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Sample records for dryas boundary sediments

  1. Origin and provenance of spherules and magnetic grains at the Younger Dryas boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingzhe; Sharma, Mukul; LeCompte, Malcolm A.; Demitroff, Mark N.; Landis, Joshua D.

    2013-09-01

    One or more bolide impacts are hypothesized to have triggered the Younger Dryas cooling at ∼12.9 ka. In support of this hypothesis, varying peak abundances of magnetic grains with iridium and magnetic microspherules have been reported at the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB). We show that bulk sediment and/or magnetic grains/microspherules collected from the YDB sites in Arizona, Michigan, New Mexico, New Jersey, and Ohio have 187Os/188Os ratios ≥1.0, similar to average upper continental crust (= 1.3), indicating a terrestrial origin of osmium (Os) in these samples. In contrast, bulk sediments from YDB sites in Belgium and Pennsylvania exhibit 187Os/188Os ratios meteoritic contribution. The YDB site in Pennsylvania is remarkable in yielding 2- to 5-mm diameter spherules containing minerals such as suessite (Fe-Ni silicide) that form at temperatures in excess of 2000 °C. Gross texture, mineralogy, and age of the spherules appear consistent with their formation as ejecta from an impact 12.9 ka ago. The 187Os/188Os ratios of the spherules and their leachates are often low, but Os in these objects is likely terrestrially derived. The rare earth element patterns and Sr and Nd isotopes of the spherules indicate that their source lies in 1.5-Ga Quebecia terrain in the Grenville Province of northeastern North America.

  2. Search for Extraterrestrial Osmium at the Allerod - Younger Dryas Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, C.; Sharma, M.; Kasse, K.; Bohncke, S.

    2008-12-01

    Ir and Os are excellent markers of extraterrestrial impact events, due to their high abundance in ET objects (Alvarez et al., 1980 Science; Turekian, 1982 Geol. Bull. Am. Spec. Pap.). Os has the advantage over Ir, in that the 187Os/188Os ratio also greatly differs between meteorites and upper continental crust (UCC). The combination of [Os] and 187Os/188Os analyses would be superior in detecting any ET contribution. Firestone et al (2007 PNAS) attributed a widespread 12.9 ka Ir containing black carbon layer to a potential extraterrestrial impact at the Allerød-Younger Dryas (A-YD) boundary. In order to test this inference, we measured [Os] and 187Os/188Os on a radiocarbon dated A-YD record (13.210 to 12.788 cal years BP) from the Netherlands. This location is close to Lommel, a Belgian site studied by Firestone et al.(2007). The organic-rich sequence was sampled continuously over a 12 cm interval at 2 cm resolution (~70 years). About 10 g samples were freeze-dried, ground and homogenized in a zirconia ball-mill. The samples mixed with 190Os tracer solutions were dissolved in carius tubes and Os extracted in liquid bromine. Os was further purified using micro-distillation. Os isotopes were measured using N-TIMS on Dartmouth Triton. The procedural blank was 7 fg/g Os with an isotopic composition of 0.41±0.01 The Allerød samples have an order of magnitude higher abundance than UCC (200 vs. 30 pg/g), but similar 187Os/188Os ratios, >1.1. The sample at the base of the YD (12.893±75 cal years BP) contains a similar amount of Os, but has a distinctly lower isotopic signature, 0.53±0.002. The high [Os] in the A-YD section possibly reflects enrichment by preferential partitioning into organic matter. The Os isotope composition of 0.53, sandwiched between values >1.1, implies contribution of a significant amount of non-radiogenic Os. Since the pollen spectra show no reworking, the non-radiogenic Os could only have been delivered as a discrete pulse at 12.893 cal yr BP

  3. Wildfire and abrupt ecosystem disruption on California's Northern Channel Islands at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (13.0-12.9 ka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, D. J.; Kennett, J. P.; West, G. J.; Erlandson, J. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Hendy, I. L.; West, A.; Culleton, B. J.; Jones, T. L.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary records from California's Northern Channel Islands and the adjacent Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) indicate intense regional biomass burning (wildfire) at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (˜13.0-12.9 ka) (All age ranges in this paper are expressed in thousands of calendar years before present [ka]. Radiocarbon ages will be identified and clearly marked " 14C years".). Multiproxy records in SBB Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 893 indicate that these wildfires coincided with the onset of regional cooling and an abrupt vegetational shift from closed montane forest to more open habitats. Abrupt ecosystem disruption is evident on the Northern Channel Islands at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary with the onset of biomass burning and resulting mass sediment wasting of the landscape. These wildfires coincide with the extinction of Mammuthus exilis [pygmy mammoth]. The earliest evidence for human presence on these islands at 13.1-12.9 ka (˜11,000-10,900 14C years) is followed by an apparent 600-800 year gap in the archaeological record, which is followed by indications of a larger-scale colonization after 12.2 ka. Although a number of processes could have contributed to a post 18 ka decline in M. exilis populations (e.g., reduction of habitat due to sea-level rise and human exploitation of limited insular populations), we argue that the ultimate demise of M. exilis was more likely a result of continental scale ecosystem disruption that registered across North America at the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling episode, contemporaneous with the extinction of other megafaunal taxa. Evidence for ecosystem disruption at 13-12.9 ka on these offshore islands is consistent with the Younger Dryas boundary cosmic impact hypothesis [Firestone, R.B., West, A., Kennett, J.P., Becker, L., Bunch, T.E., Revay, Z.S., Schultz, P.H., Belgya, T., Kennett, D.J., Erlandson, J.M., Dickenson, O.J., Goodyear, A.A., Harris, R.S., Howard, G.A., Kloosterman, J.B., Lechler, P

  4. Bayesian chronological analyses consistent with synchronous age of 12,835-12,735 Cal BP for Younger Dryas boundary on four continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennett, James P.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Culleton, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis posits that a cosmic impact across much of the Northern Hemisphere deposited the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) layer, containing peak abundances in a variable assemblage of proxies, including magnetic and glassy impact-related spherules, high-temperature mineral...

  5. Field-Analytical approach of land-sea records for elucidating the Younger Dryas Boundary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, T.; Courty, M. M.; Guichard, F.

    2009-12-01

    Linking lonsdaleite crystals, carbon spherules and diamond polymorphs from the North American dark layers at 12.9 cal yr B.P. to a cosmic event has questioned the nature and timing of the related impact processes. A global signal should trace the invoked airshocks and/or surface impacts from a swarm of comets or carbonaceous chondrites. Here we report on the contextual analytical study of debris fall events from three reference sequences of the Younger Dyras period (11-13 ka cal BP) : (1) sand dune fields along the French Atlantic coast at the Audenge site; (2) A 10 m record of detrital/bioorganic accumulation in the southern basin of the Caspian Sea with regular sedimentation rate (0.1 to 3 mm per year) from 14 to 2-ka BP cal; (3) the Paijan sequence (Peruvian coastal desert) offering fossiliferous fluvial layers with the last large mammals and aquatic fauna at 13 ka BP sealed by abiotic sand dunes. The three sequences display one remarkable layer of exogenous air-transported microdebris that is part of a complex time series of recurrent fine dust/wildfire events. The sharp debris-rich microfacies and its association to ashes derived from calcination of the local vegetation suggest instantaneous deposition synchronous to a high intensity wildfire. The debris assemblage comprises microtektite-like glassy spherules, partly devitrified glass shards, unmelted to partly melted sedimentary and igneous clasts, terrestrial native metals, and carbonaceous components. The later occur as grape-clustered polymers, vitrified graphitic carbon, amorphous carbon spherules with a honeycomb pattern, and green carbon fibres with recrystallized quartz and metal blebs. Evidence for high temperature formation from a heterogeneous melt with solid debris and volatile components derived from carbonaceous precursors supports an impact origin from an ejecta plume. The association of debris deposition to total firing would trace a high energy airburst with surface effects of the fireball. In

  6. Nanodiamonds and wildfire evidence in the Usselo horizon postdate the Allerød-Younger Dryas boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoesel, Annelies; Hoek, Wim Z.; Braadbaart, Freek; Van Der Plicht, Johannes; Pennock, Gillian M.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2012-01-01

    The controversial Younger Dryas impact hypothesis suggests that at the onset of the Younger Dryas an extraterrestrial impact over North America caused a global catastrophe. The main evidence for this impact - after the other markers proved to be neither reproducible nor consistent with an impact - i

  7. Younger Dryas and Holocene oceanography of the western Labrador Sea region based on foraminifera and sediment proxies from Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Christina; Pearce, Christof; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Kuijpers, Antoon; Reynisson, Njáll F.; Zilmer Christensen, Eva; Juncker Hansen, Mette

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and geochemical analyses from three marine sediment cores from Placentia Bay on the southwest coast of Newfoundland captured the evolving surface and subsurface environment of the eastern Labrador Sea during the late glacial and Holocene. The area, which is today located in the boundary zone between the Arctic Labrador current and the warm Gulf Stream in the eastern margin of the Labrador Sea was during the early part of the Younger Dryas (13.0-12.3 cal. kyr BP) dominated by cold, Arctic conditions and heavy sea-ice cover linked to a strong Polar Water component of the Inner Labrador Current. In the later part of the Younger Dryas (12.3-11.5 kyr BP) the influence of the Labrador Current (LC) became less pronounced resulting in more unstable conditions with varying sea-ice cover and increased influence of Gulf Stream water, presumably linked to an increased strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The earliest Holocene (11.5-10.4 kyr BP) saw slightly warmer subsurface conditions in Placentia Bay and increased productivity, presumably caused by a decreased southward transport of Polar Water via the LC. The onset of a strong AMOC caused the northward movement of the frontal zone between the Subpolar Gyre and the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre in the western North Atlantic region to closer proximity to the southern coast of Newfoundland compared to previously. From ca. 10.4-9.65 kyr BP increased bottom-current speeds and the presence of species often found in connection to oceanic fronts, suggest a further strengthening of the AMOC causing inflow of Atlantic-source water into Placentia Bay. This tendency was further strengthened at 9.65-7.3 kyr BP, which saw a relatively strong inflow of Atlantic-source Gulf Stream water into Placentia Bay, evidenced by high frequencies of Cassidulina neoteretis. This inflow of Atlantic was however temporarily halted around 8.2 kyr BP, when a short-lived, extreme peak in

  8. Youger Dryas and Heinrich events recorded by magnetic susceptibility of sediments from the central temperature area of Western Pacific Warm Pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Three short geomagnetic excursions, the Go thenburg, Mono Lake and Mungo (or Maelifell) in the Brunhes Positive Polarity period, were revealed based on the studies of magnetostratigraphy, susceptibility (x) and δ18O of sediments in core WP 92-5 from the central temperature area of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), and the ages of them are 12.1-11.3 kaBP, 25.0-24.0 kaBP, and 31.0-28.0 kaBP respectively. Furthermore, the Younger Dryas (YD) and Heinrich (H) cold events were also discov-ered in this core by the susceptibility record. The YD cold event occurred at the depth of 30-22 cm with an age of 11.5-10.6 kaBP; H1, H2 and H3 cold events occurred at depths of 51-39 cm, 108-91 cm and 140-126 cm with ages of 15.1-13.0 kaBP, 25.0-22.1 kaBP and 30.6-28.2 kaBP respectively, which well correspond to the H1, H2, H3 events recorded by susceptibility of core SU90-09 from middle At-lantic, indicating that the susceptibility change of marine sediments can be an important sign of climatic frequent fluc- tuations.

  9. Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

    2010-02-27

    We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are

  10. Differential proxy responses to late Allerød and early Younger Dryas climatic change recorded in varved sediments of the Trzechowskie palaeolake in Northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowiński, Michał; Zawiska, Izabela; Ott, Florian; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Plessen, Birgit; Apolinarska, Karina; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Michczyńska, Danuta J.; Wulf, Sabine; Skubała, Piotr; Kordowski, Jarosław; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution biological proxies (pollen, macrofossils, Cladocera and diatoms), geochemical data (μ-XRF element scans, TOC, C/N ratios, δ18Ocarb and δ13Corg values) and a robust chronology based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating and tephrochronology were applied to reconstruct lake system responses to rapid climatic and environmental changes of the Trzechowskie palaeolake (TRZ; Northern Poland) during the late Allerød - Younger Dryas (YD) transition. Palaeoecological and geochemical data at 5-15 years temporal resolution allowed tracing the dynamics of short-term shifts of the ecosystem triggered by abrupt climate change. The robust age control together with the high-resolution sampling allowed the detection of leads and lags between different proxies to the climate shift at the Allerød-Younger Dryas transition. Our results indicate (1) a water level decrease and an increase in wind activities during the late Allerød and the Allerød-YD transition, which caused intensified erosion in the catchment, (2) a two-decades delayed vegetation response in comparison to the lake depositional system. Comparison with the Lake Meerfelder Maar record revealed slightly different vegetation responses of the Trzechowskie palaeolake at the YD onset.

  11. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    suspended sediment concentrations, (2) turbulence suppression due to density gradients in the water–sand mixture, (3) boundary layer streaming due to convective terms, and (4) converging–diverging effects due to a sloping bed. The present model therefore provides a framework for simultaneous inclusion...... of a number of local factors important within cross-shore wave boundary layer and sediment transport dynamics. The hydrodynamic model is validated for both hydraulically smooth and rough conditions, based on wave friction factor diagrams and boundary layer streaming profiles, with the results in excellent...... to investigate the importance of boundary layer streaming effects on sediment transport in selected velocity-skewed conditions. For the medium sand grain conditions considered, the model results suggest that streaming effects can enhance onshore sediment transport rates by asmuch as a factor of two...

  12. An instrument system for monitoring and sampling suspended sediment in the benthic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, R.W.; Johnson, R.V.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument system has been constructed that can monitor and sample suspended sediment distributions in the benthic boundary layer. It consists of miniature nephelometers and suspended sediment samplers placed within one meter of the seabed. The system is capable of continuously monitoring suspended sediment profiles at eight levels between 14 and 100 cm above the seabed and collecting suspended sediment samples at four levels (20, 50, 70 and 100 cm) at three times during a deployment period. The suspended sediment system is designed to fit onto the instrumented tripod GEOPROBE which contains four electromagnetic current meters, pressure sensor, bottom stereo camera, two temperature sensors, transmissometer, and a Savonius rotor current meter. Sensor operation, data recording, and sediment sampling events are synchronized. Thus detailed measurements of the near-bottom flow conditions are made concurrently with suspended sediment measurements. The combined system has been used in sediment transporting environments within San Francisco Bay, California, and Puget Sound, Washington. ?? 1986.

  13. Enhanced sea-ice export from the Arctic during the Younger Dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not, Christelle; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2012-01-31

    The Younger Dryas cold spell of the last deglaciation and related slowing of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation have been linked to a large array of processes, notably an influx of fresh water into the North Atlantic related to partial drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz. Here we observe a major drainage event, in marine sediment cores raised from the Lomonosov Ridge, in the central Arctic Ocean marked by a pulse in detrital dolomitic-limestones. This points to an Arctic-Canadian sediment source area with about fivefold higher Younger Dryas ice-rafting deposition rate, in comparison with the Holocene. Our findings thus support the hypothesis of a glacial drainage event in the Canadian Arctic area, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, enhancing sea-ice production and drifting through the Arctic, then export through Fram Strait, towards Atlantic meridional overturning circulation sites of the northern North Atlantic.

  14. The Diffusive Boundary-Layer of Sediments - Oxygen Microgradients Over a Microbial Mat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; MARAIS, DJD

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen microelectrodes were used to analyze the distribution of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) at the sedimen-water interface in relation to surface topography and flow velocity. The sediment, collected from saline ponds, was covered by a microbial mat that had high oxygen consumption rate...... the mat). The oxygen uptake rate concurrently increased from 3.9 to 9.4 nmol cm-2 min-1. The effects of surface roughness and topography on the thickness and distribution of the DBL were studied by three-dimensional mapping of the sediment-water interface and the upper DBL boundary at 0.1-mm spatial...... resolution. The DBL boundary followed mat structures that had characteristic dimensions > 1/2 DBL thickness but the DBL had a dampened relief relative to the mat. The effective surface area of the sediment-water interface and of the upper DBL boundary were 31 and 14% larger, respectively, than a flat plane...

  15. The platinum group metals in Younger Dryas Horizons are terrestrial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Wikes, E.; Kennett, J.; West, A.; Sharma, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) event, which began 12,900 years ago, was a period of abrupt and rapid cooling in the Northern Hemisphere whose primary cause remains unclear. The prevalent postulated mechanism is a temporary shutdown of the thermohaline circulation following the breakup of an ice dam in North America. Firestone et al. (2007) proposed that the cooling was triggered by multiple cometary airbursts and/or impacts that engendered enormous environmental changes and disrupted the thermohaline circulation. The evidence in support for this hypothesis is a black layer in North America and in Europe marking the YD boundary containing charcoal, soot, carbon spherules and glass-like carbon suggesting extensive and intense forest fires. This layer is also enriched in magnetic grains high in iridium, magnetic microspherules, fullerenes containing extraterrestrial He-3, and nanodiamonds. Whereas the nanodiamonds could be produced in an impact or arrive with the impactor, the cometary burst/impact hypothesis remains highly controversial as the YD horizon lacks important impact markers such as craters, breccias, tektites and shocked minerals. Firestone et al. (2007) contend that bulk of Ir found at the YD boundary is associated with magnetic grains. The key issue is whether this Ir is meteorite derived. We used Ir and Os concentrations and Os isotopes to investigate the provenance of the platinum group metals in the YD horizon. The bulk sediment samples from a number of North American YD sites (Blackwater Draw, Murray Springs, Gainey, Sheriden Cave, and Myrtle Beach) and a site in Europe (Lommel) do not show any traces of meteorite derived Os and Ir. The [Os] = 2 to 45 pg/g in these sediments and the 187Os/188Os ratios are similar to the upper continental crustal values (~1.3), much higher than those in meteorites (0.13). Higher [Os] is observed in Blackwater Draw (= 194 pg/g). However, the Os/Ir ratio in Blackwater Draw is 5 (not 1 as expected for a meteorite) and 187Os/188

  16. Quantifying trace element and isotope fluxes at the ocean-sediment boundary: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homoky, William B.; Weber, Thomas; Berelson, William M.; Conway, Tim M.; Henderson, Gideon M.; van Hulten, Marco; Jeandel, Catherine; Severmann, Silke; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    Quantifying fluxes of trace elements and their isotopes (TEIs) at the ocean's sediment-water boundary is a pre-eminent challenge to understand their role in the present, past and future ocean. There are multiple processes that drive the uptake and release of TEIs, and properties that determine their rates are unevenly distributed (e.g. sediment composition, redox conditions and (bio)physical dynamics). These factors complicate our efforts to find, measure and extrapolate TEI fluxes across ocean basins. GEOTRACES observations are unveiling the oceanic distributions of many TEIs for the first time. These data evidence the influence of the sediment-water boundary on many TEI cycles, and underline the fact that our knowledge of the source-sink fluxes that sustain oceanic distributions is largely missing. Present flux measurements provide low spatial coverage and only part of the empirical basis needed to predict TEI flux variations. Many of the advances and present challenges facing TEI flux measurements are linked to process studies that collect sediment cores, pore waters, sinking material or seawater in close contact with sediments. However, such sampling has not routinely been viable on GEOTRACES expeditions. In this article, we recommend approaches to address these issues: firstly, with an interrogation of emergent data using isotopic mass-balance and inverse modelling techniques; and secondly, by innovating pursuits of direct TEI flux measurements. We exemplify the value of GEOTRACES data with a new inverse model estimate of benthic Al flux in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, we review viable flux measurement techniques tailored to the sediment-water boundary. We propose that such activities are aimed at regions that intersect the GEOTRACES Science Plan on the basis of seven criteria that may influence TEI fluxes: sediment provenance, composition, organic carbon supply, redox conditions, sedimentation rate, bathymetry and the benthic nepheloid inventory

  17. A NON-UNIFORM SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL WITH THE BOUNDARY-FITTING ORTHOGONAL COORDINATE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A 2-D non-uniform sediment mathmatical model in the boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system was developed in this paper. The governing equations, the numerical scheme, the boundary conditions, the movable boundary technique and the numerical solutions were presented. The model was verified by the data of the reach 25km upstream the Jialingjiang estuary and the 44km long main stream of the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze river. The calculated results show that, the water elevation, the velocity distribution and the river bed deformation are in agreement with the measured data.

  18. THE ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR SEDIMENT REACTION AND DIFFUSION EQUATION WITH GENERALIZED INITIAL-BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊岳山; 韦永康

    2001-01-01

    The sediment reaction and diffusion equation with generalized initial and boundary condition is studied. By using Laplace transform and Jordan lemma , an analytical solution is got, which is an extension of analytical solution provided by Cheng Kwokming James ( only diffusion was considered in analytical solution of Cheng ). Some problems arisen in the computation of analytical solution formula are also analysed.

  19. Sampling interrill water, sediment and nutrient fluxes across vegetation boundaries in the Jornada Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A.; Wainwright, J.; Powell, M.; Brazier, R.

    2003-04-01

    Sediment and nutrients transported in interrill runoff are an important component of biophysical processes in semi-arid environments. However, the fluxes of interrill runoff, sediment and nutrients are diffuse and spatially variable. Methods to estimate these quantities typically employ bounded runoff plots under simulated or natural rainfall. These methods are difficult to install over large areas (e.g. vegetation boundaries), time consuming, and present problems for sampling. In addition, the existence of plot boundaries draws into question the validity of flux measurements, particularly those made on plots established for several years. Here, we describe and present results from simple instrumentation for point measurement of interrill water, sediment and nutrient fluxes. This instrumentation has been installed at over 90 locations across boundaries between tarbush, grass, creosotebush and mesquite communities within the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. Results show, in some cases, as much as an order-of-magnitude difference in fluxes either side of vegetation boundaries. Quantification of these fluxes is important for understanding the relationships that exist among vegetation communities in this type of environment, for understanding the functioning of the environment at a landscape scale, and for determining the processes of vegetation change in semi-arid environments.

  20. Himalaya evolution at Paleogene-Neogene boundary unraveled by zircon age spectrum from Arabian Sea Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han; Lu, Huayu; Zhang, Hanzhi

    2016-04-01

    Although virtually all the intensive orogenic activities of Himalaya occurred in Neogene, the tectonic evolution of this high mountain range in Paleogene is poorly understood. Investigations of tectonic change pattern at Paleogene-Neogene boundary are important to better understand the interaction between mountain building and climate evolution. Here we present new U-Pb ages of zircon grains from Indus Fan sediments to constrain the orogenic history of Himalaya at Paleogene-Neogene boundary. 11 samples between late Oligocene and early Miocene from ODP 117 cores are dated by the zircon U-Pb technique. We calculate relative contributions of potential sources by counting zircon grains for each sample, and the quantized results indicate Himalaya contributed sediments to the coring site, and an extremely high input from Great and Tethyan Himalaya during late Oligocene-early Miocene. Four samples in Pleistocene are also dated for comparison, which indicates that high proportion of Lesser Himalaya has contributed to the sediment in Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the high contribution of Great and Tethyan Himalaya at Paleogene-Neogene boundary might correlate with the beginning of activity of MCT and extension of STD with leucogranite intrusion along Himalaya, which give rise to the extensive Great Himalaya exhumation. Our study demonstrates that zircon U-Pb dating technique is a good tool to reconstruct erosional history of mountain building on a tectonic timescale. Key words: ODP, Himalaya, Indus Fan, zircon U-Pb dating, Paleogene-Neogene boundary

  1. Quantifying trace element and isotope fluxes at the ocean–sediment boundary: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, William M.; Severmann, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying fluxes of trace elements and their isotopes (TEIs) at the ocean's sediment–water boundary is a pre-eminent challenge to understand their role in the present, past and future ocean. There are multiple processes that drive the uptake and release of TEIs, and properties that determine their rates are unevenly distributed (e.g. sediment composition, redox conditions and (bio)physical dynamics). These factors complicate our efforts to find, measure and extrapolate TEI fluxes across ocean basins. GEOTRACES observations are unveiling the oceanic distributions of many TEIs for the first time. These data evidence the influence of the sediment–water boundary on many TEI cycles, and underline the fact that our knowledge of the source–sink fluxes that sustain oceanic distributions is largely missing. Present flux measurements provide low spatial coverage and only part of the empirical basis needed to predict TEI flux variations. Many of the advances and present challenges facing TEI flux measurements are linked to process studies that collect sediment cores, pore waters, sinking material or seawater in close contact with sediments. However, such sampling has not routinely been viable on GEOTRACES expeditions. In this article, we recommend approaches to address these issues: firstly, with an interrogation of emergent data using isotopic mass-balance and inverse modelling techniques; and secondly, by innovating pursuits of direct TEI flux measurements. We exemplify the value of GEOTRACES data with a new inverse model estimate of benthic Al flux in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, we review viable flux measurement techniques tailored to the sediment–water boundary. We propose that such activities are aimed at regions that intersect the GEOTRACES Science Plan on the basis of seven criteria that may influence TEI fluxes: sediment provenance, composition, organic carbon supply, redox conditions, sedimentation rate, bathymetry and the benthic nepheloid

  2. Tools for the quantitative analysis of sedimentation boundaries detected by fluorescence optical analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaying Zhao

    Full Text Available Fluorescence optical detection in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation allows the study of macromolecules at nanomolar concentrations and below. This has significant promise, for example, for the study of systems of high-affinity protein interactions. Here we describe adaptations of the direct boundary modeling analysis approach implemented in the software SEDFIT that were developed to accommodate unique characteristics of the confocal fluorescence detection system. These include spatial gradients of signal intensity due to scanner movements out of the plane of rotation, temporal intensity drifts due to instability of the laser and fluorophores, and masking of the finite excitation and detection cone by the sample holder. In an extensive series of experiments with enhanced green fluorescent protein ranging from low nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations, we show that the experimental data provide sufficient information to determine the parameters required for first-order approximation of the impact of these effects on the recorded data. Systematic deviations of fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity data analyzed using conventional sedimentation models developed for absorbance and interference optics are largely removed after these adaptations, resulting in excellent fits that highlight the high precision of fluorescence sedimentation velocity data, thus allowing a more detailed quantitative interpretation of the signal boundaries that is otherwise not possible for this system.

  3. Hydrography and bottom boundary layer dynamics: Influence on inner shelf sediment mobility, Long Bay, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L.A.; Leonard, L.A.; Snedden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the hydrography and bottom boundary-layer dynamics of two typical storm events affecting coastal North Carolina (NC); a hurricane and the passages of two small consecutive extratropical storms during November 2005. Two upward-looking 1200-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) were deployed on the inner shelf in northern Long Bay, NC at water depths of less than 15 m. Both instruments profiled the overlying water column in 0.35 in bins beginning at a height of 1.35 in above the bottom (mab). Simultaneous measurements of wind speed and direction, wave and current parameters, and acoustic backscatter were coupled with output from a bottom boundary layer (bbl) model to describe the hydrography and boundary layer conditions during each event. The bbl model also was used to quantify sediment transport in the boundary layer during each storm. Both study sites exhibited similar temporal variations in wave and current magnitude, however, wave heights during the November event were higher than waves associated with the hurricane. Near-bottom mean and subtidal currents, however, were of greater magnitude during the hurricane. Peak depth-integrated suspended sediment transport during the November event exceeded transport associated with the hurricane by 25-70%. Substantial spatial variations in sediment transport existed throughout both events. During both events, along-shelf sediment transport exceeded across-shelf transport and was related to the magnitude and direction of subtidal currents. Given the variations in sediment type across the bay, complex shoreline configuration, and local bathymetry, the sediment transport rates reported here are very site specific. However, the general hydrography associated with the two storms is representative of conditions across northern Long Bay. Since the beaches in the study area undergo frequent renourishment to counter the effects of beach erosion, the results of this study also are relevant to coastal

  4. Effect of sediment-water interface 'boundary layer' on exposure of nodules and their abundance: a study from seabed photos

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    affects nodule abundance estimates based on photos. A model showing variable burial (or exposure) depending upon the thickness of the Sediment-Water Interface Boundary (SWIB) layer is presented. Standard relationships can be established between nodule...

  5. The atmosphere during the younger dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayewski, P A; Meeker, L D; Whitlow, S; Twickler, M S; Morrison, M C; Alley, R B; Bloomfield, P; Taylor, K

    1993-07-09

    One of the most dramatic climate change events observed in marine and ice core records is the Younger Dryas, a return to near-glacial conditions that punctuated the last deglaciation. High-resolution, continuous glaciochemical records, newly retrieved from central Greenland, record the chemical composition of the arctic atmosphere at this time. This record shows that both the onset and the termination of the Younger Dryas occurred within 10 to 20 years and that massive, frequent, and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event. Changes in atmospheric composition are attributable to changes in the size of the polar atmospheric cell and resultant changes in source regions and to the growth and decay of continental biogenic source regions.

  6. Paleoproductivity during the Younger Dryas off northeastern Luzon, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, J. M. D.; Siringan, F. P.; Villanoy, C.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of the Younger Dryas (YD) event on primary production off the northeast shelf of Luzon, Philippines is examined using sediment cores from two deep sea sites north of the Bicol shelf and with varying relative influence from terrestrial sediment input and the Kuroshio Current. Core A is immediately west of the Kuroshio feeder current and is off the slope while Core B is from a bathymetric high located almost west of Core A. XRF-, CHN- and LOI-derived geochemical proxies are utilized for reconstruction. A decrease in sediment input from ~12.9 to ~11.6 kyr BP corresponding to the YD event is indicated by the proxies, Ti, Al, and Al/Ti, in both cores. This is consistent with the drier climate during this period. Primary productivity indicators in the cores show opposing trends during the YD; Core A shows an increasing trend while Core B shows a decreasing trend. The decreasing trend in Core B can be due to a decrease in terrestrial nutrient input due to a decrease in precipitation. On the other hand, the increasing trend in Core A can be due to a swifter Kuroshio Current caused by a swifter and more southerly NEC bifurcation which in turn is due to a southerly shift of the ITCZ during YD. A swifter Kuroshio would have enhanced upwelling induced by steeper sea surface across the current and by more intense cyclonic gyres due to flow separation where the shelf width suddenly decreases north of the Bicol Shelf.

  7. First Younger Dryas moraines in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Linge, Henriette; Möller, Per; Schomacker, Anders; Fabel, Derek; Kjær, Kurt H.; Xu, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Over the Greenland ice sheet the Younger Dryas (YD) cold climate oscillation (12.9-11.7 kaBP) began with up to 10°C drop in temperatures and ended with up to 12°C abrupt warming. In the light of the present warming and melting of the ice sheet, and its importance for future climate change, the ice sheet's response to these dramatic changes in the past is of great interest. However, even though much effort has gone into charting YD ice margin behaviour around Greenland in recent years, no clear-cut signal of response to the oscillation has been uncovered. Here we show evidence to suggest that three major outlets from a local ice cap at Greenland's north coast advanced and retreated synchronously during YD. The evidence comprises OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) dates from a marine transgression of the coastal valleys that preceded the advance, and exposure ages from boulders on the moraines, formed by glaciers that overrode the marine sediment. The OSL ages suggest a maximum age of 12.4 ±0.6 kaBP for the marine incursion, and 10 exposure ages on boulders from the three moraines provide an average minimum age of 12.5 ±0.7 kaBP for the moraines, implying that the moraines were formed within the interval 11.8-13.0 kaBP. Elsewhere in Greenland evidence for readvance has been recorded in two areas. Most notably, in the East Greenland fjord zone outlet glaciers over a stretch of 800 km coast advanced through the fjords. In Scoresby Sund, where the moraines form a wide belt, an extensive 14C and exposure dating programme has shown that the readvance here probably culminated before YD, while cessation of moraine formation and rapid retreat from the moraine belt did not commence until c. 11.5 kaBP, but no moraines have so far been dated to YD. Readvance is also seen in Disko Bugt, the largest ice sheet outlet in West Greenland. However, here the advance and retreat of the ice stream took place in mid YD times, and lasted only a few hundred years, while YD in

  8. Subtropical freshwater event at the onset of Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinelt, M.; Repschläger, J.; Balmer, S.; Schwab, C.; Andersen, N.; Blanz, T.; Sarnthein, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) (12.79-11.6 ka BP) cold spell during the last deglaciation is associated with a major breakdown of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), the details of which are still controversial. Catastrophic events like a bolide impact or a major outflow of meltwater stored in the proglacial Lake Agassiz, which led to the capping of North Atlantic deep water convection sites, have been suggested to trigger the AMOC shutdown. However the geomorphological evidence for such a meltwater flood is not in agreement with the timing of the YD. Also, the YD was postulated to be part of a deglacial sequence of events generally characteristic of glacial terminations involving the displacement of major climatic zones and oceanographic fronts. We present detailed paleoceanographic records from sediment cores MD08-3180/ GEOFAR KF16 (38°N; 31.13°W, 3050 m w.d.) retrieved immediately east of the Mid Atlantic ridge south of the Azores Islands. At present, this site is located at the northern rim of the Azores Current, which delineates the subtropical gyre, recirculating warm waters of the North Atlantic Current. Due to its position at the boundary between temperate North East Atlantic waters and subtropical gyre waters, the site is ideally suited to trace past changes in the alternating influence of both water masses. Parallel stable-oxygen isotope records of surface water dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber w. (habitat depth 0-25m) and Globigerina bulloides (habitat depth 0-300m) may document the structure of surface waters. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) were derived from the UK'37 index and from planktonic foraminifera (PF) assemblages using transfer functions. d18Ow-ice and Sea Surface Salinities were estimated using the d18O G.ruber w. record corrected for SST and changes in global ice volume. The d18O records of G.ruber w. and G.bulloides diverge between 13.4 ka and 12.95 ka BP. d18Ow data show a gradual increase in the freshening of

  9. Osmium Isotopic Composition of the K/T Boundary Sediments from Sumbar: A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, T.; Krahenbuhl, U.; Nazarov, M. A.

    1993-07-01

    Osmium isotope measurements have been performed on the boundary clay at different Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) sites [1-5] since [6] suggested that Os isotopes are an indicator of an extraterrestrial component. The debate over "impact vs. volcanic" could not be resolved, but an isotope ratio close to chondritic could be demonstrated. The study of the distribution of iridium in the stratigraphy of the KTB cannot distinguish the contribution of chondritic and/or terrestrial Ir respectively, whereas the Os isotopes allow us to better constrain a mixing model. The ^187Os/^186Os ratio of the continental crust and chondritic reservoirs differ by at least 10-30 times. Assuming certain parameters, we should be able to calculate the proportion of the reservoirs making up the sediments of the KTB section. We studied a complete section of the KTB of Sumbar, Turkmenistan [7], for its Os isotopic composition. In the section 0-30 cm above the boundary clay, the ^187Os/^186Os ratio increases from 1.15 to 1.47, whereas the Ir concentration decreases from 66 to 1.4 ng/g or 66 to 4.7 ng/g on a carbonate-free basis respectively. Calculations show that the chondritic component makes up 9% at the boundary layer and decreases down to 0.6% at +30 cm. The data cannot be simply explained by varying admixtures of a chondritic component to a sediment of constant Os concentration and isotopic signature. To explain the Os ratios completely it is necessary to consider a mixture of four components (extraterrestrial, ejecta material, local terrigeneous, and carbonacous sediments) with certain assumptions: (1) The extraterrestrial source is chondritic in its Os and Re content and has an initial Os isotope ratio of 1.12 at 65 Ma (time of impact), which is above the average for normal chondrites but is within the range measured so far (e.g., Murray). (2) The ejecta material has a higher Os concentration (0.2 ng/g) than the sediments and is only present in the first 5 cm of the sequence above

  10. PALEOCLIMATE: The Younger Dryas: Cold, Cold Everywhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbell, D T

    2000-10-13

    The transition from the last ice age to the current warm period was interupted by a ~1000-year return to glacial conditions. Most of the evidence for this Younger Dryas (YD) event comes from in and around the North Atlantic, and the geographical extent of the event remains uncertain. In his Perspective, Rodbell reviews the evidence for and against a YD event in the Southern Hemisphere and highlights the study by Bennett et al., who have found no evidence for a YD event in four lake records from southern Chile.

  11. Meltwater routing and the Younger Dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The Younger Dryas--the last major cold episode on Earth--is generally considered to have been triggered by a meltwater flood into the North Atlantic. The prevailing hypothesis, proposed by Broecker et al. [1989 Nature 341:318-321] more than two decades ago, suggests that an abrupt rerouting of Lake Agassiz overflow through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Valley inhibited deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic and weakened the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). More recently, Tarasov and Peltier [2005 Nature 435:662-665] showed that meltwater could have discharged into the Arctic Ocean via the Mackenzie Valley ~4,000 km northwest of the St. Lawrence outlet. Here we use a sophisticated, high-resolution, ocean sea-ice model to study the delivery of meltwater from the two drainage outlets to the deep water formation regions in the North Atlantic. Unlike the hypothesis of Broecker et al., freshwater from the St. Lawrence Valley advects into the subtropical gyre ~3,000 km south of the North Atlantic deep water formation regions and weakens the AMOC by 30%. We conclude that meltwater discharge from the Arctic, rather than the St. Lawrence Valley, was more likely to have triggered the Younger Dryas cooling.

  12. Oxygen Isotopes in Fresh Water Biogenic Opal: Northeastern US Alleroed-Younger Dryas Temperature Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Aldo; Peteet, Dorothy

    1997-01-01

    The first oxygen isotope analysis of biogenic opal from lake sediments, from the Allerod/Younger Dryas transition in a core from Linsley Pond, Connecticut, gives an average estimate of a 6 C drop in temperature during the Younger Dryas. This shift represents temperatures during the bloom season, and may be less than the winter temperature drop. The sharp transition itself, with a duration of about 200 years, suggests that the temperature decrease may have been as large as 12 C. Previous estimates of the Allerod/Younger Dryas temperature shifts are controversial, and range from 3-20 C, suggesting that further interdisciplinary research on the same samples is warranted. One way that global climate change manifests itself is by redistributing energy throughout the globe. The Northern Hemisphere latitudinal temperature gradient during the late-glacial is at present a controversial topic. The magnitude of air temperature shifts during the Allerod/Younger Dryas (YD) oscillation are estimated from mid-latitude pollen records surrounding the North Atlantic to be 3-5 C in Europe [Lowe et al., 19941 and 3-4 C in the eastern US [Peteet et al., 1993]. In contrast, lake temperatures estimates derived from aquatic midge larvae in the Canadian eastern maritimes and Maine range from 6-20 C, with larger shifts at more southern sites [Levesque et al., 1997]. The magnitude of YD cooling in Greenland ice cores ranges from at least 7 C from the Bolling warming [Dansgaard et al., 1989] to 15 C - a more recent estimate from borehole temperatures [Cuffey et al., 1995]. The ice core geochemical records reveal that massive frequent and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event, suggesting a very dynamic circulation [Mayewski et al., 1993).

  13. Sediment cores and chemistry for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon Habitat Restoration Project, Boundary County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gary J.; Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Cox, Stephen E.; Williams, Marshall L.

    2012-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. This project is oriented toward recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. Projects currently (2010) under consideration include modifying the channel and flood plain, installing in-stream structures, and creating wetlands to improve the physical and biological functions of the ecosystem. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed the physical and chemical nature of sediment cores collected at 24 locations in the river. Core depths ranged from 4.6 to 15.2 meters; 21 cores reached a depth of 15.2 meters. The sediment was screened for the presence of chemical constituents that could have harmful effects if released during restoration activities. The analysis shows that concentrations of harmful chemical constituents do not exceed guideline limits that were published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2006.

  14. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments: identification of extra-terrestrial and volcanic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S. V.; Doehne, E. F.

    1988-01-01

    Trace element and stable isotope analyses were performed on a series of sediment samples crossing the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary from critical sections at Aumaya and Sopelano, Spain. The aim is to possibly distinguish extraterrestrial vs. volcanic or authigenic concentration of platinum group and other elements in K-T boundary transitional sediments. These sediments also have been shown to contain evidence for step-wise extinction of several groups of marine invertebrates, associated with negative oxygen and carbon isotope excursions occurring during the last million years of the Cretaceous. These isotope excursions have been interpreted to indicate major changes in ocean thermal regime, circulation, and ecosystems that may be related to multiple events during latest Cretaceous time. Results to date on the petrographic and geochemical analyses of the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleocene sediments indicate that diagenesis has obviously affected the trace element geochemistry and stable isotope compositions at Zumaya. Mineralogical and geochemical analysis of K-T boundary sediments at Zumaya suggest that a substantial fraction of anomalous trace elements in the boundary marl are present in specific mineral phases. Platinum and nickel grains perhaps represent the first direct evidence of siderophile-rich minerals at the boundary. The presence of spinels and Ni-rich particles as inclusions in aluminosilicate spherules from Zumaya suggests an original, non-diagenetic origin for the spherules. Similar spherules from southern Spain (Caravaca), show a strong marine authigenic overprint. This research represents a new approach in trying to directly identify the sedimentary mineral components that are responsible for the trace element concentrations associated with the K-T boundary.

  15. The Younger Dryas in the West Pacific marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪品先; 卞云华; 李保华; 黄奇瑜

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence and nature of the Younger Dryas (YD) abrupt climatic event in the West Pacific marginal seas are discussed on the basis of 15 sediment cores. This event has been found in all these cores studied with a high-resolution stratigraphy and proved to be common to the West Pacific region. As shown by the isotopic and micropaleontologic analyses, the YD, dated by C-14 at about 11000 to 10000 a B.P., is a brief event of sea surface cooling in winter season following a fresh-water pulse about 12000 a B.P. The "apparent regression" of the YD recorded in the Changjiang River delta and the Sea of Japan agrees with the interpretation that the YD is a period of slowed sea level rising between two phases of rapid rising. Both the winter surface water cooling and the increasing salinity in the YD imply a strengthening of the winter, but not summer monsoon circulation. This major climatic event in the marginal seas must have had profound impact on the adjacent continent.

  16. North Atlantic Storm Activity During the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, M.

    2015-12-01

    The risks posed to cities along the Eastern Seaboard by a potential intensification of tropical cyclone activity over the coming decades remain poorly constrained, in part, due to a lack of available storm proxy records that extend beyond the relatively stable climates of the late Holocene. Previous work in the Bahamas shows that coarse-grained, high-energy event layers in carbonate bank margin sediments: (1) closely track recent historic hurricane events and (2) that the sensitivity of this proxy may be less affected by the deglacial changes in sea level that have limited our ability to reconstruct past hurricane activity using overwash records from back-barrier beach settings. Here we present a record of storm triggered turbidite deposition from a suite of well dated (e.g. Lynch-Stieglitz et al., 2011, Paleoceanography) jumbo piston cores taken offbank (300-500 mbsl) the Dry Tortugas, Florida, that spans abrupt transitions in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and thermohaline circulation during the Younger Dryas (12.9 - 11.5 kyr BP). This record, along with General Circulation Model output (TraCE: NCAR-CGD), indicates strong hurricane activity may have occurred along Southeastern US coasts through this interval despite considerably colder North Atlantic SSTs.

  17. Turbulence Measurement in the Benthic Boundary Layer Following a Storm: Influence on Sediment Resuspension and Rate of Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    bed micromorphology and the rate of scour and deposition of sediments. The influence of significant sea states on a stratified bottom boundary layer...techniques, so that sidescan sonar information on bottom topography is available. Independent information on bottom micromorphology will also be

  18. Heinrich 0 at the Younger Dryas Termination Offshore Newfoundland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.; Andrews, J. T.; Jennings, A. E.; Bouloubassi, I.; Seidenkrantz, M. S.; Kuijpers, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2014-12-01

    The last deglaciation was marked by intervals of rapid climatic fluctuations accompanied by glacial advances and retreats along the eastern edge of the Laurentide ice sheet. The most severe of these events, the Younger Dryas cold reversal, was accompanied by the major detrital carbonate (DC) event generally referred to as "Heinrich event 0" (H0) in the westernmost and southern Labrador Sea. A detrital carbonate layer was observed in a high resolution marine sediment record from southern Newfoundland and the onset of the event was dated to 11,600 ± 70 cal. yrs. BP (local ΔR = 140 yrs.). A variety of different proxies was applied to investigate the transport mechanisms for deposition of the layer and provenance of the carbonates. Elevated concentrations of dolomite and calcite based on quantitative X-ray diffraction measurements, combined with the presence of several mature petrogenic biomarkers limit the source of the H0 detrital input to Palaeozoic carbonate outcrops in north-eastern Canada. The event is attributed to the rapid ice retreat from the Hudson Strait directly following the warming at the onset of the Holocene. Based on additional proxy data published earlier from the same record, the event succeeded the early Holocene resumption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), indicating that the Hudson Strait meltwater event had probably no significant impact on the AMOC. The detrital carbonate layer can be found in other marine sediment records along the Labrador Current pathway, from Hudson Strait to the Grand Banks and the southern Newfoundland slope. By using the onset of deposition of the carbonates as a time-synchronous marker, the DC layer has great potential for improving marine chronologies of late glacial age in the region and evaluating spatial variations in ΔR values.

  19. Testing Younger Dryas ET Impact (YDB) Evidence at Hall’s Cave, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, T. W.; Lundelius, E.; Kennett, J.; Kennett, D. J.; West, A.; Wolbach, W. S.

    2009-12-01

    soot at 2400 ppm, magnetic spherules, and carbon spherules, all of which we interpret as evidence for a unique chronostratigraphic marker (YDB) in the Western Hemisphere. Because the age of this horizon is ~ 13,000 CAL BP, we interpret the age of the event as the beginning of the Younger Dryas cooling. Regional soil erosion began ~15,000 CAL BP and continued until 7000 CAL BP, but dating suggests that there is no discontinuity or hiatus in deposition, and thus, the exotic materials in that layer are not considered to be erosional accumulations. Future analyses include sub-centimeter sampling over the YD boundary, quantification of nanodiamonds and other event-proxies within 1000 yr of the boundary and in sediments several 1000 years older and younger, continued refinement of the AMS 14C record to determine within 50 yr the location of 12,900 CAL BP datum and high resolution analysis of small animal biostratigraphy.

  20. The micromorphology of Younger Dryas-aged black mats from Nevada, Arizona, Texas and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Parks, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Black mats are organic-rich sediments and soils that form in wet environments associated with spring discharge. Micromorphological and geochemical analyses of 25 black mats dating to the Younger Dryas Chronozone (12.9-11.7 ka) and early Holocene were conducted to determine their composition and depositional environment. Samples were collected from Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and Nevada. Micromorphological analyses were conducted on thin sections using polarized and blue fluorescent light. These analyses determined that black mats contain humic acids, fine (5-20 μm) plant fragments, diatoms, phytoliths, and gastropods. The dominant type of organic matter in black mats is derived from herbaceous plants, contradicting previous studies that supported algal or charcoal sources. Differences in the micromorphological characteristics of the samples revealed that black mats formed as three different types, organic horizons, moist soils and, ponded sediments, depending on their topographic position in relation to the water table. The microscopic evidence found in black mats supports the presence of widespread wet environments in Nevada and Arizona during the Younger Dryas Chronozone, clearly indicating a sustained period of greater effective moisture, optimal for spring discharge and black mat formation.

  1. Effect of sediment transport boundary conditions on the numerical modeling of bed morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental sediment transport studies in laboratory flumes can use two sediment-supply methods: an imposed feed at the upstream end or recirculation of sediment from the downstream end to the upstream end. These methods generally produce similar equilibrium bed morphology, but temporal evolution c...

  2. Younger Dryas glaciers in the High Atlas, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Philip; Fink, David

    2016-04-01

    Twelve cirque glaciers formed during the Younger Dryas on the mountains of Aksoual (3912 m a.s.l.) and Adrar el Hajj (3129 m a.s.l.) in the Marrakesh High Atlas. Moraines in two separate cirques on these mountains have been dated using 10Be and 36Cl exposure dating. In both cirques the age scatter is relatively small (13.8-10.1 ka) and all ages overlap within error with the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glaciers were small and covered ELAs) ranging from 2470 and 3560 m. This large range is attributed to local topoclimatic factors with the lowest glacier (confirmed as Younger Dryas in age by 3 exposure ages) occupying a very steep cirque floor where a combination of steep glacier gradient and a large potential avalanche catchment enabled its low-lying position. This indicates that caution should be taken when using single glacier sites for reconstructing regional palaeoclimate, especially those formed in steep catchments that have strong topoclimatic controls. The average ELA of the twelve Younger Dryas glaciers was c. 3109 m a.s.l. (St Dev = 325 m) and this represents an ELA depression of > 1000 m from the modern theoretical regional ELA. Under precipitation values similar to today this would require a mean annual temperature depression of 9°C. Moreover, the glacier-climate modelling indicates that it is very unlikely that climate was drier than today during the Younger Dryas in the Marrakesh High Atlas.

  3. Fractionation and potential toxic risk of metals from superficial sediment in Itaipu Lake--boundary between Brazil and Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwa, Miguel; Quináia, Sueli Pércio; Pletsch, Adelmo L; Techy, Laura; Felsner, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate fractions of metals (labile and pseudo-total) extracted from sediment samples collected in Itaipu Lake (boundary between Brazil and Paraguay) and to assess the dynamics and mobility of these fractions by identifying the same bioavailability and ecological risk to metals in the aquatic environment. The concentrations of metal ions were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. There was a correlation between the metal ions, both in the labile and the pseudo-total, with regard to particle size. To assess metals concentrations in sediment, numerical sediment-quality guidelines were applied. The concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, lead, and zinc in all sediment samples are lower than the proposed probable effects level (PEL), thus possibly indicating that there are no harmful effects from these metals. In contrast, concentrations of copper, chromium, and nickel exceeded the PEL in some samples, thus indicating that these stations are at potential risk. The level of contamination in sediments of Itaipu Lake for all metals was evaluated using contamination factor, degree of contamination, and sum-of-metals toxic unit.

  4. Defining seascapes for marine unconsolidated shelf sediments in an eastern boundary upwelling region: The southern Benguela as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karenyi, Natasha; Sink, Kerry; Nel, Ronel

    2016-02-01

    Marine unconsolidated sediment habitats, the largest benthic ecosystem, are considered physically controlled ecosystems driven by a number of local physical processes. Depth and sediment type are recognised key drivers of these ecosystems. Seascape (i.e., marine landscape) habitat classifications are based solely on consistent geophysical features and provide an opportunity to define unconsolidated sediment habitats based on processes which may vary in distribution through space and time. This paper aimed to classify unconsolidated sediment seascapes and explore their diversity in an eastern boundary upwelling region at the macro-scale, using the South African west coast as a case study. Physical variables such as sediment grain size, depth and upwelling-related variables (i.e., maximum chlorophyll concentration, austral summer bottom oxygen concentration and sediment organic carbon content) were included in the analyses. These variables were directly measured through sampling, or collated from existing databases and the literature. These data were analysed using multivariate Cluster, Principal Components Ordination and SIMPER analyses (in PRIMER 6 + with PERMANOVA add-in package). There were four main findings; (i) eight seascapes were identified for the South African west coast based on depth, slope, sediment grain size and upwelling-related variables, (ii) three depth zones were distinguished (inner, middle and outer shelf), (iii) seascape diversity in the inner and middle shelves was greater than the outer shelf, and (iv) upwelling-related variables were responsible for the habitat diversity in both inner and middle shelves. This research demonstrates that the inclusion of productivity and its related variables, such as hypoxia and sedimentary organic carbon, in seascape classifications will enhance the ability to distinguish seascapes on continental shelves, where productivity is most variable.

  5. Quantifying sediment disturbance by bottom currents and its effect on benthic communities in a deep-sea western boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Josephine Y.

    1989-06-01

    Erosion, transport and redeposition of sediment by near-bottom currents are major sources of disturbance for soft-sediment habitats and associated benthic communities. This phenomenon takes place in western boundary slope regions of the deep sea such as the HEBBLE area on the Nova Scotian Rise, western North Atlantic. Bottom disturbance in this western boundary region can be characterized and quantified, first in terms of the driving force—the current and directly related bed shear stress; and second, by the expression of the current effect as observed in sedimentary fabric, %CaCO 3, and granulometry. These physical characteristics can be correlated with biologic features, including abundances and activities of sediment microorganisms, and apparently, in abundances and distributions of meio- and macrofauna. Currents measured at heights of 1-59 m above the seabed at the HEBBLE site (4815-4830 m) from February 1982 to 15 September 1986 show evidence of "benthic storms" with current speeds of 15-23 cm s -1 for ⩾2 days. These "storms" occur with a frequency of about 21 days and have mean durations of 7 ± 5.8 days. Storms with mean velocities over 23 cm s -1 occur every 10 months and last 12 ± 11 days. X-radiographs of vertical slabs of sediment taken from box cores at the HEBBLE site show stratification features related to current speeds and bed shear stress, immediately preceeding the time of core collection. These relationships are corroborated by radiochemical distributions of 234Th. Both erosional and depositional processes affect physical and chemical properties of the sediment and have positive and negative effects on the benthic community. Erosional periods result in sediment transport and sweeping of surficial organic matter, micro-organisms, larvae and juveniles from the area. During transitional periods of intermediate current velocities there is deposition of fresh organic matter, removal of metabolites, and mechanical stimulation of sediment micro

  6. Mountain glacier evolution in the Iberian Peninsula during the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, J. M.; Palacios, D.; González-Sampériz, P.; de Andrés, N.; Moreno, A.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Gómez-Villar, A.

