 2009. Results based on the Argo float data confirm previous findings that equatorial wave reflection contributed to the cold event in the ACT region in 2009. They further indicate that higher baroclinic mode waves played an important role. The analysis of in situ and reanalysis temperature and velocity data does not suggest a significant contribution of meridional advection of subsurface temperatures for the onset of the 2009 cold event. The results indicate an asymmetry in the importance of meridional advection for non-ENSO-like cold and warm events with warm events more strongly affected

  5. Identification of Younger Dryas outburst flood path from Lake Agassiz to the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Julian B; Bateman, Mark D; Dallimore, Scott R; Teller, James T; Yang, Zhirong

    2010-04-01

    The melting Laurentide Ice Sheet discharged thousands of cubic kilometres of fresh water each year into surrounding oceans, at times suppressing the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and triggering abrupt climate change. Understanding the physical mechanisms leading to events such as the Younger Dryas cold interval requires identification of the paths and timing of the freshwater discharges. Although Broecker et al. hypothesized in 1989 that an outburst from glacial Lake Agassiz triggered the Younger Dryas, specific evidence has so far proved elusive, leading Broecker to conclude in 2006 that "our inability to identify the path taken by the flood is disconcerting". Here we identify the missing flood path-evident from gravels and a regional erosion surface-running through the Mackenzie River system in the Canadian Arctic Coastal Plain. Our modelling of the isostatically adjusted surface in the upstream Fort McMurray region, and a slight revision of the ice margin at this time, allows Lake Agassiz to spill into the Mackenzie drainage basin. From optically stimulated luminescence dating we have determined the approximate age of this Mackenzie River flood into the Arctic Ocean to be shortly after 13,000 years ago, near the start of the Younger Dryas. We attribute to this flood a boulder terrace near Fort McMurray with calibrated radiocarbon dates of over 11,500 years ago. A large flood into the Arctic Ocean at the start of the Younger Dryas leads us to reject the widespread view that Agassiz overflow at this time was solely eastward into the North Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Heinrich 0 at the Younger Dryas Termination Offshore Newfoundland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.; Andrews, J. T.; Jennings, A. E.; Bouloubassi, I.; Seidenkrantz, M. S.; Kuijpers, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2014-12-01

    The last deglaciation was marked by intervals of rapid climatic fluctuations accompanied by glacial advances and retreats along the eastern edge of the Laurentide ice sheet. The most severe of these events, the Younger Dryas cold reversal, was accompanied by the major detrital carbonate (DC) event generally referred to as "Heinrich event 0" (H0) in the westernmost and southern Labrador Sea. A detrital carbonate layer was observed in a high resolution marine sediment record from southern Newfoundland and the onset of the event was dated to 11,600 ± 70 cal. yrs. BP (local ΔR = 140 yrs.). A variety of different proxies was applied to investigate the transport mechanisms for deposition of the layer and provenance of the carbonates. Elevated concentrations of dolomite and calcite based on quantitative X-ray diffraction measurements, combined with the presence of several mature petrogenic biomarkers limit the source of the H0 detrital input to Palaeozoic carbonate outcrops in north-eastern Canada. The event is attributed to the rapid ice retreat from the Hudson Strait directly following the warming at the onset of the Holocene. Based on additional proxy data published earlier from the same record, the event succeeded the early Holocene resumption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), indicating that the Hudson Strait meltwater event had probably no significant impact on the AMOC. The detrital carbonate layer can be found in other marine sediment records along the Labrador Current pathway, from Hudson Strait to the Grand Banks and the southern Newfoundland slope. By using the onset of deposition of the carbonates as a time-synchronous marker, the DC layer has great potential for improving marine chronologies of late glacial age in the region and evaluating spatial variations in ΔR values.

  7. Meltwater routing and the Younger Dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The Younger Dryas--the last major cold episode on Earth--is generally considered to have been triggered by a meltwater flood into the North Atlantic. The prevailing hypothesis, proposed by Broecker et al. [1989 Nature 341:318-321] more than two decades ago, suggests that an abrupt rerouting of Lake Agassiz overflow through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Valley inhibited deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic and weakened the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). More recently, Tarasov and Peltier [2005 Nature 435:662-665] showed that meltwater could have discharged into the Arctic Ocean via the Mackenzie Valley ~4,000 km northwest of the St. Lawrence outlet. Here we use a sophisticated, high-resolution, ocean sea-ice model to study the delivery of meltwater from the two drainage outlets to the deep water formation regions in the North Atlantic. Unlike the hypothesis of Broecker et al., freshwater from the St. Lawrence Valley advects into the subtropical gyre ~3,000 km south of the North Atlantic deep water formation regions and weakens the AMOC by 30%. We conclude that meltwater discharge from the Arctic, rather than the St. Lawrence Valley, was more likely to have triggered the Younger Dryas cooling.

  8. Planetary Hypothesis, sub-Milankovitch frequencies and Holocene cold events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnucci, R. H.; Cionco, R. G.; Agosta, E.; Wanner, H.

    2013-05-01

    The Planetary Hypothesis of solar cycles proposes that the movement of the Sun around the solar system barycenter modulates the solar cycles at several times scales. Using a 3-D model of the solar system (Cionco and Compagnucci, 2012) we derived the solar barycentric motion and various dynamic parameters such as the angular momentum (L= Lx, Ly, Lz) for the Holocene. Angular momentum inversions are sporadic and important events in the dynamics of the MSB: Lz becomes negative and giant planets are nearly aligned. These episodes are related to some grand solar grand minima such as Maunder and Dalton, and also to the recent deep minimum 2007-2010 which was preceded by a Lz inversion in 1990. During the Holocene several negative Lz episodes occur that are grouped in approximately millennia to centuries long periods. Each group is separated by ~2000 years where the Lz values remain positive, both generating a cycle between 1500 and 2500 years. The spectral analysis shows significant peaks at sub-Milankovitch frequencies. Furthermore, the analysis of the spatiotemporal variability of temperature defined six specific cold events (8200, 6300, 4700, 2700, 1550 and 550 years BP) during the Holocene (Wanner et al, 2011). During, and /or before, of these major climates cooling, a group of negative Lz episodes were presented. Oppositely the resulted during the warms periods were the lack of the angular movement inversion together with the extremes of positive Lz . Therefore, the origin of Holocene cold events seems to be linked to the gravitational influence of the planets, that is to say the planetary torque that has a non-negligible effect on the causes of the solar magnetic cycle. Acknowledgements:The support of the Grants PID-UTN1351, UBACYT N_:20020100101049, CONICET PIP PIP 114-201001-00250 and MINCYT-MEYS ARC/11/09. References Cionco, R.G.; Compagnucci,R.H. (2012) Dynamical characterization of the last prolonged solar minima , Advances in Space Research 50(10), 1434

  9. Abrupt release of terrigenous organic carbon to the Laptev Sea at termination of the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Muschitiello, F.; Smittenberg, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Vonk, J.; Hill, P.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I. P.; Kirchner, N.; Noormets, R.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, O.

    2015-12-01

    Based on analysis of a piston core collected in 2014 from the Lena River paleo delta, now Laptev Sea, we show that rapid and massive organic carbon (OC) deposition took place into the marine system at the termination of the Younger Dryas when the Arctic region experienced a large and extremely fast climate change. The highly laminated strata with absence of bioturbation further confirm the rapid event-driven emplacement of this deposit which was largely dominated by terrigenous OC as indicated by depleted δ13C values and high concentrations of terrestrial fossil biomarkers (lignin phenols and cutin-derived products). Moreover, the hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of HMW n-alkanes indicates that this terrestrially-derived translocated OC was produced in the watershed during a relatively cold period. The OC appears to be a few thousand years old at time of deposition (ca. 4-5000 radiocarbon years; reservoir age corrected), consistent with the radiocarbon age of pre-aged OC currently supplied by the Lena river. Altogether our results indicate that fast climate warming exerts first-order control on large-scale carbon redistribution. Because the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition occurred within a few decades, we infer that the abrupt and large release of terrigenous OC was essentially driven by rapid changes in the permafrost stability (i.e., thermal collapse/thawing) and increase in precipitation over the Siberian watershed. Interestingly, only surface and sub-surface carbon pools (i.e., active layer) were remobilized while deep and old sources (radiocarbon dead) did not seem to have substantially contributed to the total land-to-ocean flux during the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition.

  10. Connections Between Cold Air Pools and Mountain Valley Fog Events in Salt Lake City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the connection between cold air pools and fog events in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. Statistical analyses are conducted using soundings and reported automated surface observing system data from Salt Lake International Airport for the last eighteen cold seasons (October to March, during 1997-2015). A Chi-square test of independence is performed on identified cold air pool, and fog events to determine whether the two events are correlated. Conditional probabilities are then computed to investigate the occurrence of fog, given the presence of a cold pool. These probabilities are compared against that of random fog generation in the mid-winter. It is concluded that the dependence between cold air pools and fog events is statistically significant. The presence of a cold pool makes the formation of fog more likely than random generation.

  11. Efficacy and adverse events of cold vs hot polypectomy: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sato, Hiroki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Sakatani, Aki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Fujibayashi, Shugo; Nomura, Yoshiki; Kashima, Shin; Gotoh, Takuma; Sasajima, Junpei; Moriichi, Kentaro; Watari, Jiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare previously reported randomized controlled studies (RCTs) of cold and hot polypectomy, we systematically reviewed and clarify the utility of cold polypectomy over hot with respect to efficacy and adverse events. METHODS: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the predominance of cold and hot polypectomy for removing colon polyps. Published articles and abstracts from worldwide conferences were searched using the keywords “cold polypectomy”. RCTs that compared either or both the effects or adverse events of cold polypectomy with those of hot polypectomy were collected. The patients’ demographics, endoscopic procedures, No. of examined lesions, lesion size, macroscopic and histologic findings, rates of incomplete resection, bleeding amount, perforation, and length of procedure were extracted from each study. A forest plot analysis was used to verify the relative strength of the effects and adverse events of each procedure. A funnel plot was generated to assess the possibility of publication bias. RESULTS: Ultimately, six RCTs were selected. No significant differences were noted in the average lesion size (less than 10 mm) between the cold and hot polypectomy groups in each study. Further, the rates of complete resection and adverse events, including delayed bleeding, did not differ markedly between cold and hot polypectomy. The average procedural time in the cold polypectomy group was significantly shorter than in the hot polypectomy group. CONCLUSION: Cold polypectomy is a time-saving procedure for removing small polyps with markedly similar curability and safety to hot polypectomy. PMID:27340361

  12. The deglaciaton of the Pyreenes: from the Oldest Dryas to the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; de Andrés, Nuria; López-Moreno, Juan I.; García-Ruiz, José M.

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the paper is to study the deglaciation process, including the retreat of the glaciers and the occurrence of short advances with the deposition of new, relatively recent tills in two head valleys of the central-southern Pyrenees: The Upper Gállego Valley, with the main peak Balaitus (42°46'0' N, 0° 15'0'W, 3151 m), and the Marbore Cirque, at the head of the Cinca Valley, on the north face of the Monte Perdido Peak (42º400' N; 0.5º0'W; 3355 m). The deglaciation process was studied through geomorphological mapping and 36Cl cosmogenic exposure ages obtained from morainic and rock glacier boulders and polished bedrocks. Even though the exact position of the front glacier during the global Last Glacial Maximum is not known, there is evidence that the different ice tongues retreated until headwater positions, causing the subdivision of the main glaciers into various individual glaciers. Two clear climate reversals within the general trend to deglaciation have been detected: First of all, the Oldest Dryas, coinciding with the Heinrich Event 1 (ca 17-15 ka) and, secondly, the Younger Dryas (ca 13-11.7 ka). Between both stadials, the Bølling/Allerød Interstadial (ca 15-13 ka) represented an intense glacial retreat up to the cirque headwalls. During the Bølling/Allerød Interstadial the retreat was very rapid, although the occurrence of a short readvance of small glaciers during the Older Dryas must not be ruled out. The Younger Dryas is represented by a new glacial push with the deposition of distinct types of tills. During these late glacier advances, small glaciers and rock glaciers developed close to the cirque headwalls, and coexisted under the same climatic conditions. After the Younger Dryas, new glacial advances has not been detected until the Little Ice Age, except in the Marbore Cirque, where glacial expansion occurred during the Mid and Late Holocene (5.1 ± 0.1 ka), represented by a large push moraine. A melting phase occurred at

  13. Numerical Modeling of the Severe Cold Weather Event over Central Europe (January 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hari Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold waves commonly occur in higher latitudes under prevailing high pressure systems especially during winter season which cause serious economical loss and cold related death. Accurate prediction of such severe weather events is important for decision making by administrators and for mitigation planning. An Advanced high resolution Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale model is used to simulate a severe cold wave event occurred during January 2006 over Europe. The model is integrated for 31 days starting from 00UTC of 1 January 2006 with 30 km horizontal resolution. Comparison of the model derived area averaged daily mean temperatures at 2m height from different zones over the central Europe with observations indicates that the model is able to simulate the occurrence of the cold wave with the observed time lag of 1 to 3days but with lesser intensity. The temperature, winds, surface pressure and the geopential heights at 500 hPa reveal that the cold wave development associates with the southward progression of a high pressure system and cold air advection. The results have good agreement with the analysis fields indicates that the model has the ability to reproduce the time evolution of the cold wave event.

  14. Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

    2010-02-27

    We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are

  15. Evidence for cold events in the early Holocene from the Guliya ice core, Tibetan Plateau, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Evidence for the "8.2 ka cold event" has been provided mostly from the circum-North Atlantic area. However, whether this cold event occurred in other places is a key to understanding its cause. Here, we provide the evidence for the "8.2 ka cold event" from the Guliya ice core in the northwest Tibetan Plateau, and it was found that the peak cooling (~8.3-8.2 ka) in this ice core was about 7.8-10℃, which was larger than the cooling in the North Atlantic region. The primary causes for this episode were diminished solar activity and weakened thermohaline circulation. Moreover, another weak cold event, centered about 9.4 ka, was also recorded in the Guliya ice core record. These two cold events were concurrent with the ice-rafting episodes in the North Atlantic during the early Holocene, which implies that the millennial-scale climatic cyclicity might exist in the Tibetan Plateau as well as in the North Atlantic.

  16. Reduced solar activity as a trigger for the start of the Younger Dryas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, H; van Geel, B; van der Plicht, J; Magny, M

    2000-01-01

    It is generally assumed that changes in ocean circulation forced the abrupt climate changes during the Late Pleistocene, including the Younger Dryas event. Recently, however, it was proposed that variations in solar irradiance could have played a much more prominent role in forcing Pleistocene clima

  17. Pre and post 1997/1998 Westerly Wind Events and equatorial Pacific cold tongue warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Chiodi, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    Westerly Wind Events (WWEs) in the western equatorial Pacific have previously been shown to cause significant warming of sea surface temperature (SST) in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Observational statistics compiled during and prior to the large El Nino event of 1997/1998 link WWEs to substantial (up to 3C) warming in the eastern Pacific cold-tongue region. Since 1998, however, relatively little WWE-related cold tongue warming has been observed and warm equatorial Pacific SST anomalies (SSTAs) have tended to be trapped near the dateline rather than extending to the American coast as in a classical El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) composite. Here, we revisit the relationship between WWEs and cold-tongue warming using in situ and operational forecast winds and in situ and satellite-based SST. We find significant differences in the basin scale zonal wind anomalies associated with WWEs that occurred before and after 1997/1998. Although the post 1997/1998 composite WWE westerly anomalies are very similar to their predecessors within the WWE regions, conditions east of the WWE regions are different; there are enhanced equatorial easterlies in the post 1997/1998 cases. General ocean circulation model experiments are conducted to explore the extent to which the observed changes in the character of post 1997/1998 WWEs can explain the recent behavior of cold tongue SSTAs. We find that the wind differences can account for the changes in the average cold tongue warming associated with pre and post 1997/1998 WWEs.

  18. The Definition and Classification of Extensive and Persistent Extreme Cold Events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jing-Bei; BUEH Cholaw

    2011-01-01

    Using the observed daily temperatures from 756 stations in China during the period from 1951 to 2009, extensive and persistent extreme cold events (EPECEs) were defined according to the following three steps: 1) a station was defined as an extreme cold station (ECS) if the observed temperature was lower than its 10th percentile threshold; 2) an extensive extreme cold event was determined to be present if the approximated area occupied by the ECSs was more than 10% of the total area of China (83rd percentile) on its starting day and the maximum area occupied by the ECSs was at least 20% of the total area of China (96th percentile); and 3) an EPECE was determined to be present if the extensive extreme cold event lasted for at least for eight days. 52 EPECEs were identified in this manner, and these identification results were also verified using other reliable data. On the basis of cluster analysis, five types of EPECEs were classified according to the spatial distribution of ECSs at their most extensive time over the course of the EPECE.

  19. First Younger Dryas moraines in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Linge, Henriette; Möller, Per; Schomacker, Anders; Fabel, Derek; Kjær, Kurt H.; Xu, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Over the Greenland ice sheet the Younger Dryas (YD) cold climate oscillation (12.9-11.7 kaBP) began with up to 10°C drop in temperatures and ended with up to 12°C abrupt warming. In the light of the present warming and melting of the ice sheet, and its importance for future climate change, the ice sheet's response to these dramatic changes in the past is of great interest. However, even though much effort has gone into charting YD ice margin behaviour around Greenland in recent years, no clear-cut signal of response to the oscillation has been uncovered. Here we show evidence to suggest that three major outlets from a local ice cap at Greenland's north coast advanced and retreated synchronously during YD. The evidence comprises OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) dates from a marine transgression of the coastal valleys that preceded the advance, and exposure ages from boulders on the moraines, formed by glaciers that overrode the marine sediment. The OSL ages suggest a maximum age of 12.4 ±0.6 kaBP for the marine incursion, and 10 exposure ages on boulders from the three moraines provide an average minimum age of 12.5 ±0.7 kaBP for the moraines, implying that the moraines were formed within the interval 11.8-13.0 kaBP. Elsewhere in Greenland evidence for readvance has been recorded in two areas. Most notably, in the East Greenland fjord zone outlet glaciers over a stretch of 800 km coast advanced through the fjords. In Scoresby Sund, where the moraines form a wide belt, an extensive 14C and exposure dating programme has shown that the readvance here probably culminated before YD, while cessation of moraine formation and rapid retreat from the moraine belt did not commence until c. 11.5 kaBP, but no moraines have so far been dated to YD. Readvance is also seen in Disko Bugt, the largest ice sheet outlet in West Greenland. However, here the advance and retreat of the ice stream took place in mid YD times, and lasted only a few hundred years, while YD in

  20. Recent Bering Sea warm and cold events in a 95-year context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overland, James E.; Wang, Muyin; Wood, Kevin R.; Percival, Donald B.; Bond, Nicholas A.

    2012-06-01

    The meteorology and oceanography of the southeastern Bering Sea shelf was recently dominated by a multi-year warm event (2000-2005) followed by a multi-year cold event (2007-2010). We put these recent events into the context of the 95-year air temperature record from St. Paul Island and with concurrent spatial meteorological fields. For March 2000-2005 the mean air temperature anomaly at St. Paul was 2.1 °C above the long-term mean, and for March 2007-2010 the mean temperature anomaly at St. Paul was 4.7 °C below the long-term mean. The only multi-year temperature deviations comparable to the first decade of the 2000s are a cold event from 1971 to 1976 followed by a warm event from 1978 to 1983. There was also a short warm event 1935-1937. The temperature transition between warm and cold events in the 1970s and 2000s took two years. While there are theoretical arguments for some physical memory processes in the North Pacific climate system, we cannot rule out that the recent warm and cold events are of a random nature: they are rare in the St. Paul temperature record, they are dominated by North Pacific-wide sea level pressure events rather than local Bering Sea processes, and they are consistent with a red noise model of climate variability. The 1970s transition appears to have an ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) influence, while the recent events are likely connected to Arctic-wide warming. Evidence provided by the 95-year St. Paul meteorological record reinforces the idea that a red-noise model of climate variability is appropriate for the North Pacific and southeastern Bering Sea. We stress the importance of relatively rare sub-decadal events and shifts, rather than multi-decadal variability associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Thus, in the future we can expect large positive and negative excursions in the region that can last for multiple years, but there is as yet little predictability for their timing and duration.

  1. Blocking features for two types of cold events in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuowei; Bueh, Cholaw

    2017-04-01

    Cold air outbreaks (CAOs) always hit East Asia during boreal winter and have significant impacts on human health and public transport. The amplitude and route of CAOs are closely associated with blocking circulations over the Eurasian continent. Two categories of CAOs are recognized, namely, the ordinary cold wave events (CWEs) and the extensive and persistent extreme cold events (EPECEs), with the latter having even stronger impacts. The blocking features associated with these two types of CAOs and their differences are investigated in this study on the intraseasonal timescale. What these two CAOs do have in common is that they are both preceded by the intensification and recurrence of a blocking high over the midlatitude North Atlantic. The difference between these events is primarily reflected on the spatial scale and duration of the corresponding blocking high. During the CWEs, blocking occurs around the Ural Mountains, and exhibits a regional feature. The resulting cold air temperature persists for only up to 8 days. In contrast, during the EPECEs, the blocking region is quite extensive and is not only confined around the Ural Mountains but also extends eastward into Northeast Asia in a southwest-northeast orientation. As a result, the cold air tends to accumulate over a large area and persists for a much longer time. The blocking activity is primarily induced by an increased frequency and eastward extension of the synoptic anticyclonic Rossby wave breaking (AWB). Compared with the CWEs, characterized by a regional and short-lived synoptic AWB frequency, the EPECEs tend to be accompanied by more recurrent and eastward extensions of the synoptic AWB.

  2. Correlation of climatic events between East Asia and Norwegian Sea during last deglaciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周卫建; 安芷生; S.C.Porter; D.Donahue; A.J.T.Jull

    1997-01-01

    Using a high resolution 14C chronology, Sl C values and organic carbon content, from loess/paleosol and peat profiles in China, we can demonstrate century scale warm-cold East Asian monsoon paleoclimatic fluctuation events and significant precipitation variability within the last deglaciation. The major climatic events recognized are the Boiling (1 300-12 500 a B. P.), Older Dryas (12 500-11 750 a B. P. ), Allerod (11 750-11 200 a B. P.) and Younger Dryas (11 200-10 000 a B.P. ). The stratigraphic structure of the last deglaciation sediments is characterized by frequent changes in sedimentation phases reflecting climatic instability. These high frequency, rapid climatic events can correlate with fluctuations recorded by sea surface temperatures in the Norwegian Sea. This indicates a pale-oclimate teleconnection between polar, high latitude areas and East Asian monsoon areas through westerlies and the related atmospheric pressure system.

  3. Environment and paleoecology of a 12 ka mid-North American Younger Dryas forest chronicled in tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Thompson, Todd A.; Schneider, Allan F.; Lange, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Until now, availability of wood from the Younger Dryas abrupt cooling event (YDE) in N. America ca. 12.9 to 11.6 ka has been insufficient to develop high-resolution chronologies for refining our understanding of YDE conditions. Here we present a multi-proxy tree-ring chronology (ring widths, “events” evidenced by microanatomy and macro features, stable isotopes) from a buried black spruce forest in the Great Lakes area (Liverpool East site), spanning 116 yr at ca. 12,000 cal yr BP. During this largely cold and wet period, the proxies convey a coherent and precise forest history including frost events, tilting, drowning and burial in estuarine sands as the Laurentide Ice Sheet deteriorated. In the middle of the period, a short mild interval appears to have launched the final and largest episode of tree recruitment. Ultimately the tops of the trees were sheared off after death, perhaps by wind-driven ice floes, culminating an interval of rising water and sediment deposition around the base of the trees. Although relative influences of the continental ice sheet and local effects from ancestral Lake Michigan are indeterminate, the tree-ring proxies provide important insight into environment and ecology of a N. American YDE boreal forest stand.

  4. Heterologous microarray experiments allow the identification of the early events associated with potato tuber cold sweetening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitulli Federico

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its discovery more than 100 years ago, potato (Solanum tuberosum tuber cold-induced sweetening (CIS has been extensively investigated. Several carbohydrate-associated genes would seem to be involved in the process. However, many uncertainties still exist, as the relative contribution of each gene to the process is often unclear, possibly as the consequence of the heterogeneity of experimental systems. Some enzymes associated with CIS, such as β-amylases and invertases, have still to be identified at a sequence level. In addition, little is known about the early events that trigger CIS and on the involvement/association with CIS of genes different from carbohydrate-associated genes. Many of these uncertainties could be resolved by profiling experiments, but no GeneChip is available for the potato, and the production of the potato cDNA spotted array (TIGR has recently been discontinued. In order to obtain an overall picture of early transcriptional events associated with CIS, we investigated whether the commercially-available tomato Affymetrix GeneChip could be used to identify which potato cold-responsive gene family members should be further studied in detail by Real-Time (RT-PCR (qPCR. Results A tomato-potato Global Match File was generated for the interpretation of various aspects of the heterologous dataset, including the retrieval of best matching potato counterparts and annotation, and the establishment of a core set of highly homologous genes. Several cold-responsive genes were identified, and their expression pattern was studied in detail by qPCR over 26 days. We detected biphasic behaviour of mRNA accumulation for carbohydrate-associated genes and our combined GeneChip-qPCR data identified, at a sequence level, enzymatic activities such as β-amylases and invertases previously reported as being involved in CIS. The GeneChip data also unveiled important processes accompanying CIS, such as the induction of redox

  5. The Younger Dryas in the West Pacific marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪品先; 卞云华; 李保华; 黄奇瑜

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence and nature of the Younger Dryas (YD) abrupt climatic event in the West Pacific marginal seas are discussed on the basis of 15 sediment cores. This event has been found in all these cores studied with a high-resolution stratigraphy and proved to be common to the West Pacific region. As shown by the isotopic and micropaleontologic analyses, the YD, dated by C-14 at about 11000 to 10000 a B.P., is a brief event of sea surface cooling in winter season following a fresh-water pulse about 12000 a B.P. The "apparent regression" of the YD recorded in the Changjiang River delta and the Sea of Japan agrees with the interpretation that the YD is a period of slowed sea level rising between two phases of rapid rising. Both the winter surface water cooling and the increasing salinity in the YD imply a strengthening of the winter, but not summer monsoon circulation. This major climatic event in the marginal seas must have had profound impact on the adjacent continent.

  6. Cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and their relationship to extreme wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Otero, L. J.; Restrepo, J. C.; Ruiz, J.; Cadena, M.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme ocean waves in the Caribbean Sea are commonly related to the effects of storms and hurricanes during the months of June through November. The collapse of 200 m of the Puerto Colombia pier in March 2009 revealed the effects of meteorological phenomena other than storms and hurricanes that may be influencing the extreme wave regime in the Colombian Caribbean. The marked seasonality of these atmospheric fronts was established by analyzing the meteorological-marine reports of the Instituto de Hidrología, Meteorología y Estudios Ambientales of Colombia (IDEAM, based on its initials in Spanish) and the Centro de Investigación en Oceanografía y Meteorología of Colombia (CIOH, based on its initials in Spanish) during the last 16 yr. The highest number of cold fronts was observed during the months of January, February, and March, with 6 fronts occurring per year. An annual trend was observed and the highest number of fronts occurred in 2010 (20 in total); moreover, an annual strong relationship between the maximum average wave values and the cold fronts in the central zone of the Colombian Caribbean during the first three months of the year was established. In addition, the maximum values of the significant height produced by the passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the

  7. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm and cold season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, J.; A. P. Barros

    2013-01-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an impo...

  8. How Synchronous was the Transition into the Younger Dryas across the Euro-Atlantic Region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, F.; Muschitiello, F.; Heikkilä, M. P.; Väliranta, M.; Tarasov, L.; Brandefelt, J.; Johansson, A. V.; Naslund, J. O.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of a currently weakening subpolar gyre south of Greenland has again increased scientific attention regarding the role of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) for the regional to global climate. The rapid climate shift of the Younger Dryas (YD, GS-1) cold reversal during the last deglaciation is attributed to an abrupt slowdown or collapse of the AMOC due to a strong meltwater pulse and/or the rapid disintegration of the Laurentide Ice sheet. Although such a dramatic event is not expected for the future, the spatiotemporal climatic response to such a slowdown is an interesting test case. Two recently well dated proxy records around the North Sea region suggest a non-synchronous early cooling/onset of the YD compared to Greenland (NGRIP). Presentation #61803 discusses the hypothesis of a local cooling as a response to increased ice berg calving and/or meltwater from Fenno-Scandinavian Ice Sheet (FIS) during the late Alleröd warm phase (GI-1a). Here we study CCSM3 model output from the quasi-transient atmosphere-ocean simulation (TraCE) where no strong contribution from FIS is considered from the late Alleröd into the YD. We evaluate to which extent the spatiotemporal temperature response to the AMOC slowdown of the simulation is synchronous over the Euro-Atlantic region and how atmospheric teleconnections reorganize during the rapid shift into the YD. In addition, we run time-slice experiments at high spatial resolution of around 100 km with the Community Earth System Model CESM1.0.5 for the late Alleröd and YD to compare spatial climatic differences for both periods taking into account the regional influence from continental ice sheets in more detail.

  9. A Younger Dryas re-advance of local glaciers in north Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Funder, Svend; Linge, Henriette; Möller, Per; Schomacker, Anders; Fabel, Derek; Xu, Sheng; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2016-09-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) is a well-constrained cold event from 12,900 to 11,700 years ago but it remains unclear how the cooling and subsequent abrupt warming recorded in ice cores was translated into ice margin fluctuations in Greenland. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from three moraines in front of local glaciers on a 50 km stretch along the north coast of Greenland, facing the Arctic Ocean. Ten ages range from 11.6 ± 0.5 to 27.2 ± 0.9 ka with a mean age of 12.5 ± 0.7 ka after exclusion of two outliers. We consider this to be a minimum age for the abandonment of the moraines. The ages of the moraines are furthermore constrained using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of epishelf sediments, which were deposited prior to the ice advance that formed the moraines, yielding a maximum age of 12.4 ± 0.6 ka, and bracketing the formation and subsequent abandonment of the moraines to within the interval 11.8-13.0 ka ago. This is the first time a synchronous YD glacier advance and subsequent retreat has been recorded for several independent glaciers in Greenland. In most other areas, there is no evidence for re-advance and glaciers were retreating during YD. We explain the different behaviour of the glaciers in northernmost Greenland as a function of their remoteness from the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which in other areas has been held responsible for modifying the YD drop in temperatures.

  10. The Cold Vortex Circulation over Northeastern China and Regional Rainstorm Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In this study,regional rainstorm events (RREs) in northeastern China associated with the activity of the Northeastern China Cold Vortex (NCCV) were investigated on a medium-range time scale.The RREs occurring in northeastern China could be categorized into three groups according to the distribution of heavy rainfall.The largest cluster is characterized by the rainstorm events that occur on the northwestern side of the Changbai Mountains along a southwest-northeast axis.These events occur most frequently during the post-meiyu period.The authors place particular emphasis on the RREs that belong to the largest cluster and are closely associated with the activity of the NCCV.These RREs were preconditioned by the transportation of substantial amounts of water vapor to which the anomalous western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) contributed.The attendant anomalous WPSH was primarily driven by the anomalous transient eddy feedback forcing the nearby East Asian jet.The development of the NCCV circulation was concurrent with the RREs and acted as their primary causative factor.A perspective based on low-frequency dynamics indicates that Rossby wave packets emanated from the blocking-type circulation over northeastern Asia led to the development of the NCCV activity.

  11. NETmundial: only a landmark event if 'Digital Cold War' rhetoric abandoned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Musiani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While internet privacy has been a central concern for quite a long time, the revelations by Edward Snowden about the US National Security Agency’s massive surveillance programme have highlighted the extent to which it is a core political issue. The privacy-surveillance controversy has prompted what is perhaps the most prominent and ambitious call in internet governance history to break the dominance of the United States' control over internet infrastructure: the Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance, or NETmundial (April 2014. The article analyses the current state of multi-stakeholderism in internet governance in light of this event. In particular, it argues for the necessity to leave the ‘Digital Cold War’ rhetoric behind if the internationalisation and the globalisation of internet governance is to move to the next level.

  12. Reconstructing Last Glacial Maximum and Younger Dryas paleolandscapes through subsurface paleosol stratigraphy: An example from the Po coastal plain, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Agnese; Bruno, Luigi; Cleveland, David M.; Drexler, Tina M.; Amorosi, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Paleosols are commonly used to reconstruct ancient landscapes and past environmental conditions. Through identification and subsurface mapping of two pedogenically modified surfaces formed at the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and during the Younger Dryas (YD) cold event, respectively, and based on their lateral correlation with coeval channel-belt sand bodies, we assessed the geomorphic processes affecting the Po coastal plain during the Late Pleistocene (30-11.5 cal ky BP). The 3D-reconstruction of the LGM and YD paleosurfaces provides insight into the paleolandscapes that developed in the Po alluvial plain at the transitions between warm and cold climate periods. The LGM paleosol records a stratigraphic hiatus of approximately 5 kyr (29-24 cal ky BP), whereas the development of the YD paleosol was associated with a climatic episode of significantly shorter duration. Both paleosols, dissected by Apennine rivers flowing from the south, dip towards the north-east, where they are replaced by fluvial channel belts fed by the Po River. The LGM channel-belt sand body reflects the protracted lateral migration of the Po River at the onset of the glacial maximum. It is wider (> 24 km) and thicker ( 15 m) of the fluvial sand body formed during the YD. The northern margin of LGM Po channel-belt deposits was not encountered in the study area. In contrast, a spatially restricted paleosol, identified in the north at the same elevation as the southern plateau, may represent local expression of the Alpine interfluve during the YD event. This study highlights how 3D-mapping of regionally extensive, weakly developed paleosols can be used to assess the geomorphic response of an alluvial system to rapid climate change.

  13. North Atlantic Storm Activity During the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, M.

    2015-12-01

    The risks posed to cities along the Eastern Seaboard by a potential intensification of tropical cyclone activity over the coming decades remain poorly constrained, in part, due to a lack of available storm proxy records that extend beyond the relatively stable climates of the late Holocene. Previous work in the Bahamas shows that coarse-grained, high-energy event layers in carbonate bank margin sediments: (1) closely track recent historic hurricane events and (2) that the sensitivity of this proxy may be less affected by the deglacial changes in sea level that have limited our ability to reconstruct past hurricane activity using overwash records from back-barrier beach settings. Here we present a record of storm triggered turbidite deposition from a suite of well dated (e.g. Lynch-Stieglitz et al., 2011, Paleoceanography) jumbo piston cores taken offbank (300-500 mbsl) the Dry Tortugas, Florida, that spans abrupt transitions in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and thermohaline circulation during the Younger Dryas (12.9 - 11.5 kyr BP). This record, along with General Circulation Model output (TraCE: NCAR-CGD), indicates strong hurricane activity may have occurred along Southeastern US coasts through this interval despite considerably colder North Atlantic SSTs.

  14. Paleoproductivity during the Younger Dryas off northeastern Luzon, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, J. M. D.; Siringan, F. P.; Villanoy, C.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of the Younger Dryas (YD) event on primary production off the northeast shelf of Luzon, Philippines is examined using sediment cores from two deep sea sites north of the Bicol shelf and with varying relative influence from terrestrial sediment input and the Kuroshio Current. Core A is immediately west of the Kuroshio feeder current and is off the slope while Core B is from a bathymetric high located almost west of Core A. XRF-, CHN- and LOI-derived geochemical proxies are utilized for reconstruction. A decrease in sediment input from ~12.9 to ~11.6 kyr BP corresponding to the YD event is indicated by the proxies, Ti, Al, and Al/Ti, in both cores. This is consistent with the drier climate during this period. Primary productivity indicators in the cores show opposing trends during the YD; Core A shows an increasing trend while Core B shows a decreasing trend. The decreasing trend in Core B can be due to a decrease in terrestrial nutrient input due to a decrease in precipitation. On the other hand, the increasing trend in Core A can be due to a swifter Kuroshio Current caused by a swifter and more southerly NEC bifurcation which in turn is due to a southerly shift of the ITCZ during YD. A swifter Kuroshio would have enhanced upwelling induced by steeper sea surface across the current and by more intense cyclonic gyres due to flow separation where the shelf width suddenly decreases north of the Bicol Shelf.

  15. Oxygen Isotopes in Fresh Water Biogenic Opal: Northeastern US Alleroed-Younger Dryas Temperature Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Aldo; Peteet, Dorothy

    1997-01-01

    The first oxygen isotope analysis of biogenic opal from lake sediments, from the Allerod/Younger Dryas transition in a core from Linsley Pond, Connecticut, gives an average estimate of a 6 C drop in temperature during the Younger Dryas. This shift represents temperatures during the bloom season, and may be less than the winter temperature drop. The sharp transition itself, with a duration of about 200 years, suggests that the temperature decrease may have been as large as 12 C. Previous estimates of the Allerod/Younger Dryas temperature shifts are controversial, and range from 3-20 C, suggesting that further interdisciplinary research on the same samples is warranted. One way that global climate change manifests itself is by redistributing energy throughout the globe. The Northern Hemisphere latitudinal temperature gradient during the late-glacial is at present a controversial topic. The magnitude of air temperature shifts during the Allerod/Younger Dryas (YD) oscillation are estimated from mid-latitude pollen records surrounding the North Atlantic to be 3-5 C in Europe [Lowe et al., 19941 and 3-4 C in the eastern US [Peteet et al., 1993]. In contrast, lake temperatures estimates derived from aquatic midge larvae in the Canadian eastern maritimes and Maine range from 6-20 C, with larger shifts at more southern sites [Levesque et al., 1997]. The magnitude of YD cooling in Greenland ice cores ranges from at least 7 C from the Bolling warming [Dansgaard et al., 1989] to 15 C - a more recent estimate from borehole temperatures [Cuffey et al., 1995]. The ice core geochemical records reveal that massive frequent and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event, suggesting a very dynamic circulation [Mayewski et al., 1993).

  16. Strong pionic intermittency in `cold' events in 12C–AgBr interactions at 4.5 A GeV

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipak Ghosh; Argha Deb; Asok Kumar Mallik; Sharmila Sarkar; Krishnadas Purakait; Ranjan Sengupta

    2004-11-01

    In this paper intermittent behaviour of the pions from `cold' and `hot' classes of events from 12C–AgBr interactions at 4.5 A GeV has been studied, separately. The results reveal strong intermittent pattern in case of `cold' class of events.

  17. Characterization and effects of cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Coast and their relationship to extreme wave events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Ortiz-Royero

    2013-07-01

    passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that, there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the purpose of informing the design of structures in this region of the Caribbean.

  18. Younger Dryas glaciers in the High Atlas, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Philip; Fink, David

    2016-04-01

    Twelve cirque glaciers formed during the Younger Dryas on the mountains of Aksoual (3912 m a.s.l.) and Adrar el Hajj (3129 m a.s.l.) in the Marrakesh High Atlas. Moraines in two separate cirques on these mountains have been dated using 10Be and 36Cl exposure dating. In both cirques the age scatter is relatively small (13.8-10.1 ka) and all ages overlap within error with the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glaciers were small and covered ELAs) ranging from 2470 and 3560 m. This large range is attributed to local topoclimatic factors with the lowest glacier (confirmed as Younger Dryas in age by 3 exposure ages) occupying a very steep cirque floor where a combination of steep glacier gradient and a large potential avalanche catchment enabled its low-lying position. This indicates that caution should be taken when using single glacier sites for reconstructing regional palaeoclimate, especially those formed in steep catchments that have strong topoclimatic controls. The average ELA of the twelve Younger Dryas glaciers was c. 3109 m a.s.l. (St Dev = 325 m) and this represents an ELA depression of > 1000 m from the modern theoretical regional ELA. Under precipitation values similar to today this would require a mean annual temperature depression of 9°C. Moreover, the glacier-climate modelling indicates that it is very unlikely that climate was drier than today during the Younger Dryas in the Marrakesh High Atlas.

  19. Mountain glacier evolution in the Iberian Peninsula during the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, J. M.; Palacios, D.; González-Sampériz, P.; de Andrés, N.; Moreno, A.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Gómez-Villar, A.

    2016-04-01

    We review the evolution of glaciers in the Iberian Mountains during the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka, following the chronology of Greenland Stadial 1 - GS1) and compare with available environmental and climate data to investigate glacier dynamics during cold stadial episodes. The best examples of Younger Dryas moraines are found in the Central Pyrenees, involving short ice tongues up to 4 km in length in the highest massifs (above 3000 m a.s.l.) of the southern versant. Small cirque glaciers and rock glaciers formed during the YD occurred in other Pyrenean massifs, in the Cantabrian Range and in the Gredos and Guadarrama sierras (Central Range), as indicated by several rocky, polished thresholds that were ice-free at the beginning of the Holocene. Although some former rock glaciers were re-activated during the Younger Dryas, glacial activity was limited in the southernmost part of the Iberian Peninsula (Sierra Nevada). Most Iberian records show vegetation changes during the YD characterized by a forest decline and an expansion of shrubs (mainly Juniperus) and steppe herbs, although the vegetation response was not homogeneous because of variable resilience among ecosystems. Available records also document a variable lake response in terms of hydrology and productivity, with a decrease in sedimentation rates and organic productivity in most high altitude lakes and increases in salinity and relatively lower lake levels at lower altitudes. The impact of the Younger Dryas on the coastal environment was almost negligible, but it was responsible for a brief cessation in sea level rise. High-resolution analyses of new speleothem records have documented a double structure for the YD with an earlier drier phase followed by a relatively more humid period. The review of geomorphological evidence demonstrates a strong latitudinal control of glacial activity during the YD, with more intense development in the northern than in the southern regions. The increase in humidity during

  20. Tree-ring records of near-Younger Dryas time in central North America - Preliminary results from the Lincoln quarry site, central Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Wiedenhoeft, A.; Noggle, S.; Curry, B.; Grimm, E.

    2004-01-01

    The abrupt millennial-scale changes associated with the Younger Dryas (YD) event ("chronozone") near the dawn of the Holocene are at least hemispheric, if not global, in extent. Evidence for the YD cold excursion is abundant in Europe but fairly meager in central North America. We are engaged in an investigation of high-resolution environmental changes in mid-North America over several millennia (about 10,000 to 14,000 BP) during the Late Glacial-Early Holocene transition, including the YD interval. Several sites containing logs or stumps have been identified and we are in the process of initial sampling or re-sampling them for this project. Here, we report on a site in central Illinois containing a deposit of logs initially thought to be of YD age preserved in alluvial sands. The assemblage of wood represents hardwood (angiosperm) trees, and the ring-width characteristics are favorable to developing formal tree-ring chronologies. However, 4 new radiocarbon dates indicate deposition of wood may have taken place over at least 8000 14C yr (6000-14,000 BP). This complicates the effort to develop a single floating chronology of several hundred years at this site, but it may provide wood from a restricted region over a long period of time from which to develop a sequence of floating chronologies, the timing of deposition and preservation of which could be related to paleoclimatic events and conditions.

  1. Multiproxy evidence for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem responses during the 8.2 ka cold event as recorded at Højby Sø, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Rasmussen, Peter; Noe-Nygaard, Nanna;

    2010-01-01

    .2 ka cold event as registered in the Greenland ice cores. At Højby Sø, the climate anomaly appears to have started 200–250 yr earlier than the 8.2 ka cold event as the lake proxy data provide strong evidence for a precipitation-induced distinct increase in catchment soil erosion beginning around 8500...... cal yr BP. Alteration of the terrestrial environment then resulted in a major aquatic ecosystem change with nutrient enrichment of the lake and enhanced productivity, which lasted until c. 7900 cal yr BP. Keywords: 8.2 ka cold event; Lake sediments; Palaeoclimate; Pollen; Macrofossils; Geochemistry...

  2. The Role of Rossby-Wave Propagation in a North American Extreme Cold Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Shi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Eliassen–Palm flux and Plumb wave activity flux are calculated using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts interim reanalysis daily dataset to determine the propagation of Rossby waves before a North American cold wave in January 2014. The results show that the upward wave activity fluxes mainly come from planetary waves 1 and 2, which provide a stable circulation background for the influence of the subplanetary-scale waves 3 and 4. The Rossby-wave propagation anomalies between the troposphere and the stratosphere are due to the modulating effects of waves 3 and 4 on waves 1 and 2. During 9–14 January 2014, the modulating effects helped strengthen upward and eastward wave activity fluxes over the Atlantic region and enhance the Pacific high in the stratosphere in its early stage. Later in 19–24 January, the downward wave activity fluxes over the east Pacific due to the modulating effects were beneficial to downward development of the stratospheric high over the Pacific and the formation of a blocking high over the west coast of North America in the troposphere accompanied by a strong adjacent cold low on the east side. These circulations benefit the southward invasion of polar cold air reaching the lower latitudes of east North America, leading to the cold wave outbreak.

  3. Absence of Cooling in New Zealand and the Adjacent Ocean During the Younger Dryas Chronozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Lehman, Scott J.; Fifield, L. Keith; De Deckker, Patrick

    2007-10-01

    As the climate warmed at the end of the last glacial period, a rapid reversal in temperature, the Younger Dryas (YD) event, briefly returned much of the North Atlantic region to near full-glacial conditions. The event was associated with climate reversals in many other areas of the Northern Hemisphere and also with warming over and near Antarctica. However, the expression of the YD in the mid- to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (and the southwest Pacific region in particular) is much more controversial. Here we show that the Waiho Loop advance of the Franz Josef Glacier in New Zealand was not a YD event, as previously thought, and that the adjacent ocean warmed throughout the YD.

  4. Lightning Location System Data from Wind Power Plants Compared to Meteorological Conditions of Warm- and Cold Thunderstorm Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stephan; Lopez, Javier; Garolera, Anna Candela

    2016-01-01

    Five years of Lightning Location System (LLS) data from five different wind turbine sites in Europe are analysed. The sites are located in Croatia, Italy, Spain, France and one offshore wind power plant in the North sea. Each location exhibits individual characteristic properties in terms...... of topography, height above mean sea level (AMSL), and average ground flash density. For three sites, the most severe lightning events have been identified during the warm and cold months whereas the other two locations exhibit severe lightning detections mainly during the warm months. In this work severity...

