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Sample records for dry regenerable sorbents

  1. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-09-30

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

    2001-01-01

    Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

  5. Regenerable solid imine sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

    2013-09-10

    Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

  6. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  7. Regenerable sorbent technique for capturing CO.sub.2 using immobilized amine sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennline, Henry W; Hoffman, James S; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Resnik, Kevin P

    2013-08-06

    The disclosure provides a CO.sub.2 absorption method using an amine-based solid sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from a gas stream. The method disclosed mitigates the impact of water loading on regeneration by utilizing a conditioner following the steam regeneration process, providing for a water loading on the amine-based solid sorbent following CO.sub.2 absorption substantially equivalent to the moisture loading of the regeneration process. This assists in optimizing the CO.sub.2 removal capacity of the amine-based solid sorbent for a given absorption and regeneration reactor size. Management of the water loading in this manner allows regeneration reactor operation with significant mitigation of energy losses incurred by the necessary desorption of adsorbed water.

  8. Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium-sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient SO{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined. During this quarter sulfidation tests were conducted in a quartz fluidized-bed reactor in which the selected calcium-based sorbents were first calcined and then were reacted with hydrogen sulfide at ambient pressure and 1650{degree}F. These tests were conducted with each sorbent in two particle sizes. Chemical analyses of the partially sulfided sorbents indicate that the extent of sulfidation was in the range of 40--50%. The partially sulfided material will be reacted with oxygen to determine the effects of temperature and SO{sub 2} partial pressure on the stabilization of the calcium sulfide in solid waste materials. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Adsorption and Ultrasound-Assisted Sorbent Regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuhe Wang; Liping Ma; Ralph T. Yang

    2006-09-30

    This work was conducted for the department of Energy. In this work, we developed a class of new sorbents that were highly sulfur selective and had high sulfur capacities. The study consisted of two sections. Development of the new sorbents is described in Section 1, and Section was a fundamental study, conducted for a better understanding for desulfurization of jet fuels. More details of the results are given blow separately for the two sections.

  10. Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

    2002-09-19

    Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

  11. ZnO-based regenerable sulfur sorbents for fluid-bed/transport reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, Rachid B.; Abbasian, Javad; Williams, Brett E.

    2004-09-21

    A method for producing regenerable sulfur sorbents in which a support material precursor is mixed with isopropanol and a first portion of deionized water at an elevated temperature to form a sol mixture. A metal oxide precursor comprising a metal suitable for use as a sulfur sorbent is dissolved in a second portion of deionized water, forming a metal salt solution. The metal salt solution and the sol mixture are mixed with a sol peptizing agent while heating and stirring, resulting in formation of a peptized sol mixture. The metal oxide precursor is dispersed substantially throughout the peptized sol mixture, which is then dried, forming a dry peptized sol mixture. The dry peptized sol mixture is then calcined and the resulting calcined material is then converted to particles.

  12. Regenerable copper-based sorbents for high temperature flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz, P.; Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Williams, B.E.; Khalili, N.R.; Ho, K.K.

    2000-07-01

    During conventional combustion process the sulfur in the coal is converted to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). This hazardous air pollutant combines with the moisture in the atmosphere and creates what is commonly known as acid rain. Thus the removal of this pollutant from flue gas prior to its discharge is very important. Government regulations have been introduced and have become progressively more stringent. In the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, for example, legislation was introduced requiring electric utilities to adopt available technology for removal of pollutant gases and particulates from coal combustion flue gases so that the increased use of coal is done in an environmentally acceptable manner. A number of processes have been developed for flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The moving bed copper oxide process has been regarded as one of the most promising emerging technologies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal from flue gases at elevated temperatures. This process is based on the utilization of a dry, regenerable sorbent, that consists of copper oxide (CuO) supported on gamma alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), in a cross flow moving-bed reactor. This study has been directed toward evaluation of the commercially available alumina-supported copper-based (ALCOA) sorbent to establish the baseline for development of new and improved sorbents for the copper oxide process. Evaluation of the baseline sorbent included determination of effective sulfur capacity and sulfur removal efficiency of the sorbent, the effects of operating parameters on the performance of the sorbent, as well as long term durability of the sorbent. Physical and chemical properties of the baseline sorbent were also determined.

  13. Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium-sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient SO{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined. During this quarter sulfidation tests were conducted in a quartz fluidized-bed reactor in which the selected calcium-based sorbents were first calcined and then were reacted with hydrogen sulfide at ambient pressure and 1650{degree}F. These tests were conducted with each sorbent in two particle sizes. Chemical analyses of the partially sulfided sorbents indicate that the extent of sulfidation was in the range of 40--50%. The partially sulfided material will be reacted with oxygen to determine the effects of temperature and SO{sub 2} partial pressure on the stabilization of the calcium sulfide in solid waste materials. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient S0{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water using the SSRP to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined.

  15. Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO, partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium-sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient S0{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined.

  16. Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Injection Technology for Pre-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Carl [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Steen, William [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Triana, Eugenio [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Machalek, Thomas [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Davila, Jenny [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Schmit, Claire [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Wang, Andrew [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Temple, Brian [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Lu, Yongqi [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Lu, Hong [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Zhang, Luzheng [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Ruhter, David [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Sayyah, Maryam [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Ito, Brandon [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Suslick, Kenneth [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document summarizes the work performed on Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0000465, “Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture,” during the period of performance of January 1, 2010 through September 30, 2013. This project involves the development of a novel technology that combines a dry sorbent-based carbon capture process with the water-gas-shift reaction for separating CO{sub 2} from syngas. The project objectives were to model, develop, synthesize and screen sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture from gasified coal streams. The project was funded by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory with URS as the prime contractor. Illinois Clean Coal Institute and The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign were project co-funders. The objectives of this project were to identify and evaluate sorbent materials and concepts that were suitable for capturing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from warm/hot water-gas-shift (WGS) systems under conditions that minimize energy penalties and provide continuous gas flow to advanced synthesis gas combustion and processing systems. Objectives included identifying and evaluating sorbents that efficiently capture CO{sub 2} from a gas stream containing CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at temperatures as high as 650 °C and pressures of 400-600 psi. After capturing the CO{sub 2}, the sorbents would ideally be regenerated using steam, or other condensable purge vapors. Results from the adsorption and regeneration testing were used to determine an optimal design scheme for a sorbent enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) process and evaluate the technical and economic viability of the dry sorbent approach for CO{sub 2} capture. Project work included computational modeling, which was performed to identify key sorbent properties for the SEWGS process. Thermodynamic modeling was used to identify optimal physical properties for sorbents and helped down-select from the universe of possible sorbent

  17. Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Injection Technology for Pre-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Carl [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Steen, William [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Triana, Eugenio [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Machalek, Thomas [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Davila, Jenny [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Schmit, Claire [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Wang, Andrew [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Temple, Brian [URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Lu, Yongqi [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Lu, Hong [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Zhang, Luzheng [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Ruhter, David [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Sayyah, Maryam [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Ito, Brandon [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Suslick, Kenneth [Illinois State Geological Survey - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document summarizes the work performed on Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0000465, “Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture,” during the period of performance of January 1, 2010 through September 30, 2013. This project involves the development of a novel technology that combines a dry sorbent-based carbon capture process with the water-gas-shift reaction for separating CO{sub 2} from syngas. The project objectives were to model, develop, synthesize and screen sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture from gasified coal streams. The project was funded by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory with URS as the prime contractor. Illinois Clean Coal Institute and The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign were project co-funders. The objectives of this project were to identify and evaluate sorbent materials and concepts that were suitable for capturing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from warm/hot water-gas-shift (WGS) systems under conditions that minimize energy penalties and provide continuous gas flow to advanced synthesis gas combustion and processing systems. Objectives included identifying and evaluating sorbents that efficiently capture CO{sub 2} from a gas stream containing CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at temperatures as high as 650 °C and pressures of 400-600 psi. After capturing the CO{sub 2}, the sorbents would ideally be regenerated using steam, or other condensable purge vapors. Results from the adsorption and regeneration testing were used to determine an optimal design scheme for a sorbent enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) process and evaluate the technical and economic viability of the dry sorbent approach for CO{sub 2} capture. Project work included computational modeling, which was performed to identify key sorbent properties for the SEWGS process. Thermodynamic modeling was used to identify optimal physical properties for sorbents and helped down-select from the universe of possible sorbent

  18. High Temperature Flue Gas Desulfurization In Moving Beds With Regenerable Copper Based Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz, P.A.; Ho, K.K.; Abbasian, J.; Lau, F.S.

    2002-09-20

    The objective of this study was to develop new and improved regenerable copper based sorbent for high temperature flue gas desulfurization in a moving bed application. The targeted areas of sorbent improvement included higher effective capacity, strength and long-term durability for improved process control and economic utilization of the sorbent.

  19. 21 CFR 876.5600 - Sorbent regenerated dialysate delivery system for hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hemodialysis. 876.5600 Section 876.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....5600 Sorbent regenerated dialysate delivery system for hemodialysis. (a) Identification. A sorbent regenerated dialysate delivery system for hemodialysis is a device that is part of an artificial kidney...

  20. New ZnO-Based Regenerable Sulfur Sorbents for Fluid-Bed/Transport Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Abbasian, J.; Ho, K.H.

    2002-09-19

    The overall objective of the ongoing sorbent development work at GTI is the advancement to the demonstration stage of a promising ZnO-TiO2 sulfur sorbent that has been developed under DCCA/ICCI and DOE/NETL sponsorship. This regenerable sorbent has been shown to possess an exceptional combination of excellent chemical reactivity, high effective capacity for sulfur absorption, high resistance to attrition, and regenerability at temperatures lower than required by typical zinc titanates.

  1. Development of regenerable sorbents for the Copper Oxide Bed Regenerable Absorber (COBRA) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Carty, R.H. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

    1999-07-01

    In the clean air act amendments (CAAA) of 1990, legislation was introduced requiring electric utilities to adopt available technology for removal of pollutant gases (mainly SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and particulates from coal combustion flue gases so that the increased use of coal is done in an environmentally acceptable manner. The copper oxide process has been selected as one of the most promising emerging technologies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal from flue gases in the Combustion 2000 program of the U.S. Department of Energy. In particular, the development of the Copper Oxide Bed Regenerable Absorber (COBRA) process, which is based on moving-bed cross-flow reactor design for the combined removal of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates, has been pursued in conjunction with the use of Illinois coal. This ongoing study has been directed towards the evaluation of the ALCOA copper oxide sorbent currently being utilized in the demonstration of the COBRA process, to identify areas of improvement, and to develop and implement a strategy for preparing improved sorbents. The targeted areas of sorbent improvement include higher reactivity, higher theoretical sulfur capacity, lower regeneration temperature, and better attrition resistance. In this paper, the results obtained to-date from tests carried out for the evaluation of the commercial sorbent for SO2 removal from simulated flue gases, its regenerability, and its effectiveness with repeated use are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  2. Co-Adsorption of Ammonia and Formaldehyde on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique S.

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of a reversible carbon sorbent for trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is deemed non-regenerable, while the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. Data on concurrent sorption and desorption of ammonia and formaldehyde, which are major TCs of concern, are presented in this paper. A carbon sorbent was fabricated by dry impregnation of a reticulated carbon-foam support with polyvinylidene chloride, followed by carbonization and thermal oxidation in air. Sorbent performance was tested for ammonia and formaldehyde sorption and vacuum regeneration, with and without water present in the gas stream. It was found that humidity in the gas phase enhanced ammonia-sorption capacity by a factor larger than two. Co-adsorption of ammonia and formaldehyde in the presence of water resulted in strong formaldehyde sorption (to the point that it was difficult to saturate the sorbent on the time scales used in this study). In the absence of humidity, adsorption of formaldehyde on the carbon surface was found to impair ammonia sorption in subsequent runs; in the presence of water, however, both ammonia and formaldehyde could be efficiently removed from the gas phase by the sorbent. The efficiency of vacuum regeneration could be enhanced by gentle heating to temperatures below 60 deg.

  3. Alkali-Alumina Sorbents for Regenerable SO_2 Removal in Fluidized-Coal Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Gavalas, George R.; Weston, Theresa A.; Stephanopoulos, Maria F.

    1985-01-01

    Sodium and sodium-lithium oxides supported on porous alumina have been investigated as regenerable SO_2 sorbents for fluidized coal combustion. In adsorption the oxides are converted to sulfates. In regeneration, carried out by reduction with CO, the sulfates are converted back to oxides while sulfur is removed in elemental form (S_2), SO_2 and COS. The transient composition of sorbent and gaseous products was measured in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a packed-bed microreactor in order to ...

  4. Regenerable sorbents for mercury capture in simulated coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Jorge; López-Antón, M Antonia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; García, Roberto; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2013-09-15

    This work demonstrates that regenerable sorbents containing nano-particles of gold dispersed on an activated carbon are efficient and long-life materials for capturing mercury species from coal combustion flue gases. These sorbents can be used in such a way that the high investment entailed in their preparation will be compensated for by the recovery of all valuable materials. The characteristics of the support and dispersion of gold in the carbon surface influence the efficiency and lifetime of the sorbents. The main factor that determines the retention of mercury and the regeneration of the sorbent is the presence of reactive gases that enhance mercury retention capacity. The capture of mercury is a consequence of two mechanisms: (i) the retention of elemental mercury by amalgamation with gold and (ii) the retention of oxidized mercury on the activated carbon support. These sorbents were specifically designed for retaining the mercury remaining in gas phase after the desulfurization units in coal power plants.