    2016-04-01

    We review the evolution of glaciers in the Iberian Mountains during the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka, following the chronology of Greenland Stadial 1 - GS1) and compare with available environmental and climate data to investigate glacier dynamics during cold stadial episodes. The best examples of Younger Dryas moraines are found in the Central Pyrenees, involving short ice tongues up to 4 km in length in the highest massifs (above 3000 m a.s.l.) of the southern versant. Small cirque glaciers and rock glaciers formed during the YD occurred in other Pyrenean massifs, in the Cantabrian Range and in the Gredos and Guadarrama sierras (Central Range), as indicated by several rocky, polished thresholds that were ice-free at the beginning of the Holocene. Although some former rock glaciers were re-activated during the Younger Dryas, glacial activity was limited in the southernmost part of the Iberian Peninsula (Sierra Nevada). Most Iberian records show vegetation changes during the YD characterized by a forest decline and an expansion of shrubs (mainly Juniperus) and steppe herbs, although the vegetation response was not homogeneous because of variable resilience among ecosystems. Available records also document a variable lake response in terms of hydrology and productivity, with a decrease in sedimentation rates and organic productivity in most high altitude lakes and increases in salinity and relatively lower lake levels at lower altitudes. The impact of the Younger Dryas on the coastal environment was almost negligible, but it was responsible for a brief cessation in sea level rise. High-resolution analyses of new speleothem records have documented a double structure for the YD with an earlier drier phase followed by a relatively more humid period. The review of geomorphological evidence demonstrates a strong latitudinal control of glacial activity during the YD, with more intense development in the northern than in the southern regions. The increase in humidity during

  7. Regional Variations of REE Patterns in Sediments from Active Plate Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, H.; Stoffers, P.; Gwozdz, R.

    1988-01-01

    About 150 sediment samples from mid-ocean ridges (East Pacific Rise, Central Indian Ocean Ridge, Carlsberg Ridge and the Red Sea) and from a back-arc spreading environment (Lau Basin) were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation. A ratio method for rare-earth elements involving a plot...... into the field for normal deep-sea sediments....

  8. Lead isotope ratios in six lake sediment cores from Japan Archipelago: Historical record of trans-boundary pollution sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, Takahiro, E-mail: hosono@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Priority Organization for Innovation and Excellence, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Alvarez, Kelly [Priority Organization for Innovation and Excellence, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kuwae, Michinobu [Senior Research Fellow Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Sediment cores from six lakes situated from north to south on the Japanese Archipelago were collected during 2009–2010 to investigate the hypothesis that deposition of lead (Pb) was coming from East Asia (including China, South Korea and eastern part of Russia). Accumulation rates and ages of the lake sediment were estimated by the {sup 210}Pb constant rate of supply model and {sup 137}Cs inputs to reconstruct the historical trends of Pb accumulation. Cores from four lakes located in the north and central Japan, showed clear evidence of Pb pollution with a change in the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios in the recent sediment as compared to the deeper sediment. Among the six studied lakes, significant inputs of anthropogenic lead emissions were observed at Lake Mikazuki (north Hokkaido in north Japan), Lake Chokai (north of Honshu), and Lake Mikuriga (central part of Honshu). Pb isotopic comparison of collected core sediment and previously reported data for wet precipitation and aerosols from different Asian regions indicate that, before 1900, Pb accumulated in these three lakes was not affected by trans-boundary sources. Lake Mikazuki started to receive Pb emissions from Russia in early 1900s, and during the last two decades, this lake has been affected by trans-boundary Pb pollution from northern China. Lake Chokai has received Pb pollutant from northern China since early 1900s until 2009, whereas for the Lake Mikuriga the major Pb contaminant was transported from southern China during the past 100 years. The results of our study demonstrate that Japan Archipelago has received trans-boundary Pb emissions from different parts of East Asian region depending on location, and the major source region has changed historically. - Highlights: • Historical trend of Pb pollution was recorded in six Japanese Lakes. • Pb concentration and Pb isotope ratios were determined for sediment cores. • High [Pb] and less radiogenic Pb isotope ratios

  9. Observations of boundary layer parameters and suspended sediment transport over the intertidal flats of northern Jiangsu, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYaping; GAOShu; KEXiankun

    2004-01-01

    A current-turbidity monitoring system (CTMS) was deployed on the intertidal flat at Wanggang, northern Jiangsu during October 16-17, 2000, to measure the tidal current speeds and seawater turbidities at 5 levels above the seabed. Based upon the logarithmic-prof'de equation, the boundary layer parameters, i.e., u*, Z0 and C60, were obtained for 247 tidal flow velocity prof'des. Around 90% of the profiles were logarithmic according to the critical correlation coefficient. Internal consistency analysis shows that these parameters derived by different methods are consistent with each other. In addition, the height of the bedforms observed is close to the seabed roughness lengths calculated from the velocity prof'des, indicating that the boundary layer parameters obtained can reveal the conditions at the sedimentwater interface on the intertidal flats. Suspended sediment concentrations were obtained from the 5 CTMS turbidity meters using laboratory and in-situ calibrations. The results show that the in-situ calibrated SSCs have a much higher accuracy than the laboratory calibrated ones. Calculation of suspended sediment fluxes on the intertidal flats, with a magnitude of 104 kg/m per spring tidal cycle, indicates that suspended sediment moves towards the northwest, which is reversal to the transport pattern controlled by the southward Northern Jiangsu Coastal Current in the sub-tidal zone and adjacent shallow waters.

  10. Grain-resolving simulations of flows over dense, mobile, multidisperse granular sediment beds: an Immersed Boundary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Biegert, Edward; Meiburg, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    We present a collision model for phase-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations of sediment transport that couple the fluid and particles by the Immersed Boundary Method. Typically, a contact model for these types of simulations comprises a lubrication force for particles in close proximity to another solid object, a normal contact force to prevent particles from overlapping, and a tangential contact force to account for friction. Our model extends the work of previous authors to improve upon the time integration scheme to obtain consistent results for particle-wall collisions. Furthermore, we account for multidisperse spherical particles and introduce new criteria to account for enduring contact, which occurs in many sediment transport situations. This is done without using arbitrary values for physically-defined parameters and by maintaining the full momentum balance of a particle in enduring contact. We validate our model against several test cases for binary particle-wall collisions as well as the collective...

  11. Glacier retreat in New Zealand during the Younger Dryas stadial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Michael R; Schaefer, Joerg M; Denton, George H; Barrell, David J A; Chinn, Trevor J H; Putnam, Aaron E; Andersen, Bjørn G; Finkel, Robert C; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M

    2010-09-09

    Millennial-scale cold reversals in the high latitudes of both hemispheres interrupted the last transition from full glacial to interglacial climate conditions. The presence of the Younger Dryas stadial (approximately 12.9 to approximately 11.7 kyr ago) is established throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, but the global timing, nature and extent of the event are not well established. Evidence in mid to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, in particular, has remained perplexing. The debate has in part focused on the behaviour of mountain glaciers in New Zealand, where previous research has found equivocal evidence for the precise timing of increased or reduced ice extent. The interhemispheric behaviour of the climate system during the Younger Dryas thus remains an open question, fundamentally limiting our ability to formulate realistic models of global climate dynamics for this time period. Here we show that New Zealand's glaciers retreated after approximately 13 kyr bp, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, and in general over the subsequent approximately 1.5-kyr period. Our evidence is based on detailed landform mapping, a high-precision (10)Be chronology and reconstruction of former ice extents and snow lines from well-preserved cirque moraines. Our late-glacial glacier chronology matches climatic trends in Antarctica, Southern Ocean behaviour and variations in atmospheric CO(2). The evidence points to a distinct warming of the southern mid-latitude atmosphere during the Younger Dryas and a close coupling between New Zealand's cryosphere and southern high-latitude climate. These findings support the hypothesis that extensive winter sea ice and curtailed meridional ocean overturning in the North Atlantic led to a strong interhemispheric thermal gradient during late-glacial times, in turn leading to increased upwelling and CO(2) release from the Southern Ocean, thereby triggering Southern Hemisphere warming during the northern Younger Dryas.

  12. Absence of geochemical evidence for an impact event at the Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquay, François S; Goderis, Steven; Ravizza, Greg; Vanhaeck, Frank; Boyd, Matthew; Surovell, Todd A; Holliday, Vance T; Haynes, C Vance; Claeys, Philippe

    2009-12-22

    High concentrations of iridium have been reported in terrestrial sediments dated at 12.9 ka and are interpreted to support an extraterrestrial impact event as the cause of the observed extinction in the Rancholabrean fauna, changes in the Paleoindian cultures, and the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:16016-16021]. Here, we report platinum group element (PGE: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd), gold (Au) concentrations, and (187)Os/(188)Os ratios in time-equivalent terrestrial, lacustrine, and marine sections to seek robust evidence of an extraterrestrial contribution. First, our results do not reproduce the previously reported elevated Ir concentrations. Second, (187)Os/(188)Os isotopic ratios in the sediment layers investigated are similar to average crustal values, indicating the absence of a significant meteoritic Os contribution to these sediments. Third, no PGE anomalies distinct from crustal signatures are present in the marine record in either the Gulf of California (DSDP 480, Guaymas Basin) or the Cariaco Basin (ODP 1002C). Our data show no evidence of an extraterrestrial (ET)-PGE enrichment anomaly in any of the investigated depositional settings investigated across North America and in one section in Belgium. The lack of a clear ET-PGE signature in this sample suite is inconsistent with the impact of a large chondritic projectile at the Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas transition.

  13. Interpreting syndepositional sediment remobilization and deformation beneath submarine gravity flows; a kinematic boundary layer approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, Rob W.H.; Eggenhuisen, J.T.; Haughton, Peter; McCaffrey, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Turbidite sandstones and related deposits commonly contain deformation structures and remobilized sediment that might have resulted from post-depositional modification such as downslope creep (e.g. slumping) or density-driven loading by overlying deposits. However, we consider that deformation can o

  14. SWASH ZONE BED LEVEL CHANGES AND SEDIMENT ENTRAINMENT AT THE SURF-SWASH BOUNDARY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Gro; Aagaard, Troels; Baldock, Tom

    2010-01-01

    detailed data on water levels and bed elevations in the swash zone. Water levels derived from the pressure transducers show that swash zone characteristics vary from the upper to lower swash. Using pressure transducers in the swash zone coupled with measurements of the hydrodynamics and sediment...

  15. Decadal resolved leaf wax δD records of the Younger Dryas in central and eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichner, Bernhard; Słowiński, Michał; Ott, Florian; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim; Sachse, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Annually laminated (varved) sediments with defined event-based age anchor points such as tephra layers enable the establishment of precise chronologies in lacustrine climate archives. This is especially useful to study subtle temporal differences in the consequences of mechanisms and feedbacks during abrupt climatic changes such as the Younger Dryas over larger spatial areas. To decipher the drivers of ecological changes across the Allerød/Younger Dryas transition in central Europe, we analyzed leaf wax biomarkers from Trzechowskie paleolake in northern Poland. Samples were taken in 10 years intervals across the onset of the Younger Dryas, with the Laacher See Tephra (12,880 yrs BP) as anchor point for age-calibration. Further, we applied compound specific hydrogen isotope analysis to infer past hydrological changes, in comparison to results from the well-dated Meerfelder Maar record located up 900 km to the southwest [1]. Between 12,750 and 12,600 yrs BP, ratios of terrestrial n-alkanes show a transition from a tree-dominated lake catchment (Pinus, Betula) to an environment mainly covered by Juniperus and grasses, which is in agreement with palynological data. δD values of n-alkanes indicate a rapid cooling and/or a change of moisture source together with a slight aridification between 12,680 and 12,600 yrs BP. This is synchronous to a rapid and strong aridification inferred for the beginning of the Younger Dryas at Meerfelder Maar (western Germany) [1] but ca. 170 yrs after the inferred onset of cooling at both Meerfelder Maar and the NGRIP ice core at 12,850 yrs BP. This highlights a different temporal succession and impact of hydrological and climatic changes in eastern compared to western Europe which could potentially be related to the stronger influence of the Fennoscandian icesheets and/or the Siberian High on atmospheric circulation patterns in the more continental climate influenced parts of eastern Europe. [1] Rach O, Brauer A, Wilkes H, Sachse D

  16. Younger Dryas interval and outflow from the Laurentide ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T.C.; Walker, J.C.G.; Rea, David K.; Lewis, C.F.M.; Shane, L.C.K.; Smith, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    A boxmodel of the Great Lakes is used to estimate meltwater flow into the North Atlantic between 8000 and 14,000 calendar years B.P. Controls on the model include the oxygen isotopic composition of meltwaters and lake waters as measured in the shells of ostracodes. Outflow rates are highest when oxygen isotopic values of the lake waters are most negative, denoting a maximum glacial meltwater component. Flow rates reach maximum values before the onset of the Younger Dryas and after it ends. These maxima appear to be correlative with the major meltwater pulses MWP 1A and 1B. Although the resumption of North Atlantic Deep Water formation may be tied to the reduction in ice sheet melting, neither the onset nor the end of the Younger Dryas, as recorded in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project (GISP2) records, appear tied to maxima in meltwater outflow from the Laurentide ice sheet. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. CYCLIC SEDIMENTATION ACROSS THE PERMIAN – TRIASSIC BOUNDARY (CENTRAL TAURIDES, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMRE ÜNAL

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The best preserved Permian-Triassic boundary beds in Turkey are found in the Hadim region of the central Taurides. The succession is exposed in one of the allochthonous units of the Tauride Belt, the Aladag Unit, whose stratigraphy includes beds ranging from the Devonian to the Cretaceous systems. In the Aladag Unit, the Permian-Triassic boundary beds are entirely composed of carbonates. The Permian portion of these beds belongs to the Paradagmarita Zone, whereas the lowermost Triassic contains the Lower Griesbachian marker Rectocornuspira kalhori. The uppermost Permian carbonates, composed of meter-scale upward shallowing subtidal cycles, are characterized by oolitic limestones of regressive character at the top and are overlain sharply by Lower Triassic stromatolites. Cyclic Upper Permian carbonates are interpreted as highstand sytems tract deposits of the last third-order sequence of the Permian System. The Permian-Triassic boundary is an unconformity corresponding to both erosional and non-depositional hiatuses. The gap at the Permian-Triassic boundary partially corresponds to the shelf-margin systems tract and partly to the transgressive systems tract of the overlying third-order sequence. Stromatolites are interpreted as transgressive systems tract deposits. Special issueInternational Conference on Paleozoic Foraminifera, Paleoforams 2001Edited by Demir Altiner (Guest Editor

  18. Characteristics of suspended sediment and turbulence in a tidal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Yokosi, Shoitiro

    1997-07-01

    High-resolution measurements of three velocity components and the concentration of suspended sediment (SS) have been performed in the Ota diversion channel through a tidal cycle. Data are collected with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter at various distances from the bottom. Turbulence measurements are extended to the immediate vicinity of the bottom. Turbulent fluxes of SS concentration are directly estimated from the fluctuations of concentration and velocity. Both the mean concentration and the vertical turbulent flux increase with the Reynolds shear-stress, though the mean concentration lags the shear stress. The frequency range in which the fluctuations mainly contribute to the vertical turbulent fluxes of SS concentration is higher than that of the Reynolds shear-stress ρ u*2 near the bottom. The settling velocities of SS, ws, are estimated from the transport equation of suspended sediment. The values of ws decrease during the large shear velocity. The vertical profiles of vertical eddy diffusivity are shown. The ratio of the momentum and sediment diffusivity coefficients, β = Nz/ Kz, decreases with increasing values of u*/ ws and the SS concentration. 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd

  19. Arctic freshwater forcing of the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Lev; Peltier, W R

    2005-06-02

    The last deglaciation was abruptly interrupted by a millennial-scale reversal to glacial conditions, the Younger Dryas cold event. This cold interval has been connected to a decrease in the rate of North Atlantic Deep Water formation and to a resulting weakening of the meridional overturning circulation owing to surface water freshening. In contrast, an earlier input of fresh water (meltwater pulse 1a), whose origin is disputed, apparently did not lead to a reduction of the meridional overturning circulation. Here we analyse an ensemble of simulations of the drainage chronology of the North American ice sheet in order to identify the geographical release points of freshwater forcing during deglaciation. According to the simulations with our calibrated glacial systems model, the North American ice sheet contributed about half the fresh water of meltwater pulse 1a. During the onset of the Younger Dryas, we find that the largest combined meltwater/iceberg discharge was directed into the Arctic Ocean. Given that the only drainage outlet from the Arctic Ocean was via the Fram Strait into the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian seas, where North Atlantic Deep Water is formed today, we hypothesize that it was this Arctic freshwater flux that triggered the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

  20. Modelling sheet-flow sediment transport in wave-bottom boundary layers using discrete-element modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calantoni, Joseph; Holland, K Todd; Drake, Thomas G

    2004-09-15

    Sediment transport in oscillatory boundary layers is a process that drives coastal geomorphological change. Most formulae for bed-load transport in nearshore regions subsume the smallest-scale physics of the phenomena by parametrizing interactions amongst particles. In contrast, we directly simulate granular physics in the wave-bottom boundary layer using a discrete-element model comprised of a three-dimensional particle phase coupled to a one-dimensional fluid phase via Newton's third law through forces of buoyancy, drag and added mass. The particulate sediment phase is modelled using discrete particles formed to approximate natural grains by overlapping two spheres. Both the size of each sphere and the degree of overlap can be varied for these composite particles to generate a range of non-spherical grains. Simulations of particles having a range of shapes showed that the critical angle--the angle at which a grain pile will fail when tilted slowly from rest--increases from approximately 26 degrees for spherical particles to nearly 39 degrees for highly non-spherical composite particles having a dumbbell shape. Simulations of oscillatory sheet flow were conducted using composite particles with an angle of repose of approximately 33 degrees and a Corey shape factor greater than about 0.8, similar to the properties of beach sand. The results from the sheet-flow simulations with composite particles agreed more closely with laboratory measurements than similar simulations conducted using spherical particles. The findings suggest that particle shape may be an important factor for determining bed-load flux, particularly for larger bed slopes.

  1. Younger Dryas To Mid-Holocene Environmental History Of The Lowlands Of NW Transylvania, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurdean, A.; Mosbrugger, V.; Onac, B. P.; Polyak, V.; Veres, D.

    2007-12-01

    Pollen, micro-charcoal and total carbon analyses on sediments from the Turbuta profile located in the Transylvanian Basin (NW Romania) reveal information on previously unknown Younger Dryas to mid-Holocene environmental changes. The chronostratigraphy relies on AMS 14C measurements on organic matter and U/Th TIMS datings of snail shells. Results indicate the presence of Pinus and Betula open woodlands with small populations of Picea, Ulmus, Alnus and Salix before 12,000 cal yr BP, correlates well with the environmental developments expected for Younger Dryas stadial. A fairly abrupt replacement of Pinus and Betula by Ulmus dominated woodlands at ca. 11,900 cal. yr BP, likely represents competition effects of vegetation driven by climate warming at the onset of the Holocene. By 11,000 cal yr BP, the woodlands were increasingly diverse and dense with the expansion of Quercus, Fraxinus and Tilia, the establishment of Corylus, and the decline of upland herbaceous and shrubs taxa. The marked expansion of Quercus accompanied by Tilia between 10,500 and 8,000 cal yr BP could be the result of low effective moisture associated with both low elevation of the site and with regional change towards a drier climate. At 10,000 cal. yr BP Corylus spread across the region, and by 8,000 cal yr BP it replaced Quercus as a dominant forest constituent, with only little representation of Picea abies. Carpinus became established around 5,500 cal yr BP, but it was only a minor constituent in local woodlands until ca. 5,000 cal yr BP. Results from this study also indicate that the woodlands in the lowlands of Turbuta were never closed.

  2. Evidence for the 1762 Tsunamigenic Earthquake in an Extremely Sedimented Segment of the Sunda Subduction/Collision Boundary, SE Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, C. M.; Mansfield, V.; Mondal, D. R.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.; Mustaque, S.; Ahkter, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    After the catastrophic 2004 Sumatra earthquake and tsunami, attention focussed on the segment of the Sunda subduction system along the heavily populated region of the Bay of Bengal. Here the Indian plate is converging obliquely with the Burma arc at GPS rates of 14mm/yr. The extremely thick sediments (~20km) of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are accreted into a very wide thrust-fold belt. Despite some likely aseismic deformation, the great 1762 earthquake proves the seismogenic potential of this boundary. Evidence is mounting that the earthquake ruptured 700km of the boundary from the Bengal Fan to the GBD shelf along Myanmar and Bangladesh. Recent U-Th ages and GPS measurements in Saint Martin Island, an anticline in the outer part of the accretion belt on the shelf, showed that corals died and were uplifted 2.5m coseismically during the 1762 earthquake. Historic accounts and modelling predicted a 1762 tsunami, but geologic evidence for it was not previously reported. We found in both Saint Martin and ~20km north on the Teknaf coast strong evidence for tsunami emplacement. In Saint Martin we discovered a shelly sand layer that extends ~4km in the center of the island. The layer contains shallow water foraminifers, coral fragments and molluscs. Twenty C-14 ages from the shell layer range 1440-1753 cal yrs AD and average 1600 cal yrs AD. We also studied a shell layer that extends for 16,500 m2 on top of a terrace that is now 2m above present sea level and pre-1762 earthquake elevation. Ten C14 ages obtained from the shell bed range 1689-1875 cal yrs AD and average 1753 cal yrs AD. This bed is 1.2m thick and composed of molluscs and foraminifers of intertidal and subtidal origin currently found in shelf depths of 0-100 m. The layer is composed of cobble to mud size sediment and although chaotic, we identified at least three pulses of coarse sediment within an overall fining-upwards unit. The studied 1762 shoreline uplift is likely to partly include coseiesmic

  3. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems off Peru and Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, J.; Sommer, S.; Löscher, C. R.; Dale, A.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of benthic nitrogen (N2) fixation and its relevance for N cycling in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are still unknown. Recent studies confirm that benthic N2 fixation can be coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) and that several species of sulfate reducing bacteria have the genetic ability to fix N due to the presence of the gene encoding for the nitrogenase enzyme. We investigated benthic N2 fixation and SR in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone at 12°S and in the Mauritanian upwelling system at 18°N along a depth transect. Sediments were retrieved by a multicorer and a benthic lander at six stations in both regions. Benthic N2 fixation occurred throughout the sediment in both EBUS. Off Peru the highest integrated (0-20 cm) N2 fixation rate of 0.4 mmol N/m2/d was measured inside the core of the OMZ at 253 m water depth. Off Mauritania the highest integrated (0-20 cm) N2 fixation rate of 0.15 mmol N/m2/d was measured at 90 m, coinciding with a low bottom water oxygen concentration (30 μM). N2 fixation depth profiles often overlapped with SR activity. Moreover, sequencing data yielded insights into the composition and diversity of the nifH gene pool in EBUS sediments. Interestingly, detected sequences in both EBUS clustered with SR bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris and several of the novel detected clades belonged to uncultured diazotrophs. Our results suggest that N2 fixation and SR were coupled to a large extent in both regions. However, potential environmental factors controlling benthic diazotrophs in the EBUS appear to be the availability of sulfide and organic matter. Additionally, no inhibition of N2 fixation at high ammonium concentrations was found, which highlights gaps in our knowledge regards the interaction between ammonium availability and diazotrophy. Our results contribute to a better understanding of N cycling in EBUS sediments and sources of fixed N.

  4. Younger Dryas Event and Cold Events in Early-Mid Holocene: Record from the sediment of Erhai Lake%新仙女木事件及全新世早中期降温事件——来自洱海湖泊沉积的记录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周静; 王苏民; 杨桂山

    2007-01-01

    Three cold events (the Younger Dryas, 9.4 ka cal BP, 5.8 ka cal BP) since the 13 ka cal BP in Erhai (EH) Lake catchment, Yunnan Province, were analyzed using the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) series of the EH core. By comparison of the EH core, Qinghai Lake core and Guliya ice core, differences of these cold events were determined. Erhai Lake's responses to the global cold events were lagged in time and weakened in intensity in comparison with Qinghai Lake's. The latitude location of Erhai Lake and the obstruction of Tibetan Plateau may in part explain the differences. However, the remarkable cold event of 8.2 ka cal BP in the Guliya ice core was absent in the records of Erhai Lake and Qinghai Lake. Power spectrum analysis of the TOC proxy series shows that there were three kinds of millennial cycles, i.e. 5 ka, 2.3 ka, and 1.5 ka, in climate changes in Erhai Lake, which reveal the responses of climate to suborbit cycles.

  5. Embryo sac haustorium in Dryas octopetala L. (Rosaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Romana Czapik

    2014-01-01

    The embryo sac haustorium found in Dryas octopetala L. from the Tatra Mts is the first record of its occurrence in Rosaceae. At the eight-nucleate stage of the embryo sac, the antipodal end of the central cell began to grow into a narrow caecum filled with dense cytoplasm and elongated in the chalazal direction leaving the three antipodals in situ. The haustorium enlarged and lost its characteristic shape after the period of fertilization. Finally, the embryo sac occupied almost the whole len...

  6. 10Be evidence for delayed acquisition of remanent magnetization in marine sediments: Implication for a new age for the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Yusuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Kawamura, Kenji; Horng, Chorng-Shern; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-01

    Fluxes of the meteoric cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be vary with changes in the incoming cosmic rays modulated by geomagnetic field intensity variations. The variability in the 10Be flux can be used to synchronize ice cores, as well as marine sediments, by comparison with the relative paleointensity variations of the geomagnetic field. However, lock-in of the paleomagnetic signal at some depth below the sediment-water interface in marine sediments through acquisition of a post-depositional remanent magnetization (PDRM) adds uncertainty to synchronization. Despite the long history of such studies, the magnitude of the PDRM lock-in depth remains controversial. In this article, we present clear evidence for a downward offset of the paleointensity minimum relative to the 10Be flux anomaly at the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) geomagnetic polarity boundary, which we interpret to result from a ˜ 15 cm PDRM lock in depth. This lock-in depth indicates that up to several tens of thousands years of age offset probably occurs when a paleomagnetic record is used for dating marine sediments, and the age of the M-B boundary should be revised to ca. 10 kyr younger, which is consistent with a younger ice core derived age of 770 ± 6 ka (2 σ). This cosmogenic age tuning strategy will contribute to refining paleomagnetic-based age models for marine sediments and identifying of lead-lag relationships for global abrupt environmental changes.

  7. Screening Effect of the Diffusive Boundary Layer in Sediments of Lake Aha in the Suburbs of Guiyang City,Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万国江; 万曦; 等

    1997-01-01

    The redox cycle of iron and manganese is a major geochemica process at the boundary layers of lake sediments.Lake Aha,which lies in the suburbs of Guiyang City,Guizhou Province,China,is a medium-sized artificial reservoir with seasonally anoxic hypolimnion,Long-term sedimentary accumulation of iron and manganese resulted in their enrichment in the upper sediments,In the anoxic season,Fe2+ and Mn2+,formed by diological oxidation,would diffuse up to overlying waters from sediments.However,the concentration of oxidation,would diffuse up to overlying waters from sediments,However,the concentration of Fe2+ increased later and decreased earlier than that of Mn2+.Generally,sulfate reduction occurred at 6 cm below the sediment-water interface.Whereas,in the anoxic season.the reduction reached upper sediments,inhibiting the release of Fe2+,The Fe concentration of anoxic water is quickly decreased from high to low as a result of reduction of the suplhur system.

  8. Glacier-derived climate for the Younger Dryas in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellitero, Ramon; Rea, Brice R.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Philip; Braithwaite, Roger; Renssen, Hans; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Ribolini, Adriano; Bakke, Jostein; Lukas, Sven

    2016-04-01

    We have reconstructed and calculated the glacier equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) for 120 Younger Dryas palaeoglaciers from Morocco in the south to Svalbard in the north and from Ireland in the west to Turkey in the east. The chronology of these landform were checked and, when derived from cosmogenic dates, these were recalculated based on newer production rates. Frontal moraines/limits for the palaeoglaciers were used to reconstruct palaeoglacier extent by using a GIS tool which implements a discretised solution for the assumption of perfect-plasticity ice rheology for a single flowline and extents this out to a 3D ice surface. From the resulting equilibrium profile, palaeoglaciers palaeo-ELAs were calculated using another GIS tool. Where several glaciers were reconstructed in a region, a single ELA value was generated following the methodology of Osmaston (2005). In order to utilise these ELAs for quantitative palaeo-precipitation reconstructions an independent regional temperature analysis was undertaken. A database of 121 sites was compiled where the temperature was determined from palaeoproxies other than glaciers (e.g. pollen, diatoms, choleoptera, chironimids…) in both terrestrial and offshore environments. These proxy data provides estimates of average annual, summer and winter temperatures. These data were merged and interpolated to generate maps of average temperature for the warmest and coldest months and annual average temperature. From these maps the temperature at the ELA was obtained using a lapse rate of 0.65°C/100m. Using the ELA temperature range and summer maximum in a degree-day model allows determination of the potential melt which can be taken as equivalent to precipitation given the assumption a glacier is in equilibrium with climate. Results show that during the coldest part of the Younger Dryas precipitation was high in the British Isles, the NW of the Iberian Peninsula and the Vosges. There is a general trend for declining precipitation

  9. Atlantic Warm Pool Trigger for the Younger Dryas Climate Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, N. A.; Mortlock, R. A.; Wright, J. D.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Teneva, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence that variability in the size and heat content of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool impacts circum-North Atlantic climate via the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation mode (Wang et al., 2008). The Atlantic Warm Pool spans the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the western tropical North Atlantic. Barbados is located near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool and coupled ocean models suggest that Barbados remains near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool under varying wind stress simulations. Measurements of the oxygen isotope paleothermometer in Acropora palmata coral species recovered from cores offshore Barbados, show a 3oC monotonic decrease in sea surface temperature from 13106 ± 83 to 12744 ± 61 years before present (errors given as 2 sigma). This interval corresponds to a sea level rise from 71.4 meters to 67.1 meters below present levels at Barbados. The 3oC temperature decrease is captured in eight A. palmata specimens that are in stratigraphic sequence, 230Th/234U dated, and analyzed for oxygen isotopes. All measurements are replicated. We are confident that this is the warm pool equivalent of the Younger Dryas climate event. The initiation of this temperature drop in the Atlantic Warm Pool predates the Younger Dryas start in Greenland ice cores, reported to start at 12896 ± 138 years (relative to AD 2000) (Rasmussen et al., 2006), while few other Younger Dryas climate records are dated with similar accuracy to make the comparison. Rasmussen, S.O., Andersen, K.K., Svensson, A.M., Steffensen, J.P., Vinther, B.M., Clausen, H.B., Siggaard-Andersen, M.L., Johnsen, S.J., Larsen, L.B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Bigler, M., Röthlisberger, R., Fischer, H., Goto-Azuma, K., Hansson, M.E., and Ruth, U., 2006, A new Greenland ice core chronology for the last glacial termination: J. Geophys. Res., v. 111, p. D06102. Wang, C., Lee, S.-K., and Enfield, D.B., 2008, Atlantic Warm Pool acting as a link between Atlantic Multidecadal

  10. Embryo sac haustorium in Dryas octopetala L. (Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Czapik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The embryo sac haustorium found in Dryas octopetala L. from the Tatra Mts is the first record of its occurrence in Rosaceae. At the eight-nucleate stage of the embryo sac, the antipodal end of the central cell began to grow into a narrow caecum filled with dense cytoplasm and elongated in the chalazal direction leaving the three antipodals in situ. The haustorium enlarged and lost its characteristic shape after the period of fertilization. Finally, the embryo sac occupied almost the whole length of the ovule. Situated at its chalazal end there was either dense cytoplasm with a group of endosperm nuclei or dense, grainy cytoplasm only, if fertilization had not taken place.

  11. Warm summers during Younger Dryas cold reversal over Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Frederik; Muschitiello, Francesco; Heikkilä, Miaja; Väliranta, Minna; Tarasov, Lev; Brandefelt, Jenny; Johansson, Arne; Näslund, Jens-Ove; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas cold reversal (GS-1) sticks out as a major stadial interrupting the mid to late deglaciation with a sharp temperature drop of several degrees around the North Atlantic with global teleconnections. The abrupt return to a very cold glacial-like ocean state introduces a strong temperature anomaly to the climate system contrasting the high solar radiation received by northern summers. Here we show that, in contrast to earlier coarse resolution climate simulations of the Younger Dryas, these competing factors result in rather warm summer conditions over Eurasia comparable to the preceding warm period of the late Allerød (GI-1a). Despite up to 10 K colder sea-surface-temperatures in summer, our high resolution simulation with the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1.0.5) suggests that the presence of large ice sheets over Scandinavia, Spitsbergen and the Kara Sea significantly modifies atmospheric flow in summer preventing cold westerly winds from the Atlantic to impact the continent. Instead, fluid dynamics around ice sheets deflect winds to the north or south along the coasts supported by divergent flow from ice domes, stratification and increased tendency to high pressure and atmospheric blocking. Consistent with our model simulation, we show that temperature reconstructions derived from an extended compilation of multi-proxy lake records (chironomids, aquatic pollen, macrofossils) suggest warm July conditions of 13-17° C for continental Europe with exception of coastal and high elevation sites. The analysis of simulated growing degree days, season length and first results from paleo lake modelling driven by climate model output suggests that severe winter to spring conditions significantly delay and shorten the vegetation season but do not produce cold summers as previously simulated.

  12. Lacustrine lignin biomarker record reveals a severe drought during the late Younger Dryas in southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Bao, Hongyan; Zheng, Liwei; Li, Dawei; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2017-03-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) event, which punctuated the last glacial-Holocene transition period and had a profound impact on global climate, is the most well studied millennial-scale climate event although the triggering mechanism remains debate. Weakened Asian summer monsoon during the YD is recorded in oxygen isotopes of stalagmite from Mainland China. However, lacustrine climate record of the YD event has not been reported from the subtropical land-ocean boundary of the Asian continent near the Pacific warm pool. We provide a lignin biomarker record covering the last deglaciation and early Holocene (17-9 ka BP) from the Dongyuan Lake, southern Taiwan, located at the frontal zone of typhoon invasion. The lignin phenol ratio S/V shows that the vegetation in the catchments had shifted from gymnosperm dominant to angiosperm dominant plants since 12.2 ka BP. Significantly decreased lignin concentrations (TLP and λ8) and elevated lignin degradation parameters ((Ad/Al)v, P/(V + S), DHBA/V) in combination with other organic proxies (TOC, δ13Corg) during the late YD suggest a severe drought had occurred in southern Taiwan during this specific period. Changes in the lignin proxies from the Dongyuan Lake lagged the climate changes registered in stalagmite records by around 500-800 years, suggesting a slow response of vegetation and soil processes to rapid climate changes.

  13. Late Pleistocene Megafaunal Extinction Consistent With YDB Impact Hypothesis at Younger Dryas Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, J. P.; Kennett, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    At least 35 mammal and 19 bird genera became extinct across North America near the end of the Pleistocene. Modern increases in stratigraphic and dating resolution suggest that this extinction occurred relatively rapidly near 12.9 ka (11 radiocarbon kyrs). Within the context of a long-standing debate about its cause, Firestone et al., (2007) proposed that this extinction resulted from an extraterrestrial (ET) impact over North America at 12.9 ka. This hypothesis predicts that the extinction of most of these animals should have occurred abruptly at 12.9 ka. To test this hypothesis, we have critically examined radiocarbon ages and the extinction stratigraphy of these taxa. From a large data pool, we selected only radiocarbon dates with low error margins with a preference for directly dated biological materials (e.g., bone, dung, etc.) and modern chemical purification techniques. A relatively small number of acceptable dates indicate that at least 16 animal genera and several other species became extinct close to 12.9 ka. These taxa include the most common animals of the late Pleistocene such as horses, camels, and mammoths. Also, the remains of extinct taxa are reportedly found up to, but not above, the base of a widely distributed carbon-rich layer called the black mat. This stratum forms an abrupt, major biostratigraphic boundary at the Younger Dryas onset (12.9 ka), which also contains multiple ET markers comprising the impact layer (the YDB). Surviving animal populations were abruptly reduced at the YDB (e.g., Bison), with major range restrictions and apparent evolutionary bottlenecks. The abruptness of this major extinction is inconsistent with the hypotheses of human overkill and climatic change. We argue that extinction ages older than 12.9 ka for many less common species result from the Signor-Lipps effect, but the impact hypothesis predicts that as new dates are acquired, they will approach ever closer to 12.9 ka. The megafaunal extinction is strongly

  14. Root tensile strength assessment of Dryas octopetala L. and implications for its engineering mechanism on lateral moraine slopes (Turtmann Valley, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Katharina; Eichel, Jana; Dikau, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphic processes and properties are influenced by vegetation. It has been shown that vegetation cover intercepts precipitation, enhances surface detention and storage, traps sediment and provides additional surface roughness. Plant roots impact the soil in a mechanical and hydrological manner and affect shear strength, infiltration capacity and moisture content. Simultaneously, geomorphic processes disturb the vegetation development. This strong coupling of the geomorphic and ecologic system is investigated in Biogeomorphology. Lateral moraine slopes are characterized by a variety of geomorphic processes, e. g. sheet wash, solifluction and linear erosion. However, some plant species, termed engineer species, possess specific functional traits which allow them to grow under these conditions and also enable them to influence the frequency, magnitude and even nature of geomorphic processes. For lateral moraine slopes, Dryas octopetala L., an alpine dwarf shrub, was identified as a potential engineer species. The engineering mechanism of D. octopetala, based on its morphological (e.g., growth form) and biomechanical (e.g., root strength) traits, yet remains unclear and only little research has been conducted on alpine plant species. The objectives of this study are to fill this gap by (A) quantifying D. octopetala root tensile strength as an important trait considering anchorage in and stabilization of the slope and (B) linking plant traits to the geomorphic process they influence on lateral moraine slopes. D. octopetala traits were studied on a lateral moraine slope in Turtmann glacier forefield, Switzerland. (A) Root strength of single root threads of Dryas octopetala L. were tested using the spring scale method (Schmidt et al., 2001; Hales et al., 2013). Measurement equipment was modified to enable field measurements of roots shortly after excavation. Tensile strength of individual root threads was calculated and statistically analyzed. First results show that

  15. Ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with variable effective pressure at the boundary between slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism: IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; 314/315/316 Scientist, I.

    2008-12-01

    IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001 is located on the hanging wall of the midslope megasplay fault in the Nankai subduction zone off Kii peninsula (SW Japan), and penetrated an unconformity between ~200 m thick slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism. While a down-section porosity increase was clearly observed at the boundary from ~50% to ~60%, logging velocity does not appear to decrease at the boundary, which suggests that different diagenetic processes might exist above and below the boundary. In this study, we conducted ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with pore pressure control. We also conducted observations of sediment and chemical analysis. We examined the relationships between the acoustic properties, sediment textures, logging data from IODP Expedition 314 Site C0001 and data from shipboard core analysis. The ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements were conducted under constant pore pressure (500 kPa) and varying confining pressure to control effective pressure. The confining pressure ranges from 550 kPa to a maximum calculated from the density of overlying sediments (lithostatic pressure - hydrostatic pressure). 8 samples were analyzed, located from ~70 m to ~450 m below the sea floor. P-wave velocity ranges from ~1620 m/s to ~1990 m/s under the hydrostatic pressure condition. These velocities are in good agreement with the logging data. Porosity-velocity relationship in the analyzed data also coincide with that observed in the logging data. Samples shallower than ~300 m fall within previously-defined empirical relationships for normal- and high- consolidation. The deeper samples (at ~370 m and ~450 m below sea floor) show much higher velocity than that predicted by the empirical relationship, suggesting that significant cementation is present in those samples. The textural observations of sediments indicate a decrease in pore space with depth. Quartz and feldspar grains are surrounded by clay mineral matrices. Grain size seems to be almost

  16. Oxygen Isotopes and Meltwater: Younger Dryas and 8.2 ka Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigwin, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Delta 18-O is one of our most powerful and widely used proxies, with, arguably, the fewest likely unknown unknowns. Here I will consider the d18-O evidence for the two best-known floods of mostly liquid water to the ocean, the Younger Dryas (YD) and the 8.2 ka event. The first d18-O signal of a meltwater flood in the ocean was reported 40 years ago by Kennett and Shackleton (1975) and that paper led directly to the meltwater diversion hypothesis for the origin of the YD cooling. It was later suggested by Rooth (1982) that such a flood could interrupt Nordic seas convection and trigger the YD cold episode. It was reported at this meeting last year that a candidate flood has been found in the Mackenzie River region of the western Arctic based on low d18-O and multiple other lines of evidence. The 8.2 ka event was about one-tenth the duration of the YD but with possibly higher transport, and is more difficult to detect in open marine sediments. As with the YD, it has been modeled by hosing and low salinities have been derived by temperature correcting the d18-O. The resulting low salinity was shown not to follow the prediction of the highest resolution modeling, and theory, that the fresh water would be transported mostly equatorward along the continental shelf. However, I report here that the low d18-O signal of the 8.2 ka flooding is present in new cores from near Logan Canyon on the Scotian shelf break, and in Jordan Basin, Gulf of Maine. These results substantially validate the modeling of Condron and Winsor that fresh water transport must have been along the continental shelf.

  17. A Younger Dryas re-advance of local glaciers in north Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Funder, Svend; Linge, Henriette; Möller, Per; Schomacker, Anders; Fabel, Derek; Xu, Sheng; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2016-09-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) is a well-constrained cold event from 12,900 to 11,700 years ago but it remains unclear how the cooling and subsequent abrupt warming recorded in ice cores was translated into ice margin fluctuations in Greenland. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from three moraines in front of local glaciers on a 50 km stretch along the north coast of Greenland, facing the Arctic Ocean. Ten ages range from 11.6 ± 0.5 to 27.2 ± 0.9 ka with a mean age of 12.5 ± 0.7 ka after exclusion of two outliers. We consider this to be a minimum age for the abandonment of the moraines. The ages of the moraines are furthermore constrained using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of epishelf sediments, which were deposited prior to the ice advance that formed the moraines, yielding a maximum age of 12.4 ± 0.6 ka, and bracketing the formation and subsequent abandonment of the moraines to within the interval 11.8-13.0 ka ago. This is the first time a synchronous YD glacier advance and subsequent retreat has been recorded for several independent glaciers in Greenland. In most other areas, there is no evidence for re-advance and glaciers were retreating during YD. We explain the different behaviour of the glaciers in northernmost Greenland as a function of their remoteness from the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which in other areas has been held responsible for modifying the YD drop in temperatures.

  18. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, K-Ca, O, and H isotopic study of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments, Caravaca, Spain Evidence for an oceanic impact site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depaolo, D.J.; Kyte, F.T.; Marshall, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    The results of isotopic and trace-element-abundance analyses of Ir-enriched Cretaceous-Tertiary-boundary clay sediments from Caravaca, Spain, and of adjacent carbonate and marl layers, are presented. Acetic-acid and HCl leachates and residues were analyzed by isotope dilution to determine K, Rb, Sr, Sm, and Nd concentrations and Sr-87/Sr-86 and Nd-143/Nd-144 ratios. The stable isotope ratios delta-D, delta-(C-13), and delta-(0-18) were also determined. The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with published data on the Caravaca sediments and on samples from other locations. The boundary clay is found to be distinguished from the adjacent layers by its isotopic ratios and to be of mainly terrestrial, lithospheric (deeper than 3-km) origin. Although submarine-weathering effects are evident and difficult to quantify, the degree of variation in Ni, Ir, Sr, and REE concentrations is considered too large to be attributed to postdepositional processes alone. These findings are seen as evidence for the ocean impact of a large single asteroid producing a worldwide blanket of ejecta, a large injection of water vapor into the atmosphere, and perhaps a gigantic tsunami, at the end of the Cretaceous period.

  19. The presence of the Oldest Dryas in Spanish mountain landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; Andres, Nuria

    2015-04-01

    The important advances in our understanding of the Oldest Dryas (OD) in the evolution of the continental ice caps and the oceanic basin have not yet reached the European mountains, or have only affected a small part of them. In practice, research into the impact of this period on European mountains has focused on the Alps, where the Gschnitz stadial, a glacial re-advance phase, has been clearly differentiated. This is shown in the landscape by families of moraines present in many valleys, above all in small and medium ones, with minimum age 15.9 ka, but which may represent glacial advances of at least a thousand years older. Traces of this same phase are gradually appearing in other European mountains, including some mountains in Spain. The aim of this paper is to emphasise the importance of the Oldest Dryas in the configuration of high mountain landscape in Spain: (Sierra Nevada, Central System and Pyrenees), through the analysis of the latest studies of glacial chronology. In Sierra Nevada, in the SE sector of the Iberian Peninsula, the definitive deglaciation occurred just at the end of the OD, between 15 and 14.5 ka, according to dates obtained from many polished thresholds. There are moraines which obtain dates between 17 and 16 ka, very close to those of the Maximum Ice Extent (MIE), although as there are still only a few of these and because of slope instability they may be morainic boulders from the MIE phase which have been destabilized, disturbed or exhumed, so that more detailed research is required. Nevertheless, it is known for certain that the end of the OD was accompanied by the massive formation of rock glaciers, resting on the polished thresholds mentioned above and with their fronts stabilized at the end of the OD, around 14.5 ka, although their roots remained active until the Holocene. In the Central System, in both Gredos and Guadarrama, the OD was a phase of great advance after almost disappearing after the MIE. During the OD the glaciers

  20. A Non-Steady-State Condition in Sediments at the Gashydrate Stability Boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for Gashydrate Dissociation or Just Dynamic Methane Transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, T.; Krause, S.; Bertics, V. J.; Steinle, L.; Niemann, H.; Liebetrau, V.; Feseker, T.; Burwicz, E.; Krastel, S.; Berndt, C.

    2014-12-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009, GRL 36, doi:10.1029/2009GL039191). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014, Science 343: 284-287). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. δ18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study

  1. Gradual onset and recovery of the Younger Dryas abrupt climate event in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, J W; Quinn, T M; Shen, C-C; Okumura, Y; Cardenas, M B; Siringan, F P; Banner, J L; Lin, K; Hu, H-M; Taylor, F W

    2015-01-01

    Proxy records of temperature from the Atlantic clearly show that the Younger Dryas was an abrupt climate change event during the last deglaciation, but records of hydroclimate are underutilized in defining the event. Here we combine a new hydroclimate record from Palawan, Philippines, in the tropical Pacific, with previously published records to highlight a difference between hydroclimate and temperature responses to the Younger Dryas. Although the onset and termination are synchronous across the records, tropical hydroclimate changes are more gradual (>100 years) than the abrupt (10-100 years) temperature changes in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The abrupt recovery of Greenland temperatures likely reflects changes in regional sea ice extent. Proxy data and transient climate model simulations support the hypothesis that freshwater forced a reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, thereby causing the Younger Dryas. However, changes in ocean overturning may not produce the same effects globally as in Greenland.

  2. No support from osmium isotopes for an impact event at the Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquay, F.; Ravizza, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    The hypothesis that an extraterrestrial (ET) impact as a triggering mechanism for the abrupt Bølling-Allerød/Younger Dryas climatic transition, the North American megafaunal extinction and the demise of the Clovis culture still remains controversial. Reports of elevated iridium concentrations (> several ng/g) measured in magnetic grains and bulk sediments are used in previous work to argue that a chondritic bolide vaporized upon impact, or fully exploded into the atmosphere. If such a scenario is correct, high Ir concentrations are expected to be accompanied by a systematic decrease in the 187Os/188Os ratios toward unradiogenic, chondrite-like values, reflecting an ET platinum group element (PGE) component. In our study, Os, Ir and Pt were pre-concentrated from 5-20g of powdered samples by NiS fire assay after spiking the samples with a tracer solution enriched in 190Os, 191Ir and 198Pt. Large sample weights were used in order to minimize the nugget effect. Analyses of seven of the same black mat layers investigated in the original reports (Firestone et al. 2007), failed to reproduce previously reported high Ir concentrations, and yielded high 187Os/188Os ratios (1.00-1.90) that are typical of a crustal signature rather than an extraterrestrial one. In addition, a high-resolution study of 187Os/188Os ratios and Os and Ir concentrations in bulk sediments from two ocean margin sites where the Younger Dryas (YD) onset is clearly established by multiple proxies (DSDP 480, Guaymas Basin; ODP 1002C, Cariaco Basin) failed to detect any ET-PGE enrichment anomaly or systematic 187Os/188Os excursion to low ratios at the onset of the YD. Rather measured 187Os/188Os ratios remained within a few percent of present-day seawater 187Os/188Os across the BA/YD transition at both of the marine sites. These results undermine previous claims of a chondritic projectile. Moreover they are difficult to reconcile with the impact of a body from any known meteorite class because

  3. Prediction of Continental Shelf Sediment Transport Using a Theoretical Model of the Wave-Current Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    and Rocky Geyer. Paul Dragos was a very patient tutor on the computer. Vincent Lyne had good insight into the model when I was first learning how it...Schwab for being mostly not sane; to David Rudd for the cartoons; to Paul Thogersen for the key to his house in Boston, no advance notice needed; to...can be increased by biological adhesion of sediment grains (Nowell, Jumars, and Eckman , 1981; Grant, Boyer and Sanford, 1982) or electrochemical

  4. A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan T. Gardner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry system provides data on shore in real time if desired. The immediate purpose of measurements by this device is to continuously infer fluxes of water across the sediment-water interface in a complex estuarine system; however, direct application to assessment of sediment-water fluxes in rivers, lakes, and other systems is also possible. Key objectives of the design include both low cost, and accuracy of the order of ±0.5 mm H2O in measured head difference between the instrument’s two pressure ports. These objectives have been met, although a revision to the design of one component was found to be necessary. Deployments of up to nine months, and wireless range in excess of 300 m have been demonstrated.