  5. Does Hot Water Freeze Faster Than Cold? Or Why Mpemba's Ice Cream Is a Discrepant Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Bill

    1993-01-01

    A discrepant event is a happening contrary to our current beliefs. Discrepant events are said to be useful in clarifying concepts. This is one of the interesting features of current theories of constructivism. The story of Mpemba's ice cream is quite well known, but it is the educational aspects of the experiment that are of interest in this…

  6. Green mosses date the Storegga tsunami to the chilliest decades of the 8.2 ka cold event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondevik, Stein; Stormo, Svein Kristian; Skjerdal, Gudrun

    2012-06-01

    Chlorophyll in dead plants ordinarily decomposes completely before permanent burial through exposure to light, water and oxygen. Here we describe 8000-year-old terrestrial mosses that retain several percent of its original chlorophyll. The mosses were ripped of the land surface, carried 50-100 m off the Norwegian coast of the time, and deposited in depressions on the sea floor by the Storegga tsunami. A little of the chlorophyll survived because, within hours after entraining it, the tsunami buried the mosses in shell-rich sediments. These sediments preserved the chlorophyll by keeping out light and oxygen, and by keeping the pH above 7—three factors known to favour chlorophyll's stability. Because the green mosses were buried alive, their radiocarbon clock started ticking within hours after the Storegga Slide had set off the tsunami. Radiocarbon measurement of the mosses therefore give slide ages of uncommon geological precision, and these, together with a sequence of ages above and below the boundary, date the Storegga Slide to the chilliest decades of the 8.2 ka cold event at 8120-8175 years before AD 1950. North Atlantic coastal- and fjord- climatic records claimed to show evidence of the 8.2 cold event should be carefully examined for possible contamination and disturbance from the Storegga tsunami.

  7. The perennial clock is an essential timer for seasonal growth events and cold hardiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Mikael; Ibáñez, Cristian; Takata, Naoki; Eriksson, Maria E

    2014-01-01

    Over the last several decades, changes in global temperatures have led to changes in local environments affecting the growth conditions for many species. This is a trend that makes it even more important to understand how plants respond to local variations and seasonal changes in climate. To detect daily and seasonal changes as well as acute stress factors such as cold and drought, plants rely on a circadian clock. This chapter introduces the current knowledge and literature about the setup and function of the circadian clock in various tree and perennial species, with a focus on the Populus genus.

  8. Importance of freeze-thaw events in low temperature ecotoxicology of cold tolerant enchytraeids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana L Patrício; Enggrob, Kirsten; Slotsbo, Stine; Amorim, Mónica J B; Holmstrup, Martin

    2014-08-19

    Due to global warming it is predicted that freeze-thaw cycles will increase in Arctic and cold temperate regions. The effects of this variation becomes of particular ecological importance to freeze-tolerant species when it is combined with chemical pollutants. We compared the effect of control temperature (2 °C), daily freeze-thaw cycles (2 to -4 °C) and constant freezing (-2 °C) temperatures on the cold-tolerance of oligochaete worms (Enchytraeus albidus) and tested how survival was influenced by pre-exposure to 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), a common nonionic detergent found in sewage sludge amended soils. Results showed that combined effect of 4-NP and daily freeze-thaw cycles can cause higher mortality to worms as compared with sustained freezing or control temperature. Exposure to 4-NP caused a substantial depletion of glycogen reserves which is catabolized during freezing to produce cryoprotective concentrations of free glucose. Further, exposure to freeze-thaw cycles resulted in higher concentrations of 4-NP in worm tissues as compared to constant freezing or control temperature (2 °C). Thus, worms exposed to combined effect of freeze-thaw cycles and 4-NP suffer higher consequences, with the toxic effect of the chemical potentiating the deleterious effects of freezing and thawing.

  9. Dynamics of 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming event and its impact on cold weather over Eurasia: Role of planetary wave reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Zelin, Cai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander Ivanovich; Wei, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the impact of stratospheric planetary wave reflection on tropospheric weather over Central Eurasia during the 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) event. We analyze EP fluxes and Plumb wave activity fluxes to study the two and three dimensional aspects of wave propagation, respectively. The 2013 SSW event is excited by the combined influence of wavenumber 1 (WN1) and wavenumber 2 (WN2) planetary waves, which makes the event an unusual one and seems to have significant impact on tropospheric weather regime. We observe an extraordinary development of a ridge over the Siberian Tundra and the North Pacific during first development stage (last week of December 2012) and later from the North Atlantic in the second development stage (first week of January 2013), and these waves appear to be responsible for the excitation of the WN2 pattern during the SSW. The wave packets propagated upward and were then reflected back down to central Eurasia due to strong negative wind shear in the upper stratospheric polar jet, caused by the SSW event. Waves that propagated downward led to the formation of a deep trough over Eurasia and brought extreme cold weather over Kazakhstan, the Southern part of Russia and the Northwestern part of China during mid-January 2013.

  10. Younger Dryas interval and outflow from the Laurentide ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T.C.; Walker, J.C.G.; Rea, David K.; Lewis, C.F.M.; Shane, L.C.K.; Smith, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    A boxmodel of the Great Lakes is used to estimate meltwater flow into the North Atlantic between 8000 and 14,000 calendar years B.P. Controls on the model include the oxygen isotopic composition of meltwaters and lake waters as measured in the shells of ostracodes. Outflow rates are highest when oxygen isotopic values of the lake waters are most negative, denoting a maximum glacial meltwater component. Flow rates reach maximum values before the onset of the Younger Dryas and after it ends. These maxima appear to be correlative with the major meltwater pulses MWP 1A and 1B. Although the resumption of North Atlantic Deep Water formation may be tied to the reduction in ice sheet melting, neither the onset nor the end of the Younger Dryas, as recorded in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project (GISP2) records, appear tied to maxima in meltwater outflow from the Laurentide ice sheet. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm- and cold-season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, J.; A. P. Barros

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm-season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold-season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic proc...

  12. Environmental response to the cold climate event 8200 years ago as recorded at Hoejby Soe, Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Peter (Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Ulfeldt Hede, M.; Noe-Nygaard, N. (Univ. of Copenhagen, Dept. of Geography and Geology, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Clarke, A.L. (APEM Manchester Lab., Stockport (United Kingdom)); Vinebrooke, R.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Biological Science - Freshwater Biodiversity Lab., Edmonton (Canada))

    2008-07-15

    The need for accurate predictions of future environmental change under conditions of global warming has led to a great interest in the most pronounced climate change known from the Holocene: an abrupt cooling event around 8200 years before present (present = A.D. 1950), also known as the '8.2 ka cooling event' (ka = kilo-annum = 1000 years). This event has been recorded as a negative delta18OMICRON excursion in the central Greenland ice cores (lasting 160 years with the lowest temperature at 8150) and in a variety of other palaeoclimatic archives including lake sediments, ocean cores, speleothems, tree rings, and glacier oscillations from most of the Northern Hemisphere. In Greenland the maximum cooling was estimated to be 6 +- 2 deg. C while in southern Fennoscandia and the Baltic countries pollenbased quantitative temperature reconstructions indicate a maximum annual mean temperature decrease of around 1.5 deg. C. Today there is a general consensus that the primary cause of the cooling event was the final collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet near Hudson Bay and the associated sudden drainage of the proglacial Lake Agassiz into the North Atlantic Ocean around 8400 B.P. . This freshwater outflow, estimated to amount to c. 164,000 km3 of water, reduced the strength of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation and thereby the heat transported to the North Atlantic region, resulting in an atmospheric cooling. The climatic consequences of this meltwater flood are assumed to be a good geological analogue for future climate-change scenarios, as a freshening of the North Atlantic is projected by almost all global-warming models and is also currently being registered in the region. In an ongoing project, the influence of the 8.2 ka cooling event on a Danish terrestrial and lake ecosystem is being investigated using a variety of biological and geochemical proxy data from a sediment core extracted from Hojby So, north-west Sjaelland. Here we present data on

  13. Characterization and effects of cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Coast and their relationship to extreme wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Otero, L. J.; Restrepo, J. C.; Ruiz, J.; Cadena, M.

    2013-07-01

    Extreme ocean waves in the Caribbean Sea are commonly related to the effects of storms and hurricanes during the months of June through November. The collapse of 200 m of the Puerto Colombia pier in March 2009 revealed the effects of meteorological phenomena other than storms and hurricanes that may be influencing the extreme wave regime in the Colombian Caribbean. The marked seasonality of these atmospheric fronts was established by analyzing the meteorological-marine reports of Instituto de Hidrología, Meteorología y Estudios Ambientales of Colombia (IDEAM, based on its initials in Spanish) and Centro de Investigación en Oceanografía y Meteorología of Colombia (CIOH, based on its initials in Spanish). The highest occurrences were observed during the months of January, February, and March, with 6 fronts occurring per year. An annual trend was not observed, although the highest number of fronts occurred in 2010 (20 in total). An annual strong relationship between the maximum average wave values and the cold fronts, in the central zone of the Colombian Caribbean during the first three months of the year was established. In addition, the maximum values of the significant height produced by the passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that, there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the purpose of informing the design of

  14. Decadal resolved leaf wax δD records of the Younger Dryas in central and eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichner, Bernhard; Słowiński, Michał; Ott, Florian; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim; Sachse, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Annually laminated (varved) sediments with defined event-based age anchor points such as tephra layers enable the establishment of precise chronologies in lacustrine climate archives. This is especially useful to study subtle temporal differences in the consequences of mechanisms and feedbacks during abrupt climatic changes such as the Younger Dryas over larger spatial areas. To decipher the drivers of ecological changes across the Allerød/Younger Dryas transition in central Europe, we analyzed leaf wax biomarkers from Trzechowskie paleolake in northern Poland. Samples were taken in 10 years intervals across the onset of the Younger Dryas, with the Laacher See Tephra (12,880 yrs BP) as anchor point for age-calibration. Further, we applied compound specific hydrogen isotope analysis to infer past hydrological changes, in comparison to results from the well-dated Meerfelder Maar record located up 900 km to the southwest [1]. Between 12,750 and 12,600 yrs BP, ratios of terrestrial n-alkanes show a transition from a tree-dominated lake catchment (Pinus, Betula) to an environment mainly covered by Juniperus and grasses, which is in agreement with palynological data. δD values of n-alkanes indicate a rapid cooling and/or a change of moisture source together with a slight aridification between 12,680 and 12,600 yrs BP. This is synchronous to a rapid and strong aridification inferred for the beginning of the Younger Dryas at Meerfelder Maar (western Germany) [1] but ca. 170 yrs after the inferred onset of cooling at both Meerfelder Maar and the NGRIP ice core at 12,850 yrs BP. This highlights a different temporal succession and impact of hydrological and climatic changes in eastern compared to western Europe which could potentially be related to the stronger influence of the Fennoscandian icesheets and/or the Siberian High on atmospheric circulation patterns in the more continental climate influenced parts of eastern Europe. [1] Rach O, Brauer A, Wilkes H, Sachse D

  15. Centennial-scale climate cooling with a sudden cold event around 8,200 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohling, Eelco J; Pälike, Heiko

    2005-04-21

    The extent of climate variability during the current interglacial period, the Holocene, is still debated. Temperature records derived from central Greenland ice cores show one significant temperature anomaly between 8,200 and 8,100 years ago, which is often attributed to a meltwater outflow into the North Atlantic Ocean and a slowdown of North Atlantic Deep Water formation--this anomaly provides an opportunity to study such processes with relevance to present-day freshening of the North Atlantic. Anomalies in climate proxy records from locations around the globe are often correlated with this sharp event in Greenland. But the anomalies in many of these records span 400 to 600 years, start from about 8,600 years ago and form part of a repeating pattern within the Holocene. More sudden climate changes around 8,200 years ago appear superimposed on this longer-term cooling. The compounded nature of the signals implies that far-field climate anomalies around 8,200 years ago cannot be used in a straightforward manner to assess the impact of a slowdown of North Atlantic Deep Water formation, and the geographical extent of the rapid cooling event 8,200 years ago remains to be determined.

  16. Freshwater outburst from Lake Superior as a trigger for the cold event 9300 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shi-Yong; Colman, Steven M; Lowell, Thomas V; Milne, Glenn A; Fisher, Timothy G; Breckenridge, Andy; Boyd, Matthew; Teller, James T

    2010-06-04

    Paleoclimate proxy records reveal a pervasive cooling event with a Northern Hemispheric extent approximately 9300 years ago. Coeval changes in the oceanic circulation of the North Atlantic imply freshwater forcing. However, the source, magnitude, and routing of meltwater have remained unknown. Located in central North America, Lake Superior is a key site for regulating the outflow of glacial meltwater to the oceans. Here, we show evidence for an approximately 45-meter rapid lake-level fall in this basin, centered on 9300 calibrated years before the present, due to the failure of a glacial drift dam on the southeast corner of the lake. We ascribe the widespread climate anomaly approximately 9300 years ago to this freshwater outburst delivered to the North Atlantic Ocean through the Lake Huron-North Bay-Ottawa River-St. Lawrence River valleys.

  17. Embryo sac haustorium in Dryas octopetala L. (Rosaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Romana Czapik

    2014-01-01

    The embryo sac haustorium found in Dryas octopetala L. from the Tatra Mts is the first record of its occurrence in Rosaceae. At the eight-nucleate stage of the embryo sac, the antipodal end of the central cell began to grow into a narrow caecum filled with dense cytoplasm and elongated in the chalazal direction leaving the three antipodals in situ. The haustorium enlarged and lost its characteristic shape after the period of fertilization. Finally, the embryo sac occupied almost the whole len...

  18. The platinum group metals in Younger Dryas Horizons are terrestrial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Wikes, E.; Kennett, J.; West, A.; Sharma, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) event, which began 12,900 years ago, was a period of abrupt and rapid cooling in the Northern Hemisphere whose primary cause remains unclear. The prevalent postulated mechanism is a temporary shutdown of the thermohaline circulation following the breakup of an ice dam in North America. Firestone et al. (2007) proposed that the cooling was triggered by multiple cometary airbursts and/or impacts that engendered enormous environmental changes and disrupted the thermohaline circulation. The evidence in support for this hypothesis is a black layer in North America and in Europe marking the YD boundary containing charcoal, soot, carbon spherules and glass-like carbon suggesting extensive and intense forest fires. This layer is also enriched in magnetic grains high in iridium, magnetic microspherules, fullerenes containing extraterrestrial He-3, and nanodiamonds. Whereas the nanodiamonds could be produced in an impact or arrive with the impactor, the cometary burst/impact hypothesis remains highly controversial as the YD horizon lacks important impact markers such as craters, breccias, tektites and shocked minerals. Firestone et al. (2007) contend that bulk of Ir found at the YD boundary is associated with magnetic grains. The key issue is whether this Ir is meteorite derived. We used Ir and Os concentrations and Os isotopes to investigate the provenance of the platinum group metals in the YD horizon. The bulk sediment samples from a number of North American YD sites (Blackwater Draw, Murray Springs, Gainey, Sheriden Cave, and Myrtle Beach) and a site in Europe (Lommel) do not show any traces of meteorite derived Os and Ir. The [Os] = 2 to 45 pg/g in these sediments and the 187Os/188Os ratios are similar to the upper continental crustal values (~1.3), much higher than those in meteorites (0.13). Higher [Os] is observed in Blackwater Draw (= 194 pg/g). However, the Os/Ir ratio in Blackwater Draw is 5 (not 1 as expected for a meteorite) and 187Os/188

  19. Search for Extraterrestrial Osmium at the Allerod - Younger Dryas Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, C.; Sharma, M.; Kasse, K.; Bohncke, S.

    2008-12-01

    Ir and Os are excellent markers of extraterrestrial impact events, due to their high abundance in ET objects (Alvarez et al., 1980 Science; Turekian, 1982 Geol. Bull. Am. Spec. Pap.). Os has the advantage over Ir, in that the 187Os/188Os ratio also greatly differs between meteorites and upper continental crust (UCC). The combination of [Os] and 187Os/188Os analyses would be superior in detecting any ET contribution. Firestone et al (2007 PNAS) attributed a widespread 12.9 ka Ir containing black carbon layer to a potential extraterrestrial impact at the Allerød-Younger Dryas (A-YD) boundary. In order to test this inference, we measured [Os] and 187Os/188Os on a radiocarbon dated A-YD record (13.210 to 12.788 cal years BP) from the Netherlands. This location is close to Lommel, a Belgian site studied by Firestone et al.(2007). The organic-rich sequence was sampled continuously over a 12 cm interval at 2 cm resolution (~70 years). About 10 g samples were freeze-dried, ground and homogenized in a zirconia ball-mill. The samples mixed with 190Os tracer solutions were dissolved in carius tubes and Os extracted in liquid bromine. Os was further purified using micro-distillation. Os isotopes were measured using N-TIMS on Dartmouth Triton. The procedural blank was 7 fg/g Os with an isotopic composition of 0.41±0.01 The Allerød samples have an order of magnitude higher abundance than UCC (200 vs. 30 pg/g), but similar 187Os/188Os ratios, >1.1. The sample at the base of the YD (12.893±75 cal years BP) contains a similar amount of Os, but has a distinctly lower isotopic signature, 0.53±0.002. The high [Os] in the A-YD section possibly reflects enrichment by preferential partitioning into organic matter. The Os isotope composition of 0.53, sandwiched between values >1.1, implies contribution of a significant amount of non-radiogenic Os. Since the pollen spectra show no reworking, the non-radiogenic Os could only have been delivered as a discrete pulse at 12.893 cal yr BP

  20. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm and cold season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. The first objective of this study is to investigate this hypothesis. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations, availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions, and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions necessary for the initiation of slope instability, and should therefore be considered explicitly in landslide hazard assessments. Moreover, the relationships between slope stability and

  1. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm and cold season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. The first objective of this study is to investigate this hypothesis. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations, availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions, and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions necessary for the initiation of slope instability, and should therefore be considered explicitly in landslide hazard assessments. Moreover, the relationships between slope stability and interflow are

  2. Revisiting the microlensing event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A solar mass star with two cold giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, J P; Batista, V; Fukui, A; Marquette, J -B; Brillant, S; Cole, A A; Rogers, L A; Sumi, T; Abe, F; Bhattacharya, A; Koshimoto, N; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Han, C; Gould, A; Pogge, R; Yee, J

    2016-01-01

    Two cold, gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main sequence star in the galactic disk have previously been discovered in the high magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026 (Han et al. 2013). Here we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, $H=16.39 \\pm 0.08$. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B\\&C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3m H band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of a $\\sim 4-9$ Gyr lens star of $\\rm M_{lens} = 1.06 \\pm 0.05~\\,M_\\odot$ at a distance of $\\rm D_{lens} = 4.0 \\pm 0.3~$kpc, orbited by two giant plan...

  3. Impacts of extreme climatic events on the energetics of long-lived vertebrates: the case of the greater flamingo facing cold spells in the Camargue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Anne-Sophie; Labaude, Sophie; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Béchet, Arnaud; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Porter, Warren; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Mathewson, Paul; Grémillet, David

    2014-10-15

    Most studies analyzing the effects of global warming on wild populations focus on gradual temperature changes, yet it is also important to understand the impact of extreme climatic events. Here we studied the effect of two cold spells (January 1985 and February 2012) on the energetics of greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) in the Camargue (southern France). To understand the cause of observed flamingo mass mortalities, we first assessed the energy stores of flamingos found dead in February 2012, and compared them with those found in other bird species exposed to cold spells and/or fasting. Second, we evaluated the monthly energy requirements of flamingos across 1980-2012 using the mechanistic model Niche Mapper. Our results show that the body lipids of flamingos found dead in 2012 corresponded to 2.6±0.3% of total body mass, which is close to results found in woodcocks (Scolopax rusticola) that died from starvation during a cold spell (1.7±0.1%), and much lower than in woodcocks which were fed throughout this same cold spell (13.0±2%). Further, Niche Mapper predicted that flamingo energy requirements were highest (+6-7%) during the 1985 and 2012 cold spells compared with 'normal' winters. This increase was primarily driven by cold air temperatures. Overall, our findings strongly suggest that flamingos starved to death during both cold spells. This study demonstrates the relevance of using mechanistic energetics modelling and body condition analyses to understand and predict the impact of extreme climatic events on animal energy balance and winter survival probabilities. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Lacustrine lignin biomarker record reveals a severe drought during the late Younger Dryas in southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Bao, Hongyan; Zheng, Liwei; Li, Dawei; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2017-03-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) event, which punctuated the last glacial-Holocene transition period and had a profound impact on global climate, is the most well studied millennial-scale climate event although the triggering mechanism remains debate. Weakened Asian summer monsoon during the YD is recorded in oxygen isotopes of stalagmite from Mainland China. However, lacustrine climate record of the YD event has not been reported from the subtropical land-ocean boundary of the Asian continent near the Pacific warm pool. We provide a lignin biomarker record covering the last deglaciation and early Holocene (17-9 ka BP) from the Dongyuan Lake, southern Taiwan, located at the frontal zone of typhoon invasion. The lignin phenol ratio S/V shows that the vegetation in the catchments had shifted from gymnosperm dominant to angiosperm dominant plants since 12.2 ka BP. Significantly decreased lignin concentrations (TLP and λ8) and elevated lignin degradation parameters ((Ad/Al)v, P/(V + S), DHBA/V) in combination with other organic proxies (TOC, δ13Corg) during the late YD suggest a severe drought had occurred in southern Taiwan during this specific period. Changes in the lignin proxies from the Dongyuan Lake lagged the climate changes registered in stalagmite records by around 500-800 years, suggesting a slow response of vegetation and soil processes to rapid climate changes.

  5. Glacier-derived climate for the Younger Dryas in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellitero, Ramon; Rea, Brice R.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Philip; Braithwaite, Roger; Renssen, Hans; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Ribolini, Adriano; Bakke, Jostein; Lukas, Sven

    2016-04-01

    We have reconstructed and calculated the glacier equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) for 120 Younger Dryas palaeoglaciers from Morocco in the south to Svalbard in the north and from Ireland in the west to Turkey in the east. The chronology of these landform were checked and, when derived from cosmogenic dates, these were recalculated based on newer production rates. Frontal moraines/limits for the palaeoglaciers were used to reconstruct palaeoglacier extent by using a GIS tool which implements a discretised solution for the assumption of perfect-plasticity ice rheology for a single flowline and extents this out to a 3D ice surface. From the resulting equilibrium profile, palaeoglaciers palaeo-ELAs were calculated using another GIS tool. Where several glaciers were reconstructed in a region, a single ELA value was generated following the methodology of Osmaston (2005). In order to utilise these ELAs for quantitative palaeo-precipitation reconstructions an independent regional temperature analysis was undertaken. A database of 121 sites was compiled where the temperature was determined from palaeoproxies other than glaciers (e.g. pollen, diatoms, choleoptera, chironimids…) in both terrestrial and offshore environments. These proxy data provides estimates of average annual, summer and winter temperatures. These data were merged and interpolated to generate maps of average temperature for the warmest and coldest months and annual average temperature. From these maps the temperature at the ELA was obtained using a lapse rate of 0.65°C/100m. Using the ELA temperature range and summer maximum in a degree-day model allows determination of the potential melt which can be taken as equivalent to precipitation given the assumption a glacier is in equilibrium with climate. Results show that during the coldest part of the Younger Dryas precipitation was high in the British Isles, the NW of the Iberian Peninsula and the Vosges. There is a general trend for declining precipitation

  6. Embryo sac haustorium in Dryas octopetala L. (Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Czapik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The embryo sac haustorium found in Dryas octopetala L. from the Tatra Mts is the first record of its occurrence in Rosaceae. At the eight-nucleate stage of the embryo sac, the antipodal end of the central cell began to grow into a narrow caecum filled with dense cytoplasm and elongated in the chalazal direction leaving the three antipodals in situ. The haustorium enlarged and lost its characteristic shape after the period of fertilization. Finally, the embryo sac occupied almost the whole length of the ovule. Situated at its chalazal end there was either dense cytoplasm with a group of endosperm nuclei or dense, grainy cytoplasm only, if fertilization had not taken place.

  7. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 +/- 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B and C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of an approximately 4-9 Gyr lens star of M(sub lens) = 1.06 +/- 0.05 solar mass at a distance of D(sub lens) = 4.0 +/- 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 +/- 0.008 M(sub Jup) and 0.86 +/- 0.06 M(sub Jup), with projected separations of 4.0 +/- 0.5 au and 4.8 +/- 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 +/- 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  8. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 +/- 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B and C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of an approximately 4-9 Gyr lens star of M(sub lens) = 1.06 +/- 0.05 solar mass at a distance of D(sub lens) = 4.0 +/- 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 +/- 0.008 M(sub Jup) and 0.86 +/- 0.06 M(sub Jup), with projected separations of 4.0 +/- 0.5 au and 4.8 +/- 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 +/- 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  9. Younger Dryas and Holocene oceanography of the western Labrador Sea region based on foraminifera and sediment proxies from Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Christina; Pearce, Christof; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Kuijpers, Antoon; Reynisson, Njáll F.; Zilmer Christensen, Eva; Juncker Hansen, Mette

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and geochemical analyses from three marine sediment cores from Placentia Bay on the southwest coast of Newfoundland captured the evolving surface and subsurface environment of the eastern Labrador Sea during the late glacial and Holocene. The area, which is today located in the boundary zone between the Arctic Labrador current and the warm Gulf Stream in the eastern margin of the Labrador Sea was during the early part of the Younger Dryas (13.0-12.3 cal. kyr BP) dominated by cold, Arctic conditions and heavy sea-ice cover linked to a strong Polar Water component of the Inner Labrador Current. In the later part of the Younger Dryas (12.3-11.5 kyr BP) the influence of the Labrador Current (LC) became less pronounced resulting in more unstable conditions with varying sea-ice cover and increased influence of Gulf Stream water, presumably linked to an increased strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The earliest Holocene (11.5-10.4 kyr BP) saw slightly warmer subsurface conditions in Placentia Bay and increased productivity, presumably caused by a decreased southward transport of Polar Water via the LC. The onset of a strong AMOC caused the northward movement of the frontal zone between the Subpolar Gyre and the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre in the western North Atlantic region to closer proximity to the southern coast of Newfoundland compared to previously. From ca. 10.4-9.65 kyr BP increased bottom-current speeds and the presence of species often found in connection to oceanic fronts, suggest a further strengthening of the AMOC causing inflow of Atlantic-source water into Placentia Bay. This tendency was further strengthened at 9.65-7.3 kyr BP, which saw a relatively strong inflow of Atlantic-source Gulf Stream water into Placentia Bay, evidenced by high frequencies of Cassidulina neoteretis. This inflow of Atlantic was however temporarily halted around 8.2 kyr BP, when a short-lived, extreme peak in

  10. Early-Warning Signals for the onsets of Greenland Interstadials and the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition

    CERN Document Server

    Rypdal, M

    2015-01-01

    The high-frequency band of the $\\delta^{18}\\mbox{O}$ variations in the North Greenland Ice Core Project displays fluctuation levels that increase as one approaches the onset of an interstadial (warm) period. For some of the events it is possible to establish statistical significance using Monte-Carlo simulations with a non-parametric null model with random phases and the same spectral density as the $\\delta^{18}\\mbox{O}$ record during the stadial periods. Similar results are found for the locally estimated Hurst exponent for the high-frequency fluctuations, and it is therefore natural to interpret these findings as so-called "critical slowing down" signatures, i.e. early-warning signs of tipping points. The observed "slowing down" is found to be similar (and perhaps even stronger) in the Younger Dryas, suggesting that there are some similarities between mechanisms of the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition and the onsets of the Greenland interstadials. It is also verified that the temperature fluctuations duri...

  11. The response in the Pacific to the sun's decadal peaks and contrasts to cold events in the Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Harry; Meehl, Gerald A.

    2008-05-01

    van Loon et al. [2007. Coupled air-sea response to solar forcing in the Pacific region during northern winter. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, D02108, doi:10.1029/2006JD007378] showed that the Pacific Ocean in northern winter is sensitive to the influence of the sun in its decadal peaks. We extend this study by three solar peaks to a total of 14, examine the response in the stratosphere, and contrast the response to solar forcing to that of cold events (CEs) in the Southern Oscillation. The addition of three solar peak years confirms the earlier results. That is, in solar peak years the sea level pressure (SLP) is, on average, above normal in the Gulf of Alaska and south of the equator, stronger southeast trades blow across the Pacific equator and cause increased upwelling and thus anomalously lower sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Since the effect on the Pacific climate system of solar forcing resembles CEs in the Southern Oscillation, we compare the two and note that, even though their patterns appear similar in some ways, they are particularly different in the stratosphere and are thus due to separate processes. That is, in July-August (JA) of the year leading into January-February (JF) of the solar peak years, the Walker cell expands in the Pacific troposphere, and the stratospheric wind anomalies are westerly below 25 hPa and easterly above, whereas this signal in the stratosphere is absent in CEs. Thus the large-scale east-west tropical atmospheric (Walker) circulation is enhanced, though not to the extent that it is in CEs in the Southern Oscillation, and the solar influence thus appears as a strengthening of the climatological mean regional precipitation maxima in the tropical Pacific. Additionally, CEs have a 1-year evolution, while the response to solar peaks extends across 3 years such that the signal in the Pacific SLP of the solar peaks is similar but weaker in the year leading into the peak and in the year after the peak. The concurrent negative

  12. Sporo-pollen assemblage and paleoclimate events in shelf area of the southern Yellow Sea since 15 ka B. P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guanglan; Han, Yousong; Wang, Shaoqing; Wang, Zhenyan

    2004-03-01

    Based on the authors’ 1986 to 1994 sporo-pollen assemblage analysis in the southern Yellow Sea area, data from 3 main cores were studied in combination with14C, palaeomagnetic and thermoluminescence data. The evolution of the paleoclimate environments in the southern Yellow Sea since 15ka B. P. was revealed that, in deglaciation of the last glacial period, the climate of late glaciation transformed into that of postglaciation, accompanied by a series of violent climate fluctuations. These evolution events happened in a global climate background and related to the geographic changes in eastern China. We distinguished three short-term cooling events and two warming events. Among them, the sporo-pollen assemblage of subzone A1 showed some cold climate features indicating that a cooling event occurred at about 15-14ka. B. P. in early deglaciation. This subzone corresponds to the Oldest Dryas. In subzone A3, many drought-enduring herbal pollens and some few pollens of cold-resistant Picea, Abies, etc. were found, which indicated that a cooling event, with cold and arid climate, occurred at about 12-11ka. B. P. in late deglaciation. This subzone corresponds to the Younger Dryas. The sporo-pollen assemblage of zone B showed warm and arid climate features in postglaciation. Although the assemblage of subzone B2 indicated a cold and arid climate environment, the development of flora in subzone B2 climate was less cold than that in A3. Subzone B2 indicated a cooling event which occurred at about 9ka B. P. in early olocene. Subzone A2, with some distinct differences from subzone A1 and A3, indicated a warming event which occurred at 14-13ka. B.P. and should correspond to a warming fluctuation. The sporo-pollen assemblage of zone C showed features of warn-moist flora and climate, and indicated a warming event which universally occurred along the coast of eastern China at 8-3 ka B. P. in middle Holocene, and its duration was longer than that of any climate events mentioned

  13. Comment on 'Was Scotland deglaciated during the Younger Dryas?' by Small and Fabel (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Hall, Brenda L.; Schaefer, Joerg M.

    2016-11-01

    The course of climatic events in Scotland and the broader North Atlantic region during the glacial termination has important implications for our understanding of the causes and mechanisms of abrupt climate change but remains in debate. One example is the timing of the late-glacial 'Loch Lomond Readvance' (LLR), during which an ice cap and numerous cirque glaciers were nourished in the Scottish Highlands. Exactly when the LLR occurred and culminated has been disputed for several decades and has been addressed via several different types of chronologic evidence (e.g., Lowe and Walker, 1976; Golledge et al., 2007; MacLeod et al., 2011; Bromley et al., 2014). Recently, Small and Fabel (2016) presented a suite of six 10Be surface-exposure ages from moraine ridges on Rannoch Moor, central Scottish Highlands, that questioned whether two different dating techniques - 10Be and 14C - yield the same result for the timing of final deglaciation of the Scottish ice cap. In that study, Small and Fabel (2016) concluded that the 10Be data show deglaciation occurred at the close of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial (∼11.6 kyr), as much as a millennium later than the scenario presented by Bromley et al. (2014) based on minimum-limiting 14C data. While the issue of which, if either, is a more reliable age for deglaciation cannot be resolved fully in a short note, we comment on several points raised by Small and Fabel (2016) and suggest a means to resolve this question.

  14. Severe 2010 Cold-Water Event Caused Unprecedented Mortality to Corals of the Florida Reef Tract and Reversed Previous Survivorship Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirman, Diego; Schopmeyer, Stephanie; Manzello, Derek; Gramer, Lewis J.; Precht, William F.; Muller-Karger, Frank; Banks, Kenneth; Barnes, Brian; Bartels, Erich; Bourque, Amanda; Byrne, James; Donahue, Scott; Duquesnel, Janice; Fisher, Louis; Gilliam, David; Hendee, James; Johnson, Meaghan; Maxwell, Kerry; McDevitt, Erin; Monty, Jamie; Rueda, Digna; Ruzicka, Rob; Thanner, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Background Coral reefs are facing increasing pressure from natural and anthropogenic stressors that have already caused significant worldwide declines. In January 2010, coral reefs of Florida, United States, were impacted by an extreme cold-water anomaly that exposed corals to temperatures well below their reported thresholds (16°C), causing rapid coral mortality unprecedented in spatial extent and severity. Methodology/Principal Findings Reef surveys were conducted from Martin County to the Lower Florida Keys within weeks of the anomaly. The impacts recorded were catastrophic and exceeded those of any previous disturbances in the region. Coral mortality patterns were directly correlated to in-situ and satellite-derived cold-temperature metrics. These impacts rival, in spatial extent and intensity, the impacts of the well-publicized warm-water bleaching events around the globe. The mean percent coral mortality recorded for all species and subregions was 11.5% in the 2010 winter, compared to 0.5% recorded in the previous five summers, including years like 2005 where warm-water bleaching was prevalent. Highest mean mortality (15%–39%) was documented for inshore habitats where temperatures were coral species, and were 1–2 orders of magnitude higher for most species. Conclusions/Significance The cold-water anomaly of January 2010 caused the worst coral mortality on record for the Florida Reef Tract, highlighting the potential catastrophic impacts that unusual but extreme climatic events can have on the persistence of coral reefs. Moreover, habitats and species most severely affected were those found in high-coral cover, inshore, shallow reef habitats previously considered the “oases” of the region, having escaped declining patterns observed for more offshore habitats. Thus, the 2010 cold-water anomaly not only caused widespread coral mortality but also reversed prior resistance and resilience patterns that will take decades to recover. PMID:21853066

  15. Field-Analytical approach of land-sea records for elucidating the Younger Dryas Boundary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, T.; Courty, M. M.; Guichard, F.

    2009-12-01

    contrast, microfacies and debris composition of the recurrent fine dust/wildfire events would trace a series of a low energy airburst. Their record is expressed in the Audenge sequence by a series of water-laid laminae of charred pine residues formed of carbonaceous spherules wrapped by carbonaceous polymers that includes lonsdaleite crystals as detected by high resolution in situ micro-Raman analysis. This association suggests recurrent flash forest wildfires ignited by hot spray of carbon-rich debris, followed by heavy snow falls. The record from the Peruvian desert suggests a possible linkage between the repeated debris fall/wildfires during the Younger Dryas and the following irreversible aridity along the Peruvian cost. In contrast the Caspian record of the Younger Dryas period indicates more gradual changes, possibly buffered by the hydrological functioning of the Caspian sea in a complex region. The Audenge context offers the amplified signal needed to understand at local to global scales the spatio-temporal pattern of impact-airburst events.

  16. The presence of the Oldest Dryas in Spanish mountain landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; Andres, Nuria

    2015-04-01

    The important advances in our understanding of the Oldest Dryas (OD) in the evolution of the continental ice caps and the oceanic basin have not yet reached the European mountains, or have only affected a small part of them. In practice, research into the impact of this period on European mountains has focused on the Alps, where the Gschnitz stadial, a glacial re-advance phase, has been clearly differentiated. This is shown in the landscape by families of moraines present in many valleys, above all in small and medium ones, with minimum age 15.9 ka, but which may represent glacial advances of at least a thousand years older. Traces of this same phase are gradually appearing in other European mountains, including some mountains in Spain. The aim of this paper is to emphasise the importance of the Oldest Dryas in the configuration of high mountain landscape in Spain: (Sierra Nevada, Central System and Pyrenees), through the analysis of the latest studies of glacial chronology. In Sierra Nevada, in the SE sector of the Iberian Peninsula, the definitive deglaciation occurred just at the end of the OD, between 15 and 14.5 ka, according to dates obtained from many polished thresholds. There are moraines which obtain dates between 17 and 16 ka, very close to those of the Maximum Ice Extent (MIE), although as there are still only a few of these and because of slope instability they may be morainic boulders from the MIE phase which have been destabilized, disturbed or exhumed, so that more detailed research is required. Nevertheless, it is known for certain that the end of the OD was accompanied by the massive formation of rock glaciers, resting on the polished thresholds mentioned above and with their fronts stabilized at the end of the OD, around 14.5 ka, although their roots remained active until the Holocene. In the Central System, in both Gredos and Guadarrama, the OD was a phase of great advance after almost disappearing after the MIE. During the OD the glaciers

  17. Sporo-pollen Assemblage and Paleoclimate Events in Shelf Area of the Southern Yellow Sea Since 15 ka B.P.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟广兰; 韩有松; 王少青; 王珍岩

    2004-01-01

    Based on the authors'1986 to 1994 sporo-pollen assemblage analysis in the southern Yellow Sea area, data from 3 main cores were studied in combination with 14C, palaeomagnetic and thermoluminescence data. The evolution of the paleoclimate environments in the southern Yellow Sea since 15ka B.P. was revealed that, in deglaciation of the last glacial period, the climate of late glaciation transformed into that of postglaciation, accompanied by a series of violent climate fluctuations. These evolution events happened in a global climate background and related to the geographic changes in eastern China. We distinguished three short-term cooling events and two warming events. Among them, the sporo-pollen assemblage of subzone A1 showed some cold climate features indicating that a cooling event occurred at about 15-14ka. B.P. in early deglaciation. This subzone corresponds to the Oldest Dryas. In subzone A3, many drought-enduring herbal pollens and some few pollens of cold-resistant Picea, Abies, etc. were found, which indicated that a cooling event, with cold and arid climate, occurred at about 12-11ka. B.P. in late deglaciation. This subzone corresponds to the Younger Dryas. The sporo-pollen assemblage of zone B showed warm and arid climate features in postglaciation. Although the assemblage of subzone B2 indicated a cold and arid climate environment, the development of flora in subzone B2 climate was less cold than that in A3. Subzone B2 indicated a cooling event which occurred at about 9ka B.P. in early Holocene. Subzone A2, with some distinct differences from subzone A1 and A3, indicated a warming event which occurred at 14-13ka. B.P. and should correspond to a warming fluctuation. The sporo-pollen assemblage of zone C showed features of warm-moist flora and climate, and indicated a warming event which universally occurred along the coast of eastern China at 8-3ka B.P. in middle Holocene, and its duration was longer than that of any climate events mentioned above

  18. Fresh air for an event hall. Power/heat/cold generation; Gute Luft fuer Veranstaltungshalle. Kraft-Waerme-Kaelte-Kopplung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2009-02-15

    Many towns would be able to offer an attractive congress and cultural programme if the room climate in their event halls would be more comfortable. The city of Wunsidel modernized the space HVAC system of its event hall (''Fichtelgebirgshalle'') and installed a new cooling system. The operator had already used cogeneration systems with satisfactory results, so the existing cogeneration system was expanded and a refrigerating absorber was installed additionally. With the better room climate, the hall was booked for more events than ever before. (orig.)

  19. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J

    2013-08-01

    The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth are projected to increase and melt out dates change accordingly. Also, snow cover and depth will play an important role in protecting plant canopy from increasingly more frequent extreme winter warming events. Flower production of many Arctic plants is dependent on melt out timing, since season length determines resource availability for flower preformation. We erected snow fences to increase snow depth and shorten growing season, and counted flowers of six species over 5 years, during which we experienced two extreme winter warming events. Most species were resistant to snow cover increase, but two species reduced flower abundance due to shortened growing seasons. Cassiope tetragona responded strongly with fewer flowers in deep snow regimes during years without extreme events, while Stellaria crassipes responded partly. Snow pack thickness determined whether winter warming events had an effect on flower abundance of some species. Warming events clearly reduced flower abundance in shallow but not in deep snow regimes of Cassiope tetragona, but only marginally for Dryas octopetala. However, the affected species were resilient and individuals did not experience any long term effects. In the case of short or cold summers, a subset of species suffered reduced reproductive success, which may affect future plant composition through possible cascading competition effects. Extreme winter warming events were shown to expose the canopy to cold winter air. The following summer most of the overwintering flower buds could not produce flowers. Thus reproductive success is reduced if this occurs in subsequent years. We conclude that snow depth influences flower abundance by altering season length and by protecting or exposing flower buds to cold winter air, but most species studied are resistant to changes. Winter warming events, often occurring

  20. Nanodiamonds and wildfire evidence in the Usselo horizon postdate the Allerød-Younger Dryas boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoesel, Annelies; Hoek, Wim Z.; Braadbaart, Freek; Van Der Plicht, Johannes; Pennock, Gillian M.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2012-01-01

    The controversial Younger Dryas impact hypothesis suggests that at the onset of the Younger Dryas an extraterrestrial impact over North America caused a global catastrophe. The main evidence for this impact - after the other markers proved to be neither reproducible nor consistent with an impact - i

  1. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  2. Millennial scale precipitation changes over Easter Island (Southern Pacific) during MIS 3: Inter-hemispheric connections during North Atlantic abrupt cold events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Olga; Cacho, Isabel; Pla-Rabes, Sergi; Cañellas-Boltà, Núria; Pueyo, Juan Jose; Sáez, Alberto; Valero-Garcés, Blas L.; Giralt, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 climate has been globally characterized by the occurrence of millennial-scale climate variations defined over North Atlantic as Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Despite climate variability has been broadly explored over North Atlantic records, the response of the tropical and subtropical latitudes, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, still remains as a matter of debate. Rano Aroi peat record (Easter Island, Chile, 27°S) provides a unique opportunity to understand Southern Pacific atmospheric and oceanic changes during these stadial-interstadial transitions because of its exceptional location on the interplay of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the South Pacific Anticyclone (SPA) and the Southern Westerlies (SW). Rano Aroi record contains 8 main enhanced precipitation events between 70 and 40 kyr BP that can be correlated with the timing of Heinrich events 5, 5a and 6 as well as other cold stadials. These humid events are also present in other Southern Hemisphere continental sites and correspond to dry periods on Northern Hemisphere records. This opposite hydrologic trend has been explained by the latitudinal migration of ITCZ and has been supported by several climatic models. As Easter Island precipitation is mainly dependent on SPCZ storm track belt activity, we suggest that the southern migration of the ITCZ is associated to an expansion of SPCZ to the east. This process should be intimately related to a weakening of the Walker circulation, which is further supported by an estimation of d18Osw gradient along the equator for the same time period. Consequently, atmospheric and oceanic responses during these cold stadials and Heinrich events might lead to a configuration that resembles the warm ENSO state over Southern Pacific, as previously suggested by some global climatic models. Rano Aroi record clearly points out that shifts in hydrological cycle in tropical Southern

  3. Proliferation and demise of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean during the Younger Dryas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, Malcolm [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australian, Crawley, 6009, Western Australia (Australia); Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Taviani, Marco; Lopez Correa, Matthias; Remia, Alessandro [ISMAR-CNR, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Montagna, Paolo [LSCE, Av. de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, ISMAR-CNR, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Mortimer, Graham [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    Uranium-series and radiocarbon ages are reported for deep-sea corals Madrepora oculata, Desmophyllum dianthus, Lophelia pertusa and Caryophyllia smithii from the Mediterranean Sea. U-series dating indicates that deep-sea corals have persisted in the Mediterranean for over 480, 000 years, especially during cool inter-stadial periods. The most prolific period of growth however appears to have occurred within the Younger Dryas (YD) period from 12, 900 to 11, 700 years BP followed by a short ({approx} 330 years) phase of post-YD coral growth from 11, 230 to 10, 900 years BP. This indicates that deep-sea corals were prolific in the Mediterranean not only during the return to the more glacial-like conditions of the YD, but also following the rapid deglaciation and transition to warmer conditions that followed the end of the YD. Surprisingly, there is a paucity Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) coral ages, implying they were largely absent during this period when cold-water conditions were more prevalent. Radiocarbon ages show that the intermediate depth waters of the Mediterranean generally had {Delta}{sup 14}C compositions similar to surface waters, indicating that these waters were extremely well ventilated. The only exception is a narrow period in the YD (12, 500 {+-} 100 years BP) when several samples of Lophelia pertusa from the Ionian Sea had {Delta}{sup 14}C values falling significantly below the marine curve. Using a refined approach, isolation ages (T{sub isol}) of 300 years to 500 years are estimated for these intermediate (800-1000 m) depth waters relative to surface marine waters, indicating a reduction or absence of deep-water formation in the Ionian and adjacent Adriatic Seas during the YD. Contrary to previous findings, we find no evidence for widespread intrusion of low {Delta}{sup 14}C Atlantic waters into the Mediterranean. Prolific growth of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean ended abruptly at {approx} 10, 900 years BP, with many of the coral-bearing mounds

  4. Proliferation and demise of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean during the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Malcolm; Taviani, Marco; Montagna, Paolo; López Correa, Matthias; Remia, Alessandro; Mortimer, Graham

    2010-09-01

    Uranium-series and radiocarbon ages are reported for deep-sea corals Madrepora oculata, Desmophyllum dianthus, Lophelia pertusa and Caryophyllia smithii from the Mediterranean Sea. U-series dating indicates that deep-sea corals have persisted in the Mediterranean for over 480,000 years, especially during cool interstadial periods. The most prolific period of growth however appears to have occurred within the Younger Dryas (YD) period from 12,900 to 11,700 years BP followed by a short (~ 330 years) phase of post-YD coral growth from 11,230 to 10,900 years BP. This indicates that deep-sea corals were prolific in the Mediterranean not only during the return to the more glacial-like conditions of the YD, but also following the rapid deglaciation and transition to warmer conditions that followed the end of the YD. Surprisingly, there is a paucity Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) coral ages, implying they were largely absent during this period when cold-water conditions were more prevalent. Radiocarbon ages show that the intermediate depth waters of the Mediterranean generally had Δ 14C compositions similar to surface waters, indicating that these waters were extremely well ventilated. The only exception is a narrow period in the YD (12,500 ± 100 years BP) when several samples of Lophelia pertusa from the Ionian Sea had Δ 14C values falling significantly below the marine curve. Using a refined approach, isolation ages (τ isol) of 300 years to 500 years are estimated for these intermediate (800-1000 m) depth waters relative to surface marine waters, indicating a reduction or absence of deep-water formation in the Ionian and adjacent Adriatic Seas during the YD. Contrary to previous findings, we find no evidence for widespread intrusion of low Δ 14C Atlantic waters into the Mediterranean. Prolific growth of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean ended abruptly at ~ 10,900 years BP, with many of the coral-bearing mounds on the continental slopes being draped in a thin veneer

  5. Younger Dryas thermohaline circulation in the N-Atlantic: Irminger Sea versus Norwegian Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Antoon; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Luise Knudsen, Karen; Knutz, Paul C.; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Andresen, Camilla S.; Pearce, Christof

    2016-04-01

    Oceanographic observations from the early 1990's show a marked cooling and freshening of the Nordic Seas due to eastward expansion of East Greenland Current derived Polar Waters under influence of strong zonal atmospheric circulation(1). For the cold Younger Dryas (YD) period, ca 12,900 - 11,600 years ago, the impact of Northern Hemisphere late glacial melt water pulses on N- Atlantic thermohaline circulation has been discussed as a likely mechanism for cooling. Melt water discharge sources have been a matter of much debate, but recent evidence point to important melt water pulses emanating from the Arctic region (2, e.g. MacKenzie Valley discharge). The largest volume of these fresh water masses reached the North Atlantic via Fram Strait, less through the Canadian archipelago. During preceding Bølling-Allerød warming, the size of the Laurentide Ice Sheet may have been still large enough to have influenced atmospheric planetary waves resulting in a more zonal Atlantic jet axis(3). In addition, Northern Hemisphere high summer insolation favored a northward displaced west wind belt forcing surface waters away from the Greenland coast. Hence, in analogue to recent observations, ice-loaded meltwater masses in the western Greenland Sea were forced eastward, creating a pool of cold,low salinity (ice-loaded) surface water masses in the Norwegian Sea(4), while transport of cold Polar Water via Denmark Strait to the Irminger Sea would be suppressed. Our own sediment core data from offshore Iceland, Greenland and Davis Strait(5,6,7)together with results from lake studies in southern Greenland(8) point to an active Irminger Current and well-developed Irminger Sea Water subsurface transport towards Davis Strait. Subsequent incorporation of the latter water mass into the south-flowing Labrador Current may have contributed to tidewater glacier melting in eastern Canada and eventually triggering of the H0 meltwater pulse. The sediment core data indicate Irminger Sea deep

  6. Cold surges and dust events: Establishing the link between the East Asian Winter Monsoon and the Chinese loess record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Wei, Junhong; Lin, Zhaohui; Shao, Yaping; He, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese loess/palaeosol succession is one of the most comprehensive and intensively studied archives of Neogene and Quaternary global palaeoclimate events. Its stratigraphic details are widely recognised to indicate close links to the history and function of the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) - one of the most active components of the Earth's climate system. But the formal meteorological links between the EAWM and dust emission, both in the present day and in the past, have not been established and with it, the veracity of the loess record as an indicator of the EAWM questioned. Here we show that present day major dust events over northern China, while largely occurring during spring, are nevertheless 'conditioned' by the strength of the preceding EAWM. We also demonstrate, for the first time, a close link between the occurrence of dust events and the strength of the EAWM. From these findings, linked to global-scale climate model simulations, we conclude that the Chinese loess succession provides a convincing proxy record of the strength of the East Asian Winter Monsoon.