  5. Development of regenerable copper-based sorbents for hot gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Hill, A.H. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Honea, F.I. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The implementation of hot gas cleanup systems heavily depends on the development of regenerable sorbents for removal of sulfur-containing species (mainly H{sub 2}S) from the fuel gas stream at elevated temperatures (i.e., >350 C) from levels of several thousand ppm down to a few ppm, over many sulfidation/regeneration cycles. In addition, these sorbents must have high sulfur capacity, good sulfidation kinetics, good mechanical strength, and good chemical and structural stability over multicycle testing. Zinc-based sorbents, such as zinc titanates, are the leading contenders for hot gas desulfurization. However, these sorbents have been shown to suffer from zinc volatilization at elevated temperatures, resulting in sorbent deterioration and losses through attrition, loss of reactivity, leading to increasing sorbent replacement costs and overall cost of electricity. Copper-based sorbents do not suffer from volatilization problems due to the high melting point of the metal. However, bulk copper oxide is easily reduced to elemental copper in a reducing fuel gas environment, which in turn results in insufficient level of desulfurization. Fortunately, the sorbent desulfurization performance can be greatly enhanced by combining copper oxide with other oxides to minimize or prevent sorbent reduction during the sulfidation stage. This paper reports on research conducted to-date on the development of copper-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. The results of packed-bed experiments carried out for the determination of optimum operating conditions and for the evaluation of the long-term durability and regenerability of selected copper chromite sorbents are presented and discussed.

  6. Performance analysis of K-based KEP-CO2P1 solid sorbents in a bench-scale continuous dry-sorbent CO{sub 2} capture process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Cheol; Jo, Sung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Yong; Moon, Jong-Ho; Yi, Chang-Keun [Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chong Kul; Lee, Joong Beom [Korea Electric Power Corporation Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) and Korea Electric Power Corporation Research Institute (KEPCORI) have been developing a CO{sub 2} capture technology using dry sorbents. In this study, KEP-CO2P1, a potassium-based dry sorbent manufactured by a spray-drying method, was used. We employed a bench-scale dry-sorbent CO{sub 2} capture fluidized-bed process capable of capturing 0.5 ton CO{sub 2}/day at most. We investigated the sorbent performance in continuous operation mode with solid circulation between a fast fluidized-bed-type carbonator and a bubbling fluidizedbed- type regenerator. We used a slip stream of a real flue gas from 2MWe coal-fired circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) power facilities installed at KIER. Throughout more than 50 hours of continuous operation, the temperature of the carbonator was maintained around 70-80 .deg. C using a jacket-type heat exchanger, while that of the regenerator was kept above 180 .deg. C using an electric furnace. The differential pressure of both the carbonator and regenerator was maintained at a stable level. The maximum CO{sub 2} removal was greater than 90%, and the average CO{sub 2} removal was about 83% during 50 hours of continuous operation.

  7. A regenerable copper-based sorbent for H{sub 2}S removal from coal gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This paper reports on research conducted for the development of copper-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization applications in the temperature range of 550-650{degree}C. A thermodynamic analysis is given to rationalize the selection of chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and its potential superiority to alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), for the stabilization of copper oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) against complete reduction to elemental copper (Cu) upon exposure to a fuel gas in the indicated temperature range. The results of packed-bed experiments carried out for the determination of optimum operating conditions as well as the evaluation of the long-term durability and regenerability of a selected copper chromite sorbent was presented and discussed. The regenerable copper chromite sorbent developed, designated as CuCr-29, is capable of achieving less than 5 ppmv H{sub 2}S concentration in the cleaned fuel gas. The optimum desulfurization temperature in terms of sorbent efficiency (terminal H{sub 2}S levels in the cleaned fuel gas) and utilization (sulfur capacity at breakthrough or effective capacity) for this sorbent is determined to be about 600{degree}C. Sorbent regeneration with a dilute O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} gas mixture at 750{degree}C ensured complete conversion of the copper sulfide to oxide without sulfate formation or reactivity deterioration in subsequent cycles.

  8. Tail-end Hg capture on Au/carbon-monolith regenerable sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, M Teresa; Ballestero, Diego; Juan, Roberto; García-Díez, Enrique; Rubio, Begoña; Ruiz, Carmen; Pino, M Rosa

    2011-10-15

    In this work, a regenerable sorbent for Hg retention based on carbon supported Au nanoparticles has been developed and tested. Honeycomb structures were chosen in order to avoid pressure drop and particle entrainment in a fixed bed. Carbon-based supports were selected in order to easily modify the surface chemistry to favour the Au dispersion. Results of Hg retention and regeneration were obtained in a bench scale experimental installation working at high space velocities (for sorbent, 53,000 h(-1); for active phase, 2.6 × 10(8) h(-1)), 120 °C for retention temperature and Hg inlet concentration of 23 ppbv. Gold nanoparticles were shown to be the active phase for mercury capture through an amalgamating mechanism. The mercury captured by the spent sorbent can be easily released to be disposed or reused. Mercury evolution from spent sorbents was followed by TPD experiments showing that the sorbent can be regenerated at temperatures as low as 220 °C.

  9. Novel regenerable sorbent based on Zr-Mn binary metal oxides for flue gas mercury retention and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangkun; Qu, Zan; Yan, Naiqiang; Yang, Shijian; Chen, Wanmiao; Hu, Lingang; Huang, Wenjun; Liu, Ping

    2013-10-15

    To capture and recover mercury from coal-fired flue gas, a series of novel regenerable sorbents based on Zr-Mn binary metal oxides were prepared and employed at a relatively low temperature. PXRD, TEM, TPR, XPS, and N2-adsorption methods were employed to characterize the sorbents. The Hg(0) adsorption performance of the sorbents was tested, and the effects of the main operation parameters and the gas components on the adsorption were investigated. Zr significantly improved the sorbent's mercury capacity, which was nearly 5mg/g for Zr0.5Mn0.5Oy. Furthermore, the spent sorbent could be regenerated by heating to 350°C, and the highly concentrated elemental mercury released could be facilely recycled. Therefore, a much greener process for mercury capture and recovery could be anticipated based on this regenerable sorbent.

  10. Development of durable and reactive regenerable sorbents for high temperature flue gas desulphurisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz, P.A.; Abbasian, J.; Khalili, N.R.; Slimane, R.B.; Ho, K.K. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2002-07-01

    One of the emerging technologies for combined SO{sub 2} and NOx removal from flue gases is the copper oxide process, which is based on the use of a regenerable sorbent. Sorbent properties such as SO{sub 2} sorption capacity, reactivity, crush strength, and long-term durability have significant impact on the overall process cost. In this study, a number of sorbents were prepared by using various modifications of the sol-gel techniques. Compared to the commercially available sorbent used for evaluation of the process, sorbents prepared by wet impregnation of sol-gel alumina exhibited comparable sulphur capacity and about seven times higher crush strength, while those prepared by incorporation of copper in the sol resulted in three times higher sulphur capacity and 55% higher crush strength. Significant improvement in long-term durability was also achieved with these sorbents. Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that these new sorbents have the potential to reduce the projected levelized process cost down to 3.17 mil/kWh, which is lower than the cost of current SO{sub 2} emission allowance. 46 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide, Ammonia, Formaldehyde, and Water Vapor on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is nonregenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for simultaneous carbon dioxide, ammonia, formaldehyde, and water sorption. Multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also the enhancement of formaldehyde sorption by the presence of ammonia in the gas mixture.

  12. Regenerable MgO-based sorbents for high-temperature CO{sub 2} removal from syngas: 1. Sorbent development, evaluation, and reaction modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Hassanzadeh; Javad Abbasian [Pyrophase Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Highly reactive and mechanically strong low-cost regenerable MgO-based sorbents were prepared by modification of dolomite which involved partial calcinations followed by impregnation with a potassium-based salt. The sorbents are capable of removing CO{sub 2} from gasification-based processes such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). The sorbents have high reactivity and good capacity toward CO{sub 2} absorption in the temperature range of 300-450{sup o}C at 20 atm. and can be easily regenerated at 500{sup o}C. The reaction appears to be first order with respect to CO{sub 2} concentration with an activation energy of 44 kJ/mol. The reactivity and the absorption capacity of the sorbents increase with increasing temperature, as long as the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} is above the equilibrium value for sorbent carbonation. The reactivity of the sorbents appears to improve in the presence of steam, which is likely due to the increase in the BET surface area and the porosity of the sorbent. A two-zone expanding grain model, consisting of a high-reactivity outer shell and a low-reactivity inner core is shown to provide an excellent fit to the TGA experimental data on sorbent carbonation at various operating conditions. 31 refs., 16 figs.,3 tabs.

  13. The application of regenerable sorbents for mercury capture in gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Anton, M Antonia; Fernández-Miranda, Nuria; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Mercury is a well-known toxic element, and flue gas streams emitted from coal-fired utilities are one of the largest anthropogenic sources of this element. This study briefly reviews the proposed technologies for reducing mercury emissions from coal combustion, focusing on an emerging process which involves the use of regenerable sorbents and especially those loaded with noble metals. Among the mercury species formed during coal combustion, elemental mercury is the most difficult to remove from the flue gases due to its low reactivity and insolubility in water. The widespread interest in using regenerable sorbents with metals is due to their ability to retain elemental mercury. With this technology, not only can efficiencies of 100 % be reached in the retention of elemental mercury but also a way to avoid the generation of new wastes loaded with mercury. This study considers the main aspects that must be taken into account when developing effective regenerable sorbents for mercury capture, with special attention to sorbents containing noble metals. The characteristics of this process are compared with those of other processes in a more advanced state of development.

  14. Desulfurization of hot coal gas in fluidized bed with regenerable zinc titanate sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Salo, K.; Abbasian, J. (Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland))

    1994-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation processes are considered to be among the most attractive technologies for the 21st century. In such processes, solid fuels such as coal are gasified at pressure and the fuel gas is cleaned and combusted in the gas turbine. The gas cleanup is necessary not only for the protection of the gas turbine hardware, but also to comply with environmental regulations. In the so-called 'simplified' IGCC process, the fuel gas is cleaned at high temperature and pressure to improve the overall cycle efficiency. The hot gas cleanup system includes a high-temperature, high-pressure desulfurization unit and particulate removal system. The former comprises two fluidized bed reactors utilizing regenerable zinc titanate sorbents capable of removing the sulfur gases (primarily H[sub 2]S) to below 50 ppmv. The latter employs rigid ceramic filter elements operating at up to 700[degree]C and 20 bar and is capable of reducing the 'fines' concentration to an acceptable level for a gas turbine. Novel regenerable zinc titanate sorbents suitable for fluidized-bed application have been tested. The sulfur capture and attrition characteristics of these sorbents have been evaluated in extensive testing in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor operating at high pressure and temperature conditions expected in IGCC operation. Two different gas mixtures representing air-blown gasifier exit gas with and without in-situ desulfurization with Ca-based sorbents have been used. H[sub 2]S removal efficiencies of higher than 99% at acceptable levels of sorbent conversion have been achieved in all these experiments with minimal sorbent deterioration. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Biological – chemical regeneration of desulphurization sorbents based on zinc ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šepelák Vladimír

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main sources of air pollution is the combustion of fuels by various thermal and power plants, transport facilities, and metallurgical plants. Main components of industrial gases that pollute air are carbon oxides, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and hydrogen sulphide. Sulphur has received a more attention than any other contaminant, because the sulphur released into the atmosphere in the form of sulphur dioxide or hydrogen sulphide is a precursor of the “acid rain” formation. To meet environmental emission regulations, sulphur and other contaminant species released during the gasification of coal must be removed from the fuel gas stream. The removal of contaminat at high temperatures is referred to as hot-gas cleanup in general and hot-gas desulphurization in particular when sulphur species are the primary contaminants to be remove. In recent years, zinc ferrite is the leading candidate for hot-gas desulphurization, capable of removing sulphur-containing species from coal gas at gasifier exit temperatures. It can also be of being regenerated for a continuous use. The conventional methods of the regeneration of sulphurized sorbents are based on oxidizing pyrolysis of sulphides or on the pressure leaching of sulphides in the water environment at high temperatures. The first results of the experiments using the biological-chemical leaching, as a new way of regeneration of sulphurized sorbent based on zinc ferrite, are presented in this paper. The results show that the biological-chemical leaching leads to the removal of sulphides layers (á-ZnS, â-ZnS from the surface of the sorbent at room temperature. The biological-chemical leaching process results in the increase of the active surface area of the regenerated sorbent.

  16. Regenerable sorbents for CO.sub.2 capture from moderate and high temperature gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    2008-01-01

    A process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams comprising homogeneously mixing an alkali metal oxide, alkali metal hydroxide, alkaline earth metal oxide, alkaline earth metal hydroxide, alkali titanate, alkali zirconate, alkali silicate and combinations thereof with a binder selected from the group consisting of sodium ortho silicate, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO.sub.4.2H.sub.2O), alkali silicates, calcium aluminate, bentonite, inorganic clays and organic clays and combinations thereof and water; drying the mixture and placing the sorbent in a container permeable to a gas stream.