  5. Reduced solar activity as a trigger for the start of the Younger Dryas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, H; van Geel, B; van der Plicht, J; Magny, M

    2000-01-01

    It is generally assumed that changes in ocean circulation forced the abrupt climate changes during the Late Pleistocene, including the Younger Dryas event. Recently, however, it was proposed that variations in solar irradiance could have played a much more prominent role in forcing Pleistocene clima

  6. Proliferation and demise of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean during the Younger Dryas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, Malcolm [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australian, Crawley, 6009, Western Australia (Australia); Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Taviani, Marco; Lopez Correa, Matthias; Remia, Alessandro [ISMAR-CNR, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Montagna, Paolo [LSCE, Av. de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, ISMAR-CNR, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Mortimer, Graham [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    Uranium-series and radiocarbon ages are reported for deep-sea corals Madrepora oculata, Desmophyllum dianthus, Lophelia pertusa and Caryophyllia smithii from the Mediterranean Sea. U-series dating indicates that deep-sea corals have persisted in the Mediterranean for over 480, 000 years, especially during cool inter-stadial periods. The most prolific period of growth however appears to have occurred within the Younger Dryas (YD) period from 12, 900 to 11, 700 years BP followed by a short ({approx} 330 years) phase of post-YD coral growth from 11, 230 to 10, 900 years BP. This indicates that deep-sea corals were prolific in the Mediterranean not only during the return to the more glacial-like conditions of the YD, but also following the rapid deglaciation and transition to warmer conditions that followed the end of the YD. Surprisingly, there is a paucity Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) coral ages, implying they were largely absent during this period when cold-water conditions were more prevalent. Radiocarbon ages show that the intermediate depth waters of the Mediterranean generally had {Delta}{sup 14}C compositions similar to surface waters, indicating that these waters were extremely well ventilated. The only exception is a narrow period in the YD (12, 500 {+-} 100 years BP) when several samples of Lophelia pertusa from the Ionian Sea had {Delta}{sup 14}C values falling significantly below the marine curve. Using a refined approach, isolation ages (T{sub isol}) of 300 years to 500 years are estimated for these intermediate (800-1000 m) depth waters relative to surface marine waters, indicating a reduction or absence of deep-water formation in the Ionian and adjacent Adriatic Seas during the YD. Contrary to previous findings, we find no evidence for widespread intrusion of low {Delta}{sup 14}C Atlantic waters into the Mediterranean. Prolific growth of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean ended abruptly at {approx} 10, 900 years BP, with many of the coral-bearing mounds

  7. Proliferation and demise of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean during the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Malcolm; Taviani, Marco; Montagna, Paolo; López Correa, Matthias; Remia, Alessandro; Mortimer, Graham

    2010-09-01

    Uranium-series and radiocarbon ages are reported for deep-sea corals Madrepora oculata, Desmophyllum dianthus, Lophelia pertusa and Caryophyllia smithii from the Mediterranean Sea. U-series dating indicates that deep-sea corals have persisted in the Mediterranean for over 480,000 years, especially during cool interstadial periods. The most prolific period of growth however appears to have occurred within the Younger Dryas (YD) period from 12,900 to 11,700 years BP followed by a short (~ 330 years) phase of post-YD coral growth from 11,230 to 10,900 years BP. This indicates that deep-sea corals were prolific in the Mediterranean not only during the return to the more glacial-like conditions of the YD, but also following the rapid deglaciation and transition to warmer conditions that followed the end of the YD. Surprisingly, there is a paucity Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) coral ages, implying they were largely absent during this period when cold-water conditions were more prevalent. Radiocarbon ages show that the intermediate depth waters of the Mediterranean generally had Δ 14C compositions similar to surface waters, indicating that these waters were extremely well ventilated. The only exception is a narrow period in the YD (12,500 ± 100 years BP) when several samples of Lophelia pertusa from the Ionian Sea had Δ 14C values falling significantly below the marine curve. Using a refined approach, isolation ages (τ isol) of 300 years to 500 years are estimated for these intermediate (800-1000 m) depth waters relative to surface marine waters, indicating a reduction or absence of deep-water formation in the Ionian and adjacent Adriatic Seas during the YD. Contrary to previous findings, we find no evidence for widespread intrusion of low Δ 14C Atlantic waters into the Mediterranean. Prolific growth of deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean ended abruptly at ~ 10,900 years BP, with many of the coral-bearing mounds on the continental slopes being draped in a thin veneer

  8. A Younger Dryas plateau icefield in the Monadhliath, Scotland, and implications for regional palaeoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Clare M.; Lukas, Sven; Carr, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    A record of Younger Dryas glaciation in Scotland is well established. However, the role of the Monadhliath, a significant plateau area extending over 840 km2 in central Scotland, has never been investigated systematically. We present the first systematic glacial geomorphological mapping across the whole region, which has led to the identification of hitherto-unrecorded glacial and associated landforms. The spatial distribution of these landforms indicates that the last phase of glaciation in the area was that of a local plateau icefield. In addition, a clear morphostratigraphical signature provides a strong indication that the icefield dates to the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka), which is supported by numerical ages in the southeast of the study area. Based on the geomorphological evidence and 2D glacier surface profile modelling, a 280 km2 icefield is reconstructed. A novel approach is introduced to quantify plateau icefield thickness for equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and palaeoprecipitation calculations, resulting in greater overall data confidence compared to traditional reconstruction methods. The ELA for the whole icefield is calculated to be 714 ± 25 m, whilst the ELAs of individual outlet glaciers range from 560 m in the west to 816 m in the east, demonstrating a significant W-E precipitation gradient across the region during the Younger Dryas. These ELAs compare well with those calculated for Younger Dryas ice masses reconstructed in neighbouring regions and are in good agreement with overall precipitation patterns suggested for Scotland during this time. Whilst the total amount of precipitation calculated from these ELAs is highly dependent on the method used, irrespective of this, the study suggests a more arid Younger Dryas climate in the region compared to the present day.

  9. A coupled D/18O approach to reconstruct the paleohumidity during the Younger Dryas in the Eifel, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Hepp, Johannes; Bromm, Tobias; Kathrin Schäfer, Imke; Zech, Jana; Sirocko, Frank; Zech, Michael; Zech, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Leaf waxes, such as long-chain n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids, and their D/H isotopic composition, are increasingly used in lake, marine and eolian sediments to reconstruct past changes in vegetation, as well as the isotopic composition of precipitation. However, evaporative enrichment of leaf water might compromise such reconstructions, and it remains difficult to quantitatively reconstruct past climate changes. For the present study, we have analyzed samples from the Gemündener Maar, a lake situated in the western Eifel, Germany, for their isotopic composition of n-alkanes (D) and sugars (18O). Combination of both isotopes allows calculating not only the isotopic composition of paleo-precipitation, but also relative humidity (rh), based on reconstructed d-excess of leaf water. Our results suggest that the Younger Dryas was not particularly dry compared to the Alleröd. The onset of the Holocene, on the other hand, seems to have been very dry, except for one humid spell. Only with the transition Preboreal/Boreal, rh increased again.

  10. Environment and paleoecology of a 12 ka mid-North American Younger Dryas forest chronicled in tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Thompson, Todd A.; Schneider, Allan F.; Lange, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Until now, availability of wood from the Younger Dryas abrupt cooling event (YDE) in N. America ca. 12.9 to 11.6 ka has been insufficient to develop high-resolution chronologies for refining our understanding of YDE conditions. Here we present a multi-proxy tree-ring chronology (ring widths, “events” evidenced by microanatomy and macro features, stable isotopes) from a buried black spruce forest in the Great Lakes area (Liverpool East site), spanning 116 yr at ca. 12,000 cal yr BP. During this largely cold and wet period, the proxies convey a coherent and precise forest history including frost events, tilting, drowning and burial in estuarine sands as the Laurentide Ice Sheet deteriorated. In the middle of the period, a short mild interval appears to have launched the final and largest episode of tree recruitment. Ultimately the tops of the trees were sheared off after death, perhaps by wind-driven ice floes, culminating an interval of rising water and sediment deposition around the base of the trees. Although relative influences of the continental ice sheet and local effects from ancestral Lake Michigan are indeterminate, the tree-ring proxies provide important insight into environment and ecology of a N. American YDE boreal forest stand.

  11. Estimating long-term evolution of fine sediment budget in the Iffezheim reservoir using a simplified method based on classification of boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Hillebrand, Gudrun; Hoffmann, Thomas; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    The Iffezheim reservoir is the last of a series of reservoirs on the Upper Rhine in Germany. Since its construction in 1977, approximately 115,000 m3 of fine sediments accumulate annually in the weir channel (WSA Freiburg, 2011). In order to obtain detailed information about the space-time development of the topography, the riverbed evolution was measured using echo sounding by the German Federal Waterways and Shipping Administration (WSV). 37 sets of sounding data, which have been obtained between July 2000 and February 2011, were used in this research. In a previous work, the morphodynamic processes in the Iffezheim reservoir were investigated using a high-resolution 3D model. The 3D computational fluid dynamic software SSIIM II (Olsen, 2014) was used for this purpose (Zhang et al., 2015). The model was calibrated using field measurements. A computational time of 14.5 hours, using 24 cores of a 2.4 GHz reference computer, was needed for simulating a period of three months on a grid of 238,013 cells. Thus, the long-term (e.g. 30 years) simulation of morphodynamics of the fine sediment budget in the Iffezheim reservoir with this model is not feasible. A low complexity approach of "classification of the boundary conditions of discharge and suspended sediment concentration" was applied in this research for a long-term numerical simulation. The basic idea of the approach is to replace instationary or quasi-steady simulations of deposition by a limited series of stationary ones. For these, daily volume changes were calculated considering representative discharge and concentration. Representative boundary conditions were determined by subdividing time series of discharge and concentration into classes and using central values per class. The amount of the deposition in the reservoir for a certain period can then be obtained by adding up the calculated daily depositions. This approach was applied to 10 short-term periods, between two successive echo sounding measurements

  12. A non-steady-state condition in sediments at the gas hydrate stability boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for gas hydrate dissociation or just dynamic methane transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, Tina; Krause, Stefan; Bertics, Victoria; Steinle, Lea; Niemann, Helge; Liebetrau, Volker; Feseker, Tomas; Burwicz, Ewa; Krastel, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. d18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study site (e.g. water depth, temperature profile, salinity

  13. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Cheriton, Olivia M.

    2016-06-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the importance regional upwelling on water column density structure, potentially accounting for the majority of the variability in internal tidal energy flux across the shelf. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15-25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7-14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave-current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux was almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave-current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus upwelling/relaxation dynamics are primarily responsible for variability

  14. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Kurt; Storlazzi, Curt; Cheriton, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the importance regional upwelling on water column density structure, potentially accounting for the majority of the variability in internal tidal energy flux across the shelf. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15–25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7–14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave–current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux was almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave–current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus upwelling/relaxation dynamics are primarily responsible for

  15. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2......, 4 and 5, respectively. It is not the intention of the book to give a broad review of the literature on this very wide topic. The book tries to pick up information which is of engineering importance. An obstacle to the study of sedimentation is the scale effect in model tests. Whenever small...

  16. Younger Dryas thermohaline circulation in the N-Atlantic: Irminger Sea versus Norwegian Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Antoon; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Luise Knudsen, Karen; Knutz, Paul C.; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Andresen, Camilla S.; Pearce, Christof

    2016-04-01

    Oceanographic observations from the early 1990's show a marked cooling and freshening of the Nordic Seas due to eastward expansion of East Greenland Current derived Polar Waters under influence of strong zonal atmospheric circulation(1). For the cold Younger Dryas (YD) period, ca 12,900 - 11,600 years ago, the impact of Northern Hemisphere late glacial melt water pulses on N- Atlantic thermohaline circulation has been discussed as a likely mechanism for cooling. Melt water discharge sources have been a matter of much debate, but recent evidence point to important melt water pulses emanating from the Arctic region (2, e.g. MacKenzie Valley discharge). The largest volume of these fresh water masses reached the North Atlantic via Fram Strait, less through the Canadian archipelago. During preceding Bølling-Allerød warming, the size of the Laurentide Ice Sheet may have been still large enough to have influenced atmospheric planetary waves resulting in a more zonal Atlantic jet axis(3). In addition, Northern Hemisphere high summer insolation favored a northward displaced west wind belt forcing surface waters away from the Greenland coast. Hence, in analogue to recent observations, ice-loaded meltwater masses in the western Greenland Sea were forced eastward, creating a pool of cold,low salinity (ice-loaded) surface water masses in the Norwegian Sea(4), while transport of cold Polar Water via Denmark Strait to the Irminger Sea would be suppressed. Our own sediment core data from offshore Iceland, Greenland and Davis Strait(5,6,7)together with results from lake studies in southern Greenland(8) point to an active Irminger Current and well-developed Irminger Sea Water subsurface transport towards Davis Strait. Subsequent incorporation of the latter water mass into the south-flowing Labrador Current may have contributed to tidewater glacier melting in eastern Canada and eventually triggering of the H0 meltwater pulse. The sediment core data indicate Irminger Sea deep

  17. Identification of Younger Dryas outburst flood path from Lake Agassiz to the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Julian B; Bateman, Mark D; Dallimore, Scott R; Teller, James T; Yang, Zhirong

    2010-04-01

    The melting Laurentide Ice Sheet discharged thousands of cubic kilometres of fresh water each year into surrounding oceans, at times suppressing the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and triggering abrupt climate change. Understanding the physical mechanisms leading to events such as the Younger Dryas cold interval requires identification of the paths and timing of the freshwater discharges. Although Broecker et al. hypothesized in 1989 that an outburst from glacial Lake Agassiz triggered the Younger Dryas, specific evidence has so far proved elusive, leading Broecker to conclude in 2006 that "our inability to identify the path taken by the flood is disconcerting". Here we identify the missing flood path-evident from gravels and a regional erosion surface-running through the Mackenzie River system in the Canadian Arctic Coastal Plain. Our modelling of the isostatically adjusted surface in the upstream Fort McMurray region, and a slight revision of the ice margin at this time, allows Lake Agassiz to spill into the Mackenzie drainage basin. From optically stimulated luminescence dating we have determined the approximate age of this Mackenzie River flood into the Arctic Ocean to be shortly after 13,000 years ago, near the start of the Younger Dryas. We attribute to this flood a boulder terrace near Fort McMurray with calibrated radiocarbon dates of over 11,500 years ago. A large flood into the Arctic Ocean at the start of the Younger Dryas leads us to reject the widespread view that Agassiz overflow at this time was solely eastward into the North Atlantic Ocean.

  18. Behaviour of the lake district ice lobe of the Scandinavian ice sheet during the younger dryas chronozone (ca. 12 800 - 11 500 years ago)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunkka, J.P.; Erikkilae, A. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    It is highly relevant to picture the conditions that prevailed under and in front of the ice sheets as they were stationary or in equilibrium for many hundreds of years. This knowledge is particularly relevant when planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository underground. For estimating what kind of conditions might exist at the ice margin basic knowledge is needed from the palaeoice sheets that remained stationary for long periods of time. During Younder Dryas Stadial (c. 12 800 - 11 500 years ago) glaciers remained stationary or advanced worldwide as a result of climate cooling. The major end moraine complexes that run around Fennoscandia, Russian Karelia and the Kola Peninsula were deposited at that time and mark the former Younger Dryas ice margin. It this work the palaeoenvironments have been reconstructed in order to reveal the conditions that existed for more than 1000 years in the area where the former Lake District Ice Lobe of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet was in the Salpausselkae zone in southern Finland. Work was carried out using GIS-based reconstruction tools, sedimentological and geophysical (ground penetrating radar) methods. In addition, a detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstruction was produced for the Kylaeniemi area which forms a part of the Salpausselkae II end moraine. The GIS-based reconstructions clearly indicate that the ice grounding line of the Lake District Ice Lobe was standing in shallow water depth in the Baltic Ice Lake. The water depth in front of Salpausselkae I, which marks the ice margin at c. 12 500 years ago was mainly between 20-40 metres. When the ice margin was in Salpausselkae II at around 11 700 years ago the water depth in front of the ice margin was on average less than 20 metres. Although the surface profile of ice was not possible to calculate subgalcial and ice frontal landforms indicate that subgalcial tunnel systems were responsible for releasing melt water and sediment to the ice margin throughout the

  19. Abrupt release of terrigenous organic carbon to the Laptev Sea at termination of the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Muschitiello, F.; Smittenberg, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Vonk, J.; Hill, P.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I. P.; Kirchner, N.; Noormets, R.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, O.

    2015-12-01

    Based on analysis of a piston core collected in 2014 from the Lena River paleo delta, now Laptev Sea, we show that rapid and massive organic carbon (OC) deposition took place into the marine system at the termination of the Younger Dryas when the Arctic region experienced a large and extremely fast climate change. The highly laminated strata with absence of bioturbation further confirm the rapid event-driven emplacement of this deposit which was largely dominated by terrigenous OC as indicated by depleted δ13C values and high concentrations of terrestrial fossil biomarkers (lignin phenols and cutin-derived products). Moreover, the hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of HMW n-alkanes indicates that this terrestrially-derived translocated OC was produced in the watershed during a relatively cold period. The OC appears to be a few thousand years old at time of deposition (ca. 4-5000 radiocarbon years; reservoir age corrected), consistent with the radiocarbon age of pre-aged OC currently supplied by the Lena river. Altogether our results indicate that fast climate warming exerts first-order control on large-scale carbon redistribution. Because the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition occurred within a few decades, we infer that the abrupt and large release of terrigenous OC was essentially driven by rapid changes in the permafrost stability (i.e., thermal collapse/thawing) and increase in precipitation over the Siberian watershed. Interestingly, only surface and sub-surface carbon pools (i.e., active layer) were remobilized while deep and old sources (radiocarbon dead) did not seem to have substantially contributed to the total land-to-ocean flux during the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition.

  20. Spatial characteristics of sediment trace metals in an eastern boundary upwelling retention area (St. Helena Bay, South Africa): A hydrodynamic-biological pump hypothesis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Monteiro, PMS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available fluxes from bottom sediments defined by a high sedimentation rate of organic matter. It is proposed that trace metals may play an important role in alleviating part of the ecological stress by forming sulfide complexes in such systems. A spatially...

  1. The deglaciaton of the Pyreenes: from the Oldest Dryas to the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; de Andrés, Nuria; López-Moreno, Juan I.; García-Ruiz, José M.

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the paper is to study the deglaciation process, including the retreat of the glaciers and the occurrence of short advances with the deposition of new, relatively recent tills in two head valleys of the central-southern Pyrenees: The Upper Gállego Valley, with the main peak Balaitus (42°46'0' N, 0° 15'0'W, 3151 m), and the Marbore Cirque, at the head of the Cinca Valley, on the north face of the Monte Perdido Peak (42º400' N; 0.5º0'W; 3355 m). The deglaciation process was studied through geomorphological mapping and 36Cl cosmogenic exposure ages obtained from morainic and rock glacier boulders and polished bedrocks. Even though the exact position of the front glacier during the global Last Glacial Maximum is not known, there is evidence that the different ice tongues retreated until headwater positions, causing the subdivision of the main glaciers into various individual glaciers. Two clear climate reversals within the general trend to deglaciation have been detected: First of all, the Oldest Dryas, coinciding with the Heinrich Event 1 (ca 17-15 ka) and, secondly, the Younger Dryas (ca 13-11.7 ka). Between both stadials, the Bølling/Allerød Interstadial (ca 15-13 ka) represented an intense glacial retreat up to the cirque headwalls. During the Bølling/Allerød Interstadial the retreat was very rapid, although the occurrence of a short readvance of small glaciers during the Older Dryas must not be ruled out. The Younger Dryas is represented by a new glacial push with the deposition of distinct types of tills. During these late glacier advances, small glaciers and rock glaciers developed close to the cirque headwalls, and coexisted under the same climatic conditions. After the Younger Dryas, new glacial advances has not been detected until the Little Ice Age, except in the Marbore Cirque, where glacial expansion occurred during the Mid and Late Holocene (5.1 ± 0.1 ka), represented by a large push moraine. A melting phase occurred at

  2. Glacier equilibrium line altitudes as palaeoclimatic information sources - examples from the Alpine Younger Dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, H.; Sailer, R.; Hertl, A.; Schuh, M.

    2003-04-01

    Equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) and flucutations of the ELA (dELA) of well dated glacial advances are valuable terrestrial sources for palaeoclimatic information, which are physically well understood (Kuhn 1981, Kaser and Osmaston 2001). Values of dELA can be used to infer quantitatively standard climatic parameters like precipitation and precipitation change. ELAs of former glaciers are usually calculated from maps of the glacier topography based on the moraines and related geomorphological features. Then either the analytical glacial-meterological model for ELA fluctuations by Kuhn (1981) or the statistical parameterization of the climate at the ELA in terms of "summer temperature" and "precipitation" by Ohmura et al. (1992) can be used for palaeoclimatic interpretation. As dELA is influenced both by factors governing accumulation and ablation, some external climatic information on one parameter is necessary to obtain the other. Moraines of the Younger Dryas "Egesen-Stadial" can be found throughout the Alps. Early Younger Dryas (Egesen-I, Ivy-Ochs et al. 1996) dELAs show a distinct spatial pattern. They were highest (ca. 450-600 m against "present-day") in areas exposed towards the West and Northwest. In the central valleys, it was in the order of -300 m and less. Presently, almost 200 data points are available. Summer temperature depression (dTs) can be derived from the Younger Dryas timberline depression and other proxy data (Ammann and Oldfield 2000). It seems to be in the order of -3.5 K in the central Alps. Along the northern and western fringe of the Alps, it may be somewhat larger (-4 to -4.5 K). dELA and dTs values are then used to calculate precipitation change (dP). Early Younger Dryas climate in the central valleys of the Alps seems to have been considerably drier than today (dP -30%). In areas open to the West and Northwest, precipitation seems to have been the same as today or even slightly higher (dP 0 - +10%). These results agree well with the

  3. Biomarker Records of Lake Albano (central Italy) and Lake Constance (southern Germany)- Implications for environmental change in the Holocene and Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, S.; Schwalb, A.; Ariztegui, D.; Wessels, M.; Puettmann, W.

    2003-12-01

    Steroids, triterpenoids and n-alkanes from a 13 m Holocene sediment core from Lake Albano and a 7 m Late Pleistocene/Holocene core from Lake Constance (13,000 to 650 years BP) as well as pigments, pollen and stable isotopes from benthic ostracodes, are used to reconstruct climatic changes and human impact on the lake systems and their catchments. Dinosterol, isoarborinol, hopanoids, and tetrahymanol in Lake Albano sediments indicate changes in the biological assemblages and enhanced lake mixing and thus stronger wind activity at around 6,500 and 3,800 years BP. A development from forest to a more open landscape in the Lake Albano catchment from 5,000 years BP is suggested by a decrease of n-alkanes derived from deciduous trees (C27 and C29). N-alkanes, friedelin and amyrenones show a close correspondence with the percentage of broadleaf-tree pollen, indicating deforestation after 5,000 and 6,500 years BP,. High concentrations of land-plant derived β -sitosterol in Lake Constance sediments during the Younger Dryas indicate erosive input due to sparse vegetation. The increase of β -sitosterol after 7,000 years BP suggests terrigenous input as a result of enhanced precipitation. Dinosterol distribution traces a period of high productivity between 11,600 and 7,000 years BP. Tetrahymanol, a biomarker for ciliates and possibly an indicator for water column stratification, shows relatively high concentrations at approximately 9,000 years BP. This coincides with a 4 ‰ shift to more negative values of δ 13C in the ostracode L. mirabilis, suggesting hydromechanic changes in Lake Constance.

  4. Rapid response of alpine timberline vegetation to the Younger Dryas climate oscillation in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, Mel A.; Jodry, Margret A.

    2000-01-01

    Paleobotanical records from two high-altitude (>3300 m) sites in Colorado show a clear and immediate response to the Younger Dryas climate oscillation. The Black Mountain Lake and Sky Pond records indicate that alpine timberline migrated upslope to near-modern elevations during the late Bølling-Allerød (13.6 12.9 ka). Subsequent declines in arboreal pollen percentages and accumulation rates during the Younger Dryas interval (12.9 11.7 ka) reflect a downslope displacement of the alpine timberline ecotone of 60 120 m in elevation. This change translates to a cooling of summer temperature by ˜0.4 0.9 °C and is consistent with proposed Younger Dryas advances of alpine glaciers in the Rocky Mountains to positions close to Little Ice Age maxima. Alpine timberline readvanced upslope to elevations above both sites between 11.7 and 11.4 ka. The concomitant response of temperature-sensitive alpine timberline vegetation in Colorado and late-glacial changes in North Atlantic thermohaline circulation implicates a rapid, widespread atmospheric transmission of the Younger Dryas climate oscillation.

  5. Absence of Cooling in New Zealand and the Adjacent Ocean During the Younger Dryas Chronozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Lehman, Scott J.; Fifield, L. Keith; De Deckker, Patrick

    2007-10-01

    As the climate warmed at the end of the last glacial period, a rapid reversal in temperature, the Younger Dryas (YD) event, briefly returned much of the North Atlantic region to near full-glacial conditions. The event was associated with climate reversals in many other areas of the Northern Hemisphere and also with warming over and near Antarctica. However, the expression of the YD in the mid- to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (and the southwest Pacific region in particular) is much more controversial. Here we show that the Waiho Loop advance of the Franz Josef Glacier in New Zealand was not a YD event, as previously thought, and that the adjacent ocean warmed throughout the YD.

  6. Evaluating the flux of extraterrestrial osmium at the onset of Younger Dryas in the GRIP ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, J. H.; Han, C.; Hong, S.; Steffensen, J. P.; Sharma, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.6 ka) was an abrupt cooling event during the last deglaciation. The mechanism behind the cooling is suggested to be a temporary slowdown of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation due to catastrophic release of meltwater from proglacial Lake Agassiz during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet [1]. An alternative hypothesis states that the cooling was directly/indirectly triggered by one or more cosmic airbursts/impacts [2]. While several papers have documented evidence for a YD extraterrestrial impact including microspherules, nanodiamonds, magnetic grains, and glass-like carbon [4-7], this hypothesis remains controversial [8-10]. In a recent study by Petaev et al. [11], an unusually high Pt/Ir ratio of 1200 was discovered in the GISP-2 ice core at the onset of YD, indicating a large Pt enriched iron meteorite impact. Such a high Pt/Ir in extraterrestrial materials has not been documented [12]. Thus, Petaev et al. [11] acknowledge that the interpretation of the Pt anomaly is based on circumstantial evidence. The distinct Os isotopic composition (187Os/188Os ratio) of the terrestrial (=1.26) and extraterrestrial (= 0.13) sources should allow us to evaluate if there was a meteorite impact at the YD boundary. These analyses are technically challenging owing to rather low concentration of Os in ice-melts ( 1x10-15g/g). Here, we will present Os isotope data from the GRIP ice core spanning the time period through YD to shed light on the meteorite/comet impact hypothesis. [1] Broecker et al. (1989) Nature 341, 318-321; [2] Firestone et al. (2007) PNAS. 104, 16016-16021; [3] Bunch et al. (2012) PNAS. 109, 1903-1912; [4] LeCompte et al. (2012) PNAS. 109, 2960-2969; [5] Wittke et al. (2013) PNAS 110, 2088-2097; [6] Wu et al. (2013) PNAS. 110, 3557-3566; [7] Kennett et al. (2015) PNAS 112, E4344-E4353; [8] Pinter et al. (2011) Earth Sci. Rev., 106, 247-264; [9] Holliday et al. (2014) J. Quat. Sci. 29, 515-530; [10] Meltzer et al. (2014) PNAS

  7. A detailed comparison of Asian Monsoon intensity and Greenland temperature during the Allerød and Younger Dryas events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dianbing; Wang, Yongjin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Xianfeng; Wu, Jiangying; Chen, Shitao

    2008-08-01

    An annual layer-counted and 230Th-dated stalagmite oxygen isotope record from Qingtian Cave in Hubei province, central China, provides an Asian Monsoon (AM) history across the Allerød to Younger Dryas (YD) transition, with an average 2.5-year resolution. Seasonal δ18O profiles indicate that the calcite δ18O is a sensitive proxy for AM changes, and the close similarity between the Qingtian and other cave records from eastern China suggests a large-scale regional coherence of monsoonal precipitation δ18O variations associated with the temperature changes in high-northern latitudes. The annually-resolved chronology with a U-Th age uncertainty of less than 100 yr defines the timing, duration and transition of the early Allerød, the intra-Allerød cold period (IACP), the late Allerød, and the start of the YD. The 160-yr-long IACP, with two brief reversals, is clearly shown in both δ18O and lamina thickness records. The early and late Allerød, separated by the IACP, are characterized by several decadal to centennial cycles of δ18O variations, each punctuated by sub-cycles. These decadal to centennial monsoon variations correlate with the Greenland temperature changes, supporting a model simulation that the decadal North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) are coupled via atmospheric circulation under glacial boundary conditions, perhaps affecting tropical/subtropical monsoon changes. However, the monsoon transition between the late Allerød and YD lasted 380 yr, longer than the analogous Greenland temperature shift by at least 130 yr [Stuiver, M., Grootes, P.M., GISP2 oxygen isotope ratios. Quat. Res. 53 (2000) 277-284]. This implicates other links besides the direct link between Greenland and the AM, which is now well documented. One possibility is the influence by Southern Hemisphere climate via cross-equatorial air flow [An, Z.S., The history and variability of the East Asian paleomonsoon climate. Quat. Sci. Rev. 19 (2000) 171-187].

  8. A new concept for paleohydrological evolution of the Younger Dryas in NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouimetarhan, Ilham; Prange, Matthias; Gonzalez, Catalina; Dupont, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    The late deglacial interval from approximately 13 to 11 kyr BP contains some of the best documented abrupt climate changes in the Past, the Younger Dryas (YD). It is also an interval when the bipolar climatic signature of millennial-scale changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is well expressed. Here we present a high-resolution palynological record from core GeoB16205-4 (1°21.11'N, 43°05.80'W), retrieved off the Parnaíba River mouth, southeast of the Amazon River (~1955 m water depth). Pollen and organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst assemblages indicate a predominantly wet climate during the YD in the nowadays semi-arid Nordeste, whereby a second phase between ~12.3 and 11.7 kyr BP is wetter than the period before. This is recorded by a strong increase in the concentrations of river plume dinoflagellate cyst assemblages indicative of a stratified surface water column and reduced salinity environments, as well as a drop in grass pollen and microcharcoal particle concentrations along with strong fluctuations in the representation of rain forest, gallery forest and tree ferns suggesting year-round humid conditions. This shift from a relatively wet first phase to a much wetter second phase is in agreement with the transient TRACE-21k coupled climate model simulation which shows a first pluvial Parnaíba stage from ~12.8 to 12.3 kyr BP and a second stronger pluvial stage between ~12.3 and 11.7 kyr BP to be related to a very weak AMOC due to meltwater pulses in the North Atlantic. The AMOC variation induces a steep temperature gradient between the Southern and the Northern Hemisphere which forces a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and its associated rainfall. The two-step hydroclimatic and environmental evolution during the Younger Dryas has not been documented previously in this region.

  9. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, K-Ca, O, and H isotopic study of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments, Caravaca, Spain: Evidence for an oceanic impact site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D.J.; Kyte, F.T.; Marshall, B.D.; O' Neil, J.R.; Smit, J.

    1983-09-01

    Isotopic ratios and trace element abundances were measured on samples of IR-enriched clay at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, and in carbonate and marl from 5 cm below and 3 cm above the boundary. Samples were leached with acetic acid to remove carbonate, and with hydrochloric acid. Leachates and residues were measured. The Sr, Nd, O and H isotopic compositions of the boundary clay residues are distinct from those of the stratigraphically neighboring materials. The data indicate that most of the clay material was derived from a terrestrial source with relatively low /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr and high /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd ratios. The delta/sup 18/O data suggest that the detritus has been modified by submarine weathering. K-Ca and Rb-Sr systematics, as well as O isotope ratios of K-feldspar spherules within the boundary clay, suggest that they are predominantly authigenic and may have formed after the time of deposition. However, Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic data indicate that the spherules contain relict material that provides information on the nature of the original detritus. The isotopic evidence for foreign terrestrial detritus in the boundary clay, the low rare earth element concentrations and high Ni concentration, support the hypothesis of a terminal Cretaceous asteroidal impact that produced a global layer of fallout. The data are most easily explained if the impact sites was on oceanic crust rather than continental crust, and if a substantial fraction of the fallout was derived from relatively deep within the lithosphere (> 3 km). This would probably require a single large impactor. 60 references.

  10. Subglacial hydrology of the lake district ice lobe during the Younger Dryas (ca. 12 500 - 11 600 years ago) in the Kylaeniemi area, SE Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunkka, J. P.; Moisio, K.; Vainio, A. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    It is essential to gain knowledge on the subglacial hydrological conditions at the glacier bed / bedrock interface when assessing how bedrock fracture zones affect subglacial melt water flow and in which subglacial zones pressurized and oxygen-rich melt water penetrates into the bedrock fracture systems. In the warm-based glacier zones, a part of subglacial melt water will penetrate deep into the fracture systems although the major part of melt water is drained to and beyond the ice margin via subglacial tunnel networks especially in the areas where ice is flowing on the crystalline bedrock. During the last deglaciation phase of the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, glaciofluvial accumulations were deposited and these sediment accumulations are highly important when picturing the subglacial hydrology of different ice streams during deglaciation in the crystalline bedrock area. The aim of the present work was to map the bedrock fracture zones in the Kylaeniemi area and to shed light on the subglacial hydrology of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet's Lake District Ice Stream that occupied the Kylaeniemi area during the Younger Dryas between ca. 12 500 - 11 600 years ago. The special emphasis within this general aim was to study the relationship between bedrock fracture zones and the routes of subglacial drainage paths. The methods used to map and study bedrock fracture zones and subglacial drainage paths included remotes sensing methods, field observations, ground penetrating radar (GPR) investigations and GIS-based reconstructions. Conventional geological field methods aided by the GPR-method were also used to map bedrock exposures and their structures and to define the type of glaciofluvial sediments and glaciofluvial landform associations. Two main fracture zone sets occur in the study area. The most prominent bedrock fracture zone set trends NW-SE while the other, less prominent fracture zone set is aligned in NE-SW direction. The majority of the minor joint sets in

  11. Reappraisal of the sequence boundary in time and space: Case and considerations for an SU (subaerial unconformity) that is not a sediment bypass surface, a time barrier, or an unconformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, John M.; Bhattacharya, Janok P.

    2012-07-01

    The sequence-bounding unconformity bears the key defining traits of being "a surface separating younger from older strata, along which there is evidence of subaerial erosional truncation … or subaerial exposure, with a significant hiatus indicated (Van Wagoner et al., 1988)." This subaerial component of sequence boundaries (subaerial unconformity—SU) is also broadly considered to form as a topographic surface of sediment bypass, carved during relative sea level fall and buried by backfilling during relative sea level rise. Accordingly, the SU is commonly presumed to record an approximate time barrier, which separates older from younger strata along its full length. In this paper we show that regional composite scour (RCS) surfaces that are traditionally mapped as an integral component of the SU were never a single subaerial topographic surface characterized by sediment bypass, are not unconformities, do not record an effective time barrier, and form diachronously at the channel-belt scale over the entire fall to rise of a base-level cycle. These RCS surfaces, and by inference the SU surfaces they comprise, thus do not fully fit key defining characteristics embodied in the conceptual sequence boundary. Flume observations and field data show that the RCS is buried by fluvial sediment simultaneously as it is scoured. Accordingly, the RCS is perennially covered with stored sediment during formation, is only exposed as a subaerial topographic surface at the local place and time where it is undergoing active growth, and forms over the duration of local marine drainage during a relative sea-level cycle. This "cut-and-cover" model differs greatly from more established "bypass" models, which assume that the RCS was roughly sediment free and subaerially exposed for long durations of incision during regression and thus preserves a significant depositional hiatus upon later burial. Instead, the RCS may commonly and locally record a hiatus more typical of a facies

  12. Younger Dryas equilibrium line altitudes and precipitation patterns in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Hanns; Moran, Andrew; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Moraine systems of the "Egesen Stadial" are widespread and easily identifiable features in the Alps. Absolute dating with terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclides shows that the maximum extent was reached during the early Younger Dryas (YD), probably as a reaction to the intense climatic downturn subsequent to Lateglacial Interstadial. In recent years, several new studies and the availability of high-quality laser-scan hillshades and orthophotos allowed a significant extension of the database of YD glaciers as "palaeoprecipitation gauges" to large hitherto unmapped regions in the Austrian and Swiss Alps. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the glaciers and its lowering relative to the Little Ice Age ELA (dELA) shows a distinct and systematic spatial pattern. Along the northern slope of the Alps, dELAs are usually large (around 400 m and perhaps even more), while dELAs range around 200 m in the well sheltered areas of the central Alps, e.g. in the Engadine and in western Tyrol. Both stochastic glacier-climate models (e.g. Ohmura et al. 1992) and the heat- and mass balance equation (Kuhn 1981) allow the reconstruction of precipitation change under the assumption of a spatially constant summer temperature depression, which in turn can be estimated from biological proxies. This allows to draw the spatial pattern of precipitation change with considerable detail. Precipitation change is clearly controlled by the local relief like high mountain chains, deeply incised and long valleys and mountain passes. Generally the contrast between the northern fringe of the Alps and the interior was more pronounced than today. Climate in the Northern and and Northwestern Alps was rather wet with precipitation totals eventually exceeding modern annual sums. The central Alps received 20 - 30% less precipitation than today, mainly due to reduced winter precipitation. In the southern Alps, still scarce spatial information points to precipitation sums which were approximately similar to

  13. Atmospheric dynamics over Europe during the Younger Dryas revealed by palaeoglaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Brice; Pellitero, Ramon; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Philip; Braithwaite, Roger; Renssen, Hans; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Ribolini, Adriano; Bakke, Jostein; Lukas, Sven

    2017-04-01

    A dataset of 120 palaeoglaciers ranging from Morocco in the south to Svalbard in the north and from Ireland in the west to Turkey in the east, has been assembled from the literature. A robust quality control on the chronology was undertaken and, when derived from cosmogenic nuclides, ages were recalculated using the most up-to-date production rates. All the reconstructed glaciers date to the Younger Dryas. Frontal moraines/limits were used to initiate the palaeoglacier reconstructions using GlaRe, a GIS tool which generates an equilibrium profile ice surface along a single flowline and extrapolates this to out to a 3D ice surface. From the resulting glacier surfaces palaeo-ELAs were calculated within the GIS. Where multiple glaciers were reconstructed within in a region, a single ELA value was generated. Results show that ELAs decrease with latitude but have a more complex pattern with longitude. A database of 121 sites, spanning the same geographical range as the palaeoglaciers, was compiled for Younger Dryas temperature, determined from palaeoproxies, for example pollen, diatoms, coleoptera, chironimids etc. These proxy data were merged and interpolated to generate maps of average temperature for the warmest and coldest months and annual average temperature. Results show that, in general, temperature decreases with latitude. Temperature at the palaeo-ELAs were determined from the temperature maps using a lapse rate of 0.65°C/100m and the precipitation required for equilibrium was calculated. Positive precipitation anomalies are found along much of the western seaboard of Europe, with the most striking positive anomalies present in the eastern Mediterranean. Negative precipitation anomalies appear on the northern side of the Alps. This pattern is interpreted to represent a southward displaced polar frontal jet stream with a concomitant track of Atlantic mid-latitude depressions, leading to more frequent incursions of low pressure systems especially over the

  14. The Tintah-Campbell gap and implications for glacial Lake Agassiz drainage during the Younger Dryas cold interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Andy

    2015-06-01

    Reconstructions of glacial Lake Agassiz paleogeography and drainage have been an important contribution to formulating a hypothesis in which glacial Lake Agassiz drainage to the Atlantic Ocean initiated the Younger Dryas cold interval. This study evaluates the lake level and outlet history of Lake Agassiz as recorded by strandlines visible on lidar digital elevation models from North Dakota and Minnesota. The former lake levels are warped due to glacial isostatic adjustment. Older levels have experienced more uplift and therefore have more curvature. The strandline data establish that the Moorhead lowstand of Lake Agassiz was bracketed by the strongly diverging Campbell and Tintah lake levels, which creates a vertical gap between the former lake levels. This gap exists due to a lake level drop of ˜90 m when the Laurentide Ice Sheet retreat opened a lower outlet, which must have been a northwest outlet to the Arctic Ocean. By applying an exponential decay rebound model, this event dates to 12,180 ± 480 cal yr BP, post-dating the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 12,900 cal yr BP. Eastern drainage outlets to the Atlantic Ocean through the Laurentian Great Lakes that were contemporaneous with the onset of the Younger Dryas cannot be ruled out, but if these outlets existed, their duration of occupation was short-lived and not characterized by significant drawdown events within glacial Lake Agassiz.

  15. Climate change, patch choice, and intensification at Pont d'Ambon (Dordogne, France) during the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily Lena

    2009-11-01

    This paper considers the impact of the Younger Dryas on the prehistoric inhabitants of Pont d'Ambon, a site in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, through an examination of the zooarchaeological remains from this site. An investigation of patch choice indicates that patch choice evenness declines during the Younger Dryas due to increasing local dominance of the grassland patch. Analyses of demographic composition, cutmark frequency, and marrow processing in the wild European rabbit ( Oryctolagus cuniculus) assemblage suggest intensified rabbit use during this period. This study thus supports the hypothesis that changing climate had significant impacts on the prehistoric inhabitants of Pont d'Ambon. However, the traditional climate hypothesis—that changing climate negatively impacted the availability of larger fauna, forcing a switch to smaller, lower-ranked prey items—is not supported here. The inhabitants of Pont d'Ambon seem to have adapted to changing climate by efficiently exploiting the new species available to them, and possibly, during the Younger Dryas, by intensifying their use of one of these new species, the European rabbit.

  16. Exploring the Human Ecology of the Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, D. J.; Erlandson, J. M.; Braje, T. J.; Culleton, B. J.

    2007-05-01

    Several lines of evidence now exist for a major extraterrestrial impact event in North America at 12.9 ka (the YDB). This impact partially destabilized the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets, triggered abrupt Younger Dryas cooling and extensive wildfires, and contributed to megafaunal extinction. This event also occurred soon after the well established colonization of the Americas by anatomically modern humans. Confirmation of this event would represent the first near-time extraterrestrial impact with significant effects on human populations. These likely included widespread, abrupt human mortality, population displacement, migration into less effected or newly established habitats, loss of cultural traditions, and resource diversification in the face of the massive megafaunal extinction and population reductions in surviving animal populations. Ultimately, these transformations established the context for the special character of plant and animal domestication and the emergence of agricultural economies in North America. We explore the Late Pleistocene archaeological record in North America within the context of documented major biotic changes associated with the YDB in North America and of the massive ecological affects hypothesized for this event.

  17. Comment on 'Was Scotland deglaciated during the Younger Dryas?' by Small and Fabel (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Hall, Brenda L.; Schaefer, Joerg M.

    2016-11-01

    The course of climatic events in Scotland and the broader North Atlantic region during the glacial termination has important implications for our understanding of the causes and mechanisms of abrupt climate change but remains in debate. One example is the timing of the late-glacial 'Loch Lomond Readvance' (LLR), during which an ice cap and numerous cirque glaciers were nourished in the Scottish Highlands. Exactly when the LLR occurred and culminated has been disputed for several decades and has been addressed via several different types of chronologic evidence (e.g., Lowe and Walker, 1976; Golledge et al., 2007; MacLeod et al., 2011; Bromley et al., 2014). Recently, Small and Fabel (2016) presented a suite of six 10Be surface-exposure ages from moraine ridges on Rannoch Moor, central Scottish Highlands, that questioned whether two different dating techniques - 10Be and 14C - yield the same result for the timing of final deglaciation of the Scottish ice cap. In that study, Small and Fabel (2016) concluded that the 10Be data show deglaciation occurred at the close of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial (∼11.6 kyr), as much as a millennium later than the scenario presented by Bromley et al. (2014) based on minimum-limiting 14C data. While the issue of which, if either, is a more reliable age for deglaciation cannot be resolved fully in a short note, we comment on several points raised by Small and Fabel (2016) and suggest a means to resolve this question.

  18. Cometary airbursts and atmospheric chemistry: Tunguska and a candidate Younger Dryas event

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Dreschhoff, Gisela; Johnson, Carey K

    2009-01-01

    We estimate atmospheric chemistry changes from ionization at the 1908 Tunguska airburst event, finding agreement with nitrate enhancement in GIS2PH and GISP2 ice cores and noting an unexplained accompanying ammonium spike. We then consider the candidate Younger Dryas comet impact. The estimated NOx production and O3 depletion are large, beyond accurate extrapolation. A modest nitrate deposition signal exists in ice core data. The predicted very large impulsive deposition might be visible in higher resolution data. Ammonium has been attributed to biomass burning, and found coincident with nitrate spikes at YD onset in both the GRIP and GISP2 ice cores. A similar result is well-resolved in Tunguska ice core data, but the Tunguska forest fire was far too small to account for this. Direct input of ammonia from a comet into the atmosphere is consistent with the spike for the candidate YD object, but also inadequate for Tunguska. An analog of the Haber process with hydrogen contributed by the cometary or surface wa...

  19. Late-glacial climatic oscillation in Atlantic Canada equivalent to the Allerod/younger Dryas event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, R.J.; Grant, D.R.; Stea, R.; Occhietti, S.

    1986-09-18

    Attempts to relate late-glacial events in northeastern North America to the well-documented climato- and chrono-stratigraphy of Europe and the British Isles have not been considered convincing because the evidence presented was from isolated sites, and could therefore be interpreted as local fluctuations not related to a general, widespread climatic change. However, recent palynologial studies in northeastern North America postulating a late-glacial climatic oscillation have caused renewed interest in relating such an oscillation to the Allerod/younger Dryas event. The authors have extended their preliminary results from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and here present the evidence for a climatic event in Atlantic Canada. This event involved a warming trend before 11,000 yr BP that was interrupted by a cold period which persisted until the abrupt Holocene warming at approx.10,000 yr BP. They propose a possible mechanism to link this event with that of Europe. 41 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  20. Enhanced sea-ice export from the Arctic to the GIN seas during the Younger Dryas: A "Canadian" source from radiogenic isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Maccali, J.; Not, C.; Poirier, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event and the related slowing of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) have been linked to a large array of processes. The most widely supported causal mechanism involves an influx of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean linked to a partial drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz. Recently, a northward drainage route, through the Mackenzie River outlet into the Arctic Ocean, has been suggested from land-based studies [Murton et al., Nature 464, 740-743]. Sedimentological and geochemical analysis of cores raised from Lomonosov Ridge and the Fram Strait area, yield relatively robust evidence for enhanced ice-rafting deposition -IRD- (with a 5-fold increase -) during the critical interval. At Lomonosov, the corresponding sedimentary layer (from ca. 13 to 12 ka) is marked by a pulse of detrital carbonates in the silt to sand fractions, with approximately equal amounts of calcite and dolomite, pointing towards an Arctic Canadian sediment source area [Not & Hillaire-Marcel, Nature Communication, Jan. 31, 2012]. The layer also depicts a 5 fold increase 230Th-excess, which we link to an enhanced flux of scavenging particles. At both sites, the geochemical signatures of the YD-layer, based on elemental (Zr/Al) and isotopic (Sr, Nd and Pb) data on bulk sediments and residues ensuing from the removal of exchangeable fractions (Zr/Al, Nd, Pb, Sr), are used to identify detrital sediment source areas. Whereas three major source areas variably contributed to IRD during the MIS 3-Present interval (i.e., the Russian, Canadian and Greenland margins), the YD interval singles out by strongelemental and isotopic excursions, notably a peak in radiogenic Sr, indicating prominent supplies from the Canadian end-member. This suggests enhanced sea-ice production and drifting along the BeaufordGyre, then the Trans-Polar Drift. A major drainage event along the Mackenzie outlet area, as proposed in the above reference,would be a suitable trigger for

  1. Radiocarbon dating and Dendrochronology for Statigraphic Units near Tebano, Senio Northern Apennines - Time frame of Climatic Fluctuation at the onset of the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenschwiler, Loren; Hajdas, Irka; Cherubini, Paolo; Picotti, Vincenzo; Saurer, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The presence of Pinus [sylvestris] provides an insight into dramatic events due to climatic changes. Several major and minor climatic fluctuations have had a strong impact on terrestrial and marine environments since the last glacial period to present day (Ravazzi et al. 2006). This study aims to describe the response of a fluvial environment through the use of dendrochronology and stratigraphy. Here, we intend to get a better understanding of how these climatic fluctuations affect the behavior of the Senio River (Lotter et al. 1992). In Tebano, Italy, several Pinus sylvestris subfossil trunks were discovered during excavation for an irrigation pool. Subfossil samples were collected to analyze the climate during the Younger Dryas (11,000 years BP) in detail. Charcoal samples from the Bubano clay quarry extend our research to further to 35,500 cal. years BP. The combination of dendrochronology along with stratigraphy allowed us to examine the climate at a detailed local and apply it to a broader spectrum. Tree-ring measurements and cross dating provided a better understanding and verification of extreme events that occurred during the lifespans of the trees. The use of stable isotopes indicates the extreme conditions that occurred. Radiocarbon dating validates the age of the samples and what geological period they come from. Along with stratigraphy, we were able to compile depth data to create a sediment curve. Using various methods throughout this study, we discovered the climatic situation of Pinus 11,000 years BP and are able to compare them with samples from today. These present day samples mark two of the southernmost extents of the Pinus population. We were then able to comprehend the magnitude of sediment supply and precipitation. Through this collection of methods and data, we are able to understand the influence of climate change in the past and the potential changes of the future. REFERENCES Lotter, A. F.; Eicher, U.; Siegenthaler, U.; Birks, H. J. B

  2. How Synchronous was the Transition into the Younger Dryas across the Euro-Atlantic Region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, F.; Muschitiello, F.; Heikkilä, M. P.; Väliranta, M.; Tarasov, L.; Brandefelt, J.; Johansson, A. V.; Naslund, J. O.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of a currently weakening subpolar gyre south of Greenland has again increased scientific attention regarding the role of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) for the regional to global climate. The rapid climate shift of the Younger Dryas (YD, GS-1) cold reversal during the last deglaciation is attributed to an abrupt slowdown or collapse of the AMOC due to a strong meltwater pulse and/or the rapid disintegration of the Laurentide Ice sheet. Although such a dramatic event is not expected for the future, the spatiotemporal climatic response to such a slowdown is an interesting test case. Two recently well dated proxy records around the North Sea region suggest a non-synchronous early cooling/onset of the YD compared to Greenland (NGRIP). Presentation #61803 discusses the hypothesis of a local cooling as a response to increased ice berg calving and/or meltwater from Fenno-Scandinavian Ice Sheet (FIS) during the late Alleröd warm phase (GI-1a). Here we study CCSM3 model output from the quasi-transient atmosphere-ocean simulation (TraCE) where no strong contribution from FIS is considered from the late Alleröd into the YD. We evaluate to which extent the spatiotemporal temperature response to the AMOC slowdown of the simulation is synchronous over the Euro-Atlantic region and how atmospheric teleconnections reorganize during the rapid shift into the YD. In addition, we run time-slice experiments at high spatial resolution of around 100 km with the Community Earth System Model CESM1.0.5 for the late Alleröd and YD to compare spatial climatic differences for both periods taking into account the regional influence from continental ice sheets in more detail.

  3. A Model Analysis for the Design and Deployment of an Eulerian Sediment Trap Mooring Array in a Western Boundary Upwelling System from Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URSULA MENDOZA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design and configuration of a Eulerian sediment trap mooring array, which was deployed at the shelf edge (zm ≈ 140 m 80 km off Cabo Frio, SE- Brazil (23° S. The site was subject to interplay between the Tropical Waters (TW of the Brazil Current (BC, intrusions from the South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW, which are the source of upwelling in the region, and other oceanographic processes. Detailed computations were used to optimize the total weight, buoyancy balance, and maximum acceptable tilt to avoid hydrodynamic bias in the trapping efficiency and array adaptation to the local oceanographic conditions with the assistance of Matlab and Muringa programs and Modular Ocean Model 4.0 (MOM; i.e., to assert the vertical distribution of the meridional current component. The velocity range of the current component was determined by short term measurements to be between 0.1 and 0.5 m/s. Projections led to a resulting minimum anchor weight of 456 kg. The necessary line tension was ascertained by using the appropriate distribution of a series of buoys along the array, which finally attained a high vertical load of 350 kg because of the attached oceanographic equipment. Additional flotation devices resulted in a stable mooring array as reflected by their low calculated tilt (2.6° ± 0.6°. A low drag of 16 N was computed for the maximum surface current velocity of 0.5 m/s. The Reynolds number values ranged from 4 × 104 to 2 × 105 and a cone-trap aspect ratio of 1.75 was used to assess the trap sampling efficiency upon exposure to different current velocities.

  4. Precessional forcing of lacustrine sedimentation in the late Cenozoic Chemeron Basin, Central Kenya Rift, and calibration of the Gauss/Matuyama boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deino, A.L.; Kingston, J.D.; Glen, J.M.; Edgar, R.K.; Hill, A.