  7. A Younger Dryas plateau icefield in the Monadhliath, Scotland, and implications for regional palaeoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Clare M.; Lukas, Sven; Carr, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    A record of Younger Dryas glaciation in Scotland is well established. However, the role of the Monadhliath, a significant plateau area extending over 840 km2 in central Scotland, has never been investigated systematically. We present the first systematic glacial geomorphological mapping across the whole region, which has led to the identification of hitherto-unrecorded glacial and associated landforms. The spatial distribution of these landforms indicates that the last phase of glaciation in the area was that of a local plateau icefield. In addition, a clear morphostratigraphical signature provides a strong indication that the icefield dates to the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka), which is supported by numerical ages in the southeast of the study area. Based on the geomorphological evidence and 2D glacier surface profile modelling, a 280 km2 icefield is reconstructed. A novel approach is introduced to quantify plateau icefield thickness for equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and palaeoprecipitation calculations, resulting in greater overall data confidence compared to traditional reconstruction methods. The ELA for the whole icefield is calculated to be 714 ± 25 m, whilst the ELAs of individual outlet glaciers range from 560 m in the west to 816 m in the east, demonstrating a significant W-E precipitation gradient across the region during the Younger Dryas. These ELAs compare well with those calculated for Younger Dryas ice masses reconstructed in neighbouring regions and are in good agreement with overall precipitation patterns suggested for Scotland during this time. Whilst the total amount of precipitation calculated from these ELAs is highly dependent on the method used, irrespective of this, the study suggests a more arid Younger Dryas climate in the region compared to the present day.

  8. Investigating the impact of Lake Agassiz drainage routes on the 8.2 ka cold event with a climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-X. Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The 8.2 ka event is the most prominent abrupt climate change in the Holocene and is often believed to result from catastrophic drainage of proglacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway (LAO that routed through the Hudson Bay and the Labrador Sea into the North Atlantic Ocean, and perturbed Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC. One key assumption of this triggering mechanism is that the LAO freshwater drainage was dispersed over the Labrador Sea. Recent data, however, show no evidence of lowered δ18O values, indicative of low salinity, from the open Labrador Sea around 8.2 ka. Instead, negative δ18O anomalies are found close to the east coast of North America, extending as far south as Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, suggesting that the freshwater drainage may have been confined to a long stretch of continental shelf before fully mixing with North Atlantic Ocean water. Here we conduct a sensitivity study that examines the effects of a southerly drainage route on the 8.2 ka event with the ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE model. Hosing experiments of four routing scenarios, where freshwater was introduced to the Labrador Sea in the northerly route and to three different locations along the southerly route, were performed to investigate the routing effects on model responses. The modeling results show that a southerly drainage route is possible but generally yields reduced climatic consequences in comparison to those of a northerly route. This finding implies that more freshwater would be required for a southerly route than for a northerly route to produce the same climate anomaly. The implicated large amount of LAO drainage for a southerly routing scenario is in line with a recent geophysical modelling study of gravitational effects on sea-level change associated with the 8.2 ka event, which suggests that the volume of drainage might be larger than previously estimated.

  9. Hydrological and vegetational response to the Younger Dryas climatic oscillations: a high resolution case study from Quoyloo Meadow, Orkney, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, David; Abrook, Ashley; Timms, Rhys; Matthews, Ian; Palmer, Adrian; Milner, Alice; Candy, Ian; Sachse, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (Loch Lomond) Stadial is a well defined period of cold climate that in North West Europe punctuated the climatic amelioration during the Last Glacial - Interglacial Transition (LGIT ca. 16-8 ka). A palaeolake record from Quoyloo Meadow, Orkney Islands (N59.067, E-3.309) has been analysed for pollen and stable isotopes on biomarker lipids. n-Alkanes from terrestrial and aquatic sources are present throughout the core. The average chain length (ACL) is relatively low during the interstadial (~28.0) and shows a distinct increase during the Younger Dryas (to 29.0 +), attributed to an increase in grasses and drought resistant shrubs (e.g. Artemisia, Castañeda et al., 2009, Bunting, 1994). At the beginning of the Holocene, the ACL rapidly drops to 28.3 and from thereon gently increases again to ~29.0. There is a continued odd-over-even n-alkane predominance, although even n-alkanes are present in greater quantities in the interstadial, indicating an increasing terrestrial contribution in the Holocene. Ongoing deuterium isotope measurements of the n-alkanes will give independent evidence for palaeohydrological changes and can be compared to the other proxy evidence within the same core. Using a combination of nC29 and nC23 (terrestrial and aquatic end-members, respectively), a change in relative humidity (rH) can be qualified. This is based on the idea that terrestrial vegetation is affected by evapotranspiration processes, whereas aquatic vegetation is not (Rach et al., 2014). This data is supported by a high resolution palynological study; the contiguously sampled record demonstrates ecosystem/environmental responses to millennial-scale climatic change and allows for the possible detection of vegetation shifts at the sub-millennial scale. Vegetation aside, the pollen data can further aid in the interpretation of the recorded n-alkanes and isotopic analyses. This data is placed within a chronological framework derived from a high resolution crypto- and

  10. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  11. Indian summer monsoon forcing on the deglacial polar cold reversals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Virupaxa K Banakar; Sweta Baidya; Alexander M Piotrowski; D Shankar

    2017-08-01

    The deglacial transition from the last glacial maximum at $\\sim$20 kiloyears before present (ka) to the Holocene (11.7 ka to Present) was interrupted by millennial-scale cold reversals, viz., Antarctic Cold Reversal ($\\sim$14.5–12.8 ka) and Greenland Younger Dryas ($\\sim$12.8–11.8 ka) which had different timings and extent of cooling in each hemisphere. The cause of this synchronously initiated, but different hemispheric cooling during these cold reversals (Antarctic Cold Reversal $\\sim$3∘C and Younger Dryas $\\sim$10∘C) is elusive because CO2, the fundamental forcing for deglaciation, and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, the driver of antiphased bipolar climate response, both fail to explain this asymmetry. We use centennial-resolution records of the local surface water $\\delta ^{18}\\hbox {O}$ of the Eastern Arabian Sea, which constitutes a proxy for the precipitation associated with the Indian Summer Monsoon, and other tropical precipitation records to deduce the role of tropical forcing in the polar cold reversals. We hypothesize a mechanism for tropical forcing, via the Indian Summer Monsoons, of the polar cold reversals by migration of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone and the associated cross-equatorial heat transport.

  12. Investigating the impact of Lake Agassiz drainage routes on the 8.2 ka cold event with climate modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-X. Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The 8.2 ka event is the most prominent abrupt climate change in the Holocene and is widely believed to result from catastrophic drainage of proglacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway (LAO that routed through the Hudson Bay and the Labrador Sea into the North Atlantic Ocean, and perturbed Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC. One key assumption of this triggering mechanism is that the LAO freshwater drainage was spread over the Labrador Sea. Recent data, however, show no evidence of lowered δ18O values from the open Labrador Sea around 8.2 ka. Instead, negative δ18O anomalies are found close to the east coast of North America, extending as far south as Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, suggesting that the freshwater drainage was probably confined to a long stretch of continental shelf before fully mixing with North Atlantic Ocean water. Here we conduct a sensitivity study that examines the effects of this southerly drainage route on the 8.2 ka event with the ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE model. Hosing experiments of four different routing scenarios, where freshwater was introduced to the Labrador Sea in the northerly route (R1 and to three different locations (Grand Banks – R2, George Bank – R3, and Cape Hatteras – R4 on the southerly route, were performed with 0.45 m sea-level equivalent (SLE, 0.90 m SLE, and 1.35 m SLE of freshwater introduced over 5 years to investigate the routing effects on model responses. The modelling results show that a southerly drainage route is plausible but generally yields reduced climatic consequences in comparison to those of a northerly route. This finding implies that more freshwater would be required for a southerly route than for a northerly route to produce the same climate anomaly.

  13. Numerical Prediction of Cold Season Fog Events over Complex Terrain: the Performance of the WRF Model During MATERHORN-Fog and Early Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhaoxia; Chachere, Catherine N.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    A field campaign to study cold season fog in complex terrain was conducted as a component of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program from 07 January to 01 February 2015 in Salt Lake City and Heber City, Utah, United States. To support the field campaign, an advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to produce real-time forecasts and model evaluation. This paper summarizes the model performance and preliminary evaluation of the model against the observations. Results indicate that accurately forecasting fog is challenging for the WRF model, which produces large errors in the near-surface variables, such as relative humidity, temperature, and wind fields in the model forecasts. Specifically, compared with observations, the WRF model overpredicted fog events with extended duration in Salt Lake City because it produced higher moisture, lower wind speeds, and colder temperatures near the surface. In contrast, the WRF model missed all fog events in Heber City, as it reproduced lower moisture, higher wind speeds, and warmer temperatures against observations at the near-surface level. The inability of the model to produce proper levels of near-surface atmospheric conditions under fog conditions reflects uncertainties in model physical parameterizations, such as the surface layer, boundary layer, and microphysical schemes.

  14. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm- and cold-season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm-season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold-season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. We further hypothesize that the transient mass fluxes associated with the temporal-spatial dynamics of interflow govern the timing of shallow landslide initiation, and subsequent debris flow mobilization. The first objective of this study is to investigate this relationship. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations; availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions; and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions

  15. Blade-order-dependent radiocarbon variability in brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflected a cold Oyashio water intrusion event in an embayment of the Sanriku coast, northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, N.; Fukuda, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Nagata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater varies greatly, both geographically and with depth. This "reservoir effect" is thought to be reflected in the radiocarbon content (∆14C) of marine organisms, via DIC fixation by primary producers and subsequent trophic transfer. The ∆14C of marine organismal soft tissues might thus provide unique information about their habitats, diets, migration and other environmental histories. However, the effectiveness of this approach has yet to be extensively explored, with data on ∆14C variability in soft tissues of marine organisms being markedly limited. Here we examined whether ∆14C values of individual pinnate blades (leaf-like structures) of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflect the ∆14C of DIC in the water current prevailing at the time of blade formation. The study was conducted in Otsuchi Bay located in the Sanriku coastal region, northeastern Japan, where 14C-depleted cold Oyashio current and warm Tsugaru current (high ∆14C) converge, affecting the physiology and growth of marine organisms growing there. U. pinnatifida individuals cultured in the bay (length of saprophytes, 140-215 cm) were harvested in April 2014 and ∆14C of blades were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Younger blades formed after the Oyashio water intrusion had significantly lower ∆14C values compared to older blades formed before the event. The ∆14C values of younger and older blades were generally consistent with the ∆14C of DIC in Oyashio (-60.5 ‰) and Tsugaru (24.9 ‰) waters, respectively. Thus, despite possible turnover of organic carbon in seaweed soft tissues, blade-order-dependent ∆14C variability appeared to strongly reflect the Oyashio intrusion event (radiocarbon shift) in the bay.

  16. Cold Urticaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Cold urticaria By Mayo Clinic Staff Cold urticaria (ur-tih-KAR-e-uh) is a skin reaction to cold. Skin that has ... in contact with cold develops reddish, itchy welts (hives). The severity of cold urticaria symptoms varies widely. ...

  17. Testing Younger Dryas ET Impact (YDB) Evidence at Hall’s Cave, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, T. W.; Lundelius, E.; Kennett, J.; Kennett, D. J.; West, A.; Wolbach, W. S.

    2009-12-01

    soot at 2400 ppm, magnetic spherules, and carbon spherules, all of which we interpret as evidence for a unique chronostratigraphic marker (YDB) in the Western Hemisphere. Because the age of this horizon is ~ 13,000 CAL BP, we interpret the age of the event as the beginning of the Younger Dryas cooling. Regional soil erosion began ~15,000 CAL BP and continued until 7000 CAL BP, but dating suggests that there is no discontinuity or hiatus in deposition, and thus, the exotic materials in that layer are not considered to be erosional accumulations. Future analyses include sub-centimeter sampling over the YD boundary, quantification of nanodiamonds and other event-proxies within 1000 yr of the boundary and in sediments several 1000 years older and younger, continued refinement of the AMS 14C record to determine within 50 yr the location of 12,900 CAL BP datum and high resolution analysis of small animal biostratigraphy.

  18. Dynamics of the Cold Water Event off the Southeast Coast of the United States in the Summer of 2003: An Application of NASA's Remote Sensing Data to Coastal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dongliang; Savtchenko, Andrey; Li, Chunyan,

    2004-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments onboard of Terra and Aqua satellites provide, for the first time, concurrent measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean color, which are suitable for coastal upwelling studies. The accuracy, the 1-km spatial resolution, and the almost complete daily coverage of the MODIS data compared with historical measurements make it advantageous for resolving important coastal fronts of chlorophyll concentration and temperature. The cold SST anomaly during summer 2003 off the coast of the South Atlantic Bight is an event that is comprehensively covered by NASA's MODIS and SeaWinds satellite observations. These data combined with in situ tide gauge, mooring, and ship measurements can be used to identify important dynamics responsible for the anomalous cold water event. The analysis of the data suggests that coastal upwelling occurs in the climatological summer forced by the climatological southerlies over the South Atlantic Bight area in summer. However, the strong buoyancy barrier in summer prevents the cold water below the thermocline from reaching the ocean surface. In summer 2003, the southwesterlies in July through August were extraordinarily strong and persistent, which generated the upwelling currents strong enough to overcome the buoyancy resistance. The results of this analysis demonstrate the possibility of monitoring and forecasting the event using combination of the satellite and in situ observations. The MODIS data are archived and distributed by the NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data can be accessed via the URL http://wwv.daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/MODIS.

  19. Bayesian chronological analyses consistent with synchronous age of 12,835-12,735 Cal BP for Younger Dryas boundary on four continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennett, James P.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Culleton, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis posits that a cosmic impact across much of the Northern Hemisphere deposited the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) layer, containing peak abundances in a variable assemblage of proxies, including magnetic and glassy impact-related spherules, high-temperature mineral...

  20. Strong middepth warming and weak radiocarbon imprints in the equatorial Atlantic during Heinrich 1 and Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeab, Syee; Friedrich, Tobias; Timmermann, Axel; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a benthic foraminiferal multiproxy record of eastern equatorial Atlantic (EEA) middepth water (1295 m) covering the last deglacial. We show that EEA middepth water temperatures were elevated by 3.9 ± 0.5°C and 5.2 ± 1.2°C during Heinrich event 1 (H1) and Younger Dryas (YD), respectively. The radiocarbon content of the EEA middepth during H1 and YD is relatively low and comparable to the values of the pre-H1 episode and Bølling-Allerød, respectively. A transient Earth system model simulation, which mimics the observed deglacial Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) history, qualitatively reproduces the major features of the EEA proxy records. The simulation results suggest that fresh water-induced weakening of the AMOC leads to a vertical shift of the horizon of Southern Ocean-sourced water and a stronger influence of EEA sea surface temperatures via mixing. Our findings reaffirm the lack of a distinctive signature of radiocarbon depletion and therefore do not support the notion of interhemispheric exchanges of strongly radiocarbon-depleted middepth water across the tropical Atlantic during H1 and YD. Our temperature reconstruction presents a critical zonal and water depth extension of existing tropical Atlantic data and documents a large-scale and basin-wide warming across the thermocline and middepth of the tropical Atlantic during H1 and YD. Significant difference in the timing and pace of H1 middepth warming between tropical Atlantic and North Atlantic likely points to a limited role of the tropical Atlantic middepth warming in the rapid heat buildup in the North Atlantic middepth.

  1. Origin and provenance of spherules and magnetic grains at the Younger Dryas boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingzhe; Sharma, Mukul; LeCompte, Malcolm A.; Demitroff, Mark N.; Landis, Joshua D.

    2013-09-01

    One or more bolide impacts are hypothesized to have triggered the Younger Dryas cooling at ∼12.9 ka. In support of this hypothesis, varying peak abundances of magnetic grains with iridium and magnetic microspherules have been reported at the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB). We show that bulk sediment and/or magnetic grains/microspherules collected from the YDB sites in Arizona, Michigan, New Mexico, New Jersey, and Ohio have 187Os/188Os ratios ≥1.0, similar to average upper continental crust (= 1.3), indicating a terrestrial origin of osmium (Os) in these samples. In contrast, bulk sediments from YDB sites in Belgium and Pennsylvania exhibit 187Os/188Os ratios meteoritic contribution. The YDB site in Pennsylvania is remarkable in yielding 2- to 5-mm diameter spherules containing minerals such as suessite (Fe-Ni silicide) that form at temperatures in excess of 2000 °C. Gross texture, mineralogy, and age of the spherules appear consistent with their formation as ejecta from an impact 12.9 ka ago. The 187Os/188Os ratios of the spherules and their leachates are often low, but Os in these objects is likely terrestrially derived. The rare earth element patterns and Sr and Nd isotopes of the spherules indicate that their source lies in 1.5-Ga Quebecia terrain in the Grenville Province of northeastern North America.

  2. The micromorphology of Younger Dryas-aged black mats from Nevada, Arizona, Texas and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Parks, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Black mats are organic-rich sediments and soils that form in wet environments associated with spring discharge. Micromorphological and geochemical analyses of 25 black mats dating to the Younger Dryas Chronozone (12.9-11.7 ka) and early Holocene were conducted to determine their composition and depositional environment. Samples were collected from Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and Nevada. Micromorphological analyses were conducted on thin sections using polarized and blue fluorescent light. These analyses determined that black mats contain humic acids, fine (5-20 μm) plant fragments, diatoms, phytoliths, and gastropods. The dominant type of organic matter in black mats is derived from herbaceous plants, contradicting previous studies that supported algal or charcoal sources. Differences in the micromorphological characteristics of the samples revealed that black mats formed as three different types, organic horizons, moist soils and, ponded sediments, depending on their topographic position in relation to the water table. The microscopic evidence found in black mats supports the presence of widespread wet environments in Nevada and Arizona during the Younger Dryas Chronozone, clearly indicating a sustained period of greater effective moisture, optimal for spring discharge and black mat formation.

  3. Glacier equilibrium line altitudes as palaeoclimatic information sources - examples from the Alpine Younger Dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, H.; Sailer, R.; Hertl, A.; Schuh, M.

    2003-04-01

    Equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) and flucutations of the ELA (dELA) of well dated glacial advances are valuable terrestrial sources for palaeoclimatic information, which are physically well understood (Kuhn 1981, Kaser and Osmaston 2001). Values of dELA can be used to infer quantitatively standard climatic parameters like precipitation and precipitation change. ELAs of former glaciers are usually calculated from maps of the glacier topography based on the moraines and related geomorphological features. Then either the analytical glacial-meterological model for ELA fluctuations by Kuhn (1981) or the statistical parameterization of the climate at the ELA in terms of "summer temperature" and "precipitation" by Ohmura et al. (1992) can be used for palaeoclimatic interpretation. As dELA is influenced both by factors governing accumulation and ablation, some external climatic information on one parameter is necessary to obtain the other. Moraines of the Younger Dryas "Egesen-Stadial" can be found throughout the Alps. Early Younger Dryas (Egesen-I, Ivy-Ochs et al. 1996) dELAs show a distinct spatial pattern. They were highest (ca. 450-600 m against "present-day") in areas exposed towards the West and Northwest. In the central valleys, it was in the order of -300 m and less. Presently, almost 200 data points are available. Summer temperature depression (dTs) can be derived from the Younger Dryas timberline depression and other proxy data (Ammann and Oldfield 2000). It seems to be in the order of -3.5 K in the central Alps. Along the northern and western fringe of the Alps, it may be somewhat larger (-4 to -4.5 K). dELA and dTs values are then used to calculate precipitation change (dP). Early Younger Dryas climate in the central valleys of the Alps seems to have been considerably drier than today (dP -30%). In areas open to the West and Northwest, precipitation seems to have been the same as today or even slightly higher (dP 0 - +10%). These results agree well with the

  4. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest ...

  5. Rapid response of alpine timberline vegetation to the Younger Dryas climate oscillation in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, Mel A.; Jodry, Margret A.

    2000-01-01

    Paleobotanical records from two high-altitude (>3300 m) sites in Colorado show a clear and immediate response to the Younger Dryas climate oscillation. The Black Mountain Lake and Sky Pond records indicate that alpine timberline migrated upslope to near-modern elevations during the late Bølling-Allerød (13.6 12.9 ka). Subsequent declines in arboreal pollen percentages and accumulation rates during the Younger Dryas interval (12.9 11.7 ka) reflect a downslope displacement of the alpine timberline ecotone of 60 120 m in elevation. This change translates to a cooling of summer temperature by ˜0.4 0.9 °C and is consistent with proposed Younger Dryas advances of alpine glaciers in the Rocky Mountains to positions close to Little Ice Age maxima. Alpine timberline readvanced upslope to elevations above both sites between 11.7 and 11.4 ka. The concomitant response of temperature-sensitive alpine timberline vegetation in Colorado and late-glacial changes in North Atlantic thermohaline circulation implicates a rapid, widespread atmospheric transmission of the Younger Dryas climate oscillation.

  6. 1961-2010年山西省寒潮的气候特征与可能成因%Climatology of the Cold Wave Events of Shanxi Province in 1961-2010 and the Possible Reasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚红瑞; 王咏梅; 范艳琴; 魏海茹; 杨腊富

    2014-01-01

    In this paper,the cold wave events in Shanxi Province were analyzed using Kendall-tau analysis、Mann-Kendall test and correlation analysis based on the daily temperature data observed by 71 meteorological stations and NCEP reanalysis data.The results show that the days of cold wave were decreased in recent 50 years,but the change display regional differences:reduced in Northern, increased in central region and southern did not change significantly. The intensity of cold wave did not change significantly in Shanxi Province . The date of first appeared of cold wave was postpone,meanwhile,the date of final was postpone,and the feature is more prominent in the 21st century. Warming leads to decrease of the frequency of cold wave, and cold wave start late, end early. Moreover, the frequency of province-wide cold wave, such extreme weather was increased. There was significant correlation between the frequency of cold wave in Shanxi Province and the positive anomaly of height at high latitudes coordinate the negative anomalies of height at Ural Mountains, Lake Baikal etc. in 500hPa height field. The cold air come from the Arctic Ocean, West Siberia and the East Siberian in winter is major source of cold wave. The dipole mode in North Atlantic sea surface temperature field contact closely with the cold wave in Shanxi Province, it may act as predicted signal field.%利用山西71个台站逐日气温资料和 NCEP 500 hPa 高度场、海平面气压场、海温格点场再分析资料,采用Kendall-tau 非参数方法、Mann-Kendall 突变检验和相关分析法,研究山西1961-2010年寒潮的变化特征。结果表明,1961年以来,山西寒潮日数呈减少趋势,但存在区域差异,北部寒潮减少,中部寒潮增加,南部变化不明显。近50年来,山西寒潮强度变化趋势不明显,但年代际差异显著。20世纪90年代以来,山西寒潮初次出现的日期在推迟,而寒潮结束的日期却在

  7. The Y. D. and climate abrupt events in the early and middle Holocene: Stalagmite oxygen isotope record from Maolan, Guizhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jiaming; YUAN Daoxian; CHENG Hai; LIN Yushi; ZHANG Meiliang; WANG Fuxing; R. L. Edwards; WANG Hua; RAN Jingcheng

    2005-01-01

    The isotope records which range from 3.9 kaBP to 15.7 kaBP with an average resolution of 90 a have been obtained from 45 cm to 193.6 cm of the upper part of D4 stalagmite from Dongguo Cave in Libo, Guizhou, by using system TIMS U-series dating and carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses.The study indicates that the last cold event, the YD (Younger Dryas) event, of the last glacial period was apparently shown in D4 record, which started from 12.80 kaBP and ended in 11.58 kaBP, with a great range of drop in temperature. The end of the last glacial period was consistent with the termination I in oceanic isotope records and was with time limit of 11.3 kaBP. The three most distinct cold events in the early and middle Holocene occurred respectively in 10.91 kaBP, 8.27 kaBP and 4.75 kaBP, with a range of drop in temperature reaching 2-5℃. The climate abrupt events in thousand and hundred years scale recorded in stalagmite δ18O can be compared to those in GISP2 ice cores from Greenland in their happening time and the range of their lasting time. The cold events in 8.27 kaBP and 4.75 kaBP can also be compared to CC3 stalagmite records in Ireland, which indicate that climate changes of short range in China monsoon areas, western Europe and polar regions, have the same driving factor. This has a global significance. In addition, the trend of record curves in some time- stages is apparently different, which reflects probably the difference between environment in monsoon climate areas and in polar regions.

  8. Younger-Dryas cooling and sea-ice feedbacks were prominent features of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wiles, Gregory C.; Groves, Pamela; Kunz, Michael L.; Baughman, Carson A.; Reanier, Richard E.

    2017-08-01

    Declining sea-ice extent is currently amplifying climate warming in the Arctic. Instrumental records at high latitudes are too short-term to provide sufficient historical context for these trends, so paleoclimate archives are needed to better understand the functioning of the sea ice-albedo feedback. Here we use the oxygen isotope values of wood cellulose in living and sub-fossil willow shrubs (δ18Owc) (Salix spp.) that have been radiocarbon-dated (14C) to produce a multi-millennial record of climatic change on Alaska's North Slope during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (13,500-7500 calibrated 14C years before present; 13.5-7.5 ka). We first analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of δ18Owc in living willows growing at upland sites and found that over the last 30 years δ18Owc values in individual growth rings correlate with local summer temperature and inter-annual variations in summer sea-ice extent. Deglacial δ18Owc values from 145 samples of subfossil willows clearly record the Allerød warm period (∼13.2 ka), the Younger Dryas cold period (12.9-11.7 ka), and the Holocene Thermal Maximum (11.7-9.0 ka). The magnitudes of isotopic changes over these rapid climate oscillations were ∼4.5‰, which is about 60% of the differences in δ18Owc between those willows growing during the last glacial period and today. Modeling of isotope-precipitation relationships based on Rayleigh distillation processes suggests that during the Younger Dryas these large shifts in δ18Owc values were caused by interactions between local temperature and changes in evaporative moisture sources, the latter controlled by sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea. Based on these results and on the effects that sea-ice have on climate today, we infer that ocean-derived feedbacks amplified temperature changes and enhanced precipitation in coastal regions of Arctic Alaska during warm times in the past. Today, isotope values in willows on the North Slope of Alaska are similar

  9. Younger-Dryas cooling and sea-ice feedbacks were prominent features of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wiles, Gregory C.; Groves, Pamela; Kunz, Michael L.; Baughman, Carson; Reanier, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Declining sea-ice extent is currently amplifying climate warming in the Arctic. Instrumental records at high latitudes are too short-term to provide sufficient historical context for these trends, so paleoclimate archives are needed to better understand the functioning of the sea ice-albedo feedback. Here we use the oxygen isotope values of wood cellulose in living and sub-fossil willow shrubs (δ18Owc) (Salix spp.) that have been radiocarbon-dated (14C) to produce a multi-millennial record of climatic change on Alaska's North Slope during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (13,500–7500 calibrated 14C years before present; 13.5–7.5 ka). We first analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of δ18Owc in living willows growing at upland sites and found that over the last 30 years δ18Owc values in individual growth rings correlate with local summer temperature and inter-annual variations in summer sea-ice extent. Deglacial δ18Owcvalues from 145 samples of subfossil willows clearly record the Allerød warm period (∼13.2 ka), the Younger Dryas cold period (12.9–11.7 ka), and the Holocene Thermal Maximum (11.7–9.0 ka). The magnitudes of isotopic changes over these rapid climate oscillations were ∼4.5‰, which is about 60% of the differences in δ18Owc between those willows growing during the last glacial period and today. Modeling of isotope-precipitation relationships based on Rayleigh distillation processes suggests that during the Younger Dryas these large shifts in δ18Owc values were caused by interactions between local temperature and changes in evaporative moisture sources, the latter controlled by seaice extent in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea. Based on these results and on the effects that sea-ice have on climate today, we infer that ocean-derived feedbacks amplified temperature changes and enhanced precipitation in coastal regions of Arctic Alaska during warm times in the past. Today, isotope values in willows on the North Slope of Alaska are

  10. Younger Dryas To Mid-Holocene Environmental History Of The Lowlands Of NW Transylvania, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurdean, A.; Mosbrugger, V.; Onac, B. P.; Polyak, V.; Veres, D.

    2007-12-01

    Pollen, micro-charcoal and total carbon analyses on sediments from the Turbuta profile located in the Transylvanian Basin (NW Romania) reveal information on previously unknown Younger Dryas to mid-Holocene environmental changes. The chronostratigraphy relies on AMS 14C measurements on organic matter and U/Th TIMS datings of snail shells. Results indicate the presence of Pinus and Betula open woodlands with small populations of Picea, Ulmus, Alnus and Salix before 12,000 cal yr BP, correlates well with the environmental developments expected for Younger Dryas stadial. A fairly abrupt replacement of Pinus and Betula by Ulmus dominated woodlands at ca. 11,900 cal. yr BP, likely represents competition effects of vegetation driven by climate warming at the onset of the Holocene. By 11,000 cal yr BP, the woodlands were increasingly diverse and dense with the expansion of Quercus, Fraxinus and Tilia, the establishment of Corylus, and the decline of upland herbaceous and shrubs taxa. The marked expansion of Quercus accompanied by Tilia between 10,500 and 8,000 cal yr BP could be the result of low effective moisture associated with both low elevation of the site and with regional change towards a drier climate. At 10,000 cal. yr BP Corylus spread across the region, and by 8,000 cal yr BP it replaced Quercus as a dominant forest constituent, with only little representation of Picea abies. Carpinus became established around 5,500 cal yr BP, but it was only a minor constituent in local woodlands until ca. 5,000 cal yr BP. Results from this study also indicate that the woodlands in the lowlands of Turbuta were never closed.

  11. A new concept for paleohydrological evolution of the Younger Dryas in NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouimetarhan, Ilham; Prange, Matthias; Gonzalez, Catalina; Dupont, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    The late deglacial interval from approximately 13 to 11 kyr BP contains some of the best documented abrupt climate changes in the Past, the Younger Dryas (YD). It is also an interval when the bipolar climatic signature of millennial-scale changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is well expressed. Here we present a high-resolution palynological record from core GeoB16205-4 (1°21.11'N, 43°05.80'W), retrieved off the Parnaíba River mouth, southeast of the Amazon River (~1955 m water depth). Pollen and organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst assemblages indicate a predominantly wet climate during the YD in the nowadays semi-arid Nordeste, whereby a second phase between ~12.3 and 11.7 kyr BP is wetter than the period before. This is recorded by a strong increase in the concentrations of river plume dinoflagellate cyst assemblages indicative of a stratified surface water column and reduced salinity environments, as well as a drop in grass pollen and microcharcoal particle concentrations along with strong fluctuations in the representation of rain forest, gallery forest and tree ferns suggesting year-round humid conditions. This shift from a relatively wet first phase to a much wetter second phase is in agreement with the transient TRACE-21k coupled climate model simulation which shows a first pluvial Parnaíba stage from ~12.8 to 12.3 kyr BP and a second stronger pluvial stage between ~12.3 and 11.7 kyr BP to be related to a very weak AMOC due to meltwater pulses in the North Atlantic. The AMOC variation induces a steep temperature gradient between the Southern and the Northern Hemisphere which forces a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and its associated rainfall. The two-step hydroclimatic and environmental evolution during the Younger Dryas has not been documented previously in this region.

  12. A Study on a Snowband Associated with a Coastal Front and Cold-Air Damming Event of 3-4 February 1998 along the Eastern Coast of the Korean Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-Gyoo LEE; Ming XUE

    2013-01-01

    A 24-h simulation with the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) nonhydrostatic model is performed for the heavy snowfall event of 3 4 February 1998 along the eastern coast of Korean Peninsula;the results are used to understand the snowfall process,including why the precipitation maxima formed along the Yeongdong coastal region rather than over the mountain slope and ridge top during.The numerical simulation with a 4-km horizontal grid spacing and 43 levels reproduces very well the narrow snowband located off the eastern Korean coast,away from,instead of over,the Yeongdong coastal mountain range.The general evolution of the snowband agrees quite well with radar observations,while the water-equivalent precipitation amount agrees reasonably well with radar precipitation estimate.The simulation results clearly show that the snow band developed due to the lifting by a coastal front th atdeveloped because of the damming of cold air against the eastern slope of the coastal mountain range.The damming was enhanced by the advection of cold air by a low-level inountain-parallel jet from the north,formed due to geostrophic adjustnent as the on-shore upslope air was decelerated by the mountain blocking.As the onshore flow weakened later due to synoptic-scale flow pattern change,the cold front propagated off shore and the precipitation dissipated.

  13. Gymnodinium corollarium sp. nov. (Dinophyceae) - a new cold-water dinoflagellate responsible for cyst sedimentation events in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundström, Annica; Kremp, Anke; Daugbjerg, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    unidentified cyst type commonly found in sediment trap samples collected from the northern and central open Baltic Sea. Based on LSU rDNA comparison, these cysts were assigned to G. corollarium. The cysts have been observed in many parts of the Baltic Sea, indicating the ecologic versatility of the species...... revealed a preference of G. corollarium for low salinities and temperatures, confirming it to be a cold-water species well adapted to the brackish water conditions in the Baltic Sea. At nitrogen-deplete conditions, G. corollarium cultures produced small, slightly oval cysts resembling a previously...

  14. Cold Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores Canker Sore or Cold Sore? Mouth Sores: Caused By Student Stress? games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | ...

  15. Diagnosis of a Cold Wave Weather Event in March 2011 in Ningxia%2011年3月宁夏一次寒潮天气过程诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈豫英; 陈楠; 聂金鑫; 穆建华; 辛尧胜

    2012-01-01

    利用常规气象观测资料、NCEP/NCAR 1°×1°再分析资料等,采用天气动力学诊断方法,对2011年3月13~15日宁夏寒潮天气过程的影响系统配置、冷空气移动路径及高低空环流形势演变等进行诊断分析,并结合宁夏寒潮和大风沙尘预报指标,分析了强降温和大风沙尘的主要成因。结果表明:过程前期宁夏各地升温强烈,有强冷空气在西西伯利亚堆积并向南爆发造成此次寒潮天气;过程出现在乌拉尔山高压脊强烈发展东移过程中,影响系统为新疆快速东移短波槽与强锋区,促使寒潮爆发的流场为"低槽东移型",地面冷高压进入关键区,中心强度达1 062.7 hPa,以分裂南下方式影响;气温剧降的主要原因是850 hPa有强盛的冷平流自北向南控制宁夏;大风沙尘产生在强风区、辐合区、上升运动区及涡度梯度带上,并有"低层辐合中层辐散高层辐合"的垂直结构;由于系统浅薄、强度不强、宁夏及上游为平直西风气流、没有高空急流区配合是未出现沙尘暴的主要原因。在此基础上,提出宁夏春季寒潮预报概念模型和预报着眼点。%Based on conventional meteorological observation data and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data,the diagnostic analysis was made about a cold wave weather event occurred from March 13 to 15 in 2011 in Ningxia,and the main reason of strong temperature drop,gale and sanddust weather were analyzed by combining with the cold wave prediction indexes of Ningxia.The results show that in early stage of the weather event,there was an obvious rising of temperature in Ningxia,and strong cold air accumulated in west Siberi and bursting toward south caused this cold wave event.During this cold wave process,the circulation over middle-high latitude Asia presented two troughs and one bridge,the dynamic mechanisms were upper rotating short-wave trough and strong front zone,the stream fields leading to outbreak of the cold wave

  16. Evaluating the flux of extraterrestrial osmium at the onset of Younger Dryas in the GRIP ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, J. H.; Han, C.; Hong, S.; Steffensen, J. P.; Sharma, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.6 ka) was an abrupt cooling event during the last deglaciation. The mechanism behind the cooling is suggested to be a temporary slowdown of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation due to catastrophic release of meltwater from proglacial Lake Agassiz during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet [1]. An alternative hypothesis states that the cooling was directly/indirectly triggered by one or more cosmic airbursts/impacts [2]. While several papers have documented evidence for a YD extraterrestrial impact including microspherules, nanodiamonds, magnetic grains, and glass-like carbon [4-7], this hypothesis remains controversial [8-10]. In a recent study by Petaev et al. [11], an unusually high Pt/Ir ratio of 1200 was discovered in the GISP-2 ice core at the onset of YD, indicating a large Pt enriched iron meteorite impact. Such a high Pt/Ir in extraterrestrial materials has not been documented [12]. Thus, Petaev et al. [11] acknowledge that the interpretation of the Pt anomaly is based on circumstantial evidence. The distinct Os isotopic composition (187Os/188Os ratio) of the terrestrial (=1.26) and extraterrestrial (= 0.13) sources should allow us to evaluate if there was a meteorite impact at the YD boundary. These analyses are technically challenging owing to rather low concentration of Os in ice-melts ( 1x10-15g/g). Here, we will present Os isotope data from the GRIP ice core spanning the time period through YD to shed light on the meteorite/comet impact hypothesis. [1] Broecker et al. (1989) Nature 341, 318-321; [2] Firestone et al. (2007) PNAS. 104, 16016-16021; [3] Bunch et al. (2012) PNAS. 109, 1903-1912; [4] LeCompte et al. (2012) PNAS. 109, 2960-2969; [5] Wittke et al. (2013) PNAS 110, 2088-2097; [6] Wu et al. (2013) PNAS. 110, 3557-3566; [7] Kennett et al. (2015) PNAS 112, E4344-E4353; [8] Pinter et al. (2011) Earth Sci. Rev., 106, 247-264; [9] Holliday et al. (2014) J. Quat. Sci. 29, 515-530; [10] Meltzer et al. (2014) PNAS

  17. Response of the Gulf of Mexico to an Extreme Cold Front: A Numerical Study of the October 23-November 1, 2007 Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Hidalgo, J.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic response of the Gulf of Mexico to an intense cold front that occurred in October 23, 2007 is studied by a numerical simulation. The ocean model was forced by hourly fields and obtained from a simulation using the Weather, Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). The model simulation was performed with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM). Results show processes in different time and space scales on the shelves and deep waters. Initially strong surface currents are generated near the surface with a westward and southwestward transport, these currents piles water on the shelves and deepens the thermocline over the slope generating coastal trapped waves (CTW) that travel at different speeds on the shelves as barotropic CTW and over the slope as baroclinc CTW. A subsurface northward current along the Campeche escarpment is developed which turn eastward in the northern tip of the escarpment. In addition strong inertial oscillations develop mainly on the Bay of Campeche.

  18. New sedimentological evidence supporting a catastrophic meltwater discharge event along the Beaufort margin, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotsko, S.; Driscoll, N. W.; Keigwin, L. D.; Mendenhall, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, a cruise on the USCGC Healy mapped the Beaufort margin from Barrow, AK into the Amundsen Gulf using a towed CHIRP subbottom profiler and a hull-mounted Knudsen CHIRP subbottom profiler to study the deglaciation of the margin. Sediment cores were also acquired. New grain size analyses for three sediment cores will be presented. These records help constrain the flooding events captured in the existing grain size data from JPC 15, just east of the Mackenzie trough. This core shows evidence of multiple ice rafted debris events that were likely sourced from the retreat of the Amundsen ice stream. These layers have peaks in grain size around ~20 microns compared to the ~5 micron average for the rest of the core. The grain size peaks correlate to the high amplitude reflectors observed in the seismic CHIRP data. Similar reflectors are observed in the seismic data from two of the new core locations, one in the Mackenzie trough and one east of the trough. The seismic data from these stations also record a thick sediment package that is ~7 meters thick at its depocenter. This layer is interpreted to record a massive meltwater discharge event that entered the Arctic via the Mackenzie River. Oxygen isotope data from JPC 15 support an event at this location based on the covarying benthic and planktonic records. In our conceptual model, the pulses of freshwater from the Amundsen Gulf likely freshened the margin sufficiently that the major discharge event was then able to push the system over the edge. This catastrophic glacial lake draining out the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea and export out of the Arctic into the North Atlantic caused diminished meridional overturning circulation - slowing of the conveyor belt thermohaline circulation - which, in turn, potentially caused the Younger Dryas cold period.