  17. Development of Highly Durable and Reactive Regenerable Magnesium-Based Sorbents for CO2 Separation in Coal Gasification Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javad Abbasian; Armin Hassanzadeh Khayyat; Rachid B. Slimane

    2005-06-01

    The specific objective of this project was to develop physically durable and chemically regenerable MgO-based sorbents that can remove carbon dioxide from raw coal gas at operating condition prevailing in IGCC processes. A total of sixty two (62) different sorbents were prepared in this project. The sorbents were prepared either by various sol-gel techniques (22 formulations) or modification of dolomite (40 formulations). The sorbents were prepared in the form of pellets and in granular forms. The solgel based sorbents had very high physical strength, relatively high surface area, and very low average pore diameter. The magnesium content of the sorbents was estimated to be 4-6 % w/w. To improve the reactivity of the sorbents toward CO{sub 2}, The sorbents were impregnated with potassium salts. The potassium content of the sorbents was about 5%. The dolomite-based sorbents were prepared by calcination of dolomite at various temperature and calcination environment (CO{sub 2} partial pressure and moisture). Potassium carbonate was added to the half-calcined dolomite through wet impregnation method. The estimated potassium content of the impregnated sorbents was in the range of 1-6% w/w. In general, the modified dolomite sorbents have significantly higher magnesium content, larger pore diameter and lower surface area, resulting in significantly higher reactivity compared to the sol-gel sorbents. The reactivities of a number of sorbents toward CO{sub 2} were determined in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit. The results indicated that at the low CO{sub 2} partial pressures (i.e., 1 atm), the reactivities of the sorbents toward CO{sub 2} are very low. At elevated pressures (i.e., CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 10 bar) the maximum conversion of MgO obtained with the sol-gel based sorbents was about 5%, which corresponds to a maximum CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of less than 1%. The overall capacity of modified dolomite sorbents were at least one order of magnitude

  18. Development of regenerable copper-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup: Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Wangerow, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the copper-chromite sorbent (developed in previous ICCI-funded projects) for longer duration application under optimum conditions in the temperature range of 550{degrees}-650{degrees}C to minimize sorbent reduction and degradation during the cyclic process. Three (3) formulations of attrition resistant granules of the copper chromite sorbent (i.e., CuCr-10, CuCr-21, and CuCr-29) as well as one (1) copper chromite sorbent in pellet form (i.e., CuCr-36) were selected for cyclic desulfurization tests. The desulfurization and regeneration capabilities of the selected formulations as well as the effects of operating parameters were determined, to identify the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} sorbent formulation and the optimum operating conditions. The durability of the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} sorbent formulation was determined in {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} multicycle tests conducted at the optimum operating conditions. The attrition resistance of the selected formulations were determined and compared with those of other sorbents, including a limestone, a dolomite, and a commercial zinc titanate sorbent. The results obtained in this study indicate that, the CuCr-29 sorbent has excellent attrition resistance and desulfurization performance, which are far superior to the commercial zinc titanate sorbents. The optimum desulfurization temperature in terms of sorbent efficiency and utilization appears to be about 600{degrees}C. Sorbent regeneration at 750{degrees}C ensured complete conversion of the copper sulfide to oxide without sulfate formation or reactivity deterioration in subsequent cycles.

  19. Development of regenerable copper-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Hill, A.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the copper-chromite sorbent (developed in previous ICCI-funded projects) for longer duration application under optimum conditions in the temperature range of 550{degrees}-650{degrees}C to minimize sorbent reduction and degradation during the cyclic process. To achieve this objective, several formulations of copper chromite sorbents are prepared. These sorbent formulations are screened for their desulfurization and regeneration capability at predetermined temperatures and gas residence times. The durability of the best sorbent formulation identified in the screening tests is evaluated in ``long-term`` durability tests conducted at the optimum operating conditions. This includes testing the sorbent in pellet and granular forms in packed- and fluidized-bed reactors. During this quarter, twenty one copper chromite-based sorbent formulations were prepared. Two sorbent formulations that have acceptable crush strength, designated as CuCr-10 and CuCr-21, were tested over 5 and 6 cycles respectively. The results indicate that both sorbents are reactive toward H{sub 2}S at 650{degrees}C and that the reactivity of the sorbents are relatively constant over the first 5 to 6 cycles. The H{sub 2}S prebreakthrough concentrations were generally about 20 to 30 ppm, making them suitable for IGCC application.

  20. Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this study was to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent Ca-based sorbent, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents were reacted with oxygen and SO{sub 2} at various operating conditions and the extent of CaS and CaO conversion were determined. Partially sulfided dolomite was used in sulfidation/regeneration over several cycles and the regeneration efficiency and sorbent reactivity were determined after each cycle. The results of the stabilization tests show that partially sulfided Ca-based sorbents (both limestone and dolomite) can be sulfated at temperatures above 1500{degrees}F resulting in high CaS conversion without release of SO{sub 2} producing environmentally acceptable material for disposal in landfills. The results also indicate that spent dolomite can be regenerated in the SSRP process, in successive cycles, with high regeneration efficiency without loss of reactivity toward hydrogen sulfide.

  1. Adhesive carrier particles for rapidly hydrated sorbent for moderate-temperature dry flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; You, Changfu; Song, Chenxing

    2010-06-15

    A rapidly hydrated sorbent for moderate-temperature dry flue gas desulfurization was prepared by rapidly hydrating adhesive carrier particles and lime. The circulation ash from a circulating fluidized bed boiler and chain boiler ash, both of which have rough surfaces with large specific surface areas and specific pore volumes, can improve the adhesion, abrasion resistance, and desulfurization characteristics of rapidly hydrated sorbent when used as the adhesive carrier particles. The adhesion ability of sorbent made from circulation ash is 67.4% higher than that of the existing rapidly hydrated sorbent made from fly ash, the abrasion ratio is 76.2% lower, and desulfurization ability is 14.1% higher. For sorbent made from chain boiler ash, the adhesion ability is increased by 74.7%, the desulfurization ability is increased by 30.3%, and abrasion ratio is decreased by 52.4%. The abrasion ratios of the sorbent made from circulation ash having various average diameters were all about 9%, and their desulfurization abilities were similar (approximately 150 mg/g).

  2. CO{sub 2} absorption using dry potassium-based sorbents with different supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanwen Zhao; Xiaoping Chen; Changsui Zhao [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). China School of Energy and Environment

    2009-09-15

    The CO{sub 2} capture characteristics of dry potassium-based sorbents were investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a bubbling fluidized-bed reactor. Potassium-based sorbents were prepared by impregnation with potassium carbonate on supports such as coconut activated charcoal (AC1), coal active carbon (AC2), silica gel (SG), and activated alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Sorbents such as K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/AC1, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/AC2, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed excellent carbonation capacity; The total conversion rates of those sorbents were 97.2, 95.9, and 95.2%, respectively in the TG test, and 89.2, 87.9, and 87.6%, respectively, in the fluidized-bed test. However, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/SG showed poor carbonation capacity, the total conversion rates were only 34.5 and 18.8%, respectively, in TG and fluidized-bed tests. The differences in carbonation capacity of those sorbents were analyzed by studying the microscopic structure and crystal structure of the supports and the sorbents with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and N{sub 2} adsorption tests. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Destruction of problematic airborne contaminants by hydrogen reduction using a Catalytically Active, Regenerable Sorbent (CARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John O.; Akse, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermally regenerable sorbent beds were demonstrated to be a highly efficient means for removal of toxic airborne trace organic contaminants aboard spacecraft. The utilization of the intrinsic weight savings available through this technology was not realized since many of the contaminants desorbed during thermal regeneration are poisons to the catalytic oxidizer or form highly toxic oxidation by-products in the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS). Included in this class of compounds are nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, and halogen containing organics. The catalytic reduction of these problematic contaminants using hydrogen at low temperatures (200-300 C) offers an attractive route for their destruction since the by-products of such reactions, hydrocarbons and inorganic gases, are easily removed by existing technology. In addition, the catalytic oxidizer can be operated more efficiently due to the absence of potential poisons, and any posttreatment beds can be reduced in size. The incorporation of the catalyst within the sorbent bed further improves the system's efficiency. The demonstration of this technology provides the basis for an efficient regenerable TCCS for future NASA missions and can be used in more conventional settings to efficiently remove environmental pollutants.

  4. A novel method to make regenerable core-shell calcium-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F J; Chou, K S; Huang, Y K

    2006-04-01

    A sorbent having a calcium oxide core and a clay shell was prepared and shown to be capable of reusable applications in absorption and desorption processes for carbon dioxide. The novelty of this sorbent is that only calcium carbonate and clay are used for its preparation with water as a binder. A two-step granulation procedure is used to get the core and then another step to coat the shell layer with the clay powder. A repeated wet-and-dry procedure probably makes the core porous yet strong enough to serve as a sorbent. The pellet is then calcined at 1200 degrees C for 2h to reach its final structure. The core-shell pellets have an overall diameter of 4.4mm with average shell thickness of 0.45 mm, crush load of 35 N and attrition index of 0.035 wt%/h. These results indicate that the pellets will probably be capable of withstanding the stress in future applications. Carbon dioxide absorption at or below 300 degrees C showed a maximum weight gain of 38% for our pellets. Finally, desorption in nitrogen at 800 degrees C can restore the pellet to its original state and hence it is ready for re-use as a sorbent.

  5. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  6. REGENERATION OF DRY DEBRIS-CONTAMINATED LUBRICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ahmetov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial testing of regenerated lubricant in the process of wire drawing showed satisfactory quality (absence of gloss. It is determined that consumption of regenerated lubricant does not differ from consumption of new lubricant. Regenerated lubricant corresponds to the requirements of normative documents.

  7. INTERACTION BETWEEN SO2 FROM FLUE GAS AND SORBENT PARTICLES IN DRY FGD PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiying; Qi; Changfu; You; Xuchang; Xu

    2005-01-01

    Among the technologies to control SO2 emission from coal-fired boilers, the dry flue gas desulphurization (FGD) method,with appropriate modifications, has been identified as a candidate for realizing high SO2 removal efficiency to meet both technical and economic requirements, and for making the best quality byproduct gypsum as a useful additive for improving alkali soil.Among the possible modifications two major factors have been selected for study:(1) favorable chemical reaction kinetics at elevated temperatures and the sorbent characteristics;(2) enhanced diffusion of SO2 to the surface and within the pores of sorbent particles that are closely related to gas-solid two-phase flow patterns caused by flue gas and sorbent particles in the reactor.To achieve an ideal pore structure, a sorbent was prepared through hydration reaction by mixing lime and fly ash collected from bag house of power plants to form a slurry, which was first dewatered and then dried. The dry sorbent was found capable of rapid conversion of 70% of its calcium content at 700 ℃, reaching a desulphurization efficiency of over 90% at a Ca/S ratio of 1.3.Experiments confirmed that the diffusion effect of SO2 is an important factor and that gas-solid two-phase flow plays a key role to mixing and contact between SO2 and sorbent particles. For designing the FDG reactor, a new theoretical drag model was developed by combination of CFD with the Energy Minimization Multi-Scale (EMMS) theory for dense fluidization systems. This new drag model was first verified by comparing calculated and measured drag values, and was then implemented in simulation of gas-solid two-phase flow in two circulating fluidized beds with different sizes and flow parameters. One riser has diameter and height of 0.15 m×3 m and another one 0.2 m×14.2 m. Their superficial gas velocities The results show that not only the static pressure drop along the riser height, but also radial distributions of particle volume fraction have

  8. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Chu, Hsin; Lin, Hsiao-Ping; Peng, Ching-Yu

    2006-08-25

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H(2)S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl(2)O(4) was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency.

  9. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1997-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  10. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1999-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  11. Assessment of in-furnace dry sorbent injection experimental results burning low sulphur content coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F.J. [Univ. de Zaragoza (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    In an effort to adjust the SO{sub 2} emissions of coal power stations to the current air pollutant standards, established by the EC, flue gas desulfurization tests with in-furnace dry sorbent injection technology in the Spanish coal power station ``Litoral`` (tangentially-fired) were performed. The measured retentions were lower than predicted through a one-dimensional model. Then, it was thought that a CFD 3D simulation of the injection would help to understand the complex relationships of the process. The simulation was divided in two stages: in the first one, the turbulent velocity and the temperature field were solved. In the second one, representative sorbent particles were injected in the turbulent field previously solved, the focus of this work being the global sulphur capture modeling and its validation through the experimental measurements obtained. After a revision of the models proposed in the specialized literature, a global sulfation model is chosen, being compared with the experimental data obtained in the power station. Because of the main results of this work, the authors can highlight the testing of the laboratory-scale correlations against full-scale results, and can mitigate the difficulty of estimating the actual temperature profile by experimenting with the particle and its residence time without the aid of a CFD code.

  12. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

    2005-11-01

    Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate

  13. INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

    1998-10-01

    This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

  14. Data for generation of all Tables and Figures for AIMS-ES publication in 2016 pertaining to dry sorbent injection of trona for acid gas control

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — emissions data and removal efficiencies for coal combustion utilizing PM control devices and dry sorbent injection of trona specifically for acid gas control. This...