    2006-01-01

    The fluviolacustrine sedimentary sequence of the Chemeron Formation exposed in the Barsemoi River drainage, Tugen Hills, Kenya, contains a package of five successive diatomite/fluvial cycles that record the periodic development of freshwater lakes within the axial portion of the Central Kenya Rift. The overwhelming abundance in the diatomite of planktonic species of the genera Aulacoseira and Stephanodiscus, and the virtual absence of benthic littoral diatoms and detrital material indicate areally extensive, deep lake systems. A paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy has been determined and chronostratigraphic tie points established by 40Ar/39Ar dating of intercalated tuffs. The sequence spans the interval 3.1-2.35??Ma and bears a detailed record of the Gauss/Matuyama paleomagnetic transition. The 40Ar/39Ar age for this boundary of 2.589 ?? 0.003??Ma can be adjusted to concordance with the Astronomical Polarity Time Scale (APTS) on the basis of an independent calibration to 2.610??Ma, 29??kyr older than the previous APTS age. The diatomites recur at an orbital precessional interval of 23??kyr and are centered on a 400-kyr eccentricity maximum. It is concluded that these diatomite/fluvial cycles reflect a narrow interval of orbitally forced wet/dry climatic conditions that may be expressed regionally across East Africa. The timing of the lacustrine pulses relative to predicted insolation models favors origination of moisture from the northern Africa monsoon, rather than local circulation driven by direct equatorial insolation. This moisture event at 2.7-2.55??Ma, and later East African episodes at 1.9-1.7 and 1.1-0.9??Ma, are approximately coincident with major global climatic and oceanographic events. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological changes during the onset of the Younger Dryas along a W-E transect in Europe from decadal resolved lacustrine lipid biomarker D/H records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Dirk; Aichner, Bernhard; Maas, David; Neugebauer, Ina; Ott, Florian; Slowinski, Michal; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    To better understand mechanisms and feedbacks of hydrological changes during abrupt climatic changes, such as the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) cold period, we applied biomarker based paleohydrological proxies to three well dated, high-resolution lacustrine sediment profiles along a 900km W-E transect from Western Germany to Eastern Poland. Here we present biomarker hydrogen isotope records (δD values) from terrestrial and aquatic sources from three sites (Meerfelder Maar, western Germany [MFM]; Rehwiese, eastern Germany [RW]; Trzechowskie, central Poland [TRZ]) that contain annually laminated sediments and common tephra layers, allowing the identification of leads and lags in the response of the hydrological cycle to YD cooling on decadal timescales. We observed a decrease in biomarker δD values 170 and 100 years before the biostratigraphically defined onset of the YD at 12,679 in western (MFM) and eastern Germany (RW), respectively. These changes coincide with the onset of Greenland Stadial 1 in the NGRIP icecore at 12,846 years BP and imply a common climatic forcing, likely cooling. In eastern Poland however, at TRZ biomarker δD values start to decrease only at the YD onset. Further, we observed that the onset of aridification at all three sites coincided with the onset of the YD. A decrease in the magnitude of changes in biomarker δD values and aridification from W to E suggests a more gradual and less strong aridification in eastern Europe. Our results suggest that hydrological changes at the onset of the YD were strongest and most abrupt in western Europe, where a substantial increase in aridity occurred over just 80 years, resulting in widespread environmental changes [1]. These differences in magnitude and the distinct temporal succession could be related to the influence of the Fennoscandian ice sheets and/or the Siberian High on atmospheric circulation in eastern Europe. [1] Rach O, Brauer A, Wilkes H, Sachse D. Delayed hydrological response to

  6. Rapid Climatic Change at the End of the Last Glacial as Determined from Palynological Analysis of Sediments from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delusina, I.; Peterson, L. C.; Spero, H.

    2005-05-01

    We report the first palynological study of a deep marine sediment core from the anoxic Cariaco Basin, off the coast of Venezuela. The Cariaco Basin acts as a natural sediment trap for rapidly accumulating sediments of marine and terrestrial origin. This situation creates favorable conditions for studying short-term paleoenvironmental change. Our pollen analyses indicate unique pollen assemblages which mirror the complex altitudinal zonation of coastal vegetation and its dynamics. The pollen analyses encompass the interval from 3 to 9 m in core MD03-2620, spanning the Glacial/Holocene transition and including the Younger Dryas and the beginning of the Preboreal. Our data indicate large changes during the time of Heinrich event 1 (ca 16-14 Kyr BP) with high arboreal/nonarboreal pollen ratios (2/8) and a dominance of wormwood changing to a cereals/sedge community. Another characteristic of this interval is the lowest pollen concentration, indicating the coldest and driest observed conditions. The disappearance of mangrove pollen at the time of the coldest episodes provides additional indirect evidence for the deterioration of climate conditions and for a drop in sea level. Maximum forest vegetation is found from the middle of the Bolling/Allerod and the middle of the Younger Dryas. This is followed by a similar, though less intense, interval of cooling between the Younger Dryas and the Preboreal. Variations in both the diversity of species and the pollen concentration correlate well with changes in sediment color and with the marine oxygen isotope record.

  7. Stable isotope record from Seneca Lake, New York: Evidence for a cold paleoclimate following the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William T.; Mullins, Henry T.; Ito, Emi

    1997-02-01

    A radiocarbon controlled stable isotope record from Seneca Lake, New York, has defined a relatively cold paleoclimate (10.1 8.2 ka) that was younger, and regionally of greater magnitude, than the well-known Younger Dryas cold interval. These new isotope results are supported by published pollen records, from throughout the Great Lakes region, that also define a relatively cold paleoclimate at this time. This cold paleoclimate occurred during global meltwater pulse IB when large volumes of cold, isotopically light (low δ18O) meltwater flowed into the Great Lakes from the rapidly retreating Laurentide ice sheet. The discharge of cold glacial meltwaters into the Great Lakes during pulse IB suppressed downwind summer temperatures in the Finger Lakes region and provided a source of isotopically light precipitation. Published proxy data from Greenland, Norway, and Alaska also record relatively cold paleoclimates following the Younger Dryas, suggesting widespread Northern Hemisphere cooling as a direct result of the rapid melting of the Laurentide ice sheet between 10 and 8 ka.

  8. Early-Warning Signals for the onsets of Greenland Interstadials and the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition

    CERN Document Server

    Rypdal, M

    2015-01-01

    The high-frequency band of the $\\delta^{18}\\mbox{O}$ variations in the North Greenland Ice Core Project displays fluctuation levels that increase as one approaches the onset of an interstadial (warm) period. For some of the events it is possible to establish statistical significance using Monte-Carlo simulations with a non-parametric null model with random phases and the same spectral density as the $\\delta^{18}\\mbox{O}$ record during the stadial periods. Similar results are found for the locally estimated Hurst exponent for the high-frequency fluctuations, and it is therefore natural to interpret these findings as so-called "critical slowing down" signatures, i.e. early-warning signs of tipping points. The observed "slowing down" is found to be similar (and perhaps even stronger) in the Younger Dryas, suggesting that there are some similarities between mechanisms of the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition and the onsets of the Greenland interstadials. It is also verified that the temperature fluctuations duri...

  9. Gully catchment as sediment sinks, not just a source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Annegret; Heckmann, Tobias; Larsen, Joshua; Bork, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    Catchment wide sediment fluxes have been modified throughout the Anthropocene, but it`s spatial and temporal dimension is still under debate. Here, we present a long-term sediment budget, highlighting the overlooked role of gullies as significant sediment sinks, and challenging the prevalent view of gullies as being exclusively conveyor belts of sediment. This is important, as sediment delivery from hillslopes to trunk streams represents a significant pathway of mass transfer in the landscape, with a large fraction facilitated by gully systems. In this study, we analysed the sediment mass balance and storage dynamics within a headwater gully catchment in central Europe over the last ~12 500 yrs. Human induced erosion resulted in hillslope erosion rates ~2.3 times higher than under naturally de-vegetated conditions during the Younger Dryas. However the total sediment inputs to the gully system (and therefore gully aggradation), were similar. Net gully storage has consistently increased to become the second largest term in the sediment budget after hillslope erosion (storage is ~45% and ~73% of inputs during two separate erosion and aggradation cycles). In terms of the depletion of gully sediment storage, the sediment mass balance shows that export beyond the gully fan was not significant until the last ~500 years, due to reduced gully fan accommodation space. The significance of storage effects on the gully sediment mass balance, particularly the export terms, means that it would be difficult to determine the influences of human impact and / or climatic changes from floodplain or lake sedimentary archives alone and that the sediment budgets of the headwater catchments from which they drain are more likely to provide these mechanistic links.

  10. A quantitative reconstruction of changes in relative humidity during the Younger Dryas in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, O.; Kahmen, A.; Brauer, A.; Sachse, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroclimatic changes have a profound effect on terrestrial ecosystems from regional to continental scales. However, past hydrological changes linked to abrupt climate shifts and their effect on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood due to the lack of direct quantitative hydrological reconstructions. In addition, most paleoclimate proxies record the environmental response to hydrological variations, such as vegetation changes inferred by changes in pollen abundance, rather than hydroclimatic change itself. Over the last decade hydrogen isotope ratios (δD value) of lipid biomarkers have emerged as a novel and direct hydrological proxy, since it aims to reconstruct the δD values of the water source used by photosynthetic organisms. However, the hydrogen isotope ratio of source water (such as precipitation) is an integrated signal of condensation temperature, moisture pathway, precipitation amount and evaporation. As such, it is difficult to separate a single parameter, for example relative humidity, required for a true quantitative interpretation. Here we present a novel approach to quantify changes in relative humidity (Δrh) based on the hydrogen isotope composition of terrestrial and aquatic n-alkanes. In this proof-of-concept study we generate a high-resolution Δrh record for the Younger Dryas period (YD) of Western Europe from Lake Meerfelder Maar, (MFM, Germany). We use aquatic macrophyte biomarker δD values as a recorder of lake water δD (aq), which represents an integrated annual precipitation signal, and terrestrial leaf wax n-alkane δD values (terr) as a record of leaf-water evapotranspiration. Therefore we consider the isotopic difference between δDterr and δDaq (ɛterr-aq) as a measure of mean leaf water enrichment (ΔL), which is mainly controlled by relative humidity and temperature. By employing a modified and parameterized Craig-Gordon leaf-water model we are able to extract past changes in relative humidity from a sedimentary record

  11. DYNAMICAL SIMULATION ON TIDAL CURRENT FIELD IN ANCIENT YELLOW SEA DURING YOUNGER DRYAS EPISODE%新仙女木期古黄海潮流场的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩喜彬; 史经昊; 李家彪; 李广雪

    2009-01-01

    During Younger Dryas episode (12. 9 ~11. 6 cal. Ka), the sea level oscillated at about - 66 m depth contour in the continental shelf seas in eastern China and the seawater got into the south of the present North Yellow Sea,so Yellow Sea became a long narrow channel gulf. To simulate the tidal current of this special gulf, Environmental Fluid Dynamics Computer Code is used in this paper. The calculation combines curvilinear orthogonal coordinates in the horizontal direction with Sigma mapping coordinates in the vertical direction, and it uses a method which transforms a problem from three-dimension into two-dimension. The results show that the tidal current was still very strong in Yellow Sea during Younger Dryas episode, entering the special gulf along the right side entrance. From both shallow sides to deep centre, rotating flow changes reciprocating flow. Under the effect of reciprocating flow, the floor is eroded and the mud and sand are carried away. Progressive wave turns into rotating wave and two ateliotic amphidromic points appear on the western side of the gulf after tidal wave coming into Yellow Sea. At the same time, tidal residual current flows to southeast and east with relatively great velocity at the west and interior gulf and it becomes weakly near the entrance. The current may carry the bottom sediments and discharge them to the present mud sediment zone in north East China Sea. But at eastern Yellow Sea the tidal residual current flows to north and forms an anticlockwise circulation at centre of the eastern gulf which is corresponding to the eddy mud zone in Southeast Yellow Sea (Heishan mud zone). The anticlockwise circulation captures suspended sediment and may gestate the present mud sediment zone. The extension direction of tidal sand ridges and the size composition of the tidal current sand in eastern South Yellow Sea have a close relationship with the tidal current field of the ancient Yellow Sea, so the less fluctuating sea level changing

  12. Magnetism of quaternary sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Friedrich

    Magnetism of Quaternary sediments was the topic of a well-attended symposium held during the 13th INQUA (International Union of Quaternary Research) congress in Beijing, China, August 2-9. More than 40 papers were delivered by scientists from Belgium, England, France, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United States, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and other countries. The host country contributed to a productive session that was part of the first large scientific meeting to take place in Beijing after the June 4, 1989, upheaval.Nearly half of the studies focused on paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties of loess in Alaska, Central Asia, China, and New Zealand. Magnetostratigraphic polarity dating was done at some sections in the western (Shaw et al.) and central Chinese loess plateau (Bai and Hus; Wang and Evans; Yue). The interpretation of the polarity pattern found in the western loess plateau still is not unambiguous. In the central part, certain polarity boundaries, such as the Brunhes/Matuyama (B/M) boundary, are found in slightly different stratigraphic positions (Hus et al.; Yue). In deep-sea sediments the lock-in depth of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) at the B/M boundary seems to be a linear function of sedimentation rate (de Menocal et al.). Although the magnetization process in the Chinese loess is not well understood, detailed records of polarity transitions have been reported for the B/M and the Jaramillo R→N transition (Ma et al.; Rolph).

  13. Surface (sea floor) and near-surface (box cores) sediment mineralogy in Baffin Bay as a key to sediment provenance and ice sheet variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, John T.; Eberl, D.D.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the glacial history of the ice sheets surrounding Baffin Bay and to provide information on sediment pathways, samples from 82 seafloor grabs and core tops, and from seven box cores were subjected to quantitative X-ray diffraction weight percent (wt.%) analysis of the 2000 m) all show an abrupt drop in calcite wt.% (post-5 cal ka BP?) following a major peak in detrital carbonate (mainly dolomite). This dolomite-rich detrital carbonate (DC) event in JR175BC06 is possibly coeval with the Younger Dryas cold event. Four possible glacial-sourced end members were employed in a compositional unmixing algorithm to gain insight into down core changes in sediment provenance at the deep central basin. Estimates of the rates of sediment accumulation in the central basin are only in the range of 2 to 4 cm/cal ka, surprisingly low given the glaciated nature of the surrounding land.

  14. Emerging boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a processual ontology for the emergence of man-made, linear boundaries across northwestern Europe, particularly in the first millennium BC. Over a significant period of time, these boundaries became new ways of organizing the landscape and settlements—a phenomenon that has...... of this phenomenon emerged along equivalent trajectories. At the same time, variation in the regional incorporation of these linear phenomena points toward situation-specific applications and independent development....

  15. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  16. Hydrological and vegetational response to the Younger Dryas climatic oscillations: a high resolution case study from Quoyloo Meadow, Orkney, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, David; Abrook, Ashley; Timms, Rhys; Matthews, Ian; Palmer, Adrian; Milner, Alice; Candy, Ian; Sachse, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (Loch Lomond) Stadial is a well defined period of cold climate that in North West Europe punctuated the climatic amelioration during the Last Glacial - Interglacial Transition (LGIT ca. 16-8 ka). A palaeolake record from Quoyloo Meadow, Orkney Islands (N59.067, E-3.309) has been analysed for pollen and stable isotopes on biomarker lipids. n-Alkanes from terrestrial and aquatic sources are present throughout the core. The average chain length (ACL) is relatively low during the interstadial (~28.0) and shows a distinct increase during the Younger Dryas (to 29.0 +), attributed to an increase in grasses and drought resistant shrubs (e.g. Artemisia, Castañeda et al., 2009, Bunting, 1994). At the beginning of the Holocene, the ACL rapidly drops to 28.3 and from thereon gently increases again to ~29.0. There is a continued odd-over-even n-alkane predominance, although even n-alkanes are present in greater quantities in the interstadial, indicating an increasing terrestrial contribution in the Holocene. Ongoing deuterium isotope measurements of the n-alkanes will give independent evidence for palaeohydrological changes and can be compared to the other proxy evidence within the same core. Using a combination of nC29 and nC23 (terrestrial and aquatic end-members, respectively), a change in relative humidity (rH) can be qualified. This is based on the idea that terrestrial vegetation is affected by evapotranspiration processes, whereas aquatic vegetation is not (Rach et al., 2014). This data is supported by a high resolution palynological study; the contiguously sampled record demonstrates ecosystem/environmental responses to millennial-scale climatic change and allows for the possible detection of vegetation shifts at the sub-millennial scale. Vegetation aside, the pollen data can further aid in the interpretation of the recorded n-alkanes and isotopic analyses. This data is placed within a chronological framework derived from a high resolution crypto- and

  17. Carbon isotopes from fossil packrat pellets and elevational movements of Utah agave plants reveal the Younger Dryas cold period in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth L.; Arundel, Samantha T.

    2005-09-01

    Carbon isotopes in rodent fecal pellets were measured on packrat (Neotoma spp.) middens from the Grand Canyon, Arizona. The pellet samples reflect the abundance of cold-intolerant C4 and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant species relative to the predominant C3 vegetation in the packrat diet. The temporal sequence of isotopic results suggests a temperature decline followed by a sharp increase corresponding to the Bølling/ Allerød Younger Dryas early Holocene sequence. This pattern was then tested using the past distribution of Utah agave (Agave utahensis). Spatial analyses of the range of this temperature-sensitive CAM species demonstrate that its upper elevational limit is controlled by winter minimum temperature. Applying this paleotemperature proxy to the past elevational limits of Utah agave suggests that minimum winter temperatures were ˜8 °C below modern values during the Last Glacial Maximum, 4.5 6.5 °C below modern during the Bølling/Allerød, and 7.5 8.7 °C below modern during the early Younger Dryas. As the Younger Dryas terminated, temperatures warmed ˜4 °C between ca. 11.8 ka and 11.5 ka. These extreme fluctuations in winter minimum temperature have not been generally accepted for terrestrial paleoecological records from the arid southwestern United States, likely because of large statistical uncertainties of older radiocarbon results and reliance on proxies for summer temperatures, which were less affected.

  18. Sediment Budget Analysis; Masonboro Inlet, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-15

    littoral sediments or sediments derived principally from the beaches, consisting of generally sandy material. Other sediments consisting of fine-grain...propagate only from the seaward boundary toward shore . It includes features such as wave generation, wave reflection, and bottom frictional dissipation...analysis. The regional shore line adopted in the study is oriented at 36.17o clockwise from north, as shown in Figure 8. Statistics were performed for

  19. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  20. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  1. Inferring the provenance of an alien species with DNA barcodes: the neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah A Burg

    Full Text Available The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful.

  2. Inferring the provenance of an alien species with DNA barcodes: the neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Noah A; Pradhan, Ashman; Gonzalez, Rebecca M; Morban, Emely Z; Zhen, Erica W; Sakchoowong, Watana; Lohman, David J

    2014-01-01

    The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful.

  3. Inferring the Provenance of an Alien Species with DNA Barcodes: The Neotropical Butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Noah A.; Pradhan, Ashman; Gonzalez, Rebecca M.; Morban, Emely Z.; Zhen, Erica W.; Sakchoowong, Watana; Lohman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful. PMID:25119899

  4. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This article builds on the results obtained in the so-called Blurring Boundaries project which was undertaken at the Law Department, Copenhagen Business School, in the period from 2007 to 2009. It looks at the sustainability of the Danish welfare state in an EU law context and on the integration ...

  5. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work to ...

  6. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SEDIMENT RELEASE FROM RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    For the computation of the sediment quantity released from reservoirs, a vertical two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is combined with a sediment transport model. The hydrodynamic model is based on the equations of mass and momentum conservation along with a k - ε model for closure of the Reynolds stresses. The sediment transport model is based on the convection-diffusion equation of sediment concentration and the sediment continuity equation. Both the hydrodynamic and sediment transport models are developed in a boundary-fitted curvilinear co-ordinate system. Comparison of the predicted mean velocity field with laboratory results indicates that the present model captures most experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. Also good agreement is found in comparison of the sediment transport results for the numerical model and the experimental model.

  7. Application of Large-Scale 3D Non-Orthogonal Boundary Fitted Sediment Transport Model and Small-Scale Approach for Offshore Structure in Cimanuk Delta North Java Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim Muin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the Cimanuk Delta at the North Java Sea has changed rapidly over the last two decades. The annual sediment deposition is about two million cubic meters (Yuanita and Tingsanchali, [1]. The large-scale ocean hydrodynamics and sediment transport model MuSed3D (Muin, [2] was applied to the North Java Sea to simulate suspended sediment transport at the study site. A potential offshore structure was positioned at approximately 30 km from the Cimanuk Delta. The result of the large-scale model was calibrated using observation data and Landsat satellite image interpretation. The agreement between the modeling results and the observations was excellent. It was found that the critical shear stresses for erosion and deposition were 0.1 Pa and 0.05 Pa respectively. An empirical formula was further utilized to assess the local scouring at the potential offshore structure site in a small-scale domain and under extreme conditions.

  8. Changing Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodkin, Evelyn; Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, workfare-style policies have become part of the institutional architecture of welfare and labor market arrangements around the world. In this article, we offer a comparative, historical view of workfare´s advance. Our analysis recognizes the complexity and diversity of what we...... call the “policies of workfare” and highlights the different paths through which these policies have developed in the U.S. and parts of Europe. We argue that it is necessary to look beyond familiar policy labels and language in order to consider workfare-style policies as part of a broader political...... project that is altering the boundary between the democratic welfare state and the market economy. We see workfare policies as boundary-changing with potentially profound implications both for individuals disadvantaged by market arrangements and for societies seeking to grapple with the increasing...

  9. Reconstructing Last Glacial Maximum and Younger Dryas paleolandscapes through subsurface paleosol stratigraphy: An example from the Po coastal plain, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Agnese; Bruno, Luigi; Cleveland, David M.; Drexler, Tina M.; Amorosi, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Paleosols are commonly used to reconstruct ancient landscapes and past environmental conditions. Through identification and subsurface mapping of two pedogenically modified surfaces formed at the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and during the Younger Dryas (YD) cold event, respectively, and based on their lateral correlation with coeval channel-belt sand bodies, we assessed the geomorphic processes affecting the Po coastal plain during the Late Pleistocene (30-11.5 cal ky BP). The 3D-reconstruction of the LGM and YD paleosurfaces provides insight into the paleolandscapes that developed in the Po alluvial plain at the transitions between warm and cold climate periods. The LGM paleosol records a stratigraphic hiatus of approximately 5 kyr (29-24 cal ky BP), whereas the development of the YD paleosol was associated with a climatic episode of significantly shorter duration. Both paleosols, dissected by Apennine rivers flowing from the south, dip towards the north-east, where they are replaced by fluvial channel belts fed by the Po River. The LGM channel-belt sand body reflects the protracted lateral migration of the Po River at the onset of the glacial maximum. It is wider (> 24 km) and thicker ( 15 m) of the fluvial sand body formed during the YD. The northern margin of LGM Po channel-belt deposits was not encountered in the study area. In contrast, a spatially restricted paleosol, identified in the north at the same elevation as the southern plateau, may represent local expression of the Alpine interfluve during the YD event. This study highlights how 3D-mapping of regionally extensive, weakly developed paleosols can be used to assess the geomorphic response of an alluvial system to rapid climate change.

  10. Strong middepth warming and weak radiocarbon imprints in the equatorial Atlantic during Heinrich 1 and Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeab, Syee; Friedrich, Tobias; Timmermann, Axel; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a benthic foraminiferal multiproxy record of eastern equatorial Atlantic (EEA) middepth water (1295 m) covering the last deglacial. We show that EEA middepth water temperatures were elevated by 3.9 ± 0.5°C and 5.2 ± 1.2°C during Heinrich event 1 (H1) and Younger Dryas (YD), respectively. The radiocarbon content of the EEA middepth during H1 and YD is relatively low and comparable to the values of the pre-H1 episode and Bølling-Allerød, respectively. A transient Earth system model simulation, which mimics the observed deglacial Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) history, qualitatively reproduces the major features of the EEA proxy records. The simulation results suggest that fresh water-induced weakening of the AMOC leads to a vertical shift of the horizon of Southern Ocean-sourced water and a stronger influence of EEA sea surface temperatures via mixing. Our findings reaffirm the lack of a distinctive signature of radiocarbon depletion and therefore do not support the notion of interhemispheric exchanges of strongly radiocarbon-depleted middepth water across the tropical Atlantic during H1 and YD. Our temperature reconstruction presents a critical zonal and water depth extension of existing tropical Atlantic data and documents a large-scale and basin-wide warming across the thermocline and middepth of the tropical Atlantic during H1 and YD. Significant difference in the timing and pace of H1 middepth warming between tropical Atlantic and North Atlantic likely points to a limited role of the tropical Atlantic middepth warming in the rapid heat buildup in the North Atlantic middepth.

  11. Transgressive Surface as Sequence Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the four cases of the sequence boundary (SB)-transgressive surface (TS) relation in nature shows that applying transgressive surfaces as sequence boundaries has the following merits: it improves the methodology of stratigraphic subdivision; the position of transgressive surface in a sea level curve is relatively fixed; the transgressive surface is a transforming surface of the stratal structure; in platforms or ramps, the transgressive surface is the only choice for determining the sequence boundary; the transgressive surface is a readily recognized physical surface reflected by seismic records in seismostratigraphy. The paper reaches a conclusion that to delineate a SB in terms of the TS is theoretically and practically better than to delineate it between highstand and lowstand sediments as has been done traditionally.

  12. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  13. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  14. Suspended sediment and sediment-associated contaminants in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Mumley, T.E.; Leatherbarrow, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Water-quality managers desire information on the temporal and spatial variability of contaminant concentrations and the magnitudes of watershed and bed-sediment loads in San Francisco Bay. To help provide this information, the Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) takes advantage of the association of many contaminants with sediment particles by continuously measuring suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), which is an accurate, less costly, and more easily measured surrogate for several trace metals and organic contaminants. Continuous time series of SSC are collected at several sites in the Bay. Although semidiurnal and diurnal tidal fluctuations are present, most of the variability of SSC occurs at fortnightly, monthly, and semiannual tidal time scales. A seasonal cycle of sediment inflow, wind-wave resuspension, and winnowing of fine sediment also is observed. SSC and, thus, sediment-associated contaminants tend to be greater in shallower water, at the landward ends of the Bay, and in several localized estuarine turbidity maxima. Although understanding of sediment transport has improved in the first 10 years of the RMP, determining a simple mass budget of sediment or associated contaminants is confounded by uncertainties regarding sediment flux at boundaries, change in bed-sediment storage, and appropriate modeling techniques. Nevertheless, management of sediment-associated contaminants has improved greatly. Better understanding of sediment and sediment-associated contaminants in the Bay is of great interest to evaluate the value of control actions taken and the need for additional controls. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. SEDIMENTATION AND EROSION STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ The river systems observed today is the cumulative result of surface, rill, and gully erosion, and sediment transport, scour, and deposition. The divisions of approach between these two related areas are man-made, and are not based on sound science. Most of the erosion studies are done by geologists and agricultural engineers who are concerned of the surface, rill, and gully erosion and the loss of agricultural land productivity. Hydraulic engineers are more interested in the study of sediment transport, scour, and deposition, and their impacts on river engineering and hydraulic structures in rivers and reservoirs. Erosion studies are often based on empirical relationships or field data to determinate the annual sediment yield from a watershed. On the other hand, hydraulic engineers focus their attention on solving equations based on assumed initial and boundary conditions with a time scale of days, hours, or seconds. Both approaches have their complementary strengths and weaknesses. It is important to provide a forum for specialists in both areas to communicate, exchange ideas, and learn from each other.

  16. Paleoclimate and paleoceanographic reconstruction in the southern Iberian Mediterranean and Atlantic margins across the Younger Dryas event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Gámiz, Marta; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca

    2017-04-01

    The Alboran Sea basin in the Mediterranean and the Gulf of Cadiz in the Atlantic have provided excellent paleoarchives for reconstructing past climate variability in southern Iberian regions. Particularly interesting has been the study of the paleoclimate evolution of abrupt climate events from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the onset of the Holocene such as the Younger Dryas (YD). A diverse range of geochemical proxies, integrating inorganic and organic, has been used for paleoclimate reconstructions in these regions. Elemental concentrations and elemental ratios have been used for determining detrital inputs and bottom water oxygen conditions while organic molecular biomarkers as algal and archaea derived lipids have been used for estimating sea surface temperature (SST). Al-ratios mirroring eolian input, such as Zr/Al and Si/Al ratios, record enhanced dust input at the end of the LGM, during the last Heinrich event (H1) and at the onset of the YD in the Alboran Sea. For this latest interval, these ratios suggest an initial dry phase followed by a progressive aridity decrease throughout the YD. In the Gulf of Cadiz, these variations are not similarly recorded, probably due to less sensitive open ocean records in comparison to the restricted nature of the Alboran Sea basin. Selected redox proxies, Fe/Al and Mn/Al ratios, show peaks of oxidation fronts during the LGM and the H1 in the Alboran Sea and during the Bölling-Alleröd and the onset of the Holocene in the Gulf of Cadiz, derived from variations in ventilation and oxygen conditions that differ in the Mediterranean and Atlantic regions. SST records have also showed remarkable differences between both basins with minima temperature estimated values during the YD of ca. 12°C in the Alboran Sea and ca. 18°C in the Gulf of Cadiz, according to the freshening of the Atlantic jet along the Alboran basin. In general, a different paleoclimate and oceanographic evolution with a different YD response is recorded

  17. Hydrological Influence on the Dead Carbon Fraction in a Tropical Speleothem During the Younger Dryas and the Last Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M. L.; Hua, Q.; Drysdale, R.; Bajo, P.; Jenkins, D.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Johnson, K. R.; Gagan, M. K.; Zhao, J. X.

    2015-12-01

    The number of paleoclimate records derived from speleothems has increased significantly in recent years. In addition, speleothems have been used for calibration of the radiocarbon timescale beyond the range of the tree-ring record. One critical issue for reliable speleothem-based radiocarbon calibration and 14C dating of speleothems is constraining the temporal variations in the radioactively dead carbon (i.e. dead carbon fraction (DCF)) that is incorporated into this archive and to determine the potential mechanisms driving such changes. While some studies have shown insignificant variations in DCF through time and highlighted the potential utility of speleothems to extend/improve the radiocarbon calibration curve, others have reported significant temporal variability in speleothem DCF associated with changes in cave recharge. To further assess the potential hydrological control on speleothem radiocarbon variability, we constructed a new high-resolution DCF record from a speleothem from Flores, Indonesia for two different time periods, the Younger Dryas (YD) chronozone and the Last Millennium. A total of thirty-four 14C analyses (twenty for the YD and fourteen for the Last Millennium) were conducted on pieces of calcite extracted from stalagmite LR06-B1, which was well-dated by ~90 U-Th ages. To better characterize the paleoclimate and environmental changes, high-resolution stable-isotope (δ18O, δ13C) and trace-element (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) measurements were also conducted along the same sections of stalagmite. Broad comparison of the DCF record with the hydrologically-controlled proxy data suggests that increases in rainfall were matched by DCF increases. In line with a previous interpretation of DCF variability for the same specimen, but during the time interval 2.4-2.8 cal kyr BP and the post-bomb period, we interpret the DCF during the YD and the Last Millennium to have been primarily controlled by limestone dissolution associated with changes in open- versus

  18. Sedimentation coefficient distributions of large particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter

    2016-07-21

    The spatial and temporal evolution of concentration boundaries in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation reports on the size distribution of particles with high hydrodynamic resolution. For large particles such as large protein complexes, fibrils, viral particles, or nanoparticles, sedimentation conditions usually allow migration from diffusion to be neglected relative to sedimentation. In this case, the shape of the sedimentation boundaries of polydisperse mixtures relates directly to the underlying size-distributions. Integral and derivative methods for calculating sedimentation coefficient distributions g*(s) of large particles from experimental boundary profiles have been developed previously, and are recapitulated here in a common theoretical framework. This leads to a previously unrecognized relationship between g*(s) and the time-derivative of concentration profiles. Of closed analytical form, it is analogous to the well-known Bridgman relationship for the radial derivative. It provides a quantitative description of the effect of substituting the time-derivative by scan differences with finite time intervals, which appears as a skewed box average of the true distribution. This helps to theoretically clarify the differences between results from time-derivative method and the approach of directly fitting the integral definition of g*(s) to the entirety of experimental boundary data.

  19. Technology for Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a study of an organisation, which is undergoing a process transforming organisational and technological boundaries. In particular, we shall look at three kinds of boundaries: the work to maintain and change the boundary between the organisation and its customers; boundaries.......After analysing the history and the current boundary work, the paper will propose new technological support for boundary work. In particular the paper will suggest means of supporting boundaries when these are productive and for changing boundaries when this seems more appropriate. In total, flexible technologies...... seem a core issue when dealing with technology for boundaries....

  20. The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux are one of the key problems of sediment transport research under nonequilibrium condition. Based on the three-dimensional primitive suspended transport equation, the two-dimensional suspended sediment transport equation is deduced. The derived process indicates that the physical essence of the near-bed sediment flux is right the bottom boundary condition for the suspended sediment transport equation. This paper analyzes the internal relations between the two methods of sediment carrying capacity and shear stress in common use, points out the consistency of these two methods in terms of form and physical meaning, and unifies these two methods theoretically. Furthermore, based on the analysis and comparison of the expressions of the near-bed sediment flux, this paper summarizes some problems to which attention should be paid, thus offering a novel approach to the study and the solution of the problems of suspended sediment transport and exchange flux of near-bed water sediment.

  1. The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI RuiJie; LUO Feng; ZHU WenJin

    2009-01-01

    The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux are one of the key prob-lems of sediment transport research under nonequilibrium condition. Based on the three-dimensional primitive suspended transport equation, the two-dimensional suspended sediment transport equation is deduced. The derived process indicates that the physical essence of the near-bed sediment flux is right the bottom boundary condition for the suspended sediment transport equation. This paper ana-lyzes the internal relations between the two methods of sediment carrying capacity and shear stress in common use, points out the consistency of these two methods in terms of form and physical meaning, and unifies these two methods theoretically. Furthermore, based on the analysis and comparison of the expressions of the near-bed sediment flux, this paper summarizes some problems to which attention should be paid, thus offering a novel approach to the study and the solution of the problems of sus-pended sediment transport and exchange flux of near-bed water sediment.

  2. RATIONAL BASIS FOR SUSPENDED SEDIMENT MODELING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun ZHOU; Binliang LIN; Bingnan LIN

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a rational basis to model the transport of suspended sediment. The looseboundary condition for 3D models and the adjustment coefficients for both the depth-integrated 2D and laterally integrated 1D models are treated comprehensively. A combination of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions is proposed as the loose-boundary condition. The adjustment coefficient for 2D models is obtained on the basis of the proposed boundary condition and analytical solutions developed for some simple cases of non-equilibrium transport of sediment in uniform flows. The adjustment coefficient for 1D models for natural rivers is further obtained from lateral integration. Comparisons with analytical solutions and a considerable amount of laboratory and prototype data show that mathematical models developed along the proposed line of attack would well simulate the transport of suspended sediment in practical problems.

  3. An ultra-high resolution last deglacial marine sediment records of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, H.; Piper, D.; Marche, B.; Vermooten, M.; Lazar, K.; Brockway, B.

    2016-12-01

    Lack of high sedimentation rate records of past changes pertaining to the late Pleistocene Laurentide ice-sheet (LIS) dynamics has prevented efforts to differentiate the various forcings in modulating abrupt climate changes. Here, we present an ultra-high resolution sediment record spanning approximately 1,500 km of the Eastern Canadian continental margin. The new record comprises four sediment cores which were collected from the northwest Labrador Sea (i.e., Saglek Bank) to southwestern Flemish Pass to the southeast Grand Banks in outer shelf and slope settings. Fifty new 14C-accelerator mass spectrometric dates were obtained to construct the stratigraphy. The total sediment thickness of the new record is 41 m covering the past 26 ka with 1.58/ka mean sediment rate, the highest sediment rate ever reported from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean for this time interval. Further, the temporal resolution of the record varies from a couple of decades to centuries depending on the time interval. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data in conjunction with physical properties of sediments and petrology allowed us to distinguish sediment delivered by major ice-streams of the LIS namely the Hudson Strait, Hopedale Saddle, and Cumberland Sound ice streams. Heinrich layers 1 and 2 are well identified by their Labrador Sea specific characteristics. The so-called Younger Dryas equivalent Heinrich layer H0 was identified in these cores but the timing of onset of H0 has an offset by nearly 1,000 years with that of the 12.9 ka, suggesting that the YD event was not initiated by the Hudson Strait compared to other Heinrich events.

  4. Study of Boundary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 11 - 4 TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY STRUCTURES...19 B THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 37 C TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY...layer structure. 10 SECTION 3 THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE The (111) planes of the fcc structure is stacked as ABCABC... as

  5. Generalized Supersymetric Boundary State

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Following our previous paper (hep-th/9909027), we generalize a supersymmetric boundary state so that arbitrary configuration of the gauge field coupled to the boundary of the worldsheet is incorpolated. This generalized boundary state is BRST invariant and satisfy the non-linear boundary conditions with non-constant gauge field strength. This boundary state contains divergence which is identical with the loop divergence in a superstring sigma model. Hence vanishing of the beta function in the...

  6. Abrupt climate-triggered lake ecosystem changes recorded in late glacial lake sediments in northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowinski, M. M.; Zawiska, I.; Ott, F.; Noryskiewicz, A. M.; Apolinarska, K.; Lutynska, M.; Michczynska, D. J.; Brauer, A.; Wulf, S.; Skubala, P.; Blaszkiewicz, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand how local lake ecosystems responded to abrupt climate changes through applying multi-proxy sediment analyses. Therefore, we carried out a detailed and high-resolution case study on the late glacial sediment from the Trzechowskie palaeolake located in the eastern part of the Pomeranian Lakeland, northern Poland. We reconstructed climate induced environmental changes in the paleolake and its catchment using biotic proxies (macrofossils, pollen, cladocera, diatoms, oribatidae mite) and classical geochemical proxies (δ18O, δ13C, loss-on-ignition, CaCO3 content) in combination with high-resolution μ-XRF element core scanning. The core chronology has been established by means of biostratigraphy, AMS 14C-dating on plant macro remains, varve counting in laminated intervals and tephrochronology. The latter was possible by the discovery of the late Allerød Laacher See Tephra for the first time at such eastern location. Biogenic accumulation in the lake started rather late during the lateglacial interstadial at 13903×170 cal yrs BP. The rapid and pronounced cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas had a major impact on the lake and its catchment as clearly reflected by both, biotic and geochemical proxies. The depositional environment of the lake abruptly changed from a varved to massive gytjia. The pronounced warming at the demise of Younger Dryas cooling is well-reflected in all environmental indicators but with conspicuous leads and lags reflecting complex responses of lake ecosystems to climate warming. The research was supported by the National Science Centre Poland - NN306085037. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute ICLEA (Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis) funded by the Helmholtz Association.

  7. Geochemical signatures of sediments documenting Arctic sea-ice and water mass export through Fram Strait since the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccali, Jenny; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Carignan, Jean; Reisberg, Laurie C.

    2013-03-01

    Elemental (Ca, Zr, Th, etc.) and radiogenic isotope (Pb, Nd, Sr) measurements in leachates and residues from deep-sea sediments of core MC16 (WarmPast Program) in central Fram Strait were used to document the geochemical signatures of outflowing Arctic water masses and ice rafted debris (IRD) since the Last Glacial Maximum. In addition, the elemental distribution among the three main sedimentary fractions (terrigenous, biogenic and authigenic) was quantified. Elements dominated by the terrigenous fraction display a change at ˜13 ka assigned to an early Younger Dryas (YD) event. In the authigenic fraction, migration of the redox front, perhaps spurred by discontinuous delivery of organic matter to the sediment, has led to the mobility of elements such as Mn. Fe contents display lesser variability within the sediment suggesting that Fe experienced only minor redox-related redistribution. Authigenic Pb and Nd, thought to be hosted primarily by Fe-oxyhydroxides, also show little evidence of mobility, suggesting that their isotopic compositions should reliably record the isotopic compositions of past bottom water. We have broadly identified the isotopic signatures of the three major source areas of IRD, the Russian, Canadian and Greenland margins. The elemental and isotopic residue records from core MC16 display distinct trends prior to and after the YD. The pre-YD interval, with ɛNd values between -10.1 and -13.2, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.715 to 0721, reflects a mixture of IRD from the Russian and Canadian margins. The YD episode stands out with sediments originating mostly from the Canadian end-member, displaying the lowest ɛNd values and highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios. This suggests enhanced sea-ice production and/or drifting along the Beaufort Gyre at that time. The post-YD interval, i.e. the Holocene, is characterized by a less variable mixture of IRD material, with ɛNd values and 87Sr/86Sr ratios centred at -12.2 and 0.718 respectively. This material was derived

  8. Shallow sediment transport flow computation using time-varying sediment adaptation length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaan Hui PU; Khalid HUSSAIN; Song-dong SHAO; Yue-fei HUANG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the common approach, the adaptation length in sediment transport is normally estimated astemporally independent. However, this approach might not be theoretically justified as the process of reaching the sediment transport equilibrium stage is affected by the flow conditions in time, especially for fast moving flows, such as scour-hole developing flows. In this study, the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water formulation together with a sediment continuity-concentration (SCC) model were applied to flow with mobile sediment boundary. A time-varying approach was proposed to determine the sediment transport adaptation length to simulate the sediment erosion-deposition rate. The proposed computational model was based on the Finite Volume (FV) method. The Monotone Upwind Scheme of Conservative Laws (MUSCL)-Hancock scheme was used with the Harten Lax van Leer-contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to discretize the FV model. In the flow applications of this paper, a highly discontinuous dam-break, fast sediment transport flow was used to calibrate the proposed time-varying sediment adaptation length model. Then the calibrated model was further applied to two separate experimental sediment transport flow applications documented in the literature, i.e. a highly concentrated sediment transport flow in a wide alluvial channel and a sediment aggradation flow. Good agreement with the experimental data were obtained with the proposed model simulations. The tests prove that the proposed model, which was calibrated by the discontinuous dam-break bed scouring flow, also performed well to represent rapid bed change and steady sediment mobility conditions.

  9. Climate Reconstructions of the Younger Dryas: An ELA Model Investigating Variability in ELA Depressions, Temperature, and Precipitation Changes for the Graubϋnden Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, D. G.; Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    The high sensitivity of mountain glaciers to even small perturbations in climate, combined with a near global distribution, make alpine glaciers an important target for terrestrial paleoclimate reconstructions. The geomorphic remnant of past glaciers can yield important insights into past climate, particularly in regions where other methods of reconstruction are not possible. The quantitative conversion of these changes in geomorphology to a climate signal, however, presents a significant challenge. A particular need exists for a versatile climate reconstruction method applicable to diverse glacierized regions around the globe. Because the glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA) provides a more explicit comparison of climate than properties such as glacier length or area, ELA methods lend themselves well to such a need, and allow for a more direct investigation of the primary drivers of mountain glaciations during specific events. Here, we present an ELA model for quantifying changes in climate based on changes in glacier extent, while accounting for differences in glacier width, glacier shape, bed topography, ice thickness, and glacier length. The model furthermore provides bounds on the ΔELA using Monte Carlo simulations. These methods are validated using published mass balances and ELA measurements from 4 modern glaciers in the European Alps. We then use this ELA model, combined with a surface mass and energy balance model, to estimate the changes in temperature/precipitation between the Younger Dryas (constrained by 10Be surface exposure ages) and the present day for three glacier systems in the Graubϋnden Alps. Our results indicate an ELA depression in this area of 257 m ±45 m during the Younger Dryas (YD) relative to today. This corresponds to a 1.3 °C ±0.36 °C decrease in temperature or a 156% ±30% increase in precipitation relative to today. These results indicate the likelihood of a predominantly temperature-driven change rather than a strong

  10. Younger-Dryas cooling and sea-ice feedbacks were prominent features of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wiles, Gregory C.; Groves, Pamela; Kunz, Michael L.; Baughman, Carson A.; Reanier, Richard E.

    2017-08-01

    Declining sea-ice extent is currently amplifying climate warming in the Arctic. Instrumental records at high latitudes are too short-term to provide sufficient historical context for these trends, so paleoclimate archives are needed to better understand the functioning of the sea ice-albedo feedback. Here we use the oxygen isotope values of wood cellulose in living and sub-fossil willow shrubs (δ18Owc) (Salix spp.) that have been radiocarbon-dated (14C) to produce a multi-millennial record of climatic change on Alaska's North Slope during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (13,500-7500 calibrated 14C years before present; 13.5-7.5 ka). We first analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of δ18Owc in living willows growing at upland sites and found that over the last 30 years δ18Owc values in individual growth rings correlate with local summer temperature and inter-annual variations in summer sea-ice extent. Deglacial δ18Owc values from 145 samples of subfossil willows clearly record the Allerød warm period (∼13.2 ka), the Younger Dryas cold period (12.9-11.7 ka), and the Holocene Thermal Maximum (11.7-9.0 ka). The magnitudes of isotopic changes over these rapid climate oscillations were ∼4.5‰, which is about 60% of the differences in δ18Owc between those willows growing during the last glacial period and today. Modeling of isotope-precipitation relationships based on Rayleigh distillation processes suggests that during the Younger Dryas these large shifts in δ18Owc values were caused by interactions between local temperature and changes in evaporative moisture sources, the latter controlled by sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea. Based on these results and on the effects that sea-ice have on climate today, we infer that ocean-derived feedbacks amplified temperature changes and enhanced precipitation in coastal regions of Arctic Alaska during warm times in the past. Today, isotope values in willows on the North Slope of Alaska are similar

  11. Younger-Dryas cooling and sea-ice feedbacks were prominent features of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wiles, Gregory C.; Groves, Pamela; Kunz, Michael L.; Baughman, Carson; Reanier, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Declining sea-ice extent is currently amplifying climate warming in the Arctic. Instrumental records at high latitudes are too short-term to provide sufficient historical context for these trends, so paleoclimate archives are needed to better understand the functioning of the sea ice-albedo feedback. Here we use the oxygen isotope values of wood cellulose in living and sub-fossil willow shrubs (δ18Owc) (Salix spp.) that have been radiocarbon-dated (14C) to produce a multi-millennial record of climatic change on Alaska's North Slope during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (13,500–7500 calibrated 14C years before present; 13.5–7.5 ka). We first analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of δ18Owc in living willows growing at upland sites and found that over the last 30 years δ18Owc values in individual growth rings correlate with local summer temperature and inter-annual variations in summer sea-ice extent. Deglacial δ18Owcvalues from 145 samples of subfossil willows clearly record the Allerød warm period (∼13.2 ka), the Younger Dryas cold period (12.9–11.7 ka), and the Holocene Thermal Maximum (11.7–9.0 ka). The magnitudes of isotopic changes over these rapid climate oscillations were ∼4.5‰, which is about 60% of the differences in δ18Owc between those willows growing during the last glacial period and today. Modeling of isotope-precipitation relationships based on Rayleigh distillation processes suggests that during the Younger Dryas these large shifts in δ18Owc values were caused by interactions between local temperature and changes in evaporative moisture sources, the latter controlled by seaice extent in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea. Based on these results and on the effects that sea-ice have on climate today, we infer that ocean-derived feedbacks amplified temperature changes and enhanced precipitation in coastal regions of Arctic Alaska during warm times in the past. Today, isotope values in willows on the North Slope of Alaska are

  12. Modeling Sediment Bypassing around Rocky Headlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. A.; Largier, J. L.; Pasternack, G. B.; Erikson, L. H.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Barnard, P.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment bypassing rocky headlands remains understudied despite the importance of characterizing littoral processes and sediment budgets for erosion abatement, climate change adaptation, and beach management. This study was developed to identify controlling factors on and the mechanisms supporting sediment bypassing. Sediment flux around four idealized rocky headlands was investigated using the hydrodynamic model Delft3D and spectral wave model SWAN. The experimental design involved 120 simulations to explore the influence of headland morphology, substrate composition, sediment grain size, and oceanographic forcing. Headlands represented sizes and shapes found in natural settings, grain sizes ranged from fine to medium sand, and substrates from sandy beds to offshore bedrock reefs. The oceanography included a constructed representative tide, an alongshore background current, and four wave conditions derived from observational records in the eastern Pacific Ocean. A bypassing ratio was developed for alongshore flux between upstream and downstream cross-shore transects to determine the degree of blockage by a headland. Results showed that northwesterly oblique large waves (Hs = 7 m, Tp = 16 s) generated the most flux around headlands, whereas directly incident waves blocked flux across a headland apex. The headland shape heavily influenced the sediment fate by changing the relative angle between the shoreline and the incident waves. The bypassing ratio characterized each headland's capacity to allow alongshore flux under different wave conditions. All headlands may allow flux, although larger ones block sediment more effectively, promoting their ability to be littoral cell boundaries compared to smaller headlands. The controlling factors on sediment bypassing were determined to be wave angle, shape and size of the headland, and sediment grain size. This novel numerical modeling study advances headland modeling from the generic realm to broadly applicable classes of

  13. HUD GIS Boundary Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HUD GIS Boundary Files are intended to supplement boundary files available from the U.S. Census Bureau. The files are for community planners interested in...

  14. Political State Boundary (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — State boundaries with political limit - boundaries extending into the ocean (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an...

  15. State Agency Administrative Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database comprises 28 State agency boundaries and point of contact. The Kansas Geological Survey collected legal descriptions of the boundaries for various...

  16. Mingo Wilderness boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document gives information as to the exact legal boundaries of the Mingo Wilderness area. It also includes a map showing the boundaries visually.

  17. County Political Boundaries (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with political limit - boundaries extending into the ocean (NTAD 2015). The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract...

  18. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  19. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  20. Sedimentary microbial oxygen demand for laminar flow over a sediment bed of finite length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Makoto; Stefan, Heinz G

    2005-09-01

    Dead organic material accumulated on the bed of a lake, reservoir or wetland often provides the substrate for substantial microbial activity as well as chemical processes that withdraw dissolved oxygen (DO) from the water column. A model to estimate the actual DO profile and the "sedimentary oxygen demand (SOD)" must specify the rate of microbial or chemical activity in the sediment as well as the diffusive supply of DO from the water column through the diffusive boundary layer into the sediment. Most previous experimental and field studies have considered this problem with the assumptions that the diffusive boundary layer is (a) turbulent and (b) fully developed. These assumptions require that (a) the flow velocity above the sediment bed is fast enough to produce turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, and (b) the sediment bed is long. In this paper a model for laminar flow and SOD over a sediment bed of finite length is presented and the results are compared with those for turbulent flow. Laminar flow near a sediment bed is encountered in quiescent water bodies such as lakes, reservoirs, river backwaters, wetlands and ponds under calm wind conditions. The diffusive oxygen transfer through the laminar diffusive boundary layer above the sediment surface can restrict the microbial or chemical oxygen uptake inside the sediment significantly. The developing laminar diffusive boundary layer above the sediment/water interface is modeled based on the analogy with heat transfer, and DO uptake inside the sediment is modeled by Michaelis-Menten microbial growth kinetics. The model predicts that the rate of SOD at the beginning of the reactive sediment bed is solely dependent on microbial density in the sediment regardless of flow velocity and type. The rate of SOD, and the DO penetration depth into the sediment decrease in stream-wise direction over the length of the sediment bed, as the diffusive boundary layer above the sediment/water interface thickens. With increasing

  1. The Case against Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Howard

    1977-01-01

    In this tongue-in-cheek article, sociological boundaries are on trial in a simulated courtroom. It is argued that sociologists concerned with establishing boundaries are neglecting the significant issues facing social scientists whereas the defense contends that boundaries are essential to the discipline. (Author/JR)

  2. Watershed Boundaries - Watershed Boundary Database for Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set is a complete digital hydrologic unit boundary layer of the Subbasins (8-digit), Watersheds (10-digit), and Subwatersheds (12-digit) for Montana. This...

  3. Tree-ring records of near-Younger Dryas time in central North America - Preliminary results from the Lincoln quarry site, central Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Wiedenhoeft, A.; Noggle, S.; Curry, B.; Grimm, E.

    2004-01-01

    The abrupt millennial-scale changes associated with the Younger Dryas (YD) event ("chronozone") near the dawn of the Holocene are at least hemispheric, if not global, in extent. Evidence for the YD cold excursion is abundant in Europe but fairly meager in central North America. We are engaged in an investigation of high-resolution environmental changes in mid-North America over several millennia (about 10,000 to 14,000 BP) during the Late Glacial-Early Holocene transition, including the YD interval. Several sites containing logs or stumps have been identified and we are in the process of initial sampling or re-sampling them for this project. Here, we report on a site in central Illinois containing a deposit of logs initially thought to be of YD age preserved in alluvial sands. The assemblage of wood represents hardwood (angiosperm) trees, and the ring-width characteristics are favorable to developing formal tree-ring chronologies. However, 4 new radiocarbon dates indicate deposition of wood may have taken place over at least 8000 14C yr (6000-14,000 BP). This complicates the effort to develop a single floating chronology of several hundred years at this site, but it may provide wood from a restricted region over a long period of time from which to develop a sequence of floating chronologies, the timing of deposition and preservation of which could be related to paleoclimatic events and conditions.

  4. Sediments at the top of Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, B A; Garnero, E J; Jeanloz, R

    2000-11-17

    Unusual physical properties at the core-mantle boundary have been inferred from seismic and geodetic observations in recent years. We show how both types of observations can be explained by a layer of silicate sediments, which accumulate at the top of the core as Earth cools. Compaction of the sediments expels most of the liquid iron but leaves behind a small amount of core material, which is entrained in mantle convection and may account for the isotopic signatures of core material in some hot spot plumes. Extraction of light elements from the liquid core also enhances the vigor of convection in the core and may increase the power available to the geodynamo.