  19. Late Pleistocene Megafaunal Extinction Consistent With YDB Impact Hypothesis at Younger Dryas Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, J. P.; Kennett, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    At least 35 mammal and 19 bird genera became extinct across North America near the end of the Pleistocene. Modern increases in stratigraphic and dating resolution suggest that this extinction occurred relatively rapidly near 12.9 ka (11 radiocarbon kyrs). Within the context of a long-standing debate about its cause, Firestone et al., (2007) proposed that this extinction resulted from an extraterrestrial (ET) impact over North America at 12.9 ka. This hypothesis predicts that the extinction of most of these animals should have occurred abruptly at 12.9 ka. To test this hypothesis, we have critically examined radiocarbon ages and the extinction stratigraphy of these taxa. From a large data pool, we selected only radiocarbon dates with low error margins with a preference for directly dated biological materials (e.g., bone, dung, etc.) and modern chemical purification techniques. A relatively small number of acceptable dates indicate that at least 16 animal genera and several other species became extinct close to 12.9 ka. These taxa include the most common animals of the late Pleistocene such as horses, camels, and mammoths. Also, the remains of extinct taxa are reportedly found up to, but not above, the base of a widely distributed carbon-rich layer called the black mat. This stratum forms an abrupt, major biostratigraphic boundary at the Younger Dryas onset (12.9 ka), which also contains multiple ET markers comprising the impact layer (the YDB). Surviving animal populations were abruptly reduced at the YDB (e.g., Bison), with major range restrictions and apparent evolutionary bottlenecks. The abruptness of this major extinction is inconsistent with the hypotheses of human overkill and climatic change. We argue that extinction ages older than 12.9 ka for many less common species result from the Signor-Lipps effect, but the impact hypothesis predicts that as new dates are acquired, they will approach ever closer to 12.9 ka. The megafaunal extinction is strongly

  20. Younger Dryas equilibrium line altitudes and precipitation patterns in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Hanns; Moran, Andrew; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Moraine systems of the "Egesen Stadial" are widespread and easily identifiable features in the Alps. Absolute dating with terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclides shows that the maximum extent was reached during the early Younger Dryas (YD), probably as a reaction to the intense climatic downturn subsequent to Lateglacial Interstadial. In recent years, several new studies and the availability of high-quality laser-scan hillshades and orthophotos allowed a significant extension of the database of YD glaciers as "palaeoprecipitation gauges" to large hitherto unmapped regions in the Austrian and Swiss Alps. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the glaciers and its lowering relative to the Little Ice Age ELA (dELA) shows a distinct and systematic spatial pattern. Along the northern slope of the Alps, dELAs are usually large (around 400 m and perhaps even more), while dELAs range around 200 m in the well sheltered areas of the central Alps, e.g. in the Engadine and in western Tyrol. Both stochastic glacier-climate models (e.g. Ohmura et al. 1992) and the heat- and mass balance equation (Kuhn 1981) allow the reconstruction of precipitation change under the assumption of a spatially constant summer temperature depression, which in turn can be estimated from biological proxies. This allows to draw the spatial pattern of precipitation change with considerable detail. Precipitation change is clearly controlled by the local relief like high mountain chains, deeply incised and long valleys and mountain passes. Generally the contrast between the northern fringe of the Alps and the interior was more pronounced than today. Climate in the Northern and and Northwestern Alps was rather wet with precipitation totals eventually exceeding modern annual sums. The central Alps received 20 - 30% less precipitation than today, mainly due to reduced winter precipitation. In the southern Alps, still scarce spatial information points to precipitation sums which were approximately similar to

  1. Atmospheric dynamics over Europe during the Younger Dryas revealed by palaeoglaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Brice; Pellitero, Ramon; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Philip; Braithwaite, Roger; Renssen, Hans; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Ribolini, Adriano; Bakke, Jostein; Lukas, Sven

    2017-04-01

    A dataset of 120 palaeoglaciers ranging from Morocco in the south to Svalbard in the north and from Ireland in the west to Turkey in the east, has been assembled from the literature. A robust quality control on the chronology was undertaken and, when derived from cosmogenic nuclides, ages were recalculated using the most up-to-date production rates. All the reconstructed glaciers date to the Younger Dryas. Frontal moraines/limits were used to initiate the palaeoglacier reconstructions using GlaRe, a GIS tool which generates an equilibrium profile ice surface along a single flowline and extrapolates this to out to a 3D ice surface. From the resulting glacier surfaces palaeo-ELAs were calculated within the GIS. Where multiple glaciers were reconstructed within in a region, a single ELA value was generated. Results show that ELAs decrease with latitude but have a more complex pattern with longitude. A database of 121 sites, spanning the same geographical range as the palaeoglaciers, was compiled for Younger Dryas temperature, determined from palaeoproxies, for example pollen, diatoms, coleoptera, chironimids etc. These proxy data were merged and interpolated to generate maps of average temperature for the warmest and coldest months and annual average temperature. Results show that, in general, temperature decreases with latitude. Temperature at the palaeo-ELAs were determined from the temperature maps using a lapse rate of 0.65°C/100m and the precipitation required for equilibrium was calculated. Positive precipitation anomalies are found along much of the western seaboard of Europe, with the most striking positive anomalies present in the eastern Mediterranean. Negative precipitation anomalies appear on the northern side of the Alps. This pattern is interpreted to represent a southward displaced polar frontal jet stream with a concomitant track of Atlantic mid-latitude depressions, leading to more frequent incursions of low pressure systems especially over the

  2. Millennial-scale precipitation variability over Easter Island (South Pacific) during MIS 3: inter-hemispheric teleconnections with North Atlantic abrupt cold events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, O.; Cacho, I.; Pla-Rabes, S.; Cañellas-Boltà, N.; Pueyo, J. J.; Sáez, A.; Pena, L. D.; Valero-Garcés, B. L.; Rull, V.; Giralt, S.

    2015-04-01

    Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3, 59.4-27.8 kyr BP) is characterized by the occurrence of rapid millennial-scale climate oscillations known as Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles (DO) and by abrupt cooling events in the North Atlantic known as Heinrich events. Although both the timing and dynamics of these events have been broadly explored in North Atlantic records, the response of the tropical and subtropical latitudes to these rapid climatic excursions, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, still remains unclear. The Rano Aroi peat record (Easter Island, 27° S) provides a unique opportunity to understand atmospheric and oceanic changes in the South Pacific during these DO cycles because of its singular location, which is influenced by the South Pacific Anticyclone (SPA), the Southern Westerlies (SW), and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) linked to the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Rano Aroi sequence records 6 major events of enhanced precipitation between 38 and 65 kyr BP. These events are compared with other hydrological records from the tropical and subtropical band supporting a coherent regional picture, with the dominance of humid conditions in Southern Hemisphere tropical band during Heinrich Stadials (HS) 5, 5a and 6 and other Stadials while dry conditions prevailed in the Northern tropics. This antiphased hydrological pattern between hemispheres has been attributed to ITCZ migration, which in turn might be associated with an eastward expansion of the SPCZ storm track, leading to an increased intensity of cyclogenic storms reaching Easter Island. Low Pacific Sea Surface Temperature (SST) gradients across the Equator were coincident with the here-defined Rano Aroi humid events and consistent with a reorganization of Southern Pacific atmospheric and oceanic circulation also at higher latitudes during Heinrich and Dansgaard-Oeschger stadials.

  3. Millennial-scale precipitation variability over Easter Island (South Pacific during MIS 3: inter-hemispheric teleconnections with North Atlantic abrupt cold events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Margalef

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3, 59.4–27.8 kyr BP is characterized by the occurrence of rapid millennial-scale climate oscillations known as Dansgaard–Oeschger cycles (DO and by abrupt cooling events in the North Atlantic known as Heinrich events. Although both the timing and dynamics of these events have been broadly explored in North Atlantic records, the response of the tropical and subtropical latitudes to these rapid climatic excursions, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, still remains unclear. The Rano Aroi peat record (Easter Island, 27° S provides a unique opportunity to understand atmospheric and oceanic changes in the South Pacific during these DO cycles because of its singular location, which is influenced by the South Pacific Anticyclone (SPA, the Southern Westerlies (SW, and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ linked to the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ. The Rano Aroi sequence records 6 major events of enhanced precipitation between 38 and 65 kyr BP. These events are compared with other hydrological records from the tropical and subtropical band supporting a coherent regional picture, with the dominance of humid conditions in Southern Hemisphere tropical band during Heinrich Stadials (HS 5, 5a and 6 and other Stadials while dry conditions prevailed in the Northern tropics. This antiphased hydrological pattern between hemispheres has been attributed to ITCZ migration, which in turn might be associated with an eastward expansion of the SPCZ storm track, leading to an increased intensity of cyclogenic storms reaching Easter Island. Low Pacific Sea Surface Temperature (SST gradients across the Equator were coincident with the here-defined Rano Aroi humid events and consistent with a reorganization of Southern Pacific atmospheric and oceanic circulation also at higher latitudes during Heinrich and Dansgaard–Oeschger stadials.

  4. Climate Reconstructions of the Younger Dryas: An ELA Model Investigating Variability in ELA Depressions, Temperature, and Precipitation Changes for the Graubϋnden Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, D. G.; Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    The high sensitivity of mountain glaciers to even small perturbations in climate, combined with a near global distribution, make alpine glaciers an important target for terrestrial paleoclimate reconstructions. The geomorphic remnant of past glaciers can yield important insights into past climate, particularly in regions where other methods of reconstruction are not possible. The quantitative conversion of these changes in geomorphology to a climate signal, however, presents a significant challenge. A particular need exists for a versatile climate reconstruction method applicable to diverse glacierized regions around the globe. Because the glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA) provides a more explicit comparison of climate than properties such as glacier length or area, ELA methods lend themselves well to such a need, and allow for a more direct investigation of the primary drivers of mountain glaciations during specific events. Here, we present an ELA model for quantifying changes in climate based on changes in glacier extent, while accounting for differences in glacier width, glacier shape, bed topography, ice thickness, and glacier length. The model furthermore provides bounds on the ΔELA using Monte Carlo simulations. These methods are validated using published mass balances and ELA measurements from 4 modern glaciers in the European Alps. We then use this ELA model, combined with a surface mass and energy balance model, to estimate the changes in temperature/precipitation between the Younger Dryas (constrained by 10Be surface exposure ages) and the present day for three glacier systems in the Graubϋnden Alps. Our results indicate an ELA depression in this area of 257 m ±45 m during the Younger Dryas (YD) relative to today. This corresponds to a 1.3 °C ±0.36 °C decrease in temperature or a 156% ±30% increase in precipitation relative to today. These results indicate the likelihood of a predominantly temperature-driven change rather than a strong

  5. Climate change, patch choice, and intensification at Pont d'Ambon (Dordogne, France) during the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily Lena

    2009-11-01

    This paper considers the impact of the Younger Dryas on the prehistoric inhabitants of Pont d'Ambon, a site in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, through an examination of the zooarchaeological remains from this site. An investigation of patch choice indicates that patch choice evenness declines during the Younger Dryas due to increasing local dominance of the grassland patch. Analyses of demographic composition, cutmark frequency, and marrow processing in the wild European rabbit ( Oryctolagus cuniculus) assemblage suggest intensified rabbit use during this period. This study thus supports the hypothesis that changing climate had significant impacts on the prehistoric inhabitants of Pont d'Ambon. However, the traditional climate hypothesis—that changing climate negatively impacted the availability of larger fauna, forcing a switch to smaller, lower-ranked prey items—is not supported here. The inhabitants of Pont d'Ambon seem to have adapted to changing climate by efficiently exploiting the new species available to them, and possibly, during the Younger Dryas, by intensifying their use of one of these new species, the European rabbit.

  6. Discussion of “Deglacial paleoclimate in the southwestern United States: an abrupt 18.6 cold event and evidence for a North Atlantic forcing of Termination I” by M.S. Lachniet, Y. Asmerom and V. Polyak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winograd, Isaac J.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a stable isotopic time series obtained from a speleothem (PC-1), which grew between 20.1 and 15.6 ka, Lachniet, Asmeron and Polyak (2011; hereafter LAP) present evidence for a significant cold event in the southern Great Basin at 18.6 ka, a finding that we accept. Supplementing this short record with a literature review, they go on to claim, as their central thesis, that the paleoclimate of the southwestern US was driven by “the transmission of atmospheric anomalies to the southwest…that coincided with deglacial climate changes in Greenland and the North Atlantic region”, not by a “dominant Pacific Ocean SST control” as suggested by SST time series off California and by the Devils Hole δ18O time series from the southern Great Basin. We do not find their central thesis supportable.

  7. Twenty-five years of change in scleractinian coral communities of Daya Bay (northern South China Sea)and its response to the 2008 AD extreme cold climate event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN TianRan; YU KeFu; SHI Qi; LI Shu; Gilbert J. Price; WANG Rong; ZHAO MeiXia; CHEN TeGu; ZHAO JianXin

    2009-01-01

    taking into account additional factors,we hypothesize that direct anthropogenic impacts, rather than climatic events, have both restricted the development, and drove the decline, of Daya Bay coral communities in the last 15 years. The Daya Bay has also been subjected to occasional extreme cold events during the past 50 years, with the most recent occurring in early 2008 (13 January-13 February). During the 2008 cold event, the lowest air temperature reaches only 6.6℃, and the mean sea surface temperature for February fall to<14℃, in-cluding six continuous days at 12.3℃. Significantly, the sea surface temperatures fall below the hypothesized critical lower temperature threshold (~13℃) that commonly leads to mass mortality in scleractinian coral communities. Surprisingly, our coral community surveys, conducted both before(August 2007) and after (late February 2008) the extreme 2008 cold event, demonstrate that the Daya Bay coral ecosystems are barely impacted upon during the cold period. Those observations suggest that the Daya Bay scleractinian coral communities have developed adaptations to low sea surface temperatures. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that high-latitude coral communities, such as Daya Bay, have the potential to act as areas of refugia for scieractinian corals in the advent of potential future global warming.

  8. Common cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a low fever or no fever. Young children often run a fever around 100 to 102°F (37.7 to 38.8°C). Depending on which virus caused your cold, you may also have: Cough Decreased appetite Headache Muscle aches Postnasal drip Sore throat

  9. Project COLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  10. Phosphorus in Cold-Water Corals as a Proxy for Seawater Nutrient Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Paolo; McCulloch, Malcolm; Taviani, Marco; Mazzoli, Claudio; Vendrell, Begoña

    2006-06-01

    Phosphorus is a key macronutrient being strongly enriched in the deep ocean as a result of continuous export and remineralization of biomass from primary production. We show that phosphorus incorporated within the skeletons of the cosmopolitan cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus is directly proportional to the ambient seawater phosphorus concentration and thus may serve as a paleo-oceanographic proxy for variations in ocean productivity as well as changes in the residence times and sources of deep-water masses. The application of this tool to fossil specimens from the Mediterranean reveals phosphorus-enriched bottom waters at the end of the Younger Dryas period.

  11. Glacier response in the European Alps to Heinrich Event 1 cooling: the Gschnitz stadial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kerschner, Hanns; Kubik, Peter W.; Schlüchter, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The Gschnitz stadial was a period of regionally extensive glacier advance in the European Alps that lies temporally between the breakdown of the Last Glacial Maximum piedmont lobes and the beginning of the Bølling warm interval. Moraines of the Gschnitz stadial are found in medium to small catchments, are steep-walled and blocky, and reflect a snowline lowering of 650-700 m in comparison to the Little Ice Age reference snowline. 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders from the moraine at the type locality at Trins (Gschnitz valley, Tyrol, Austria) shows that it stabilised no later than 15 400 +/- 1400 yr ago. The overall morphological situation and the long reaction time of the glacier suggest that the climatic downturn lasted about 500 +/- 300 yr, indicating that the Gschnitz cold period began approximately 15 900 +/- 1400 yr ago, if not somewhat earlier. This is consistent with published radiocarbon dates that imply that the stadial occurred sometime between 15 400 14C yr BP (18 020-19 100 cal. yr) and 13250 14Cyr BP (15360-16015cal.yr). A palaeoclimatic interpretation of the Gschnitz glacier based on a simple glacier flow model and statistical glacier-climate models shows that precipitation was about one-third of modern-day precipitation and summer temperatures were about 10K lower than today. In comparison, during the Younger Dryas, precipitation in this area was only about 10% less and Ts (summer temperature) was only 3.5-4K lower than modern values. Based on the age of the moraine and the cold and dry climate at that time, we suggest that the Gschnitz stadial was the response of Alpine glaciers to cooling of the North Atlantic Ocean associated with Heinrich Event 1.

  12. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  13. A quantitative reconstruction of changes in relative humidity during the Younger Dryas in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, O.; Kahmen, A.; Brauer, A.; Sachse, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroclimatic changes have a profound effect on terrestrial ecosystems from regional to continental scales. However, past hydrological changes linked to abrupt climate shifts and their effect on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood due to the lack of direct quantitative hydrological reconstructions. In addition, most paleoclimate proxies record the environmental response to hydrological variations, such as vegetation changes inferred by changes in pollen abundance, rather than hydroclimatic change itself. Over the last decade hydrogen isotope ratios (δD value) of lipid biomarkers have emerged as a novel and direct hydrological proxy, since it aims to reconstruct the δD values of the water source used by photosynthetic organisms. However, the hydrogen isotope ratio of source water (such as precipitation) is an integrated signal of condensation temperature, moisture pathway, precipitation amount and evaporation. As such, it is difficult to separate a single parameter, for example relative humidity, required for a true quantitative interpretation. Here we present a novel approach to quantify changes in relative humidity (Δrh) based on the hydrogen isotope composition of terrestrial and aquatic n-alkanes. In this proof-of-concept study we generate a high-resolution Δrh record for the Younger Dryas period (YD) of Western Europe from Lake Meerfelder Maar, (MFM, Germany). We use aquatic macrophyte biomarker δD values as a recorder of lake water δD (aq), which represents an integrated annual precipitation signal, and terrestrial leaf wax n-alkane δD values (terr) as a record of leaf-water evapotranspiration. Therefore we consider the isotopic difference between δDterr and δDaq (ɛterr-aq) as a measure of mean leaf water enrichment (ΔL), which is mainly controlled by relative humidity and temperature. By employing a modified and parameterized Craig-Gordon leaf-water model we are able to extract past changes in relative humidity from a sedimentary record

  14. Spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological changes during the onset of the Younger Dryas along a W-E transect in Europe from decadal resolved lacustrine lipid biomarker D/H records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Dirk; Aichner, Bernhard; Maas, David; Neugebauer, Ina; Ott, Florian; Slowinski, Michal; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    To better understand mechanisms and feedbacks of hydrological changes during abrupt climatic changes, such as the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) cold period, we applied biomarker based paleohydrological proxies to three well dated, high-resolution lacustrine sediment profiles along a 900km W-E transect from Western Germany to Eastern Poland. Here we present biomarker hydrogen isotope records (δD values) from terrestrial and aquatic sources from three sites (Meerfelder Maar, western Germany [MFM]; Rehwiese, eastern Germany [RW]; Trzechowskie, central Poland [TRZ]) that contain annually laminated sediments and common tephra layers, allowing the identification of leads and lags in the response of the hydrological cycle to YD cooling on decadal timescales. We observed a decrease in biomarker δD values 170 and 100 years before the biostratigraphically defined onset of the YD at 12,679 in western (MFM) and eastern Germany (RW), respectively. These changes coincide with the onset of Greenland Stadial 1 in the NGRIP icecore at 12,846 years BP and imply a common climatic forcing, likely cooling. In eastern Poland however, at TRZ biomarker δD values start to decrease only at the YD onset. Further, we observed that the onset of aridification at all three sites coincided with the onset of the YD. A decrease in the magnitude of changes in biomarker δD values and aridification from W to E suggests a more gradual and less strong aridification in eastern Europe. Our results suggest that hydrological changes at the onset of the YD were strongest and most abrupt in western Europe, where a substantial increase in aridity occurred over just 80 years, resulting in widespread environmental changes [1]. These differences in magnitude and the distinct temporal succession could be related to the influence of the Fennoscandian ice sheets and/or the Siberian High on atmospheric circulation in eastern Europe. [1] Rach O, Brauer A, Wilkes H, Sachse D. Delayed hydrological response to

  15. Using Methane 14C to Determine the Origin of the Rapid Methane Rise at the End of the Younger Dryas 11,600 Years Ago: Increased Wetland Production or Methane Hydrates? A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Reeh, N.

    2002-12-01

    The atmospheric methane concentration rose from about 500 parts per billion (ppb) to about 750 ppb over a period of just 150 years at the termination of the Younger Dryas cold period 11,600 years ago, as indicated by Greenland ice core records. The start of this rapid methane increase was synchronous with an even more rapid climate warming -- Greenland ice core nitrogen and argon isotope records indicate that temperatures rose 5 - 10 ?C over just a few decades. There has been considerable debate about the source of this methane rise. Currently, the two main hypotheses attribute the methane rise either to increased bacterial methane production in wetlands, or to the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor. Here we describe the progress of a project whose aim is to determine the origin of this methane rise. Our approach involves using 14C of ancient methane (derived from air bubbles in glacial ice) to determine its source. Methane hydrates are hundreds of thousands to millions of years old, and should contain virtually no 14C, whereas wetland-derived methane will have 14C content identical to that of atmospheric CO2 at the time of production. Obtaining enough ancient methane for a 14C measurement requires very large samples -- about 2 cubic meters. We have been able to locate a site on the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet where large amounts of uncontaminated ancient ice are available at the surface. Furthermore, our measurements of oxygen isotopes in the ice, as well as measurements of methane and oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in the air trapped in this ice have allowed us to date the ice and precisely locate the ice that contains the end-of-Younger-Dryas methane increase signal. Our data also demonstrate that the methane record in this ice is uncontaminated and suitable for methane 14C analysis. During the past year, we also constructed and are testing a device for melting and extracting air from large volumes of glacial ice.

  16. Enhanced sea-ice export from the Arctic to the GIN seas during the Younger Dryas: A "Canadian" source from radiogenic isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Maccali, J.; Not, C.; Poirier, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event and the related slowing of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) have been linked to a large array of processes. The most widely supported causal mechanism involves an influx of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean linked to a partial drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz. Recently, a northward drainage route, through the Mackenzie River outlet into the Arctic Ocean, has been suggested from land-based studies [Murton et al., Nature 464, 740-743]. Sedimentological and geochemical analysis of cores raised from Lomonosov Ridge and the Fram Strait area, yield relatively robust evidence for enhanced ice-rafting deposition -IRD- (with a 5-fold increase -) during the critical interval. At Lomonosov, the corresponding sedimentary layer (from ca. 13 to 12 ka) is marked by a pulse of detrital carbonates in the silt to sand fractions, with approximately equal amounts of calcite and dolomite, pointing towards an Arctic Canadian sediment source area [Not & Hillaire-Marcel, Nature Communication, Jan. 31, 2012]. The layer also depicts a 5 fold increase 230Th-excess, which we link to an enhanced flux of scavenging particles. At both sites, the geochemical signatures of the YD-layer, based on elemental (Zr/Al) and isotopic (Sr, Nd and Pb) data on bulk sediments and residues ensuing from the removal of exchangeable fractions (Zr/Al, Nd, Pb, Sr), are used to identify detrital sediment source areas. Whereas three major source areas variably contributed to IRD during the MIS 3-Present interval (i.e., the Russian, Canadian and Greenland margins), the YD interval singles out by strongelemental and isotopic excursions, notably a peak in radiogenic Sr, indicating prominent supplies from the Canadian end-member. This suggests enhanced sea-ice production and drifting along the BeaufordGyre, then the Trans-Polar Drift. A major drainage event along the Mackenzie outlet area, as proposed in the above reference,would be a suitable trigger for

  17. Radiocarbon dating and Dendrochronology for Statigraphic Units near Tebano, Senio Northern Apennines - Time frame of Climatic Fluctuation at the onset of the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenschwiler, Loren; Hajdas, Irka; Cherubini, Paolo; Picotti, Vincenzo; Saurer, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The presence of Pinus [sylvestris] provides an insight into dramatic events due to climatic changes. Several major and minor climatic fluctuations have had a strong impact on terrestrial and marine environments since the last glacial period to present day (Ravazzi et al. 2006). This study aims to describe the response of a fluvial environment through the use of dendrochronology and stratigraphy. Here, we intend to get a better understanding of how these climatic fluctuations affect the behavior of the Senio River (Lotter et al. 1992). In Tebano, Italy, several Pinus sylvestris subfossil trunks were discovered during excavation for an irrigation pool. Subfossil samples were collected to analyze the climate during the Younger Dryas (11,000 years BP) in detail. Charcoal samples from the Bubano clay quarry extend our research to further to 35,500 cal. years BP. The combination of dendrochronology along with stratigraphy allowed us to examine the climate at a detailed local and apply it to a broader spectrum. Tree-ring measurements and cross dating provided a better understanding and verification of extreme events that occurred during the lifespans of the trees. The use of stable isotopes indicates the extreme conditions that occurred. Radiocarbon dating validates the age of the samples and what geological period they come from. Along with stratigraphy, we were able to compile depth data to create a sediment curve. Using various methods throughout this study, we discovered the climatic situation of Pinus 11,000 years BP and are able to compare them with samples from today. These present day samples mark two of the southernmost extents of the Pinus population. We were then able to comprehend the magnitude of sediment supply and precipitation. Through this collection of methods and data, we are able to understand the influence of climate change in the past and the potential changes of the future. REFERENCES Lotter, A. F.; Eicher, U.; Siegenthaler, U.; Birks, H. J. B

  18. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  19. Cold confusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  20. Cold energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  1. Cold energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, John P., E-mail: jpw@castinganalysis.com [Casting Analysis Corp., PO Box 52, Weyers Cave, VA 24486 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  2. Synchronous inter-hemispheric alpine glacier advances during the Antarctic Cold Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, J.; Bradley, R. S.; Dahl, S.; Balascio, N. L.

    2013-12-01

    The termination of the last glaciation in both hemispheres was a period of rapid climate oscillations superimposed on the overall warming trend, resulting from large-scale reorganizations of the atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns in both hemispheres. Environmental changes during the deglaciation have been inferred from proxy records, as well as by model simulations. Several oscillations took place in both the northern and southern hemispheres caused by melt water releases such as during the Younger Dryas in the north and the Antarctic Cold Reversal in the south. However, a consensus on the hemispheric linkages through ocean and atmosphere are yet to be reached. Here we present a new multi-proxy reconstruction from a sub-annually resolved lake sediment record from lake Lusvatnet in arctic Norway suggesting inter-hemispheric climate linkages during the Bølling/Allerød time period. Our reconstruction of the Lusvatnet cirque glacier shows a synchronous glacier advance with the Birch-hill moraine complex in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, during the Intra Allerød Cooling. We propose these inter-hemispheric climate oscillations to be forced by the northward migration of the southern Subtropical Front during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Such a northward migration of the Subtropical Front is shown in model simulation and in palaeorecords to reduce the Agulhas leakage impacting the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The Bølling-Allerød time period was a warm interval in the North Atlantic with a strong Atlantic meridional overturning circulation setting the stage for the later fresh water forcing of the Younger Dryas cold reversal with reduced overturning. Two minor cold reversals, the Older Dryas and the Intra Allerød Cooling, took place during this time span and we suggest a reduction in the Agulhas leakage during peak cooling over Antarctica as the mechanism teleconnecting arctic rapid climate oscillations with rapid climate

  3. Climate Reconstructions for the Younger Dryas in Graubünden, Swiss Alps: Using Glacier Geometry and Hypsometry to Estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, D. G.; Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain glaciers serve as important paleoclimate records due to the direct physical link between glacier extent and climate. The high sensitivity of mountain glaciers to even small perturbations in the climate has the potential to provide very detailed records of regional glacier and climate histories. Recent progress in age determination techniques such as surface exposure dating has greatly improved the temporal precision of glacial records. The conversion of changes in glacier geometries to a climate signal, however, remains a significant challenge. A particular need exists for a versatile method easily applicable to diverse regions and conditions around the globe. Because the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) provides a more explicit comparison of climate than properties such as glacier length or area, ELA methods lend themselves well to such a need, and allow for a more direct investigation of the primary drivers of mountain glaciations during specific events. Here we present a new, robust ELA model for quantifying changes in climate directly from glacier geometry. The model derives from a linear flow model based on Glen's Flow law while fully accounting for glacier hypsometry. As a preliminary application, we combined our modeled ELA reconstructions with a new 10Be chronology of late glacial culminations in Graubünden in the Swiss Alps. These glacier culminations occurred during the Egesen Stadial, which has been correlated to the Younger Dryas (YD) interval. Results for two related glacier systems in Graubünden reveal an ELA depression of 365-401 m (depending on the moraines chosen) during the Egesen stage/YD compared to the modern ELA. This agrees well both with established estimates for ELA depressions in the region and an additional application performed using our model and previously determined ages on the nearby Lagrev Glacier (a 370 m ELA depression). We then reconstruct the temperature and precipitation changes required to explain the ELA changes for

  4. Vaccines for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Franco, Juan Va; Guerra, Claudia V; Felix, Maria L; Hidalgo, Ricardo; Martinez-Zapata, Maria José

    2017-05-18

    The common cold is a spontaneously remitting infection of the upper respiratory tract, characterised by a runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing, cough, malaise, sore throat, and fever (usually Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (September 2016), MEDLINE (1948 to September 2016), Embase (1974 to September 2016), CINAHL (1981 to September 2016), and LILACS (1982 to September 2016). We also searched three trials registers for ongoing studies and four websites for additional trials (February 2017). We included no language or date restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any virus vaccines compared with placebo to prevent the common cold in healthy people. Two review authors independently evaluated methodological quality and extracted trial data. We resolved disagreements by discussion or by consulting a third review author. We found no additional RCTs for inclusion in this update. This review includes one RCT dating from the 1960s with an overall high risk of bias. The RCT included 2307 healthy participants, all of whom were included in analyses. This trial compared the effect of an adenovirus vaccine against placebo. No statistically significant difference in common cold incidence was found: there were 13 (1.14%) events in 1139 participants in the vaccines group and 14 (1.19%) events in 1168 participants in the placebo group (risk ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 2.02; P = 0.90). No adverse events related to the live vaccine were reported. The quality of the evidence was low due to limitations in methodological quality and a wide 95% confidence interval. This Cochrane Review was based on one study with low-quality evidence. We found no conclusive results to support the use of vaccines for preventing the common cold in healthy people compared with placebo. We identified a need for well-designed, adequately powered RCTs to investigate vaccines for the common cold in healthy people. Any future trials on medical treatments for preventing the

  5. Abrupt sea surface pH change at the end of the Younger Dryas in the central sub-equatorial Pacific inferred from boron isotope abundance in corals (Porites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Juillet-Leclerc

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The "δ11B-pH" technique was applied to modern and ancient corals Porites from the sub-equatorial Pacific areas (Tahiti and Marquesas spanning a time interval from 0 to 20.720 calendar years to determine the amplitude of pH changes between the Last Glacial Period and the Holocene. Boron isotopes were measured by Multi-Collector – Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS with an external reproducibility of 0.25‰, allowing a precision of about ±0.03 pH-units for pH values between 8 and 8.3. The boron concentration [B] and isotopic composition of modern samples indicate that the temperature strongly controls the partition coefficient KD for different aragonite species. Modern coral δ11B values and the reconstructed sea surface pH values for different Pacific areas match the measured pH expressed on the seawater scale and confirm the calculation parameters that were previously determined by laboratory calibration exercises. Most ancient sea surface pH reconstructions near Marquesas are higher than modern values. These values range between 8.19 and 8.27 for the Holocene and reached 8.30 at the end of the last glacial period (20.7 kyr BP. At the end of the Younger Dryas (11.50±0.1 kyr BP, the central sub-equatorial Pacific experienced a dramatic drop of up to 0.2 pH-units from the average pH of 8.2 before and after this short event. Using the marine carbonate algorithms, we recalculated the aqueous pCO2 to be 440±25 ppmV at around 11.5 kyr BP for corals at Marquesas and ~500 ppmV near Tahiti where it was assumed that pCO2 in the atmosphere was 250 ppmV. Throughout the Holocene, the difference in pCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere at Marquesas (ΔpCO2 indicates that the surface waters behave as a moderate CO2 sink or source (−53 to 20 ppmV during El Niño-like conditions. By contrast, during the last glacial/interglacial transition, this area was a marked source of CO2 (21 to 92 ppmV for the atmosphere, highlighting

  6. Inferring the provenance of an alien species with DNA barcodes: the neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah A Burg

    Full Text Available The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful.

  7. A coupled D/18O approach to reconstruct the paleohumidity during the Younger Dryas in the Eifel, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Hepp, Johannes; Bromm, Tobias; Kathrin Schäfer, Imke; Zech, Jana; Sirocko, Frank; Zech, Michael; Zech, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Leaf waxes, such as long-chain n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids, and their D/H isotopic composition, are increasingly used in lake, marine and eolian sediments to reconstruct past changes in vegetation, as well as the isotopic composition of precipitation. However, evaporative enrichment of leaf water might compromise such reconstructions, and it remains difficult to quantitatively reconstruct past climate changes. For the present study, we have analyzed samples from the Gemündener Maar, a lake situated in the western Eifel, Germany, for their isotopic composition of n-alkanes (D) and sugars (18O). Combination of both isotopes allows calculating not only the isotopic composition of paleo-precipitation, but also relative humidity (rh), based on reconstructed d-excess of leaf water. Our results suggest that the Younger Dryas was not particularly dry compared to the Alleröd. The onset of the Holocene, on the other hand, seems to have been very dry, except for one humid spell. Only with the transition Preboreal/Boreal, rh increased again.

  8. Inferring the provenance of an alien species with DNA barcodes: the neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Noah A; Pradhan, Ashman; Gonzalez, Rebecca M; Morban, Emely Z; Zhen, Erica W; Sakchoowong, Watana; Lohman, David J

    2014-01-01

    The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful.

  9. Inferring the Provenance of an Alien Species with DNA Barcodes: The Neotropical Butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Noah A.; Pradhan, Ashman; Gonzalez, Rebecca M.; Morban, Emely Z.; Zhen, Erica W.; Sakchoowong, Watana; Lohman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful. PMID:25119899

  10. Wildfire and abrupt ecosystem disruption on California's Northern Channel Islands at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (13.0-12.9 ka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, D. J.; Kennett, J. P.; West, G. J.; Erlandson, J. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Hendy, I. L.; West, A.; Culleton, B. J.; Jones, T. L.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary records from California's Northern Channel Islands and the adjacent Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) indicate intense regional biomass burning (wildfire) at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (˜13.0-12.9 ka) (All age ranges in this paper are expressed in thousands of calendar years before present [ka]. Radiocarbon ages will be identified and clearly marked " 14C years".). Multiproxy records in SBB Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 893 indicate that these wildfires coincided with the onset of regional cooling and an abrupt vegetational shift from closed montane forest to more open habitats. Abrupt ecosystem disruption is evident on the Northern Channel Islands at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary with the onset of biomass burning and resulting mass sediment wasting of the landscape. These wildfires coincide with the extinction of Mammuthus exilis [pygmy mammoth]. The earliest evidence for human presence on these islands at 13.1-12.9 ka (˜11,000-10,900 14C years) is followed by an apparent 600-800 year gap in the archaeological record, which is followed by indications of a larger-scale colonization after 12.2 ka. Although a number of processes could have contributed to a post 18 ka decline in M. exilis populations (e.g., reduction of habitat due to sea-level rise and human exploitation of limited insular populations), we argue that the ultimate demise of M. exilis was more likely a result of continental scale ecosystem disruption that registered across North America at the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling episode, contemporaneous with the extinction of other megafaunal taxa. Evidence for ecosystem disruption at 13-12.9 ka on these offshore islands is consistent with the Younger Dryas boundary cosmic impact hypothesis [Firestone, R.B., West, A., Kennett, J.P., Becker, L., Bunch, T.E., Revay, Z.S., Schultz, P.H., Belgya, T., Kennett, D.J., Erlandson, J.M., Dickenson, O.J., Goodyear, A.A., Harris, R.S., Howard, G.A., Kloosterman, J.B., Lechler, P

  11. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  12. Root tensile strength assessment of Dryas octopetala L. and implications for its engineering mechanism on lateral moraine slopes (Turtmann Valley, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Katharina; Eichel, Jana; Dikau, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphic processes and properties are influenced by vegetation. It has been shown that vegetation cover intercepts precipitation, enhances surface detention and storage, traps sediment and provides additional surface roughness. Plant roots impact the soil in a mechanical and hydrological manner and affect shear strength, infiltration capacity and moisture content. Simultaneously, geomorphic processes disturb the vegetation development. This strong coupling of the geomorphic and ecologic system is investigated in Biogeomorphology. Lateral moraine slopes are characterized by a variety of geomorphic processes, e. g. sheet wash, solifluction and linear erosion. However, some plant species, termed engineer species, possess specific functional traits which allow them to grow under these conditions and also enable them to influence the frequency, magnitude and even nature of geomorphic processes. For lateral moraine slopes, Dryas octopetala L., an alpine dwarf shrub, was identified as a potential engineer species. The engineering mechanism of D. octopetala, based on its morphological (e.g., growth form) and biomechanical (e.g., root strength) traits, yet remains unclear and only little research has been conducted on alpine plant species. The objectives of this study are to fill this gap by (A) quantifying D. octopetala root tensile strength as an important trait considering anchorage in and stabilization of the slope and (B) linking plant traits to the geomorphic process they influence on lateral moraine slopes. D. octopetala traits were studied on a lateral moraine slope in Turtmann glacier forefield, Switzerland. (A) Root strength of single root threads of Dryas octopetala L. were tested using the spring scale method (Schmidt et al., 2001; Hales et al., 2013). Measurement equipment was modified to enable field measurements of roots shortly after excavation. Tensile strength of individual root threads was calculated and statistically analyzed. First results show that

  13. Cold and Cough Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  14. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Daanen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced metabolism. van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, Daanen HA. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesi

  15. Cold nuclear fusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    ...... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion...

  16. ENSO's far reaching connection to Indian cold waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Annamalai, H; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-23

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  17. 中全新世云南寻甸地区气候演化与冷干事件的石笋记录%Stalagmite Records of Climate Change and Cold-Dry Events During the Middle Holocene in Xundian, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张会领; 蒲晓强

    2011-01-01

    通过对云南寻甸XR1石笋进行TIMS-U系测年、氧碳同位素和沉积速率变化分析,重建了寻甸地区中全新世季风气候演化模式:(1)8.0~6.0 ka BP为温暖湿润期;(2)6.0~5.1 ka BP为气候突变期,温湿向冷干转变;(3)5.1~2.1 ka BP为气候恢复期,气候从冷干逐渐恢复到中全新世正常的气候水平.XR1石笋还揭示了该地区中全新世出现的四次冷干气候事件:6.0~5.1 ka BP冷干事件相当于考古学上的仰韶中期的寒冷期,被Denton称为第二次小冰期;4.7~4.5 ka BP气候事件是气候回暖过程中一次短暂的变冷事件;3.1~2.5kaBP间的降温事件在中国历史文献中被称为西周寒冷期,相当于北半球新冰期中的第三次新冰期.2.5~2.1ka BP降温阶段相当于我国近5000年气候变化的第二次冷期.%Based on age-dating of TIMS-U series and analyzing carbon and oxygen isotopes and deposition velocity on XR1 stalagmite from Xianren cave in Xundian, Yunnan, the authors revealed the monsoon climate change pattern during the middle Holocene in Xundian. The climate change in Xundian can be divided into three periods approximately: (1) 8.0 ~ 6.0kaBP was a warm and wet period; (2) 6.0~5.1ka BP was a climate change period, with climate changing from wet and warm to cold and dry; (3) 5.1~2.1kaBP was a climate recovering period, during which the climate changed from cold and dry to the average climate level of the Middle Holocene.The authors also detected four clod and dry climate events during the Middle Holocene in Xundian, which perfectly responded to the global change. The first climate event that lasted from 6.0 ka BP to 5.1ka BP corresponded to the cold period during the Middle Yangshao age in archaeology, and is also called the second little ice age by Denton. The second climate event whose age span was from 4.7kaBPto 4.5kaBP was a short cooling event during the climate recovering period. The third cooling event that lasted from 3.1kaBP to 2

  18. Coupling between Chemical and Meteorological Processes under Persistent Cold-Air Pool Conditions: Evolution of Wintertime PM2.5 Pollution Events and N2O5 Observations in Utah's Salt Lake Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Hoch, Sebastian W; Bares, Ryan; Lin, John C; Brown, Steven S; Millet, Dylan B; Martin, Randal; Kelly, Kerry; Zarzana, Kyle J; Whiteman, C David; Dube, William P; Tonnesen, Gail; Jaramillo, Isabel Cristina; Sohl, John

    2017-06-06

    The Salt Lake Valley experiences severe fine particulate matter pollution episodes in winter during persistent cold-air pools (PCAPs). We employ measurements throughout an entire winter from different elevations to examine the chemical and dynamical processes driving these episodes. Whereas primary pollutants such as NOx and CO were enhanced twofold during PCAPs, O3 concentrations were approximately threefold lower. Atmospheric composition varies strongly with altitude within a PCAP at night with lower NOx and higher oxidants (O3) and oxidized reactive nitrogen (N2O5) aloft. We present observations of N2O5 during PCAPs that provide evidence for its role in cold-pool nitrate formation. Our observations suggest that nighttime and early morning chemistry in the upper levels of a PCAP plays an important role in aerosol nitrate formation. Subsequent daytime mixing enhances surface PM2.5 by dispersing the aerosol throughout the PCAP. As pollutants accumulate and deplete oxidants, nitrate chemistry becomes less active during the later stages of the pollution episodes. This leads to distinct stages of PM2.5 pollution episodes, starting with a period of PM2.5 buildup and followed by a period with plateauing concentrations. We discuss the implications of these findings for mitigation strategies.

  19. Cold period in the Northern Europe in the past (about 8200 years ago: analysis of empirical data and possible causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Borzenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold episode in Northern Europe happened about 8200 years ago was known for a relatively long time, mainly due to paleobotanical (palynological data obtained from analysis of lake and peat sediments. Detailed analysis of ice cores from the Greenland holes GRIP, GISP2, and NGRIP with a time resolution of about 10 years made possible to refine the duration and characteristics of the time structure of this cold period. This cooling lasted for approximately 160 yr. Spore-pollen analysis of lake sediments in Northern Europe (Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Germany, the North and North-West of Russia and deep-sea cores of the North Atlantic showed that the mean annual air temperature during the maximum stage of the cooling was reduced by 1–2 °C, and in some areas by more than 3 °C. The cold spread from the coast of the North Atlantic into the European continent and manifested itself mostly in Sweden, Finland, the Baltic States, and to a lesser extent in the North-West and West of the Russian Federation. In the central Russia and North of 70°N the cooling was weak or absent. The question about a nature of this cold event and other cold spells in Late Glaciation, known as the cold of the early, middle and late Dryas, is widely discussed in the scientific literature. Most of scientists accept a hypothesis proposed more than 20 years ago, that the reduction of air temperatures in regions immediately adjacent to the North Atlantic was caused by the large volume of melt water discharged into the ocean as a result of disintegration and melting of ice-sheets. Climate models that take into account these effects allow estimating a decrease in the air and sea surface temperature due to freshening (desalination of the upper ocean layer, and this confirms that the greatest decrease in temperature should be observed in the regions directly adjacent to the ocean. The increase in global temperature over the last 30 years is estimated to be 0.8 ± 0.2

  20. Hydrological Influence on the Dead Carbon Fraction in a Tropical Speleothem During the Younger Dryas and the Last Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M. L.; Hua, Q.; Drysdale, R.; Bajo, P.; Jenkins, D.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Johnson, K. R.; Gagan, M. K.; Zhao, J. X.

    2015-12-01

    The number of paleoclimate records derived from speleothems has increased significantly in recent years. In addition, speleothems have been used for calibration of the radiocarbon timescale beyond the range of the tree-ring record. One critical issue for reliable speleothem-based radiocarbon calibration and 14C dating of speleothems is constraining the temporal variations in the radioactively dead carbon (i.e. dead carbon fraction (DCF)) that is incorporated into this archive and to determine the potential mechanisms driving such changes. While some studies have shown insignificant variations in DCF through time and highlighted the potential utility of speleothems to extend/improve the radiocarbon calibration curve, others have reported significant temporal variability in speleothem DCF associated with changes in cave recharge. To further assess the potential hydrological control on speleothem radiocarbon variability, we constructed a new high-resolution DCF record from a speleothem from Flores, Indonesia for two different time periods, the Younger Dryas (YD) chronozone and the Last Millennium. A total of thirty-four 14C analyses (twenty for the YD and fourteen for the Last Millennium) were conducted on pieces of calcite extracted from stalagmite LR06-B1, which was well-dated by ~90 U-Th ages. To better characterize the paleoclimate and environmental changes, high-resolution stable-isotope (δ18O, δ13C) and trace-element (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) measurements were also conducted along the same sections of stalagmite. Broad comparison of the DCF record with the hydrologically-controlled proxy data suggests that increases in rainfall were matched by DCF increases. In line with a previous interpretation of DCF variability for the same specimen, but during the time interval 2.4-2.8 cal kyr BP and the post-bomb period, we interpret the DCF during the YD and the Last Millennium to have been primarily controlled by limestone dissolution associated with changes in open- versus

  1. Assessing cold chain status in a metro city of India: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, S; Mandal, P K; Chatterjee, C; Ghosh, P; Manna, N; Chakrabarty, D; Bagchi, S N; Dasgupta, S

    2011-03-01

    Cold chain maintenance is an essential activity to maintain the potency of vaccines and to prevent adverse events following immunization. One baseline study highlighted the unsatisfactory cold chain status in city of Kolkata in India. To assess the changes which occurred in the cold chain status after the intervention undertaken to improve the status and also to assess the awareness of the cold chain handlers regarding cold chain maintenance. Intervention consisted of reorganization of cold chain points and training of health manpower in Kolkata Municipal area regarding immunization and cold chain following the guidelines as laid by Govt of India. Reevaluation of cold chain status was done at 20 institutions selected by stratified systematic random sampling after the intervention. The results were compared with baseline survey. Significant improvement had been observed in correct placing of cold chain equipment, maintenance of stock security, orderly placing of ice packs, diluents and vaccines inside the equipment, temperature recording and maintenance. But awareness and skill of cold chain handlers regarding basics of cold chain maintenance was not satisfactory. The success of intervention included significant improvement of cold chain status including creation of a designated cold chain handler. The gaps lay in non-availability of non-electrical cold chain equipment and separate cold chain room, policy makers should stress. Cold chain handlers need reorientation training regarding heat & cold sensitive vaccines, preventive maintenance and correct contingency plan.

  2. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...