  15. Development of a Dry Sorbent-based Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas; Coleman, Luke; Anderson, Matthew; Gupta, Raghubir; Herr, Joshua; Kalluri, Ranjeeth; Pavani, Maruthi

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this research and development (R&D) project was to further the development of a solid sorbent-based CO2 capture process based on sodium carbonate (i.e. the Dry Carbonate Process) that is capable of capturing>90% of the CO2 as a nearly pure stream from coal-fired power plant flue gas with <35% increase in the cost of electrictiy (ICOE).

  16. Performance of silica-supported copper oxide sorbents for SOx/NOx-removal from flue gas I. Sulphur dioxide absorption and regeneration kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.H.A.; Prins, W.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide absorption and regeneration kinetics of several silica-supported copper oxide (CuO) sorbents were studied in a microbalance over a temperature range of 300 to 450°C. The porous silica support was prepared according to a sol-gel technique, and CuO was deposited on this support through

  17. A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2012-09-30

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

  18. Regenerable Trace-Contaminant Sorbent for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA objective of expanding the human experience into the far reaches of space requires the development of regenerable life support systems. This proposal...

  19. Preparation and characterization of manganese-based regenerable sorbents for high temperature H2S removal%锰系可再生高温脱硫剂的制备及其性能测试

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭婧; 王菊; 梁斌

    2013-01-01

    High temperature desulfurization of coal gas is a key step of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and direct reduced iron (DRI) production,which directly influences the global thermal efficiency.Manganese-based sorbents with different Mn-contents were prepared by coprecipitation method for the high temperature sulfur removal.Precipitation was conducted by neutralizing the mixed solution of manganese nitrate and alumina nitrate with 10% NH3 · H2O at 50℃.And the pH value in precipitation was kept around 9.The sorbents prepared were tested in a fixed-bed reactor by sulfidation-regeneration cycles.XRD,SEM and BET were used to characterise the structural change of the sorbents during the cycles.The sorbents made by coprecipitation method have good Mn/Al dispersibility.The desulfurization reaction at 850℃ was rapid and quantitative.The sulfur capacity increased linearly with increase of manganese content in the sorbents.The S/Mn atomic ratio was within 0.90-0.95 after sulfurization.The sulfur capacity was not influenced by space velocity and H2S content in feed gas.The sulfided sorbent was regenerated using diluted air containing 3% O2 at 850℃.The sulfur capacity was stable after many cycles.So,the sorbents could be used as regenerable sulfur sorbents for high temperature H2S removal.%煤气的高温脱硫净化是IGCC和DRI生产的瓶颈,直接影响整个过程的热效率.在50℃、pH值约为9的条件下采用硝酸锰、硝酸铝混合溶液与氨水进行共沉淀,制备了锰含量不同的脱硫剂,在固定床反应器中考察了脱硫剂的硫化及再生性能,并利用XRD、SEM、BET等手段表征了脱硫剂在硫化/再生过程中的物相和结构变化.共沉淀法制备的脱硫剂Mn/Al分散性好,在850℃高温下进行脱硫反应可以定量快速进行.脱硫硫容与脱硫剂锰含量呈正比,Mn-S/Mn-O交换原子比在0.90~0.95之间,改变空速和进口H2S含量并不改变脱硫硫容.采用O2浓度为3

  20. SO{sub 2} retention on CaO/activated carbon sorbents. Part III. Study of the retention and regeneration conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.C. Macias-Perez; A. Bueno-Lopez; M.A. Lillo-Rodenas; C. Salinas-Martinez de Lecea; A. Linares-Solano [University of Alicante, Alicante (Spain). Department of Inorganic Chemistry

    2008-11-15

    The retention of SO{sub 2} on CaO/activated carbon sorbents is studied. The effect of several variables such as the reaction temperature, partial pressure of SO{sub 2} for different calcium loads, and O{sub 2} presence are analysed. Additionally, the regeneration and reutilization of spent sorbents is investigated. In all cases presence of well-dispersed CaO in the sorbents improves SO{sub 2} retention in comparison with the activated carbon. In absence of O{sub 2} in the gas mixture, the amount of SO{sub 2} retained does not depend on the SO{sub 2} partial pressure in the range of partial pressures studied and, as expected, SO{sub 2} physisorption on the activated carbon support occurs at room temperature. SO{sub 2} retention occurs in surface CaO between 100{sup o}C and 250{sup o}C, and in bulk CaO above 300{sup o}C. The total calcium conversion is reached at 500{sup o}C. Above 550{sup o}C calcium-catalysed carbon gasification by SO{sub 2} occurs. In presence of O{sub 2} in the gas mixture, the studied sorbents are very effective for SO{sub 2} removal. However, the SO{sub 2} retention process in presence of oxygen must be carried out at temperatures lower than 300{sup o}C to avoid carbon gasification by O{sub 2}. The thermal regeneration of the spent sorbents can be done under inert atmosphere (880{sup o}C) with only 20% activity loss after the first regeneration cycle due to sintering and formation of CaS. No additional activity loss is detected in the subsequent cycles. 22 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology: Phase 2. Exploratory studies on the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A.; Huang, W.; White, J. [and others

    1997-07-01

    The topical report describes the results of Phase 2 research to determine the feasibility of the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Many of the contaminants present in coal emerge from the gasification process in the product gas. Much effort has gone into the development of high temperature metal oxide sorbents for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas. The oxides of zinc, iron, manganese, and others have been studied. In order for high temperature desulfurization to be economical it is necessary that the sorbents be regenerated to permit multicycle operation. Current methods of sorbent regeneration involve oxidation of the metal sulfide to reform the metal oxide and free the sulfur as SO{sub 2}. An alternate regeneration process in which the sulfur is liberated in elemental form is desired. Elemental sulfur, which is the typical feed to sulfuric acid plants, may be easily separated, stored, and transported. Although research to convert SO{sub 2} produced during sorbent regeneration to elemental sulfur is on-going, additional processing steps are required and the overall process will be more complex. Clearly, the direct production of elemental sulfur is preferred. Desulfurization utilizing a cerium oxide based sorbent is discussed.

  2. Comparison of in-furnace dry sorbent injection full-scale tests with laboratory-scale sulfation correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F.J. [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2003-10-01

    In an effort to limit SO{sub 2} emissions to the current EU air pollutant regulations, flue gas desulfurization tests were performed with in-furnace dry sorbent, Ca(OH){sub 2}, injection technology in the Spanish coal power station 'Litoral.' The measured SO{sub 2} removals 19.5% using a CaS ratio of 3 for a coal containing 0.53% of sulfur, and 26.4% with Ca/S=1.75 for a coal with 0.73% of sulfur were lower than predicted through a 1-D model. Hence, it was thought that a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the injection of sorbent particles would assist in understanding this complex process. After the turbulent velocity and temperature fields in the furnace were modeled, representative sorbent particles were injected, obtaining the temperature and SO{sub 2} concentrations encountered by the particles as a function of time. These data were the input to the global sulfur capture model used to simultaneously analyze calcination, sintering and sulfation. The simulation compared well with the data measured in the power station, thus verifying laboratory-scale correlations. The main conclusion is that the first temperatures encountered by the particles (in addition to the mean diameter, the sulfur content and the Ca/S ratio) control the sulfur retention. Furthermore, it is extremely difficult to accurately predict these temperatures without a CFD simulation. Low retentions were due to low sulfur concentration, the high mean diameter of the particles, and the position of the injection nozzles.

  3. Dry sorbent injection of trona to control acid gases from a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany L. B. Yelverton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available  Gaseous and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal have been associated with adverse effects on human and environmental health, and have for that reason been subject to regulation by federal and state governments. Recent regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency have further restricted the emissions of acid gases from electricity generating facilities and other industrial facilities, and upcoming deadlines are forcing industry to consider both pre- and post-combustion controls to maintain compliance. As a result of these recent regulations, dry sorbent injection of trona to remove acid gas emissions (e.g. HCl, SO2, and NOx from coal combustion, specifically 90% removal of HCl, was the focus of the current investigation. Along with the measurement of HCl, SO2, and NOx, measurements of particulate matter (PM, elemental (EC, and organic carbon (OC were also accomplished on a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility. Gaseous and particulate emissions from a coal-fired combustor burning bituminous coal and using dry sorbent injection were the focus of the current study. From this investigation it was shown that high levels of trona were needed to achieve the goal of 90% HCl removal, but with this increased level of trona injection the ESP and BH were still able to achieve greater than 95% fine PM control. In addition to emissions reported, measurement of acid gases by standard EPA methods were compared to those of an infrared multi-component gas analyzer. This comparison revealed good correlation for emissions of HCl and SO2, but poor correlation in the measurement of NOx emissions.

  4. Novel dry-desulfurization process using Ca(OH)2/fly ash sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Norihiko; Li, Yan; Nishioka, Masateru; Sadakata, Masayoshi; Qi, Haiying; Xu, Xuchang

    2004-12-15

    A dry-desulfurization process using Ca(OH)2/fly ash sorbent and a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) was developed. Its aim was to achieve high SO2 removal efficiency without humidification and production of CaSO4 as the main byproduct. The CaSO4 produced could be used to treat alkalized soil. An 83% SO2 removal rate was demonstrated, and a byproduct with a high CaSO4 content was produced through baghouse ash. These results indicated that this process could remove SO2 in flue gas with a high efficiency under dry conditions and simultaneously produce soil amendment. It was shown that NO and NO2 enhanced the SO2 removal rate markedly and that NO2 increased the amount of CaSO4 in the final product more than NO. These results confirmed that the significant effects of NO and NO2 on the SO2 removal rate were due to chain reactions that occurred under favorable conditions. The amount of baghouse ash produced increased as the reaction progressed, indicating that discharge of unreacted Ca(OH)2 from the reactor was suppressed. Hence, unreacted Ca(OH)2 had a long residence time in the CFB, resulting in a high SO2 removal rate. It was also found that 350 degrees C is the optimum reaction temperature for dry desulfurization in the range tested (320-380 degrees C).

  5. Investigations to the reduction of the drying time of temperature sensitive goods with assistance of sorbents. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Verkuerzung der Trocknungszeit temperaturempfindlicher Gueter unter Verwendung von Sorptionsmitteln. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutelle, R.

    1998-07-31

    It was the aim of the project to improve the solar drying process with assistance of solar regenerated sorbents. Fruits, vegetables, herbs and mushrooms were dried in hurdles and calcium chloride solutions were concentrated in black plastic basins with solar energy during the day. At night or at bad meteorological conditions the hurdles with the drying goods were set into the basins and capped in order to continue the drying process. By this means a microbial decay was prohibited and the drying time was shortened roughly by half. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel des Vorhabens war es, den Prozess der solaren Trocknung mit Hilfe von solar regenerierten Sorptionsmitteln zu verbessern. Tagsueber wurden mit Solarenergie Fruechte, Gemuese, Kraeuter und Pilze in Horden getrocknet, und Calciumchloridloesungen wurden in schwarzen Kunststoffwannen regeneriert. Zur Fortsetzung der Trocknung waehrend der Nacht und bei unguenstigen Witterungsverhaeltnissen wurden die Horden mit den Trocknungsguetern in die Wannen gesetzt und abgedeckt. Durch dieses Verfahren konnte ein mikrobieller Verderb vermieden und die Trocknungszeit auf ca. die Haelfte verkuerzt werden. (orig.)

  6. INVESTIGATION ON DURABILITY AND REACTIVITY OF PROMISING METAL OXIDE SORBENTS DURING SULFIDATION AND REGENERATION. QUARTERLY AND FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. KWON

    1998-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Experiments on removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with formulated metal oxide sorbents were conducted in a batch reactor or a differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures, to find initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of hydrogen, nitrogen and moisture on dynamic absorption and equilibrium absorption at various absorption temperatures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur-absorbing capacity were formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders, and calcining these powder mixtures. The Research Triangle Institute (RTI), a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide, and review experimental results.

  7. INVESTIGATION ON DURABILITY AND REACTIVITY OF PROMISING METAL OXIDE SORBENTS DURING SULFIDATION AND REGENERATION. QUARTERLY AND FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. KWON

    1998-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Experiments on removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with formulated metal oxide sorbents were conducted in a batch reactor or a differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures, to find initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of hydrogen, nitrogen and moisture on dynamic absorption and equilibrium absorption at various absorption temperatures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur-absorbing capacity were formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders, and calcining these powder mixtures. The Research Triangle Institute (RTI), a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide, and review experimental results.