  5. Scaling oxygen microprofiles at the sediment interface of deep stratified waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, Robert; Hondzo, Miki; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen microprofiles at the sediment-water interface of Lake Geneva were measured concurrently with velocities 0.25 to 2 m above the sediment. The measurements and scaling analyses indicate dissolved oxygen fluctuations and turbulent fluxes in exceedance of molecular diffusion in the proximity of the sediment-water interface. The measurements allowed the parameterization of the turbulent diffusion as a function of the dimensionless height above the sediment and the turbulence above the sediment-water interface. Turbulent diffusion depended strongly on the friction velocity and differed from formulations reported in the literature that are based on concepts of turbulent and developed wall-bounded flows. The dissolved oxygen microprofiles and proposed parameterization of turbulent diffusion enable a foundation for the similarity scaling of oxygen microprofiles in proximity to the sediment. The proposed scaling allows the estimation of diffusive boundary layer thickness, oxygen flux, and oxygen microprofile distribution in the near-sediment boundary layer.

  6. Characterizations of boundary pluripolar hulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djire, I.K.; Wiegerinck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present some basic properties of the so-called boundary relative extremal function and discuss boundary pluripolar sets and boundary pluripolar hulls. We show that for B-regular domains the boundary pluripolar hull is always trivial on the boundary of the domain and present a “boundary version” o

  7. Characterizations of boundary pluripolar hulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djire, I.K.; Wiegerinck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present some basic properties of the so-called boundary relative extremal function and discuss boundary pluripolar sets and boundary pluripolar hulls. We show that for B-regular domains the boundary pluripolar hull is always trivial on the boundary of the domain and present a “boundary version” o

  8. BoundaryOther_BNDHASH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The BNDHASH dataset depicts Vermont villages, towns, counties, Regional Planning Commissions (RPC), and LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee) boundaries. It is a...

  9. Sediment transport and carbon sequestration characteristics along mangrove fringed coasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Qiang; YANG Shengyun; ZHOU Qiulin; YANG Juan

    2015-01-01

    Mangroves play an important role in sequestering carbon and trapping sediments. However, the effectiveness of such functions is unclear due to the restriction of knowledge on the sedimentation process across the vegetation boun-daries. To detect the effects of mangrove forests on sediment transportation and organic carbon sequestration, the granulometric and organic carbon characteristics of mangrove sediments were investigated from three vegetation zones of four typical mangrove habitats on the Leizhou Peninsula coast. Based on our results, sediment transport was often“environmentally sensitive”to the vegetation friction. A transition of the sediment transport mode from the mudflat zone to the interior/fringe zone was often detected from the cumulative frequency curve. The vegetation cover also assists the trapping of material, resulting in a significantly higher concentration of organic carbon in the interior surface sediments. However, the graphic parameters of core sediments reflected a highly temporal variability due to the sedimentation process at different locations. The sediment texture ranges widely from sand to mud, altho-ugh the sedimentary environments are restricted within the same energy level along the fluvial-marine transition zone. Based on the PCA results, the large variation was mainly attributed to either the mean grain size features or the organic carbon features. A high correlation between the depth andδ13C value also indicated an increasing storage of mangrove-derived organic carbon with time.

  10. Wave boundary layer hydrodynamics during onshore bar migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriquez, M.; Reniers, A.; Ruessink, G.; Stive, M.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    To study onshore bar migration and the accompanying intra-wave sediment transport a wave flume experiment was conducted. The wave flume had a rigid bottom with a single bar profile. The focus of the experiment was to measure the hydrodynamics in the wave bottom boundary layer. The results show that

  11. Ocean Sediment Thickness Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean sediment thickness contours in 200 meter intervals for water depths ranging from 0 - 18,000 meters. These contours were derived from a global sediment...

  12. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment in...

  13. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  14. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment...

  15. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  16. Electrodialytic remediation of sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland

    often hinders this usage. Hence, for both types of sediments, expensive deposition at hazardous waste landfills is required. Electrodialysis is presently being developed as an alternative method for treatment of such contaminated sediments. Heavy metals are removed by treating the sediments...

  17. Generalized Supersymetric Boundary State

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, K

    2000-01-01

    Following our previous paper (hep-th/9909027), we generalize a supersymmetric boundary state so that arbitrary configuration of the gauge field coupled to the boundary of the worldsheet is incorpolated. This generalized boundary state is BRST invariant and satisfy the non-linear boundary conditions with non-constant gauge field strength. This boundary state contains divergence which is identical with the loop divergence in a superstring sigma model. Hence vanishing of the beta function in the superstring sigma model corresponds to a well-defined boundary state with no divergence. The coupling of a single closed superstring massless mode with multiple open string massless modes is encoded in the boundary state, and we confirm that derivative correction to the D-brane action in this sector vanishes up to the first non-trivial order O(alpha'(derivative)^2). Combining T-dualities, we incorpolate also general configurations of the scalar fields on the D-brane, and construct boundary states representing branes stuc...

  18. Renormalized Volumes with Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    We develop a general regulated volume expansion for the volume of a manifold with boundary whose measure is suitably singular along a separating hypersurface. The expansion is shown to have a regulator independent anomaly term and a renormalized volume term given by the primitive of an associated anomaly operator. These results apply to a wide range of structures. We detail applications in the setting of measures derived from a conformally singular metric. In particular, we show that the anomaly generates invariant (Q-curvature, transgression)-type pairs for hypersurfaces with boundary. For the special case of anomalies coming from the volume enclosed by a minimal hypersurface ending on the boundary of a Poincare--Einstein structure, this result recovers Branson's Q-curvature and corresponding transgression. When the singular metric solves a boundary version of the constant scalar curvature Yamabe problem, the anomaly gives generalized Willmore energy functionals for hypersurfaces with boundary. Our approach ...

  19. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) study of sediment dispersion on the seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Duc, Thien; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-08-01

    Ocean-scale sediment dispersion and sedimentation problems are studied using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). A SPH formulation based on a mixture model for two-phase flows is developed to investigate the problem. The sediment mass transport via the settling advection and the turbulent diffusion of the suspended sediment are fully accounted for in the current SPH model. The simulations are carried out in an opened boundary domain with a unidirectional underlined current, with relevant deposition/re-suspension boundary conditions on the seafloor. The factors influencing the sedimentation process, such as the hindering and the bottom shear stress effects, are also considered. The simulation results reveal that the sediment convection near the sediment source location is caused by both the ocean current and secondary density driven flows that are created by the concurrent settling motion of suspended sediment particles, while the downstream sediment transport in the far field is only driven by the ocean current. The peak sediment concentration in the ambient ocean water is found to correlate with the sediment release rate, and the settlement rate is inversely proportional to the initial height of the disturbed sediment.

  20. The evolution and distribution of methane in Lake Champlain sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, P.M. (Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Regions of Lake Champlain sediments are acoustically impenetrable to the energy emitted from high resolution, low energy sub-bottom seismic profiling apparatus. This anomolous behavior is caused by the presence of interstitial methane gas which absorbs the wave energy and thus prevents the formation of well-defined seismic boundaries. Through gas chromatographic and carbon isotope analyses, the methane gas contained in the recent sediments of Lake Champlain has been demonstrated to be biogenic in origin. The production of biogenic methane occurs as a result of a series of coupled oxidation-reduction reactions occurring within the upper two meters beneath the sediment-water interface.

  1. Seeking the boundary of boundary extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDunn, Benjamin A; Siddiqui, Aisha P; Brown, James M

    2014-04-01

    Boundary extension (BE) is a remarkably consistent visual memory error in which participants remember seeing a more wide-angle image of a scene than was actually viewed (Intraub & Richardson, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 15:179-187, 1989). Multiple stimulus factors are thought to contribute to the occurrence of BE, including object recognition, conceptual knowledge of scenes, and amodal perception at the view boundaries (Intraub, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science 3:117-127, 2012). In the present study, we used abstract scenes instead of images of the real world, in order to remove expectations based on semantic associations with objects and the schematic context of the view. Close-angle and wide-angle scenes were created using irregular geometric shapes rated by independent observers as lacking any easily recognizable structure. The abstract objects were tested on either a random-dot or a blank background in order to assess the influence of implied continuation of the image beyond its boundaries. The random-dot background conditions had background occlusion cues either present or absent at the image border, in order to test their influence on BE in the absence of high-level information about the scenes. The results indicate that high-level information about objects and schematic context is unnecessary for BE to occur, and that occlusion information at the image boundary also has little influence on BE. Contrary to previous studies, we also found clear BE for all conditions, despite using scenes depicting undetailed objects on a blank white background. The results highlighted the ubiquitous nature of BE and the adaptability of scene perception processes.

  2. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  3. Boundary Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cardy, J L

    2004-01-01

    Boundary conformal field theory (BCFT) is simply the study of conformal field theory (CFT) in domains with a boundary. It gains its significance because, in some ways, it is mathematically simpler: the algebraic and geometric structures of CFT appear in a more straightforward manner; and because it has important applications: in string theory in the physics of open strings and D-branes, and in condensed matter physics in boundary critical behavior and quantum impurity models. In this article, however, I describe the basic ideas from the point of view of quantum field theory, without regard to particular applications nor to any deeper mathematical formulations.

  4. Boundary processes traced by neodymium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandel, C.; Lacan, F.

    2003-04-01

    Continental margins have been identified as preferential sites for removing of reactive elements from the ocean, on the base of U-series measurements (more specifically 231Pa/230Th). This process is called boundary scavenging (Bacon, 1988). Five years of neodymium isotopes data in water masses along the ocean margins (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Greenland-Scotland ridge and Labrador Sea) suggests that Nd is transferred from the sediments to the ocean but the reverse also occurs via the so-called boundary scavenging. These processes are only detectable by isotopic ratio measurements because they affect the isotopic signature of the water mass coming in contact with the margin, without changing its concentration. They can involve much higher fluxes than net input processes: for example, the modification of the AAIW signature along the Papua New Guinea slope involves exchange processes only (Lacan and Jeandel, 2001). Since we suspect that such processes not only affect the Nd oceanic chemistry but also the chemical fate of other reactive elements in the ocean, we suggest that the concept of boundary scavenging should be extended to "boundary exchange".

  5. Cross-shore sediment transport; analysis of Delta Flume data and mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, C.

    1994-01-01

    In the last decade, several mathematical models for cross-shore sediment transport have been developed under the assumption that the instantaneous sediment transport is directly related to the instantaneous horizontal velocity just above the boundary layer. Although some models took beach slopes

  6. Cross-shore sediment transport; analysis of Delta Flume data and mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, C.

    1994-01-01

    In the last decade, several mathematical models for cross-shore sediment transport have been developed under the assumption that the instantaneous sediment transport is directly related to the instantaneous horizontal velocity just above the boundary layer. Although some models took beach slopes int

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of flow and particulate contaminants sedimentation in an urban stormwater detention and settling basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hexiang; Lipeme Kouyi, Gislain; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Becouze-Lareure, Céline; Sebastian, Christel; Barraud, Sylvie; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2014-04-01

    Sedimentation is a common but complex phenomenon in the urban drainage system. The settling mechanisms involved in detention basins are still not well understood. The lack of knowledge on sediment transport and settling processes in actual detention basins is still an obstacle to the optimization of the design and the management of the stormwater detention basins. In order to well understand the sedimentation processes, in this paper, a new boundary condition as an attempt to represent the sedimentation processes based on particle tracking approach is presented. The proposed boundary condition is based on the assumption that the flow turbulent kinetic energy near the bottom plays an important role on the sedimentation processes. The simulated results show that the proposed boundary condition appears as a potential capability to identify the preferential sediment zones and to predict the trapping efficiency of the basin during storm events.

  8. Effects of sediment on the dynamic pressure of water and sediment on dams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    After a reservoir has been in operation for a period of time,a sediment layer is likely formed before the dam. Since studies of the effects of sediment layers on the hydrodynamic pressures of impounded water and the aseismic responses of dam are few,the dynamic effect of sediment may be applied neither in the seismic design of new dams nor in the assessment of earthquake safety of existing dams. However,a common practice of the action of sediment layers and foundation is based on a partial energy absorption boundary. It is shown that during a vertical harmonic ground motion,the sediment layer could alter the natural frequencies of reservoir. The dynamic pressure on a rigid vertical dam face caused by the vertical ground motion is obtained through a computational model and an experimental test by using a shaking table. With a change in the thickness of sediment,the frequency corresponding to the inertia amplification effect appears to vary gradually. The results are useful for further study of seismic responses of dams.

  9. Shared care and boundaries:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2008-01-01

    and technology studies. Findings – The paper shows how a version of “the responsible patient” emerges from the project which is different from the version envisioned by the project organisation. The emerging one is concerned with the boundary between primary and secondary sector care, and not with the boundary...... of healthcare in relation to IT design. Originality/value – The paper shows that “unshared” care does not exist; care is always shared among human and nonhuman actors. It also points to the value of studying how boundaries are enacted in projects that seek to create continuity across boundaries. Udgivelsesdato......Purpose – The paper seeks to examine how an online maternity record involving pregnant women worked as a means to create shared maternity care. Design/methodology/approach – Ethnographic techniques have been used. The paper adopts a theoretical/methodological framework based on science...

  10. FWS Approved Acquisition Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data layer depicts the external boundaries of lands and waters that are approved for acquisition by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in North America,...

  11. FWS Approved Acquisition Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data layer depicts the external boundaries of lands and waters that are approved for acquisition by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in North...

  12. VT Telephone Exchange Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The UtilityTelecom_EXCHANGE represents Vermont Telephone Exchange boundaries as defined by the VT Public Service Board. The original data was...

  13. NM School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The dataset represents the boundaries of all public school districts in the state of New Mexico. The source for the data layer is the New Mexico Public Education...

  14. FWS Approved Acquisition Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data layer depicts the external boundaries of lands and waters that are approved for acquisition by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in North America,...

  15. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  16. Watershed Boundary Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer contains hydrologic unit boundaries and codes for the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It was revised for inclusion in the...

  17. HUC 8 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  18. Site Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of site boundaries from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  19. The boundary l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naseer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present problem is the steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a hyperbolic tangent fluid flowing over a vertical exponentially stretching cylinder in its axial direction. After applying usual boundary layer with a suitable similarity transformation to the given partial differential equations and the boundary conditions, a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations is obtained. This system of ordinary differential equations subject to the boundary conditions is solved with the help of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method. The effects of the involved parameters such as Reynolds numbers, Prandtl numbers, Weissenberg numbers and the natural convection parameter are presented through the graphs. The associated physical properties on the flow and heat transfer characteristics that is the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt numbers are presented for different parameters.

  20. 500 Cities: City Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This city boundary shapefile was extracted from Esri Data and Maps for ArcGIS 2014 - U.S. Populated Place Areas. This shapefile can be joined to 500 Cities...

  1. Allegheny County Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the Allegheny County boundary. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  2. Allegheny County Parcel Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains parcel boundaries attributed with county block and lot number. Use the Property Information Extractor for more control downloading a filtered...

  3. Site Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of site boundaries from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  4. State Park Statutory Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Legislative statutory boundaries for sixty six state parks, six state recreation areas, and eight state waysides. These data are derived principally from DNR's...

  5. National Forest Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme shows the USFS national forest boundaries in the state. This data was acquired from the GIS coordinators at both the Chippewa National Forest and the...

  6. Minnesota County Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography...

  7. No K/T boundary at Anjar, Gujarat, India: Evidence from magnetic susceptibility and carbon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H J Hansen; D M Mohabey; P Toft

    2001-06-01

    The paper describes the variation pattern of magnetic susceptibility of Lameta sediments and isotopic variation of organic 13C from Chui Hill, Bergi, Kholdoda, Pisdura and Girad. The susceptibility pattern and a negative carbon isotopic anomaly allows fixation of the K/T boundary at these localities and they dier in these aspects from the inter-trappean sediments at Anjar. Paleomagnetic measurements of the Anjar sediment and the overlying basalt ow demonstrate reversed polarity. The Lameta sediments with dinosaur nests at Kheda and the overlying intertrappean sediments are of normal polarity The clay layers at Anjar, associated closely with Ir-enrichments, are strongly leached, rhyolitic bentonites containing low-quartz paramorphs after high-quartz with glass inclusions. It is concluded, that the inter-trappean lake deposits at Anjar were deposited in the early part of magnetochron 29R and are unrelated to the K/T boundary.

  8. VT Federal Aid Urban Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Federal Aid Urban boundaries are defined based on US Census data. The roadways within these boundaries have urban classifications. These FAU boundaries were updated...

  9. Climate Reconstructions for the Younger Dryas in Graubünden, Swiss Alps: Using Glacier Geometry and Hypsometry to Estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, D. G.; Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain glaciers serve as important paleoclimate records due to the direct physical link between glacier extent and climate. The high sensitivity of mountain glaciers to even small perturbations in the climate has the potential to provide very detailed records of regional glacier and climate histories. Recent progress in age determination techniques such as surface exposure dating has greatly improved the temporal precision of glacial records. The conversion of changes in glacier geometries to a climate signal, however, remains a significant challenge. A particular need exists for a versatile method easily applicable to diverse regions and conditions around the globe. Because the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) provides a more explicit comparison of climate than properties such as glacier length or area, ELA methods lend themselves well to such a need, and allow for a more direct investigation of the primary drivers of mountain glaciations during specific events. Here we present a new, robust ELA model for quantifying changes in climate directly from glacier geometry. The model derives from a linear flow model based on Glen's Flow law while fully accounting for glacier hypsometry. As a preliminary application, we combined our modeled ELA reconstructions with a new 10Be chronology of late glacial culminations in Graubünden in the Swiss Alps. These glacier culminations occurred during the Egesen Stadial, which has been correlated to the Younger Dryas (YD) interval. Results for two related glacier systems in Graubünden reveal an ELA depression of 365-401 m (depending on the moraines chosen) during the Egesen stage/YD compared to the modern ELA. This agrees well both with established estimates for ELA depressions in the region and an additional application performed using our model and previously determined ages on the nearby Lagrev Glacier (a 370 m ELA depression). We then reconstruct the temperature and precipitation changes required to explain the ELA changes for

  10. Holocene glacier fluctuations inferred from lacustrine sediment, Emerald Lake, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, Taylor S.; Kaufman, Darrell S.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and biological characteristics of lacustrine sediment from Emerald Lake were used to reconstruct the Holocene glacier history of Grewingk Glacier, southern Alaska. Emerald Lake is an ice-marginal threshold lake, receiving glaciofluvial sediment when Grewingk Glacier overtops the topographic divide that separates it from the lake. Sub-bottom acoustical profiles were used to locate core sites to maximize both the length and resolution of the sedimentary sequence recovered in the 4-m-long cores. The age model for the composite sequence is based on 13 14C ages and a 210Pb profile. A sharp transition from the basal inorganic mud to organic-rich mud at 11.4 ± 0.2 ka marks the initial retreat of Grewingk Glacier below the divide of Emerald Lake. The overlaying organic-rich mud is interrupted by stony mud that records a re-advance between 10.7 ± 0.2 and 9.8 ± 0.2 ka. The glacier did not spill meltwater into the lake again until the Little Ice Age, consistent with previously documented Little Ice Ages advances on the Kenai Peninsula. The retreat of Grewingk Glacier at 11.4 ka took place as temperature increased following the Younger Dryas, and the subsequent re-advance corresponds with a climate reversal beginning around 11 ka across southern Alaska.

  11. GRAI N-BOUNDARY DIFFUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01

    The more useful experimental techniques for determining grain-boundary diffusion are briefly described followed by a presentation of results that shed light on the models and mechanisms of grain-boundary and dislocation diffusion. Studies of the following grain-boundary diffusion phenomena will be considered ; anisotropy in grain-boundary diffusion, effect of orientation relationship on grain-boundary diffusion, effect of boundary type and dislocation dissociation, lattice structure, correlat...

  12. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments. DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  13. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  14. Dynamics of Cohesive Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Claus

    the nature of the cohesive sediment with respect to the transport processes is presented. In addition, the flocculation process and the rheological behaviour of cohesive sediments is outlined. The second part contains the laboratory experiments. The laboratory experiments were conducted with respect......The present thesis considers the transport processes of cohesive sediments. The cohesive sediment used in the laboratory experiments was kaolinite, a clay mineral, in order to be able to reproduce the individual experiments. In the first part of the thesis, the theoretical considerations regarding...

  15. The contribution of bank and surface sediments to fluvial sediment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contribution of bank and surface sediments to fluvial sediment transport of the Pra River. ... Sediment source studies involving a simple mixing model was undertaken in the ... For bank erosion, river channel bank materials were sampled.

  16. Paired proglacial lake sediment and cosmogenic ages reveal the timing of Late Glacial and Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Huaguruncho Massif of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, Nathan; Rodbell, Donald; Licciardi, Joseph; Schweinsberg, Avriel; Huss, Elizabeth; Finkel, Robert; Zimmerman, Susan

    2015-04-01

    The pairing of cosmogenic ages on moraine boulders and radiocarbon-dated lake sediments provides a powerful tool for reconstructing past climates based on former ice positions. Surface exposure ages (10Be) and clastic sediment records from a proglacial lake at Nevado Huaguruncho, Peru, document the waxing and waning of tropical alpine glaciers in the Eastern Cordillera during the last ca. 15 ka. Moraine ages indicate that glaciers were advanced at ca. 14.1 ± 0.4 ka, a pattern that is consistent with cooling associated with the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Yanacocha is located immediately upvalley from this 14.1 ka moraine, and lake sediments and cosmogenic ages also suggest that glaciers advanced just prior to, or at the start of, the Younger Dryas from 13.1 to 12.5 ka. Lake sediments and cosmogenic ages then indicate that glaciers retreated after ca. 12.5 ka, and again advanced during the early Holocene between ca. 12 and 9 ka. Short-lived increases in clastic lake sediment values suggest that ice margins advanced briefly at times through the middle Holocene from ca. 8 to 4 ka, and the lack of moraine boulders dating to this interval suggest that glaciers were less extensive than during the late Holocene. Lake sediments suggest that glaciers experienced a relatively limited advance at the start of the late Holocene from ca. 4 to 2 ka, followed by retreat until the start of the Medieval Climate Anomaly at ca. 1.1 ka. Clastic sediment values in the lake sediments then suggest that ice began advancing during the MCA, and the most pronounced Holocene advance at Huaguruncho occurred during the Little Ice Age (ca. 0.4 to 0.2 ka) under colder and wetter conditions. The pattern of glacier variability in Huaguruncho during the Late Glacial and Holocene provides further evidence that tropical Atlantic Ocean conditions drove much of the observed temperature and precipitation changes along the Eastern Cordillera.

  17. Structural practices for controlling sediment transport from erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriels, Donald; Verbist, Koen; Van de Linden, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Erosion on agricultural fields in the hilly regions of Flanders, Belgium has been recognized as an important economical and ecological problem that requires effective control measures. This has led to the implementation of on-site and off-site measures such as reduced tillage and the installation of grass buffers trips, and dams made of vegetative materials. Dams made out of coir (coconut) and wood chips were evaluated on three different levels of complexity. Under laboratory conditions, one meter long dams were submitted to two different discharges and three sediment concentrations under two different slopes, to assess the sediment delivery ratios under variable conditions. At the field scale, discharge and sediment concentrations were monitored under natural rainfall conditions on six 3 m wide plots, of which three were equipped with coir dams, while the other three served as control plots. The same plots were also used for rainfall simulations, which allowed controlling sediment delivery boundary conditions more precisely. Results show a clear advantage of these dams to reduce discharge by minimum 49% under both field and laboratory conditions. Sediment delivery ratios (SDR) were very small under laboratory and field rainfall simulations (4-9% and 2% respectively), while larger SDRs were observed under natural conditions (43%), probably due to the small sediment concentrations (1-5 g l-1) observed and as such a larger influence of boundary effects. Also a clear enrichment of larger sand particles (+167%) could be observed behind the dams, showing a significant selective filtering effect.

  18. Transport of fine sediment over a coarse, immobile riverbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Paul E.; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment transport in cobble-boulder rivers consists mostly of fine sediment moving over a coarse, immobile bed. Transport rate depends on several interrelated factors: boundary shear stress, the grain size and volume of fine sediment, and the configuration of fine sediment into interstitial deposits and bed forms. Existing models do not incorporate all of these factors. Approaches that partition stress face a daunting challenge because most of the boundary shear is exerted on immobile grains. We present an alternative approach that divides the bed into sand patches and interstitial deposits and is well constrained by two clear end-member cases: full sand cover and absence of sand. Entrainment from sand patches is a function of their aerial coverage. Entrainment from interstices among immobile grains is a function of sand elevation relative to the size of the immobile grains. The bed-sand coverage function is used to predict the ratio of the rate of entrainment from a partially covered bed to the rate of entrainment from a completely sand-covered bed, which is determined using a standard sand transport model. We implement the bed-sand coverage function in a morphodynamic routing model and test it against observations of sand bed elevation and suspended sand concentration for conditions of nonuniform fine sediment transport in a large flume with steady uniform flow over immobile hemispheres. The results suggest that this approach may provide a simple and robust method for predicting the transport and migration of fine sediment through rivers with coarse, immobile beds.

  19. Sediment supply to beaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2014-01-01

    and this reduces confidence in predictions of long-term shoreline change. In this paper, field measurements of suspended sediment load and cross-shore transport on the lower shoreface are used to derive a model for sediment supply from the lower to the upper shoreface at large spatial and temporal scales. Data...

  20. Adaptive Sentence Boundary Disambiguation

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, D D; Palmer, David D.; Hearst, Marti A.

    1994-01-01

    Labeling of sentence boundaries is a necessary prerequisite for many natural language processing tasks, including part-of-speech tagging and sentence alignment. End-of-sentence punctuation marks are ambiguous; to disambiguate them most systems use brittle, special-purpose regular expression grammars and exception rules. As an alternative, we have developed an efficient, trainable algorithm that uses a lexicon with part-of-speech probabilities and a feed-forward neural network. After training for less than one minute, the method correctly labels over 98.5\\% of sentence boundaries in a corpus of over 27,000 sentence-boundary marks. We show the method to be efficient and easily adaptable to different text genres, including single-case texts.

  1. Strangelove ocean at era boundaries, terrestrial or extraterrestrial cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsue, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Negative perturbations in carbon-isotope value of calcite in pelagic sediments were found at times of biotic crisis, marking horizons which are, or were proposed as era boundaries: Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T), Permian/Triassic (P/T), and Precambrian/Cambrian (PreC/C). The anomaly was also found at several other mass-extinction horizons, such as terminal Ordovician, Frasnian-Famenian, etc. Studies of K/T boundary indicate that only the planktic fraction of the sediments has the negative isotope anomaly, whereas the benthic fraction has the same value across the boundary. This geochemical signal is thus considered a record of strangelove ocean, or an ocean where isotope fractionation of dissolved carbonate ions in surface waters (by biotic function of planktic organisms) has been significantly reduced because of the drastic reduction of the biomass in the oceans. The reduction of marine biomass at each of the era boundaries was related to chemical pollution of the oceans as a consequence of a catastrophic event; a pH decrease of 0.5 could inhibit the fertility of planktons. Studies of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and meteorite-impact occurrences have indicated a linearly inverse log/log relationship between the magnitude and frequency of events. The frequency of era boundaries in geologic history supports the postulate that the rare events causing those biotic crises were large bolide-impacts.

  2. Stability of boundary measures

    CERN Document Server

    Chazal, Frédéric; Mérigot, Quentin

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the boundary measure at scale r of a compact subset of the n-dimensional Euclidean space. We show how it can be computed for point clouds and suggest these measures can be used for feature detection. The main contribution of this work is the proof a quantitative stability theorem for boundary measures using tools of convex analysis and geometric measure theory. As a corollary we obtain a stability result for Federer's curvature measures of a compact, allowing to compute them from point-cloud approximations of the compact.

  3. Mineralogical Signatures in Electrically Coupled Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, A.; Gorby, Y. A.; Schramm, J.

    2014-12-01

    'Electric cable bacteria' are organisms of the family Desulfobulbaceaethat exhibit a novel method of electron transport. Cells form conductive filaments that function like electric wires, transferring electrons over distances of more than 1 cm from deep sulfidic sediments to oxygen or other electron acceptors near the soil/water interface. The rate of electron transfer across redox boundaries far exceeds that of diffusion limited processes and generates pH gradients that can significantly influence geochemical reactions, leading to the formation of distinct mineralogical profiles unlikely to be created by abiotic means. Electrically coupled sediments are characterized by carbonate and iron sulfide dissolution reactions occurring at depth and formation of carbonate and metal oxide crusts at the surface, exhibiting a reverse pattern compared to conventional sediment geochemistry. Our research seeks to address the following questions: How prevalent are electric cable bacteria in diverse environments? How do biogeochemical conditions such as ion concentration influence mineral formation? Do biogenic minerals participate in charge transfer? What is the importance of electric charge transfer in the subsurface or other low energy habitats? Can mineral banding patterns caused by cable bacteria activity be preserved in the geologic record? With this research we hope to further elucidate the impact of biologically-induced electric fields on the mineralogy of sediments.

  4. Evidence for phase-locked changes in climate between Scotland and Greenland during GS-1 (Younger Dryas) using micromorphology of glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Adrian P.; Rose, Jim; Rasmussen, Sune Olander

    2012-01-01

    There is a current need to develop annual/decadal chronologies from periods of rapid climate change in order to understand the rate and timing of climate events and identify how other proxies either lead or lag this climate forcing. Annually-laminated or varved sediments are key proxies for under...

  5. Paleomagnetic research on Black Sea Quaternary sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcheva, V.; Nozharov, P.; Kovacheva, M.; Shopov, V.

    1990-10-01

    The paper reports the first paleomagnetic study of a Black Sea Quaternary sediment core made by a Bulgarian research group. The experimental results show an important difference in magnetic behaviour between the samples from the Holocene part and those from the Pleistocene part of the core. Suggestions are made for the character of the remanent magnetization and the main carriers of it. The presence of greigite (Fe 3S 4) and pyrite (FeS 2) is discussed. A rough correlation is established between the variation of inclination for the Holocene part of the sediment and for the Bulgarian archeomagnetic curve. On the basis of the comparison of inclination data obtained from the Pleistocene part of the core and previously studied Black Sea core (related to the absolute time scale), it is suggested that the lower boundary of the Pleistocene part is ˜ 16000 years old (BP).

  6. Beringian Megafaunal Extinctions at ~37 ka B.P.: Do Micrometeorites Embedded in Fossil Tusks and Skulls Indicate an Extraterrestial Precursor to the Younger Dryas Event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Firestone, R. B.; West, A.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of Late Pleistocene megafaunal fossils and their ancient DNA from Beringia (eastern Siberia, Alaska, and the emerged Bering Strait) indicate sharp declines in steppe bison population diversity and horse body size, extinction of the Alaskan wild ass, and local extinctions of brown bear and woolly mammoth genetic lines beginning at about 37 ka B.P. Beringia is also well known for its remarkably preserved Late Pleistocene frozen animal mummies. 14C ages of these mummies are bimodally distributed, having peaks coincident with the earlier ~37 ka B.P., and ~13 ka B.P. Younger Dryas, onset extinction events. Associated with the ~37 ka B.P. event are, for example, the Berezovka mammoth, headless Selerikan horse, steppe bison “Blue Babe”, and baby mammoths “Dima” and “Lyuba”. Analyses of these and other mummies indicate that they died instantly, in mostly healthy condition, with gut contents and high fat reserves indicative of a late summer to autumn season. An assortment of uneaten limbs and other body parts from a variety of species have also been found. Uniformitarian death scenarios inadequately account for the lack of evidence of normal predation and scavenging. Extensive internal injuries (e.g. large bone fractures, hemorrhaging) and apparent rapid burial of the mummies also indicate that something truly unusual happened at the time of these extinction events. We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites embedded in seven Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull acquired from commercial sources. 14C ages for five of these fossils have a weighted mean age of 33 ± 2 ka B.P. Laser ablation ICP-MS and XRF analyses of the particles indicate high Fe contents with compositions enriched in Ni and depleted in Ti, similar to Fe meteorites and unlike any natural terrestrial sources. Microprobe analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain from tusk 2 also show that it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. SEM images and XRF analyses of a bison

  7. Boundaries of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    2013-01-01

    The boundaries of space exploration are being pushed back constantly, but the realm of the partially understood and the totally unknown is as great as ever. Among other things this book deals with astronomical instruments and their application, recent discoveries in the solar system, stellar evolution, the exploding starts, the galaxies, quasars, pulsars, the possibilities of extraterrestrial life and relativity.

  8. Minnesota County Boundaries - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography lines....

  9. Dual boundary spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The extant literature runs short in understanding openness of innovation regarding and the different pathways along which internal and external knowledge resources can be combined. This study proposes a unique typology for outside-in innovations based on two distinct ways of boundary spanning: wh...

  10. Challenging the Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2004-01-01

    To many people, challenging the boundaries between the traditional disciplines in foreign language studies means doing cultural studies. The aim of this article is to pull in a different direction by suggesting how the interface between linguistics and literature may be another fertile field...

  11. Sediment Transport in Rivers with Overbank Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald; W; KNIGHT

    2005-01-01

    Some concepts related to sediment transport in rivers with overbank flow are described.Following a description of the physical processes that are involved when a river inundates its floodplains,some simple com- putational methods are presented which permit the depth-averaged velocity and boundary shear stress to be pre- dicted within a cross section of variable,but prismatic shape.The methoda account for the strong transverse shear in velocity that occurs when the stage is just above bankfull,as well as ...

  12. A Buoy for Continuous Monitoring of Suspended Sediment Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Güntner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of Suspended Sediments Dynamics (SSD across spatial scales is relevant for several fields of hydrology, such as eco-hydrological processes, the operation of hydrotechnical facilities and research on varved lake sediments as geoarchives. Understanding the connectivity of sediment flux between source areas in a catchment and sink areas in lakes or reservoirs is of primary importance to these fields. Lacustrine sediments may serve as a valuable expansion of instrumental hydrological records for flood frequencies and magnitudes, but depositional processes and detrital layer formation in lakes are not yet fully understood. This study presents a novel buoy system designed to continuously measure suspended sediment concentration and relevant boundary conditions at a high spatial and temporal resolution in surface water bodies. The buoy sensors continuously record turbidity as an indirect measure of suspended sediment concentrations, water temperature and electrical conductivity at up to nine different water depths. Acoustic Doppler current meters and profilers measure current velocities along a vertical profile from the water surface to the lake bottom. Meteorological sensors capture the atmospheric boundary conditions as main drivers of lake dynamics. It is the high spatial resolution of multi-point turbidity measurements, the dual-sensor velocity measurements and the temporally synchronous recording of all sensors along the water column that sets the system apart from existing buoy systems. Buoy data collected during a 4-month field campaign in Lake Mondsee demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the system in monitoring suspended sediment dynamics. Observations were related to stratification and mixing processes in the lake and increased turbidity close to a catchment outlet during flood events. The rugged buoy design assures continuous operation in terms of stability, energy management and sensor logging throughout the study period

  13. Modeling chemical accumulation in sediment of small waterbodies accounting for sediment transport and water-sediment exchange processes over long periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David Albert; Strehmel, Alexander; Erzgräber, Beate; Hammel, Klaus

    2017-07-20

    In a recent scientific opinion of the European Food Safety Authority it is argued that the accumulation of plant protection products in sediments over long time periods may be an environmentally significant process. Therefore, the European Food Safety Authority proposed a calculation to account for plant protection product accumulation. This calculation, however, considers plant protection product degradation within sediment as the only dissipation route, and does not account for sediment dynamics or back-diffusion into the water column. The hydraulic model Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS; US Army Corps of Engineers) was parameterized to assess sediment transport and deposition dynamics within the FOrum for Co-ordination of pesticide fate models and their USe (FOCUS) scenarios in simulations spanning 20 yr. The results show that only 10 to 50% of incoming sediment would be deposited. The remaining portion of sediment particles is transported across the downstream boundary. For a generic plant protection product substance this resulted in deposition of only 20 to 50% of incoming plant protection product substance. In a separate analysis, the FOCUS TOXSWA model was utilized to examine the relative importance of degradation versus back-diffusion as loss processes from the sediment compartment for a diverse range of generic plant protection products. In simulations spanning 20 yr, it was shown that back-diffusion was generally the dominant dissipation process. The results of the present study show that sediment dynamics and back-diffusion should be considered when calculating long-term plant protection product accumulation in sediment. Neglecting these may lead to a systematic overestimation of accumulation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-9. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  14. Lutocline Mixing and sediment wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, P.; Gonzalez/Nieto, P. L.

    2010-05-01

    Coastal mixing induced by waves is modeled experimentally by means of an oscillating grid, [1,2]when the boundary layer is turbulent as when waves generated by a storm break and spill, or when wind interacts with wave stirring, then a strong turbulence lifts off bottom sediments and these often form a distinct sediment laden region capped by a sharp density interface called in this case a Lutocline. These particle layer may be transported to deeper regions by compensation or gravity currents[3,4]. Point velocity distributions created by wind, waves and sloping currents are dominated by breaker areas which act as strong attractors for the sediments in suspension, because at the same time there is a higher mean water level near the coast due to wave radiation[5]. The combination of offshore and onshore together with the longshore and crosshore strong currents due to wave radiation imbalance produce the strongest local shear induced morphological sediment transport. The use of a circular Couette flow to hold sediments in suspension using a vortex generator (producing shear) or an oscilating grid is used to investigate the parameter range of sediment lift off. [1] Crespo A. and Redondo J.M.(1989) A simple experiment on the interaction between gravity currents and sediment transport, Rev. de Geofisica 45, 203-210. [2] Redondo J.M. and Cantalapiedra I.R. (1993) Mixing in horizontally heterogeneous flows", Applied Scientific Research, 51, 217-222 [3] J.E. Simpson (1997) Gravity Currents: In the Environment and the Laboratory, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England. [4] R.S.J. Sparks, R.T. Bonnecaze, H.E. Huppert, J.R. Lister, M.A. Hallworth, H. Mader, J. Phillips (1993) Sediment-laden gravity currents with reversing buoyancy, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 114. 243-257. [5] Bezerra M.O., Diez M., Medeiros C. Rodriguez A., Bahia E., Sanchez Arcilla A and Redondo J.M. (1998) Study on the influence of waves on coastal diffusion using image analysis. Applied

  15. Quantum gravitational effects on boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may hold the key to some of the outstanding problems in theoretical physics. In this work we analyze the perturbative quantum effects on the boundary of a gravitational system and Dirichlet boundary condtion imposed at the classical level. Our analysis reveals that for a black hole solution there exists a clash between the quantum effects and Dirichlet boundary condition: the solution of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary condition. The analysis also suggests that the violation of the Dirichlet boundary condition should be tied with a certain mechanism of information storage on the boundary.

  16. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  17. Radiochronology of lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erten, H.N. [Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    Sediment cores from Lakes Zurich, Constance, from the Sea of Marmara and from southern Turkey, northern Cyprus and eastern Spain were dated using natural {sup 210}Pb, fallout {sup 137}Cs and cosmic-ray produced {sup 7}Be radionuclides. Constant activity regions in the uppermost sections of sediments from Lake Zurich and the Sea of Marmara were attributed to post-depositional mobility of {sup 210}Pb in the former case and to bioturbation in the latter. A serious discrepancy exists between the {sup 210}Pb dating of Sea of Marmara sediments and those obtained by organic carbon based methods. The elements Zn, Cu, P and Pb were enriched in the upper sections of the sediment cores corresponding to the last 200 years. The increased metallurgical activities as a result of reforms in the Ottoman Army during the 18th century could be the most likely cause. (Author).

  18. Sediment Resuspension Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The full report on sediment resuspension in drinking water storage tanks and a link to an animation of results. This dataset is associated with the following...

  19. Rapid Sediment Characterization Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Organic (PAHs), inorganic (metals) Mobile field Lab or lab * Biomarkers (P450RGS dioxin screening assay) Dioxins , PAHs Lab Biological *cDNA...7 Immunoassays for PCBs, PAHs, Pesticides, and Dioxins ...9 P450RGS Dioxin Screening Assay for Sediment

  20. Offshore Surficial Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This data layer (PAC_EXT.txt and PAC_PRS.txt) represents two of five point coverages of known sediment samples, inspections, and probes from the usSEABED data...

  1. Collaboration in Healthcare Through Boundary Work and Boundary Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2015-01-01

    . In highly specialized, knowledge-intensive organizations such as healthcare organizations, organizational, professional, and disciplinary boundaries mark the formal structure and division of work. Collaboration and coordination across these boundaries are essential to minimizing gaps in patient care...

  2. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  3. Boundary transfer matrices and boundary quantum KZ equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaar, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Vlaar@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    A simple relation between inhomogeneous transfer matrices and boundary quantum Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov (KZ) equations is exhibited for quantum integrable systems with reflecting boundary conditions, analogous to an observation by Gaudin for periodic systems. Thus, the boundary quantum KZ equations receive a new motivation. We also derive the commutativity of Sklyanin’s boundary transfer matrices by merely imposing appropriate reflection equations, in particular without using the conditions of crossing symmetry and unitarity of the R-matrix.

  4. Reply to comment by E. Bard et al. on "Younger Dryas sea level and meltwater pulse 1B recorded in Barbados reef crest coral Acropora palmata" by N. A. Abdul et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Richard A.; Abdul, Nicole A.; Wright, James D.; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    2016-12-01

    Abdul et al. (2016) presented a detailed record of sea level at Barbados (13.9-9 kyr B.P.) tightly constraining the timing and amplitude during the Younger Dryas and Meltwater Pulse 1B (MWP-1B) based on U-Th dated reef crest coral species Acropora palmata. The Younger Dryas slow stand and the large (14 m) rapid sea level jump are not resolved in the Tahiti record. Tahiti sea level estimates are remarkably close to the Barbados sea level curve between 13.9 and 11.6 kyr but fall below the Barbados sea level curve for a few thousand years following MWP-1B. By 9 kyr the Tahiti sea level estimates again converge with the Barbados sea level curve. Abdul et al. (2016) concluded that Tahiti reefs at the core sites did not keep up with intervals of rapidly rising sea level during MWP-1B. We counter Bard et al. (2016) by showing (1) that there is no evidence for a hypothetical fault in Oistins Bay affecting one of the Barbados coring locations, (2) that the authors confuse the rare occurrences of A. palmata at depths >5 m with the "thickets" of A. palmata fronds representing the reef-crest facies, and (3) that uncertainties in depth habitat proxies largely account for differences in Barbados and Tahiti sea level differences curves with A. palmata providing the most faithful proxy. Given the range in Tahiti paleodepth uncertainties at the cored sites, the most parsimonious explanation remains that Tahiti coralgal ridges did not keep up with the sea level rise of MWP-1B.

  5. Sedimentary record of postglacial variability in near-bottom currents, sediment supply and ice rafting on the continental shelf off SW Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, B.; Szczuciński, W.; Forwick, M.; ZajÄ czkowski, M.; Lorenc, S.; Vorren, T. O.

    2012-04-01

    The continental shelf off the west coast of southern Spitsbergen is influenced by the northward-flowing water masses (warmer and more saline Atlantic Water carried by the West Spitsbergen Current and colder, fresher Arctic Water carried by the East Spitsbergen Current), as well as ice rafting. The present study was conducted to identify the influence of these factors on the sedimentary environment and to decipher temporal variations in the intensity of bottom currents, ice rafting off and glacial activity on southwestern Spitsbergen during the past 14,000 years. The study is based on a multiproxy analyses of one gravity core from the outer continental shelf (148 m water depth) in decadal to centennial resolution. Age control was obtained on a basis of ten AMS 14C dates along with 210Pb and 137Cs datings. To infer the style of sedimentation and the sediment supply the core was measured for magnetic susceptibility, X-rayed, analysed for grain-size distribution of bulk sediment and for coarse sand fraction components. The assessment of ice rafting intensity was based on coarse sand fraction counting (IRD), whereas to assume the type of ice rafting, whether by icebergs or sea ice, the analysis of quartz grains roundness was performed. Moreover, relative velocity of bottom currents was estimated by grain-size analysis of sortable silt fraction. We distinguish seven intervals: c. 14,000 - 12,600 cal yr BP - Bølling/Allerød (unit 1); 12,600 - 11,500 cal yr BP - Younger Dryas (unit 2) and 11,500 cal yr BP to present - Holocene (units 3 - 7). The smallest mean sortable silt values, reflecting relatively low bottom current velocity, occurred from the Bølling/Allerød to the early Younger Dryas and after ~0.5 cal ka BP. Increased velocities were inferred for the early Holocene as well as period between 8.8 - 7.8 cal yr BP. The IRD was present throughout the entire record indicating continuous supply of a material delivered from ice rafting, with variable dominance of

  6. Normal transmitting boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖振鹏

    1996-01-01

    The multi-transmitting formula (MTF) governed by a single artificial speed is analytically developed into a generalized MTF governed by a few artificial speeds to improve its capacity in simultaneous simulation of several one-way waves propagating at different speeds.The generalized MTF is then discretized and further generalized using the space extrapolation to improve its accuracies in numerical simulation of transient waves at large angles of incidence.The above two successive generalizitions of MTF based on the notion of normal transmission lead to a compact formula of local non-reflecting boundary condition.The formula not only provides a general representation of the major schemes of existing local boundary conditions but can be used to generate new schemes,which combine advantages of different schemes.

  7. Evaluation of suspended sediment concentrations, sediment fluxes and sediment depositions along a reservoir by using laser diffraction and acoustic backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizano, Laura; Haun, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The construction of dams and reservoirs disturb the natural morphological behavior of rivers. A natural settling effect occurs due to the reduced turbulences and flow velocities. As a consequence, reservoirs fill up with sediments which results in a reduction of storage volume, influences the operation of hydropower plants and leads in several cases to flood protection problems. The sediment depositions in reservoirs are standardly evaluated by using bathymetric data, obtained by a single beam sonar from pre-defined cross sections or by an extensive evaluation of the reservoir bed by a side scan sonar. However, a disadvantage of this method is that it is not possible to evaluate the pore water content of the depositions, which may lead as consequence to an uncertainty in the measured amount of deposited sediments. Given that a major part of sediments entering reservoirs are transported in suspension, sediment flux measurements along defined transects could give more reliable information on the settled amount of sediments and additional information on the sediment transport mechanism within the reservoir. An evaluation of the sediment fluxes is in practice often conducted by a single suspended sediment concentration (SSC) measurement in combination with a cross sectional calibration factor to take changes in the SSC along the transect into account. However, these calibration factors are often developed only for one specific in-situ condition and may give unreliable results in case that the boundaries change e.g. the hydraulic conditions. Hence an evaluation of the sediment fluxes along the whole transect would give a more reliable number for the amount of transported sediments through the reservoir. This information can afterwards be used to calculate the amount of settled sediments in different sections of the reservoir and the amount of sediments which will enter the intake. For this study the suspended sediment transport within the Peñas Blancas reservoir in

  8. Boundary-layer theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting (Deceased), Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  9. The boundary is mixed

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Oeckl's boundary formalism incorporates quantum statistical mechanics naturally, and we formulate general-covariant quantum statistical mechanics in this language. We illustrate the formalism by showing how it accounts for the Unruh effect. We observe that the distinction between pure and mixed states weakens in the general covariant context, and surmise that local gravitational processes are indivisibly statistical with no possible quantal versus probabilistic distinction.

  10. The causal boundary and its relations with the conformal boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J, E-mail: jherrera@agt.cie.uma.e [Departamento de Algebra, GeometrIa y TopologIa, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Our aim in this note is to present the results (obtained in [2]) which ensure that, under certain regularity conditions, the conformal boundary becomes equal to the causal boundary, not only as a point set, but in a topological and chronological level. In particular, under these conditions the conformal boundary becomes a powerful tool to compute the causal one.

  11. The open boundary equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Diederen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new equation describing the hydrodynamics in infinitely long tidal channels (i.e., no reflection under the influence of oceanic forcing. The proposed equation is a simple relationship between partial derivatives of water level and velocity. It is formally derived for a progressive wave in a frictionless, prismatic, tidal channel with a horizontal bed. Assessment of a large number of numerical simulations, where an open boundary condition is posed at a certain distance landward, suggests that it can also be considered accurate in the more natural case of converging estuaries with nonlinear friction and a bed slope. The equation follows from the open boundary condition and is therefore a part of the problem formulation for an infinite tidal channel. This finding provides a practical tool for evaluating tidal wave dynamics, by reconstructing the temporal variation of the velocity based on local observations of the water level, providing a fully local open boundary condition and allowing for local friction calibration.

  12. Cell boundary fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  13. Allegheny County Zip Code Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the zip code boundaries that lie within Allegheny County. These are not clipped to the Allgeheny County boundary. If viewing this...

  14. Boundary Terms for Causal Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, Michel; Jubb, Ian; Surya, Sumati

    2015-01-01

    We propose a family of boundary terms for the action of a causal set with a spacelike boundary. We show that in the continuum limit one recovers the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term in the mean. We also calculate the continuum limit of the mean causal set action for an Alexandrov interval in flat spacetime. We find that it is equal to the volume of the codimension-2 intersection of the two light-cone boundaries of the interval.

  15. On the degenerate phase boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y; Kuang, Z; Ma, Yongge; Liang, Canbin; Kuang, Zhiquan

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the phase boundary between degenerate and non-degenerate regions in Ashtekar's gravity has been studied by Bengtsson and Jacobson who conjectured that the "phase boundary" should always be null. In this paper, we reformulate the reparametrization procedure in the mapping language and distinguish a phase boundary from its image. It is shown that the image has to be null, while the nullness of the phase boundary requries more suitable criterion.

  16. Boundary sine-Gordon model

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Z; Takács, G

    2002-01-01

    We review our recent results on the on-shell description of sine-Gordon model with integrable boundary conditions. We determined the spectrum of boundary states together with their reflection factors by closing the boundary bootstrap and checked these results against WKB quantization and numerical finite volume spectra obtained from the truncated conformal space approach. The relation between a boundary resonance state and the semiclassical instability of a static classical solution is analyzed in detail.

  17. Continental Transform Boundaries: Tectonic Evolution and Geohazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Steckler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Continental transform boundaries cross heavily populated regions, and they are associated with destructive earthquakes,for example, the North Anatolian Fault (NAFacross Turkey, the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault in Haiti,the San Andreas Fault in California, and the El Pilar fault in Venezuela. Transform basins are important because they are typically associated with 3-D fault geometries controlling segmentation—thus, the size and timing of damaging earthquakes—and because sediments record both deformation and earthquakes. Even though transform basins have been extensively studied, their evolution remains controversial because we don’t understand the specifics about coupling of vertical and horizontal motions and about the basins’long-term kinematics. Seismic and tsunami hazard assessments require knowing architecture and kinematics of faultsas well as how the faults are segmented.

  18. Geoacoustic model of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung basin, the East Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G. S.; Kim, S. P.; Bae, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    To realization of geoacoustic model in the southwestern Ulleung basin, the East Sea of Korea, eighty-two piston core samples and sixty-six box core samples were collected. Sediment texture (mean grain size and sand, silt, and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, and grain density), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation) were measured using surface sediments below 40 cm from the surface. As the results, the study area is divided into five sub-areas based on acoustic property of sediments: (1) Area I is composed of muddy sediments that affected directly by the Nakdong River discharge. The velocity is almost 1490 m/s. (2) Area II is generally characterized by hemi-pelagic muds and partially mixed with intermittent sandy sediments originated from the outer shelf and upper slope. The velocity approximately ranges from 1490 to 1500 m/s. (3) Area III is comprised of muddy sand sediments that are corresponds to the boundary between recent sediments and relict sediments. The velocity ranges from 1500 to 1600 m/s. (4) Area IV is dominated by coarse-grained relict sediments. The velocity ranges from 1600 to 1700 m/s. And (5) Area V consists of very coarser sediments. The velocity is higher than 1700 m/s. The sediment velocity generally decreases with increasing porosity or decreasing mean grain size and bulk density.

  19. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  20. The impact of the streamflow hydrograph on sediment supply from terrace erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higson, John Lee; Singer, Michael Bliss

    2015-11-01

    Sediment supply from banks and terraces has important implications for grain-size distributions in alluvial rivers (and by extension for aquatic habitat), as well as for the delivery of floodplain-stored nutrients and contaminants to the aquatic environment. The interactions between streamflow hydrographs and lateral channel boundary failure control the sediment supply from banks and terraces. However, the relationships between variable flow and discrete sediment supply from catastrophic erosion of lateral boundaries and subsequent mass sediment flux in rivers are not well characterised by existing methods and models that focus only on one of several relevant interrelated processes. In order to improve predictive capability of catastrophic sediment supply from lateral boundaries, we adopt a new approach to modelling the process interactions between stream hydrology, erosion of banks/terraces, and the corresponding discrete supply of sediment to channels. We develop a modelling framework for terrace - channel coupling that combines existing theories of flow through porous media, bank stability, and fractional sediment flux. We demonstrate the utility of this modelling approach by assessing hydrologically driven erosion, evolution of grain size in the channel, and fine sediment flux from a study site along the Yuba River in California over individual flood hydrographs and over decadal historical flow series. We quantify the supply of sediment eroded from a contaminated nineteenth century fan terrace of hydraulic gold mining tailings intersecting the Yuba, and find that a threshold for erosion exists at a stage in the channel in excess of 8 m producing episodic sediment concentrations in excess of 300 mg L-1. The modelling produced erosion and fine sediment pulses from each of three major floods in the past several decades until the flow drops below 500 m3 s-1 and a bed armor layer forms, while no sediment was generated from the terrace during smaller floods. We

  1. Marine sediment cores database for the Mediterranean Basin: a tool for past climatic and environmental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberico, I.; Giliberti, I.; Insinga, D. D.; Petrosino, P.; Vallefuoco, M.; Lirer, F.; Bonomo, S.; Cascella, A.; Anzalone, E.; Barra, R.; Marsella, E.; Ferraro, L.