  3. Differential proxy responses to late Allerød and early Younger Dryas climatic change recorded in varved sediments of the Trzechowskie palaeolake in Northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowiński, Michał; Zawiska, Izabela; Ott, Florian; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Plessen, Birgit; Apolinarska, Karina; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Michczyńska, Danuta J.; Wulf, Sabine; Skubała, Piotr; Kordowski, Jarosław; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution biological proxies (pollen, macrofossils, Cladocera and diatoms), geochemical data (μ-XRF element scans, TOC, C/N ratios, δ18Ocarb and δ13Corg values) and a robust chronology based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating and tephrochronology were applied to reconstruct lake system responses to rapid climatic and environmental changes of the Trzechowskie palaeolake (TRZ; Northern Poland) during the late Allerød - Younger Dryas (YD) transition. Palaeoecological and geochemical data at 5-15 years temporal resolution allowed tracing the dynamics of short-term shifts of the ecosystem triggered by abrupt climate change. The robust age control together with the high-resolution sampling allowed the detection of leads and lags between different proxies to the climate shift at the Allerød-Younger Dryas transition. Our results indicate (1) a water level decrease and an increase in wind activities during the late Allerød and the Allerød-YD transition, which caused intensified erosion in the catchment, (2) a two-decades delayed vegetation response in comparison to the lake depositional system. Comparison with the Lake Meerfelder Maar record revealed slightly different vegetation responses of the Trzechowskie palaeolake at the YD onset.

  4. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  5. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  6. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  7. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  8. Cold fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  9. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports A A A What's in this article? ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  10. Coping with Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have heard that chicken soup can cure a cold. There's no real proof of this, but sick people have been swearing by it for more than 800 years. When Should I Go to the Doctor? Teens who catch colds usually don't get very sick or need ...

  11. Strong Cold Weather Event over Eurasia during the Winter of 2011/2012 and a Downward Arctic Oscillation Signal from the Stratosphere%2011~2012年冬季欧亚大陆低温严寒事件与平流层北极涛动异常下传的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰晓青; 陈文

    2013-01-01

    The circulation evolution and possible causes of a severe cold event over the Eurasian continent during the winter of 2011/2012 were investigated with the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data.Strong cold anomalies covering most of Europe,Mongolia,and northeastern China began in late January 2012 and lasted for about 3 weeks.Analysis results indicate that this cold event coincided with the phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) changing from positive to negative,which implied a possible impact of the AO.Before this AO phase change,a minor warming occurred in the stratosphere caused by an anomalous upward propagation of planetary waves.The polar night jet then decelerated and the AO changed its sign in the stratosphere.Within 2-3 weeks,the stratospheric AO signal gradually propagated downward and accordingly the tropospheric AO evolved into the negative phase.Thus,a strong Ural blocking high developed,and cold air invaded Europe and East Asia from the polar region,which induced the decreasing temperature there.Our results suggest that improvements can be made in predicting severe winter cold events over Eurasia by taking into account the stratospheric circulation anomaly.%利用NCEP-NCAR再分析资料分析了2011~2012年冬季发生在欧亚大陆的一次异常低温严寒事件的大气环流演变过程以及可能的成因.这次低温事件,主要出现在2012年1月下旬至2月上旬,持续大约3周左右,非常强的低温异常覆盖了几乎整个欧洲以及东亚的西伯利亚、蒙古国和我国东北、华北等地.这次低温事件的演变与对流层北极涛动(AO)由正位相转变为负位相的时间相匹配,意味着AO可能发挥重要作用.进一步分析表明,前期行星波的异常上传导致平流层发生爆发性增温现象,极夜急流减弱,AO位相首先在平流层由正变负;在2~3周左右的时间内,平流层AO异常信号逐渐下传,使得对流层AO也转为负位相;随后,乌拉尔山阻塞高压异常发展,极区

  12. How Cold is Cold Dark Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models, however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter. The latter imply that its velocity dispersion extrapolated to the present has to be smaller than 56 m/s. Cold dark matter has t...

  13. Interhemispheric Correlation of Late Pleistocene Glacial Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, T. V.; Heusser, C. J.; Andersen, B. G.; Moreno, P. I.; Hauser, A.; Heusser, L. E.; Schluchter, C.; Marchant, D. R.; Denton, G. H.

    1995-09-01

    A radiocarbon chronology shows that piedmont glacier lobes in the Chilean Andes achieved maxima during the last glaciation at 13,900 to 14,890, 21,000, 23,060, 26,940, 29,600, and >=33,500 carbon-14 years before present (14C yr B.P.) in a cold and wet Subantarctic Parkland environment. The last glaciation ended with massive collapse of ice lobes close to 14,000 14C yr B.P., accompanied by an influx of North Patagonian Rain Forest species. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, additional glacial maxima are registered at 17,720 14C yr B.P., and at the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 11,050 14C yr B.P. These glacial maxima in mid-latitude mountains rimming the South Pacific were coeval with ice-rafting pulses in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, the last termination began suddenly and simultaneously in both polar hemispheres before the resumption of the modern mode of deep-water production in the Nordic Seas. Such interhemispheric coupling implies a global atmospheric signal rather than regional climatic changes caused by North Atlantic thermohaline switches or Laurentide ice surges.

  14. Behaviour of the lake district ice lobe of the Scandinavian ice sheet during the younger dryas chronozone (ca. 12 800 - 11 500 years ago)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunkka, J.P.; Erikkilae, A. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    It is highly relevant to picture the conditions that prevailed under and in front of the ice sheets as they were stationary or in equilibrium for many hundreds of years. This knowledge is particularly relevant when planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository underground. For estimating what kind of conditions might exist at the ice margin basic knowledge is needed from the palaeoice sheets that remained stationary for long periods of time. During Younder Dryas Stadial (c. 12 800 - 11 500 years ago) glaciers remained stationary or advanced worldwide as a result of climate cooling. The major end moraine complexes that run around Fennoscandia, Russian Karelia and the Kola Peninsula were deposited at that time and mark the former Younger Dryas ice margin. It this work the palaeoenvironments have been reconstructed in order to reveal the conditions that existed for more than 1000 years in the area where the former Lake District Ice Lobe of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet was in the Salpausselkae zone in southern Finland. Work was carried out using GIS-based reconstruction tools, sedimentological and geophysical (ground penetrating radar) methods. In addition, a detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstruction was produced for the Kylaeniemi area which forms a part of the Salpausselkae II end moraine. The GIS-based reconstructions clearly indicate that the ice grounding line of the Lake District Ice Lobe was standing in shallow water depth in the Baltic Ice Lake. The water depth in front of Salpausselkae I, which marks the ice margin at c. 12 500 years ago was mainly between 20-40 metres. When the ice margin was in Salpausselkae II at around 11 700 years ago the water depth in front of the ice margin was on average less than 20 metres. Although the surface profile of ice was not possible to calculate subgalcial and ice frontal landforms indicate that subgalcial tunnel systems were responsible for releasing melt water and sediment to the ice margin throughout the

  15. Event Management

    OpenAIRE

    Havlenová, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    Event is an experience that is perceived by all the senses. Event management is a process involving the various activities that are assigned to staffers. Organizing special events became an individual field. If the manager understand the events as a communication platform gets into the hands of a modern, multifunctional and very impressive tool. The procedure to implement a successful event in a particular area is part of this work. The first part explains the issues of event management on th...

  16. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  17. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  18. The cold reading technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  19. A Cold Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of 2009, north China has been repeatedly struck by arctic-like blasts of cold weather. As temperatures have plummeted to historic lows, they have inflicted considerable suffering as well.

  20. A Cold Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JIANXIONG

    2010-01-01

    @@ Since the end of 2009, north China has been repeatedly struck by arctic-like blasts of cold weather. As temperatures have plummeted to historic lows, they have inflicted considerable suffering as well.

  1. Rethinking Little Rock: The Cold War Politics of School Integration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejong-Lambert, William

    2007-01-01

    Though the impact of the cold war on the civil rights movement continued long after the desegregation crisis in Little Rock, the timing of the events in Arkansas, particularly the events at Central High School, constituted a unique moment in the history of the cold war. Up until the fall of 1957, the Soviet Union had been perceived as less…

  2. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  3. Event marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Novotná, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to analyze event-marketing activities of the small firm and propose new events. At first the theoretical part describes marketing and communication mix and then especially planning and development of event marketing campaign. Research data were collected by the method of survey to propose the new events. Randomly selected customers were asked to fill the questionnaire. Its results were integrated into the proposal of the new events. The interview was realized with the owner of...

  4. Cold snaps still a threat despite global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-07-01

    Long stretches of extreme cold weather can cause serious damage to agriculture as well as to transportation, water, and energy infrastructure. Cold snaps have the potential to kill people, with deaths attributed to cold weather often outpacing those caused by extreme heat. With climate projections anticipating at least 2deg;C increases in global average temperature by the end of the century, some regional planners may be taking solace in the idea that the threat of cold weather extremes could fade as the world warms. Research by Kodra et al., however, suggests that on a global scale the intensity and duration of extreme cold weather events will persist and in some regions will possibly even increase by the end of the 21st century. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL047103, 2011)

  5. Analysis of Fatigue Crack Paths in Cold Drawn Pearlitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fracto-metallographic analysis was performed on the cracked specimens of cold drawn pearlitic steel subjected to fatigue tests. Fatigue cracks are transcollonial and exhibit a preference for fracturing pearlitic lamellae, with non-uniform crack opening displacement values, micro-discontinuities, branchings, bifurcations and frequent local deflections that create microstructural roughness. At the micro-level, the cold drawn pearlitic steel exhibits higher micro-roughness than the hot rolled bar (this is a consequence of the manufacturing process by cold drawing, so that the actual fractured surface in the cold drawn wire is greater than that in the hot rolled bar, due to the fact that the crack deflection events are more frequent and with higher angle in the former (the heavily drawn prestressing steel wire. These findings show the relevant role on the manufacturing process by cold drawing in the fatigue crack propagation in pearlitic steel.

  6. Cold asymmetrical fermion superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, Heron

    2003-12-19

    The recent experimental advances in cold atomic traps have induced a great amount of interest in fields from condensed matter to particle physics, including approaches and prospects from the theoretical point of view. In this work we investigate the general properties and the ground state of an asymmetrical dilute gas of cold fermionic atoms, formed by two particle species having different densities. We have show in a recent paper, that a mixed phase composed of normal and superfluid components is the energetically favored ground state of such a cold fermionic system. Here we extend the analysis and verify that in fact, the mixed phase is the preferred ground state of an asymmetrical superfluid in various situations. We predict that the mixed phase can serve as a way of detecting superfluidity and estimating the magnitude of the gap parameter in asymmetrical fermionic systems.

  7. Cold nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion beam mixing control, developed ion speed dc transformer, it is cold nuclear fusion collide, issue of motivation and the nuclear power plant start-up fusion and power transfer system of the important equipment, so the merger to apply for a patent

  8. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  9. Commemoration of a cold war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farbøl, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together the fields of Cold War studies and memory studies. In Denmark, a remarkable institutionalisation of Cold War memory has taken place in the midst of a heated ideological battle over the past and whether to remember the Cold War as a ‘war’. Using Danish Cold War museums...... and heritage sites as case studies, this article sheds new light on the politics of history involved in Cold War commemoration. It suggests that the Cold War is commemorated as a war, yet this war memory is of a particular kind: it is a war memory without victims....

  10. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  11. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  12. Finger cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are indications that subjects with a reduced finger CIVD response are more prone to get local cold injuries, but more epidemiological research is needed to establish a firm relationship. Although it was observed that an early CIVD onset was associated with initially superior manual performance

  13. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one…

  14. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they can be knocked over, potentially starting a fire. Check your furnace before the cold weather sets in to make ... avoided because of the risk of burns or fire. Heated pet mats should also be used ... to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of ...

  15. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic respon

  16. Chilling Out With Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some feel-better tips if you get a cold: Bring on the heat. Hot drinks soothe coughs and sore throats while also clearing mucus. So eat (or drink) your chicken soup! Get steamed up. A steamy shower helps stuffy or irritated noses. Or run a ...

  17. Out in the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jane

    2016-05-04

    Every now and then, you say something to a patient and wonder whether you should have kept quiet. On this occasion, a female patient and I were indulging in a moment of shared empathy over an annoying symptom we both experience - permanently cold feet.

  18. Cold War Propaganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discusses the development of Cold War propaganda in the United States, Canada, and the USSR after 1947. Presents two movie reviews and a Canadian magazine advertisement of the period which illustrate the harshness of propaganda used by both sides in the immediate postwar years. (GEA)

  19. Recent Cold War Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  20. Surpassing the Cold War Mentality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Mingjie

    2006-01-01

    @@ Five years have passed since September 11. What has been the influence of these events on international relations? What has changed in the world since then? The majority of scholars hold that the September 11 terrorist attacks were essentially a key event, a "turning point" in the international strategy transformation after the Cold War.Yet some others believe that the September 11 terrorist attacks cannot have had so profound an impact on international relations. For example, in America's Foreign Policy, most articles commemorating the fifth anniversary of September 11 fall into the second category. These articles suggest that, five years after September 11, security issues have not slowed down the pace of globalization; potential strategic competition among the big powers has not been weakened due to their cooperation in counter-terrorism and international terrorist organizations, represented by Al Qaeda, still exist. Meanwhile, many proturning-point scholars think that, after September 11, terrorism has become the main threat to international security and that the strategic focuses of major powers have also undergone a big adjustment, valuing cooperation over competition. There is even a saying that "the central content of international relations is to meet challenges from the non-state actors represented by terrorism."

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  2. Effects of cold working on the pitting corrosion behavior s of AISI 304 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kee Min; Kim, Jong Soo; Kim, Young Jun; Kwon, Houk Sang [KAIST, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    These microstructural changes by cold working can lead improvement of mechanical properties, however from a corrosion resistant point of view, the effects of cold working on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel have been argued. Several studies has been focused on the influence of cold working on the localized corrosion resistance of stainless steels. However, the opinions about the role of cold working on the localized corrosion resistance are highly in consistence. Some studies report that the pitting potential of austenitic stainless steels decreased with cold working level, on the other hands, other studies claimed that the pitting resistance was increased by cold working. Therefore it is necessary to verify how cold working affects pitting corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels. In the present work, the influence of cold working on the localized corrosion of AISI 304stainless steel in the neutral chloride solution was studied based on point defect model (PDM). The fraction of deformation-induced martensite was linearly increased with cold rolling level. Through cold rolling, the pitting potential was decreased, the metastable pitting event density was significantly increased and the repassivation potential was decreased. The overall localized corrosion resistance was decreased with cold working, however cold working level increased from 30 % to 50 %, localized corrosion resistance was recovered. The accumulated cation vacancy generates a void at metal/film interface, therefore film breakdown accelerates for cold worked alloys.

  3. Wind energy under cold climate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in wind energy production under different climatic conditions, among them cold climate and icing conditions. More and more wind turbines are being installed in cold climates and even adapted technology has been developed for that environment. Various national activities are going on in at least Finland, Canada, Italy, Sweden, etc. and international collaboration has been carried out within the European Union's Non-nuclear energy programme. Wind turbine operation is affected by both the cold temperatures and the formation of ice on the blades and the supporting structure. Cold temperatures can be handled by material selections known in other technical fields but to prevent icing, new techniques have to be - and have been - developed. Icing affects the reliability of anemometers, which concerns both turbine control and resource estimation, and changes the aerodynamics of the blades, which eventually stops the turbine. In addition, occasional icing events can locally affect public safety. The development of applied technology has entered some different paths and different solutions are tried out. As the applications are entering a commercial phase, these is a request to gather the experiences and monitor the reliability in a form that can be utilised by developers, manufactureres, consultants and other tenderers. The Topical Experts Meeting will focus on site classification, operational experiences, modelling and mesurements of ice induced loads and safety aspects. (EHS)

  4. SENTINEL EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Objective of the article is a two year statistics on sentinel events in hospitals. Results of a survey on sentinel events and the attitude of hospital leaders and staff are also included. Some recommendations regarding patient safety and the handling of sentinel events are given.Methods. In March 2002 the Ministry of Health introduce a voluntary reporting system on sentinel events in Slovenian hospitals. Sentinel events were analyzed according to the place the event, its content, and root causes. To show results of the first year, a conference for hospital directors and medical directors was organized. A survey was conducted among the participants with the purpose of gathering information about their view on sentinel events. One hundred questionnaires were distributed.Results. Sentinel events. There were 14 reports of sentinel events in the first year and 7 in the second. In 4 cases reports were received only after written reminders were sent to the responsible persons, in one case no reports were obtained. There were 14 deaths, 5 of these were in-hospital suicides, 6 were due to an adverse event, 3 were unexplained. Events not leading to death were a suicide attempt, a wrong side surgery, a paraplegia after spinal anaesthesia, a fall with a femoral neck fracture, a damage of the spleen in the event of pleural space drainage, inadvertent embolization with absolute alcohol into a femoral artery and a physical attack on a physician by a patient. Analysis of root causes of sentinel events showed that in most cases processes were inadequate.Survey. One quarter of those surveyed did not know about the sentinel events reporting system. 16% were having actual problems when reporting events and 47% beleived that there was an attempt to blame individuals. Obstacles in reporting events openly were fear of consequences, moral shame, fear of public disclosure of names of participants in the event and exposure in mass media. The majority of

  5. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is

  6. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is re

  7. Formation of the southern Bay of Bengal cold pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Umasankar; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Behara, Ambica

    2016-09-01

    A pool of relatively cooler water, called here as the southern Bay of Bengal cold pool, exists around Sri Lanka and southern tip of India during the summer monsoon. This cold pool is enveloped by the larger Indian Ocean warm pool and is believed to affect the intraseasonal variations of summer monsoon rainfall. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the formation of the cold pool using a combination of both satellite data sets and a general circulation model of the Indian Ocean. Sea surface temperature (SST) within the cold pool, after the steady increase during the February-April period, decreases first during a pre-monsoon spell in April and then with the monsoon onset during May. The onset cooling is stronger (~1.8°C) than the pre-monsoon cooling (~0.8°C) and culminates in the formation of the cold pool. Analysis of the model temperature equation shows that SST decrease during both events is primarily due to a decrease in incoming solar radiation and an increase in latent heat loss. These changes in the net heat flux are brought about by the arrival of cloud bands above the cold pool during both periods. During the pre-monsoon period, a cloud band originates in the western equatorial Indian Ocean and subsequently arrives above the cold pool. Similarly, during the monsoon onset, a band of clouds originating in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean comes over the cold pool region. A lead-lag correlation calculation between daily SST and rainfall anomalies suggest that cooling in SST occurs in response to rainfall events with a lag of 5 days. These sequence of events occur every year with certain amount of interannual variability.

  8. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  9. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  10. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  11. "Miniature Cold War?"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fu: Relations between America and Russia are one of the most important bilateral ties that could affect the trend of world situation.What's the matter with U. S. -Russia ties? What's wrong with their bilateral relations? People tend to ask these days. Some observers on both sides suggest that post 9/11 honeymoon has turned sour when joint effort against challenges from nontraditional security issues failed to remove original bilateral contradictions over traditional security concerns.Japanese Jiji News Agency saw "a miniature Cold War" evolving and the British Guardian even bluntly pronounced "a new Cold War" on January 3, asserting that disintegration of the former Soviet Union did not terminate bilateral contention, which has only been performed on an international stage more complicated than ever before, with covert scheming against each other replacing overt, direct confrontation. How about starting our discussion with those comments?

  12. Engine Cold Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    14. ABSTRACT These fuels were used for testing a GEP 6.5L turbocharged V-8 diesel engine operation in a cold box. This engine architecture is... engines . The U.S. military currently uses petroleum-based jet fuels in diesel engine -powered ground vehicles and is studying the use of alternative jet...to identify a window, or range, of cetane number which would be acceptable to ensure the reliable operation of diesel engine -powered military ground

  13. Electronic Equipment Cold Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-01

    equations for such a flow regiae. For laainar flow and Moderate teaperature differwwe« between the well «nd coolant, a aodifled Sieder -Tate...con- figuration. The heat-transfer coefficients, therefore, were determined by using both the Sieder -Tate and McAdams equations and the coaputed...values used In the analytical predictions. As with th* previous cold Plates, the Sieder -Tate equation gave too low of values for the heat- transfer

  14. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  15. Early winter cold spells over the Euro-Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toreti, Andrea; Xoplaki, Elena; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2016-04-01

    In a changing climate context, temperature extremes are expected to heavily impact societies and economies. Projected changes in warm extremes have been extensively investigated, while less efforts are devoted to cold extremes. Despite the projected warming of the climate system, cold extremes could still occur and have an impact on several sectors, such as human health and agriculture. Here, we focus on cold spells that have a potential high impact, i.e. early winter cold spells occurring after a mild-to-warm autumn. Projected changes of these events over the Euro-Mediterranean region are analysed by using the latest Euro-Cordex simulations under the scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. In terms of spatial extension of cold spells, a significant reduction can be seen only at the end of the 21st century and under the RCP8.5 scenario. As for the changes in intensity in the mid-century, no consistency is found among models over large areas. At the end of the century, the north-eastern part of the domain and northern Africa are projected to be early-cold-spell free under the RCP4.5 scenario, while, almost the entire domain is projected to be early-cold-spell free under the RCP8.5 scenario.

  16. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  17. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases.

  18. Exception in Cold War

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the Cold War, India mainly focused its Southeast Asia Strategy on preserving the regional peace and stability, fearing that changes in Southeast Asia would impact India. Generally speaking, India would like to see a relatively strong, stable and independent Southeast Asia, which would guarantee the stability of its east wing. However, fettered by its limited power, its non-alignment policy and its special relation with Soviet Union, India's policy toward Southeast Asia remained relatively passive and its relation with Southeast Asia was, to some extent, trapped in a historical "intermission."

  19. Subglacial hydrology of the lake district ice lobe during the Younger Dryas (ca. 12 500 - 11 600 years ago) in the Kylaeniemi area, SE Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunkka, J. P.; Moisio, K.; Vainio, A. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    It is essential to gain knowledge on the subglacial hydrological conditions at the glacier bed / bedrock interface when assessing how bedrock fracture zones affect subglacial melt water flow and in which subglacial zones pressurized and oxygen-rich melt water penetrates into the bedrock fracture systems. In the warm-based glacier zones, a part of subglacial melt water will penetrate deep into the fracture systems although the major part of melt water is drained to and beyond the ice margin via subglacial tunnel networks especially in the areas where ice is flowing on the crystalline bedrock. During the last deglaciation phase of the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, glaciofluvial accumulations were deposited and these sediment accumulations are highly important when picturing the subglacial hydrology of different ice streams during deglaciation in the crystalline bedrock area. The aim of the present work was to map the bedrock fracture zones in the Kylaeniemi area and to shed light on the subglacial hydrology of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet's Lake District Ice Stream that occupied the Kylaeniemi area during the Younger Dryas between ca. 12 500 - 11 600 years ago. The special emphasis within this general aim was to study the relationship between bedrock fracture zones and the routes of subglacial drainage paths. The methods used to map and study bedrock fracture zones and subglacial drainage paths included remotes sensing methods, field observations, ground penetrating radar (GPR) investigations and GIS-based reconstructions. Conventional geological field methods aided by the GPR-method were also used to map bedrock exposures and their structures and to define the type of glaciofluvial sediments and glaciofluvial landform associations. Two main fracture zone sets occur in the study area. The most prominent bedrock fracture zone set trends NW-SE while the other, less prominent fracture zone set is aligned in NE-SW direction. The majority of the minor joint sets in

  20. Sololuminescence:microwaves and cold fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TVPrevenslik

    1997-01-01

    Sonoluminescence(SL) observed in the cavitation of water is explained by the Planck theory of SL that treats the bubbles as miniature masers converting the velocity of bubble collapes to electromagnetic(EM) waves at microwave(MW) froequencies.The Planck theory of SL is consistent with historical experimental data that shows MW's concurrent with SL are produced in cavitation.As the bubbles collapse,MW's are absorbed and the Planck energy accumulates through the rotation quantum state of the bubble wall molecules,A MW photoelectric effect for accumulated MW photons is identified as a new SL parameter.During ultrasonic cavitation,cold fusion on average betweeen the D's on colliding D2O bubble wall molecules does not occur as the Planck energy is limited to about 2keV,but a limited number of cold fusion events with a Planck energy in excess of 10keV are possible.However,high power microwaves(HPM) pulsed to less than-1ns appear to be a far more efficient way of creating cold fusion in D2O than by ultrasonic cavitation.

  1. Biomarker Records of Lake Albano (central Italy) and Lake Constance (southern Germany)- Implications for environmental change in the Holocene and Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, S.; Schwalb, A.; Ariztegui, D.; Wessels, M.; Puettmann, W.

    2003-12-01

    Steroids, triterpenoids and n-alkanes from a 13 m Holocene sediment core from Lake Albano and a 7 m Late Pleistocene/Holocene core from Lake Constance (13,000 to 650 years BP) as well as pigments, pollen and stable isotopes from benthic ostracodes, are used to reconstruct climatic changes and human impact on the lake systems and their catchments. Dinosterol, isoarborinol, hopanoids, and tetrahymanol in Lake Albano sediments indicate changes in the biological assemblages and enhanced lake mixing and thus stronger wind activity at around 6,500 and 3,800 years BP. A development from forest to a more open landscape in the Lake Albano catchment from 5,000 years BP is suggested by a decrease of n-alkanes derived from deciduous trees (C27 and C29). N-alkanes, friedelin and amyrenones show a close correspondence with the percentage of broadleaf-tree pollen, indicating deforestation after 5,000 and 6,500 years BP,. High concentrations of land-plant derived β -sitosterol in Lake Constance sediments during the Younger Dryas indicate erosive input due to sparse vegetation. The increase of β -sitosterol after 7,000 years BP suggests terrigenous input as a result of enhanced precipitation. Dinosterol distribution traces a period of high productivity between 11,600 and 7,000 years BP. Tetrahymanol, a biomarker for ciliates and possibly an indicator for water column stratification, shows relatively high concentrations at approximately 9,000 years BP. This coincides with a 4 ‰ shift to more negative values of δ 13C in the ostracode L. mirabilis, suggesting hydromechanic changes in Lake Constance.

  2. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stalder

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral (CWC ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago. However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents.

  3. Monitoring of Sedimentary Fluxes in Cold Environments: The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2014-05-01

    Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated geomorphic process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G. / A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program (2005 - 2017) is addressing this existing key knowledge gap. The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Research carried out at each of the ca. 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by program, logistics and available resources, but typically represent interdisciplinary collaborations of geomorphologists, hydrologists, ecologists, permafrost scientists and glaciologists. SEDIBUD has developed manuals and protocols (SEDIFLUX Manual) with a key set of primary surface process monitoring and research data requirements to incorporate results from these diverse projects and allow coordinated quantitative analysis across the program. Defined SEDIBUD key tasks for the coming years include (i) The continued generation and compilation of comparable longer-term datasets on contemporary sedimentary fluxes and sediment yields from SEDIBUD key test sites worldwide, (ii) The continued extension of the SEDIBUD metadata database with these datasets, (iii) The testing of defined SEDIBUD hypotheses (available

  4. Cold season soil NO fluxes from a temperate forest: drivers and contribution to annual budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinets, S.; Gasche, R.; Skiba, U.; Schindlbacher, A.; Kiese, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2016-11-01

    Soils, and here specifically acidic forest soils exposed to high rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, are a significant source for the secondary greenhouse gas nitric oxide (NO). However, as flux estimates are mainly based on measurements during the vegetation period, annual NO emissions budgets may hold uncertainty as cold season soil NO fluxes have rarely been quantified. Here we analyzed cold season soil NO fluxes and potential environmental drivers on the basis of the most extensive database on forest soil NO fluxes obtained at the Höglwald Forest, Germany, spanning the years 1994 to 2010. On average, the cold season (daily average air temperature soil NO budget, varying from 13% to 41% between individual cold seasons. Temperature was the main controlling factor of the cold season NO fluxes, whereas during freeze-thaw cycles soil moisture availability determined NO emission rates. The importance of cold season soil NO fluxes for annual NO fluxes depended positively on the length of the cold season, but responded negatively to frost events. Snow cover did not significantly affect cold season soil NO fluxes. Cold season NO fluxes significantly correlated with cold season soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. During freeze-thaw periods strong positive correlations between NO and N2O fluxes were observed, though stimulation of NO fluxes by freeze-thaw was by far less pronounced as compared to N2O. Except for freeze-thaw periods NO fluxes significantly exceeded those for N2O during the cold season period. We conclude that in temperate forest ecosystems cold season NO emissions can contribute substantially to the annual NO budget and this contribution is significantly higher in years with long lasting but mild (less frost events) cold seasons.

  5. Lightning and severe thunderstorms in event management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Katie M

    2012-01-01

    There are a few national position stands/guidelines that address environmental conditions in athletics, yet they do not govern all outdoor sports. Extreme heat and cold, lightning, and severe wind can all be fatal, yet the majority of outdoor sports have no published guidelines addressing these conditions in relation to activity. Available research on extreme heat and cold conditions in athletics provides prevention strategies, to include acclimatization. Lightning and severe wind are two environmental conditions to which humans cannot accommodate, and they both can be deadly. There are strong positions on extreme heat/cold and lightning safety in athletics, but none affiliated with severe winds. Medical personnel involved in planning large outdoor sporting events must know of the presence of nationally published weather-related documents and apply them to their event. In addition, research needs to be expanded in the realm of establishing guidelines for safety to participants and spectators in severe wind conditions.

  6. Cold nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Dorso, C O; Nichols, J I; López, J A

    2012-01-01

    We study the behavior of cold nuclear matter near saturation density (\\rho 0) and very low temperature using classical molecular dynamics. We used three different (classical) nuclear interaction models that yield `medium' or `stiff' compressibilities. For high densities and for every model the ground state is a classical crystalline solid, but each one with a different structure. At subsaturation densities, we found that for every model the transition from uniform (crystal) to non-uniform matter occurs at \\rho ~ 0.12 fm^(-3) = 0.75 \\rho 0. Surprisingly, at the non-uniform phase, the three models produce `pasta-like' structures as those allegedly present in neutron star matter but without the long-range Coulomb interaction and with different length scales.

  7. Cold dark matter resuscitated?

    CERN Document Server

    White, M; Silk, J; Davis, M; White, Martin; Scott, Douglas; Silk, Joe; Davis, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model has an elegant simplicitly which makes it very predictive, but when its parameters are fixed at their `canonical' values its predictions are in conflict with observational data. There is, however, much leeway in the initial conditions within the CDM framework. We advocate a re-examination of the CDM model, taking into account modest variation of parameters from their canonical values. We find that CDM models with n=0.8--0.9 and h=0.45--0.50 can fit the available data. Our ``best fit'' CDM model has n=0.9, h=0.45 and C_2^{T}/C_2^{S}=0.7. We discuss the current state of observations which could definitely rule out this model.

  8. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in w

  9. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in w

  10. The status of cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  11. Cold Crystal Reflector Filter Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Muhrer, G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical concept of a cold crystal reflector filter will be presented. The aim of this concept is to balance the shortcoming of the traditional cold polycrystalline reflector filter, which lies in the significant reduction of the neutron flux right above (in energy space) or right below (wavelength space) the first Bragg edge.

  12. Tracking the evolution of a cold stress associated gene family in cold tolerant grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandve, Simen R; Rudi, Heidi; Asp, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Background Grasses are adapted to a wide range of climatic conditions. Species of the subfamily Pooideae, which includes wheat, barley and important forage grasses, have evolved extreme frost tolerance. A class of ice binding proteins that inhibit ice re-crystallisation, specific to the Pooideae...... to the repeat motifs of the IRI-domain in cold tolerant grasses. Finally we show that the LRR-domain of carrot and grass IRI proteins both share homology to an Arabidopsis thaliana LRR-trans membrane protein kinase (LRR-TPK). Conclusion The diverse IRI-like genes identified in this study tell a tale...... of a complex evolutionary history including birth of an ice binding domain, a burst of gene duplication events after cold tolerant grasses radiated from rice, protein domain structure differentiation between paralogs, and sub- and/or neofunctionalisation of IRI-like proteins. From our sequence analysis we...

  13. The structure and energetics of midlatitude disturbances accompanying cold-air outbreaks over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, N.-C.; Lau, K.-M.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of extratropical transient waves as they propagate eastward from the Eurasian land mass toward the Pacific during selected cold surge events in the winter Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) is studied. The outstanding cold surge episodes during MONEX are first identified, and the salient synoptic features related to these events are described using composite streamline charts. The structure of rapidly varying disturbances accompanying the cold surges and the associated energetics are examined, and the behavior of those fluctuations over relatively longer time scales is addressed.

  14. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Parents > Cough ... cough and cold medicine. Why Do Kids Abuse Cough and Cold Remedies? Before the U.S. Food and ...

  15. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  16. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least one-half of colds. (5) Cold viruses can only multiply when they are inside of living cells. When on an environmental surface, cold viruses cannot multiply. However, they are still infectious if ...

  17. Cold fronts and reservoir limnology: an integrated approach towards the ecological dynamics of freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tundisi, J G; Matsumura-Tundisi, T; Pereira, K C; Luzia, A P; Passerini, M D; Chiba, W A C; Morais, M A; Sebastien, N Y

    2010-10-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the effects of cold fronts on the dynamics of freshwater ecosystems of southeast South America. Cold fronts originating from the Antarctic show a monthly frequency that promotes turbulence and vertical mixing in reservoirs with a consequence to homogenize nutrient distribution, dissolved oxygen and temperature. Weak thermoclines and the athelomixis process immediately before, during and after the passage of cold fronts interfere with phytoplankton succession in reservoirs. Cyanobacteria blooms in eutrophic reservoirs are frequently connected with periods of stratification and stability of the water column. Cold fronts in the Amazon and Pantanal lakes may produce fish killings during the process of "friagem" associated mixing events. Further studies will try to implement a model to predict the impact of cold fronts and prepare management procedures in order to cope with cyanobacteria blooms during warm and stable water column periods. Changes in water quality of reservoirs are expected during circulation periods caused by cold fronts.

  18. An abrupt cooling event early in the last interglacial in the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU; Xia

    2001-01-01

    [1]Grootes, P. M., Stulver, M., Johnson, J. W. C. et al., Comparison of oxygen isotope records from GISP2 and GRIP Greenland ice cores, Nature, 1993, 366:552-554.[2]Maslin, M., Sarnthein, M., Knaack, J. J. et al., Intra-interglacial cold events: An Eemian-Holocene comparison, The Geo logical Society of London, Special Publications, 1998, 131:91-99.[3]Wang, P., Prell, W., Blum, P. et al., Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, 2000, 184.[4]Thompson, P. R., Bé, A. W. H., Disappearrence of pink-pigmented Globigerinoides ruber at 120,000yr BP in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, Nature, 1976, 280:554-558.[5]Martinson, D. G., Piasias, N. G., Hays, J. D. et al., Age dating and the orbital theory of the ice ages: Development of a high-resolution 0 to 300000-year chronostratigraphy, Quaternary Research, 1987, 27: 1-29.[6]Thompson, P. R., Planktonic foraminifera in the West North Pacific during the past 150,000 years: Comparison of modern and fossil assemblages, Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol., 1981, 35:241-279.[7]Tu, X., Zheng, F., Chen, M. et al., Planktonic foraminifera in continental slope of southern South China Sea and their im plications to paleotemperature of surface sea water, Tropic Oceanology (in Chinese with English abstract), 2000, 19(3): 40-49.[8]Wang, L., Sarnthein, M., Erlenkeuser, H. et al., East Asian monsoon climate during the late Pleistocene: High-resolution sediment records from the South China Sea, Marine Geology, 1999, 156: 245-284.[9]Eglintin, G., Bradshaw, S. A., Rosell, A. et al., Molecular record of secular sea surface temperature changes on 100-year timescales for glacial terminations I, Ⅱ, and IV, Nature, 1992, 356: 423-426.[10]Maslin, M., Sarnthein, M., Knaack, J.-J., Subtropical Eastern Atlantic climate during the Eamian, Naturwissenschaften,1996, 83:122-126.[11]Sarnthein, M., Tiedemann, R., Younger Dryas-style cooling events at glacial terminations I-VI at ODP Site 658

  19. Cold plasma decontamination of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemira, Brendan A

    2012-01-01

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology that uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas, such as air, oxygen, nitrogen, or helium; antimicrobial chemical agents are not required. The primary modes of action are due to UV light and reactive chemical products of the cold plasma ionization process. A wide array of cold plasma systems that operate at atmospheric pressures or in low pressure treatment chambers are under development. Reductions of greater than 5 logs can be obtained for pathogens such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Effective treatment times can range from 120 s to as little as 3 s, depending on the food treated and the processing conditions. Key limitations for cold plasma are the relatively early state of technology development, the variety and complexity of the necessary equipment, and the largely unexplored impacts of cold plasma treatment on the sensory and nutritional qualities of treated foods. Also, the antimicrobial modes of action for various cold plasma systems vary depending on the type of cold plasma generated. Optimization and scale up to commercial treatment levels require a more complete understanding of these chemical processes. Nevertheless, this area of technology shows promise and is the subject of active research to enhance efficacy.

  20. Circulation characteristics of persistent cold spells in central-eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhua; Manson, Alan H.; Li, Yanping; Meek, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The circulation patterns of persistent cold weather spells with durations longer than 10 days in central-eastern North America (United States and Canada; 32°-52°N, 95°-65°W) are investigated by using NCEP reanalysis data from 1948 to 2014. The criteria for the persistent cold spells are: (1) three-day averaged temperature anomalies for the regional average over the central-eastern United States and Canada must be below the 10th percentile, and (2) such extreme cold spells must last at least 10 days. The circulation patterns associated with these cold spells are examined to find the common signals of these events. The circulation anomaly patterns of these cold spells are categorized based on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Arctic Oscillation (AO), and other climate indices. The atmospheric circulation patterns that favor the cold spells are identified through composites of geopotential height maps for the cold spells. Negative AO phases favor persistent cold spells. Phases of sea surface temperature (SST) modes that are associated with warm SSTs in the eastern extratropical Pacific also favor persistent cold events in the study region. Stratospheric polar vortex breakdown alone is not a good predictor for the regional extreme cold spells in central-eastern North America. The meridional dispersions of quasi-stationary Rossby waves in the Pacific-North America sector in terms of cut-off zonal wavenumber modulated by background flow are analyzed to provide insight into the difference in evolution of the cold spells under different mean AO phases. The waveguide for AO > 1 is in a narrow latitudinal band centered on 40°N, whereas the waveguide for AO <-1 is in a broader latitudinal band from 40° to 65°N. The circulation patterns and lower boundary conditions favorable for persistent cold spells identified by this study can be a stepping-stone for improving winter subseasonal forecasting in North America.

  1. Equatorward phytoplankton migration during a cold spell within the Late Cretaceous super-greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helmond, Niels A. G. M.; Sluijs, Appy; Papadomanolaki, Nina M.; Plint, A. Guy; Gröcke, Darren R.; Pearce, Martin A.; Eldrett, James S.; Trabucho-Alexandre, João; Walaszczyk, Ireneusz; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2016-05-01

    Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2), a ˜ 600 kyr episode close to the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (ca. 94 Ma), is characterized by relatively widespread marine anoxia and ranks amongst the warmest intervals of the Phanerozoic. The early stages of OAE2 are, however, marked by an episode of widespread transient cooling and bottom water oxygenation: the Plenus Cold Event. This cold spell has been linked to a decline in atmospheric pCO2, resulting from enhanced global organic carbon burial. To investigate the response of phytoplankton to this marked and rapid climate shift we examined the biogeographical response of dinoflagellates to the Plenus Cold Event. Our study is based on a newly generated geochemical and palynological data set from a high-latitude Northern Hemisphere site, Pratts Landing (western Alberta, Canada). We combine these data with a semi-quantitative global compilation of the stratigraphic distribution of dinoflagellate cyst taxa. The data show that dinoflagellate cysts grouped in the Cyclonephelium compactum-membraniphorum morphological plexus migrated from high to mid-latitudes during the Plenus Cold Event, making it the sole widely found (micro)fossil to mark this cold spell. In addition to earlier reports from regional metazoan migrations during the Plenus Cold Event, our findings illustrate the effect of rapid climate change on the global biogeographical dispersion of phytoplankton.

  2. Friendly units for coldness

    CERN Document Server

    Fraundorf, P

    2006-01-01

    Measures of temperature that center around human experience get lots of use. Of course thermal physics insights of the last century have shown that reciprocal temperature (1/kT) has applications that temperature addresses less well. In addition to taking on negative absolute values under population inversion (e.g. of magnetic spins), bits and bytes turn 1/kT into an informatic measure of the thermal ambient for developing correlations within any complex system. We show here that, in the human-friendly units of bytes and food Calories, water freezes when 1/kT ~200 ZB/Cal or kT ~5 Cal/YB. Casting familiar benchmarks into these terms shows that habitable human space requires coldness values (part of the time, at least) between 0 and 40 ZB/Cal with respect body temperature ~100 degrees F, a range in kT of ~1 Cal/YB. Insight into these physical quantities underlying thermal equilibration may prove useful for budding scientists, as well as the general public, in years ahead.

  3. Zitterbewegung in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Poliana; Egues, J. Carlos

    2013-03-01

    In condensed matter systems, the coupling between spatial and spin degrees of freedom through the spin-orbit (SO) interaction offers the possibility of manipulating the electron spin via its orbital motion. The proposal by Datta and Das of a `spin transistor' for example, highlights the use of the SO interaction to control the electron spin via electrical means. Recently, arrangements of crossed lasers and magnetic fields have been used to trap and cool atoms in optical lattices and also to create light-induced gauge potentials, which mimic the SO interactions in real solids. In this work, we investigate the Zitterbewegung in cold atoms by starting from the effective SO Hamiltonian derived in Ref.. Cross-dressed atoms as effective spins can provide a proper setting in which to observe this effect, as the relevant parameter range of SO strengths may be more easily attainable in this context. We find a variety of peculiar Zitterbewegung orbits in real and pseudo-spin spaces, e.g., cycloids and ellipses - all of which obtained with realistic parameters. This work is supported by FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  4. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  5. PANDA: Cold three axes spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Schneidewind

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cold three axes spectrometer PANDA, operated by JCNS, Forschungszentrum Jülich, offers high neutron flux over a large dynamic range keeping the instrumental background comparably low.

  6. Flu and Colds: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studies have evaluated the use of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) to prevent colds. A 2011 evaluation of ... E561. Seida JK, Durec T, Kuhle S. North American (Panax quinquefolius) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) preparations for ...

  7. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  8. A 16000-year pollen record of Qinghai Lake and its paleo-climate and paleoenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paleoclimate and paleoenvironment of Qinghai Lake indicated by a 16000-year pollen record are as follows. It was very cold and dry before 15200 years. During the Late Glacial, the climate varied from colder and semiarid to cool and semi-humid and fluctuated frequently but with little amplitude. Three cold events in the periods of 13400-13000, 11600-12000, and 11000-10400 aBP respectively correspond to the Oldest Dryas, Older Dryas and Younger Dryas events, whereas the two warm periods between them, 12000-13000 and 11600-11000 aBP, respectively correspond to B?lling and Aller?d periods. The temperature increased abruptly after the Younger Dryas event, and then the climate gradually turned to be warm and wet from warm and semiarid. In the Holocene, the largest amplitude of cold event that occurred at ca. 8200 aBP is quite prominent.. The Holocene climatic optimum culminated at 6700 aBP. After 2100 aBP, the climate tended to be cold and dry, keeping on up to now. Palaeoclimatic evolution and events of Qinghai Lake based on pollen assemblage and concentrations can be well parallel with the global climatic events.

  9. Detection of heat and cold waves in Montevergine time series (1884-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vincenzo; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, extreme events related to cooling and heating have taken high resonance, motivating the scientific community to carry out an intensive research activity, aimed to detect their variability and frequency. In this work, we have investigated about the frequency, the duration, the severity and the intensity of heat and cold waves in a Southern Italy high-altitude region, by analysing the climatological time series collected in Montevergine observatory. Following the guidelines provided by CLIVAR project (Climate and Ocean Variability, Predictability and Change), we have adopted indicators based on percentiles and duration to define a heat wave and cold event. Main results have highlighted a strong and significant positive trend in the last 40 years (1974-2015) in heat waves frequency, severity and intensity. On the contrary, in recent decades, cold wave events have exhibited a significant and positive trend only in intensity. Moreover, through the usage of two Wavelet Analysis tools, the Cross Wavelet Transform and the Wavelet Coherence, we have investigated about the connections between the extreme temperature events occurred in Montevergine and the large-scale atmospheric patterns. The heat wave events have exhibited relevant relationships with the Western European Zonal Circulation and the North Atlantic Oscillation, whereas the variability of cold wave events have shown linkages with the Eastern Mediterranean Pattern and the North Sea Caspian Pattern. In addition, the main features of synoptic patterns that have caused summer heat waves and winter cold waves in Montevergine site are presented.

  10. Heated, humidified air for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenu; Singh, Manvi; Jaiswal, Nishant; Chauhan, Anil

    2017-08-29

    -effect analysis showed evidence of an effect (odds ratio (OR) 0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 0.56; 2 studies, 149 participants), but the random-effects analysis showed no significant difference in the results (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.03 to 1.95). There is an argument for using either form of analysis. No studies demonstrated an exacerbation of clinical symptom scores. One study conducted in the USA demonstrated worsened nasal resistance, but an earlier Israeli study showed improvement. One study examined viral shedding in nasal washings, finding no significant difference between treatment and placebo groups (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.04 to 5.19). As judged by the subjective response to therapy (i.e. therapy did not help), the number of participants reporting resolution of symptoms was not significantly higher in the heated humidified group (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.18; 2 studies, 124 participants). There was significant heterogeneity in the effects of heated, humidified air on different outcomes, therefore we graded the quality of the evidence as low. Some studies reported minor adverse events (including discomfort or irritation of the nose). The current evidence does not show any benefits or harms from the use of heated, humidified air delivered via the RhinoTherm device for the treatment of the common cold. There is a need for more double-blind, randomised trials that include standardised treatment modalities.