  8. Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohadlo, S; Abbasi, H; Cygan, D [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

  9. Disentangling the effects of shrubs and herbivores on tree regeneration in a dry Chaco forest (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tálamo, Andrés; Barchuk, Alicia H; Garibaldi, Lucas A; Trucco, Carlos E; Cardozo, Silvana; Mohr, Federico

    2015-07-01

    Successful persistence of dry forests depends on tree regeneration, which depends on a balance of complex biotic interactions. In particular, the relative importance and interactive effects of shrubs and herbivores on tree regeneration are unclear. In a manipulative study, we investigated if thornless shrubs have a direct net effect, an indirect positive effect mediated by livestock, and/or an indirect negative effect mediated by small vertebrates on tree regeneration of two key species of Chaco forest (Argentina). In a spatial association study, we also explored the existence of net positive interactions from thorny and thornless shrubs. The number of Schinopsis lorentzii seedlings was highest under artificial shade with native herbivores and livestock excluded. Even excluding livestock, no seedlings were found with natural conditions (native herbivores present with natural shade or direct sunlight) at the end of the experiment. Surprisingly, seedling recruitment was not enhanced under thornless shrubs, because there was a complementary positive effect of shade and interference. Moreover, thornless shrubs had neither positive nor negative effects on regeneration of S. lorentzii. Regeneration of Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco was minimal in all treatments. In agreement with the experiment, spatial distributions of saplings of both tree species were independent of thornless shrubs, but positively associated with thorny shrubs. Our results suggest that in general thornless shrubs may have a negligible effect and thorny shrubs a net positive effect on tree regeneration in dry forests. These findings provide a conceptual framework for testing the impact of biotic interactions on seedling recruitment in other dry forests.

  10. Regeneration complexities of Pinus gerardiana in dry temperate forests of Indian Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Shamet, G S; Mehta, Harsh; Alam, N M; Kaushal, Rajesh; Chaturvedi, O P; Sharma, Navneet; Khaki, B A; Gupta, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    Pinus gerardiana is considered an important species in dry temperate forests of North-Western Indian Himalaya because of its influence on ecological processes and economic dependence of local people in the region. But, large numbers of biotic and abiotic factors have affected P. gerardiana in these forests; hence, there is a crucial need to understand the regeneration dynamics of this tree species. The present investigation was conducted in P. gerardiana forests to understand vegetation pattern and regeneration processes on different sites in the region. Statistical analysis was performed to know variability in growing stock and regeneration on sample plots, while correlation coefficients and regression models were developed to find the relationship between regeneration and site factors. The vegetation study showed dominance of P. gerardiana, which is followed by Cedrus deodara, Pinus wallichiana and Quercus ilex in the region. The growing stock of P. gerardiana showed steep increasing and then steadily declining trend from lower to higher diameter class. The distribution of seedling, sapling, pole and trees was not uniform at different sites and less number of plots in each site were observed to have effective conditions for continuous regeneration, but mostly showed extremely limited regeneration. Regeneration success ranging from 8.44 to 15.93 % was recorded in different sites of the region, which suggests that in different sites regeneration success is influenced by collection of cone for extracting seed, grazing/browsing and physico-chemical properties of soil. Regeneration success showed significant correlation and relationship with most of abiotic and biotic factors. The regeneration success is lower than the requirement of sustainable forest, but varies widely among sites in dry temperate forests of Himalaya. More forest surveys are required to understand the conditions necessary for greater success of P. gerardiana in the region.

  11. Enhancement of mass transfer by ultrasound: Application to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ye

    2016-07-01

    The physical mechanisms of heat and mass transfer enhancement by ultrasound have been identified by people. Basically, the effect of 'cavitation' induced by ultrasound is the main reason for the enhancement of heat and mass transfer in a liquid environment, and the acoustic streaming and vibration are the main reasons for that in a gaseous environment. The adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration are typical heat and mass transfer process, and the intensification of the two processes by ultrasound is of complete feasibility. This paper makes an overview on recent studies regarding applications of power ultrasound to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration. The concerned adsorbents include desiccant materials (typically like silica gel) for air dehumidification and other ones (typically active carbon and polymeric resin) for water treatment. The applications of ultrasound in the regeneration of these adsorbents have been proved to be energy saving. The concerned foods are mostly fruits and vegetables. Although the ultrasonic treatment may cause food degradation or nutrient loss, it can greatly reduce the food processing time and decrease drying temperature. From the literature, it can be seen that the ultrasonic conditions (i.e., acoustic frequency and power levels) are always focused on during the study of ultrasonic applications. The increasing number of relevant studies argues that ultrasound is a very promising technology applied to the adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

  12. A high capacity manganese-based sorbent for regenerative high temperature desulfurization with direct sulfur production conceptual process application to coal gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, W.J.W.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2003-12-15

    A high capacity, monolith or particle shaped, regenerable sorbent has been developed for the desulfurization of a dry type coal gas. It consists of crystalline MnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, a small amount of disperse MnO, and an amorphous Mn-Al-O phase. Elemental sulfur is the only observed regeneration product during regeneration with SO{sub 2}. The sorbent can be used in the temperature range between 673 and 1273 K but the optimum capacity is utilized between 1100 and 1200 K. For regeneration with SO{sub 2} the regeneration temperature should be > 873 K to avoid sulfate formation. The sulfur uptake capacity is high and amounts up to 20 wt.% S and the sorbent performance appears to be stable during at least 110 sulfiding and regeneration cycles at 1123 K. For temperatures above 1100 K thermodynamic calculations are in accordance with the observed (solid) phases after sulfiding and regeneration, indicating the predictive potential for high temperatures. The performance of the surface sites that play an important role during desulfurization can, however, not be predicted. The regenerative removal of H{sub 2}S, COS, HCl and HF can possibly take place simultaneously with the same sorbent. A new conceptual process configuration for high temperature coal gas cleaning and sorbent regeneration is proposed. Compared to other processes, less heat exchange equipment is required and no Claus unit is necessary to convert the regeneration product to sulfur.

  13. High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Lowenstein

    2005-12-19

    Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create

  14. Natural regeneration dynamics of three dry deciduous forest species in Chacocente Wildlife Reserve, Nicaragua

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guillermo Castro Marín; Mulualem Tigabu; Benigno González Rivas; Per Christer Odén

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the natural regeneration of three dry forest species, Lysiloma divaricatum (Jacq.), Tabebuia ochracea (Cham.) and Lonchocarpus minimiflorus (Donn. Sm.) over a three-year period and to analyze heterogeneity of regeneration in relationship to topographic slope and incidence of light in Chacocente Wildlife Reserve in Nicaragua. Permanent sample plots were established in 2001, and all individuals with height as low as 10 cm and diameter as large as 10 cm were recorded for three consecutive years from 2001 to 2003. The results show that the density of naturally regenerated individuals varied significantly among species, as well as over time. L. minimiflorus and T. ochracea had higher densities compared with L. divaricatum, and the net change in population density was slightly positive for T. ochracea only. Regeneration was more abundant in the gentle and steep slopes under partial exposure of the crown to sunlight, thus resulting in aggregated pattern of distribution, especially for L. minimiflorus and T. ochracea. We concluded that natural regeneration alone is not sufficient to maintain the desired number of stocks of these species, and an immediate restoration measure should be taken to assist the natural regeneration process.

  15. Sulphur dioxide removal using activated sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuzinski, K.; Jaschik, M.; Jaschik, J.; Wasilewski, W.; Mrozowski, J. [Inst. Inzynierii Chemical PAN, Gliwice (Poland)

    2001-07-01

    Results are presented of experimental investigation of the dry flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) process at low temperatures using activated sorbents. Solid wastes (ashes) from the dry (with humidification) FGD plant are used as a sorbent. The influence of basic operating parameters on the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal is determined. More than twofold sulphur dioxide removal efficiency is obtained using activated sorbents in comparison with the efficiency obtained in the process with dry sorbents. The possibility of reduction of sorbent consumption in the dry method of FGD with humidification is found.

  16. Regenerable Sorbent for Combined CO2, Water, and Trace-Contaminant Capture in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA objective of expanding the human experience into the far reaches of space requires the development of regenerable life support systems. This proposal...

  17. Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan [TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Jayaraman, Ambalavanan [TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Dietz, Steven [TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)

    2016-03-03

    In this project TDA Research, Inc (TDA) has developed a new post combustion carbon capture technology based on a vacuum swing adsorption system that uses a steam purge and demonstrated its technical feasibility and economic viability in laboratory-scale tests and tests in actual coal derived flue gas. TDA uses an advanced physical adsorbent to selectively remove CO2 from the flue gas. The sorbent exhibits a much higher affinity for CO2 than N2, H2O or O2, enabling effective CO2 separation from the flue gas. We also carried out a detailed process design and analysis of the new system as part of both sub-critical and super-critical pulverized coal fired power plants. The new technology uses a low cost, high capacity adsorbent that selectively removes CO2 in the presence of moisture at the flue gas temperature without a need for significant cooling of the flue gas or moisture removal. The sorbent is based on a TDA proprietary mesoporous carbon that consists of surface functionalized groups that remove CO2 via physical adsorption. The high surface area and favorable porosity of the sorbent also provides a unique platform to introduce additional functionality, such as active groups to remove trace metals (e.g., Hg, As). In collaboration with the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California, Irvine (UCI), TDA developed system simulation models using Aspen PlusTM simulation software to assess the economic viability of TDA’s VSA-based post-combustion carbon capture technology. The levelized cost of electricity including the TS&M costs for CO2 is calculated as $116.71/MWh and $113.76/MWh for TDA system integrated with sub-critical and super-critical pulverized coal fired power plants; much lower than the $153.03/MWhand $147.44/MWh calculated for the corresponding amine based systems. The cost of CO2 captured for TDA’s VSA based system is $38

  18. Durable zinc oxide-containing sorbents for coal gas desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1996-01-01

    Durable zinc-oxide containing sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream at an elevated temperature are made up to contain titania as a diluent, high-surface-area silica gel, and a binder. These materials are mixed, moistened, and formed into pellets, which are then dried and calcined. The resulting pellets undergo repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration without loss of reactivity and without mechanical degradation. Regeneration of the pellets is carried out by contacting the bed with an oxidizing gas mixture.

  19. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javad Abbasian

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this program was to develop regenerable sorbents for use in the temperature range of 343 to 538 C (650 to 1000 F) to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal-derived fuel gases in a fluidized-bed reactor. The goal was to develop sorbents that are capable of reducing the H{sub 2}S level in the fuel gas to less than 20 ppmv in the specified temperature range and pressures in the range of 1 to 20 atmospheres, with chemical characteristics that permit cyclic regeneration over many cycles without a drastic loss of activity, as well as physical, characteristics that are compatible with the fluidized bed application. This topical report focuses on the investigation directed toward preparation of zinc-based sorbents using the sol-gel approach that has been shown to require only a moderate temperature for calcination, while resulting in significantly more attrition-resistant sorbents. The sorbents prepared in this part of the investigation and the results from their evaluation in packed-bed and fluidized-bed reactors are described in this report.

  20. Species diversity and regeneration of old-growth seasonally dry Shorea robusta forests following gap formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Indra Prasad Sapkota; Mulualem Tigabu; Per Christer Odén

    2009-01-01

    Diversity and regeneration of woody species were investigated in two ecological niches viz. gap and intact vegetation in old-growth seasonally dry Shorea robusta (Gaertn. f.) forests in Nepal. We also related varieties of diversity measures and regeneration attributes to gap characteristics. Stem density of tree and shrub components is higher in the gap than in the intact vegetation. Seedling densities of S. robusta and Terminalia alata (B. Heyne ex Roth.) are higher in the gap than in the intact vegetation, while contrary result is observed for T. bellirica (Gaertn. ex Roxb.) and Syzigium cumini (L. Skeels) in term of seedling density. The complement of Simpson index, Evenness index, and species-individual ratio in the seedling layer are lower in the gap than the intact vegetation. Gap size can explain species richness and species establishment rate. Gaps created by multiple tree falls in different years have higher seedling density of S. robusta than gaps created by single and/or multiple tree falls in the same year. In conclusion, gaps maintain species diversity by increasing seedling density, and favor regeneration of Sal forests. In addition to gap size, other gap attributes also affect species diversity and regeneration.

  1. Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 [mu]m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871[degrees]C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750[degrees]C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750[degrees]C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

  2. Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 {mu}m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871{degrees}C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750{degrees}C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750{degrees}C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

  3. Aerogel sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begag, Redouane; Rhine, Wendell E; Dong, Wenting

    2016-04-05

    The current invention describes methods and compositions of various sorbents based on aerogels of various silanes and their use as sorbent for carbon dioxide. Methods further provide for optimizing the compositions to increase the stability of the sorbents for prolonged use as carbon dioxide capture matrices.

  4. Effect of allogenic freeze-dried demineralized bone matrix on guided tissue regeneration in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplanis, N; Lee, M B; Zimmerman, G J; Selvig, K A; Wikesjö, U M

    1998-08-01

    This randomized, split-mouth study was designed to evaluate the adjunctive effect of allogenic, freeze-dried, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) to guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Contralateral fenestration defects (6 x 4 mm) were created 6 mm apical to the buccal alveolar crest on maxillary canine teeth in 6 beagle dogs. DBM was implanted into one randomly selected fenestration defect. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membranes were used to provide bilateral GTR. Tissue blocks including defects with overlying membranes and soft tissues were harvested following a four-week healing interval and prepared for histometric analysis. Differences between GTR+DBM and GTR defects were evaluated using a paired t-test (N = 6). DBM was discernible in all GTR+DBM defects with limited, if any, evidence of bone metabolic activity. Rather, the DBM particles appeared solidified within a dense connective tissue matrix, often in close contact to the instrumented root. There were no statistically significant differences between the GTR+DBM versus the GTR condition for any histometric parameter examined. Fenestration defect height averaged 3.7+/-0.3 and 3.9+/-0.3 mm, total bone regeneration 0.8+/-0.6 and 1.5+/-0.8 mm, and total cementum regeneration 2.0+/-1.3 and 1.6+/-1.7 mm for GTR+DBM and GTR defects, respectively. The histologic and histometric observations, in concert, suggest that allogenic freeze-dried DBM has no adjunctive effect to GTR in periodontal fenestration defects over a four-week healing interval. The critical findings were 1) the DBM particles remained, embedded in dense connective tissue without evidence of bone metabolic activity; and 2) limited and similar amounts of bone and cementum regeneration were observed for both the GTR+DBM and GTR defects.