    2017-06-01

    Paleoclimatic data are essential for fingerprinting the climate of the earth before the advent of modern recording instruments. They enable us to recognize past climatic events and predict future trends. Within this framework, a conceptual and logical model was drawn to physically implement a paleoclimatic database named WDB-Paleo that includes the paleoclimatic proxies data of marine sediment cores of the Mediterranean Basin. Twenty entities were defined to record four main categories of data: a) the features of oceanographic cruises and cores (metadata); b) the presence/absence of paleoclimatic proxies pulled from about 200 scientific papers; c) the quantitative analysis of planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, pollen, calcareous nannoplankton, magnetic susceptibility, stable isotopes, radionuclides values of about 14 cores recovered by Institute for Coastal Marine Environment (IAMC) of Italian National Research Council (CNR) in the framework of several past research projects; d) specific entities recording quantitative data on δ18O, AMS 14C (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) and tephra layers available in scientific papers. Published data concerning paleoclimatic proxies in the Mediterranean Basin are recorded only for 400 out of 6000 cores retrieved in the area and they show a very irregular geographical distribution. Moreover, the data availability decreases when a constrained time interval is investigated or more than one proxy is required. We present three applications of WDB-Paleo for the Younger Dryas (YD) paleoclimatic event at Mediterranean scale and point out the potentiality of this tool for integrated stratigraphy studies.

  2. Sedimentation of Knotted Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Piili, Joonas; Kaski, Kimmo; Linna, Riku

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the sedimentation of knotted polymers by means of the stochastic rotation dynamics, a molecular dynamics algorithm which takes hydrodynamics fully into account. We show that the sedimentation coefficient s, related to the terminal velocity of the knotted polymers, increases linearly with the average crossing number n_c of the corresponding ideal knot. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first direct computational confirmation of this relation, postulated on the basis of experiments in "The effect of ionic conditions on the conformations of supercoiled DNA. I. sedimentation analysis" by Rybenkov et al., for the case of sedimentation. Such a relation was previously shown to hold with simulations for knot electrophoresis. We also show that there is an accurate linear dependence of s on the inverse of the radius of gyration R_g^-1, more specifically with the inverse of the R_g component that is perpendicular to the direction along which the polymer sediments. Intriguingly, the linear de...

  3. Boundary Anomalies and Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that boundary terms of conformal anomalies recover the universal contribution to the entanglement entropy and also play an important role in the boundary monotonicity theorem of odd-dimensional quantum field theories. Motivated by these results, we investigate relationships between boundary anomalies and the stress tensor correlation functions in conformal field theories. In particular, we focus on how the conformal Ward identity and the renormalization group equation are modified by boundary central charges. Renormalized stress tensors induced by boundary Weyl invariants are also discussed, with examples in spherical and cylindrical geometries.

  4. Fiat and bona fide boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, B.; Varzi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Consider John, the moon, a lump of cheese. These are objects possessed of divisible bulk. They can be divided, in reality or in thought, into spatially extended parts. They have interiors. They also have boundaries, which we can think of (roughly) asinfinitely thin extremal slices. The boundary of the moon is its surface. The boundary of John is the surface of his skin. But what of inner boundaries, the boundaries of the interior parts of things? There are many genuine two-dimensional (sphere...

  5. Boundary perimeter Bethe ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassek, Rouven

    2017-06-01

    We study the partition function of the six-vertex model in the rational limit on arbitrary Baxter lattices with reflecting boundary. Every such lattice is interpreted as an invariant of the twisted Yangian. This identification allows us to relate the partition function of the vertex model to the Bethe wave function of an open spin chain. We obtain the partition function in terms of creation operators on a reference state from the algebraic Bethe ansatz and as a sum of permutations and reflections from the coordinate Bethe ansatz.

  6. The Boundaries of Fictio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ivanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay surveys four articles of the section dedicated to the boundaries of fiction in literature, scientific discourse, and other areas of human creativity. The section is supposed to contribute to the study of a broad range of the problems of literary theory, such as the interaction between literature and other social practices, resulting in the creation of a particular discourse of ‘reality’ and ‘objectivity’, and the highly controversial issue of the relationship between ‘material’ and ‘form’ in the literary text.

  7. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are symbionts. In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place...... as the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of circumventing the science-industry food chain and sequestering biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time demonstrating...

  8. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are "symbionts". In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place...... as the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of "circumventing" the science-industry food chain and "sequestering" biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time demonstrating...

  9. Challenging the Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2004-01-01

    To many people, challenging the boundaries between the traditional disciplines in foreign language studies means doing cultural studies. The aim of this article is to pull in a different direction by suggesting how the interface between linguistics and literature may be another fertile field...... linguistics in general and to Hallidayan linguistics in particular. The theoretical framework thus laid out, it is exemplified how Halliday's theory of language may be employed in the analysis of literature. The article concludes by considering the possible status of literary linguistics in a broader...

  10. Power, boundaries, intersubjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Ian R

    1995-06-01

    The first part of this paper is a brief overview of the keynote speech given by Jeffrey Masson at the Sixth Conference of the Society for Existential Analysis, London, entitled Issues of power in the psychotherapeutic relationship, in which Masson raised various questions about the assumptions of what constitutes the alleged inappropriate behaviour of therapists, and the boundaries of the professional role that must not be overstepped. These criticisms are begun to be addressed in this paper. The overall aim of this paper is to promote a sceptical and critical discussion of the psychotherapeutic relationship and a few of its founding assumptions.

  11. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...

  12. Grain Boundary Energies in Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ramli

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The dependence of grain boundary energy on boundary orientation was studied in copper annealed at 1000 ^circC. Grain boundary orientations and the disorientations across the boundaries were measured. A rotation matrix notation is used to interpret selected area electron channelling patterns observed in a scanning electron microscope. The Herring and Shewmon torque terms were investigated using wire specimens having a "bamboo" structure. The Herring torque terms were determined using the Hess relation. The (110) section of the Sigma 11 gamma-plot (i.e. the variation of grain boundary energy with boundary orientation) was evaluated. In this plot, minima in energies were found at the (311) and (332) mirror planes. Sigma 3 and Sigma9 boundaries were investigated in sheet specimens. The (110) and (111) sections of the Sigma3 gamma -plot were evaluated. In addition to the sharp cusps occurring at the Sigma3 {111} planes, the further shallower cusps occur at the incoherent Sigma 3 boundaries with the interfacial planes approximately parallel to {322} in one crystal and {11.44} in the other crystal. Flat and curved Sigma9 boundaries were investigated. The break up of Sigma9 boundaries into two Sigma3 boundaries and the relation between the Sigma3 and Sigma 9 gamma-plots was also examined. The (110) section of the Sigma9 gamma-plot was constructed.

  13. Development of Sediment Deposition Height Capacity Equation in Sewer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yangho; Jo, Deokjun; Lee, Jungho

    2017-04-01

    Sediment characteristics and transport processes in sewers are markedly different from river. There is a wide range of particle densities and smaller particle size variation in sewers. Sediment supply and the available erodible material are more limited in sewers, and the diverse hydraulic characteristics in sewer systems are more unsteady. Prevention of sewer sediment accumulation, which can cause major sewer operational problems, is imperative and has been an immense concern for engineers. The effects of sediment formation in sewer systems, an appropriate sediment transport modelling with the ability to determine the location and depth of sediment deposit is needed. It is necessary to design efficiently considering the transfer and settling phenomena of the sediment coming into the sewer systems. During transport in the sewer, the minimum shear flow velocity and possible shear stress at which the sediment is transported smoothly. However, the interaction of sediment and fluid within the sewer systems has been very complex and the rigorous theoretical handling of this problem has not been developed. It is derived from the empirical values obtained from the river bed. The basic theory that particles float is based on the balance between sedimentation of particles by gravity and turbulent diffusion of fluids. There are many variables related. Representative parameters include complex phenomena due to collisions between particles, particles and fluids, and interactions between particles and tube walls. In general, the main parameters that form the boundary between the main transport and sediment are particle size, density, volume fraction, pipe diameter and gravity. As the particle size and volume concentration increase, the minimum feed rate increases and the same tendency is observed for the change of the capillary diameter. Based on this tendency, this study has developed a sediment deposition height capacity formula to take into consideration the sewer discharge

  14. Boundary effects in entanglement entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Berthiere, Clement

    2016-01-01

    We present a number of explicit calculations of Renyi and entanglement entropies in situations where the entangling surface intersects the boundary in $d$-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. When the boundary is a single plane we compute the contribution to the entropy due to this intersection, first in the case of the Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, and then in the case of a generic Robin type boundary condition. The flow in the boundary coupling between the Neumann and Dirichlet phases is analyzed in arbitrary dimension $d$ and is shown to be monotonic, the peculiarity of $d=3$ case is noted. We argue that the translational symmetry along the entangling surface is broken due the presence of the boundary which reveals that the entanglement is not homogeneous. In order to characterize this quantitatively, we introduce a density of entanglement entropy and compute it explicitly. This quantity clearly indicates that the entanglement is maximal near the boundary. We then consider the situation where the ...

  15. Ecosystem responses during Late Glacial period recorded in the sediments of Lake Łukie (East Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Słowiński, Michał; Correa-Metrio, Alex; Obremska, Milena; Luoto, Tomi; Nevalainen, Liisa; Woszczyk, Michał; Milecka, Krystyna

    2014-05-01

    The main objectives of this study was to reconstruct climate impact on the functioning of Lake Łukie and its catchment (Łęczna Włodawa Lake District, East European Plain) during Late Glacial period. In order to reconstruct climatic fluctuations and corresponding ecosystem responses, we analysed lake sediments for pollen, subfossil Cladocera, plant macrofossils and chemical composition of the sediment. Of these, plant macrofossils and Cladocera were used to infer minimum and mean July temperatures and ordination analysis was used to examine biotic community shifts. Multiproxy analyses of late-glacial sediments of Lake Łukie clearly show that the main driver of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems as well as geomorphological processes in the catchment was climate variation. The history of the lake initiated during the Older Dryas. In that period, Łęczna Włodawa Lake District was covered by open habitats dominated by grasses (Poaceae), humid sites were occupied by tundra plant communities with less clubmoss (Selaginella selaginoides), dry sites by dominated by steppe-like vegetation with light-demanding species such as Helianthemum, Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae, and juniper bushes (Juniperus). Cold climate limited the growth and development of organisms in the lake, Cladocera community species composition was poor, with only few species present there all the time. During this time period, permafrost was still present in the ground limiting infiltration of rainwater and causing high erosion in the catchment area. Surface runoff is confirmed by the presence of sclerotia of Cenococcum geophilum and high terrigenous silica content. The warming of the early Allerød caused a remarkable change in the natural environment of this area. This is in accordance with the temperature rise reconstructed with the use of plant macrofossils though the Cladocera reconstruction did not recorded the rise than. This temperature increase resulted in turnover of vegetation in the

  16. The Boundary Layer Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Ranah; Bowles, N. E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Hurley, J.

    2010-10-01

    The Boundary Layer Radiometer is a small, low mass (<1kg) radiometer with only a single moving part - a scan/calibration mirror. The instrument consists of a three mirror telescope system incorporating an intermediate focus for use with miniature infrared and visible filters. It also has an integrated low power blackbody calibration target to provide long-term calibration stability The instrument may be used as an upward looking boundary layer radiometer for both the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres with appropriate filters for the mid-infrared carbon dioxide band, as well as a visible channel for the detection of aerosol components such as dust. The scan mirror may be used to step through different positions from the local horizon to the zenith, allowing the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere to be retrieved. The radiometer uses miniature infrared filter assemblies developed for previous space-based instruments by Oxford, Cardiff and Reading Universities. The intermediate focus allows for the use of upstream blocking filters and baffles, which not only simplifies the design of the filters and focal plane assembly, but also reduces the risk of problems due to stray light. Combined with the calibration target this means it has significant advantages over previous generations of small radiometers.

  17. Reweighting twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussone, Andrea; Hansen, Martin; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Imposing twisted boundary conditions on the fermionic fields is a procedure extensively used when evaluating, for example, form factors on the lattice. Twisting is usually performed for one flavour and only in the valence, and this causes a breaking of unitarity. In this work we explore the possibility of restoring unitarity through the reweighting method. We first study some properties of the approach at tree level and then we stochastically evaluate ratios of fermionic determinants for different boundary conditions in order to include them in the gauge averages, avoiding in this way the expensive generation of new configurations for each choice of the twisting angle, $\\theta$. As expected the effect of reweighting is negligible in the case of large volumes but it is important when the volumes are small and the twisting angles are large. In particular we find a measurable effect for the plaquette and the pion correlation function in the case of $\\theta=\\pi/2$ in a volume $16\\times 8^3$, and we observe a syst...

  18. A two-dimensional Segmented Boundary Algorithm for complex moving solid boundaries in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasanizade, Sh.; Sousa, J. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    A Segmented Boundary Algorithm (SBA) is proposed to deal with complex boundaries and moving bodies in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Boundaries are formed in this algorithm with chains of lines obtained from the decomposition of two-dimensional objects, based on simple line geometry. Various two-dimensional, viscous fluid flow cases have been studied here using a truly incompressible SPH method with the aim of assessing the capabilities of the SBA. Firstly, the flow over a stationary circular cylinder in a plane channel was analyzed at steady and unsteady regimes, for a single value of blockage ratio. Subsequently, the flow produced by a moving circular cylinder with a prescribed acceleration inside a plane channel was investigated as well. Next, the simulation of the flow generated by the impulsive start of a flat plate, again inside a plane channel, has been carried out. This was followed by the study of confined sedimentation of an elliptic body subjected to gravity, for various density ratios. The set of test cases was completed with the simulation of periodic flow around a sunflower-shaped object. Extensive comparisons of the results obtained here with published data have demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, namely in cases involving complex geometries and moving bodies.

  19. Petrophysics of Palaeogene sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadalkarim, Ahmed

    the geomechanical behaviour of shale. Biot’s coefficient (β) for elastic deformation is an important parameter involves in the estimation of effective stress. However, engineers usually assume β equal to one when estimating in-situ vertical effective stress on buried sediments, but, this assumption is not always...... related to borehole stability. This Ph.D. study stressed on the importance of using correct β value in estimation of vertical effective stress especially on deep-sea sediments. To assess the geomechanical stability and the stiffness of the three studied lithologies, their β was found and used to calculate...

  20. WAVE BOTTOM LAYERS DYNAMIC WITH SUSPENDED SEDIMENT OVER VORTEX RIPPLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-bo; BAI Yu-chuan; ZHAO Zi-dan; ZHANG Hong-wu

    2004-01-01

    Vortex ripple is widely formed in the coastal region, and the dynamic of vortex is quite important because it is responsible for sediment transport. The flow structure around the vortex ripples can be modeled as 2D flow due to the geometry of the flow boundaries. In this paper, 2D Large-Ed dy-Simulation (LES) method was used to predict the flow structure and the dynamic of vortex in the bottom layers under the action of the wave, the numerical simulation results show a completely process of vortex formation, evolvement and disappearance. Based on the study of flow structure, the suspended sediment transport was modeled in present paper. The simulated sediment concentrations were compared to measurements from the literature. The agreement between the time averaged simulated concentration profiles and measurements is satisfactory. For a high setting velocity, the suspended sediment is confined to the vicinity of the bed, and it is dominated by the local bottom shear stress. For a small setting velocity,the suspension is more dominated by the characteristic of vor tex. There are two suspended sediment transport peaks observed in the cross-section at the trough and crest in the half period, the second peak is due to the separation bubble taking the sediment.

  1. Benchmarking an unstructured grid sediment model in an energetic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jesse E.; Baptista, António M.

    2017-02-01

    A sediment model coupled to the hydrodynamic model SELFE is validated against a benchmark combining a set of idealized tests and an application to a field-data rich energetic estuary. After sensitivity studies, model results for the idealized tests largely agree with previously reported results from other models in addition to analytical, semi-analytical, or laboratory results. Results of suspended sediment in an open channel test with fixed bottom are sensitive to turbulence closure and treatment for hydrodynamic bottom boundary. Results for the migration of a trench are very sensitive to critical stress and erosion rate, but largely insensitive to turbulence closure. The model is able to qualitatively represent sediment dynamics associated with estuarine turbidity maxima in an idealized estuary. Applied to the Columbia River estuary, the model qualitatively captures sediment dynamics observed by fixed stations and shipborne profiles. Representation of the vertical structure of suspended sediment degrades when stratification is underpredicted. Across all tests, skill metrics of suspended sediments lag those of hydrodynamics even when qualitatively representing dynamics. The benchmark is fully documented in an openly available repository to encourage unambiguous comparisons against other models.

  2. Authigenic Uranium in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcantonio, F.; Lyle, M. W.; Loveley, M. R.; Ibrahim, R.

    2014-12-01

    Authigenic U concentrations have been used as an indicator of redox state in marine sediments. Soluble U(VI) in porewaters is reduced to insoluble U(IV) under suboxic conditions setting up a diffusion gradient through which U in bottom waters is supplied to reducing sediments. Researchers have used sedimentary redox enrichment of U as a tool to identify past redox changes, which may be caused by changes in organic carbon rain rates and/or bottom water oxygen levels. Differentiating between these two explanations is important, as the former is tied to the use of authigenic U as a paleoproductivity proxy. We examined sediments from 4 sediment cores retrieved from two different localities in the Panama Basin in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Two cores were retrieved from the northern Panama basin at the Cocos Ridge, (4JC at 5° 44.7'N 85° 45.5' W, 1730 m depth; 8JC at 6° 14.0'N 86° 2.6' W, 1993 m depth), and two were retrieved from the south at the Carnegie Ridge, (11JC at 0° 41.6'S 85° 20.0' W, 2452 m depth; 17JC at 0° 10.8'S 85° 52.0' W, 2846 m depth). Using 230Th systematics and seismic profiling at each of the sites, we've identified significant sediment winnowing (4JC and 11JC) and focusing (8JC and 17JC). At all sites, we believe that changes in age-model-derived sand (i.e., >63µm) mass accumulation rates (MAR) best represent changes in rain rates. Glacial rain rates are higher than those in the Holocene by a factor of 2-3 at both sites. Peak Mn levels (>1%), the brown-to-green color transition (which likely represents the oxic/post-oxic boundary), and peak U concentrations all appear in the same order with increasing depth down core. At the Carnegie sites, where MARs are greater than those at the Cocos sites, increases in authigenic U (up to 4 ppm) occur during the mid- to late Holocene at depths of 10-15 cm. At the Cocos sites, increases in authigenic U (up to 12 ppm) occur lower in the sediment column (25-30 cm) during the late glacial. The decrease

  3. Toxicity of contaminated sediments in dilution series with control sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M.K.; Landrum, P.F.; Burton, G.A.; Klaine, S.J.; Crecelius, E.A.; Byl, T.D.; Gossiaux, Duane C.; Tsymbal, V.N.; Cleveland, L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Sasson-Brickson, G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of dilutions has been the foundation of our approach for assessing contaminated water, and accordingly, it may be important to establish similar or parallel approaches for sediment dilutions. Test organism responses to dilution gradients can identify the degree of necessary sediment alteration to reduce the toxicity. Using whole sediment dilutions to represent the complex interactions of in situ sediments can identify the toxicity, but the selection of the appropriate diluent for the contaminated sediment may affect the results and conclusions drawn. Contaminated whole sediments were examined to evaluate the toxicity of dilutions of sediments with a diversity of test organisms. Dilutions of the contaminated sediments were prepared with differing diluents that varied in organic carbon content, particle size distribution, and volatile solids. Studies were conducted using four macroinvertebrates and a vascular, rooted plant. Responses by some test organisms followed a sigmoidal dose-response curve, but others followed a U-shaped curve. Initial dilutions reduced toxicity as expected, but further dilution resulted in an increase in toxicity. The type of diluent used was an important factor in assessing the sediment toxicity, because the control soil reduced toxicity more effectively than sand as a diluent of the same sediment. Using sediment chemical and physical characteristics as an indicator of sediment dilution may not be as useful as chemical analysis of contaminants, but warrants further investigation.

  4. Acoustical and optical backscatter measurements of sediment transport in the 1988 1989 STRESS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J. F.; Gross, T. F.; Sherwood, C. R.; Irish, J. D.; Brumley, B. H.

    1997-04-01

    During the 1988-1989 Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) experiment, a 1-MHz acoustic backscatter system (ABSS), deployed in 90 m of water off the California coast measured vertical profiles of suspended sediment concentration from 1.5 to (nominally) 26 meters above bottom (m.a.b.). An 8-week-long time series was obtained, showing major sediment transport events (storms) in late December and early January. Comparison of the acoustics measurements from 1.5 m.a.b. are made with optical backscatter system (OBS) concentration estimates lower in the boundary layer (0.25 m.a.b.). Correlations between ABSS and OBS concentration measurements and the boundary layer forcing functions (waves, currents, and their non-linear interaction) provided a variety of insights into the nature of the sediment transport of the STRESS site. Transport rates and integrated transport are seen to be dominated by the largest storm events.

  5. The glacial/deglacial history of sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Heil, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    of glaciation indicated in the Bear Lake record postdates the initial rise of Lake Bonneville and roughly corresponds to the Stansbury shoreline. The lake record indicates that maximum glaciation occurred as Lake Bonneville reached its maximum extent ca. 20 cal ka and that deglaciation was under way while Lake Bonneville remained at its peak. The transition from siliciclastic to carbonate sedimentation probably indicates increasingly evaporative conditions and may coincide with the climatically driven fall of Lake Bonneville from the Provo shoreline. Although lake levels fluctuated during the Younger Dryas, the Bear Lake record for this period is more consistent with drier conditions, rather than cooler, moister conditions interpreted from many studies from western North America. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  6. Sediments of a retting yard

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Remani, K.N.; Venugopal, P.; Devi, K.S.; Unnithan, R.V.

    Sediments of a coconut husk retting yard and a reference station in Cochin backwaters, Kerala, India were studied for 1 yr. Effects of monsoon were found significant Organic carbon and organic matter showed enrichment in the retting ground sediments...

  7. SEDIMENT CONTROL FOR IRRIGATION INTAKES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of the sediment problems in irrigation engineeringwas carried out, and the layout, the method as well as the effect of sediment control for irrigation intake structures in China were briefly introduced.

  8. Sedimentological characteristics of lake sediment of the Lake Jelonek (North Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramkowski, Mateusz; Filbrandt-Czaja, Anna; Ott, Florian; Słowiński, Michał; Tjallingii, Rik; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake Jelonek is located in Northern Poland (53°45'58N, 18°23'30E). The lake is surrounded by forest, covers an area of 19,9 ha and has a maximum depth of 13,8 m. In 2013 and 2014 three overlapping and parallel series of long sediment cores JEL14-A-(1445 cm), JEL14-B-(1430 cm), JEL14-C-(1435 cm) and seven short gravity cores JEL13 (K1-K7) have been recovered from the deepest part of the lake. A continuous composite profile JEL14 covering 1426 cm has been established by correlation based on 28 distinct macroscopic marker layers. The sediment sequence can be divided into 15 (I-XV) lithological units. These units comprise biochemical calcite varves, homogeneous calcite-rich gyttja, homogeneous organic-diatomaceous gyttja, and sandy layers. The chronology established so far is based on 14 AMS 14C dates from terrestrial plant remains and tephrochronology (Askja AD-1875) and covers the interval from the Younger Dryas to present times. Based on the chronology and sedimentological characteristics the composite profile has been correlated to a previous core from which a detailed pollen diagram had been established (Filbrandt-Czaja 2009). Here we present initial results from thin section analyses for two intervals from the new composite record JEL14, (I) the uppermost 0-256 cm and (II) the interval from 768-1296 cm. Intercalated between these two varved interval is a thick section (512 cm) of homogeneous organic-ditomaceous sediments. We present varve micro-facies data in combination with μ-XRF element scanning for comprehensive reconstruction of the sedimentation processes in Lake Jelonek. Preliminary varve counting reveals that the uppermost 256 cm varved sediments comprise ca 925 years (2008-1083 AD), while the lower floating varve interval covers the time period from 1850 - 10500 cal a BP. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis -ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association; grant number VH-VI-415. References

  9. Sediment Interfaces: Ecotones on a Microbial Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.; D'Angelo, G.; Thurber, A. R.; Graw, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Ecotones - transitions between different biomes - often support greater faunal diversity than the adjacent ecological systems. For subseafloor microorganisms, defined geological and chemical gradients have been shown to affect population sizes and community structure, but the role that sediment interfaces play is still unclear. Here, we test the hypothesis that zones of transition between two distinct sediment types increase microbial diversity and change community composition. Concurrently, we explore those factors that drive deep-subsurface microbial community structure (e.g., depth, interstitial water chemistry, methane concentrations, clay content). Samples from IODP Expedition 349 - South China Sea Tectonics - had interfaces of either ash/clay or turbidite/clay boundaries sampled , DNA extracted, and the 16S rRNA gene analyzed on an Illumina MiSeq platform. Initial analyses reveal that microbial communities in sediment samples are distinct from communities in drilling fluid, indicating that contamination is unlikely. In four of the eight complete interfaces currently analyzed we found an increase in diversity (based on the chao1 index), in certain cases doubling the diversity of the adjacent rock types. The pattern was not uniform across all interfaces. While some posit that ecotones provide a mixing of the two adjacent communities, we were surprised to find an abundance (mean = 392 OTUs) of unique microbial taxa within the ecotone itself when compared to adjacent sediment (mean=282 unique OTUs). Thus while diversity was not uniformly increased in ecotones, the interface led to divergent microbial communities that were not simply mixtures of those adjacent. We will discuss the ability of abiotic factors in explaining the among ecotone variance that we observed. Our investigation helps to characterize the factors that drive microbial community structure of the subseafloor while highlighting the need to focus on habitat heterogeneity at a scale pertinent to

  10. Boundary layer transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  11. Superfluid Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G. W.; Parker, N. G.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  12. Public Computation & Boundary Play

    CERN Document Server

    Sengupta, Pratim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce 'public computation' as a genre of learning environments that can be used to radically broaden public participation in authentic, computation-enabled STEM disciplinary practices. Our paradigmatic approach utilizes open source software designed for professional scientists, engineers and digital artists, and situates them in an undiluted form, alongside live and archived expert support, in a public space. We present a case study of DigiPlay, a prototypical public computation space we designed at the University of Calgary, where users can interact directly with scientific simulations as well as the underlying open source code using an array of massive multi- touch screens. We argue that in such a space, public interactions with the code can be thought of as boundary work and play, through which public participation becomes legitimate scientific act, as the public engages in scientific creation through truly open-ended explorations with the code.

  13. Boundary layer transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  14. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  15. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the fre...

  16. Bottom currents and shelf sediments, southwest of Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D.; Sommerville, J. H.; Stanford, P. N.

    1980-04-01

    The shelf sediments southwest of Britain range from large boulders to muddy fine sands. The large boulders, which occur in patches, were probably dropped from icebergs. A reworked basal bed forms an extensive pavement over which well to very well sorted medium to fine sands are transported, whilst muddy sediments occur between sandbanks. Measurements of boundary layer currents show that the threshold friction velocities for the sands are exceeded by maximum tidal flows over most of the area. Repeated selective entrainment by tidal currents, in a virtually closed sediment system, is proposed as the mechanism for the formation of these very well sorted mobile sands, which have a mean size close to that of the most easily entrained grains and size frequency distributions approaching log-normality.

  17. Annually resolved lake and shallow marine sediment records of global climate change of the past 16,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, G. H.; Brauer, A.; Yancheva, G.; Dulski, P.; Negendank, J. F.; Peterson, L. C.; Sigman, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    In the sediments of lake Huguang Maar in coastal southeast China, the titanium content and redox-sensitive magnetic properties record the strength of winter monsoon winds at subdecadal to annual resolution over the last 16 thousand years. The record indicates a stronger winter monsoon prior to the Bølling-Allerød warming, during the Younger Dryas, and during the middle and late Holocene, when cave stalagmite oxygen isotope data indicate a weaker summer monsoon. The anti-correlation between winter and summer monsoon strength is best explained by migrations in the ITCZ that occurred simultaneously in central America and Africa. Drought associated with southward ITCZ migration may have played a role in the termination of several Chinese dynasties. A remarkable similarity of ITCZ migration in east Asia and the Americas from 700 to 900 AD raises the possibility that the coincident declines of the important Tang Dynasty in China and the Classic Maya in Central America were catalyzed by the same ITCZ migrations. The mechanisms behind these decadal-scale ITCZ-monsoon swings can be further exoplored at major climate transitions such as the onset of Younger Dryas cooling at ~12.7 ka, one of the most abrupt climate changes observed in ice core, lake and marine records in the North Atlantic realm and much of the Northern Hemisphere. Annually laminated lake sediments ideally record the dynamics of abrupt climate changes since seasonal deposition immediately responds to climate and varve counts accurately estimate the time of change. We report new sub-annual geochemical and varve microfacies data from a lake in Western Germany, which provides one of the best-dated records currently available for this climate transition, which we compare to the Cariaco Basin and Lake Huguang Maar records. The Lake Meerfelder Maar record indicates an abrupt increase in storminess, occurring from one year to the next at 12,678 ka BP, coincident with other observed climate changes in the region

  18. Abrupt sea surface pH change at the end of the Younger Dryas in the central sub-equatorial Pacific inferred from boron isotope abundance in corals (Porites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Juillet-Leclerc

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The "δ11B-pH" technique was applied to modern and ancient corals Porites from the sub-equatorial Pacific areas (Tahiti and Marquesas spanning a time interval from 0 to 20.720 calendar years to determine the amplitude of pH changes between the Last Glacial Period and the Holocene. Boron isotopes were measured by Multi-Collector – Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS with an external reproducibility of 0.25‰, allowing a precision of about ±0.03 pH-units for pH values between 8 and 8.3. The boron concentration [B] and isotopic composition of modern samples indicate that the temperature strongly controls the partition coefficient KD for different aragonite species. Modern coral δ11B values and the reconstructed sea surface pH values for different Pacific areas match the measured pH expressed on the seawater scale and confirm the calculation parameters that were previously determined by laboratory calibration exercises. Most ancient sea surface pH reconstructions near Marquesas are higher than modern values. These values range between 8.19 and 8.27 for the Holocene and reached 8.30 at the end of the last glacial period (20.7 kyr BP. At the end of the Younger Dryas (11.50±0.1 kyr BP, the central sub-equatorial Pacific experienced a dramatic drop of up to 0.2 pH-units from the average pH of 8.2 before and after this short event. Using the marine carbonate algorithms, we recalculated the aqueous pCO2 to be 440±25 ppmV at around 11.5 kyr BP for corals at Marquesas and ~500 ppmV near Tahiti where it was assumed that pCO2 in the atmosphere was 250 ppmV. Throughout the Holocene, the difference in pCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere at Marquesas (ΔpCO2 indicates that the surface waters behave as a moderate CO2 sink or source (−53 to 20 ppmV during El Niño-like conditions. By contrast, during the last glacial/interglacial transition, this area was a marked source of CO2 (21 to 92 ppmV for the atmosphere, highlighting

  19. Fullerenes and interplanetary dust at the Permian-Triassic boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreda, Robert J; Becker, Luann

    2003-01-01

    We recently presented new evidence that an impact occurred approximately 250 million years ago at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB), triggering the most severe mass extinction in the history of life on Earth. We used a new extraterrestrial tracer, fullerene, a third carbon carrier of noble gases besides diamond and graphite. By exploiting the unique properties of this molecule to trap noble gases inside of its caged structure (helium, neon, argon), the origin of the fullerenes can be determined. Here, we present new evidence for fullerenes with extraterrestrial noble gases in the PTB at Graphite Peak, Antarctica, similar to PTB fullerenes from Meishan, China and Sasayama, Japan. In addition, we isolated a (3)He-rich magnetic carrier phase in three fractions from the Graphite Peak section. The noble gases in this magnetic fraction were similar to zero-age deep-sea interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and some magnetic grains isolated from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The helium and neon isotopic compositions for both the bulk Graphite Peak sediments and an isolated magnetic fraction from the bulk material are consistent with solar-type gases measured in zero-age deep-sea sediments and point to a common source, namely, the flux of IDPs to the Earth's surface. In this instance, the IDP noble gas signature for the bulk sediment can be uniquely decoupled from fullerene, demonstrating that two separate tracers are present (direct flux of IDPs for (3)He vs. giant impact for fullerene).

  20. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Solodukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons–Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  1. Boundary Effects in Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, M

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the role of boundaries in the infrared behavior of quantum field theories. By means of a novel method we calculate the vacuum energy for a massless scalar field confined between two homogeneous parallel plates with the most general type of boundary properties. This allows the discrimination between boundary conditions which generate attractive or repulsive Casimir forces between the plates. In the interface between both regimes we find a very interesting family of boundary conditions which do not induce any type of Casimir force. We analyze the effect of the renormalization group flow on these boundary conditions. Even if the Casimirless conformal invariant conditions are physically unstable under renormalization group flow they emerge as a new set of conformally invariant boundary conditions which are anomaly free.

  2. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.fr

    2016-01-10

    We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons–Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  3. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  4. Deep-water sediment bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Christopher J.; Jackson, Christopher A L; Hodgson, David M.; Hubbard, Stephen M.; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.

    2015-01-01

    Submarine gravity flows are a key process for transporting large volumes of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. The location, volume, and character of the sediment bypassed by these flows dictates the areal extent and thickness of the associated deposits. Despite its importance, sediment b

  5. Exploiting virtual sediment deposits to explore conceptual foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael; Fuchs, Margret; Kreutzer, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Geomorphic concepts and hypotheses are usually formulated based on empiric data from the field or the laboratory (deduction). After translation into models they can be applied to case study scenarios (induction). However, the other way around - expressing hypotheses explicitly by models and test these by empiric data - is a rarely touched trail. There are several models tailored to investigate the boundary conditions and processes that generate, mobilise, route and eventually deposit sediment in a landscape. Thereby, the last part, sediment deposition, is usually omitted. Essentially, there is no model that explicitly focuses on mapping out the characteristics of sedimentary deposits - the material that is used by many disciplines to reconstruct landscape evolution. This contribution introduces the R-package sandbox, a model framework that allows creating and analysing virtual sediment sections for exploratory, explanatory, forecasting and inverse research questions. The R-package sandbox is a probabilistic and rule-based model framework for a wide range of possible applications. The model framework is used here to discuss a set of conceptual questions revolving around geochemical and geochronological methods, such as: How does sample size and sample volume affect age uncertainty? What determines the robustness of sediment fingerprinting results? How does the prepared grain size of the material of interest affect the analysis outcomes? Most of the concepts used in geosciences are underpinned by a set of assumptions, whose robustness and boundary conditions need to be assessed quantitatively. The R-package sandbox is a universal and flexible tool to engage with this challenge.

  6. Information dynamics of boundary perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragness, Haley; Hansen, Niels Christian; Vuust, Peter

    uncertain than low-entropy contexts. Because phrase boundaries tend to afford high-entropy continuations, thus generating uncertain expectations in the listener, one possibility is that boundary perception is directly related to entropy. In other words, it may be hypothesized that entropy underlies...... on predictive uncertainty to the timing domain, as well as potentially answer key questions relating to boundary perception in musical listening....

  7. Conformal boundaries of warped products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2006-01-01

    In this note we prove a result on how to determine the conformal boundary of a type of warped product of two length spaces in terms of the individual conformal boundaries. In the situation, that we treat, the warping and conformal distortion functions are functions of distance to a base point....... The result is applied to produce examples of CAT(0)-spaces, where the conformal and ideal boundaries differ in interesting ways....

  8. Boundary fluxes for nonlocal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Carmen; Elgueta, Manuel; Rossi, Julio D.; Wolanski, Noemi

    We study a nonlocal diffusion operator in a bounded smooth domain prescribing the flux through the boundary. This problem may be seen as a generalization of the usual Neumann problem for the heat equation. First, we prove existence, uniqueness and a comparison principle. Next, we study the behavior of solutions for some prescribed boundary data including blowing up ones. Finally, we look at a nonlinear flux boundary condition.

  9. Hurricane Boundary-Layer Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    2501. Kundu PK. 1990. Fluid Mechanics . Academic Press: San Diego, USA. Kuo HL. 1982. Vortex boundary layer under quadratic surface stress. Boundary...identification of two mechanisms for the spin-up of the mean tangential circulation of a hurricane. The first involves convergence of absolute angular...momentum above the boundary layer, where this quantity is approximately conserved. This mechanism acts to spin up the outer circulation at radii

  10. Control of manganese and iron in Skagerrak sediments (northeastern North Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajendran, A.; DileepKumar, M.; Bakker, J.F.

    boundary lies below the Mn redox boundary whereas the latter coincides with the level of oxygen penetration. Extractable Mn in the upper layers of the central basin sediments is 10 times higher than that present in sediments of the southern part (30 mmol...., for three cores from the Skagerrak. 2. Material and methods The samples were collected at twenty-eight stations in the Skagerrak during a cruise of RV "Aurelia" in August 1984 and three cores were selected for the present study (Fig. 2 ). Undis...

  11. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  12. Using Methane 14C to Determine the Origin of the Rapid Methane Rise at the End of the Younger Dryas 11,600 Years Ago: Increased Wetland Production or Methane Hydrates? A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Reeh, N.

    2002-12-01

    The atmospheric methane concentration rose from about 500 parts per billion (ppb) to about 750 ppb over a period of just 150 years at the termination of the Younger Dryas cold period 11,600 years ago, as indicated by Greenland ice core records. The start of this rapid methane increase was synchronous with an even more rapid climate warming -- Greenland ice core nitrogen and argon isotope records indicate that temperatures rose 5 - 10 ?C over just a few decades. There has been considerable debate about the source of this methane rise. Currently, the two main hypotheses attribute the methane rise either to increased bacterial methane production in wetlands, or to the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor. Here we describe the progress of a project whose aim is to determine the origin of this methane rise. Our approach involves using 14C of ancient methane (derived from air bubbles in glacial ice) to determine its source. Methane hydrates are hundreds of thousands to millions of years old, and should contain virtually no 14C, whereas wetland-derived methane will have 14C content identical to that of atmospheric CO2 at the time of production. Obtaining enough ancient methane for a 14C measurement requires very large samples -- about 2 cubic meters. We have been able to locate a site on the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet where large amounts of uncontaminated ancient ice are available at the surface. Furthermore, our measurements of oxygen isotopes in the ice, as well as measurements of methane and oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in the air trapped in this ice have allowed us to date the ice and precisely locate the ice that contains the end-of-Younger-Dryas methane increase signal. Our data also demonstrate that the methane record in this ice is uncontaminated and suitable for methane 14C analysis. During the past year, we also constructed and are testing a device for melting and extracting air from large volumes of glacial ice.

  13. PIV measurements of the bottom boundary layer under nonlinear surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriquez, M.; Reniers, A. J H M; Ruessink, B. G.; Stive, M. J F

    2014-01-01

    Sediment in the nearshore is largely mobilized in the wave bottom boundary layer (wbbl) hereby emphasizing the importance of this relatively thin layer to nearshore morphology. This paper presents a laboratory experiment where hydrodynamic properties of the wbbl were quantified by measuring flow vel

  14. Net currents in the wave bottom boundary layer: on waveshape streaming and progressive wave streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Wouter; Ribberink, Jan S.; Uittenbogaard, R.E.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The net current (streaming) in a turbulent bottom boundary layer under waves above a flat bed, identified as potentially relevant for sediment transport, is mainly determined by two competing mechanisms: an onshore streaming resulting from the horizontal non-uniformity of the velocity field under pr

  15. The continental Permian-Triassic boundary in the Netherlands: Implications for the geomagnetic polarity time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szurlies, M.; Geluk, M.C.; Krijgsman, W.; Kürschner, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    In Central and NW Europe, the transition from the Permian to the Triassic (i.e., the Zechstein–Buntsandstein boundary interval) is developed mainly in red bed facies. This continental sedimentary succession is marked by relatively high sedimentation rates providing a high temporal resolution favorab

  16. Net currents in the wave bottom boundary layer: on waveshape streaming and progressive wave streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Wouter; Ribberink, Jan S.; Uittenbogaard, R.E.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The net current (streaming) in a turbulent bottom boundary layer under waves above a flat bed, identified as potentially relevant for sediment transport, is mainly determined by two competing mechanisms: an onshore streaming resulting from the horizontal non-uniformity of the velocity field under

  17. Net currents in the wave bottom boundary layer: on waveshape streaming and progressive wave streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.; Ribberink, J.S.; Uittenbogaard, R.E.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The net current (streaming) in a turbulent bottom boundary layer under waves above a flat bed, identified as potentially relevant for sediment transport, is mainly determined by two competing mechanisms: an onshore streaming resulting from the horizontal non-uniformity of the velocity field under pr

  18. Collaboration in Healthcare Through Boundary Work and Boundary Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to our understanding of how boundary work is practiced in healthcare settings. Previous studies have shown how boundaries are constantly changing, multiple, and co-existing, and can also be relatively stable cognitive and social distinctions between individuals and groups...

  19. Sediment problems in reservoirs. Control of sediment deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Tom

    1997-12-31

    When a reservoir is formed on a river, sediment will deposit in the reservoir. Such processes are unfortunate, for instance, for the implementation of hydroelectric energy. This thesis studies the problem of reservoir sedimentation and discusses methods of removing the sediments. Various aspects of reservoir sedimentation are discussed. Anthropogenic impacts seem to greatly affect the erosion processes. Temporal distribution is uneven, mainly because of the very large flood events. A world map showing the Reservoir Capacity: Annual Sediment Inflow ratio for reservoirs with volume equal to 10% of annual inflow has been prepared. The map shows that sedimentation is severe in the western parts of North and South America, eastern, southern and northern Africa, parts of Australia and most of Asia. The development of medium-sized reservoirs is difficult, as they are too large for conventional flushing technique and too small to store the sediment that accumulates during their economic lifetime. A computer model, SSIIM, was used with good results in a case study of two flood drawdown trials in Lake Roxburg, New Zealand. Two techniques have been developed that permits controlled suction of sediment and water into a pipe: the Slotted Pipe Sediment Sluicer (SPSS) and the Saxophone Sediment Sluicer (SSS). The techniques exploit the inflow pattern in through a slot in a pipe. An equation describing this inflow pattern was derived and verified experimentally. The SPSS is fixed near the reservoir bed, and sediment that deposits on top of it is removed in the sluicing process. The SSS sluices sediment from the surface of the sediment deposits. Some technical and economic conditions affecting the economics of sediment removal from reservoirs have been identified and studied. 79 refs., 112 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  1. Boundary effects in entanglement entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthiere, Clément; Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2016-09-01

    We present a number of explicit calculations of Renyi and entanglement entropies in situations where the entangling surface intersects the boundary of d-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. When the boundary is a single plane we compute the contribution to the entropy due to this intersection, first in the case of the Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, and then in the case of a generic Robin type boundary condition. The flow in the boundary coupling between the Neumann and Dirichlet phases is analyzed in arbitrary dimension d and is shown to be monotonic, the peculiarity of d = 3 case is noted. We argue that the translational symmetry along the entangling surface is broken due the presence of the boundary which reveals that the entanglement is not homogeneous. In order to characterize this quantitatively, we introduce a density of entanglement entropy and compute it explicitly. This quantity clearly indicates that the entanglement is maximal near the boundary. We then consider the situation where the boundary is composed of two parallel planes at a finite separation and compute the entanglement entropy as well as its density in this case. The complete contribution to entanglement entropy due to the boundaries is shown not to depend on the distance between the planes and is simply twice the entropy in the case of single plane boundary. Additionally, we find how the area law, the part in the entropy proportional to the area of entire entangling surface, depends on the size of the separation between the two boundaries. The latter is shown to appear in the UV finite part of the entropy.

  2. Evaluation of Cross-Hole Seismic Tomography for Imaging Low Resistance Intervals and Associated Carbonate Sediments in Coastal Plain Sequences on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumbest, R. J.

    1999-01-05

    The objectives of the pilot study were to investigate the limitations of the technique for imaging the presence, extent, and boundaries of the low-resistance intervals and associated carbonate sediments.

  3. Sediment transport on the Palos Verdes shelf, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferre, B.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wiberg, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment transport and the potential for erosion or deposition have been investigated on the Palos Verdes (PV) and San Pedro shelves in southern California to help assess the fate of an effluent-affected deposit contaminated with DDT and PCBs. Bottom boundary layer measurements at two 60-m sites in spring 2004 were used to set model parameters and evaluate a one-dimensional (vertical) model of local, steady-state resuspension, and suspended-sediment transport. The model demonstrated skill (Brier scores up to 0.75) reproducing the magnitudes of bottom shear stress, current speeds, and suspended-sediment concentrations measured during an April transport event, but the model tended to underpredict observed rotation in the bottom-boundary layer, possibly because the model did not account for the effects of temperature-salinity stratification. The model was run with wave input estimated from a nearby buoy and current input from four to six years of measurements at thirteen sites on the 35- and 65-m isobaths on the PV and San Pedro shelves. Sediment characteristics and erodibility were based on gentle wet-sieve analysis and erosion-chamber measurements. Modeled flow and sediment transport were mostly alongshelf toward the northwest on the PV shelf with a significant offshore component. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stresses ranged from 0.09 to 0.16 Pa at the 65-m sites, and the lowest values were in the middle of the PV shelf, near the Whites Point sewage outfalls where the effluent-affected layer is thickest. Long-term mean transport rates varied from 0.9 to 4.8 metric tons m-1 yr-1 along the 65-m isobaths on the PV shelf, and were much higher at the 35-m sites. Gradients in modeled alongshore transport rates suggest that, in the absence of a supply of sediment from the outfalls or PV coast, erosion at rates of ???0.2 mm yr-1 might occur in the region southeast of the outfalls. These rates are small compared to some estimates of background natural sedimentation

  4. Sediment transport on the Palos Verdes shelf, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2010-04-01

    Sediment transport and the potential for erosion or deposition have been investigated on the Palos Verdes (PV) and San Pedro shelves in southern California to help assess the fate of an effluent-affected deposit contaminated with DDT and PCBs. Bottom boundary layer measurements at two 60-m sites in spring 2004 were used to set model parameters and evaluate a one-dimensional (vertical) model of local, steady-state resuspension, and suspended-sediment transport. The model demonstrated skill (Brier scores up to 0.75) reproducing the magnitudes of bottom shear stress, current speeds, and suspended-sediment concentrations measured during an April transport event, but the model tended to underpredict observed rotation in the bottom-boundary layer, possibly because the model did not account for the effects of temperature-salinity stratification. The model was run with wave input estimated from a nearby buoy and current input from four to six years of measurements at thirteen sites on the 35- and 65-m isobaths on the PV and San Pedro shelves. Sediment characteristics and erodibility were based on gentle wet-sieve analysis and erosion-chamber measurements. Modeled flow and sediment transport were mostly alongshelf toward the northwest on the PV shelf with a significant offshore component. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stresses ranged from 0.09 to 0.16 Pa at the 65-m sites, and the lowest values were in the middle of the PV shelf, near the Whites Point sewage outfalls where the effluent-affected layer is thickest. Long-term mean transport rates varied from 0.9 to 4.8 metric tons m -1 yr -1 along the 65-m isobaths on the PV shelf, and were much higher at the 35-m sites. Gradients in modeled alongshore transport rates suggest that, in the absence of a supply of sediment from the outfalls or PV coast, erosion at rates of ˜0.2 mm yr -1 might occur in the region southeast of the outfalls. These rates are small compared to some estimates of background natural sedimentation

  5. Transient sedimentation in a cell with top and bottom walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Sarah; Maxey, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Wall boundary conditions may play a role in the screening of particle velocity fluctuations in Stokes suspensions. Using a Force-Coupling Method (Maxey and Patel, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 27 (2001)) we simulate transient sedimentation. The numerical scheme is a mixed Fourier-spectral element method, based on the Uzawa algorithm for Stokes flows. The sedimentation cell has top and bottom wall boundaries and periodic boundaries in the horizontal. These boundaries are chosen both for computational convenience, and to determine the relative importance of bottom and side walls in screening the velocity fluctuations. We consider several different box sizes, in an attempt to elucidate the connection between particle velocity fluctuation levels and box width. We quantify the evolution of particle mean velocities and fluctuations as well as the particle microstructure. In each case we observe an initial growth, followed by a decay in both the mean particle velocity and fluctuations. We also observe that a stable stratification develops. We suggest that the stratification is important in the evolution of the bulk mean velocity. We propose a mechanism involving particle cluster dynamics to explain the behaviour of the velocity fluctuations.

  6. Boundary organisations and their strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enst, van Wynanda I.; Runhaar, Hens A.C.; Driessen, P.P.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses three empirical cases of boundary organisations, within the context of the Wadden Sea: the Wadden Academy, IMSA Amsterdam and the NCEA. The research aims to provide further insights into how boundary organisations work in practice. The research shows that the role of a boun

  7. N=1 Supersymmetric Boundary Bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Toth, G Z

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the boundary bootstrap programme for finding exact reflection matrices of integrable boundary quantum field theories with N=1 boundary supersymmetry. The bulk S-matrix and the reflection matrix are assumed to take the form S=S_1S_0, R=R_1R_0, where S_0 and R_0 are the S-matrix and reflection matrix of some integrable non-supersymmetric boundary theory that is assumed to be known, and S_1 and R_1 describe the mixing of supersymmetric indices. Under the assumption that the bulk particles transform in the kink and boson/fermion representations and the ground state is a singlet we present rules by which the supersymmetry representations and reflection factors for excited boundary bound states can be determined. We apply these rules to the boundary sine-Gordon model, to the boundary a_2^(1) and a_4^(1) affine Toda field theories, to the boundary sinh-Gordon model and to the free particle.

  8. Community Sediment Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    are used to determine that model results are consistent across compilers, platforms, and computer architectures , and to ensure that changes in code do...Mississippi State University: Bhate During the early months of this project, the focus was on understanding ROMS-CSTM model, architecture , and...Marchesiello, J.C. McWilliams, & K.D. Stolzenbach, 2007: Sediment transport modeling on Southern Californian shelves: A ROMS case study. Continental

  9. Boundary Drawing in Clinical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    The aim of this paper is to show how health care professionals temporarily dissolve and redraw boundaries in their everyday work, in order to coordinate clinical work and facilitate collaboration in patient pathways. Boundaries are social constructions that help us make sense of our complex, social...... world. In health care, formal boundaries are important distinctions that separate health care practitioners into medical specialties, professions and organizational departments. But clinical work also relies on the ability of health care practitioners to collaborate around patients in formal...... arrangements or emergent, temporary teams. Focusing on the cognitive and social boundaries we draw to establish identity and connection (to a profession, team or person) the paper shows how health care professionals can use inter-personal relationships to temporarily dismiss formal boundaries. By redrawing...

  10. Random Matrices, Boundaries and Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Niedner, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the application of random matrix theory to the study of random surfaces, both discrete and continuous; special emphasis is placed on surface boundaries and the associated boundary conditions in this formalism. In particular, using a multi-matrix integral with permutation symmetry, we are able to calculate the partition function of the Potts model on a random planar lattice with various boundary conditions imposed. We proceed to investigate the correspondence between the critical points in the phase diagram of this model and two-dimensional Liouville theory coupled to conformal field theories with global $\\mathcal{W}$-symmetry. In this context, each boundary condition can be interpreted as the description of a brane in a family of bosonic string backgrounds. This investigation suggests that a spectrum of initially distinct boundary conditions of a given system may become degenerate when the latter is placed on a random surface of bounded genus, effectively leaving a smaller set of ind...

  11. Submarine landslide and tsunami hazards offshore southern Alaska: Seismic strengthening versus rapid sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Derek E.; Reece, Robert S.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Lenz, Brandi L.