  11. Role of Leptin in Metabolic Adaptation During Cold Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Bin Tang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cold exposure stimulates thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, resulting in fat mobilization and compensatory hyperphagia. Mostly, these physiological events are accompanied by a remarkable reduction in serum leptin levels. However, the physiological roles of hypoleptinemia in cold adaptation are still not fully clear. We hypothesized that leptin is the keystone of the regulatory systems linking energy balance to cold adaptation. Leptin treatment (5μg/day decreased food intake, body weight, serum ghrelin levels and hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH gene expression. Food restriction in the pair-fed group mimicked most of the effects induced by leptin treatment. Central coadministration of ghrelin (1.2 μg/day partially reversed the effect of leptin on hypothalamic MCH mRNA, but it did not block the reducing effects of leptin on food intake, body weight and serum ghrelin levels. In addition, hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression increased significantly in response to the coadministration of leptin and ghrelin. Collectively, we conclude that the regulatory effects of leptin on energy balance in cold-acclimated rats are dependent on feeding, which may involve the reduction of hypothalamic MCH gene expression. We found no evidence for ghrelin involvement in the regulation of leptin on food intake and body weight during cold acclimation.

  12. Thermo-mechanical Design Methodology for ITER Cryodistribution cold boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vinit; Patel, Pratik; Das, Jotirmoy; Vaghela, Hitensinh; Bhattacharya, Ritendra; Shah, Nitin; Choukekar, Ketan; Chang, Hyun-Sik; Sarkar, Biswanath

    2017-04-01

    The ITER cryo-distribution (CD) system is in charge of proper distribution of the cryogen at required mass flow rate, pressure and temperature level to the users; namely the superconducting (SC) magnets and cryopumps (CPs). The CD system is also capable to use the magnet structures as a thermal buffer in order to operate the cryo-plant as much as possible at a steady state condition. A typical CD cold box is equipped with mainly liquid helium (LHe) bath, heat exchangers (HX’s), cryogenic valves, filter, heaters, cold circulator, cold compressor and process piping. The various load combinations which are likely to occur during the life cycle of the CD cold boxes are imposed on the representative model and impacts on the system are analyzed. This study shows that break of insulation vacuum during nominal operation (NO) along with seismic event (Seismic Level-2) is the most stringent load combination having maximum stress of 224 MPa. However, NO+SMHV (Séismes Maximaux Historiquement Vraisemblables = Maximum Historically Probable Earthquakes) load combination is having the least safety margin and will lead the basis of the design of the CD system and its sub components. This paper presents and compares the results of different load combinations which are likely to occur on a typical CD cold box.

  13. Cold surge: a sudden and spatially varying threat to health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Wu, Pei-Chih; Chen, Vivian Yi-Ju; Su, Huey-Jen

    2009-05-01

    While cold surge is one of the most conspicuous features of the winter monsoon in East Asia, its impact on human health remains underexplored. Based on the definition by the Central Weather Bureau in Taiwan, we identified four cold surges between 2000 and 2003 and collected the cardiovascular disease mortality data 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after these events. We attempted to answer the following research questions: 1) whether the cold surges impose an adverse and immediate effect on cardiovascular mortality; 2) whether the people living in temperate zones have a higher tolerance of extreme temperature drop than those in the subtropics. With geographic weighting techniques, we not only found that the cardiovascular disease mortality rates increased significantly after the cold surges, but also discovered a spatially varying pattern of tolerance to cold surges. Even within a small study area such as Taiwan, human reaction to severe weather drop differs across space. Needless to say, in the U.S., these findings should be considered in redirecting policy to address populations living in warm places when extreme temperature drops occur.

  14. Garlic for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-11-11

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions There is insufficient clinical trial evidence

  15. Events diary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  16. Finger and toe temperature response to cold water and cold air exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, N.R. van der; Es, E.M. van; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Subjects with a weak cold-induced vasodilatation response (CIVD) to experimental cold-water immersion of the fingers in a laboratory setting have been shown to have a higher risk for local cold injuries when exposed to cold in real life. Most of the cold injuries in real life, however,

  17. The paleoclimatic events and cause in the Okinawa Trough during 50 kaBP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal d18O record for core DGKS9603 from the Okinawa Trough shows a series of climatic fluctuations and sudden cooling events in short time scale during 50 kaBP, which appear to correlate closely to the Younger Dryas and Heinrich events H1-5 recorded in Chine-se loess, the South China Sea, the North Atlantic cores and the Greenland ice cores. Three polarity reversal events, cor-relating to Gothenburg, Mungo and Laschamp events, ap-proximately correspond to Heinrich events H1, H3 and H5 respectively, which could be a cause of global climate changes. The d18O curve of the Okinawa Trough is well asso-ciated with the grain size record of the Lijiayuan loess profile in northwestern China and is somewhat different from the climate fluctuations documented in the Greenland ice cores. These correlation results indicate that regional factors play an important role in controlling the climate changes in the East Asia, and the East Asian Monsoon could be the promi-nent regional controlling factor.

  18. An abrupt cooling event early in the last interglacial in the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The high-resolution quantitative analysis of the planktonic foraminifera and the δ18O records of the section between 96.49-137.6 mcd at ODP Site 1144 on the continental slope ot northern South China Sea reveals an abrupt cooling event of sea surface temperature (SST) dur ing the last interglacial (MIS 5.5, i.e. 5e). The dropping range of the winter SST may come to 7.5℃corresponding to 1.2‰ of the δ18O value of sea surface water. This event is comparable with those discovered in the west Europe and the northern Atlantic Ocean, but expressed in a more intensive way. It is inferred that this event may have been induced by middle- to Iow-latitude processes rather than by polar ice sheet change. Since the Kuroshio-index species Pulleniatina obliquilocu lata displayed the most distinct change at the event, it may also be related to the paleocean ographic change of the Iow-latitude area in the western Pacific Ocean. This event can be consid ered as one of "Younger Dryas-style coolings" and is indicative of climate variability of the last in terglacial stage.

  19. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  20. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  1. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  2. Cold Tolerance of Plants Used for Cold-Regions Revegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    from tempted to transfer the rye cold-tolerance genome to increased concentrations of solutes in cells and extra- wheat in hybrids. While the gene...Journal, 76: 516-517. Tryon, E.H. and R.P. True (1952) Blister shake of Yelenosky, G. (1988) Capacity of citrus flowers to yellow poplar. Bulletin of the

  3. Analysis of a Cold Wave Weather Process in Chengdu in March 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to analyze one cold wave weather process in Chengdu in March in 2010.[Method] Based on the NCEP 1°×1° 6 h interval reanalysis data and daily observation data,using synoptic analysis and diagnosis methods,and combining with the cold wave forecast index in spring of Sichuan,a cold wave event covering the whole region between March 21 and 24,2010 was analyzed from the aspects of circulation background,influencing weather systems and weather causation.[Result] Results showed that the 500...

  4. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  5. Reply to comment by E. Bard et al. on "Younger Dryas sea level and meltwater pulse 1B recorded in Barbados reef crest coral Acropora palmata" by N. A. Abdul et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Richard A.; Abdul, Nicole A.; Wright, James D.; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    2016-12-01

    Abdul et al. (2016) presented a detailed record of sea level at Barbados (13.9-9 kyr B.P.) tightly constraining the timing and amplitude during the Younger Dryas and Meltwater Pulse 1B (MWP-1B) based on U-Th dated reef crest coral species Acropora palmata. The Younger Dryas slow stand and the large (14 m) rapid sea level jump are not resolved in the Tahiti record. Tahiti sea level estimates are remarkably close to the Barbados sea level curve between 13.9 and 11.6 kyr but fall below the Barbados sea level curve for a few thousand years following MWP-1B. By 9 kyr the Tahiti sea level estimates again converge with the Barbados sea level curve. Abdul et al. (2016) concluded that Tahiti reefs at the core sites did not keep up with intervals of rapidly rising sea level during MWP-1B. We counter Bard et al. (2016) by showing (1) that there is no evidence for a hypothetical fault in Oistins Bay affecting one of the Barbados coring locations, (2) that the authors confuse the rare occurrences of A. palmata at depths >5 m with the "thickets" of A. palmata fronds representing the reef-crest facies, and (3) that uncertainties in depth habitat proxies largely account for differences in Barbados and Tahiti sea level differences curves with A. palmata providing the most faithful proxy. Given the range in Tahiti paleodepth uncertainties at the cored sites, the most parsimonious explanation remains that Tahiti coralgal ridges did not keep up with the sea level rise of MWP-1B.

  6. Climate change and extreme events in weather

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    monsoon and b) tropical cyclones. Basically the climate of India is domi- nated by the south west monsoon season which accounts for about 75% of the annual rainfall. The extreme weather events occur over India are: Floods, Droughts, Tropical Cyclones..., Heat Waves and Cold Waves, Storms Surges, Hail Storms, Thunderstorms, Dust Storms. Floods, droughts and tropical cyclones have specific significance a far as India is concerned. Floods and droughts are the two sides of the weather phenomena...

  7. Phonon forces and cold denaturatio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    the molecule Is a continuum. The frequencies of the vibrational modes depend on the molecular dimensionality; hence, the zero-point energies for the folded and the denatured protein are estimated to differ by several electron volts. For a biomolecule such an energy is significant and may contribute to cold...

  8. Images of the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The conventional U.S. picture traces the Cold War to Soviet violation of wartime agreements, while the U.S.S.R. defends its actions as responses to American violations and foreign adventurism. An understanding of how ideology is shaped by national self-interest will help students see beyond propaganda and myth in interpreting past and current…

  9. Encyclopedia of the Cold War

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1945 and 1991, tension between the USA, its allies, and a group of nations led by the USSR, dominated world politics. This period was called the Cold War - a conflict that stopped short to a full-blown war. Benefiting from the recent research of newly open archives, the Encyclopedia of the C

  10. Encyclopedia of the Cold War

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1945 and 1991, tension between the USA, its allies, and a group of nations led by the USSR, dominated world politics. This period was called the Cold War - a conflict that stopped short to a full-blown war. Benefiting from the recent research of newly open archives, the Encyclopedia of the

  11. Event Index - an LHCb Event Search System

    CERN Document Server

    Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    During LHC Run 1, the LHCb experiment recorded around 1011 collision events. This paper describes Event Index | an event search system. Its primary function is to quickly select subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or number of hits in a subdetector. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene [1] optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  12. The geochemistry characteristic and dating of cold seepage carbonates of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, eastern of South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yunxin; Fu, Shaoying

    2015-04-01

    Cold seepage carbonates are usually formed by the interaction of methane oxidizing archaea, sulfate reducing bacteria and cold seepage which contain abundant venting hydrocarbon gases. The presence of cold seepage carbonates on the seabed is one of the evidences that the area exist venting hydrocarbon gases, which are usually result by the dissociation of gas hydrate. The cold seepage property and fluid flow rate can influence the oxidation-deoxidation environment of the bottom water and sediment. Many previous studies focused on the mineral composition, microstructure, elemental composition, isotope composition of the cold seepage carbonates and isotopic dating for the cold seepage carbonates. The isotopic dating for the cold seepage carbonates can provide the information of the gas hydrate formation and dissociation in some area of the South China Sea. High precision TIMS-U dating and 14C dating are used as routine method for the dating of the Quaternary carbonates and fossils. The cold seepage carbonates in the study include the samples collected by ROV on the seabed and the drilling for gas hydrate in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, eastern of the South China Sea. The authigenic carbonate occurred in different depth in the A, B and C drilling site. They may be represent different events of gas hydrate formation and dissociation in the Quaternary. The dating study for all the cold seepage carbonates can provide the relative accurate eras of the gas hydrate dissociation events in certain area of the South China Sea.

  13. A new dynamical index for classification of cold surge types over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Won; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Heo, Jin-Woo; Deng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The cold surges over East Asia can be classified into wave-train type and blocking type according to their dynamic origins. In the present study, two dynamic indices are proposed to objectively identify cold surge types using potential temperature ( θ) on the dynamic tropopause at 2-potential vorticity units (2-PVU) surface. The two indices are designed to represent primary characteristics of the two types of cold surge. The wave-train index ( WI) is defined as a difference of anomalous θ on the 2-PVU surface between the western North Pacific and northeast China, which captures a southward (northward) intrusion of cold (warm) air mass related to the trough-ridge pattern. The blocking index ( BI) is defined as a difference of anomalous θ between the subarctic region and northeast China, which indicates air mass overturning related to a reversal of the usual meridional θ gradient commonly observed in the occurrence of blocking type cold surge. Composite analyses based on the distribution of the WI and BI clearly demonstrate the dynamic evolutions of corresponding cold surge types. The wave-train cold surge is associated with a southeastward expansion of the Siberian High and northerly wind near surface, which is caused by growing baroclinic waves. During the blocking cold surge, a geopotential height dipole indicating the subarctic blocking and deepening of East Asian coastal trough induces a southward expansion of the Siberian High and northeasterly wind. Compared to the wave-train type, the blocking cold surge exhibits a longer duration and stronger intensity. In the new framework of these dynamic indices, we can detect a third type of cold surge when both the wave-train and the blocking occur together. In addition, we can exclude the events that do not have the essential features of the upper tropospheric disturbances or the subarctic anticyclonic circulation, which are responsible for cold surge occurrence, using the new indices.

  14. Gastrointestinal events with clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Würtz, Morten; Schwarz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events.......Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events....

  15. Late Pleistocene Climate Events and The Origin of Agriculture In SW Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol-Strick, M.

    In the Eastern Mediterranean sea, the climate succession of the last deglaciation is documented and dated in marine cores by the d18-O variation of foraminiferal cal- cite and pollen records. The Last Glacial Maximum is identified by a large abundance of grass pollen from a prairie-type vegetal cover with low annual precipitation in the mountainous north and east borderlands of the sea, where the pollen mainly origi- nates. During the first phase of the last deglaciation, the Bolling/Allerod chronozone, the moisture availability increases and makes possible the spread of a deciduous for- est, as shown by the increasing pollen abundance of the deciduous oak. The cold and arid Younger Dryas is identified by a reversal to semi-desert conditions, with the in- crease of sage-brush (Artemisia) and the saline-tolerant Chenopodiaceae. The climate of the earliest Holocene is Optimum for at least 3000 years (9000-6000yr BP), with the largest spread of the deciduous forest at low-middle elevations signalling wet sum- mers and of the Pistacia woodland at low elevations signalling mild, no-frost winters. This is the time when the most recent sapropel deposited in the eastern Mediterranean under anoxic bottom conditions generated by a surface lid of lower salinity due to the concomitant largest floods of the Nile River fed by the strongest African monsoon rains in the Ethiopian Highlands. In SW Asia, the pollen records of lakes and marshes have been correlated with those of the marine cores, thereby obtaining a robust time-frame. In that area, the archaeo- logical data of human settlements are independently dated by 14C. Thus the archaeo- logical succession can be securely set against the well-dated climatic succession. The Late Palaeolithic populations of SW Asia were wandering hunter-gatherers in the prairies of the Last Glacial Maximum, where they already collected wild wheat, barley and fruit. With the Bolling/Allerod wetter and warmer climate, they began to settle in

  16. Common cold - how to treat at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm Common cold - how to treat at home To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Colds are very common. A visit to your health care provider's office ...

  17. Creating Special Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  18. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greeff, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudin, Sven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Corckett, Scott D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wills, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  19. SCIENCES IN COLD AND ARID REGIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Scope Sciences in Cold and Arid Regions, an international Engiish-language journal, is devoted to publishing the latest research achievements on the process and the pattern of Earth surface system in cold and arid regions. Researches in cold regions 1) emphasize particularly on the cold-region-characterized physical, chemical and biological processes and their interactions, and on the response of Cryosphere to Global change and Human activities as well as its effect to environment and the acclimatizable

  20. Common Cold in Babies: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common cold in babies Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff The first indication of the common cold in a baby is often: A congested ... or green Other signs and symptoms of a common cold in a baby may include: Fever Sneezing ...

  1. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of the...

  2. Cold Stress at High Altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Majumdar

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cold at high altitudes has been analysed from a purely physical standpoint. It has been shown that Siple's Wind-Chill Index is not reliable because (i it does not make use of the well established principles governing the physical processes of heat transfer by convection and radiation, and (ii it assumes that the mean radiant temperature of the surroundings is the same as the ambient dry bulb temperature. A Cold Stress Index has been proposed which is likely to be a more reliable guide for assessing the climatic hazards of high altitude environments. The Index can be quickly estimated with the help of two nomograms devised for the purpose.

  3. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  4. Pseudoneutropenia from cold agglutinin leucoagglutination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momin M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoneutropenia or low leucocyte count secondary to leucoagglutination is caused by ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA or cold agglutinins and is seen in benign and malignant disorders. We report a 34-year-old lady who was admitted with fever, vomiting, respiratory distress and productive cough. Complete blood count (CBC at initial presentation revealed low haemoglobin (11.6 g/dL, total leucocyte count (TLC (5900/mm3 with 50% polymorphs. Peripheral blood smear showed leucocytes in clusters. Another sample was asked for in citrate anticoagulant which showed a TLC of 5900/mm3 with 50% polymorphs and evidence of auto agglutination. Another collected in a prewarmed ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA tube, CBC showed a TLC of 9800/mm3 with 39% neutrophils suggestive of pseudoneutropenia due to cold agglutinins.

  5. Cold dark matter heats up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  6. Tracking the evolution of a cold stress associated gene family in cold tolerant grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandve, Simen R; Rudi, Heidi; Asp, Torben

    2008-01-01

    subfamily lineage, have been identified in perennial ryegrass and wheat, and these proteins are thought to have evolved from a leucine-rich repeat phytosulfokine receptor kinase (LRR-PSR)-like ancestor gene. Even though the ice re-crystallisation inhibition function of these proteins has been studied...... of a complex evolutionary history including birth of an ice binding domain, a burst of gene duplication events after cold tolerant grasses radiated from rice, protein domain structure differentiation between paralogs, and sub- and/or neofunctionalisation of IRI-like proteins. From our sequence analysis we......Background Grasses are adapted to a wide range of climatic conditions. Species of the subfamily Pooideae, which includes wheat, barley and important forage grasses, have evolved extreme frost tolerance. A class of ice binding proteins that inhibit ice re-crystallisation, specific to the Pooideae...

  7. Superheavy nuclei – cold synthesis and structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj K Gupta

    2001-08-01

    The quantum mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT), given for the cold synthesis of new and superheavy elements, is reviewed and the use of radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) and targets (RNT) is discussed. The QMFT is a complete theory of cold nuclear phenomena, namely, the cold fission, cold fusion and cluster radioactivity. Also, the structure calculations based on the axially deformed relativistic mean field (DRMF) approach are presented which predict new regions of spherical magicity, namely = 120 and = 172 or 184, for superheavy nuclei. This result is discussed in the light of recent experiments reporting the cold synthesis of = 118 element.

  8. Acclimatization to cold in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses and mechanisms of both natural and artificial acclimatization to a cold environment in mammals, with specific reference to human beings. The purpose is to provide basic information for designers of thermal protection systems for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activities. Hibernation, heat production, heat loss, vascular responses, body insulation, shivering thermogenesis, water immersion, exercise responses, and clinical symptoms and hypothermia in the elderly are discussed.

  9. Superheated rubber for cold storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberg, Frank; Heuwers, Benjamin; Tiller, Joerg Christian [Biomaterials and Polymer Science, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, TU Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2011-04-26

    Highly stretched rubber cools down upon relaxation. A natural rubber material that stores high elongations up to 1000% strain upon strain-induced crystallization at room temperature is reported. The strain recovered and, with this, the stored ''cold'' is released only by a thermal or athermal trigger. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  11. Cold Ion Escape from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Wei, Y.; Morgan, D.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2013-09-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express in combination with the MARSIS radar experiment. We first compare calculations of the mean ion flux observed by ASPERA-3 alone with previously published results. We then combine observations of the cold ion velocity by ASPERA-3 with observations of the cold plasma density by MARSIS since ASPERA-3 misses the cold core of the ion distribution. We show that the mean density of the nightside plasma observed by MARSIS is about two orders higher than observed by ASPERA-3 (Fig.1). Combining both datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars (Fig. 2). At a distance of about 0.5 R_M the flux settles at a constant value (Fig. 3) which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  12. Monitoring and forecasting heat and cold waves in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaysse, Christophe; Vogt, Jürgen; van der Schrier, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    Extreme temperature anomalies such as heat and cold waves may have a strong impacts on the human activities and health. The heat waves in Western Europe in 2003 and in Russia in 2010, or the cold wave in South-Eastern Europe in 2012 have generated a considerable amounts of lost and in total several hundreds of people died. Providing an operational system to monitor and forecast extreme temperature anomalies in Europe is thus a primordial importance to help decision makers, users and emergency services to trigger different type of emergencies depending the intensity of a current event or the uncertainties of a forecasts. In this study, the development and the validation of a complete tool of monitoring and forecasting extreme temperature anomalies are presented and allow providing seamless information with the uncertainties associated. In the first part of the study, the methodology applied, dealing with persistent quantiles of Tmin and Tmax above 0.85, will be presented. The climatology of the extreme events from 1995 to now will be then exposed, highlighting the spatial and temporal variabilities of the hazard. The uncertainties of the observation will be also discussed by comparing three different sets of observations. In the second part of the study, the assessment of the predictability of heat and cold waves will be presented. Thanks to a relative good reliability of the forecasted temperature, there is a benefit of using the forecasts to predict heat and cold waves. With some (temporal and spatial) uncertainties, the model is able to predict extreme waves up to 15-day lead time. Nevertheless, the prediction of the onset with a daily accuracy is a big challenge. So far, there is no significant signal after 6-day lead time.

  13. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  14. Holter and Event Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Holter and Event Monitors Also known as ambulatory EKG; continuous EKG; EKG event monitors. Holter and event monitors are small, portable electrocardiogram devices ...

  15. Evidence for phase-locked changes in climate between Scotland and Greenland during GS-1 (Younger Dryas) using micromorphology of glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Adrian P.; Rose, Jim; Rasmussen, Sune Olander

    2012-01-01

    There is a current need to develop annual/decadal chronologies from periods of rapid climate change in order to understand the rate and timing of climate events and identify how other proxies either lead or lag this climate forcing. Annually-laminated or varved sediments are key proxies for under...

  16. Keterlibatan Event Stakeholders pada Keberhasilan Event PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidya Wati Evelina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to determine how event organizers collaborate with stakeholders including the media, particular community, sponsors, participants, venue providers, accommodation providers, carteres, legal and finance personnel, production, local trade, transportation providers, government and associations for implementation Public Relations event. This paper discusses about the things that must be done for the cooperation and the benefits of cooperation undertaken. The method used in this paper is qualitative research method based on observations, literature and case studies. The results of this research note that the event organizers or companies can together with the stakeholders (the other party make an event as mutually beneficial Public Relations. This means that all parties can achieve through the event. At the conclusion of an event Public Relations, all stakeholders involved for their own purposes. Event organizer must ensure that all stakeholders work together effectively in accordance with the agreed schedule and budget. One important feature of the agreement is to maintain a good flow of communication according to the needs of its stakeholders. All information is documented to avoid misunderstandings. Collaboration between stakeholders continuously until the event is completed. Discussion of issues that arise during the event takes place between the committee with various stakeholders is an important thing for the evaluation and response to the events that occurred.

  17. Biodiversity and cold adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-adapted bacteria and archaea are widely distributed in cold environments on Earth, such as permafrost, cold soils and deserts, glaciers, lakes, sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountains, as well as the deep sea, ice caves and the atmospheric stratosphere etc. Cold-adapted organisms inhabiting these environments exhibit rich diversity. Studies on the biogeography of psychrophiles will enable us to understand their biodiversity, distribution and origins. Due to long-term living in cold regions, cold-adapted bacteria and archeae have developed specific physiological mechanisms of adaptation to cold environments. These mechanisms include: regulating the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane through adjusting the composition of membrane lipids; achieving low-temperature protection through compatibility solute, antifreeze proteins, ice-binding proteins, ice-nucleation proteins and anti-nucleating proteins; production of heat-shock and coldshock proteins, cold acclimation protein and DEAD-box RNA helicase at low temperatures; production of cold-active enzymes; increasing energy generation and conservation. With the rapid development of sequencing technology, various omics-based approaches have been used to reveal cold-adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles at the genomic level.

  18. Cardiac event monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ECG) - ambulatory; Continuous electrocardiograms (EKGs); Holter monitors; Transtelephonic event monitors ... attached. You can carry or wear a cardiac event monitor up to 30 days. You carry the ...

  19. Dropwise condensation on a cold gradient substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Distributions of drops that arise from dropwise condensation evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence of drops. An understanding of how surface-energy gradients applied to the substrate affect drop growth and coalescence is needed for design of effective surfaces for large-scale dropwise condensation. Transient dropwise condensation from a vapor phase onto a cold and chemically treated surface is reported. The surfaces were treated to deliver either a uniform contact-angle or a gradient of contact-angles by silanization. The time evolution of drop-size and number-density distributions is reported. For a typical condensation experiment, the drop distributions advance through two stages: an increase in drop density as a result of nucleation and a decrease in drop density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Because the experiment is transient in nature, the shape of the distribution can be used to predict the number of drop generations and their stage of development. Preliminary results for gradient surfaces will be discussed and compared against observations of behavior on uniformly coated surfaces. NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  20. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S

    2008-01-01

    We perform a set of high-resolution, dissipationless N-body simulations to investigate the influence of cold dark matter (CDM) substructure on the dynamical evolution of thin galactic disks. Our method combines cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized CDM halos to derive the properties of substructure populations and controlled numerical experiments of consecutive subhalo impacts onto initially-thin, fully-formed disk galaxies. We demonstrate that close encounters between massive subhalos and galactic disks since z~1 should be common occurrences in LCDM models. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. One typical host halo merger history is used to seed controlled N-body experiments of subhalo-disk encounters. As a result of these accretion events, the disk thickens considerably at all radii with the disk scale height increasing in excess of a factor of 2 in the solar neighborhood. We show that interactions with the subhalo p...

  1. Detecting Extreme Events in Gridded Climate Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandra, Bharathkumar [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Gadiraju, Krishna [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Vatsavai, Raju [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Kaiser, Dale Patrick [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and tracking extreme events in gridded climatological data is a challenging problem on several fronts: algorithms, scalability, and I/O. Successful detection of these events will give climate scientists an alternate view of the behavior of different climatological variables, leading to enhanced scientific understanding of the impacts of events such as heat and cold waves, and on a larger scale, the El Nin o Southern Oscillation. Recent advances in computing power and research in data sciences enabled us to look at this problem with a different perspective from what was previously possible. In this paper we present our computationally efficient algorithms for anomalous cluster detection on climate change big data. We provide results on detection and tracking of surface temperature and geopotential height anomalies, a trend analysis, and a study of relationships between the variables. We also identify the limitations of our approaches, future directions for research and alternate approaches.

  2. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  3. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Subedi, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Boeglin, W; Chen, J -P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J -O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; De Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Širca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X -C; Zhu, L; 10.1126/science.1156675

    2009-01-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, where a proton is knocked-out of the nucleus with high momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in 12C the neutron-proton pairs are nearly twenty times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  4. The Herschel Cold Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Andras

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel "DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES)" survey has found a number of debris disk candidates that are apparently very cold, with temperatures near 22K. It has proven difficult to fit their spectral energy distributions with conventional models for debris disks. Given this issue we carefully examine the alternative explanation, that the detections arise from confusion with IR cirrus and/or background galaxies that are not physically associated with the foreground star. We find that such an explanation is consistent with all of these detections.

  5. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  6. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  7. Diagnosis and management of cold urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Reid; Halverstam, Caroline P

    2016-01-01

    Cold urticaria is a physical urticaria characterized by a localized or systemic eruption of papules upon exposure of the skin to cold air, liquids, and/or objects. In some cases, angioedema and anaphylaxis also may occur. The symptoms of cold urticaria can have a negative impact on patients' quality of life. Second-generation H1 antihistamines are the first line of treatment in cold urticaria; however, patients who are unresponsive to initial treatment with H1 antihistamines may require further management options. Avoidance of cold exposure is the most effective prophylactic measure. In mild to moderate cases, the primary goal of therapy is to improve the patient's quality of life. In more severe cases, treatment measures to protect the patient's airway, breathing, and circulation may be necessary. We report the case of a 23-year-old man with cold urticaria who was refractory to initial therapy with H1 antihistamines. A review of the literature also is provided.

  8. Nearly synchronous climate change in the Northern Hemisphere during the last glacial termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, L.; Burdett, J.; Lund, S.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Mensing, S.

    1997-01-01

    The climate of the North Atlantic region underwent a series of abrupt cold/warm oscillations when the ice sheets of the Northern Hemisphere retreated during the last glacial termination (17.711.5 kyr ago). Evidence for these oscillations, which are recorded in European terrestrial sediments as the Oldest Dryas/Bolling/Older Dryas/Allerod/Younger Dryas vegetational sequence, has been found in Greenland ice cores. The geographical extent of many of these oscillations is not well known, but the last major cold event (the Younger Dryas) seems to have been global in extent. Here we present evidence of four major oscillations in the hydrological balance of the Owens basin, California, that occurred during the last glacial termination. Dry events in western North America occurred at approximately the same time as cold events recorded in Greenland ice, with transitions between climate regimes in the two regions taking place within a few hundred years of each other. Our observations thus support recent climate simulations which indicate that cooling of the North Atlantic Ocean results in cooling of the North Pacific Ocean which, in turn, leads to a drier climate in western North America.

  9. How the Cold War is Taught: Six American History Textbooks Examined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Martin F.

    This booklet is a comparative analysis of how six high school history textbooks present events and issues related to the Cold War. The texts are "History of a Free People" (Macmillan, 1973), "Rise of the American Nation" (Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1977), "The American Experience" (Addison-Wesley, 1975), "A New…

  10. Foliar applied abscisic acid increases 'Chardonnay' grapevines (Vitis vinifera) bud freezing tolerance during Autumn cold acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic loss due to cold weather events is a major constraint to winegrape-related industries where extreme and/or fluctuating winter temperatures induce injury and required remedial retraining and replanting increases production costs and lowers yield and fruit quality. The purpose of this study ...

  11. Effects of Moderate Strength Cold Air Exposure on Blood Pressure and Biochemical Indicators among Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cold air on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were investigated in an experimental study examining blood pressure and biochemical indicators. Zhangye, a city in Gansu Province, China, was selected as the experimental site. Health screening and blood tests were conducted, and finally, 30 cardiovascular disease patients and 40 healthy subjects were recruited. The experiment was performed during a cold event during 27–28 April 2013. Blood pressure, catecholamine, angiotensin II (ANG-II, cardiac troponin I (cTnI, muscle myoglobin (Mb and endothefin-1 (ET-1 levels of the subjects were evaluated 1 day before, during the 2nd day of the cold exposure and 1 day after the cold air exposure. Our results suggest that cold air exposure increases blood pressure in cardiovascular disease patients and healthy subjects via the sympathetic nervous system (SNS that is activated first and which augments ANG-II levels accelerating the release of the norepinephrine and stimulates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. The combined effect of these factors leads to a rise in blood pressure. In addition, cold air exposure can cause significant metabolism and secretion of Mb, cTnI and ET-1 in subjects; taking the patient group as an example, ET-1 was 202.7 ng/L during the cold air exposure, increased 58 ng/L compared with before the cold air exposure, Mb and cTnI levels remained relatively high (2,219.5 ng/L and 613.2 ng/L, increased 642.1 ng/L and 306.5 ng/L compared with before the cold air exposure, respectively 1-day after the cold exposure. This showed that cold air can cause damage to patients’ heart cells, and the damage cannot be rapidly repaired. Some of the responses related to the biochemical markers indicated that cold exposure increased cardiovascular strain and possible myocardial injury.

  12. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan L. Boyd; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in ...

  13. The North Atlantic Cold Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbatch, Richard; Drews, Annika; Ding, Hui; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic cold bias, associated with a too zonal path of the North Atlantic Current and a missing "northwest corner", is a common problem in coupled climate and forecast models. The bias affects the North Atlantic and European climate mean state, variability and predictability. We investigate the use of a flow field correction to adjust the path of the North Atlantic Current as well as additional corrections to the surface heat and freshwater fluxes. Results using the Kiel Climate Model show that the flow field correction allows a northward flow into the northwest corner, largely eliminating the bias below the surface layer. A surface cold bias remains but can be eliminated by additionally correcting the surface freshwater flux, without adjusting the surface heat flux seen by the ocean model. A model version in which only the surface fluxes of heat and freshwater are corrected continues to exhibit the incorrect path of the North Atlantic Current and a strong subsurface bias. Removing the bias impacts the multi-decadal time scale variability in the model and leads to a better representation of the SST pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability than the uncorrected model.

  14. Prediction of cold flow properties of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Saxena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel being environmentally friendly is fast gaining acceptance in the market as an alternate diesel fuel. But compared to petroleum diesel it has certain limitations and thus it requires further development on economic viability and improvement in its properties to use it as a commercial fuel. The cold flow properties play a major role in the usage of biodiesel commercially as it freezes at cold climatic conditions. In the present study, cold flow properties of various types of biodiesel were estimated by using correlations available in literature. The correlations were evaluated based on the deviation between the predicted value and experimental values of cold flow properties.

  15. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  16. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  17. Cold panniculitis: delayed onset in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Michelle M; Cutlan, Jonathan E; Smith, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    The panniculitides are a complex dermatologic entity for both dermatologists and dermatopathologists. Panniculitis is an inflammation of the subcutaneous adipose tissue and can be associated with systemic diseases. We present a case of cold panniculitis, a form of traumatic panniculitis, in a 37-year-old woman that was caused by a cold therapy unit. Our patient did not develop lesions until 10 days following initiation of therapy, which is a unique presentation of cold panniculitis, as lesions usually develop 1 to 3 days after cold exposure.

  18. DYNAMICAL SIMULATION ON TIDAL CURRENT FIELD IN ANCIENT YELLOW SEA DURING YOUNGER DRYAS EPISODE%新仙女木期古黄海潮流场的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩喜彬; 史经昊; 李家彪; 李广雪

    2009-01-01

    During Younger Dryas episode (12. 9 ~11. 6 cal. Ka), the sea level oscillated at about - 66 m depth contour in the continental shelf seas in eastern China and the seawater got into the south of the present North Yellow Sea,so Yellow Sea became a long narrow channel gulf. To simulate the tidal current of this special gulf, Environmental Fluid Dynamics Computer Code is used in this paper. The calculation combines curvilinear orthogonal coordinates in the horizontal direction with Sigma mapping coordinates in the vertical direction, and it uses a method which transforms a problem from three-dimension into two-dimension. The results show that the tidal current was still very strong in Yellow Sea during Younger Dryas episode, entering the special gulf along the right side entrance. From both shallow sides to deep centre, rotating flow changes reciprocating flow. Under the effect of reciprocating flow, the floor is eroded and the mud and sand are carried away. Progressive wave turns into rotating wave and two ateliotic amphidromic points appear on the western side of the gulf after tidal wave coming into Yellow Sea. At the same time, tidal residual current flows to southeast and east with relatively great velocity at the west and interior gulf and it becomes weakly near the entrance. The current may carry the bottom sediments and discharge them to the present mud sediment zone in north East China Sea. But at eastern Yellow Sea the tidal residual current flows to north and forms an anticlockwise circulation at centre of the eastern gulf which is corresponding to the eddy mud zone in Southeast Yellow Sea (Heishan mud zone). The anticlockwise circulation captures suspended sediment and may gestate the present mud sediment zone. The extension direction of tidal sand ridges and the size composition of the tidal current sand in eastern South Yellow Sea have a close relationship with the tidal current field of the ancient Yellow Sea, so the less fluctuating sea level changing

  19. North Pacific-wide spreading of isotopically heavy nitrogen from intensified denitrification during the Bølling/Allerød and post-younger dryas periods: evidence from the Western Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Kao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentary δ15N record for the past 30 ka buried in the Okinawa Trough in the western North Pacific mimicking the pattern from the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP, but the values (4.4–5.8‰ and the amplitude of the variation were much smaller than those (9–17‰ of the previous site. All but three values in the record were lower than the mean δ15N (5.6‰ of nitrate in the upper 800 m of the Kuroshio water suggesting additional inputs of isotopically light nitrogen from N2-fixation. The peak values of δ15N occurred during the Bølling/Allerød period and the warming period right after the Younger Dryas, synchronous to those found in the Eastern North Pacific. It is highly probable the high δ15N values are originated from the influence of the intensified denitrification in the ETNP during the warming periods. These new data represent the sedimentary record most distant from the intensive denitrifying zone in the ETNP and may serve as critical constraints to better quantify the nitrogen budget in the last climate cycle.

  20. IMPROVED, FAVORABLE FOR ENVIRONMENT POLYURETHANE COLD-BOX-PROCESS (COLD BOX «HUTTENES-ALBERTUS» .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sergini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the laboratory and industrial investigations, the purpose of which is improvement of the classical Cold-box-process, i.e. the process of the slugs hardening in cold boxes, are presented.

  1. Cold Air Activities in July 2004 and Its Impact on Intense Rainfalls over Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The severe rainfall events in the mid-summer of July 2004 and the roles of cold air in the formation of heavy precipitation are investigated by using daily observational precipitation data of China and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. The results show that the severe rainfalls in Southwest China are closely related to the cold air activities from the mid-high latitudes, and the events take place under the cooperative effects of mid-high latitude circulation and low latitude synoptic regimes. It is the merging of a cold vortex over mid-latitudes with the northward landing typhoon and eastward Southwest China Vortex, as well as the abrupt transformation from a transversal trough into an upright one that causes three large alterations of mid-high atmospheric circulation respectively in the early and middle ten days of this month. Then, the amplitude of long waves soon magnifies, leading to the unusual intrusion of cold air to low-latitude areas in the mid-summer. Meanwhile, the warm and humid southwest summer monsoon is quite active. The strong interactions of cold air and summer monsoon over Southwest China result in the large-scale convective rainfalls on the southern side of cold air.With regard to the activities of cold air, it can influence rainfalls in three prominent ways. Firstly, the incursion of upper-level cold air is often accompanied by partial southerly upper-level jet. The ascending branch of the corresponding secondary circulation, which is on the left front side of the jet center, provides the favorite dynamic upward motion for the rainfalls. Secondly, the southward movement of cold air contributes to the establishment of atmospheric baroclinic structure, which would lead to baroclinic disturbances. The atmospheric disturbances associated with the intrusion of cold air can destroy the potential instability stratification, release the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and finally cause convective activities. In addition, the advection processes of dry

  2. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch-Völk, Marlies; Barrett, Bruce; Kiefer, David; Bauer, Rudolf; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Linde, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Echinacea plant preparations (family Asteraceae) are widely used in Europe and North America for common colds. Most consumers and physicians are not aware that products available under the term Echinacea differ appreciably in their composition, mainly due to the use of variable plant material, extraction methods and the addition of other components. Objectives To assess whether there is evidence that Echinacea preparations are effective and safe compared to placebo in the prevention and treatment of the common cold. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1946 to May week 5, 2013), EMBASE (1991 to June 2013), CINAHL (1981 to June 2013), AMED (1985 to February 2012), LILACS (1981 to June 2013), Web of Science (1955 to June 2013), CAMBASE (no time limits), the Centre for Complementary Medicine Research (1988 to September 2007), WHO ICTRP and clinicaltrials.gov (last searched 5 June 2013), screened references and asked experts in the field about published and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing mono-preparations of Echinacea with placebo. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed eligibility and trial quality and extracted data. The primary efficacy outcome was the number of individuals with at least one cold in prevention trials and the duration of colds in treatment trials. For all included trials the primary safety and acceptability outcome was the number of participants dropping out due to adverse events. We assessed trial quality using the Cochrane ’Risk of bias’ tool. Main results Twenty-four double-blind trials with 4631 participants including a total of 33 comparisons of Echinacea preparations and placebo met the inclusion criteria. A variety of different Echinacea preparations based on different species and parts of plant were used. Evidence from seven trials was available for preparations based on the aerial parts of Echinacea purpurea

  3. Cold-induced vasodilatation in cold-intolerant rats after nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.S.; Duraku, L.S.; Niehof, S.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Hovius, S.E.R.; Selles, R.W.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose: Cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) is a cyclic regulation of blood flow during prolonged cooling of protruding body parts. It is generally considered to be a protective mechanism against local cold injuries and cold intolerance after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study

  4. a Marine Record of Holocene Climate Events in Tropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, G. H.; Günther, D.; Hughen, K. A.; Peterson, L. C.; Röhl, U.

    2002-12-01

    Metal concentration data (Ti, Fe) from the anoxic Cariaco Basin off the Venezuelan coast record with subdecadal to seasonal resolution variations in the hydrological cycle over tropical South America during the last 14 ka. Following a dry Younger Dryas, a period of increased precipitation and riverine discharge occurred during the Holocene `thermal maximum'. Since ~5.4 ka, a trend towards drier conditions is evident from the data, with high amplitude fluctuations and precipitation minima during the time interval 3.8 to 2.8 ka and during the `Little Ice Age'. O pronouced increase in precipitation coincides with the phase sometimes referred to as the `Medieval Warm Period'. These regional changes in precipitation are best explained by shifts in the mean latitude of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), potentially driven by Pacific-based climate variability. The variations recorded in Cariaco Basin sediments coincide with events in societal evolution that have been suggested previously to be motivated by environmental change. Regionally, the Cariaco record supports the notion that the collapse of this civilization between 800 and 1000 AD coincided with an extended period of drier conditions, implying that the rapid growth of Mayan culture from 600 to 800 AD may have resulted in a population operating at the fringes of the environment's carrying capacity. The Cariaco Basin record also hints at tropical climate events similar in timing to high latitude changes in the North Atlantic often invoked as pivotal to societal developments in Europe.

  5. Episodes, events, and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet eKhemlani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning.

  6. Cold Injury and Perniosis (Chilblain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Tulay Koca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Perniosis (chilblain is inflammatory cutaneous lesions located on acral surfaces (fingers, toes, nose, aurikula which present in association with cold exposure. They can appear as an idiopathic (primary dermatosis or with an underlying autoimmune disease (secondary. The primary or idiopathic form is not associated with an underlying disease and is clinically indistinguishable from the secondary form. The secondary form is associated with an underlying condition such as connective tissue disease, monoclonal gammopathy, cryoglobulinemia, or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Histopathology cannot accurately help distinguish the primary from secondary forms of chilblains. This review aims to raise the awareness of perniosis to avoid excessive investigation and anxiety and to help patients with only appropriate simple advice and treatment. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 463-471

  7. Cold and Slow Molecular Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Wright, Matthew J; Patterson, Dave; Doyle, John M

    2011-01-01

    Employing a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas cell, we produce a cold, hydrodynamically extracted beam of calcium monohydride molecules with a near effusive velocity distribution. Beam dynamics, thermalization and slowing are studied using laser spectroscopy. The key to this hybrid, effusive-like beam source is a "slowing cell" placed immediately after a hydrodynamic, cryogenic source [Patterson et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2007, 126, 154307]. The resulting CaH beams are created in two regimes. One modestly boosted beam has a forward velocity of vf = 65 m/s, a narrow velocity spread, and a flux of 10^9 molecules per pulse. The other has the slowest forward velocity of vf = 40 m/s, a longitudinal temperature of 3.6 K, and a flux of 5x10^8 molecules per pulse.

  8. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-07-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants.

  9. Improved Windows for Cold Climates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    A large part of the energy consumption in countries in Nordic and Arctic climates is used for space heating in buildings. In typical buildings the windows are responsible for a con-siderable part of the heat losses. Therefore there is a large potential for energy savings by developing and using...... windows with improved energy performance. Traditionally evaluation of the energy performance of windows has focused on the thermal transmittance, but as windows differ from the rest of the building envelope by allowing solar energy to enter the building, the total solar energy transmittance is equally...... important. In the heating season in cold climates the solar gain through windows can be utilized for space heating which results in a corresponding reduction in the energy production that is often based on fossil fuels. A suitable quantity for evaluating the energy performance of windows in a simple...

  10. Improved Windows for Cold Climates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    A large part of the energy consumption in countries in Nordic and Arctic climates is used for space heating in buildings. In typical buildings the windows are responsible for a considerable part of the heat losses. Therefore there is a large potential for energy savings by developing and using...... windows with improved energy performance. Traditionally evaluation of the energy performance of windows has focussed on the thermal transmittance, but as windows differ from the rest of the building envelope by allowing solar energy to enter the building, the total solar energy transmittance is equally...... important. In the heating season in cold climates the solar gain through windows can be utilized for space heating which results in a corresponding reduction in the energy production that is often based on fossil fuels. A suitable quantity for evaluating the energy perform-ance of windows in a simple...

  11. The global event system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winans, J.

    1994-03-02

    The support for the global event system has been designed to allow an application developer to control the APS event generator and receiver boards. This is done by the use of four new record types. These records are customized and are only supported by the device support modules for the APS event generator and receiver boards. The use of the global event system and its associated records should not be confused with the vanilla EPICS events and the associated event records. They are very different.

  12. A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164381.html A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold People who feel isolated tend to have ... 30, 2017 THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A cold is never fun, but it's even more ...

  13. Cold head maintenance with minimal service interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovinsky, A. L.; Michael, P. C.; Zhukovsky, A.; Forton, E.; Paradis, Y.; Nuttens, V.; Minervini, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Turn-key superconducting magnet systems are increasingly conduction-cooled by cryogenerators. Gifford-McMahon systems are reliable and cost effective, but require annual maintenance. A usual method of servicing is replacing the cold head of the cryocooler. It requires a complicated design with a vacuum chamber separate from the main vacuum of the cryostat, as well as detachable thermal contacts, which add to the thermal resistance of the cooling heat path and reduce the reliability of the system. We present a rapid warm-up scheme to bring the cold head body, which remains rigidly affixed to the cold mass, to room temperature, while the cold mass remains at cryogenic temperature. Electric heaters thermally attached to the cold head stations are used to warm them up, which permits conventional cold head maintenance with no danger of contaminating the inside of the cold head body. This scheme increases the efficiency of the cooling system, facilitates annual maintenance of the cold head and returning the magnet to operation in a short time.

  14. Mapping Anomalous Democracies During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the Cold War, a number of countries established stable democracies despite low levels of modernization and a relative lack of democratic neighbour countries—factors otherwise consistently related to the endurance of democracy. Meanwhile, the Cold War superpowers often supported autocracies...