  5. Bio-inspired capillary dry spinning of regenerated silk fibroin aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Wei; Zhang Yaopeng, E-mail: zyp@dhu.edu.cn; Zhao Yingmei; Luo Jie; Shao Huili; Hu Xuechao

    2011-10-10

    To biomimic the spinning process of silkworm or spider, a capillary spinning equipment was applied to spin regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) fibers from RSF aqueous solutions in air. This equipment exhibits a wide processing window for various RSF aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, metal ions, RSF concentration and spinning parameters on the spinnability of the spinning dope and the mechanical properties of the obtained fibers were investigated. As a result, spinning dopes with a pH from 5.2 to 6.9 have good spinnability, especially for the dope with a pH of 6.0 and a Ca{sup 2+} concentration of 0.3 M. The RSF concentration of this dope ranges from 44% to 48%. Under optimized conditions of our dry spinning experiments (L/D, 133; take-up speed, 30 mm/s), the obtained as-spun fiber has a breaking strength of 46 MPa, which can be improved up to 359 MPa after a preliminary post-drawing in 80 vol.% ethanol aqueous solution. Highlights: {yields} Regenerated silk fibroin fibers were prepared by using a dry spinning method. {yields} Dope compositions affect dope spinnability. {yields} Spinning parameters affect dope spinnability and fiber properties. {yields} The breaking stress of the post-treated fiber was up to 359 MPa.

  6. Developments in solar drying using forced ventilation and solar regenerated desiccant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoruwa, T.F.N. [Kenyatta University, Nairobi (Kenya). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Smith, J.E. [Strathclyde University, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology; Johnstone, C.M. [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Energy Simulation Research Unit

    1996-09-01

    In many countries, grains are naturally sun dried in the field, resulting in large-scale spoilage. Purpose-built solar grain dryers are being introduced with some success, but to be effective, their performance must be carefully controlled to prevent cracking of grains, fungal growth and aflatoxin production during storage. This paper describes some of the performance aspects of an autonomous solar desiccant maize dryer developed for village use in Kenya. Since most commercial desiccants are expensive, a low cost solid desiccant was fabricated from bentonite clay and calcium chloride materials. This desiccant is capable of regeneration at 45{sup o}C, has high moisture sorption of 45% (dwb), significantly extends the drying process at night and reduces aflatoxin contamination of the grain. Laboratory and field testing took place to determine the drying performance and allow conclusions to be drawn. This showed the prototype dryer had the capability of drying 90kg of fresh maize from 38% (dwb) to 15% (dwb) within 24 hours. (Author)

  7. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2014-09-02

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  8. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S; Holmes, Michael J; Pavlish, John Henry

    2013-08-20

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  9. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1998-06-16

    The overall objective of this program was to develop regenerable sorbents for use in the temperature range of 343 to 538 C (650 to 1000 F) to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal-derived fuel gases in a fluidized-bed reactor. The goal was to develop sorbents that are capable of reducing the H{sub 2}S level in the fuel gas to less than 20 ppmv in the specified temperature range and pressures in the range of 1 to 20 atmospheres, with chemical characteristics that permit cyclic regeneration over many cycles without a drastic loss of activity, as well as physical characteristics that are compatible with the fluidized bed application.

  10. Continuous fluidized-bed contactor with recycle of sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Petersen, James N.; Davison, Brian H.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous fluidized-bed contactor containing sorbent particles is used to remove solutes from liquid solvents. As the sorbent particles, for example gel beads, sorb the solute, for example metal ion species, the sorbent particles tend to decrease in diameter. These smaller loaded sorbent particles rise to the top of the contactor, as larger sorbent particles remain at the bottom of the contactor as a result of normal hydraulic forces. The smaller loaded sorbent particles are then recovered, regenerated, and reintroduced into the contactor. Alternatively, the loaded sorbent particles may also slightly increase in diameter, or exhibit no change in diameter but an increase in density. As a result of normal hydraulic forces the larger loaded sorbent particles fall to the bottom of the contactor. The larger loaded sorbent particles are then recovered, regenerated, and reintroduced into the contactor.

  11. Advanced Low-Temperature Fluid Bed Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the results obtained in an ongoing study geared towards developing advanced mixed-metal oxide sorbents for desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range of 350 to 550{degrees}C. The paper focuses on the study related to the development of durable sorbents suitable for fluidized-bed application and addresses thermodynamic considerations, sulfidation kinetics, regenerability, and the physical and chemical characteristics of a number of novel sorbents.

  12. Diversity, structure and regeneration of the seasonally dry tropical forest of Yucatán Península, Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Ramírez, Angélica María; García-Méndez, Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Seasonally dry tropical forests are considered as the most endangered ecosystem in lowland tropics. The aim of this study was to characterize the floristic composition, richness, diversity, structure and regeneration of a seasonally dry tropical forest landscape constituted by mature forest, secondary forest and seasonally inundated forest located in the Northeastern part of the Yucatán Península, Mexico. We used the Gentry’s standard inventory plot methodology (0.1 ha per forest type in 2007...

  13. Desulfurization sorbent development activities at METC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1995-06-01

    Development of a suitable regenerable sorbent is a major barrier issue in the hot gas cleanup program for integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. This has been a challenging problem during the last 20 years, since many of the sorbents developed in the program could not retain their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration reactions. A series of promising sorbents (METC 2-10), which were capable of sustaining their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated sulfidation/ regeneration cycles, have been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). These sorbents were tested both in low-pressure (260 KPa/23 psig) and high-pressure (520 KPa/60.7 psig) fixed-bed reactors at 538{degrees}C (1000{degrees}F) with simulated coal gas. High-pressure testing was continued for 20 cycles with steam regeneration. A major research goal during the last year was to lower the cost of materials utilized during the sorbent preparation. The METC 9 sorbent was prepared by substituting low-cost materials for some of the materials in METC 6 sorbent. The sulfur capacity of the two sorbents were similar during the 20-cycle testing. METC 2 sorbent was exposed to coal gas in the Modular Gas Cleanup Rig and it was later tested in the high-pressure fixed-bed reactor. The reactivity of the METC 2 sorbent was unaffected by the exposure to the coal gas. Development of these sorbents will be continued for both fluid-bed and moving-bed applications.

  14. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and cation use efficiency in stands of regenerating tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Bonnie G; Becknell, Justin M; Powers, Jennifer S

    2015-07-01

    Plants on infertile soils exhibit physiological and morphological traits that support conservative internal nutrient cycling. However, potential trade-offs among use efficiencies for N, P, and cations are not well explored in species-rich habitats where multiple elements may limit plant production. We examined uptake efficiency and use efficiency of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Al, and Na in plots of regenerating tropical dry forests spanning a gradient of soil fertility. Our aim was to determine whether plant responses to multiple elements are correlated, or whether there are trade-offs among exploitation strategies across stands varying in community composition, soil quality, and successional stage. For all elements, both uptake efficiency and use efficiency decreased as availability of the corresponding element increased. Plant responses to N, Na, and Al were uncoupled from uptake and use efficiencies for P and essential base cations, which were tightly correlated. N and P use efficiencies were associated with shifts in plant species composition along the soil fertility gradient, and there was also a trend towards increasing N use efficiency with stand age. N uptake efficiency was positively correlated with the abundance of tree species that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Taken together, our results suggest that successional processes and local species composition interact to regulate plant responses to availability of multiple resources. Successional tropical dry forests appear to employ different strategies to maximize response to N vs. P and K.

  15. Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bovine Cortical Bone: Its Potential for Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BPCM had been widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR whose manufacturing process usually required chemical cross-linking to prolong its biodegradation. However, cross-linking of collagen fibrils was associated with poorer tissue integration and delayed vascular invasion. Objective. This study evaluated the potential of bovine cortical bone collagen membrane for GBR by evaluating its antigenicity potential, cytotoxicity, immune and tissue response, and biodegradation behaviors. Material and Methods. Antigenicity potential of demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane (DFDBCBM was done with histology-based anticellularity evaluation, while cytotoxicity was analyzed using MTT Assay. Evaluation of immune response, tissue response, and biodegradation was done by randomly implanting DFDBCBM and BPCM in rat’s subcutaneous dorsum. Samples were collected at 2, 5, and 7 days and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for biocompatibility and tissue response-biodegradation study, respectively. Result. DFDBCBM, histologically, showed no retained cells; however, it showed some level of in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo study exhibited increased immune response to DFDBCBM in early healing phase; however, normal tissue response and degradation rate were observed up to 4 weeks after DFDBCBM implantation. Conclusion. Demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane showed potential for clinical application; however, it needs to be optimized in its biocompatibility to fulfill all requirements for GBR membrane.

  16. Vegetation structure and composition of a tropical dry forest in regeneration in Bataclán (Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Londoño Lemos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of long-term vegetation in a tropical dry forest (TDF that is in the process of regeneration permits establishment of patterns of composition, structure and dynamics of plant communities and sheds light on the different stages of plant succession. In this study, the plant community of ecoparque Bataclán, Cali, Colombia was evaluated by determining its structure and composition in two regeneration strategies. One strategy consisted of natural regeneration with bamboo barriers and the other of natural regeneration without bamboo barriers. Three permanent plots of 500 m2 were established in each regeneration strategy (six plots in total. Composition and structure was determined, taking into account all the growth habits, with different sampling methods. We found no significant differences between vegetation structure and composition of the two strategies for forest regeneration. forty-one species belonging to 27 families were recorded (trees and shrubs 58.5 %, herbs 24.4 %, climbers or scandents 14.6 %, epiphytes 2.4 %. The dominant family was Melastomataceae and the dominant species was Miconia prasina. The orchidCatasetum ochraceum and the grass Thrasya petrosa were indicator species for high luminosity. We conclude that the plant community is in an early successional stage, where there is a mixture of planted and naturally regenerated species in the zone, characterized by pioneer species from TDF and other nearby life zones.

  17. Decomposition of New Woody Inputs as a Dry Tropical Forest Regenerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, J. S.; Powers, J. S.; Ayres, A.; Kaffenberger, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling deadwood dynamics is limited by our empirical understanding of decomposition patterns and drivers. This gap is significant in dry tropical forests (and in the tropics, broadly) where forest regeneration is a management priority but where decision-making lacks resources. Our goal was to track decomposition and its biological drivers in tree boles added to the forest floor of a regenerating dry forest. We cut and then placed logs (~18 cm dia) of eight representative tree species in ground contact at two different sites (n=8, per site). We tracked density loss and element import/export in both sapwood and heartwood each 6 months over two years. We measured initial and final lignin, structural carbohydrates, nitrogen, and extractives. We also quantified insect gallery volumes, and used two residue 'signatures' to determine dominant fungal rot type: 1) dilute alkali solubility (DAS) and lignin:glucan loss. By year 2, mean density losses in sapwood were 11.6 - 44.4% among tree species, excluding one species that decomposed completely. The best predictor of density loss in sapwood was initial pH, but the correlation was negative rather than positive, as has been reported in temperate systems. Decay was consistently more advanced in sapwood than in heartwood, and although extractives were as high as 16.4% in heartwood, trait-density loss correlations were insignificant. Insects contributed little at this stage to density loss (import dynamics broadly resembled those from temperate studies (e.g., Ca gain, P, K loss), there was high spatial variability. This perhaps related to zone line (spalting) complexity, suggesting intense competition among fungi colonizing small territories within the wood. Estimated CO2 fluxes from the test logs ranged from ~25 to 75% of the annual fluxes from litter fall at these sites. Collectively, these results implicate wood decomposition as an important component of dry forest carbon cycling. Emergent patterns from decomposers are also

  18. Pilot-scale testing of a new sorbent for combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S. Jr. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

    1994-06-01

    A new regenerable sorbent concept for SO{sub 2} and NOx removal was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station at a 1.5 to 2-MW(e) level. A radial panel-bed filter of a new dry, granular sorbent was exposed to flue gas and regenerated in an experimental proof-of-concept program. The project was successful in demonstrating the new sorbent`s ability to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal, 30% NOx removal, and over 80% removal of residual particulates with realistic approach temperatures and low pressure drops. Based on the results of this project, the retrofit cost of this technology is expected to be on the order of $400 per ton of SO{sub 2} and $900 per ton of NOx removed. This assumes that gas distribution is even and methane regeneration is used for a 30% average utilization. For a 2.5%-sulfur Ohio coal, this translates to a cost of approximately $17 per ton of coal. Two by-product streams were generated in the process that was tested: a solid, spent-sorbent stream and a highly-concentrated SO{sub 2} or elemental-sulfur stream. While not within the scope of the project, it was found possible to process these streams into useful products. The spent sorbent materials were shown to be excellent substrates for soil amendments; the elemental sulfur produced is innocuous and eminently marketable.