    2017-08-01

    The southern Alaskan offshore margin is prone to submarine landslides and tsunami hazards due to seismically active plate boundaries and extreme sedimentation rates from glacially enhanced mountain erosion. We examine the submarine landslide potential with new shear strength measurements acquired by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 on the continental slope and Surveyor Fan. These data reveal lower than expected sediment strength. Contrary to other active margins where seismic strengthening enhances slope stability, the high-sedimentation margin offshore southern Alaska behaves like a passive margin from a shear strength perspective. We interpret that seismic strengthening occurs but is offset by high sedimentation rates and overpressure. This conclusion is supported by shear strength outside of the fan that follow an active margin trend. More broadly, seismically active margins with wet-based glaciers are susceptible to submarine landslide hazards because of the combination of high sedimentation rates and earthquake shaking.

  12. Bacterial Diversity Across a Turbidite-Stranded Sediment-Water Interface, La Jolla Canyon, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, B. K.; Flood, B.; Myrbo, A.; Bailey, J.

    2016-12-01

    The emplacement of gravity-driven sediment flows imposes a significant physical and geochemical impact on underlying sediment and microbial communities. Although previous studies have established lasting mineralogical (e.g., McKay and Pederson, 2014) and biological signatures (e.g., Anschutz et al., 2002) of turbidite deposition, the response of prokaryotes within and beneath debris flows remains poorly constrained. Both bacterial cells associated with the underlying sediment and allocthonous material must respond to substantially altered selective pressures. As a consequence, turbidites and underlying sediments provide an exceptional opportunity to examine 1) microbial community response to sedimentation 2) preservation and identification of microbial dispersal mechanisms. We collected Illumina MiSeq sequence libraries across an intact marine turbidite boundary at 25cm sediment depth in La Jolla canyon off the coast of California. 16S rRNA gene signatures of relict and active bacterial populations exhibit persistent differences attributable to turbidite deposition. In particular, the sedimentary boundary is sharply demarcated at the cm scale by the diversity and abundance of Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria. Variations in the abundance of putative dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria across the stranded sediment-water interface reflect persistent turbidite-induced changes to the geochemical environment. This work raises the possibility that abrupt sedimentological events may alter the microbial community in a manner that persists with burial.

  13. North Pacific-wide spreading of isotopically heavy nitrogen from intensified denitrification during the Bølling/Allerød and post-younger dryas periods: evidence from the Western Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Kao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentary δ15N record for the past 30 ka buried in the Okinawa Trough in the western North Pacific mimicking the pattern from the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP, but the values (4.4–5.8‰ and the amplitude of the variation were much smaller than those (9–17‰ of the previous site. All but three values in the record were lower than the mean δ15N (5.6‰ of nitrate in the upper 800 m of the Kuroshio water suggesting additional inputs of isotopically light nitrogen from N2-fixation. The peak values of δ15N occurred during the Bølling/Allerød period and the warming period right after the Younger Dryas, synchronous to those found in the Eastern North Pacific. It is highly probable the high δ15N values are originated from the influence of the intensified denitrification in the ETNP during the warming periods. These new data represent the sedimentary record most distant from the intensive denitrifying zone in the ETNP and may serve as critical constraints to better quantify the nitrogen budget in the last climate cycle.

  14. Electromagnetic Boundaries with PEC/PMC Equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Lindell, Ismo V

    2016-01-01

    The most general electromagnetic boundary, defined by linear and local boundary conditions, is defined in terms of conditions which can be called generalized impedance boundary conditions. Requiring that the boundary be equivalent to PEC and PMC boundaries for its two eigen-plane waves, which property is known to exist for many of its special cases, it is shown that the recently introduced Generalized Soft-and-Hard/DB (GSHDB) boundary is the most general boundary satisfying this property.

  15. Brain response to prosodic boundary cues depends on boundary position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHolzgrefe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prosodic information is crucial for spoken language comprehension and especially for syntactic parsing, because prosodic cues guide the hearer’s syntactic analysis. The time course and mechanisms of this interplay of prosody and syntax are not yet well understood. In particular, there is an ongoing debate whether local prosodic cues are taken into account automatically or whether they are processed in relation to the global prosodic context in which they appear. The present study explores whether the perception of a prosodic boundary is affected by its position within an utterance. In an event-related potential (ERP study we tested if the brain response evoked by the prosodic boundary differs when the boundary occurs early in a list of three names connected by conjunctions (i.e., after the first name as compared to later in the utterance (i.e., after the second name. A closure positive shift (CPS — marking the processing of a prosodic phrase boundary — was elicited only for stimuli with a late boundary, but not for stimuli with an early boundary. This result is further evidence for an immediate integration of prosodic information into the parsing of an utterance. In addition, it shows that the processing of prosodic boundary cues depends on the previously processed information from the preceding prosodic context.

  16. DOWNSLOPE EROSION PROCESS UNDER UPSLOPE RUNOFF AND SEDIMENT USING A DUAL-BOX SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiqing XIAO; Fenli ZHENG; Wenyi YAO

    2005-01-01

    Soil erosion at the hilly-gully region of the Loess Plateau has obvious vertical erosion zonation from watershed boundary to gully edge. Meanwhile, upslope runoff and sediment have a significant impact on the downslope erosion process. But due to the limits of research methods, there is not much data available to quantify the effects of upslope runoff and sediment on the downslope erosion process under different conditions. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of upslope runoff and sediment on the downslope erosion process using a dual-box system with a 15° gradient consisting of a 2 m-long feeder box and a 5 m-long test box under different runoff rates and sediment concentrations in upslope runoff, rainfall intensities and soil surface conditions. The results showed that the sediment regime was detachment-transport dominant at steep hillslopes. The net sediment delivery S caused by upslope runoff was controlled by sediment concentration in upslope runoff, especially by interaction of the rainfall intensity, runoff rate, surface condition and dominant erosion process. The net sediment delivery S accounted for the total sediment delivery Sft at downslope 31.7% to 97.3% and 27.8 to 89.7% for both loose and compact surface treatments, respectively. Rainfall intensity, slope gradient, surface condition, and rill erosion development had important influences on the downslope erosion process.

  17. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  18. Parts and boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackendoff, R

    1991-12-01

    Within the framework of Conceptual Semantics, a family of conceptual features and functions is developed that accounts for phenomena in the semantics of noun phrases such as the mass-count distinction, plurality, the partitive construction (a leg of the table), the constitutive construction (a house of wood), the "Universal Packager" (three coffees), and boundary words such as end, edge, and crust. Using the strong formal parallelism between noun phrase semantics and event structure that is a hallmark of the Conceptual Semantics approach, the features and functions of the NP system are applied to a wide range of problems in event structure, for example the analysis of the Vendler classes, the meaning of the progressive, the "imperfective paradox", and "aktionsarten" such as the syntactically unexpressed sense of repetition in The light flashed until dawn. Crucial to the analysis is that these features and functions can be expressed in syntactic structure either by being part of lexical conceptual structure, or by use of a morphological affix, or by being associated with the meaning of a construction such as N of NP or nominal compounding. Alternatively, they may remain unexpressed altogether, being introduced into the conceptual structure of a phrase by "rules of construal". This shows that lexical semantics and phrasal semantics interpenetrate deeply, and that there is no strict one-to-one correspondence between syntactic and semantic structures. In addition, the analysis provides further evidence that natural language semantics must be based on a psychological view of meaning--it must be concerned with how language users are constructed to understand and schematize the world.

  19. Role of the vertical pressure gradient in wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Vittori, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    By direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the flow in an oscillatory boundary layer, it is possible to obtain the pressure field. From the latter, the vertical pressure gradient is determined. Turbulent spots are detected by a criterion involving the vertical pressure gradient. The vertical pressure...... gradient is also treated as any other turbulence quantity like velocity fluctuations and statistical properties of the vertical pressure gradient are calculated from the DNS data. The presence of a vertical pressure gradient in the near bed region has significant implications for sediment transport....

  20. Cyclic Sediment Trading Between Channel and River Bed Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadchi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the previous work on sediment tracing has focused on determining either the initial sources of the sediment (soils derive from a particular rock type) or the erosion processes generating the sediment. However, alluvial stores can be both a source and sink for sediment transported by streams. Here geochemical and fallout radionuclide tracing of river-bed and alluvial sediments are used to determine the role of secondary sources, sediment stores, as potential sources of sediment leaving Emu Creek catchment, southeastern Queensland, Australia. Activity concentrations of 137Cs on the river sediments are consistent with channel erosion being the dominant source at all sites sampled along the river. To characterise the deposition and remobilisation cycles in the catchment, a novel geochemical tracing approach was used. Successive pockets of alluvium were treated as discrete sink terms within geochemical mixing models and their source contributions compared with those of river bed sediments collected adjacent to each alluvial pocket. Three different size fractions were examined; silts and clays (soil/rock type sources to river bed and alluvial sediments at each sampling site was identical for all three different size fractions, but varied along the stream. Combining these findings it is concluded that proximal alluvial stores dominated the supply of sediment to the river at each location, with this being particularly evident at the catchment outlet. Identical contribution of rock type sources to both river bed and alluvial pockets together with the dominant erosion being from channel banks indicates a high degree of 'trading' between the fluvial space and the alluvial space. Hence, management works aimed at primarily reducing the supply of sediments to the outlet of Emu Creek should focus on rehabilitation of channel banks in the lower catchment.

  1. Coalbed methane reservoir boundaries and sealing mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xianbo; LIN Xiaoying; LIU Shaobo; SONG Yan

    2005-01-01

    It is important to investigate the coalbed methane reservoir boundaries for the classification, exploration, and development of the coalbed methane reservoir.Based on the investigation of the typical coalbed methane reservoirs in the world, the boundaries can be divided into four types: hydrodynamic boundary, air altered boundary,permeability boundary, and fault boundary. Hydrodynamic and air altered boundaries are ubiquitous boundaries for every coalbed methane reservoir. The four types of the fault sealing mechanism in the petroleum geological investigation (diagen- esis, clay smear, juxtaposition and cataclasis) are applied to the fault boundary of the coalbed methane reservoir. The sealing mechanism of the open fault boundary is the same with that of the hydrodynamic sealing boundary.The sealing mechanism of the permeability boundary is firstly classified into capillary pressure sealing and hydrocarbon concentration sealing. There are different controlling boundaries in coalbed methane reservoirs that are in different geological backgrounds. Therefore, the coalbed methane reservoir is diversiform.

  2. Optimal boundary control and boundary stabilization of hyperbolic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gugat, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This brief considers recent results on optimal control and stabilization of systems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations, specifically those in which the control action takes place at the boundary.  The wave equation is used as a typical example of a linear system, through which the author explores initial boundary value problems, concepts of exact controllability, optimal exact control, and boundary stabilization.  Nonlinear systems are also covered, with the Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers Equations serving as standard examples.  To keep the presentation as accessible as possible, the author uses the case of a system with a state that is defined on a finite space interval, so that there are only two boundary points where the system can be controlled.  Graduate and post-graduate students as well as researchers in the field will find this to be an accessible introduction to problems of optimal control and stabilization.

  3. A western boundary current eddy characterisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbe, Joachim; Brieva, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of an eddy census for the East Australian Current (EAC) region yielded a total of 497 individual short-lived (7-28 days) cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies for the period 1993 to 2015. This was an average of about 23 eddies per year. 41% of the tracked individual cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies were detected off southeast Queensland between about 25 °S and 29 °S. This is the region where the flow of the EAC intensifies forming a swift western boundary current that impinges near Fraser Island on the continental shelf. This zone was also identified as having a maximum in detected short-lived cyclonic eddies. A total of 94 (43%) individual cyclonic eddies or about 4-5 per year were tracked in this region. The census found that these potentially displaced entrained water by about 115 km with an average displacement speed of about 4 km per day. Cyclonic eddies were likely to contribute to establishing an on-shelf longshore northerly flow forming the western branch of the Fraser Island Gyre and possibly presented an important cross-shelf transport process in the life cycle of temperate fish species of the EAC domain. In-situ observations near western boundary currents previously documented the entrainment, off-shelf transport and export of near shore water, nutrients, sediments, fish larvae and the renewal of inner shelf water due to short-lived eddies. This study found that these cyclonic eddies potentially play an important off-shelf transport process off the central east Australian coast.

  4. Boundary layers in stochastic thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    We study the problem of optimizing released heat or dissipated work in stochastic thermodynamics. In the overdamped limit these functionals have singular solutions, previously interpreted as protocol jumps. We show that a regularization, penalizing a properly defined acceleration, changes the jumps into boundary layers of finite width. We show that in the limit of vanishing boundary layer width no heat is dissipated in the boundary layer, while work can be done. We further give an alternative interpretation of the fact that the optimal protocols in the overdamped limit are given by optimal deterministic transport (Burgers equation).

  5. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  6. Spherules associated with the cretaceous-paleogene boundary in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachaniec, Tomasz; Karwowski, Łukasz; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2014-03-01

    The succession of the Lechówka section near Chełm in south-eastern Poland presents the first complete record of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary in Poland. Samples of the boundary clay were examined for microtektites and shocked minerals to confirm the impact origin of the sediment. The spheroidal fraction reveals morphological and mineralogical features, e.g., spherules, similar to material from the K-Pg boundary as described from elsewhere. The impact genesis of the spherules is confirmed by the presence of nickel-rich spinel grains on their surfaces. The spinels are considered to be primary microlites and, thus, the spherules at Lechówka can be classified as microkrystites. No shocked minerals were noted. The deposits with spherules comprise Aland Mg-rich smectite (Cheto smectite). This almost pure Mg-rich smectite, forming up to 100% of the clay fraction, derived from the weathering of the impact glass. It is proposed that the spherules isolated from the Cretaceous- Paleogene boundary clay at Lechówka come from the Chicxulub crater in Mexico.

  7. Respiration in ocean margin sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the study of respiration in ocean margin sediments and the assessments of tools needed for this purpose. The first study was on the biological pump and global respiration patterns in the deep ocean using an empirical model based on sediment oxygen consumption data. In this thesis the depth dependence of respiration patterns was modelled using a compiled data set of sediment oxygen consumption rates. We showed that the depth relationship can best be described by a do...

  8. Sediment yields of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Flint, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    Sediment in Wisconsin streams causes economic and engineering problems in water management and reduces the value of water for nearly all uses. Sediment produces problems such as reduced reservoir capacity, navigation hazards, increased cost of water treatment, property damage, temporary loss of farmland, destruction of feeding and nesting grounds of fish, and destruction of wildlife habitat. Sediment in water also reduces the aesthetic value of surface waters and is detrimental to the State's tourist and recreation industry.

  9. Sediment Geo-Probe System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides wideband in situ measurement capability of compressional wave speed and attenuation and their spatial variability in marine sediments.DESCRIPTION:...

  10. APPLICABILITY OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT FORMULAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG; Caian HUANG

    2001-01-01

    The paper provides a comprehensive testing of the applicability of 13 sediment transport formulas under different flow and sediment conditions. The dimensionless parameters used for testing the reliability and sensitivity of formulas are dimensionless particle diameter, relative depth, Froude number, relative shear velocity, dimensionless unit stream power, and sediment concentration. A total of 3,391 sets of laboratory and river data are used in the tests. Engineers may find the test results useful to their selection of formulas under different flow and sediment conditions.

  11. Transport model of underground sediment in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jichao, Sun; Guangqian, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Studies about sediment erosion were mainly concentrated on the river channel sediment, the terrestrial sediment, and the underground sediment. The transport process of underground sediment is studied in the paper. The concept of the flush potential sediment is founded. The transport equation with stable saturated seepage is set up, and the relations between the flush potential sediment and water sediment are discussed. Flushing of underground sediment begins with small particles, and large particles will be taken away later. The pore ratio of the soil increases gradually. The flow ultimately becomes direct water seepage, and the sediment concentration at the same position in the water decreases over time. The concentration of maximal flushing potential sediment decreases along the path. The underground sediment flushing model reflects the flushing mechanism of underground sediment.

  12. County Boundaries with Shorelines (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with shorelines cut in (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and...

  13. Allegheny County School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the school district boundaries within Allegheny County If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  14. State Highway District Boundaries - 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data represents the NM Department of Transportation District boundaries as legislatively defined (i.e. these are not maintenance defined districts).

  15. Boundary Spanners in Global Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Romani, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    technology (IT) development projects from the rare perspective of Indian vendor managers in one of the world’s largest IT service companies. It draws on a qualitative study of a collaborative partnership and focuses on the key boundary spanners who are responsible for developing trustful and sustainable...... client relationships and coordinating highly complex projects. We analyze vendor managers’ narratives of their collaboration with a European client in a long-term project, which is presented as a strategic partnership in an outsourcing 3.0 mode. The study offers a rich and conceptualized account of those...... managers’ boundary-spanning activities and a context-sensitive understanding of their boundary work. The study applies Bourdieu’s concept of capital (economic, cultural, social, and symbolic) not only in its analysis of the two powerful partners but also in its discussion of the boundary...

  16. Census Bureau Regional Office Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The Census Bureau has six regional offices to facilitate data collection, data dissemination and geographic operations within their boundary. The surveys these...

  17. Semiconjugacies Between Relatively Hyperbolic Boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shubhabrata

    2010-01-01

    We prove the existence of Cannon-Thurston maps for Kleinian groups corresponding to pared manifolds whose boundary is incompressible away from cusps. We also describe the structure of these maps in terms of ending laminations.

  18. Allegheny County School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the school district boundaries within Allegheny County If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  19. VT Subwatershed Boundaries - HUC12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) WaterHydro_WBD12VT was developed by NRCS. The boundaries on consistent with Vermont's Hydrography Dataset (VHD). This data set is a digital...

  20. HUC 8-11 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  1. An Investigation of the Influence of Waves on Sediment Processes in Skagit Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    coupled wave- current model will resolve the influence of external processes, including tidal forcing, buoyant river discharge, fluvial sediment...panel: energy vs. depth. Fetch calculation includes water level, direction, and position of the observation (Fig 2). 2. Erosion Potential...to set the boundary condition for the momentum equations. Maximum stresses are used to compute the potential cumulative erosion (PCE) in meters. For

  2. Erosion properties of cohesive sediments in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahori, R.; Schmeeckle, M.W.; Topping, D.J.; Melis, T.S.

    2008-01-01

    Cohesive sediment deposits characterized by a high fraction of mud (silt plus clay) significantly affect the morphology and ecosystem of rivers. Potentially cohesive sediment samples were collected from deposits in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons. The erosion velocities of these samples were measured in a laboratory flume under varying boundary shear stresses. The non-dimensional boundary shear stress at which erosion commenced showed a systematic deviation from that of non-cohesive sediments at mud fractions greater than 0.2. An empirical relation for the boundary shear stress threshold of erosion as a function of mud fraction was proposed. The mass erosion rate was modelled using the Ariathurai-Partheniades equation. The erosion rate parameter of this equation was found to be a strong function of mud fraction. Under similar boundary shear stress and sediment supply conditions in the Colorado River, cohesive lateral eddy deposits formed of mud fractions in excess of 0.2 will erode less rapidly than non-cohesive deposits. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Toolbox for Geometric Grain Boundary Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowinski, Krzysztof; Morawiec, Adam

    Properties of polycrystalline materials are affected by grain boundary networks. The most basic aspect of boundary analysis is boundary geometry. This paper describes a package of computer programs for geometric boundary characterization based on macroscopic boundary parameters. The program allows for determination whether a boundary can be classified as near-tilt, -twist, -symmetric et cetera. Since calculations on experimental, i.e., error affected data are assumed, the program also provides distances to the nearest geometrically characteristic boundaries. The software has a number of other functions helpful in grain boundary analysis. One of them is the determination of planes of all characteristic boundaries for a given misorientation. The resulting diagrams of geometrically characteristic boundaries can be linked to experimentally determined grain boundary distributions. In computations, all symmetrically equivalent representations of boundaries are taken into account. Cubic and hexagonal holohedral crystal symmetries are allowed.

  4. Non-normal Hasemann Boundary Value Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We will discuss the non-normal Hasemann boundary value problem:we may find these results are coincided with those of normal Hasemann boundary value problem and non normal Riemann boundary value problem.

  5. Equivalent boundary integral equations for plane elasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡海昌; 丁皓江; 何文军

    1997-01-01

    Indirect and direct boundary integral equations equivalent to the original boundary value problem of differential equation of plane elasticity are established rigorously. The unnecessity or deficiency of some customary boundary integral equations is indicated by examples and numerical comparison.

  6. Fuzzy Boundary and Fuzzy Semiboundary

    OpenAIRE

    Athar, M.; Ahmad, B.

    2008-01-01

    We present several properties of fuzzy boundary and fuzzy semiboundary which have been supported by examples. Properties of fuzzy semi-interior, fuzzy semiclosure, fuzzy boundary, and fuzzy semiboundary have been obtained in product-related spaces. We give necessary conditions for fuzzy continuous (resp., fuzzy semicontinuous, fuzzy irresolute) functions. Moreover, fuzzy continuous (resp., fuzzy semicontinuous, fuzzy irresolute) functions have been characterized via fuzzy-derived (resp., fuzz...

  7. Boundary Conditions of Weyl Semimetals

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji; Wu, Xi

    2016-01-01

    We find that generic boundary conditions of Weyl semimetal is dictated by only a single real parameter, in the continuum limit. We determine how the energy dispersions (the Fermi arcs) and the wave functions of edge states depend on this parameter. Lattice models are found to be consistent with our generic observation. Furthermore, the enhanced parameter space of the boundary condition is shown to support a novel topological number.

  8. Boundary condition may change chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., RIAM, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawai, Yoshinobu [Kyushu Univ., Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Role of boundary condition for the appearance of chaos is examined. Imposition of the boundary condition is interpreted as the reduction of the system size L. For a demonstration, Rayleigh-Benard instability is considered and the shell model analysis is applied. It is shown that the reduction of L reduces the number of positive Lyapunov exponent of the system, hence opens the route from the turbulence, to the chaos and to the limit cycle/fixed point. (author)

  9. Optical sedimentation recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2014-05-06

    A robotic optical sedimentation recorder is described for the recordation of carbon flux in the oceans wherein both POC and PIC particles are captured at the open end of a submersible sampling platform, the captured particles allowed to drift down onto a collection plate where they can be imaged over time. The particles are imaged using three separate light sources, activated in sequence, one source being a back light, a second source being a side light to provide dark field illumination, and a third source comprising a cross polarized light source to illuminate birefringent particles. The recorder in one embodiment is attached to a buoyancy unit which is capable upon command for bringing the sedimentation recorder to a programmed depth below the ocean surface during recordation mode, and on command returning the unit to the ocean surface for transmission of recorded data and receipt of new instructions. The combined unit is provided with its own power source and is designed to operate autonomously in the ocean for extended periods of time.

  10. Eulerian simulation of sedimentation flows in vertical and inclined vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Chun-Liang; Zhan Jie-Min

    2005-01-01

    Sedimentation of particles in inclined and vertical vessels in numerically simulated using a finite volume method where the Eulerian multiphase model is applied. The particulate phase as well as the fluid phase is regarded as a continuum while the viscosity and solid stress of the particulate phase are modelled by the kinetic theory of granular flows. The numerical results show an interesting phenomenon of the emergence of two circulation vortices of the sedimentation flow in a vertical vessel but only one in the inclined vessel. Several sensitivity tests are simulated to understand the factors that influence the dual-vortex flow structure in vertical sedimentation. Result show that a larger fluid viscosity makes the two vortex centres much closer to each other and the boundary layer effect at lateral walls is the key factor to induce this phenomenon. In the fluid boundary layer particles settle down more rapidly and drag the local carrier fluid to flow downward near the lateral walls and thus form the dual-vortex flow pattern.

  11. Application of 2-D sediment model to fluctuating backwater area of Yangtze River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong FAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of backflow, a two-dimensional mathematical model of sediment movement was established. The complexity of the watercourse boundary at the confluence of the main stream and the tributary was dealt with using a boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system. The basic equation of the two-dimensional total sediment load model, the numerical calculation format, and key problems associated with using the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discussed. Water and sediment flow in the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze River were simulated. The calculated water level, flow velocity distribution, amount of silting and scouring, and alluvial distribution are found to be in agreement with the measured data, which indicates that the numerical model and calculation method are reasonable. The model can be used for calculation of flow in a relatively complicated river network.

  12. Application of 2-D sediment model to fluctuating backwater area of Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong FAN

    2009-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of backflow,a two-dimensional mathematical model of sediment movement was established.The complexity of the watercourse boundary at the confluence of the main stream and the tributary was dealt with using a boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system.The basic equation of the two-dimensional total sediment load model,the numerical calculation format,and key problems associated with using the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discussed.Water and sediment flow in the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze River were simulated.The calculated water level,flow velocity distribution,amount of silting and scouring,and alluvial distribution are found to be in agreement with the measured data,which indicates that the numerical model and calculation method are reasonable.The model can be used for calculation of flow in a relatively complicated river network.

  13. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  14. Modeling microalgal flocculation and sedimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salim, S.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Rinzema, A.; Vermuë, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a combined flocculation and sedimentation model is developed. The model predicts the time needed to reach a desired concentration of microalgal suspension in a sedimentation tank. The concentration of the particles as function of the time and the position in the tank is described. The

  15. Reservoir sedimentation; a literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloff, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of literature is made on reservoir sedimentation, one of the most threatening processes for world-wide reservoir performance. The sedimentation processes, their impacts, and their controlling factors are assessed from a hydraulic engineering point of view with special emphasis on mathematic

  16. Reservoir sedimentation; a literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloff, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of literature is made on reservoir sedimentation, one of the most threatening processes for world-wide reservoir performance. The sedimentation processes, their impacts, and their controlling factors are assessed from a hydraulic engineering point of view with special emphasis on mathematic

  17. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  18. Intensive landfarming of contaminated sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieggers, H.J.J.; Bezemer, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and mineral oil was investigated in heavily and normally polluted sediments. The aims of the research were: to improve the knowledge of dewatering and ripening of sediments in an open land-farm, to quantify the biodegradation in two sedime

  19. Respiration in ocean margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the study of respiration in ocean margin sediments and the assessments of tools needed for this purpose. The first study was on the biological pump and global respiration patterns in the deep ocean using an empirical model based on sediment oxygen consumption data. In this

  20. Respiration in ocean margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the study of respiration in ocean margin sediments and the assessments of tools needed for this purpose. The first study was on the biological pump and global respiration patterns in the deep ocean using an empirical model based on sediment oxygen consumption data.

  1. Reservoir sedimentation; a literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloff, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of literature is made on reservoir sedimentation, one of the most threatening processes for world-wide reservoir performance. The sedimentation processes, their impacts, and their controlling factors are assessed from a hydraulic engineering point of view with special emphasis on

  2. Modelling of Suspended Sediment Discharge for Masinga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedimentation models however, require suspended load as the basic input data. ... at the two mouths of the reservoir, at the confluence, and near the dam wall. ... Dredging out fine sediments, construction of sedimentation basins at the two ...

  3. Study on the Reutilization of River Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gui-yun; JIANG Pei-hua; XI Dan-li

    2002-01-01

    Main components and properties of river sediment are introduced. Secondary pollution of river sediments to the water quality of the river is clarified. The methods of the reutilization of river sediment are elucidated.

  4. Geochemistry of Sediments from the PLUTO Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical data for unconsolidated sediments (stream sediments, lake sediments, etc.) collected in the US and analyzed by the USGS. These data were originally...

  5. Alkane Biomarkers in Permian-Triassic Boundary Strata at Meishan Section, Changxing,Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Meishan Section D in Changxing County, Zhejiang Province, China has been selected as the global stratotype of the Permian-Triassic boundary and various studies have been done at the boundary, but the gas chromatographic-mass spectrographic analysis of alkane biomarkers has not been investigated. This paper presents the results of a study of the biomarkers analyzed in a series of samples across the Permian-Triassic boundary at both Meishan Section A and Section D. The results show that the overall concentration of alkane biomarkers in the Permian-Triassic boundary strata is high in Bed 26 while it is low in Bed 27. A variety of biomarker parameters demonstrate that the main sources of organic matter in the sediment are algae and bacteria and that the depositional environment varied from weakly oxidizing to reducing during the studied interval.

  6. Modelling sediment transport processes in macro-tidal estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rauen; William; B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines a numerical modeling study to predict the sediment transport processes in a macro-tidal estuary, namely the Mersey Estuary, UK. An integrated numerical model study is conducted to investigate the interaction between the hydrodynamic, morphological and sediment transport processes occurring in the estuary. The numerical model widely used in environmental sediment transport studies worldwide, namely ECOMSED is used to simulate flow and sediment transport in estuary. A wetting and drying scheme is proposed and applied to the model, which defines "dry" cells as regions with a thin film of fluid O (cm). The primitive equations are solved in the thin film as well as in other regular wet cells. A model for the bed load transport is included in the code to account for the dynamics of the mobile bed boundary. The bed evolution due to bed load transport which is calculated according to van Rijn (1984a) is obtained by solving the sediment mass-balance equation. An estuary-related laboratory flume experiment is used to verify the model. Six sets of field measured hydrodynamic data are used to verify the corresponding predictions of the model, with the model-predicted water elevations and salinity levels generally agreeing well with the field measurements. The numerical model results show that in the Mersey Estuary both the tidal level and river discharge affect significantly the sediment transport. Reasonable agreement between the model results and field data has been obtained, indicating that the model can be used as computer-based tool for the environment management of estuarine system.

  7. Experimental study on the effects of sediment size and porosity on contaminant adsorption/desorption and interfacial diffusion characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jing-yu; HE Xiao-yan; WANG Dao-zeng

    2013-01-01

    The joint effects of the sediment size and porosity on the contaminant adsorption/desorption and interracial diffusion characteristics were experimentally investigated.The adsorption of Phosphorus (P) on the natural and artificial sediment suspensions was measured with respect to the P adsorption isotherms and kinetics in the experiment.The obtained adsorption isotherms for different grain-sized sediment suspensions fit well with the Langmuir equation,dependent on the initial aqueous concentration and sediment content.The P kinetic adsorption behaviors for cohesive fine-grained and non-cohesive coarse-grained sediment suspensions clearly show the size-dependent feature.On the other hand,the P kinetic release feature of a porous sediment layer is affected by not only the direct desorption of the uppermost sediments,but also the diffusivity in the pore-water within the underlying sediment layer,characterized by the sediment size and porosity,respectively.Furthermore,the temporal contaminant release from the permeable sediment layer into the overlying water colunm increases with the increasing flow velocity,while this enhancement in mediating the interfacial diffusion flux is somewhat insignificant in an immediate release stage,largely due to the resistance of the diffusive boundary layer on the hydrodynamic disturbance.

  8. Targeting sediment management strategies using sediment quantification and fingerprinting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective sediment management is required to reduce excessive delivery of fine sediment due to intensive land uses such as agriculture, resulting in the degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Prioritising measures to mitigate dominant sediment sources is, however, challenging, as sediment loss risk is spatially and temporally variable between and within catchments. Fluctuations in sediment supply from potential sources result from variations in land uses resulting in increased erodibility where ground cover is low (e.g., cultivated, poached and compacted soils), and physical catchment characteristics controlling hydrological connectivity and transport pathways (surface and/or sub-surface). Sediment fingerprinting is an evidence-based management tool to identify sources of in-stream sediments at the catchment scale. Potential sediment sources are related to a river sediment sample, comprising a mixture of source sediments, using natural physico-chemical characteristics (or 'tracers'), and contributions are statistically un-mixed. Suspended sediment data were collected over two years at the outlet of three intensive agricultural catchments (approximately 10 km2) in Ireland. Dominant catchment characteristics were grassland on poorly-drained soils, arable on well-drained soils and arable on moderately-drained soils. High-resolution (10-min) calibrated turbidity-based suspended sediment and discharge data were combined to quantify yield. In-stream sediment samples (for fingerprinting analysis) were collected at six to twelve week intervals, using time-integrated sediment samplers. Potential sources, including stream channel banks, ditches, arable and grassland field topsoils, damaged road verges and tracks were sampled, oven-dried (account for particle size and organic matter selectivity processes. Contributions from potential sources type groups (channel - ditches and stream banks, roads - road verges and tracks, fields - grassland and arable topsoils) were

  9. Iridium profiles and delivery across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeray-Senlet, Selen; Miller, Kenneth G.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Senlet, Turgay; Vellekoop, Johan; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2017-01-01

    We examined iridium (Ir) anomalies at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in siliciclastic shallow marine cores of the New Jersey Coastal Plain, USA, that were deposited at an intermediate distance (∼2500 km) from the Chicxulub, Mexico crater. Although closely spaced and generally biostratigraphically complete, the cores show heterogeneity in terms of preservation of the ejecta layers, maximum concentration of Ir measured (∼0.1-2.4 ppb), and total thickness of the Ir-enriched interval (11-119 cm). We analyzed the shape of the Ir profiles with a Lagrangian particle-tracking model of sediment mixing. Fits between the mixing model and measured Ir profiles, as well as visible burrows in the cores, show that the shape of the Ir profiles was determined primarily by sediment mixing via bioturbation. In contrast, Tighe Park 1 and Bass River cores show post-depositional remobilization of Ir by geochemical processes. There is a strong inverse relationship between the maximum concentration of Ir measured and the thickness of the sediments over which Ir is spread. We show that the depth-integrated Ir inventory is similar in the majority of the cores, indicating that the total Ir delivery at time of the K/Pg event was spatially homogeneous over this region. Though delivered through a near-instantaneous source, stratospheric dispersal, and settling, our study shows that non-uniform Ir profiles develop due to changes in the regional delivery and post-depositional modification by bioturbation and geochemical processes.

  10. The boundary-scan handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Kenneth P

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at electronics industry professionals, this 4th edition of the Boundary Scan Handbook describes recent changes to the IEEE1149.1 Standard Test Access Port and Boundary-Scan Architecture. This updated edition features new chapters on the possible effects of the changes on the work of the practicing test engineers and the new 1149.8.1 standard. Anyone needing to understand the basics of boundary scan and its practical industrial implementation will need this book. Provides an overview of the recent changes to the 1149.1 standard and the effect of the changes on the work of test engineers;   Explains the new IEEE 1149.8.1 subsidiary standard and applications;   Describes the latest updates on the supplementary IEEE testing standards. In particular, addresses: IEEE Std 1149.1                      Digital Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.4                      Analog Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.6                      Advanced I/O Testing IEEE Std 1149.8.1           �...

  11. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illus, E. [ed.

    1998-08-01

    The Second NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research)/EKO-1 Seminar was held at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) on April 2-3, 1997. The work of the NKS is based on 4-year programmes; the current programme having been planned for the years 1994-1997. The programme comprises 3 major fields, one of them being environmental effects (EKO). Under this umbrella there are 4 main projects. The EKO-1 project deals with marine radioecology, in particular bottom sediments and sediment processes. The programme of the second seminar consisted of 8 invited lecturers and 6 other scientific presentations. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate are important in all types of sedimentological study and model calculations of fluxes of substances in the aquatic environment. In many cases these tasks have been closely related to radioecological studies undertaken in marine and fresh water environments, because they are often based on measured depth profiles of certain natural or artificial radionuclides present in the sediments. During recent decades Pb-210 has proved to be very useful in dating of sediments, but some other radionuclides have also been successfully used, e.g. Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cs-137. The difficulties existing and problems involved in dating of sediments, as well as solutions for resolving these problems are discussed in the presentations

  12. Biostratigraphic interpretation for the cyclic sedimentation in northwestern Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tekbali, A.O.; Cornell, W.C. (Univ. of Texas at El Paso, (United States) Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Mesozoic sediments in western Libya are best exposed along the Jabal Nafusah escarpment. This northeast-southwest trending structure overlooks the Al Jifarah plain and extends more than 300 km westward to connect with a T-shaped anticlinorium in Algeria and Tunisia. The Al Aziziyan fault (normal, north side down) parallels the northern edge of the escarpment and marks its initial position. Alternate deposition of marine and continental sediments began in the Triassic before the formation of a major monocline in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous time. Subsequent epiorogenic movements and isostatic adjustments initiated a westward sloping shelf along the southern edge of the Tethys. As a result, the eastern and central regions of western Libya were subjected to severe erosion and coalescing of unconformities towards the topographic highs, prior to the deposition of the overstepping Kiklah Formation. Geometrical and physical interpretation of the Mesozoic sediments in the region, combined with paleogeographic reconstruction indicate that the post-Hercynian epiorogenic adjustments and fluctuations of the Tethys resulted in local cyclic sedimentation. Accurate age assessment of the boundaries between the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous facies in northwestern Libya can be carried out on the basis of microfloral and faunal distribution and makes possible correlation of aquifers and probable oil-bearing sequences in western Libya.

  13. Episodes of low dissolved oxygen indicated by ostracodes and sediment geochemistry at Crystal Lake, Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B. Brandon; Filippelli, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen during the summer and early fall controls profundal continental ostracode distribution in Crystal Lake (McHenry County), Illinois, favoring Cypria ophthalmica and Physocypria globula at water depths from 6 to 13 m. These species also thrived in the lake's profundal zone from 14,165 to 9600 calendar year before present (cal yr b.p.) during the late Boiling, Allerod, and Younger Dryas chronozones, and early Holocene. Characterized by sand, cemented tubules, large aquatic gastropod shells, and littoral ostracode valves, thin (1-6 cm) tempestite deposits punctuate thicker deposits of organic gyttja from 16,080 to 11,900 cal yr b.p. The succeeding 2300 yr (11,900-9600 cal yr b.p.) lack tempestites, and reconstructed water depths were at their maximum. Deposition of marl under relatively well-oxygenated conditions occurred during the remainder of the Holocene until the arrival of Europeans, when the lake returned to a pattern of seasonally low dissolved oxygen. Such conditions are also indicated in the lake sediment by the speciation of phosphorus, high concentrations of organic carbon, and abundant iron and manganese occluded to mineral grains. Initial low dissolved oxygen was probably caused by the delivery of dissolved P and Fe in shallow groundwater, the chemistry of which was influenced by Spodosol pedogenesis under a spruce forest. The triggering may have been regionally warm and wet conditions associated with retreat of the Lake Michigan lobe (south-central Laurentide Ice Sheet). ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Inc.

  14. Slow sedimentation and deformability of charged lipid vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Suarez, Ivan Rey; Tellez, Gabriel; Gay, Guillaume; Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres

    2013-01-01

    The study of vesicles in suspension is important to understand the complicated dynamics exhibited by cells in vivo and in vitro. We developed a computer simulation based on the boundary-integral method to model the three dimensional gravity-driven sedimentation of charged vesicles towards a flat surface. The membrane mechanical behavior was modeled using the Helfrich Hamiltonian and near incompressibility of the membrane was enforced via a model which accounts for the thermal fluctuations of the membrane. The simulations were verified and compared to experimental data obtained using suspended vesicles labelled with a fluorescent probe, which allows visualization using fluorescence microscopy and confers the membrane with a negative surface charge. The electrostatic interaction between the vesicle and the surface was modeled using the linear Derjaguin approximation for a low ionic concentration solution. The sedimentation rate as a function of the distance of the vesicle to the surface was determined both expe...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of pattern formation in subaqueous sediment

    CERN Document Server

    Kidanemariam, Aman G

    2014-01-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulation of incompressible fluid flow over a thick bed of mobile, spherically-shaped particles. The algorithm is based upon the immersed boundary technique for fluid-solid coupling and uses a soft-sphere model for the solid-solid contact. Two parameter points in the laminar flow regime are chosen, leading to the emergence of sediment patterns classified as `small dunes', while one case under turbulent flow conditions leads to `vortex dunes' with significant flow separation on the lee side. Wavelength, amplitude and propagation speed of the patterns extracted from the spanwise-averaged fluid-bed interface are found to be consistent with available experimental data. The particle transport rates are well represented by available empirical models for flow over a plane sediment bed in both the laminar and the turbulent regimes.

  16. A theoretical framework of tracer methods for marine sediment dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new theoretical framework of tracer methods is proposed in the present contribution, on the basis of mass conservation. This model is applicable for both artificial and natural tracers. It can be used to calculate the spatial distribution patterns of sediment transport rate, thus providing independent information and verification for the results derived from empirical formulae. For the procedures of the calculation, first, the tracer concentration and topographic maps of two times are obtained. Then, the spatial and temporal changes in the concentration and seabed elevation are calculated, and the boundary conditions required are determined by field observations (such as flow and bedform migration measurements). Finally, based upon eqs. (1) and (13), the transport rate is calculated and expressed as a function of the position over the study area. Further, appropriate modifications to the model may allow the tracer to have different densities and grain size distributions from the bulk sediment.

  17. Boundary layer control for airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pake, F. A.; Pipitone, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is summarized of the aerodynamic principle of boundary layer control for nonrigid LTA craft. The project included a wind tunnel test on a BLC body of revolution at zero angle of attack. Theoretical analysis is shown to be in excellent agreement with the test data. Methods are evolved for predicting the boundary layer development on a body of revolution and the suction pumping and propulsive power requirements. These methods are used to predict the performance characteristics of a full-scale airship. The analysis indicates that propulsive power reductions of 15 to 25 percent and endurance improvements of 20 to 40 percent may be realized in employing boundary-layer control to nonrigid airships.

  18. Gravitational action with null boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Luis; Poisson, Eric; Sorkin, Rafael D

    2016-01-01

    We present a complete discussion of the boundary term in the action functional of general relativity when the boundary includes null segments in addition to the more usual timelike and spacelike segments. We confirm that ambiguities appear in the contribution from a null segment, because it depends on an arbitrary choice of parametrization for the generators. We also show that similar ambiguities appear in the contribution from a codimension-two surface at which a null segment is joined to another (spacelike, timelike, or null) segment. The parametrization ambiguity can be tamed by insisting that the null generators be affinely parametrized; this forces each null contribution to the boundary action to vanish, but leaves intact the fredom to rescale the affine parameter by a constant factor on each generator. Once a choice of parametrization is made, the ambiguity in the joint contributions can be eliminated by formulating well-motivated rules that ensure the additivity of the gravitational action. Enforcing t...

  19. Boundary works of Grindr research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Møller

    . Intimate boundary works There are phycological and sociological approaches that use it to describe types of interpersonal relationships (Giddens 1992, Baumeister 2007, Stempfhuber 2011, Nordqvist 2013). Related to this approach is the understanding that intimacy is something that is done, that is practiced....... (Berlant 1998) The production of a public/private divide serves to orient subject attention towards interpersonal matters, making invisible the forces that define which exact distinctions to police. This paper argues for an integrative approach, an amalgamation of sociological and critical intimacy theory...... Inquiry, 11(6), 840–860. Jamieson, L. (2005). Boundaries of Intimacy. In S. Cunningham-Burley (Ed.), Families in Society. Boundaries and relationships (pp. 189–205). Polity press. Linke, C. (2011). Being a couple in a media world: The mediatization of everyday communication in couple relationships...

  20. The aqueous thermal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1980-02-01

    This article reviews the available data, measurement techniques, and present understanding of the millimeter thick aqueous thermal boundary layer. A temperature difference between the surface and lower strata, δT, of the order of a few tenths to -1 °C have been observed. Techniques ranging from miniature mercury thermometers and electrical point sensors to optical interferometry and infrared radiometry have been employed. Many processes influence the temperature structure in this thin boundary layer. Among them are: the net upward heat flux due to evaporation and sensible heat transfer; infrared and solar radiation; and the turbulence near the interface due to wind mixing, wave breaking and current shear. Presence of solute and surface-active materials stimulate or dampen these mixing processes thereby influencing boundary-layer thickness and temperature structure.

  1. Asymptotic analysis and boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cousteix, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This book presents a new method of asymptotic analysis of boundary-layer problems, the Successive Complementary Expansion Method (SCEM). The first part is devoted to a general comprehensive presentation of the tools of asymptotic analysis. It gives the keys to understand a boundary-layer problem and explains the methods to construct an approximation. The second part is devoted to SCEM and its applications in fluid mechanics, including external and internal flows. The advantages of SCEM are discussed in comparison with the standard Method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions. In particular, for the first time, the theory of Interactive Boundary Layer is fully justified. With its chapter summaries, detailed derivations of results, discussed examples and fully worked out problems and solutions, the book is self-contained. It is written on a mathematical level accessible to graduate and post-graduate students of engineering and physics with a good knowledge in fluid mechanics. Researchers and practitioners will estee...

  2. Hydrologic-Hydraulic Modeling of Fluvial Sediment Transport During a Storm Event in a Highly Managed Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, F.; Mantilla, R.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment movement along the main stem of a watershed is strongly affected by the sediment supply and the channel morphology. Anthropogenic interventions tend to alter the hydraulic conveyance and consequently modify the sediment regime of the main stem. This connection between channel hydraulics and sediment transport is often overlooked in hydrologic models where simplified methods are used for flow and sediment routing. In this study, we adopt a hydrologic-hydraulic modeling approach to quantify the fluvial sediment transport along the main stem of a watershed during a storm event. The hydrologic model CUENCAS is implemented to estimate the sub-hourly hydrographs of the major tributaries of the watershed. The simulated hydrographs are used as boundary conditions for the depth-averaged two-dimensional hydraulic model FESMWS to simulate the propagation of the flood wave along the main stem. The corresponding sub-hourly, unsteady non-equilibrium sediment transport along the main stem is also simulated with FESWMS. This procedure is applied to a highly managed agricultural watershed of Iowa. The study site has a catchment area of 70 Km2 with soils that are silty clay loams. The land-use is mostly row crop, but in the past decade a large portion of the watershed was converted to native prairie. The main stem is a meandering stream with a length of 15 Km and ten major tributaries contribute to its flow. Several sections of the main stem have been heavily channelized and straightened since the 1930s. Different grain size distributions and sediment boundary conditions are investigated to discern the effects of land-use changes and channelization on the sediment regime along the main stem. The simulations are able to capture the typical hysteresis between flow and sediment transport. The results indicate that the in-stream sediment transport rate is in general higher in the channelized sections and depends, to a certain extent, on the degree of straightening.

  3. Boundary stabilization of transmission problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernando; Vodev, Georgi

    2010-02-01

    We study the transmission problem in bounded domains with dissipative boundary conditions. Under some natural assumptions, we prove uniform bounds of the corresponding resolvents on the real axis at high frequency and, as a consequence, we obtain regions free of eigenvalue. To this end, we extend the result of Cardoso et al. ["Distribution of resonances and local energy decay in the transmission problem. II," Math. Res. Lett. 6, 377 (1999)] under more general assumptions. As an application, we get exponential decay of the energy of the solutions of the corresponding mixed boundary value problems.

  4. Nonparallel stability of boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1987-01-01

    The asymptotic formulations of the nonparallel linear stability of incompressible growing boundary layers are critically reviewed. These formulations can be divided into two approaches. The first approach combines a numerical method with either the method of multiple scales, or the method of averaging, of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation; all these methods yield the same result. The second approach combined a multi-structure theory with the method of multiple scales. The first approach yields results that are in excellent agreement with all available experimental data, including the growth rates as well as the neutral stability curve. The derivation of the linear stability of the incompressible growing boundary layers is explained.

  5. Higgsless Deconstruction Without Boundary Condition

    CERN Document Server

    He, H J

    2004-01-01

    Deconstruction is a powerful means to explore the rich dynamics of gauge theories in four and higher dimensions. We demonstrate that gauge symmetry breaking in a compactified higher dimensional theory can be formulated via deconstructed 4D moose theory with {\\it spontaneous symmetry breaking} and {\\it without boundary condition.} The proper higher-D boundary conditions are automatically induced in the continuum limit rather than being imposed. We identify and analyze the moose theories which exhibit {\\it delayed unitarity violation} (effective unitarity) as a {\\it collective effect} of many gauge groups, without resorting to any known 5D geometry. Relevant phenomenological constraints are also addressed.

  6. Fractional Boundaries for Fluid Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bayin, S; Krisch, J P; Bayin, Selcuk; Krisch, Jean P.

    2006-01-01

    A single Israel layer can be created when two metrics adjoin with no continuous metric derivative across the boundary. The properties of the layer depend only on the two metrics it separates. By using a fractional derivative match, a family of Israel layers can be created between the same two metrics. The family is indexed by the order of the fractional derivative. The method is applied to Tolman IV and V interiors and a Schwarzschild vacuum exterior. The method creates new ranges of modeling parameters for fluid spheres. A thin shell analysis clarifies pressure/tension in the family of boundary layers.

  7. Distributed Tuning of Boundary Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, Ben; Elaluf-Calderwood, Silvia; Sørensen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The digital age has seen the rise of service systems involving highly distributed, heterogeneous, and resource-integrating actors whose relationships are governed by shared institutional logics, standards, and digital technology. The cocreation of service within these service systems takes place...... resources within Apple’s iOS service system. We conduct an embedded case study of Apple’s iOS service system with an in-depth analysis of 4,664 blog articles concerned with 30 boundary resources covering 6 distinct themes. Our analysis reveals that boundary resources of service systems enabled by digital...

  8. Unsteady Mass transfer Across the Sediment-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Alexander; Grant, Stanley; Stewardson, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Fluxes across the sediment-water interface (SWI) are of high ecological significance, as they promote biogeochemical processes that support benthic ecosystems within the hyporheic zone. The SWI marks a boundary between the turbulent water column (typically modelled by Navier Stokes equations) and the interstitial pore fluids in the sediment column, which are typically laminar (and modelled by Darcy's law). Although models of these two flow regimes are generally not coupled, flow in the turbulent boundary layer is affected by the sediment permeability and a slip velocity at the SWI, which decays exponentially into the streambed across a characteristic mixing length. Momentum is transferred across this region (known as the Brinkman layer) through the penetration of coherent structures and turbulent mixing, however, these turbulent structures also promote turbulent mass transfer. Mass transfer within the hyporheic zone can be conceptualised in terms of: (1) the downwelling of solutes from the stream; (2) retention of solutes in the sediment; and (3) the upwelling of solutes back into the stream. Recent work by the authors has shown that a mass transfer coefficient can be defined where a downwelling-upwelling unit cell exists across a concentration gradient. Such unit cells are generated at the SWI by pressure variation from: (1) steady-state influences, such as stream geometry and velocity variation; and (2) unsteady pressure waves produced by coherent turbulent structures. With this definition, mass transfer coefficients can be defined for: steady exchange, by adopting the Elliott and Brooks [1997] advective pumping model; and unsteady exchange, induced by streamwise propagation of upwelling-downwelling unit cells migrating downstream with a characteristic celerity associated with turbulent eddies. We hypothesize that beneath the Brinkman layer (where Laplace equation applies) these mass transfer coefficients can be summed to yield the total mass flux. Although, it

  9. Anthropogenic sediments and soils of tells of the Balkans and Anatolia: Composition, genesis, and relationships with the history of landscape and human occupation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedov, S. N.; Aleksandrovskii, A. L.; Benz, M.; Balabina, V. I.; Mishina, T. N.; Shishkov, V. A.; Şahin, F.; Özkaya, V.