  15. Axon Reflexes in cold-exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.; O'Neill, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Prolonged immersion of fingers in cold water induces Cold-Induced Vasodilatation (CIVD). Although evidence is available that Arterio-Venous Anastomoses (AVAs) play an important role, the mechanism underlying CIVD remains unsolved. The main hypotheses are a paralysis of the AVAs due to an impaired

  16. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in

  17. Axon Reflexes in cold-exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.; O'Neill, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Prolonged immersion of fingers in cold water induces Cold-Induced Vasodilatation (CIVD). Although evidence is available that Arterio-Venous Anastomoses (AVAs) play an important role, the mechanism underlying CIVD remains unsolved. The main hypotheses are a paralysis of the AVAs due to an impaired ne

  18. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  19. Cold plasma processing to improve food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cold plasma is an antimicrobial process being developed for application as a food processing technology. This novel intervention is the subject of an expanding research effort by groups around the world. A variety of devices can be used to generate cold plasma and apply it to the food commodity bein...

  20. Tolerance to multiple climate stressors: A case study of Douglas-fir drought and cold hardiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A; St. Clair, John Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Summary: 1. Drought and freeze events are two of the most common forms of climate extremes which result in tree damage or death, and the frequency and intensity of both stressors may increase with climate change. Few studies have examined natural covariation in stress tolerance traits to cope with multiple stressors among wild plant populations. 2. We assessed the capacity of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), an ecologically and economically important species in the northwestern USA, to tolerate both drought and cold stress on 35 populations grown in common gardens. We used principal components analysis to combine drought and cold hardiness trait data into generalized stress hardiness traits to model geographic variation in hardiness as a function of climate across the Douglas-fir range. 3. Drought and cold hardiness converged among populations along winter temperature gradients and diverged along summer precipitation gradients. Populations originating in regions with cold winters had relatively high tolerance to both drought and cold stress, which is likely due to overlapping adaptations for coping with winter desiccation. Populations from regions with dry summers had increased drought hardiness but reduced cold hardiness, suggesting a trade-off in tolerance mechanisms. 4. Our findings highlight the necessity to look beyond bivariate trait–climate relationships and instead consider multiple traits and climate variables to effectively model and manage for the impacts of climate change on widespread species.

  1. The Effect of Cold Showering on Health and Work: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijze, Geert A; Sierevelt, Inger N; van der Heijden, Bas C J M; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative effect of a routine (hot-to-) cold shower on sickness, quality of life and work productivity. Between January and March 2015, 3018 participants between 18 and 65 years without severe comorbidity and no routine experience of cold showering were randomized (1:1:1:1) to a (hot-to-) cold shower for 30, 60, 90 seconds or a control group during 30 consecutive days followed by 60 days of showering cold at their own discretion for the intervention groups. The primary outcome was illness days and related sickness absence from work. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, work productivity, anxiety, thermal sensation and adverse reactions. 79% of participants in the interventions groups completed the 30 consecutive days protocol. A negative binomial regression model showed a 29% reduction in sickness absence for (hot-to-) cold shower regimen compared to the control group (incident rate ratio: 0.71, P = 0.003). For illness days there was no significant group effect. No related serious advents events were reported. A routine (hot-to-) cold shower resulted in a statistical reduction of self-reported sickness absence but not illness days in adults without severe comorbidity. Netherlands National Trial Register NTR5183.

  2. History in the Cold War and the Cold War in the Present

    OpenAIRE

    Aunesluoma, Juhano; Kettunen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Introduction to the book: This book is on the Cold War and the politics of history. It is a multidimensional subject. On one hand, it concerns the different roles of history in the confrontations called the Cold War. The topic includes, on the other hand, the many-faceted presence of Cold War experiences, interpretations and conclusions in post-Cold-War politics. The very concept of the Cold War should be seen as a historical interpretation that has varied and changed over time. The way in wh...

  3. Event dependent sampling of recurrent events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Tine Kajsa; Andersen, Per Kragh; Angst, Jules

    2010-01-01

    The effect of event-dependent sampling of processes consisting of recurrent events is investigated when analyzing whether the risk of recurrence increases with event count. We study the situation where processes are selected for study if an event occurs in a certain selection interval. Motivation...... retrospective and prospective disease course histories are used. We examine two methods to correct for the selection depending on which data are used in the analysis. In the first case, the conditional distribution of the process given the pre-selection history is determined. In the second case, an inverse......-probability-of-selection weighting scheme is suggested. The ability of the methods to correct for the bias due to selection is investigated with simulations. Furthermore, the methods are applied to affective disease data from a register-based study (Kessing et al. Br J Psychiatry 185:372-377, 2004a) and from a long-term clinical...

  4. Modelling of an explosive event observed by SUMER & TRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel; Taroyan, Youra; Ishak, Bebe

    2016-07-01

    To fully understand coronal heating, we must first understand the different solar processes that move energy throughout the solar atmosphere. TRACE observations have revealed a short cold loop evolving over a small timescale, seemingly with multiple explosive events occurring along its length. An adaptive hydrodynamic radiation code was used to simulate the loop under non-equilibrium ionization. Footpoint heating and cold plasma injection were considered as possible scenarios to reproduce the observations. The simulation results were converted into synthetic observations through forward modelling, for comparison to SOHO/SUMER spectral observations of the loop.

  5. Social science in the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life.

  6. Biotechnology of cold-active proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-05-03

    The bulk of Earth's biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth's surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  7. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  8. Cold Resistant Properties of High Modulus Polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Minghua; XIA Ru; ZHANG Yuchuan; HUANG Zhifang; YAO Heping; HUANG Wanli; WANG Yifeng; HUI Jianqiang; WU Chunyu

    2009-01-01

    Six kinds of polyurethane(PU)elastomers were prepared based on different poly-esters,polyethers and chain extenders.The structure,mechanical properties and cold resistant proper-ties of PU were systematically investigated by FTIR,XRD,DMTA,universal testing machine and flex ductility machine.The results show that T_g of soft segment is the main factor of the cold resistant properties of polyurethane elastomer.Compared with the same relative molecular mass of the polyester and the polyether,the polyether flexibility is better,the glass transition temperature(T_g)is lower and the cold resistant properties is remarkable,for example the cold resistant properties of PU based on poly(tetramethylene glycol),1,4-BG and MDI achieves the fifth level.The physics performances of polyurethane elastomers,such as breakdown strength,Young's modulus and the cold resistant prop-erties,are all superior.

  9. Computer model for analyzing sodium cold traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPheeters, C C; Raue, D J

    1983-05-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions. The calculated pressure drop as a function of impurity mass content determines the capacity of the cold trap. The accuracy of the model was checked by comparing calculated mass distributions with experimentally determined mass distributions from literature publications and with results from our own cold trap experiments. The comparisons were excellent in all cases. A parametric study was performed to determine which design variables are most important in maximizing cold trap capacity.

  10. Improving cold chain systems: Challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Ashvin; Brison, Michael; LeTallec, Yann

    2017-04-19

    While a number of new vaccines have been rolled out across the developing world (with more vaccines in the pipeline), cold chain systems are struggling to efficiently support national immunization programs in ensuring the availability of safe and potent vaccines. This article reflects on the Clinton Health Access Initiative, Inc. (CHAI) experience working since 2010 with national immunization programs and partners to improve vaccines cold chains in 10 countries-Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Cameroon, Mozambique, Lesotho and India - to identify the root causes and solutions for three common issues limiting cold chain performance. Key recommendations include: Collectively, the solutions detailed in this article chart a path to substantially improving the performance of the cold chain. Combined with an enabling global and in-country environment, it is possible to eliminate cold chain issues as a substantial barrier to effective and full immunization coverage over the next few years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasi Satyanarayana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  12. Cold Exposure Can Induce an Exaggerated Early-Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Young Prehypertensives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian-Hui Hong

    Full Text Available Prehypertension is related to a higher risk of cardiovascular events than normotension. Our previous study reported that cold exposure elevates the amplitude of the morning blood pressure surge (MBPS and is associated with a sympathetic increase during the final sleep transition, which might be critical for sleep-related cardiovascular events in normotensives. However, few studies have explored the effects of cold exposure on autonomic function during sleep transitions and changes of autonomic function among prehypertensives. Therefore, we conducted an experiment for testing the effects of cold exposure on changes of autonomic function during sleep and the MBPS among young prehypertensives are more exaggerate than among young normotensives. The study groups consisted of 12 normotensive and 12 prehypertensive male adults with mean ages of 23.67 ± 0.70 and 25.25 ± 0.76 years, respectively. The subjects underwent cold (16°C and warm (23°C conditions randomly. The room temperature was maintained at either 23°C or 16°C by central air conditioning and recorded by a heat-sensitive sensor placed on the forehead and extended into the air. BP was measured every 30 minutes by using an autonomic BP monitor. Electroencephalograms, electrooculograms, electromyograms, electrocardiograms, and near body temperature were recorded by miniature polysomnography. Under cold exposure, a significantly higher amplitude of MBPS than under the warm condition among normotensives; however, this change was more exaggerated in prehypertensives. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in parasympathetic-related RR and HF during the final sleep transition and a higher early-morning surge in BP and in LF% among prehypertensives, but no such change was found in normotensives. Our study supports that cold exposure might increase the risk of sleep-related cardiovascular events in prehypertensives.

  13. Effects of cold front passage on turbulent fluxes over a large inland water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Liu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat over a large inland water in southern USA were measured using the eddy covariance method through the year of 2008. In addition, net radiation, air temperatures and relative humidity, and water temperature in different depths were also measured. The specific objective of this study is to examine effects of a cold front passage on the surface energy fluxes. For the typical cold front event selected from April 11 to 14, air temperature decreased by 16°C, while surface temperature only dropped 6°C. Atmospheric vapor pressure decreased by 1.6 kPa, while that in the water-air interface dropped 0.7 kPa. The behavior difference in the water-air interface was caused by the passage of cold, dry air masses immediately behind the cold front. During the cold front event, sensible heat and latent heat flux increased by 171 W m-2 and 284 W m-2, respectively. Linear aggression analysis showed that the sensible heat flux was proportional to the product of wind speed and the temperature gradient of water-air interface, with a correlation coefficient of 0.95. Latent heat flux was proportional to the product of wind speed and vapor pressure difference between the water surface and overlaying atmosphere, with a correlation coefficient of 0.81. Also, the correlations between both fluxes and the wind speed were weak. This result indicated that the strong wind associated with the cold front event contributed to the turbulent mixing, which indirectly enhanced surface energy exchange between the water surface and the atmosphere. The relationship between the water heat storage energy and turbulent fluxes was also examined.

  14. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-12-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors.

  15. Assessment of a GOES microburst product for two early cold season convective storms

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Kenneth L

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager channel 3 - 4 brightness temperature difference (BTD) product for two early cold season severe convective storm events that occurred over the Mid-Atlantic region on 17 November and 1 December 2010. Both of these events involved squall lines that produced strong downbursts as they tracked over the Tidal Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay regions. It has been found recently that the BTD between GOES infrared channel 3 (water vapor) and channel 4 (thermal infrared) can highlight regions where severe outflow wind generation (i.e. downbursts, microbursts) is likely due to the channeling of dry mid-tropospheric air into the precipitation core of a deep, moist convective storm. These two cases demonstrate effective operational use of this image product for cold-season convective storm events.

  16. Performance of wind turbines during icing events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillenwater, D. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Masson, C. [Canada Research Chair on Nordic Environment Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines, Ottawa, ON (Canada)]|[Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Perron, J. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory

    2007-07-01

    Wind turbines are increasingly being installed in cold climate sites where the cold climate can have a great impact on the operation and performance of the wind turbine. Issues of concern include turbine stoppage, mechanical failure, instrument failure, aerodynamic disruption, difficult access and safety concerns. The scope of this study was to calculate energy losses caused by ice accretions on a wind turbine and to analyze different icing prediction and icing detection tools. The purpose was to improve knowledge on wind turbine operation in cold climate and assist pertinent parties in wind farm siting and wind turbine operation. Another objective was to precisely calculate the financial losses caused by icing of wind turbines. The study was based on stall regulated wind turbines that have a nominal power of 750 kW. Data from Environment Canada included various meteorological measurements as well as visual observations. The reference mast's measurement data included various meteorological measurements as well as some wind turbine operational parameters. The wind turbine's operational data included all measurements saved by the wind turbine's acquisition system. The study revealed that stall controlled turbines are seriously affected by icing and that all measuring instruments should be selected with care. It was recommended that precise evaluation of losses due to icing should be made in order to avoid overestimating losses. The probability and severity of icing events on Quebec territory will be determined. figs.

  17. Traumatic events and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stabbing of a person Sudden death of a parent or trusted caregiver Hospitalization Examples of traumatic events that your child experiences over and over are: Physical or emotional abuse Sexual abuse Gang violence War Terrorist events

  18. Arctic sea ice decline and continental cold anomalies: Upstream and downstream effects of Greenland blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodan; Luo, Dehai

    2017-04-01

    The influence of Greenland blocking on continental cold anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere is examined. It is found that westward moving Greenland blocking (WGB) events in the recent decade are more strongly related to the sea ice decline over the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, and Labrador Sea (BDL), while the quasi-stationary Greenland blocking (QGB) events are more strongly related to the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The frequency of WGB events is significantly increased owing to reduced mid-high-latitude westerly winds in the North Atlantic and its upstream region because of intensified Arctic warming related to the large BDL sea ice decline. It is further revealed that North American low temperatures are more sensitive to the WGB, while European low temperatures are more sensitive to the QGB. For the WGB, an intense cold anomaly is seen over the eastern North America. But for the QGB, strong cold anomalies appear over the North Europe and eastern Asia. Thus, it is concluded that more winter cold air outbreaks should occur over the eastern North America, if large BDL sea ice decline continues in the recent decade.

  19. Advertising Effectiveness In Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sushilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Confronted with decreasing effectiveness of the classic marketing communications, events have become an increasingly popular alternative for marketers. Events constitute one of the most exciting and fastest growing forms of leisure and business. With time, the decreasing effectiveness of classical marketing communications boosted the use of events for marketing and making brand awareness. Event marketing is seen as the unique opportunity to integrate the firm’s communication activities like p...

  20. The use of cold plasma generators in medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolomiiets R.O; Nikitchuk T.M; Hrek O.V

    2017-01-01

    Cold plasma treatment of wounds is a modern area of therapeutic medicine. We describe the physical mechanisms of cold plasma, the principles of therapeutic effects and design of two common types of cold plasma generators for medical use...

  1. COLD AND HEAT WAVES IN THE BARLAD PLATEAU BETWEEN 1961-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. HUSTIU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the meteorological phenomena with severe impact upon individual humans, upon society and the environment one distinguishes cold and heat waves. The geographic location of the Bârlad Plateau – east of the mountainous barrier of the Eastern Carpathians and in a region where main pressure centers travel along the year – facilitates the occurrence of cold and heat waves. Such events were analysed, for the interval 1961-2013, both as the frequency of massive warming and cooling situations, and their duration – taking as a reference intervals of at least 5 consecutive days when in any month thermal anomalies are recorded, either positive or negative.

  2. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  3. Event generators at BESⅢ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PING Rong-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief remark and introduction to event generators for tau-charm physics currently used at BESⅢ,including KKMC,BesEvtGen,Bhlumi,Bhwide,Babayaga and inclusive Monte-Carlo event generators.This paper provides basic information on event generators for BESⅢ users.

  4. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. M. S.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M. J. N.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T. C. E.

    2014-05-01

    The Cape Lookout cold-water coral area off the coast of North Carolina forms the shallowest and northernmost cold-water coral mound area on the Blake Plateau in the NW Atlantic. Cold-water coral habitats near Cape Lookout are occasionally bathed in the Gulf Stream, which is characterised by oligotrophic warm water and strong surface currents. Here, we present the first insights into the mound distribution and morphology, sedimentary environment and coral cover and near-bed environmental conditions as recorded by bottom landers from this coral area. The mounds occur between 320 and 550 m water depth and are characterised by high acoustic backscatter indicating the presence of hard structure. Three distinct mound morphologies were observed: (1) a mound with a flattened top at 320 m, (2) multi-summited mounds with a teardrop shape in the middle part of the area and (3) a single mound at 540 m water depth. Echosounder profiles show the presence of a strong reflector underneath all mound structures that forms the base of the mounds. This reflector cropped out at the downstream side of the single mound and consists of carbonate slabs. Video analysis revealed that all mounds are covered by Lophelia pertusa and that living colonies only occur close to the summits of the SSW side of the mounds, which is the side that faces the strongest currents. Off-mound areas were characterised by low backscatter and sediment ripples, indicating the presence of relatively strong bottom currents. Two bottom landers were deployed amidst the coral mounds between December 2009 and May 2010. Both landers recorded prominent events, characterised by large fluctuations in environmental conditions near the seabed as well as in the overlying water column. The period between December and April was characterised by several events of increasing temperature and salinity, coinciding with increased flow and near-bed acoustic backscatter. During these events temperature fluctuated by up to 9 °C within a

  5. Protection of feet in cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklane, Kalev

    2009-07-01

    The paper summarizes the research on cold protection of feet. There exist several conflicting requirements for the choice of the best suited footwear for cold exposure. These conflicts are related to various environmental factors, protection needs and user comfort issues. In order to reduce such conflicts and simplify the choice of proper footwear the paper suggests dividing the cold into specific ranges that are related to properties and state of water and its possibility to penetrate into, evaporate from or condensate in footwear. The thermo-physiological background and reactions in foot are briefly explained, and main problems and risks related to cold injuries, mechanical injuries and slipping discussed. Footwear thermal insulation is the most important factor for protection against cold. The issues related to measuring the insulation and the practical use of measured values are described, but also the effect of socks, and footwear size. Other means for reducing heat losses, such as PCM and electrical heating are touched. The most important variable that affects footwear thermal insulation and foot comfort is moisture in footwear. In combination with motion they may reduce insulation and thus protection against cold by 45%. The paper includes recommendations for better foot comfort in cold.

  6. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  7. Event studies in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulkem Basdas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this paper is to review the event studies conducted for Turkey to in order to identify the common components in their designs. This paper contributes to the existing literature by reviewing all event studies for Turkey for the first time, but more importantly; this review leads to the upcoming event studies on Turkey by highlighting main components of a proper design. Based on the review of 75 studies, it is observed that event studies generally choose BIST-100 (formerly, ISE-100 market index and market adjusted returns with the parametric tests. In general, the studies prefer to rely on one type of model to calculate abnormal returns without discussing the selection of the underlying model. Especially for the event studies focusing on the impact of political events or macroeconomic announcements in Turkey, there is a risk of clustering due to the application of same event date for all observations.

  8. Cold stress alters transcription in meiotic anthers of cold tolerant chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kamal Dev; Nayyar, Harsh

    2014-10-11

    Cold stress at reproductive phase in susceptible chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) leads to pollen sterility induced flower abortion. The tolerant genotypes, on the other hand, produce viable pollen and set seed under cold stress. Genomic information on pollen development in cold-tolerant chickpea under cold stress is currently unavailable. DDRT-PCR analysis was carried out to identify anther genes involved in cold tolerance in chickpea genotype ICC16349 (cold-tolerant). A total of 9205 EST bands were analyzed. Cold stress altered expression of 127 ESTs (90 up-regulated, 37 down-regulated) in anthers, more than two third (92) of which were novel with unknown protein identity and function. Remaining about one third (35) belonged to several functional categories such as pollen development, signal transduction, ion transport, transcription, carbohydrate metabolism, translation, energy and cell division. The categories with more number of transcripts were carbohydrate/triacylglycerol metabolism, signal transduction, pollen development and transport. All but two transcripts in these categories were up-regulated under cold stress. To identify time of regulation after stress and organ specificity, expression levels of 25 differentially regulated transcripts were also studied in anthers at six time points and in four organs (anthers, gynoecium, leaves and roots) at four time points. Limited number of genes were involved in regulating cold tolerance in chickpea anthers. Moreover, the cold tolerance was manifested by up-regulation of majority of the differentially expressed transcripts. The anthers appeared to employ dual cold tolerance mechanism based on their protection from cold by enhancing triacylglycerol and carbohydrate metabolism; and maintenance of normal pollen development by regulating pollen development genes. Functional characterization of about two third of the novel genes is needed to have precise understanding of the cold tolerance mechanisms in chickpea anthers.

  9. Ergonomics of heat and cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamon, E

    1975-01-01

    The biophysical, physiological and some of the psychological aspects of work under unfavorable man-made ambient conditions are presented in light of the need to prevent excessive strain. Work is treated in two ways: 1) in terms of the muscles O2 demand as a fraction of maximal aerobic capacity; and 2) in terms of metabolic heat source. Since maximal aerobic capacity depends on factors such as physical fitness, age and sex, these factors require consideration in estimating strain due to work. The absolute metabolic heat (M) produced during work is needed in the consideration of the total heat balance. Radiation (r), convection (C), and, under some circumstances, evaporation (Eev) are the main avenues of heat exchange between man and his immediate environment. Eev is primarily a function of the ambient potential for evaporation (Emax). Since the relation of the sum M+R+C to Emax determines heat balance when man in under a heat load, evaluation of the avenues of heat exchange, the sources of heat load, and the stressing effect of all these on the physiological responses are treated in some detail. Psychrometrically defined limits of exposure are also discussed. Subjective sensation and mental performance are discussed in light of their correlation with physiological responses to heat. Cold is treated mainly from the point of view of safety and protective clothing.

  10. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  11. Microbiological interactions with cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, P; Ziuzina, D; Han, L; Cullen, P J; Gilmore, B F

    2017-08-01

    There is a diverse range of microbiological challenges facing the food, healthcare and clinical sectors. The increasing and pervasive resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics and health-related concerns with many biocidal agents drives research for novel and complementary antimicrobial approaches. Biofilms display increased mechanical and antimicrobial stability and are the subject of extensive research. Cold plasmas (CP) have rapidly evolved as a technology for microbial decontamination, wound healing and cancer treatment, owing to the chemical and bio-active radicals generated known collectively as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This review outlines the basics of CP technology and discusses the interactions with a range of microbiological targets. Advances in mechanistic insights are presented and applications to food and clinical issues are discussed. The possibility of tailoring CP to control specific microbiological challenges is apparent. This review focuses on microbiological issues in relation to food- and healthcare-associated human infections, the role of CP in their elimination and the current status of plasma mechanisms of action. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. A Miniature Cold-Atom Frequency Standard

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Vishal; Stoner, Rick; Vuletic, Vladan; Lutwak, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Atomic sensors employing cold-atom technology enable unprecedented accuracy and resolution for next generation atomic clocks, magnetometers, gravimeters, and gyroscopes. To date, however, the size and complexity of cold atom systems have prevented their deployment in practical applications outside of large research laboratories. Here we demonstrate a low power, palm-top, and fully integrated cold atom system that functions as an atomic clock with a stability of 2 parts in 10^11 at 1s. This work demonstrates the feasibility of developing compact, robust, and portable devices based on laser cooled atoms.

  13. A magnetic guide for cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Richmond, J A; Cantwell, B P; Opat, G I

    1998-01-01

    We propose a novel method for guiding cold, neutral atoms using static magnetic fields. A theoretical study of the magnetic field produced by a tube consisting of two identical, interwound solenoids carrying equal but opposite currents is presented. This field is almost zero throughout the centre of the tube, but it increases with exponential rapidity as one approaches the walls formed by the current carrying wires. Hence, cold atoms passing through the tube may be reflected by magnetic mirror effects near the walls. Applying this technique to a free-falling cloud of magneto-optically cooled caesium atoms we hope to construct atomic guides to facilitate the manipulation of cold atomic beams.

  14. CMB Cold Spot from Inflationary Feature Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a "feature-scattering" mechanism to explain the cosmic microwave background cold spot seen from {\\it WMAP} and {\\it Planck} maps. If there are hidden features in the potential of multi-field inflation, the inflationary trajectory can be scattered by such features. The scattering is controlled by the amount of isocurvature fluctuations, and thus can be considered as a mechanism to convert isocurvature fluctuations into curvature fluctuations. This mechanism predicts localized cold spots (instead of hot ones) on the CMB. In addition, it may also bridge a connection between the cold spot and a dip on the CMB power spectrum at $\\ell \\sim 20$.

  15. International cooperation in cold forging technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Lange, K

    1992-01-01

    of the ICFG are personally elected by the Plenary as experts within the field, often representing national groups within cold forging. The main work within the ICFG is carried out in its subgroups which are established by the Plenary to collect, compile and evaluate data and eventually also produce data......International cooperation in the field of cold forging technology started in 1961 by formation of the OECD Group of Experts on Metal Forming. In 1967 this group was transformed into the International Cold Forging Group, ICFG, an independent body which has now been operative for 25 years. Members...

  16. New Perspectives on Intermountain Cyclones and Cold Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, W. J.; West, G.; Neuman, C.; Shafer, J.; Jeglum, M.; Bosart, L. F.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    The topography in and around the Intermountain West strongly affects the genesis, migration, and lysis of extratropical cyclones and cold fronts. In this presentation, we summarize new perspectives on Intermountain cyclone and cold-front evolution derived from recent climatological, observational, and modeling studies based on high-density observations and high-resolution reanalyses and numerical simulations. Recent high-resolution reanalyses show that Intermountain cyclone activity is greatest in two distinct regions. The first, which we call the Great Basin cyclone region, extends northeastward from the southern high Sierra to the Great Salt Lake Basin of northwest Utah. The second, which we call the Canyonlands cyclone region, lies over the upper Colorado River Basin of southeast Utah, a lowland region between the mountains and plateaus of central Utah and the Colorado Rockies. Composites of strong Intermountain cyclones generated in cross-Sierra (210-300°) 500-hPa flow show that cyclogenesis is preceeded by the development of the Great Basin Confluence Zone (GBCZ), a regional airstream boundary that extends downstream from the Sierra Nevada. Cyclogenesis occurs along the GBCZ as large-scale ascent develops over the Intermountain West in advance of an approaching upper-level trough. Flow splitting around the high Sierra and the presence of low-level baroclinity along the GBCZ suggest that Intermountain Cyclogenesis might be better conceptualized from a potential vorticity perspective than from traditional quasigeostrophic models of lee cyclogenesis. Surface observations indicate that the frequency of strong cold-frontal passages increases dramatically from the Cascade-Sierra Mountains to northern Utah, suggesting that the Intermountain West is a frequent cold-frontal breeding ground. Two case studies help illustrate the mechanisms contributing to these strong cold-frontal passages. During the 2002 Tax Day Cyclone, strong contraction (i.e., deformation and

  17. 萨拉乌苏河流域高分辨率的沙丘砂常量元素分布指示的全新世寒冷事件%Cold events of Holocene indicated by primary elements distribution of the high-resolution sand dunes in the Salawusu River Valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛东风; 李保生; 杜恕环; 温小浩; 邱世藩; 欧先交; 杨艺

    2008-01-01

    The components of the primary elements in the dune sands for the MGS1 subsection of the Milanggouwan section in the Salawusu River valley, compared with those of modern dune sands, show that they were caused by East Asian winter monsoon in the Mu Us desert during Holocene. The examined ages for the 11 layers of dune sands, based on the average sedimentary rate, are: 0 to 960, 1350-2240, 2470 to 3530, 4000 to 4180, 4290 to 4350, 4380 to 4760, 5040 to 5920, 6570 to 8270, 9020 to 9700, 9880 to 10160 and 10580 to 11080 a BP, respectively. The climatic events indicated by these dune sands are consistent with those records in the Huguangyan volcanic lake, Zoige peat bog, Hulu cave and Dunde ice core, particularly with the climatic fluctuations of the North Atlantic since 11 000 a BP.Among them, patterns from BO to B8 correspond to the peak values of 0MD, 2D, 4D,6D+8D+10D, 12D, 14D, 16D, 18D and 20D respectively. It might be caused by the North Atlantic ice age induced by the heat circulation, which strengthened the polar high pressure and Siberian-Mongolian high pressure and further led to the dominance of the winter monsoon over China's desert area.

  18. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  19. Cold-induced changes in amphibian oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelier, N.; Moreau, N.A.; N' Da, E.A.; Lautredou, N.F. (Centre de Biologie Cellulaire, Ivry-sur-Seine (France))

    1989-08-01

    Female Pleurodeles waltl newts (Amphibia, urodele), usually raised at 20 degrees C, were submitted to low temperatures; oocytes responded to this cold stress by drastic changes both in lampbrush chromosome structure and in protein pattern. Preexisting lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes were reduced in size and number, while cold-induced loops which were tremendously developed, occurred on defined bivalents of the oocyte at constant, reproducible sites. A comparison of protein patterns in control and stressed oocytes showed two main differences: in stressed oocytes, overall protein synthesis was reduced, except for a set of polypeptides, the cold-stress proteins; second, there was a striking inversion of the relative amount of beta- and gamma-actin found in the oocyte nucleus before and after cold stress. Whereas beta-actin was the predominant form in control oocytes, gamma-actin became the major form in stressed oocytes.

  20. A comprehensive overview of the Cold Spot

    CERN Document Server

    Vielva, P

    2010-01-01

    The report of a significant deviation of the CMB temperature anisotropies distribution from Gaussianity (soon after the public release of the WMAP data in 2003) has become one of the most solid WMAP anomalies. This detection grounds on an excess of the kurtosis of the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelet coefficients at scales of around 10 degrees. At these scales, a prominent feature --located in the southern Galactic hemisphere-- was highlighted from the rest of the SMHW coefficients: the Cold Spot. This article presents a comprehensive overview related to the study of the Cold Spot, paying attention to the non-Gaussianity detection methods, the morphological characteristics of the Cold Spot, and the possible sources studied in the literature to explain its nature. Special emphasis is made on the Cold Spot compatibility with a cosmic texture, commenting on future tests that would help to give support or discard this hypothesis.

  1. Cold quark matter in compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzon, B.; Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Horvath, J. E. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We used an equation of state for the cold quark matter to the study of properties of quark stars. We also discuss the absolute stability of quark matter and compute the mass-radius relation for self-bound stars.

  2. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  3. A semi-physiological model of cold hardening and dehardening in walnut stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Magalie; Lacointe, André; Améglio, Thierry

    2010-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the increase in temperature in this century could lead to an increase in frost damage to plant tissues. Several models have been proposed to describe the development of cold hardiness, but never taking into account extreme climatic and/or physiological events. Our results on walnut tree (Juglans regia L.) show that cold hardiness was best correlated with average daily temperatures minimal temperatures over the last 15 days before sampling (T(min 15 days)), indicating that the freezing tolerance depended on the tree's climatic history. Moreover, this study also shows that the accumulation of sucrose and the water content (WC) decrease are an essential step towards cold hardiness. Thus, a simple linear model based on climatic (T(min 15 days)) and physiological (soluble sugars, WC) explanatory variables was developed to predict the cold hardiness level in walnut stem at any time during the leafless period. Each of the three input variables can be assigned a specific role contributing to the simulated function, cold hardiness. The extent and robustness of this relation was assessed on extreme physiological events on walnut trees bearing three main branches. On each tree, one branch was defoliated to limit the local carbohydrate and transpiration, one was girdled to increase local carbohydrate and prevent carbohydrate export and the third one was kept untreated as control. As expected, these treatments impacted both local carbon reserves and WC in the stems born by each main branch in comparison with the control on the same tree. The impact of these treatments on stem's freezing tolerance, as evaluated by an electrolyte leakage method (LT₅₀), confirmed the direct impact of soluble sugar and WC on cold hardiness over a wide range of carbohydrate and WC. This is discussed in relation to the branch autonomy theory for carbon but also for water during summer growth and winter periods. The present study demonstrates the importance of

  4. Improvements in Cold-Plate Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffetti, Mark A.; Taddey, Edmund P.; Laurin, Michael B.; Chabebe, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Five improvements are reported in cold-plate fabrication. This cold plate is part of a thermal control system designed to serve on space missions. The first improvement is the merging of the end sheets of the cold plate with the face sheets of the structural honeycomb panel. The cold plate, which can be a brazed assembly, uses the honeycomb face sheet as its end sheet. Thus, when the honeycomb panel is fabricated, the face sheet that is used is already part of the cold plate. In addition to reducing weight, costs, and steps, the main benefit of this invention is that it creates a more structurally sound assembly. The second improvement involves incorporation of the header into the closure bar to pass the fluid to a lower layer. Conventional designs have used a separate header, which increases the geometry of the system. The improvement reduces the geometry, thus allowing the cold plate to fit into smaller area. The third improvement eliminates the need of hose, tube, or manifold to supply the cooling fluid externally. The external arrangement can be easily damaged and is vulnerable to leakage. The new arrangement incorporates an internal fluid transfer tube. This allows the fluid to pass from one cold plate to the other without any exposed external features. The fourth improvement eliminates separate fabrication of cold plate(s) and structural members followed by a process of attaching them to each other. Here, the structural member is made of material that can be brazed just as that of the cold plate. Now the structural member and the cold plate can be brazed at the same time, creating a monolithic unit, and thus a more structurally sound assembly. Finally, the fifth improvement is the elimination of an additional welding step that can damage the braze joints. A tube section, which is usually welded on after the braze process, is replaced with a more structurally sound configuration that can be brazed at the same time as the rest of the cold plate.

  5. Photosynthetic microorganisms in cold environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Elster, Josef; Bartak, Milos; Vaczi, Peter; Nedbalova, Linda

    and their physiological processes are inactive. If hydrated, they are physiologically active even at subzero temperatures (Kappen et al., 1996). Although living in cold environments, the growth optimum temperature of typical phycobiont Trebouxia (Chlorophyta) sp. is above 15 ° C, so these algae are considered to be rather psychrotolerant. Acknowledgement The work was supported from projects GA AS CR Nos. KJB 601630808 and KJ KJB600050708, CAREX and long-term institutional research plan of the Institute of Botany AS CR AV0Z600050516 and the Masaryk University. Prof. Martin Backor (Safarik University in Kosice) is kindly ac-knowledged for providing the strains Trebouxia erici and T. glomerata (Backor). References Elster, J. , Benson, E.E. Life in the polar terrestrial environment with a focus on algae and cyanobacteria, in Fuller, B.J., Lane, N. , Benson, E.E. (Eds), Life in the Frozen State. CRC Press, pp. 111-150, 2004. Kappen, L., Schroeter, B., Scheidegger, C., Sommerkorn, M. , Hestmark, G. Cold resistance and metabolic activity of lichens below 0 ° C. Adv. Space Res. 18, 119-128, 1996. Kviderova, J. Characterization of the community of snow algae and their photochemical performance in situ in the Giant Mountains, Czech Republic. Arct. Antarct. Alp. Res. accepted, 2010. Nedbalova, L., Kocianova, M. , Lukavsky, J. Ecology of snow algae in the Giant Mountains and their relation to cryoseston in Europe. Opera Corcontica 45, 59-68, 2008.

  6. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  7. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  8. Mathematical modeling of rewarming after cold therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avet, L M

    1978-07-01

    Statistical methods are presented for fitting mathematical models to skin temperature data. Three types of regression curves, namely, linear regression (Y = A + BX), second-degree regression (Y = A + BX + CX2), and asymptotic regression (Y = alpha + betapx), are discussed as possible models for the rewarming process following cold therapy. The data for fitting the curves consists of back surface temperature (degrees C) corresponding to various times after cold pack treatment (19 degrees C, administered for 20 minutes) was terminated.

  9. Is freezing in the vaccine cold chain an ongoing issue? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Celina M; George, Anupa M; Sawadogo, Adama; Schreiber, Benjamin

    2017-04-19

    Vaccine exposure to temperatures below recommended ranges in the cold chain may decrease vaccine potency of freeze-sensitive vaccines leading to a loss of vaccine investments and potentially places children at risk of contracting vaccine preventable illnesses. This literature review is an update to one previously published in 2007 (Matthias et al., 2007), analyzing the prevalence of vaccine exposure to temperatures below recommendations throughout various segments of the cold chain. Overall, 45 studies included in this review assess temperature monitoring, of which 29 specifically assess 'too cold' temperatures. The storage segments alone were evaluated in 41 articles, 15 articles examined the transport segment and 4 studied outreach sessions. The sample size of the studies varied, ranging from one to 103 shipments and from three to 440 storage units. Among reviewed articles, the percentage of vaccine exposure to temperatures below recommended ranges during storage was 33% in wealthier countries and 37.1% in lower income countries. Vaccine exposure to temperatures below recommended ranges occurred during shipments in 38% of studies from higher income countries and 19.3% in lower income countries. This review highlights continuing issues of vaccine exposure to temperatures below recommended ranges during various segments of the cold chain. Studies monitoring the number of events vaccines are exposed to 'too cold' temperatures as well as the duration of these events are needed. Many reviewed studies emphasize the lack of knowledge of health workers regarding freeze damage of vaccines and how this has an effect on temperature monitoring. It is important to address this issue by educating vaccinators and cold chain staff to improve temperature maintenance and supply chain management, which will facilitate the distribution of potent vaccines to children. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Soundscapes, events, resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mubi Brighenti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Put it bluntly, a soundscape is the sonic counterpart, or component, of landscape. From such minimal assumption, some interesting consequences follow: just as landscape is far from being a simple stage-set upon which events take place, soundscape, too, is itself evental, i.e., it consists of events. Not only because its nature, far from being acoustics is always ‘psychoacoustics’, as Murray Schafer (1977/1994 first argued. Processes of environmental perception are of course there.

  11. The Terrorist Event

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Bill

    2007-01-01

    In his article "The Terrorist Event," Bill Nichols examines how the US media attempted to make meaning of the events of 9/11. How were news anchors and producers to explain an event that escaped their comprehension? Without context or historical equivalence in the US, news outlets groped for a narrative in which to frame the event even if that meant creating the meaning themselves. In their attempt to create meaning, what sorts of fetishes and fantasies did they draw-on and in turn create? Th...

  12. The PHENIX Event Builder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, David

    2004-10-01

    The PHENIX Event Builder is a critical part of the back-end of the PHENIX DAQ. It is reponsible for assembling event fragments from each subsystem into complete events ready for archiving. It allows subsystems to be read out either in parallel or simultaneously while supporting a high rate of archiving. Additionally, it implements an environment where Level-2 trigger algorithms may be optionally executed, providing the ability to tag and/or filter rare physics events. Up to and including RHIC Run-4, the Event Builder was implemented as a set of three Windows NT/2000 multithreaded executables that run on a farm of over 100 dual-cpu 1U servers connected via a Foundry Layer2/3 Gigabit switch. Under this architecture it has been capable of recording a wide range of event sizes from central Au-Au to p-p interactions, with data archiving rates of over 400 MB/s at 2 KHz event rates. Between Runs 4 and 5, the Event Builder will be ported to Linux. Preliminary work has shown we can expect great improvements in performance when moving to this platform for Run 5. The PHENIX Event Builder design and implementation, as well as performance and plans for future development, will be discussed.

  13. Fracture Behavior of Cold Sprayed 304 Stainless Steel Coating During Cold Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xian-ming; ZHANG Jun-bao; HAN Wei; ZHAO Jie

    2012-01-01

    The fracture behavior of cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating in cold rolling process was studied. The 304 stainless steel coatings were deposited on low carbon steel substrate by cold gas dynamic spray (CGDS) and then cold rolled, respectively. The fracture morphology of the coatings was observed and analyzed, and the crack distri- butions along the longitudinal rolling direction of the coatings were also investigated and discussed. The results showed that the cohesive strength of the cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating was too low to be cold rolled. Mi crocracks were formed in the as-sprayed coatings and ran perpendicularly to the rolling direction. The spacing dis- tance between these cracks decreased with the increase of the cold rolling reduction. In addition, it was also found that the initial crack generated at the surface of the coating and propagated from the surface to the interface along the weakly bonded particles. A theoretical analysis was developed for the coating fracture. It gave a critical minimum cohesive bonding strength of the coating for non-breaking in cold rolling process. The crack propagation manner of the cold rolled coatings was also discussed.

  14. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  15. Identification of Cold Tolerance of Rice Germplasm Resource at Germinating Stage in Cold Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hualong; SUN Shiche; WANG Jingguo; ZOU Detang

    2008-01-01

    Total 75 rice varieties (lines) in Heilongiiang Province (or cold region) as germplasm resources were identified for cold tolerance at germinating stage by controlling temperature in artificial incubator. The results showed that the shooting seed rate at the germinating stage could be used as the evaluation index of cold tolerance. The cold tolerance was recorded on 1-9 scale and could be identified by the criteria of five indexes such as highly tolerant (HT), tolerant (T), moderately tolerant (MT), susceptible (S), highly susceptible (HS).

  16. TRPA1 contributes to cold hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Camino, Donato; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B; Earley, Taryn J; Cook, Colby A; Petrus, Matt J; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J; Chong, Jayhong A; Fanger, Christopher M; Woolf, Clifford J; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M

    2010-11-10

    TRPA1 is a nonselective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. Although it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions in which reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1(-/-) mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide] reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

  17. Continuous cold therapy in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, D W; Harris, H

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a retrospective study that assessed 52 consecutive patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between January 1, 1992 and September 15, 1992. Thirty-three patients underwent TKA and received cold therapy pads placed over a thin dressing in the operating room. Nineteen patients underwent TKA using an identical operative and postoperative procedure, but did not receive continuous cold therapy. Continuous cold therapy consisted of two sterile plastic pads connnected by rubber hoses containing cool water from an electric main unit that maintained a constant temperature of 42 degrees F for the immediate postoperative period. Cold therapy pads were used an average of 3 days and removed with the first dressing change. Patients who had continuous cold therapy averaged a 200 cc decrease in postoperative blood loss. There was no significant difference in the amount of narcotic use, transfusion requirements, or hospital stay between the two groups. Postoperative swelling and range of motion were not consistently recorded. Twenty-eight other variables also examined not significant. Based on these results, we cannot recommend continuous cold therapy or justify the extra expense for all patients who undergo TKA.

  18. Quaternary ecological and geomorphic changes associated with rainfall events in presently semi-arid northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auler, Augusto S.; Wang, Xianfeng; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Cristalli, Patrícia S.; Smart, Peter L.; Richards, David A.

    2004-10-01

    Several geomorphic features and palaeobiotic remains in now semi-arid northeastern Brazil indicate major palaeoenvironmental changes during past periods of increased rainfall. 230Th mass spectrometric ages of speleothems and travertines have allowed the determination of the timing and duration of wetter than present conditions. The data demonstrate that wet events have occurred throughout much of the Pleistocene, present dry conditions having been established at the end of the Younger Dryas. A markedly different fauna comprising megafaunal elements not adapted to the present low arboreal scrubland caatinga vegetation existed in the area. Palaeobotanical remains embedded in travertine indicate forested vegetation at these wetter intervals, suggesting that the caatinga was then replaced or mixed with a semi-deciduous forest. Due to the abundance of travertine sites containing fossil botanical remains in northeastern Brazil, it is believed that forest expansion occurred over large areas of the now semi-arid zone, showing that the long hypothesised forested links between biodiversity-rich Amazon and Atlantic rainforests may indeed have existed during these moister phases. Copyright

  19. Thermodynamic and dynamic structure of atmosphere over the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia during the passage of a cold surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samah, Azizan Abu; Babu, C. A.; Varikoden, Hamza; Jayakrishnan, P. R.; Hai, Ooi See

    2016-08-01

    An intense field observation was carried out for a better understanding of cold surge features over Peninsular Malaysia during the winter monsoon season. The study utilizes vertical profiles of temperature, humidity and wind at high vertical and temporal resolution over Kota Bharu, situated in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. LCL were elevated during the passage of the cold surge as the relative humidity values decreased during the passage of cold surge. Level of Free Convection were below 800 hPa and equilibrium levels were close to the LFC in most of the cases. Convective available potential energy and convection inhibition energy values were small during most of the observations. Absence of local heating and instability mechanism are responsible for the peculiar thermodynamic structure during the passage of the cold surge. The wind in the lower atmosphere became northeasterly and was strong during the entire cold surge period. A slight increase in temperature near the surface and a drop in temperature just above the surface were marked by the passage of the cold surge. A remarkable increase in specific humidity was observed between 970 and 900 hPa during the cold surge period. Further, synoptic scale features were analyzed to identify the mechanism responsible for heavy rainfall. Low level convergence, upper level divergence and cyclonic vorticity prevailed over the region during the heavy rainfall event. Dynamic structure of the atmosphere as part of the organized convection associated with the winter monsoon was responsible for the vertical lifting and subsequent rainfall.

  20. Long term climatology and trends of heat and cold waves over southern Bihar, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sheraz Mahdi; B S Dhekale

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the trends and variability in extreme temperature indices. We examined climatological distribution of heat and cold waves of two important agro-climatic zones (South Bihar Alluvial Zone-IIIA and B), which is part of the middle Indo-Gangetic Basin and comprising 17 densely populated (1108 persons/km²) districts of Bihar state. We used series of daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 1969 to 2013 of seven stations to calculate temperature indices, from which the trend, occurrence, duration and severity of heat and cold waves were estimated. Results revealed that, in a period of 45 years, zone-IIIA and B has experienced 251/182 and 337/140 average number of heat and cold events, respectively. Although the zone-IIIA on average is experiencing ≥8 heat and cold wave days per season, both these high frequency temperature extremes are decreasing at the rate 0.15 and 0.17 per year, respectively, with significance at 95% confidence level. Zone-IIIB on average is experiencing ≤5 heat and cold days per season, but heat waves have been found increasing at the rate 0.11 per year, whereas, a non-significant decreasing rate of 0.04/year was observed in cold waves. The study also inferred that heat waves of the month of May in zone-IIIA and of June in zone-IIIB are more frequent, hotter and longer than other months of hot weather period under study, whereas, the cold waves of month January are more frequent and longer, in both zones.