  19. Steam induced structural changes of a poly(ethylenimine) impregnated γ-alumina sorbent for CO2 extraction from ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-06-25

    Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) impregnated mesoporous γ-alumina sorbents are utilized for CO2 adsorption from dry and humid simulated ambient air, and the sorbents are regenerated under an environment of flowing steam for times ranging from 5 min to 24 h of continuous exposure. The sorbents are compared on the basis of equilibrium CO2 capacities from simulated air at 400 ppm of CO2, 50% relative humidity, and 30 °C as well as their physiochemical characterization by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), (27)Al NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, and elemental analysis. The sorbents retain better than 90% of the initial equilibrium capacity of ∼1.7 mmol/g at steam exposure times up to 12 h; however, PEI leaching reduced the capacity of the sorbent to 0.66 mmol/g after 24 h of continuous treatment. It is demonstrated that the γ-alumina support partially hydrates to form a boehmite crystal phase at steam times of 90 min and longer but that this phase transition occurs predominately between 90 min and 12 h of steam treatment, slowing at longer times of 12 and 24 h of treatment. Evidence is presented to suggest that the presence of boehmite on the sorbent surface does not significantly alter the amine efficiency of impregnated PEI. The collected results suggest that γ-alumina/PEI composite materials are promising sorbents for CO2 capture from ambient air with regeneration in flowing steam.

  20. Sorbent Structural Impacts Due to Humidity on Carbon Dioxide Removal Sorbents for Advanced Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David; Knox, James C.; West, Phillip; Stanley, Christine M.; Bush, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program builds upon the work performed under the AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project focusing on the numerous technology development areas. The CO2 removal and associated air drying development efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art system on the International Space Station (ISS) utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. A component of the CO2 removal effort encompasses structural stability testing of existing and emerging sorbents. Testing will be performed on dry sorbents and sorbents that have been conditioned to three humidity levels. This paper describes the sorbent structural stability screening efforts in support of the LSS Project within the AES Program.

  1. Microfluidic Dry-spinning and Characterization of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qingfa; Shao, Huili; Hu, Xuechao; Zhang, Yaopeng

    2017-09-04

    The protocol demonstrates a method for mimicking the spinning process of silkworm. In the native spinning process, the contracting spinning duct enables the silk proteins to be compact and ordered by shearing and elongation forces. Here, a biomimetic microfluidic channel was designed to mimic the specific geometry of the spinning duct of the silkworm. Regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) spinning doped with high concentration, was extruded through the microchannel to dry-spin fibers at ambient temperature and pressure. In the post-treated process, the as-spun fibers were drawn and stored in ethanol aqueous solution. Synchrotron radiation wide-angle X-ray diffraction (SR-WAXD) technology was used to investigate the microstructure of single RSF fibers, which were fixed to a sample holder with the RSF fiber axis normal to the microbeam of the X-ray. The crystallinity, crystallite size, and crystalline orientation of the fiber were calculated from the WAXD data. The diffraction arcs near the equator of the two-dimensional WAXD pattern indicate that the post-treated RSF fiber has a high orientation degree.

  2. Hybrid Silk Fibers Dry-Spun from Regenerated Silk Fibroin/Graphene Oxide Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yaopeng; Shao, Huili; Hu, Xuechao

    2016-02-10

    Regenerated silk fibroin (RSF)/graphene oxide (GO) hybrid silk fibers were dry-spun from a mixed dope of GO suspension and RSF aqueous solution. It was observed that the presence of GO greatly affect the viscosity of RSF solution. The RSF/GO hybrid fibers showed from FTIR result lower β-sheet content compared to that of pure RSF fibers. The result of synchrotron radiation wide-angle X-ray diffraction showed that the addition of GO confined the crystallization of silk fibroin (SF) leading to the decrease of crystallinity, smaller crystallite size, and new formation of interphase zones in the artificial silks. Synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering also proved that GO sheets in the hybrid silks and blended solutions were coated with a certain thickness of interphase zones due to the complex interaction between the two components. A low addition of GO, together with the mesophase zones formed between GO and RSF, enhanced the mechanical properties of hybrid fibers. The highest breaking stress of the hybrid fibers reached 435.5 ± 71.6 MPa, 23% improvement in comparison to that of degummed silk and 72% larger than that of pure RSF silk fiber. The hybrid RSF/GO materials with good biocompatibility and enhanced mechanical properties may have potential applications in tissue engineering, bioelectronic devices, or energy storage.

  3. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop hot-gas desulfurization sorbent formulations for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343--538 C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The specific objective was to develop suitable sorbents, that would have high and stable surface area and are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. Stability of surface area during regeneration was achieved by adding stabilizers. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives that promote the light-off of the regeneration reaction at lower temperature was considered. Another objective of this study was to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343 to 538 C and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

  4. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C (1200{degree}--1550{degree}F). To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.

  5. Characterization of active sites, determination of mechanisms of H(2)S, COS and CS(2) sorption and regeneration of ZnO low-temperature sorbents: past, current and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Alexander; Tatarchuk, Bruce J

    2011-02-28

    The intellectually and technically challenging pursuit of the emerging global environmentally "green" and energy-efficient infrastructure of the 21st century requires the development of a worldwide network of low- to medium-power fuel cell (FC) based portable electric power-generating devices and high-power biomass/clean coal "electric+chemical plants" with zero carbon footprint utilizing integrated coal gasification combined cycle with geologic carbon sequestration (IGCC-GCS) under energy-efficient low-temperature conditions. These emerging technologies require the deep and ultradeep desulfurization of gaseous feeds, since sulfur compounds, especially hydrogen sulfide H(2)S are highly corrosive and poisonous to both technological processes and the environment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance for both academic and industrial research communities to have a solid understanding of the atomic-level structures of active sites and molecular-level mechanisms of surface chemical reactions of the novel deep and ultradeep desulfurization materials, especially desulfurization sorbents. This review critically analyzes the recent literature (last ∼20 years) on the experimental determination of molecular and atomic-level nature of adsorption sites, effects of desulfurization promoters, mechanisms of chemical reactions of H(2)S, COS and CS(2) and physical processes during and upon regeneration of "spent" low-temperature H(2)S sorbents based on ZnO that were developed for desulfurization of fuel reformates, syngas and similar streams. Recent trends in research on the ultradeep H(2)S sorbents are discussed with an impetus on real-time in situ and Operando techniques of instrumental chemical analysis, and the challenges of direct determination of the structure of active sites and of the experimental mechanistic studies in general are described.

  6. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 2, Appendix A: Fixed bed gasifier and sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem computer model development: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, E.; Russell, W.; Leach, J.W.

    1990-08-01

    Computer models have been developed for evaluating conceptual designs of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants. An overall system model was developed for performing thermodynamic cycle analyses, and detailed models were developed for predicting performance characteristics of fixed bed coal gasifiers and hot gas clean up subsystem components. The overall system model performs mass and energy balances and does chemical equilibrium analyses to determine the effects of changes in operating conditions, or to evaluate proposed design changes. An existing plug flow model for fixed bed gasifiers known as the Wen II model was revised and updated. Also, a spread sheet model of zinc ferrite sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem was developed. Parametric analyses were performed to determine how performance depends on variables in the system design. The work was done to support CRS Sirrine Incorporated in their study of standardized air blown coal gasifier gas turbine concepts.

  7. [Regeneration of Acacia glauca and Leucaena leucacephala plantations in Yuanmou dry and hot valley].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiangming; Li, Kun; Zhang, Changshun

    2006-08-01

    An investigation on the seed yield, seed dispersal pattern, seed density, and the numbers of seedlings and saplings was conducted at the sampling sites of Acacia glauca and Leucaena leucacephala plantations. The factors affecting the natural regeneration and tree adaptability of A. glauca and L. leucacephala were analyzed, and their regeneration status was evaluated by gray relational analysis. The results showed that the seed yield of A. glauca with the same age was 566 grains per tree, while that of L. leucacephala was 1 199 grains per tree. The mean seed yield of individual tree, whether A. glauca or L. leucacephala, was higher in mixed forest than in pure forest, and that of naturally regenerated L. leucacephala forest was between those of A. glauca and L. leucacephala plantations. With the increasing distance to mother tree, A. glauca had a smaller decrement of seed density than L. leucacephala. The seed dispersal distance of A. glauca was 110 m, while that of L. leucacephala was 90 m. The gray relational coefficient of A. glauca plantation, L. leucacephala plantation, and naturally regenerated L. leucacephala forest was 0.7269, 0.6000 and 0.6000, respectively, indicating that A. glauca plantation had a better regeneration status.

  8. A Reusable Calcium-Based Sorbent for Desulfurizing Hot Coal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.; Hasler, D.J.L.

    2002-09-19

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. The sorbent should be strong, durable, inexpensive to manufacture, and capable of being reused many times. To achieve these objectives the project has focused on the development of the very promising core-in-shell sorbent.

  9. Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Demonstration Using Supported Amine Sorbents: Design and Evaluation of 200 kWth Pilot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Wenying; Veneman, Rens; Chen, Denggao; Li, Zhenshan; Cai, Ningsheng; Brilmana, Derk W.F.

    2014-01-01

    CO2 capture using supported amine sorbents is a promising post-combustion capture technology. With regard to supported amine sorbents, the most important issues exist in the regeneration process. In this paper, various regeneration strategies including thermal regeneration in pure CO2 stream, vacuum

  10. Patterns of Loss and Regeneration of Tropical Dry Forest in Madagascar: The Social Institutional Context

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Elmqvist; Markku Pyykönen; Maria Tengö; Fanambinantsoa Rakotondrasoa; Elisabeth Rabakonandrianina; Chantal Radimilahy

    2007-01-01

    Loss of tropical forests and changes in land-use/land-cover are of growing concern worldwide. Although knowledge exists about the institutional context in which tropical forest loss is embedded, little is known about the role of social institutions in influencing regeneration of tropical forests. In the present study we used Landsat images from southern Madagascar from three different years (1984, 1993 and 2000) and covering 5500 km(2), and made a time-series analysis of three distinct large-...

  11. Patterns of loss and regeneration of tropical dry forest in Madagascar: the social institutional context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elmqvist

    Full Text Available Loss of tropical forests and changes in land-use/land-cover are of growing concern worldwide. Although knowledge exists about the institutional context in which tropical forest loss is embedded, little is known about the role of social institutions in influencing regeneration of tropical forests. In the present study we used Landsat images from southern Madagascar from three different years (1984, 1993 and 2000 and covering 5500 km(2, and made a time-series analysis of three distinct large-scale patterns: 1 loss of forest cover, 2 increased forest cover, and 3 stable forest cover. Institutional characteristics underlying these three patterns were analyzed, testing the hypothesis that forest cover change is a function of strength and enforcement of local social institutions. The results showed a minor decrease of 7% total forest cover in the study area during the whole period 1984-2000, but an overall net increase of 4% during the period 1993-2000. The highest loss of forest cover occurred in a low human population density area with long distances to markets, while a stable forest cover occurred in the area with highest population density and good market access. Analyses of institutions revealed that loss of forest cover occurred mainly in areas characterized by insecure property rights, while areas with well-defined property rights showed either regenerating or stable forest cover. The results thus corroborate our hypothesis. The large-scale spontaneous regeneration dominated by native endemic species appears to be a result of a combination of changes in precipitation, migration and decreased human population and livestock grazing pressure, but under conditions of maintained and well-defined property rights. Our study emphasizes the large capacity of a semi-arid system to spontaneously regenerate, triggered by decreased pressures, but where existing social institutions mitigate other drivers of deforestation and alternative land-use.

  12. Patterns of loss and regeneration of tropical dry forest in Madagascar: the social institutional context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmqvist, Thomas; Pyykönen, Markku; Tengö, Maria; Rakotondrasoa, Fanambinantsoa; Rabakonandrianina, Elisabeth; Radimilahy, Chantal

    2007-05-02

    Loss of tropical forests and changes in land-use/land-cover are of growing concern worldwide. Although knowledge exists about the institutional context in which tropical forest loss is embedded, little is known about the role of social institutions in influencing regeneration of tropical forests. In the present study we used Landsat images from southern Madagascar from three different years (1984, 1993 and 2000) and covering 5500 km(2), and made a time-series analysis of three distinct large-scale patterns: 1) loss of forest cover, 2) increased forest cover, and 3) stable forest cover. Institutional characteristics underlying these three patterns were analyzed, testing the hypothesis that forest cover change is a function of strength and enforcement of local social institutions. The results showed a minor decrease of 7% total forest cover in the study area during the whole period 1984-2000, but an overall net increase of 4% during the period 1993-2000. The highest loss of forest cover occurred in a low human population density area with long distances to markets, while a stable forest cover occurred in the area with highest population density and good market access. Analyses of institutions revealed that loss of forest cover occurred mainly in areas characterized by insecure property rights, while areas with well-defined property rights showed either regenerating or stable forest cover. The results thus corroborate our hypothesis. The large-scale spontaneous regeneration dominated by native endemic species appears to be a result of a combination of changes in precipitation, migration and decreased human population and livestock grazing pressure, but under conditions of maintained and well-defined property rights. Our study emphasizes the large capacity of a semi-arid system to spontaneously regenerate, triggered by decreased pressures, but where existing social institutions mitigate other drivers of deforestation and alternative land-use.