    2017-04-01

    Soils and sediments composing Tell Körtik Tepe (Epipaleolithic, Turkey) and Tell Yunatsite (Chalcolithic (Eneolithic), Bulgaria) have been studied with the aim to gain a better insight into their microfabrics, determine the composition of anthropogenic artifacts, and, on this basis, to analyze similarities and distinctions between these objects and the modern soils of urban areas. The methods of micromorphology, scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, X-ray fluorometry, and other techniques to determine the chemical and physical properties of the soils and sediments have been applied. Two paleosols have been identified in Tell Yunatsite with a total thickness of 9 m: the paleosol buried under the tell and the paleosol in its middle part. Sediments of Tell Körtik Tepe have a total thickness of up to 5 m; their accumulation began at the end of Pleistocene over the surface of buried paleosol. The cultural layer of the tells consists of construction debris mainly represented by a mixture of clay and sand and of domestic wastes with the high content of phosphorus. The major source of phosphorus is calcium phosphate (apatite) of bone tissues. The abundance of various anthropogenic materials in the sediments is clearly seen in thin sections. Even in the paleosols developed within the cultural layer (the mid-profile paleosol in Tell Yunatsite), the amount of microinclusions of bone fragments, charcoal, and burnt clay (ceramics) is very high. Micromorphological data indicate that up to 50% of the layered material filling an Epipaleolithic construction in Tell Körtik Tepe consists of the anthropogenic inclusions: bone fragments, charcoal, etc. The features of pedogenic transformation are present in the sediments. Such sediments can be classified as synlithogenic soils similar to the modern Urbic Technosols. It is shown that the formation of paleosols and sediments of Tell Körtik Tepe took place under extreme environmental conditions

  10. An approach for modeling sediment budgets in supply-limited rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    Reliable predictions of sediment transport and river morphology in response to variations in natural and human-induced drivers are necessary for river engineering and management. Because engineering and management applications may span a wide range of space and time scales, a broad spectrum of modeling approaches has been developed, ranging from suspended-sediment "rating curves" to complex three-dimensional morphodynamic models. Suspended sediment rating curves are an attractive approach for evaluating changes in multi-year sediment budgets resulting from changes in flow regimes because they are simple to implement, computationally efficient, and the empirical parameters can be estimated from quantities that are commonly measured in the field (i.e., suspended sediment concentration and water discharge). However, the standard rating curve approach assumes a unique suspended sediment concentration for a given water discharge. This assumption is not valid in rivers where sediment supply varies enough to cause changes in particle size or changes in areal coverage of sediment on the bed; both of these changes cause variations in suspended sediment concentration for a given water discharge. More complex numerical models of hydraulics and morphodynamics have been developed to address such physical changes of the bed. This additional complexity comes at a cost in terms of computations as well as the type and amount of data required for model setup, calibration, and testing. Moreover, application of the resulting sediment-transport models may require observations of bed-sediment boundary conditions that require extensive (and expensive) observations or, alternatively, require the use of an additional model (subject to its own errors) merely to predict the bed-sediment boundary conditions for use by the transport model. In this paper we present a hybrid approach that combines aspects of the rating curve method and the more complex morphodynamic models. Our primary objective

  11. An approach for modeling sediment budgets in supply-limited rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2010-10-01

    Reliable predictions of sediment transport and river morphology in response to variations in natural and human-induced drivers are necessary for river engineering and management. Because engineering and management applications may span a wide range of space and time scales, a broad spectrum of modeling approaches has been developed, ranging from suspended-sediment "rating curves" to complex three-dimensional morphodynamic models. Suspended sediment rating curves are an attractive approach for evaluating changes in multi-year sediment budgets resulting from changes in flow regimes because they are simple to implement, computationally efficient, and the empirical parameters can be estimated from quantities that are commonly measured in the field (i.e., suspended sediment concentration and water discharge). However, the standard rating curve approach assumes a unique suspended sediment concentration for a given water discharge. This assumption is not valid in rivers where sediment supply varies enough to cause changes in particle size or changes in areal coverage of sediment on the bed; both of these changes cause variations in suspended sediment concentration for a given water discharge. More complex numerical models of hydraulics and morphodynamics have been developed to address such physical changes of the bed. This additional complexity comes at a cost in terms of computations as well as the type and amount of data required for model setup, calibration, and testing. Moreover, application of the resulting sediment-transport models may require observations of bed-sediment boundary conditions that require extensive (and expensive) observations or, alternatively, require the use of an additional model (subject to its own errors) merely to predict the bed-sediment boundary conditions for use by the transport model. In this paper we present a hybrid approach that combines aspects of the rating curve method and the more complex morphodynamic models. Our primary objective

  12. Numerical Model of Turbulence, Sediment Transport, and Sediment Cover in a Large Canyon-Bound River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. V.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Colorado River in Grand Canyon is confined by bedrock and coarse-grained sediments. Finer grain sizes are supply limited, and sandbars primarily occur in lateral separation eddies downstream of coarse-grained tributary debris fans. These sandbars are important resources for native fish, recreational boaters, and as a source of aeolian transport preventing the erosion of archaeological resources by gully extension. Relatively accurate prediction of deposition and, especially, erosion of these sandbar beaches has proven difficult using two- and three-dimensional, time-averaged morphodynamic models. We present a parallelized, three-dimensional, turbulence-resolving model using the Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) technique. DES is a hybrid large eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS). RANS is applied to the near-bed grid cells, where grid resolution is not sufficient to fully resolve wall turbulence. LES is applied further from the bed and banks. We utilize the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence closure with a rough wall extension. The model resolves large-scale turbulence using DES and simultaneously integrates the suspended sediment advection-diffusion equation. The Smith and McLean suspended sediment boundary condition is used to calculate the upward and downward settling of sediment fluxes in the grid cells attached to the bed. The model calculates the entrainment of five grain sizes at every time step using a mixing layer model. Where the mixing layer depth becomes zero, the net entrainment is zero or negative. As such, the model is able to predict the exposure and burial of bedrock and coarse-grained surfaces by fine-grained sediments. A separate program was written to automatically construct the computational domain between the water surface and a triangulated surface of a digital elevation model of the given river reach. Model results compare favorably with ADCP measurements of flow taken on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

  13. SEDIMENTATION BROKEN IN INCLINED SEOIMENTADORES

    OpenAIRE

    Lama-Ramirez, R.; Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química, Departamento Académico de Operaciones Unitarias,Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos,Lima,Perú.; Condorhuamán-Ccorimanya, C.; Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química, Departamento Académico de Operaciones Unitarias,Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos,Lima,Perú.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the batch sedimentation of aqueous suspensions of precipitated calcium carbonate, barium sulfate and lead oxide settlers inclined rectangular and circular cross section. The énguio tilt with respect to the horizontal between 35 ° and 75 °, to suspensions that vary in strength between 39.4 and 1070 g / l.Las obtained apparent sedimentation velocities ranging from 0.071 to 17.6 cm / min. the apparent sedimentation rate has been correlated using a modified version of the equation...

  14. Analysis of sup(210)Pb in sediment trap samples and sediments from the northern Arabian Sea: Evidence for boundary scavenging

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Borole, D.V.

    samples varied from 11 to 108 dpm g sup(-1) at 1024 m and 58 dpm g sup(-1) to 588 dpm g sup(-1) at 3024 m. The mean annual sup(210)Pb flux increased from 0.27 dpm cm sup(-2) yr sup(-1) in the 1024 m trap to 0.65 dpm cm sup(-2) yr sup(-1) in the 3024 m trap...

  15. Generic 2-D River Network Modeling of Flow and Sediment Transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W.; Wang, C.; Xiang, X.; Ma, T.

    2012-04-01

    A generic 2D river network model of flow and sediment transports is proposed for the flow and sediment simulation in the complex river network. The paper expands the three-step method adopted in the 1D river network to the 2D river network simulation. A 2D river network model is divided into several cells, including single river cell, "tree-like" river cell, "ring-like" river cell and "cross-like" river cell, which can reflect the interactive influence of flow field in the bifurcated channel and applies to generic 2D simulation. Based on equation of the 2D shallow water and unsteady non-uniform suspended sediment, the relationship between the variables (water level, discharge and sediment concentration) of each section and those of the boundaries are obtained through the full implicit matrix chase-after method. Through the conservation of water and sediment on the boundaries, the water level and sediment concentration on the nodes can be got by solving the irregular sparse matrix of conservation equation, so as to implement the coupled simulation of flow and sediment in the whole river network. The paper take the Chengtong River Reach located in the low reaches of Yangtze River as the example of "cross-like" river to verify the algorithm. The model is calibrated using the measured data. A comparison of calculated water level, discharge and sediment concentration shows that the generic model can reflex the interactive influence of flow field, with reasonable accuracy, especially in the bifurcated channel.

  16. BOUNDARY ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CONTACT PROBLEMS USING ARTIFICIAL BOUNDARY NODE APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bahattin KANBER; Ibrahim H. GUZELBEY; Ahmet ERKLI

    2003-01-01

    An improved version of the regular boundary element method, the artificial boundary node approach, is derived. A simple contact algorithm is designed and implemented into the direct boundary element, regular boundary element and artificial boundary node approaches. The exisiting and derived approaches are tested using some case studies. The results of the artificial boundary node approach are compared with those of the existing boundary element program, the regular element approach, ANSYS and analytical solution whenever possible. The results show the effectiveness of the artificial boundary node approach for a wider range of boundary offsets.

  17. Boundaries, work and the rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    This position paper takes its starting point in the definitions of work, and of boundaries often found in CSCW and HCI literature. By looking back at the case of parental leave planning and on my writings from the past 10 years, I discuss how these definitions need to be reconsidered, and I summa...

  18. Shockwave-boundary layer interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glepman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Shock wave-boundary layer interactions are a very common feature in both transonic and supersonic flows. They can be encountered on compressor and turbine blades, in supersonic jet inlets, on transonic wings, on the stabilization fins of missiles and in many more situations. Because of their major i

  19. Humor styles and symbolic boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.

    2009-01-01

    Humor is strongly related to group boundaries. Jokes and other humorous utterances often draw on implicit references and inside knowledge; they tend to refer to sensitive topics which may offend people; and they ideally incite laughter, one of the strongest markers of social solidarity and emotional

  20. the Martian atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2011-01-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime...

  1. Current Sinkhole Boundaries in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This dataset is a polygon coverage of the sinkhole boundaries as determined by using LiDAR data. The polygons relate to the point coverage using the KPolyID field in...

  2. The seismotectonics of plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J.; Brune, J. N.; Goodkind, J.; Wyatt, F.; Agnew, D. C.; Beaumont, C.

    1981-01-01

    Research on the seismotectonics of plate boundaries is summarized. Instrumental development and an observational program designed to study various aspects of the seismotectonics of southern California and the northern Gulf of California are described. A unique superconducting gravimeter was further developed and supported under this program for deployment and operation at several sites. Work on Earth tides is also discussed.

  3. 'Regime shopping' across (blurring) boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, M.S.; Evju, Stein

    2014-01-01

    This book chapter identifies and explores the (blurring) boundaries between the legal regimes for labour mobility across the EU. In the context of - what is sometimes called - 'regime shopping' a close look is taken into the law on freedom of movement within the EU. Several categories of transnation

  4. 'Regime shopping' across (blurring) boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, M.S.; Evju, Stein

    2014-01-01

    This book chapter identifies and explores the (blurring) boundaries between the legal regimes for labour mobility across the EU. In the context of - what is sometimes called - 'regime shopping' a close look is taken into the law on freedom of movement within the EU. Several categories of

  5. Incoherent boundary conditions and metastates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enter, Aernout C.D. van; Netočný, Karel; Schaap, Hendrikjan G.

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution we discuss the role which incoherent boundary conditions can play in the study of phase transitions. This is a question of particular relevance for the analysis of disordered systems, and in particular of spin glasses. For the moment our mathematical results only apply to ferrom

  6. Stability of Boundary Layer Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    and Teske (1975). We can conclude (as in the case of ducting) that theoretical models of boundary layer structure and associated radar structure...FI33 (Secret). Hitney, (1978) "Surface Duct Effects," Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, Calif., Report No. TD144. Lewellen, W. S., and M. E. Teske

  7. Humor styles and symbolic boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.

    2009-01-01

    Humor is strongly related to group boundaries. Jokes and other humorous utterances often draw on implicit references and inside knowledge; they tend to refer to sensitive topics which may offend people; and they ideally incite laughter, one of the strongest markers of social solidarity and emotional

  8. BOUNDARY STABILIZATION OF TIMOSHENKO BEAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Qingxu

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the stabilization problem of Timoshenko beam by some nonlinear boundary feedback controls is considered. By virtue of nonlinear semigroup theory and energy-perturbed method, it is shown that the vibration of the beam under the proposed control action decays exponentially or in negative power of time t as t → ∞.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of the coupling of turbulence and sediment transport over dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeeckle, M. W.; Leary, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the spatiotemporal coupling of sediment transport over dunes using a turbulence- and particle-resolving numerical model and high-speed video in a laboratory flume. The model utilizes the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for the fluid turbulence and a Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulation for the sediment. Previous experiments assessing the effects of flow separation on downstream fluid turbulent structures and bedload transport suggest that localized, intermittent, high-magnitude transport events, called permeable splat events, play an important role in both downstream and cross-stream transport near flow reattachment. The flume was lined with 17 concrete ripples that had a 2 cm high crest and were 30 cm long. A high-speed camera observed sediment transport along the entirety of the bedform at 250 Hz. Downstream and vertical fluid velocity was observed at 1mm and 3 mm above the bed using Laser Doppler Velocitmetry (LDV) at 15 distances along bedform profile. As observed in our previous backward-facing step experiments and simulations, mean downstream fluid velocity increases nonlinearly with increasing distance along the ripple. Observed sediment transport, however, increases linearly with increasing distance along the ripple with an exception at the crest of the bedform, where both mean downstream fluid velocity and sediment transport decrease significantly. Previous experiments assessing only the effect of flow separation showed that calculating sediment transport as a function of boundary shear stress using a Meyer-Peter Müller type equation, produced a zone of underestimated transport near flow reattachment. Results reported here show that calculating sediment transport in this way underestimates observed sediment transport along the entire profile of the bedform, not just near flow reattachment. Preliminary sediment transport time-series data show a zone of high-magnitude cross-stream transport near flow reattachment, suggesting that permeable

  10. Sediment transport following water transfer from Yangtze River to Taihu Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng GONG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To meet the increasing need of fresh water and to improve the water quality of Taihu Lake, water transfer from the Yangtze River was initiated in 2002. This study was performed to investigate the sediment distribution along the river course following water transfer. A rainfall-runoff model was first built to calculate the runoff of the Taihu Basin in 2003. Then, the flow patterns of river networks were simulated using a one-dimensional river network hydrodynamic model. Based on the boundary conditions of the flow in tributaries of the Wangyu River and the water level in Taihu Lake, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment transport numerical model of the Wangyu River was built to analyze the influences of the inflow rate of the water transfer and the suspended sediment concentration (SSC of inflow on the sediment transport. The results show that the water transfer inflow rate and SSC of inflow have significant effects on the sediment distribution. The higher the inflow rate or SSC of inflow is, the higher the SSC value is at certain cross-sections along the river course of water transfer. Higher inflow rate and SSC of inflow contribute to higher sediment deposition per kilometer and sediment thickness. It is also concluded that a sharp decrease of the inflow velocity at the entrance of the Wangyu River on the river course of water transfer induces intense sedimentation at the cross-section near the Changshu hydro-junction. With an increasing distance from the Changshu hydro-junction, the sediment deposition and sedimentation thickness decrease gradually along the river course.

  11. Analysis of the Sediment Hydrograph of the alluvial deltas in the Apalachicola River, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daranpob, A.; Hagen, S.; Passeri, D.; Smar, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Channel and alluvial characteristics in lowlands are the products of boundary conditions and driving forces. The boundary conditions normally include materials and land cover types, such as soil type and vegetation cover. General driving forces include discharge rate, sediment loadings, tides and waves. Deltas built up of river-transported sediment occur in depositional zones of the river mouth in flat terrains and slow currents. Total sediment load depends on two major abilities of the river, the river shear stress and capacity. The shear stress determines transport of a given sediment grain size, normally expressed as tractive force. The river capacity determines the total load or quantity of total sediments transported across a section of the river, generally expressed as the sediment loading rate. The shear stress and sediment loading rate are relatively easy to measure in the headwater and transfer zones where streams form a v-shape valley and the river begins to form defined banks compared to the deposition zone where rivers broaden across lower elevation landscapes creating alluvial forms such as deltas. Determinations of deposition and re-suspension of sediment in fluvial systems are complicated due to exerting tidal, wind, and wave forces. Cyclic forces of tides and waves repeatedly change the sediment transport and deposition rate spatially and temporally in alluvial fans. However, the influence decreases with water depth. Understanding the transport, deposition, and re-suspension of sediments in the fluvial zone would provide a better understanding of the morphology of landscape in lowland estuaries such as the Apalachicola Bay and its estuary systems. The Apalachicola River system is located in the Florida Panhandle. Shelf sedimentation process is not a strong influence in this region because it is protected by barrier islands from direct ocean forces of the Gulf of Mexico. This research explores the characteristic of suspended sediment loadings in

  12. Fly Ash as a Time Marker for Anthropocene Alluvial Sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettis, E. A., III; Grimley, D. A.; Anders, A. M.; Bates, B.; Hannan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Human land use has transformed the landscapes, ecosystems and hydrology of the North American Midcontinent. One widespread impact of this transformation is increased runoff and accelerated soil erosion, which, along with direct human channel modifications and artificial drainage, have dramatically altered hydrologic and ecological conditions in streams and rivers with far-reaching results. A legacy of this change in streams and rivers is preserved on floodplains throughout the region in sediment known as post-settlement alluvium (PSA). Documenting the spatial and temporal pattern of historic floodplain sedimentation in the drainage network is part of a larger effort to understand decadal and century-scale sediment routing through the drainage system and the role of floodplain sedimentation in carbon sequestration. Fly ash, a product of high-temperature coal combustion, began to accumulate on the landscape in the early historic period (c.a.1840-1850 in Iowa and Illinois) as coal-burning technology such as steam engines came into use after 1850; prior to which no source of fly ash was present. Release of fly ash from coal burning in power plants and steam locomotives likely peaked in the early-mid 20th century. Fly ash particles (~ 1 to 10 % magnetic) are identified by their spheroidal shape and range in size from coarse clay to silt (~1-63µ). By identifying the percentage of fly ash spheroids in the magnetic separate (10 - 60µ size range) of a soil or sediment profile, the pre-fly ash Historic surface could be discerned. Application of this technique in selected localities in eastern Iowa (Clear Creek drainage) and central Illinois (Sangamon River drainage) resulted in successful demarcation of the PSA contact in areas where the boundary was physically evident. Bolstered by this success we were able to confidently demark the PSA contact in other settings where the boundary was not as physically evident. This relatively easy to implement, inexpensive tool will

  13. Cyclone with boundary layer displacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorton-Huelgerth, A.; Hoffmann, D.; Staudinger, G. [Technische Universitaet Graz, Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik, Abt. fuer Apparatebau und Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik

    1998-12-31

    In a cyclone the boundary layers at the cover plate and outside of the vortex finder are considered to affect the separation efficiency of a cyclone. To improve separation efficiency, the boundary layers at and the space between vortex finder and cover plate were investigated. Two identical cyclones, 400 mm diameter and 990 mm long were manufactured with high precision from stainless steel. One was equipped with openings for insertion of velocity probes; the opening could be closed with glass windows to allow Laser Doppler Anemometry. The other cyclone was used for testing separation efficiency. Velocity measurements by both conventional pressure probes and Laser Doppler Anemometry revealed that only a minor part of the boundary layer at the outside of the vortex finder reaches the lower end of it, because the axial velocity is slowed down drastically. Light sheet visualization showed that there exists a heavily particle loaded boundary layer at the cover plate. There are no particles at the lower part of the vortex finder. This can be explained by the radial mass exchange. The effect of vortex finder length on separation efficiency was investigated by varying the length of the vortex finder and measuring the separation efficiency using a limestone powder as test material. It was found that the separation efficiency is not sensitive to the length of the vortex finder. Particle slip increases only where the vortex finder is definitely shorter than its diameter. It was tried to improve the separation efficiency by introducing an air curtain along the vortex finder. The positive effect on separation efficiency and particle cut size is minimal. Results from velocity measurements with cylinder pressure probes in the boundary layer do not fit the results from other measurement techniques. Many older measurements were made with these probes. The conclusions drawn and the design rules deduced are to be questioned. 17 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Haw River sediment quality assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents an evaluation of chemical contaminants in, and toxicity of, sediments collected from impoundments created by dams on the Haw River in Alamance...

  15. SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT IN HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.G.RANGA RAJU; U.C.KOTHYARI

    2005-01-01

    Withdrawal of water from a river into a canal involves the construction of a barrage or a dam across the river depending on whether the river is perennial or not. The design of the reservoir upstream of the dam and of the canal requires consideration of the sediment load carried by the river in case the river is sediment-laden. The basic equations concerning morphological changes in such rivers are discussed with particular reference to computation of reservoir sedimentation. The hydraulics of lined canals carrying wash load is examined from the point of view of limiting transport capacity and changes in frictional resistance. Lastly,the methods of design of sediment extraction devices like settling basins and vortex chambers are presented.

  16. CHWAKA BAY MANGROVE SEDIMENTS, ZANZIBAR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed-Studies on Benthic denitrification in the Chwaka bay mangrove. Extensive mangrove ... In this case, six sediment cores were taken randomly from the three study sites as above and a ..... Academic Press. Orlando. pp. 277-293.

  17. Kanawha River Basin Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains sediment size data collected at research sites using a Wolman Pebble Count method. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  18. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...

  19. Seafloor Surficial Sediments (Deck 41)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) "Deck41" database contains surficial sediment descriptions for over 36,000 seafloor samples worldwide. The file was begun...

  20. Evidence of Impact at the Permian/Triassic Boundary from Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, H. C.; Upadhyay, C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (India); Tripathi, R. P. [Jai Narain Vyas University, Department of Physics (India); Shukla, A. D.; Bhandari, N. [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura (India)

    2002-06-15

    Sediment samples from Spiti valley, India, deposited about 250 Million years ago during the Permian-Triassic transition, have been analysed. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopic studies show that iron occurs mainly as nanoparticles of hematite and goethite with a broad size distribution. The results show a high degree of resemblance with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (65 My) samples where an asteroidal impact is believed to have caused mass extinction.

  1. The Chronology and Characteristics of Sediments Since Late Glacial in Huahai Lake, Hexi Corridor, NW China%河西走廊花海剖面晚冰期以来年代学及沉积特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王乃昂; 李卓仑; 李育; 朱金峰

    2011-01-01

    选择位于河西走廊的花海古湖泊沉积剖面作为研究对象,根据13个普通14C和5个AMS14C年代结果,以沉积物岩性特征为主要指标,建立了晚冰期以来花海湖泊沉积的年代框架及环境变化过程.结果表明:花海地区新仙女木期和晚冰期花海湖泊主要以芒硝沉积为主,指示了较低的温度环境.芒硝沉积中的淤泥细线为短暂升温标志,芒硝-淤泥-芒硝的沉积韵律揭示了晚冰期和新仙女木期气候的不稳定性和温度的周期性变化.根据沉积过程和岩性特征,全新世花海湖泊在千年尺度上存在干湿变化特征.10.47 cal ka BP之前的早全新世气候较为干旱,以冲洪积和风成砂为主的沉积过程,10.47~8.87 cal ka BP的早全新世湖相沉积所揭示的气候由干到湿的转变期,8.87~5.5 cal ka BP存在深湖相沉积的气候湿润期,5.5 cal ka BP至今沉积间断所揭示的中晚全新世气候呈现干旱化趋势,湖泊趋于萎缩干涸.%From the profile which is located in the Hexi Corridor, NW China. 13 samples were collected for conventional 14C dating and 5 samples were collected for AMS 14C dating. The materials used for 14C dating were seeds, mud and wood. Based on the dating results, we reconstructed the age framework of Huahai Lake since the Late Glacial period. And then, we concluded that the sediments between 0.73 ~ 6.83 m were deposited during Holocene. Between 6.83 ~ 7.35 m, the sediments were deposited during the early Holocene and the late Younger Dryas. The sediments of 7.35 ~ 10.44 m were deposited during the Late Glacial and early Younger Dryas. Based on the mineral analysis of the sediments during the Younger Dryas and late glacial, mirabilite was the main component in the sediments, indicating the low-temperature environment. According to the chemical composition analysis , the main ingredient of the pure mirabilite deposition is Na2SO4 0 10H2O, which is an indicator of the cold-dry environment

  2. Luminescence dating of Netherlands’ sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we review: 1) the development of the methodology; 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands’ sediments; and 3) geological applications of the method in the Netherlands. Our review shows that optically stimulated luminescence dating of quartz grains using the single aliquot regenerative dose method yi...

  3. Mathematical theory of sedimentation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Hiroshi; Van Rysselberghe, P

    1962-01-01

    Mathematical Theory of Sedimentation Analysis presents the flow equations for the ultracentrifuge. This book is organized into two parts encompassing six chapters that evaluate the systems of reacting components, the differential equations for the ultracentrifuge, and the case of negligible diffusion. The first chapters consider the Archibald method for molecular weight determination; pressure-dependent sedimentation; expressions for the refractive index and its gradient; relation between refractive index and concentration; and the analysis of Gaussian distribution. Other chapters deal with th

  4. Grain Boundary Engineering of Electrodeposited Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein

    of the favorable boundaries that break the network of general grain boundaries. Successful dedicated synthesis of a textured nickel film fulfilling the requirements of grain boundary engineered materials, suggests improved boundary specific properties. However, the textured nickel film shows fairly low......Grain boundary engineering aims for a deliberate manipulation of the grain boundary characteristics to improve the properties of polycrystalline materials. Despite the emergence of some successful industrial applications, the mechanism(s) by which the boundary specific properties can be improved...... is not yet well-understood. This, at least partly, owes to the lack of robust characterization methods for analyzing the nature of grain boundaries including the grain boundary plane characteristics, until recently. In the past decade, significant improvements in the 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional analysis...

  5. Reservoir Operation to Minimize Sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ari Wulandari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Wonogiri Reservoir capacity decreases rapidly, caused by serious sedimentation problems. In 2007, JICA was proposed a sediment storage reservoir with a new spillway for the purpose of sediment flushing / sluicing from The Keduang River. Due to the change of reservoir storage and change of reservoir system, it requires a sustainable reservoir operation technique. This technique is aimed to minimize the deviation between the input and output of sediments. The main objective of this study is to explore the optimal Wonogiri reservoir operation by minimizing the sediment trap. The CSUDP incremental dynamic programming procedure is used for the model optimization.  This new operating rules will also simulate a five years operation period, to show the effect of the implemented techniques. The result of the study are the newly developed reservoir operation system has many advantages when compared to the actual operation system and the disadvantage of this developed system is that the use is mainly designed for a wet hydrologic year, since its performance for the water supply is lower than the actual reservoir operations.Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.16-23 [How to cite this article:  Wulandari, D.A., Legono, D., and Darsono, S., 2014. Reservoir Operation to Minimize Sedimentation. International Journal of Science and Engineering, 5(2,61-65. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.16-23] Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  6. Holocene paleoclimate history of Fallen Leaf Lake, CA., from geochemistry and sedimentology of well-dated sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Paula J.; Ball, G. Ian; Zimmerman, Susan H.; Maloney, Jillian; Smith, Shane B.; Kent, Graham; Adams, Kenneth D.; Karlin, Robert E.; Driscoll, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Millennial-scale shifts in aridity patterns have been documented during the Holocene in the western United States, yet the precise timing, severity, and regional extent of these shifts prompts further study. We present lake sediment core data from Fallen Leaf Lake, a subalpine system at the southern end of the Lake Tahoe basin for which 80% of the contemporary inflow is derived from snowpack delivered by Pacific frontal storm systems. A high quality age model has been constructed using 14C ages on plant macrofossils, 210Pb, and the Tsoyowata tephra datum (7.74-7.95 cal kyr BP). One core captures the transition from the Late Tioga-younger Dryas glaciolacustrine package to laminated opaline clay at 11.48 cal kyr BP. Early Holocene sedimentation rates are relatively high (∼1.9 mm/year) and cooler winter temperatures are inferred by the presence of pebbles interpreted to be transported out into the lake via shore ice. There is a geochemically distinct interval from ∼4.71 to 3.65 cal kyr BP that is interpreted as a late Holocene neopluvial, characterized by depleted δ13C and lower C:N that point to reduced runoff of terrigenous organic matter, increased winter precipitation, and increased algal productivity. The largest Holocene signal in the cores occurs at the end of the neopluvial, at 3.65 cal kyr BP, and marks a shift into a climate state with variable precipitation, yet is overall more arid than the neopluvial. This new climate state persists for ∼3 ka, until the Little Ice Age. Low sedimentation rates (0.5 mm/year), the homogeneous opaline sediment, and steadily increasing contributions of terrestrial vs. algal organic matter in these cores suggest that the lowstand state of Fallen Leaf Lake may have been the norm from 3.65 to 0.55 cal kyr BP, punctuated by short term high precipitation years or multi-year intervals capable of rapid short duration lake level rise. Fallen Leaf Lake is strongly influenced by changes in winter precipitation and temperature

  7. Composition, structure and properties of sediment thermal springs of Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanina, Violetta; Smolyakov, Pavel; Parfenov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    associated with the rise of mixed solutions, formed at the boundary of secondary boil through faults to the surface thermal boiler (Bortnikova et al., 2009). Calculated flow index and plasticity, shows the classification in accordance with GOST 25100-2011. From these figures it is clear that all the sediments are sandy loam and are in a fluid state. A clear relationship between temperature, pH and particle size distribution of sediment thermal springs can not be traced, great importance is the geological evolution of the volcanic activity, hydrogeological conditions and the time factor. Therefore, samples with a currently active Mutnovsky volcano - sandy loam, sediments of the thermal springs Koshelevo fields are often to loams. The bottom sediments of thermal springs from the territory of the Lower Koshelevo thermal field in a natural occurrence in a state of higher yield strength, so they are an unstable surface, which may cause landslides. The bottom sediments of thermal springs are low explored subject of engineering geology, it is important to examine their properties to simulate the conditions of formation and the development of dangerous processes.

  8. Quantum "violation" of Dirichlet boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, I. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Dirichlet boundary conditions have been widely used in general relativity. They seem at odds with the holographic property of gravity simply because a boundary configuration can be varying and dynamic instead of dying out as required by the conditions. In this work we report what should be a tension between the Dirichlet boundary conditions and quantum gravitational effects, and show that a quantum-corrected black hole solution of the 1PI action no longer obeys, in the naive manner one may expect, the Dirichlet boundary conditions imposed at the classical level. We attribute the 'violation' of the Dirichlet boundary conditions to a certain mechanism of the information storage on the boundary.

  9. Quantum violation of Dirichlet boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Dirichlet boundary conditions have been widely used in general relativity. They seem at odds with the holographic property of gravity simply because a boundary configuration can be varying and dynamic instead of dying out as required by the conditions. In this work we report what should be a clash between the Dirichlet boundary conditions and quantum gravitational effects, and show that a quantum corrected solution of the 1PI action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary conditions imposed at the classical level. We attribute the violation of the Dirichlet boundary conditions to a certain mechanism of the information storage on the boundary.

  10. Temporal downscaling of decadal sediment load estimates to a daily interval for use in hindcast simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, N.K.; Knowles, N.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    , corresponding to a reduction in available mining debris. The analogue selection procedure also permits exploration of the morphological hydrograph concept, where a limited set of hydrographs is used to simulate the same bathymetric change as the actual set of hydrographs. The final daily sediment load time-series and morphological hydrograph concept will be applied as landward boundary conditions for hindcasting simulations of bathymetric change in San Francisco Bay.

  11. Boundary monotonicity formulae and applications to free boundary problems I: The elliptic case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg S. Weiss

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We derive a monotonicity formula at boundary points for a class of nonlinear elliptic partial differential equations, including the obstacle problem case, quenching, a free boundary problem with Bernoulli-type free boundary condition as well as the blow-up case. As application model we prove - for Dirichlet boundary data satisfying certain assumptions - the global existence of a classical solution of the free boundary problem with Bernoulli-type free boundary condition in two and three dimensions.

  12. Stability of compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of compressible 2-D and 3-D boundary layers is reviewed. The stability of 2-D compressible flows differs from that of incompressible flows in two important features: There is more than one mode of instability contributing to the growth of disturbances in supersonic laminar boundary layers and the most unstable first mode wave is 3-D. Whereas viscosity has a destabilizing effect on incompressible flows, it is stabilizing for high supersonic Mach numbers. Whereas cooling stabilizes first mode waves, it destabilizes second mode waves. However, second order waves can be stabilized by suction and favorable pressure gradients. The influence of the nonparallelism on the spatial growth rate of disturbances is evaluated. The growth rate depends on the flow variable as well as the distance from the body. Floquet theory is used to investigate the subharmonic secondary instability.

  13. Social Entrepreneurship: Definition and Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Abu-Saifan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available While individuals may be publicly recognized as social entrepreneurs for their contributions to improve the welfare of communities, the field of social entrepreneurship continues to struggle to gain academic legitimacy. Social entrepreneurship is a term in search of a good definition. The current use of the term seems vague and limitless; it needs boundaries to demarcate its function. The lack of a common definition hinders research and raises questions about which social or profit-making activities fall within the spectrum of social entrepreneurship. To become an important stream in the entrepreneurship literature, social entrepreneurship needs to be properly defined and it requires a theoretical framework that links it to the theory of entrepreneurship. This article builds on the literature to define social entrepreneurship, discusses the boundaries of socially-oriented entrepreneurial activities, and positions the social entrepreneur in the spectrum of entrepreneurship.

  14. Hofer's metrics and boundary depth

    CERN Document Server

    Usher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We show that if (M,\\omega) is a closed symplectic manifold which admits a nontrivial Hamiltonian vector field all of whose contractible closed orbits are constant, then Hofer's metric on the group of Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms of (M,\\omega) has infinite diameter, and indeed admits infinite-dimensional quasi-isometrically embedded normed vector spaces. A similar conclusion applies to Hofer's metric on various spaces of Lagrangian submanifolds, including those Hamiltonian-isotopic to the diagonal in M x M when M satisfies the above dynamical condition. To prove this, we use the properties of a Floer-theoretic quantity called the boundary depth, which measures the nontriviality of the boundary operator on the Floer complex in a way that encodes robust symplectic-topological information.

  15. Decoherence induced by fluctuating boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fluctuating boundaries on a superposition state of a quantum particle in a box is studied. We consider a model in one space dimension in which the initial state is a coherent superposition of two energy eigenstates. The locations of the walls of the box are assumed to undergo small fluctuation with a Gaussian probability distribution. The spatial probability density of the particle contains an interference term, which is found to decay in time due to the boundary fluctuations. At late times, this term vanishes and the quantum coherence is lost. The system is now described by a density matrix rather than a pure quantum state.This model gives a simple illustration of how environment-induced decoherence can take place in quantum systems. It can also serve as an analog model for the effects of spacetime geometry fluctuations on quantum systems.

  16. How Firms Make Boundary Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobrajska, Magdalena; Billinger, Stephan; Becker, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report findings from an analysis of 234 firm boundary decisions that a manufacturing firm has made during a 10 year period. Extensive interviews with all major decision makers located both at the headquarters and subsidiaries allow us to examine (a) who was involved in each boundary decision......, and (b) how the firm arrived at a particular transactional choice in each decision. We find that decision makers extensively adapt decision structures in order to effectively make governance mode choices. They adapt hierarchy span, i.e. the number of hierarchical levels involved, and expertise span, i.......e. the number of same-level decision makers with dissimilar knowledge basis. We observe that decision makers heavily rely on varying hierarchy and expertise span in order to improve the quality of the decision outcome. Central to the adaption of decision structures is that decision makers, over time...

  17. Nucleation of small angle boundaries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available -ANGLE BOUNDARIES F.R.N. Nabarro Condensed Matter Physics Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, Johannesburg, and Division of Materials Science and Technology, CSIR, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria, South... with eq. 11. Acknowledgment F.R.N. Nabarro is grateful to the University of Virginia for hospitality during the course of this work. D. Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf thanks the National Science Foundation, (Surface Engineering...

  18. Topological expansion and boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we compute the topological expansion of all possible mixed-traces in a hermitian two matrix model. In other words we give a recipe to compute the number of discrete surfaces of given genus, carrying an Ising model, and with all possible given boundary conditions. The method is recursive, and amounts to recursively cutting surfaces along interfaces. The result is best represented in a diagrammatic way, and is thus rather simple to use.

  19. Transition in hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanhong; Zhu, Yiding; Chen, Xi; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second-mode instability is a key modulator of the transition process. Although the second-mode is primarily an acoustic wave, it causes the formation of high-frequency vortical waves, which triggers a fast transition to turbulence.

  20. Transition in hypersonic boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhong Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second-mode instability is a key modulator of the transition process. Although the second-mode is primarily an acoustic wave, it causes the formation of high-frequency vortical waves, which triggers a fast transition to turbulence.

  1. Integrated monitoring approach to investigate the contamination, mobilization and risks of sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölscher, Jens; Schulte, Achim; Terytze, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    The use of surface water bodies for manufacturing purposes has been common not only in Germany since the beginning of industrialization, and this has led to a high accumulation of different chemical contaminants in the sediments of aquatic ecosystems. In particular, water bodies with very low flow conditions like the "Rummelsburger See", an anabranch of the Spree River located in the centre of Berlin, have been highly affected. Given that, it has become necessary to obtain improved knowledge concerning the current sediment dynamics, the rate of sedimentation and the current level of contamination and toxicity compared to earlier conditions. Against this background, a survey was set up, consisting of an integrated monitoring approach that focuses on hydraulics, sediment dynamics and contamination, including boundary conditions, such as weather and motor-boat activities to find information, which would help design appropriate treatment in the future. To detect the spatial distribution of pollutants in the sediment, over 200 sediment samples were collected via drill cores at 16 locations. The upper 15 cm of each drill core was systematically divided into 5 layers (each of 3 cm) for separate examination. The investigation of sediment deposition and remobilisation rates was accomplished by installing 18 sediment traps. The presence of selected heavy metals and organic pollutants in the sediments was determined for every sampling location and layer of the drill cores, as well as for all sediment traps. Changes in boundary conditions which influence the spatial and temporal distribution of deposition and resuspension were monitored by placing devices within the water body and taking different mobile measurements (3-D flow conditions, oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll-a, temperature). The analysis of sediment and suspended matter included the determination of the total content of inorganic (Hg, Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn) and organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  2. Borders, boundaries and desirable wishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Pinciaroli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available “Borders, boundaries and desirable wishes” is the title of the residential workshop offered to a group of young adults (aged 18-25 of the Centro di Salute Mentale (Mental Health Center of the DSM Basaglia of ASL TO2 in Turin. The idea of the workshop, the definition of the objectives and the topics, which are clearly expressed in the title, come from the work of the team dedicated to group psychotherapies, which has been offering group psychodrama sessions to young adults of this age since 2008. In the delicate move to the adult age, these young adults are lost and stuck in static realities where it is not possible to open up to the dimension of desire nor to the transforming encounter with the Other, since they didn’t have the experience of boundaries and lack. These two elements are necessary to acquire the ability to make projects for oneself. During the workshop the following instruments were used: group, psychodrama and art therapy. The group, as a paternal function, ensured the presence of safe boundaries enabling individuals to experiment; psychodrama and art therapy enabled the bodies to experience encounters and transformations, using doing as a metaphor for the movement against the inhibition of doing and as a way to show oneself to the Other and be able to see the Other. 

  3. Gravitational action with null boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Luis; Myers, Robert C.; Poisson, Eric; Sorkin, Rafael D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a complete discussion of the boundary term in the action functional of general relativity when the boundary includes null segments in addition to the more usual timelike and spacelike segments. We confirm that ambiguities appear in the contribution from a null segment, because it depends on an arbitrary choice of parametrization for the generators. We also show that similar ambiguities appear in the contribution from a codimension-two surface at which a null segment is joined to another (spacelike, timelike, or null) segment. The parametrization ambiguity can be tamed by insisting that the null generators be affinely parametrized; this forces each null contribution to the boundary action to vanish, but leaves intact the fredom to rescale the affine parameter by a constant factor on each generator. Once a choice of parametrization is made, the ambiguity in the joint contributions can be eliminated by formulating well-motivated rules that ensure the additivity of the gravitational action. Enforcing these rules, we calculate the time rate of change of the action when it is evaluated for a so-called "Wheeler-DeWitt patch" of a black hole in asymptotically anti de Sitter space. We recover a number of results cited in the literature, obtained with a less complete analysis.

  4. Microscopic filter feeders near boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Rachel; Roper, Marcus; Ryu, Sangjin; Matsudiara, Paul; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    We show through calculations, simulations, and experiments that the eddies often observed near sessile filter feeders are due to the presence of nearby boundaries. We model the common filter feeder Vorticella, which is approx 50 μm across and which feeds by removing bacteria from ocean or pond water that it draws towards itself. We use an analytic stokeslet model and a Brinkman flow approximation with the organism modeled as a cylinder with two different boundary conditions to predict the size of the eddy caused by two parallel no-slip boundaries that represent the slides between which experimental observations are often made. We also use three-dimensional finite-element simulations to fully solve for the flow around a model Vorticella. Additionally, we track particles around live feeding Vorticella in order to determine the experimental flow field. Our models are in good agreement both with each other and with the experiments. We also show through calculations that filter feeders such as Vorticella can greatly enhance their nutrient uptake by feeding at an angle rather than perpendicular to a substrate.

  5. Boundary determinations for trivariate solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchaineau, M; Joy, K I

    1999-05-14

    The trivariate tensor-product B-spline solid is a direct extension of the B-spline patch and has been shown to be useful in the creation and visualization of free-form geometric solids. Visualizing these solid objects requires the determination of the boundary surface of the solid, which is a combination of parametric and implicit surfaces. This paper presents a method that determines the implicit boundary surface by examination of the Jacobian determinant of the defining B-spline function. Using an approximation to this determinant, the domain space is adaptively subdivided until a mesh can be determined such that the boundary surface is close to linear in the cells of the mesh. A variation of the marching cubes algorithm is then used to draw the surface. Interval approximation techniques are used to approximate the Jacobian determinant and to approximate the Jacobian determinant gradient for use in the adaptive subdivision methods. This technique can be used to create free-form solid objects, useful in geometric modeling applications.

  6. Holographic duals of Boundary CFTs

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Gutperle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    New families of regular half-BPS solutions to 6-dimensional Type 4b supergravity with $m$ tensor multiplets are constructed exactly. Their space-time consists of $AdS_2 \\times S^2$ warped over a Riemann surface with an arbitrary number of boundary components, and arbitrary genus. The solutions have an arbitrary number of asymptotic $AdS_3 \\times S^3$ regions. In addition to strictly single-valued solutions to the supergravity equations whose scalars live in the coset $SO(5,m)/SO(5)\\times SO(m)$, we also construct stringy solutions whose scalar fields are single-valued up to transformations under the $U$-duality group $SO(5,m;\\bZ)$, and live in the coset $SO(5,m;\\bZ)\\backslash SO(5,m)/SO(5)\\times SO(m)$. We argue that these Type 4b solutions are holographically dual to general classes of interface and boundary CFTs arising at the juncture of the end-points of 1+1-dimensional bulk CFTs. We evaluate their corresponding holographic entanglement and boundary entropy, and discuss their brane interpretation. We conj...

  7. Event boundaries and memory improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Kyle A; Thompson, Alexis N; Tamplin, Andrea K; Krawietz, Sabine A; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-03-01

    The structure of events can influence later memory for information that is embedded in them, with evidence indicating that event boundaries can both impair and enhance memory. The current study explored whether the presence of event boundaries during encoding can structure information to improve memory. In Experiment 1, memory for a list of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated by having participants walk through a doorway, or not, halfway through the word list. In Experiment 2, memory for lists of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated using computer windows. Finally, in Experiments 3 and 4, event structure was manipulated by having event shifts described in narrative texts. The consistent finding across all of these methods and materials was that memory was better when the information was distributed across two events rather than combined into a single event. Moreover, Experiment 4 demonstrated that increasing the number of event boundaries from one to two increased the memory benefit. These results are interpreted in the context of the Event Horizon Model of event cognition.

  8. Morality and boundaries in Paul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Jan Lietaert Peerbolte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Pauline communities, ethics, ethos and identity were closely intertwined. This essay analyses the way in which Paul emphasised the mental boundaries of the Christ communities to turn them into moral boundaries. In this process, the fencing off of these communities over against their past and their present was a fundamental feature of Paul’s reasoning. The communities thus became fenced off from their past, because the Christ event was seen as causing a major change in history. This change affected both Gentile and Jewish believers. At the same time, Paul stressed the boundaries with the outside world: he characterised the inside world as the loyal remnant of Israel, consisting of Jews and Gentiles alike, and pointed out that this group is the group of the elect ‘saints’. The perspective with which Paul looked at ethics and morality inside this group was strongly coloured by the assumed identity of this group as ‘Israel’. Even though the Mosaic Law was no longer the focal point for the identity of this eschatological Israel, the ethical demands Paul mentioned over against the members of this new Israel were highly influenced by the morality of the law. For Paul, sanctification was a fundamental ideal, and this ideal reflected the spirituality of the Holiness Code of Leviticus. This particular ethical model was framed by the awareness that Paul (and Christ before him was ‘sent’ by God, much in the same way the prophets of Israel themselves had been sent.

  9. Compact difference approximation with consistent boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dexun; MA Yanwen; LI Xinliang; LIU Mingyu

    2003-01-01

    For simulating multi-scale complex flow fields it should be noted that all the physical quantities we are interested in must be simulated well. With limitation of the computer resources it is preferred to use high order accurate difference schemes. Because of their high accuracy and small stencil of grid points computational fluid dynamics (CFD) workers pay more attention to compact schemes recently. For simulating the complex flow fields the treatment of boundary conditions at the far field boundary points and near far field boundary points is very important. According to authors' experience and published results some aspects of boundary condition treatment for far field boundary are presented, and the emphasis is on treatment of boundary conditions for the upwind compact schemes. The consistent treatment of boundary conditions at the near boundary points is also discussed. At the end of the paper are given some numerical examples. The computed results with presented method are satisfactory.

  10. Boundary Spanners as supports of social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Boundary Spanners are important agenets of supporting the capacity building of local neighbourhoods and of sustainable social captial the article focuses on the skills and competnces adn role of Boundary Spanners....

  11. Boundary of the State of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This coverage contains polygons representing the Iowa Boundary, it was derived from a coverage of county boundaries, called COUNTIES, of the state of Iowa. COUNTIES...

  12. Sage-grouse Conservation Assessment Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Boundary of the conservation assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and sagebrush habitat conducted by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. The boundary...

  13. Boundary value problems and Markov processes

    CERN Document Server

    Taira, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    This volume is devoted to a thorough and accessible exposition on the functional analytic approach to the problem of construction of Markov processes with Ventcel' boundary conditions in probability theory. Analytically, a Markovian particle in a domain of Euclidean space is governed by an integro-differential operator, called a Waldenfels operator, in the interior of the domain, and it obeys a boundary condition, called the Ventcel' boundary condition, on the boundary of the domain. Probabilistically, a Markovian particle moves both by jumps and continuously in the state space and it obeys the Ventcel' boundary condition, which consists of six terms corresponding to the diffusion along the boundary, the absorption phenomenon, the reflection phenomenon, the sticking (or viscosity) phenomenon, the jump phenomenon on the boundary, and the inward jump phenomenon from the boundary. In particular, second-order elliptic differential operators are called diffusion operators and describe analytically strong Markov pr...

  14. Boundary Value Problems and Approximate Solutions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tadesse

    boundary value problems suggested by nonlinear diffusion process. .... According to VIM, a correction functional could be written as follows: (5.4) ... The Variational Iteration Method is remarkably effective for solving boundary value problems.

  15. Determination of grain boundary geometry using TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, H.; Farkas, D. (Department of Materials Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061-0237 (United States)); De Hosson, J.T.M. (Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 18, 9747 AG, Groningen (Netherlands))

    1992-07-01

    An experimental method to obtain the grain boundary geometry using the transmission electron microscope is presented. The method allows {Sigma} determination including grain boundary plane orientation. In order to determine the specialness of the grain boundary, three different criteria for maximum allowable deviations from exact CSL misorientations were examined. We tested these three criteria from a statistical distribution of grain boundary types in terms of {Sigma}. We compared grain boundary distributions from other studies in Ni{sub 3}Al and found discrepancies among them. It seems that the discrepancy came from the different criteria for special boundaries in {Sigma} determination and different experimental procedures they used. The statistical distribution of grain boundary plane orientations showed that low {Sigma} boundaries ({Sigma}{lt}11) were oriented to the plane of high density of coincident sites.

  16. Cal State Park Boundaries 2011/2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a GIS version of California State Park (CSP) operational boundaries and does not represent official property boundary determinations. This GIS version is...

  17. Practical boundary surveying legal and technical principles

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This guide to boundary surveying provides landowners, land surveyors, students and others with the necessary foundation to understand boundary surveying techniques and the common legal issues that govern boundary establishment.  Boundary surveying is sometimes mistakenly considered a strictly technical discipline with simple and straightforward technical solutions.  In reality, boundary establishment is often a difficult and complex matter, requiring years of experience and a thorough understanding of boundary law.  This book helps readers to understand the challenges often encountered by boundary surveyors and some of the available solutions. Using only simple and logically explained mathematics, the principles and practice of boundary surveying are demystified for those without prior experience, and the focused coverage of pivotal issues such as easements and setting lot corners will aid even licensed practitioners in untangling thorny cases. Practical advice on using both basic and advanced instruments ...

  18. River sediment supply, sedimentation and transport of the highly turbid sediment plume in Malindi Bay, Kenya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JOHNSON U.Kitheka

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of a study on the sediment supply and movement of highly turbid sediment plume within Malindi Bay in the Northern region of the Kenya coast.The current velocities,tidal elevation,salinity and suspended sediment concentrations (TSSC)were measured in stations located within the bay using Aanderaa Recording Current Meter (RCM-9),Turbidity Sensor mounted on RCM-9,Divers Gauges and Aanderaa Temperature-Salinity Meter.The study established that Malindi Bay receives a high terrigenous sediment load amounting to 5.7 × 106 ton·yr-1.The river freshwater supply into the bay is highly variable ranging from 7 to 680 m3·s-1.The high flows that are > 150 m3·s-1 occurred in May during the South East Monsoon (SEM).Relatively low peak flows occurred in November during the North East Monsoon (NEM) but these were usually <70 m3·s-1.The discharge of highly turbidity river water into the bay in April and May occurs in a period of high intensity SEM winds that generate strong north flowing current that transports the river sediment plume northward.However,during the NEM,the river supply of turbid water is relatively low occurring in a period of relatively low intensity NEM winds that result in relatively weaker south flowing current that transports the sediment plume southward.The mechanism of advection of the sediment plume north or south of the estuary is mainly thought to be due to the Ekman transport generated by the onshore monsoon winds.Limited movement of the river sediment plume southward towards Ras Vasco Da Gama during NEM has ensured that the coral reef ecosystem in the northern parts of Malindi Marine National Park has not been completely destroyed by the influx of terrigenous sediments.However,to the north there is no coral reef ecosystem.The high sediment discharge into Malindi Bay can be attributed to land use change in the Athi-Sabaki River Basin in addition to rapid population increase which has led to clearance of forests to open land

  19. Experimental and numerical modelling of sedimentation in a rectangular shallow basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation of flows in shallow reservoirs has to be checked for its consistency in predicting real flow conditions and sedimentation patterns. Typical flow patterns may exhibit flow separation at the inlet, accompanied by several recirculation and stagnation areas all over the reservoir surface. The aim of the present research project is to study the influence of the geometry of a reservoir on sediment transport and deposition numerically and experimentally, focusing on a prototype reservoir depth between 5 and 15 m as well as suspended sediment transport.A series of numerical simulations is presented and compared with scaled laboratory experiments, with the objective of testing the sensitivity to different flow and sediment parameters and different turbulence closure schemes. Different scenarios are analyzed and a detailed comparison of preliminary laboratory tests and some selected simulations are presented.The laboratory experiments show that suspended sediment transport and deposition are determined by the initial flow pattern and by the upstream and downstream boundary conditions. In the experiments, deposition in the rectangular basin systematically developed along the left bank, although inflow and outflow were positioned symmetrically along the centre of the basin. Three major horizontal eddies developed influencing the sediment deposition pattern. Although asymmetric flow patterns are privileged, a symmetric pattern can appear from time to time.This particular behaviour could also be reproduced by a two-dimensional depth-averaged flow and sediment transport model (CCHE2D). The paper presents numerical simulations using different turbulence closure schemes (k-e and eddy viscosity models). In spite of the symmetric setup, these generally produced an asymmetric flow pattern that can easily switch sides depending on the assumptions made for the initial and boundary conditions. When using the laboratory experiment as a reference, the most reliable

  20. Investigations of grain size dependent sediment transport phenomena on multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Sediment transport processes in coastal and fluvial environments resulting from disturbances such as urbanization, mining, agriculture, military operations, and climatic change have significant impact on local, regional, and global environments. Primarily, these impacts include the erosion and deposition of sediment, channel network modification, reduction in downstream water quality, and the delivery of chemical contaminants. The scale and spatial distribution of these effects are largely attributable to the size distribution of the sediment grains that become eligible for transport. An improved understanding of advective and diffusive grain-size dependent sediment transport phenomena will lead to the development of more accurate predictive models and more effective control measures. To this end, three studies were performed that investigated grain-size dependent sediment transport on three different scales. Discrete particle computer simulations of sheet flow bedload transport on the scale of 0.1--100 millimeters were performed on a heterogeneous population of grains of various grain sizes. The relative transport rates and diffusivities of grains under both oscillatory and uniform, steady flow conditions were quantified. These findings suggest that boundary layer formalisms should describe surface roughness through a representative grain size that is functionally dependent on the applied flow parameters. On the scale of 1--10m, experiments were performed to quantify the hydrodynamics and sediment capture efficiency of various baffles installed in a sediment retention pond, a commonly used sedimentation control measure in watershed applications. Analysis indicates that an optimum sediment capture effectiveness may be achieved based on baffle permeability, pond geometry and flow rate. Finally, on the scale of 10--1,000m, a distributed, bivariate watershed terain evolution module was developed within GRASS GIS. Simulation results for variable grain sizes and for