  1. Long term climatology and trends of heat and cold waves over southern Bihar, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, S. Sheraz; Dhekale, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the trends and variability in extreme temperature indices. We examined climatological distribution of heat and cold waves of two important agro-climatic zones (South Bihar Alluvial Zone-IIIA and B), which is part of the middle Indo-Gangetic Basin and comprising 17 densely populated (1108 persons/km 2) districts of Bihar state. We used series of daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 1969 to 2013 of seven stations to calculate temperature indices, from which the trend, occurrence, duration and severity of heat and cold waves were estimated. Results revealed that, in a period of 45 years, zone-IIIA and B has experienced 251/182 and 337/140 average number of heat and cold events, respectively. Although the zone-IIIA on average is experiencing ≥8 heat and cold wave days per season, both these high frequency temperature extremes are decreasing at the rate 0.15 and 0.17 per year, respectively, with significance at 95% confidence level. Zone-IIIB on average is experiencing ≤5 heat and cold days per season, but heat waves have been found increasing at the rate 0.11 per year, whereas, a non-significant decreasing rate of 0.04/year was observed in cold waves. The study also inferred that heat waves of the month of May in zone-IIIA and of June in zone-IIIB are more frequent, hotter and longer than other months of hot weather period under study, whereas, the cold waves of month January are more frequent and longer, in both zones.

  2. The impact of the February 2012 cold spell on health in Italy using surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Donato, Francesca K; Leone, Michela; Noce, Damia; Davoli, Marina; Michelozzi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    In February 2012 Italy was hit by an exceptional cold spell with extremely low temperatures and heavy snowfall. The aim of this work is to estimate the impact of the cold spell on health in the Italian cities using data from the rapid surveillance systems. In Italy, a national mortality surveillance system has been operational since 2004 in 34 cities for the rapid monitoring of daily mortality. Data from this system were used to evaluate the impact of the February 2012 cold spell on mortality shortly after the occurrence of the event. Furthermore, a cause-specific analysis was conducted in Roma using the Regional Mortality Registry and the emergency visits (ER) surveillance system. Cold spell episodes were defined as days when mean temperatures were below the 10(th) percentile of February distribution for more than three days. To estimate the impact of the cold spell, excess mortality was calculated as the difference between observed and daily expected values. An overall 1578 (+25%) excess deaths among the 75+ age group was recorded in the 14 cities that registered a cold spell in February 2012. A statistically significant excess in mortality was observed in several cities ranging from +22% in Bologna to +58% in Torino. Cause-specific analysis conducted in Roma showed a statistically significant excess in mortality among the 75+ age group for respiratory disease (+64%), COPD (+57%), cardiovascular disease +20% ischemic heart disease (14%) and other heart disease (+33%). Similar results were observed for ER visits. Surveillance systems need to become are a key component of prevention plans as they can help improve public health response and are a valid data source to rapidly quantify the impact on health. Cold-related mortality is still an important issue and should not be underestimated by public health Authorities.

  3. Is "Warm Arctic, Cold Continent" A Fingerprint Pattern of Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerling, M. P.; Sun, L.; Perlwitz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cold winters and cold waves have recently occurred in Europe, central Asia and the Midwest to eastern United States, even as global mean temperatures set record highs and Arctic amplification of surface warming continued. Since 1979, Central Asia winter temperatures have in fact declined. Conjecture has it that more cold extremes over the mid-latitude continents should occur due to global warming and the impacts of Arctic sea ice loss. A Northern Hemisphere temperature signal termed the "Warm Arctic, Cold Continent" pattern has thus been surmised. Here we use a multi-model approach to test the hypothesis that such a pattern is indeed symptomatic of climate change. Diagnosis of a large model ensemble of historical climate simulations shows some individual realizations to yield cooling trends over Central Asia, but importantly the vast majority show warming. The observed cooling has thus likely been a low probability state of internal variability, not a fingerprint of forced climate change. We show that daily temperature variations over continents decline in winter due to global warming, and cold waves become less likely. This is partly related to diminution of Arctic cold air reservoirs due to warming-induced sea ice loss. Nonetheless, we find some evidence and present a physical basis that Arctic sea ice loss alone can induce a winter cooling over Central Asia, though with a magnitude that is appreciably smaller than the overall radiative-forced warming signal. Our results support the argument that recent cooling trends over central Asia, and cold extreme events over the winter continents, have principally resulted from atmospheric internal variability and have been neither a forced response to Arctic seas ice loss nor a symptom of global warming. The paradigm of climate change is thus better expressed as "Warm Arctic, Warm Continent" for the NH winter.

  4. Understanding Extreme Spanish Coastal Flood Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, J. Javier; Esteban, M. Dolores; Silvestre, J. Manuel

    2013-04-01

    The Santa Irene flood event, at the end of October 1982, is one of the most dramatically widely reported flood events in Spain. Its renown is mainly due to the collapse of the Tous dam, but its main message is to be the paradigm of the incidence of the maritime/littoral weather and its temporal sea level rise by storm surge accompanying rain process on the coastal plains inland floods. Looking at damages the presentation analyzes the adapted measures from the point of view of the aims of the FP7 SMARTeST Project related to the Flood Resilience improvement in urban areas through looking for Technologies, Systems and Tools an appropriate "road to de market". The event was due to the meteorological phenomenon known as "gota fría" (cold drop), a relatively frequent and intense rainy phenomenon affecting one or more basins on the Iberian Peninsula, particularly on the Spanish east to southeast inlands and coasts. There are some circumstances that can easily come together to unleash the cold drop there: cold and dry polar air masses coming onto the whole Iberian Peninsula and the north of Africa, high sea water temperatures, and low atmospheric pressure (cyclone) areas in the western Mediterranean basin; these circumstances are quite common during the autumn season there, and, as it happens, in other places around the world (East/Southeast Africa). Their occurrence, however shows a great space-temporal variability (in a similar way to hurricanes, on Caribbean and western North-Atlantic areas, or to typhoons do). As a matter of fact, all of these equivalent though different phenomena may have different magnitude each time. An overview of the very main events since 11th century in the East to Southeast areas in Spain is shown in the presentation, looking for relation with climatic conditions and Climate changes on one hand, and with geomorphologic and geotechnical conditions on the other It also describes the results of a detailed analysis and reflection about this cold

  5. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  6. Magnitude and frequency of heat and cold waves in recent decades: the case of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ceccherini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades there has been an increase in magnitude and occurrence of heat waves and a decrease of cold waves which are possibly related to the anthropogenic influence (Solomon et al., 2007. This study describes the extreme temperature regime of heat waves and cold waves across South America over recent years (1980–2014. Temperature records come from the Global Surface Summary of the Day (GSOD, a climatological dataset produced by the National Climatic Data Center that provides records of daily maximum and minimum temperatures acquired worldwide. The magnitude of heat waves and cold waves for each GSOD station are quantified on annual basis by means of the Heat Wave Magnitude Index (Russo et al., 2014 and the Cold Wave Magnitude Index (CWMI, Forzieri et al., 2015. Results indicate an increase in intensity and in frequency of heat waves, with up to 75 % more events occurring only in the last 10 years. Conversely, no significant changes are detected for cold waves. In addition, the trend of the annual temperature range (i.e., yearly mean of Tmax – yearly mean of Tmin is positive – up to 1 °C decade−1 – over the extra-tropics and negative – up to 0.5 °C decade−1 – over the tropic. This dichotomous behaviour indicates that the annual mean of Tmax is generally increasing more than the annual mean of Tmin in the extra-tropics and vice versa in the tropics.

  7. Generation of seiches by cold fronts over the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M. P. C.; Holthuijsen, L. H.; Battjes, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Seiches affecting the Port of Rotterdam are generated in the Southern North Sea. Their generation is investigated with observations and numerical simulations. A wavelet analysis of the observations, both at sea and in the harbor, shows that low-frequency energy (0.1-2.0 mHz) does indeed occur at sea prior to each seiche event in Rotterdam. An analysis of 6 years of weather charts indicates that all 51 seiche events in this period (with amplitude exceeding 0.25 m) coincided with the passage of a low-pressure weather system. Some of these low-pressure systems included a sharp cold front (classical or ana), whereas others included a more diffuse cold front (split or kata). Numerical simulations with a hydrodynamic model driven by meteorological observations reproduced the seiches for situations with the sharp cold fronts correctly. The seiches that were simulated for situations with the gradual cold fronts do not agree with the observations, which is ascribed to the inadequate atmospheric forcing of the hydrodynamical model.

  8. Forecasting European cold waves based on subsampling strategies of CMIP5 and Euro-CORDEX ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Llana, Laura; Braconnot, Pascale; Vautard, Robert; Vrac, Mathieu; Jezequel, Aglae

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting future extreme events under the present changing climate represents a difficult task. Currently there are a large number of ensembles of simulations for climate projections that take in account different models and scenarios. However, there is a need for reducing the size of the ensemble to make the interpretation of these simulations more manageable for impact studies or climate risk assessment. This can be achieved by developing subsampling strategies to identify a limited number of simulations that best represent the ensemble. In this study, cold waves are chosen to test different approaches for subsampling available simulations. The definition of cold waves depends on the criteria used, but they are generally defined using a minimum temperature threshold, the duration of the cold spell as well as their geographical extend. These climate indicators are not universal, highlighting the difficulty of directly comparing different studies. As part of the of the CLIPC European project, we use daily surface temperature data obtained from CMIP5 outputs as well as Euro-CORDEX simulations to predict future cold waves events in Europe. From these simulations a clustering method is applied to minimise the number of ensembles required. Furthermore, we analyse the different uncertainties that arise from the different model characteristics and definitions of climate indicators. Finally, we will test if the same subsampling strategy can be used for different climate indicators. This will facilitate the use of the subsampling results for a wide number of impact assessment studies.

  9. A New High-resolution Late Glacial-Holocene Climatic Record from Eastern Nanling Mountains in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Jibin; ZHONG Wei; ZHENG Yanming; MA Qiaohong; CAI Ying; OUYANG Jun

    2009-01-01

    A 350-cm-long sediment core sequence from Dahu Swamp situated in the eastern Nanling Mountains was selected for high-resolution paleoclimatic reconstruction since the Late Glacial period. The multi-proxy records of this paper reveal several evidently dry and cold events that may coincide with the Oldest Dryas, the Older Dryas, the Younger Dryas in the late deglacial period. Two relatively wetter and warmer phases occurred in ca. 15,000-14,400 cal yr B.P. And 13,500-12,800 cal yr B.P. Respectively may correspond to the Boiling and Allerod warming events. The Younger Dryas event(ca. 12,800-11,500 cal yr B.P.) revealed by multi-proxies was characterized by relatively colder and drier climate. A warmer and wetter climate, occurred in ca. 10,000-6000 cal yr B.P., was consistent with the Holo-cene Optimum, which coincided with the maximum Northern Hemisphere insolation. The "8.2kyr cool event" and even the "8.8kyr cool event" were indicated as well from our sediment core. A dry mid-Holocene period (ca. 6000-3000 cal yr B.P.) indicated by multi-proxies does not follow the traditional concept of the wet mid-Holoeene conditions observed in other regions in China.

  10. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  11. Practices Surrounding Event Photos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Kotzé, P.; Marsden, G.; Lindgaard, G.; Wesson, J.; Winckler, M.

    Sharing photos through mobile devices has a great potential for creating shared experiences of social events between co-located as well as remote participants. In order to design novel event sharing tools, we need to develop indepth understanding of current practices surrounding these so called

  12. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  13. CHED Events: Philadelphia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-08-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Fall 2008 ACS Meeting in Philadelphia. Most will take place in the Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel, 17th and Race Streets: This includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet.

  14. The Agency of Event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Tamke, Martin; Riiber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of agency within event-based models. We present an event-based modeling approach that links interdependent generative, analytic and decision making sub-models within a system of exchange. Two case study projects demonstrate the underlying modeling concepts...

  15. The Agency of Event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Tamke, Martin; Riiber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of agency within event-based models. We present an event-based modeling approach that links interdependent generative, analytic and decision making sub-models within a system of exchange. Two case study projects demonstrate the underlying modeling concepts and metho...

  16. Activating Event Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  17. The ATLAS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Vandelli, W; Battaglia, A; Beck, H P; Blair, R; Bogaerts, A; Bosman, M; Ciobotaru, M; Cranfield, R; Crone, G; Dawson, J; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drake, G; Ermoline, Y; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Gorini, B; Green, B; Haberichter, W; Haberli, C; Hauser, R; Hinkelbein, C; Hughes-Jones, R; Joos, M; Kieft, G; Klous, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kugel, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann, G; Martin, B; Mapelli, L; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Misiejuk, A; Mornacchi, G; Müller, M; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Petersen, J; Pope, B; Schlereth, J L; Spiwoks, R; Stancu, S; Strong, J; Sushkov, S; Szymocha, T; Tremblet, L; Ünel, G; Vermeulen, J; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Yu, M; Yasu, Y; Zhang, J; Zobernig, H; 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    2008-01-01

    Event data from proton-proton collisions at the LHC will be selected by the ATLAS experiment in a three-level trigger system, which, at its first two trigger levels (LVL1+LVL2), reduces the initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz to $sim$3~kHz. At this rate, the Event Builder collects the data from the readout system PCs (ROSs) and provides fully assembled events to the Event Filter (EF). The EF is the third trigger level and its aim is to achieve a further rate reduction to $sim$200~Hz on the permanent storage. The Event Builder is based on a farm of O(100) PCs, interconnected via a Gigabit Ethernet to O(150) ROSs. These PCs run Linux and multi-threaded software applications implemented in C++. All the ROSs, and substantial fractions of the Event Builder and Event Filter PCs have been installed and commissioned. We report on performance tests on this initial system, which is capable of going beyond the required data rates and bandwidths for Event Building for the ATLAS experiment.

  18. Limits in late time conversion of cold dark matter into hot dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, M; de Holanda, P C

    2013-01-01

    Structure formation creates high temperature and density regions in the Universe that allow the conversion of matter into more stable states, with a corresponding emission of relativistic matter and radiation. An example of such a mechanism is the supernova event, that releases relativistic neutrinos corresponding to 99% of the binding energy of remnant neutron star. We take this phenomena as a starting point for an assumption that similar processes could occur in the dark sector, where structure formation would generate a late time conversion of cold dark matter into a relativistic form of dark matter. We performed a phenomenological study about the limits of this conversion, where we assumed a transition profile that is a generalized version of the process responsible for the neutrino production in supernovae events. With this assumption, we obtained interesting modifications for the constraints over some parameters such as the dark energy equation of state and the cold dark matter density. We show that whe...

  19. COLD ELECTRON REACTIONS PRODUCING THE ENERGETIC ISOMER OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mario B.; Buhr, Henrik; Berg, Max H.; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Krantz, Claude; Novotny, Oldrich; Novotny, Steffen; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Petrignani, Annemieke; Repnow, Roland; Schwalm, Dirk; Shornikov, Andrey; Stuetzel, Julia; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael L.; Zajfman, Daniel, E-mail: A.Wolf@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2012-02-10

    Using event-by-event fragment momentum spectroscopy in a storage-ring merged-beams experiment, we find laboratory evidence that in the dissociative recombination (DR) of HCNH{sup +} with cold electrons the energetic isomer HNC is produced with a high yield, similar to that of HCN. With a newly implemented mass-sensitive fragment imaging detector, we analyze the kinetic energy release of the triatomic fragments DCN/DNC from the DR reaction of the isotopologue DCND{sup +} with cold (near 10 K) electrons. The results show that the internal energy of these fragments is extremely high, far exceeding the isomerization barrier between DNC and DCN. From this laboratory characterization of the DR reaction we conclude that also the triatomic fragment HCN/HNC from the DR of HCNH{sup +} will carry a large amount of ro-vibrational excitation and show that this implies an isomeric production ratio in a narrow range near unity.

  20. Agility following the application of cold therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T A; Ingersoll, C; Knight, K L; Worrell, T

    1995-09-01

    Cold application is commonly used before strenuous exercise due to its hypalgesic effects. Some have questioned this procedure because of reports that cold may reduce isokinetic torque. However, there have been no investigations of actual physical performance following cold application. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 20-minute ice immersion treatment to the foot and ankle affected the performance of three agility tests: the carioca maneuver, the cocontraction test, and the shuttle run. Twenty-four male athletic subjects were tested during two different treatment sessions following an orientation session. Subjects were tested following a 20-minute 1 degrees C ice immersion treatment to the dominant foot and ankle and 20 minutes of rest. Following each treatment, subjects performed three trials of each agility test, with 30 seconds rest between each trial, and 1 minute between each different agility test. The order in which each subject performed the agility tests was determined by a balanced Latin square. A MANOVA with repeated measures was used to determine if there was an overall significant difference in the agility times recorded between the cold and control treatments and if the order of the treatment sessions affected the scores. Although the mean agility time scores were slightly slower following the cold treatment, cooling the foot and ankle caused no difference in agility times. Also, there was no difference resulting from the treatment orders. We felt that the slightly slower scores may have been a result of tissue stiffness and/or subject's apprehension immediately following the cold treatment. Cold application to the foot and ankle can be used before strenuous exercise without altering agility.

  1. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  2. Cold-Hearted or Cool-Headed: Physical Coldness Promotes Utilitarian Moral Judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eNakamura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we examine the effect of physical coldness on personal moral dilemma judgment. Previous studies have indicated that utilitarian moral judgment—sacrificing a few people to achieve the greater good for others—was facilitated when: (1 participants suppressed an initial emotional response and deliberately thought about the utility of outcomes; (2 participants had a high-level construal mindset and focused on abstract goals (e.g., save many; or (3 there was a decreasing emotional response to sacrificing a few. In two experiments, we exposed participants to extreme cold or typical room temperature and then asked them to make personal moral dilemma judgments. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that coldness prompted utilitarian judgment, but the effect of coldness was independent from deliberate thought or abstract high-level construal mindset. As Experiment 2 revealed, coldness facilitated utilitarian judgment via reduced empathic feelings. Therefore, physical coldness did not affect the cool-headed deliberate process or the abstract high-level construal mindset. Rather, coldness biased people toward being cold-hearted, reduced empathetic concern about a sacrificed victim, and facilitated utilitarian moral judgments.

  3. Water and Electrolyte Exchange during Exposure to Cold, Altitude and Combined Cold and Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-28

    adrenergic receptors may play a dominant role in acclimation to cold in the laboratory rat . Since an increase in the rate of secretion of thyroid hormones...stimulation that accompanies cold acclimation in the laboratory rat . Studies from this laboratory have shown that reduction in thyroid activity reduces

  4. Cold War Paradigms and the Post-Cold War High School History Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAninch, Stuart A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how Cold War ideological models provide a way to examine the U.S. role in world affairs. Discusses and compares on the writings of Paul Gagnon and Noam Chomsky on this topic. Concludes that students should stand outside both models to develop a meaningful perspective on the U.S. role during the Cold War. (CFR)

  5. Cold War Paradigms and the Post-Cold War High School History Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAninch, Stuart A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how Cold War ideological models provide a way to examine the U.S. role in world affairs. Discusses and compares on the writings of Paul Gagnon and Noam Chomsky on this topic. Concludes that students should stand outside both models to develop a meaningful perspective on the U.S. role during the Cold War. (CFR)

  6. The cold driver: Cold stress while driving results in dangerous behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Drew M; Pilcher, June J

    2016-10-01

    Cool vehicle cabin temperatures can induce short-term non-hypothermic cold stress. The current study created a cold condition to examine the impact of cold stress on driving behavior. Forty-four participants drove a high-fidelity driving simulator during a thermal neutral or local torso cooled condition. Participants performed additional tasks to assess attention, psychomotor vigilance, and manual dexterity. Skin temperature was significantly lower in the cold condition while internal temperature was unaffected. Participants who had higher subjective ratings of cold followed lead vehicles closer and started to brake later. Participants in the cold condition followed the lead car 22% (0.82s) closer and started braking 20% (2.35s) later when approaching a stop sign during the car-following task. No change in attention, psychomotor vigilance, or dexterity was observed. The current results suggest that cold environmental conditions can contribute to dangerous driving behaviors. Measures of cold perception were also shown to predict changes in driving behavior.

  7. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology. Volume 52. Part 2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Russia. Polyak , L., et at, event. Edgerton, D., [1997,eng] 52-4459 [1996,eng] 52-2602 [1997,eng] 52-2380 Reconstruction of Arctic Ocean...290 Acres International Limited. Hydraunlics Department, Niagara eng] 52-5049 3 AUTHOR INDEX Adref, KI Aircraft accident report--Denver,CO,Nov. 1987...5569 AmericanConcreteInstitute(ACI) International meats on patterned ground, N.W.T., Canada [1998, Allen,TER. Practitioner’s guide to cold weather

  8. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, psex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature.

  9. Cold months in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Jouni; Ylhäisi, Jussi S.

    2011-11-01

    The frequency of cold months in the 21st century is studied using the CMIP3 ensemble of climate model simulations, using month-, location- and model-specific threshold temperatures derived from the simulated 20th century climate. Unsurprisingly, cold months are projected to become less common, but not non-existent, under continued global warming. As a multi-model mean over the global land area excluding Antarctica and under the SRES A1B scenario, 14% of the months during the years 2011-2050 are simulated to be colder than the 20th century median for the same month, 1.3% colder than the 10th percentile, and 0.1% record cold. The geographic and seasonal variations in the frequency of cold months are strongly modulated by variations in the magnitude of interannual variability. Thus, for example, cold months are most infrequently simulated over the tropical oceans where the variability is smallest, not over the Arctic where the warming is largest.

  10. Cold-atom Inertial Sensor without Deadtime

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Bess; Savoie, Denis; Venon, Bertrand; Alzar, Carlos L Garrido; Geiger, Remi; Landragin, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    We report the operation of a cold-atom inertial sensor in a joint interrogation scheme, where we simultaneously prepare a cold-atom source and operate an atom interferometer in order to eliminate dead times. Noise aliasing and dead times are consequences of the sequential operation which is intrinsic to cold-atom atom interferometers. Both phenomena have deleterious effects on the performance of these sensors. We show that our continuous operation improves the short-term sensitivity of atom interferometers, by demonstrating a record rotation sensitivity of $100$ nrad.s$^{-1}/\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ in a cold-atom gyroscope of $11$ cm$^2$ Sagnac area. We also demonstrate a rotation stability of $1$ nrad.s$^{-1}$ after $10^4$ s of integration, improving previous results by an order of magnitude. We expect that the continuous operation will allow cold-atom inertial sensors with long interrogation time to reach their full sensitivity, determined by the quantum noise limit.

  11. Gender, the Cold War, and Ingeborg Bachmann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lennox

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay uses the methodology of materialist feminism to situate Ingeborg Bachmann's life and writing in their Cold War context. After outlining the ways in which U.S. Cold War policy affected Austrian cultural life in the nineteen-fifties, I show that Bachmann's own activities during the period of U.S. occupation were steeped in that Cold War atmosphere. I also argue that the Cold War reconfiguration of gender relations left their imprint on Bachmann's writing. Comparing the narrative techniques of the unpublished short story "Sterben für Berlin" (1961 and Bachmann's Büchner Prize Speech "Ein Ort für Zufälle" (1964, I maintain that both texts address the Cold War's impact on Central European subjectivity and that Bachmann's subsequent writing oscillates between those two narrative approaches. Particularly the middle, dream chapter of the novel Malina uses the expressionist or surrealist strategies of "Ein Ort für Zufälle" to present history only via the scars left on the psyche, what Bachmann called "die Geschichte im Ich." Subsequent to the novel Malina , the figure Malina assumes the narrative standpoint of "Sterben für Berlin" to tell the apparently realist stories of the "Todesarten" cycle, whose characters remain unaware of the social forces of which they are victims.

  12. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  13. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  14. CCG - News & Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  15. RAS Initiative - Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  16. Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal events that mimic epilepsy, and their precipitants, prodromes, and distinguishing features are reviewed by researchers at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, and American University of Beirut, New York.

  17. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  18. Analysis of extreme events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khuluse, S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ) determination of the distribution of the damage and (iii) preparation of products that enable prediction of future risk events. The methodology provided by extreme value theory can also be a powerful tool in risk analysis...

  19. "Universe" event at AIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  20. Electrifying Current Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip

    1980-01-01

    The author describes how he has adapted the television quiz show format of "College Bowl" to current events study for junior high school students. An insert explains use of the same technique with fourth graders. (SJL)

  1. Setting parameters in the cold chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Rodríguez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breaks in the cold chain are important economic losses in food and pharmaceutical companies. Many of the failures in the cold chain are due to improper adjustment of equipment parameters such as setting the parameters for theoretical conditions, without a corresponding check in normal operation. The companies that transport refrigeratedproducts must be able to adjust the parameters of the equipment in an easy and quick to adapt their functioning to changing environmental conditions. This article presents the results of a study carried out with a food distribution company. The main objective of the study is to verify the effectiveness of Six Sigma as a methodological toolto adjust the equipment in the cold chain. The second objective is more speciÞ c and is to study the impact of: reducing the volume of storage in the truck, the initial temperature of the storage areain the truck and the frequency of defrost in the transport of refrigerated products.

  2. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions. Photo 2 The cold mass assembly is resting on special supports in order to allow the finishing operations. Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions. Photo 3 View of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. The extremity of the shrinking cylinder has been bevelled in view of welding the end cover. Photo 4 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. One can also see the light building surrounding the finishing station, which purpose is to isolate the laser measuring machines from disturbances. Photo 5 The extremity of the shri...

  3. Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools

    CERN Document Server

    Torri, Giuseppe; Tian, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are fundamental ingredients of deep convection. They contribute to organizing the sub-cloud layer and are considered key elements in triggering convective cells. It was long known that this could happen mechanically, through lifting by the cold pools' fronts. More recently, it has been suggested that convection could also be triggered thermodynamically, by accumulation of moisture around the edges of cold pools. A method based on Lagrangian tracking is here proposed to disentangle the signatures of both forcings and quantify their importance in a given environment. Results from a simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean show that parcels reach their level of free convection through a combination of both forcings, each being dominant at different stages of the ascent. Mechanical forcing is an important player in lifting parcels from the surface, whereas thermodynamic forcing reduces the inhibition encountered by parcels before they reach their level of free convection.

  4. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  5. COLD-PCR: Applications and Advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zhuang; Jabbar, Kausar J

    2016-01-01

    Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-based polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a single-step amplification method that results in the enhancement of both known and unknown minority alleles during PCR, irrespective of mutation type and position. This method is based on exploitation of the critical temperature, Tc, at which mutation-containing DNA is preferentially melted over wild type. COLD-PCR can be a good strategy for mutation detection in specimens with high nonneoplastic cell content, small specimens in which neoplastic cells are difficult to micro-dissect and therefore enrich, and whenever a mutation is suspected to be present but is undetectable using conventional PCR and sequencing methods. We describe in this chapter our COLD-PCR-based pyrosequencing method for KRAS mutation detection in various clinical samples using DNA extracted from either fresh or fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  6. Shocks and cold fronts in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Markevitch, M L; Markevitch, Maxim; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    The currently operating X-ray imaging observatories provide us with an exquisitely detailed view of the Megaparsec-scale plasma atmospheres in nearby galaxy clusters. At z < 0.05, the Chandra's 1" angular resolution corresponds to linear resolution of less than a kiloparsec, which is smaller than some interesting linear scales in the intracluster plasma. This enables us to study the previously unseen hydrodynamic phenomena in clusters: classic bow shocks driven by the infalling subclusters, and the unanticipated "cold fronts," or sharp contact discontinuities between regions of gas with different entropies. The ubiquitous cold fronts are found in mergers as well as around the central density peaks in "relaxed" clusters. They are caused by motion of cool, dense gas clouds in the ambient higher-entropy gas. These clouds are either remnants of the infalling subclusters, or the displaced gas from the cluster's own cool cores. Both shock fronts and cold fronts provide novel tools to study the intracluster plasm...

  7. Yugoslav dissidents and the cold war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Mira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the cold war, Eastern Europe dissidents played a high-profile role as an instrument of anti-communist ideological subversion. In contrast, Yugoslav dissidents were relegated to a marginal status due to the extraordinary position of Yugoslavia between two opposing blocs. The expected explosive impact on the Soviet satellites of Yugoslavia's defection from the Soviet orbit in 1948, also turned Tito into an internationally famous dissident. After Tito turned his back on the Soviet Union, Yugoslav dissidents were practically of no interest to Western policy makers. They did not wish to antagonize Tito, because he was much more useful than a handful of dissidents who potentially could interfere with his role in the cold war game. The paper focuses on the functions of dissidents in the cold war rather than their self-image, their noble and sincere motives notwithstanding.

  8. Sympathetic cooling of nanospheres with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ground state cooling of mesoscopic mechanical structures could enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. Such systems could provide coupling between photons, spins and charges via phonons. It has recently been shown theoretically that optically trapped dielectric nanospheres could reach the ground state via sympathetic cooling with trapped cold atoms. This technique can be beneficial in cases where cryogenic operation of the oscillator is not practical. We describe experimental advances towards coupling an optically levitated dielectric nanosphere to a gas of cold Rubidium atoms. The sphere and the cold atoms are in separate vacuum chambers and are coupled using a one-dimensional optical lattice. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant Nos. PHY-1205994,PHY-1506431.

  9. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-11-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 239/Np and /sup 240/Pu are /sup 100/Zr, /sup 104/Mo, /sup 106/Mo and /sup 106/Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for /sup 234/U - the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  10. The quality of cold smoked salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løje, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this Ph. D. thesis was to study the liquid holding capacity/liquid loss of raw and smoked salmonids as affected by raw material and chill storage of the cold smoked product. The liquid holding capacity is an important quality parameter for cold smoked salmon. This study has shown...... the water fraction remained at a constant level. The decrease in the liquid holding capacity during chill storage of the smoked product was related to changes in the water distribution. Three water pools were found in raw and smoked salmon samples. An exchange of water from pool II to pool I was seen during...... that the liquid holding capacity in raw and cold smoked salmon is influenced by several factors. The size of the fish affected the liquid holding capacity as large fish had lower liquid holding capacity than smaller fish. The salt content influenced the liquid holding capacity in smoked fish as it was found...

  11. [Technical problems associated with the cold chain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, A

    2001-01-01

    After having covered the current status of the cold chain in France, the author highlights the economic impact of refrigerated storage and processing involving refrigeration. Lose reduction is such that the return on investments is estimated as being roughly 3 years. In years to come, progress will be achieved in the field of plant design. Some information on design trends is provided. Operators in general, and carriers in particular, are faced with an increasingly complex regulatory framework leading to a competition imbalance. The current cold chain developmental trend is characterized by complex computer management of logistics: the flow of goods is modulated in order to meet the production to the distribution needs as cost effectively as possible. This logistic strategy enables management of downstream to upstream interfaces involving various operators. Finally, the author indicates the main causes of non-compliance with the cold chain, generally at retail and consumer levels.

  12. Event Filter Dataflow Software

    CERN Document Server

    Meessen, C; Bosman, M; Karr, K M; Pacheco, A; Qian, Z; Touchard, F

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the software handling the flow of events through the Event Filter. This is the fourth iteration of the implementation of the code. When compared to previous versions, enhancements come from the feedback by users and can be seen as simplifications while the interfaces have been kept identical. The high level design of the dataflow is briefly reminded. Then, the details of the implementation of the components are given.

  13. Gargamelle: neutral current event

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This event shows real tracks of particles from the 1200 litre Gargamelle bubble chamber that ran on the PS from 1970 to 1976 and on the SPS from 1976 to 1979. In this image a neutrino passes close to a nucleon and reemerges as a neutrino. Such events are called neutral curent, as they are mediated by the Z0 boson which has no electric charge.

  14. CHED Events: New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-03-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Spring 2008 ACS Meeting in New Orleans. Most will take place in the Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras Street; this includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet. Exceptions are the Sunday evening Poster Session and the Undergraduate Poster Sessions, which will be in Hall A of the Morial Convention Center.

  15. A novel behavioral assay for measuring cold sensation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Brenner

    Full Text Available Behavioral models of cold responses are important tools for exploring the molecular mechanisms of cold sensation. To complement the currently cold behavioral assays and allow further studies of these mechanisms, we have developed a new technique to measure the cold response threshold, the cold plantar assay. In this assay, animals are acclimated on a glass plate and a cold stimulus is applied to the hindpaw through the glass using a pellet of compressed dry ice. The latency to withdrawal from the cooled glass is used as a measure of the cold response threshold of the rodents, and the dry ice pellet provides a ramping cold stimulus on the glass that allows the correlation of withdrawal latency values to rough estimates of the cold response threshold temperature. The assay is highly sensitive to manipulations including morphine-induced analgesia, Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced inflammatory allodynia, and Spinal Nerve Ligation-induced neuropathic allodynia.

  16. [Cold-induced urticaria and angioedema. Classification, diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, K; Degener, F; Altrichter, S; Ardelean, E; Kalogeromitros, D; Magerl, M; Metz, M; Siebenhaar, F; Weller, K; Maurer, M

    2010-09-01

    The onset of wheals and/or angioedema following the exposure to cold may be associated with a number of different diseases. Most frequently this occurs in cold contact urticaria, a type of physical urticaria, which is characterized by a positive cold stimulation test. The clinical symptoms are based on cold-dependent mast cell activation with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators. In cases of negative or atypical reaction to cold stimulation testing rare acquired atypical or familiar cold urticaria forms may be suspected. Strict avoidance of cold should be recommended as far as possible. As the underlying causes of cold contact urticaria are widely unknown, the symptomatic use of non-sedating antihistamines is the treatment of first choice. The very rare familiar cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is based on CIAS1/NLRP3 mutations and may be treated effectively by neutralization of pathogenic interleukin 1beta.

  17. Detecting Priming News Events

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Di; Yu, Jeffrey Xu; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    We study a problem of detecting priming events based on a time series index and an evolving document stream. We define a priming event as an event which triggers abnormal movements of the time series index, i.e., the Iraq war with respect to the president approval index of President Bush. Existing solutions either focus on organizing coherent keywords from a document stream into events or identifying correlated movements between keyword frequency trajectories and the time series index. In this paper, we tackle the problem in two major steps. (1) We identify the elements that form a priming event. The element identified is called influential topic which consists of a set of coherent keywords. And we extract them by looking at the correlation between keyword trajectories and the interested time series index at a global level. (2) We extract priming events by detecting and organizing the bursty influential topics at a micro level. We evaluate our algorithms on a real-world dataset and the result confirms that ou...

  18. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined.

  19. Stationary Light Pulses in Cold Atomic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Wen-Te; Peters, Thorsten; Chou, Hung-Chih; Wang, Jian-Siung; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Yu, Ite A

    2008-01-01

    Stationary light pulses (SLPs), i.e., light pulses without motion, are formed via the retrieval of stored probe pulses with two counter-propagating coupling fields. We show that there exist non-negligible hybrid Raman excitations in media of cold atoms that prohibit the SLP formation. We experimentally demonstrate a method to suppress these Raman excitations and realize SLPs in laser-cooled atoms. Our work opens the way to SLP studies in cold as well as in stationary atoms and provides a new avenue to low-light-level nonlinear optics.

  20. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the cause of science and technology progress of mankind to contribute

  1. Application of Heat Pipes in Cold Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Masataka

    Recently, there has been put into practical use of heat pipes as space application, electronics cooling, and waste heat recovery. Especially, the low temperature heat pipe which can be used in below atmospheric temperature are also actively developed and applied in terrestrial field. These are based on utilization of natural energy in cold region. This paper is described about application of snow melting and deicing system on a road and roof, snow damage prevention system for electric pole branch wire, artificial permafrost storage system as a reverse utilization of cold atmosphere, and cryo-anchor applied in Alaska and northern Canada.

  2. Energy Wastage Estimation of a Cold Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. N. Mukhopadhyay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption of a cold storage was measured for different storage temperatures. Suction temperature and pressure temperature of the compressor and working time of the compressor were determined to reach evaporator setup temperatures. An axial fan located back of the evaporator was used to distribute the cooled air into the cold store. An electrical heater was used to defrost. The compressor suction temperature of ammonia vapour variedbetween273K–271Kand 305K–308K respectively. Compressor suction pressure(p1=3.5 Kg/cm 2 and discharge pressure (p2=10.5Kg/cm 2

  3. Cold Flow Properties of Fatty Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kleinová

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cold fl ow properties of neat esters of branched chain alcohols with fatty acids and blends of these esters with fossil diesel fuel. According to the determined CFPP values, the influence of alcohol branching on the fuel filterability is negligible and was detected only in the case of 2-ethyl hexanol. Fossil fuel blending with fatty esters up to 10 % vol. does not substantially change the cold flow properties of fossil fuel. DSC cooling scan parameters should be employed to predict CFPP of blended diesel fuel.

  4. Imaging Cold Molecules on a Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Marx, S; Abel, M J; Zehentbauer, T; Meijer, G; Santambrogio, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the integrated imaging of cold molecules in a microchip environment. The on-chip de- tection is based on REMPI, which is quantum-state-selective and generally applicable. We demon- strate and characterize time-resolved spatial imaging and subsequently use it to analyze the effect of a phase-space manipulation sequence aimed at compressing the velocity distribution of a molec- ular ensemble with a view to future high-resolution spectroscopic studies. The realization of such on-chip measurements adds the final fundamental component to the molecule chip, offering a new and promising route for investigating cold molecules.

  5. Mechanism of sand slide - cold lahar induced by extreme rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masumi; Dok, Atitkagna

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing frequencies of extreme rainfall events in almost every where on the earth, shallow slide - debris flow, i.e. cold lahars running long distance often occurs and claims downslope residents lives. In the midnight of 15 October 2013, Typhoon Wilpha attacked the Izu-Oshima, a active volcanic Island and the extreme rainfall of more than 800 mm / 24 hours was recorded. This downpour of more than 80 mm/hr lasted 4 hours at its peak and caused a number of cold lahars. The initial stage of those lahars was shallow slides of surface black volcanic ash deposits, containing mostly fine sands. The thickness was only 50 cm - 1 m. In the reconnaissance investigation, author found that the sliding surface was the boundary of two separate volcanic ash layers between the black and yellow colored and apparently showing contrast of permeability and hardness. Permeability contrast may have contributed to generation of excess pore pressure on the border and trigger the slide. Then, the unconsolidated, unpacked mass was easily fluidized and transformed into mud flows, that which volcanologists call cold lahars. Seismometers installed for monitoring the active volcano's activities, succeeded to detect many tremors events. Many are spikes but 5 larger and longer events were extracted. They lasted 2 -3 minutes and if we assume that this tremors reflects the runout movement, then we can calculate the mean velocity of the lahars. Estimated velocity was 45 - 60 km/h, which is much higher than the average speed 30 - 40 km/h of debris flows observed in Japan. Flume tests of volcanic ash flows by the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute showed the wet volcanic ash can run at higher speed than other materials. The two tremor records were compare d with the local residents witnessed and confirmed by newspaper reported that the reach of the lahar was observed at the exact time when tremor ends. We took the black volcanic ash and conducted ring shear tests to

  6. Concepts of event-by-event analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroebele, H. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-07-15

    The particles observed in the final state of nuclear collisions can be divided into two classes: those which are susceptible to strong interactions and those which are not, like leptons and the photon. The bulk properties of the {open_quotes}matter{close_quotes} in the reaction zone may be read-off the kinematical characteristics of the particles observable in the final state. These characteristics are strongly dependent on the last interaction these particles have undergone. In a densly populated reaction zone strongly interacting particles will experience many collisions after they have been formed and before they emerge into the asymptotic final state. For the particles which are not sensitive to strong interactions their formation is also their last interaction. Thus photons and leptons probe the period during which they are produced whereas hadrons reflect the so called freeze-out processes, which occur during the late stage in the evolution of the reaction when the population density becomes small and the mean free paths long. The disadvantage of the leptons and photons is their small production cross section; they cannot be used in an analysis of the characteristics of individual collision events, because the number of particles produced per event is too small. The hadrons, on the other hand, stem from the freeze-out period. Information from earlier periods requires multiparticle observables in the most general sense. It is one of the challenges of present day high energy nuclear physics to establish and understand global observables which differentiate between mere hadronic scenarios, i.e superposition of hadronic interactions, and the formation of a partonic (short duration) steady state which can be considered a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  7. Anoxic stress and rapid cold hardening enhance cold tolerance of the migratory locust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Hanying; Kang, Le

    2014-10-01

    Anoxia and rapid cold hardening (RCH) can increase the cold tolerance of many animals. However, mechanisms underlying these two kinds of stresses remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship of acclimation to cold stress with acclimation to anoxic stress in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. RCH at 0°C for 3h promoted the survival of cold stress-exposed locusts. Anoxic hypercapnia (CO2 anoxic treatment) for 40 min exerted an effect similar to that of RCH. Anoxic hypercapnia within 1h can all promote the cold hardiness of locusts. We investigated the transcript levels of six heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, namely, Hsp20.5, Hsp20.6, Hsp20.7, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90. Four genes, namely, Hsp90, Hsp40, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7, showed differential responses to RCH and anoxic hypercapnia treatments. Under cold stress, locusts exposed to the two regimens showed different responses for Hsp90, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7. However, the varied responses disappeared after recovery from cold stress. Compared with the control group, the transcript levels of six Hsp genes were generally downregulated in locusts subjected to anoxic hypercapnia or/and RCH. These results indicate that anoxic stress and RCH have different mechanisms of regulating the transcription of Hsp family members even if the two treatments exerted similar effects on cold tolerance of the migratory locust. However, Hsps may not play a major role in the promotion of cold hardiness by the two treatments.

  8. Sterile Neutrinos in Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Benjamin J.P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of neutrino oscillations at short baselines contain an intriguing set of experimental anomalies that may be suggestive of new physics such as the existence of sterile neutrinos. This three-part thesis presents research directed towards understanding these anomalies and searching for sterile neutrino oscillations. Part I contains a theoretical discussion of neutrino coherence properties. The open-quantum-system picture of neutrino beams, which allows a rigorous prediction of coherence distances for accelerator neutrinos, is presented. Validity of the standard treatment of active and sterile neutrino oscillations at short baselines is verified, and non-standard coherence loss effects at longer baselines are predicted. Part II concerns liquid argon detector development for the MicroBooNE experiment, which will search for short-baseline oscillations in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. Topics include characterization and installation of the MicroBooNE optical system; test-stand measurements of liquid argon optical properties with dissolved impurities; optimization of wavelength-shifting coatings for liquid argon scintillation light detection; testing and deployment of high-voltage surge arrestors to protect TPC field cages; and software development for optical and TPC simulation and reconstruction. Part III presents a search for sterile neutrinos using the IceCube neutrino telescope, which has collected a large sample of atmospheric-neutrino-induced events in the 1-10 TeV energy range. Sterile neutrinos would modify the detected neutrino flux shape via MSW-resonant oscillations. Following a careful treatment of systematic uncertainties in the sample, no evidence for MSW-resonant oscillations is observed, and exclusion limits on 3+1 model parameter space are derived. Under the mixing assumptions made, the 90% confidence level exclusion limit extends to sin224 ≤ 0.02 at m2 ~ 0.3 eV2, and the LSND and Mini

  9. The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme: Ongoing activities and selected key tasks for the coming years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Decaulne, Armelle

    2012-09-01

    Projected climate change in cold environments is expected to alter melt-season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. In addition, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. The combined effects of these changes will alter surface environments in cold climate regions and change the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of data, coordinated process monitoring and coordinated quantitative analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment are acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists (I.A.G./A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme has been formed to address this key knowledge gap and builds on the earlier European Science Foundation (ESF) SEDIFLUX (Sedimentary Source-to-Sink-Fluxes in Cold Environments) Network. Coordinated efforts are carried out to monitor, quantify, compare and model sedimentary fluxes and possible effects of predicted climate change in currently 44 selected SEDIBUD Key Test Sites (cold climate environment catchments) worldwide.

  10. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four

  11. Arctic Cold Weather Medicine and Accidental Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    ZIP Code) Tb . ADDRESS (City. State, and ZIP Code) Panama City, Ft 32407-5001 8a. NDJE OF FUNDING/SPONSORING 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT...patient not being that cold. h. Abdomen/ Urogenital . With the intense shivering and increased muscle tone of mild hypothermia, it is very difficult to

  12. Could spectator electrons legalize cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, L. (Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-12-01

    In this paper the possibility of spectator electrons driving cold d-d fusion in condensed matter to an observation threshold is considered, along with the consequences on the branching ratio of the exit channels. The intrinsic dominance of the t-p channel due to the increased phase space is demonstrated.

  13. Educational Exchange as a Cold War Weapon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Bo

    2014-01-01

    American President Harry S. Truman called the Cold War a "struggle for the minds of men," and assigned journalists an important role in the conflict. This study finds that the U.S. Depeartment of State, via the American Embassy in Copenhagen, consciously attempted to shape Danish journalits' view...

  14. A Steampunk History of the Cold War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    JEFFREY LEWIS

    2013-01-01

    ... embarking on a massive arms buildup. His model implies an alternate history of the Cold War that could not be stranger if it were steampunk. Sechser and Fuhrmann, for example, wonder about Kroenig's data set, which suggests U.S. nuclear superiority enabled the United States to ferry 545 Belgian paratroopers into Congo over Soviet objections in 1964. I, too...

  15. Flange Curling in Cold Formed Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Ramonas, Gediminas

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear flange curling phenomenon in cold formed profiles is the tendency of slender flanges to deform towards the neutral axis for increasing flexural curvature. Based on Braziers work, Winter proposed a simple engineering formula for determination of the local flange deformation towards...

  16. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four hund

  17. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  18. Confronting Common Folklore: Catching a Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    Almost every child has experienced the sniffly, stuffy, and achy congestion of the common cold. In addition, many have encountered the "old wives tales" that forge a link between personal actions and coming down with this common respiratory infection. Much of this health folklore has been passed down from generation to generation (e.g., getting a…

  19. Use of cold plasma in food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Application of cold plasma has been reported in agriculture, food, and bioscience literature as an effective, non-chemical, gas-phase disinfection agent that can be applied at moderate temperatures. The unusual thermodynamic properties of these gases are discussed with focus on nitrogen-based

  20. Commissioning of laser assisted cold spraying technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the potential of a newly designed, assembled and commissioned laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) technology at the National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa, to deposit Al-12wt%Si coatings on stainless steel substrate...