  13. Exploration of remediation of acid rock drainage with clinoptilolite as sorbent in a slurry bubble column for both heavy metal capture and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Heping; Li, Loretta Y; Grace, John R

    2006-10-01

    Preliminary work was carried out to explore a novel process for high-efficiency high-capacity remediation of acid rock drainage. Zn and other metal ions were adsorbed and desorbed in a laboratory Plexiglas slurry bubble column with natural clinoptilolite particles as sorbent. The results indicate that both adsorption and desorption in this medium have considerable advantages over those in the packed beds and rotating columns, leading to faster batch adsorption and desorption, as well as greater uptake of zinc. The adsorption order of clinoptilolite particles to different metal ions appeared to be Fe>Al>Cu>Zn>Mg>Mn on the basis of normalized concentrations. Smaller particles had significantly higher capacity and rates of the adsorption than larger particles for the same operating conditions.

  14. Low temperature SO{sub 2} removal with solid sorbents in a circulating fluidized bed absorber. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.K.; Keener, T.C.

    1994-10-10

    A novel flue gas desulfurization technology has been developed at the University of Cincinnati incorporating a circulating fluidized bed absorber (CFBA) reactor with dry sorbent. The main features of CFBA are high sorbent/gas mixing ratios, excellent heat and mass transfer characteristics, and the ability to recycle partially utilized sorbent. Subsequently, higher SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies with higher overall sorbent utilization can be realized compared with other dry sorbent injection scrubber systems.

  15. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C (1200{degree}--1550{degree}F). To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.

  16. Copper-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Zarnegar, M.K. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    High-temperature coal gas desulfurization has been recognized as essential in the development of emerging power generation technologies such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), aiming to improve both the efficiency and environmental performance of power generation from coal. Hot gas desulfurization may be accomplished by using regenerable mixed metal oxides sorbents which can reduce the H{sub 2}S content of the coal gas to a few ppmv over many sulfidation/regeneration cycles. The focus of much of the current research on hot gas desulfurization has been on the use of zinc-based sorbents. Although these sorbents have been the subject of extensive pilot-scale and process development work, zinc-based sorbents have been shown to suffer from sulfate formation and zinc volatilization, leading to sorbent degradation over multicycle use, increasing sorbent replacement costs and the overall cost of hot gas desulfurization processes. A novel copper-chromite sorbent has been developed at IGT for hot coal gas desulfurization under the sponsorship of the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI). Results obtained so far indicate that this sorbent, in granular form (i.e., CuCr-29), has a much higher attrition resistance compared to the commercial granular zinc titanate sorbent, as well as excellent desulfurization efficiency. Furthermore, unlike most zinc titanate sorbents, the reactivity of IGT`s CuCr-29 sorbent gradually and consistently improved during the 20 cycles tested. The sorbent preparation techniques developed at IGT have been applied to produce highly reactive and attrition resistant sorbent pellets for moving-bed applications.

  17. Development of advanced sorbents for hot gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Wangerow, J.R. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cicero, D.C. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    1996-12-31

    Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) processes are among the leading contenders for the production of electricity from coal. Coal gas desulfurization to sufficiently low levels at elevated temperatures (T > 350 C) is now recognized as crucial to efficient and economic coal utilization in advanced IGCC processes. The implementation of hot coal gas desulfurization relies heavily on the development of regenerable sorbent materials which can efficiently reduce H{sub 2}S from several thousand ppmv levels down to a few ppmv over many cycles of sulfidation/regeneration. Zinc-based sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are currently the leading candidate sorbents, however, they have been shown to suffer from zinc volatilization at elevated temperatures leading to sorbent deterioration, increasing sorbent replacement costs, and the overall cost of hot gas cleanup. This paper discusses the results obtained in an ongoing investigation geared towards developing advanced mixed-metal oxide sorbents for desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range of 350 to 550 C. The paper focuses on the study related to the development of durable sorbents and addresses thermodynamic considerations, sulfidation kinetics, regenerability, and long term durability of a number of novel sorbents.

  18. Moving-bed sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, R.E.; Gupta, R.P.; Chuck, T.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to develop mixed-metal oxide sorbent formulations that are suitable for moving-bed, high-temperature, desulfurization of coal gas. Work continues on zinc titanates formulations and Z-sorb III sorbent.

  19. Fuel gas desulfurization at elevated temperatures with copper-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Lau, F.S. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States); Honea, F.I. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Zinc-based sorbents, the leading candidates for hot gas cleanup, have been shown to suffer from zinc volatilization at elevated temperatures, leading to sorbent deterioration, increasing sorbent replacement costs. Copper-based sorbents, because of the high melting point of the metal, do not suffer from this problem. However, bulk copper oxide is generally reduced to metallic copper in reducing fuel gas environments leading to thermodynamic limitations, resulting in insufficient level of desulfurization. The reduction stability and therefore the desulfurization performance of copper oxide sorbents can be significantly improved by combining copper oxide with other oxides in a supported form or as bulk mixed metal oxides. This paper addresses the results of a systematic study of several novel copper-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup application. The evaluation criteria included reduction stability, sulfidation reactivity and regenerability at elevated temperatures. The performance of the most promising sorbent in long duration cycle sulfidation-regeneration tests is also presented.

  20. Forest composition modifies litter dynamics and decomposition in regenerating tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Erik M; Waring, Bonnie G; Schilling, Jonathan S; Powers, Jennifer S

    2016-09-01

    We investigated how forest composition, litter quality, and rainfall interact to affect leaf litter decomposition across three successional tropical dry forests in Costa Rica. We monitored litter stocks and bulk litter turnover in 18 plots that exhibit substantial variation in soil characteristics, tree community structure, fungal communities (including forests dominated by ecto- or arbuscular mycorrhizal host trees), and forest age. Simultaneously, we decomposed three standard litter substrates over a 6-month period spanning an unusually intense drought. Decay rates of standard substrates depended on the interaction between litter identity and forest type. Decomposition rates were correlated with tree and soil fungal community composition as well as soil fertility, but these relationships differed among litter types. In low fertility soils dominated by ectomycorrhizal oak trees, bulk litter turnover rates were low, regardless of soil moisture. By contrast, in higher fertility soils that supported mostly arbuscular mycorrhizal trees, bulk litter decay rates were strongly dependent on seasonal water availability. Both measures of decomposition increased with forest age, as did the frequency of termite-mediated wood decay. Taken together, our results demonstrate that soils and forest age exert strong control over decomposition dynamics in these tropical dry forests, either directly through effects on microclimate and nutrients, or indirectly by affecting tree and microbial community composition and traits, such as litter quality.

  1. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, L.; Patel, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.

  2. Biodiversity and functional regeneration during secondary succession in a tropical dry forest: from microorganisms to mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Espírito Santo, M. M.; Neves, F. S.; Valério, H. M.; Leite, L. O.; Falcão, L. A.; Borges, M.; Beirão, M.; Reis, R., Jr.; Berbara, R.; Nunes, Y. R.; Silva, A.; Silva, L. F.; Siqueira, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the changes on soil traits, forest structure and species richness and composition of multiple groups of organisms along secondary succession in a tropical dry forest (TDF) in southeastern Brazil. We defined three successional stages based in forest vertical and horizontal structure and age: early (18-25 years), intermediate (50-60 years) and late (no records of clearing). Five plots of 50 x 20 m were established per stage, and the following groups were sampled using specific techniques: rhizobacteria, mycorrhiza, trees and lianas, butterflies, ants, dung beetles, mosquitoes (Culicidae), birds and bats. We also determined soil chemical and physical characteristics and forest structure (tree height, density and basal area). Soil fertility increased along the successional gradient, and the same pattern was observed for all the forest structure variables. However, species richness and composition showed mixed results depending on the organism group. Three groups usually considered as good bioindicators of habitat quality did not differ in species richness and composition between stages: butterflies, ants and dung beetles. On the other hand, rizhobacteria and mycorrhiza differed both in species richness and composition between stages and may be more sensitive to changes in environmental conditions in TDFs. The other five groups differed either in species richness or composition between one or two pairs of successional stages. Although changes in abiotic conditions and forest structure match the predictions of classical successional models, the response of each group of organism is idiosyncratic in terms of diversity and ecological function, as a consequence of specific resource requirements and life-history traits. In general, diversity increased and functional groups changed mostly from early to intermediate-late stages, strengthening the importance of secondary forests to the maintenance of ecosystem integrity of TDFs.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF DISPOSABLE SORBENTS FOR CHLORIDE REMOVAL FROM HIGH TEMPERATURE COAL-DERIVED GASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala Krishnan; Raghubir Gupta

    1999-09-01

    Advanced integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) and integrated-gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems require the development of high temperature sorbents for the removal of hydrogen chloride (HCl) vapor to less than 1 parts-per-million (ppm) levels. HCl is a highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic gas which must be removed to meet environmental regulations, to protect power generation equipment, and to minimize deterioration of hot gas desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this program was to develop disposable, alkali-based sorbents capable of reducing HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm in the temperature range from 400 to 750 C and pressures in the range from 1 to 20 atm. The primary areas of focus of this program were to investigate different methods of sorbent fabrication, testing their suitability for different reactor configurations, obtaining reaction kinetics data, and conducting a preliminary economic feasibility assessment. This program was a joint effort between SRI International (SRI), Research Triangle Institute (RTI), and General Electric Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). SRI, the prime contractor and RTI, a major subcontractor, performed most of the work in this program. Thermochemical calculations indicated that sodium-based sorbents were capable of reducing HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm at temperatures up to 650 C, but the regeneration of spent sorbents would require complex process steps. Nahcolite (NaHCO{sub 3}), a naturally-occurring mineral, could be used as an inexpensive sorbent to remove HCl vapor in hot coal gas streams. In the current program, nahcolite powder was used to fabricate pellets suitable for fixed-bed reactors and granules suitable for fluidized-bed reactors. Pilot-scale equipment were used to prepare sorbents in large batches: pellets by disk pelletization and extrusion techniques, and granules by granulation and spray-drying techniques. Bench-scale fixed- and fluidized-bed reactors were assembled at

  4. Low-temperature desulfurizing reaction with Cu-containing sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Kwang Bok; Choi, Eun Mi; Song, Yi Keun; Rhee, Young Woo [Department of Chemical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Taejeon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The sorbents containing Cu O as an active material were prepared and their effectiveness in desulfurization was investigated at low temperatures(350-550 degree C). M.I.5 and MnO{sub 2} were chosen as additives and SiO{sub 2} was chosen as support material. In the low temperature regeneration reaction, sulfate was formed, which could not be decomposed until regeneration temperature reached 650 degree C. Sulfidation reaction rate decreased as calcination temperature increased. Promoting effect of MoO{sub 3} was not observed throughout the sulfidation/regeneration reaction. When SiO{sub 2} content was below 25% of sorbents composition, sulfur loading of above 10% could be obtained. Mass transfer inhibition by sulfiding gas was observed for the sorbents containing no SiO{sub 2}. 9 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Modified sorbents for flue gas desulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bis, Z.; Radecki, M. [Czestochowa Technical Univ., Dabrowskiego (Poland). Dept. of Energy Engineering; Nowak, W.; Szymanek, A. [Czestochowa Technical Univ., Dabrowskiego (Poland). Dept. of Heting, Ventilation and Air Protection

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a technological description of modified sorbents that are highly reactive and which offer possibilities for economic ash utilization from atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed boilers (ACFB). Effective methods to use solid combustion products are becoming a necessity to reduce emissions to the atmosphere. Desulphurization products and limestone are compounds derived from ash from fluidized bed and other boilers where dry, or self-dry methods, of desulphurization are used. The safe disposal or effective utilization of solid waste produced during simultaneous processes of combustion and waste gas desulphurization is a challenge because of the high cost of capturing sulphur from flue gases and the high cost of sorbents. Efforts are being made to find new kinds of sorbents so that their consumption can be lowered substantially. The economic use of solid wastes from combustion and desulphurization processes is also being investigated. This paper described the basic aspects of sulphur capture by calcined sorbents, and the mechanical activation of sorbents. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Dual layer hollow fiber sorbents for trace H2S removal from gas streams

    KAUST Repository

    Bhandari, Dhaval A.

    2013-05-01

    Hollow fiber sorbents are pseudo monolithic materials with potential use in various adsorption based applications. Dual layer hollow fiber sorbents have the potential to allow thermal regeneration without direct contact of the regeneration fluid with the sorbent particles. This paper considers the application of dual layer hollow fiber sorbents for a case involving trace amounts of H2S removal from a simulated gas stream and offers a comparison with single layer hollow fiber sorbents. The effect of spin dope composition and core layer zeolite loading on the gas flux, H2S transient sorption capacity and pore structure are also studied. This work can be used as a guide to develop and optimize dual layer hollow fiber sorbent properties beyond the specific example considered here. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Fixing atmospheric CO2 by environment adaptive sorbent and renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Liu, J.; Ge, K.; Fang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Fixing atmospheric CO2, followed by geologic storage in remote areas is considered an environmentally secure approach to climate mitigation. A moisture swing sorbent was investigated in the laboratory for CO2 capture at a remote area with humid and windy conditions. The energy requirement of moisture swing absorption could be greatly reduced compared to that of traditional high-temperature thermal swing, by assuming that the sorbent can be naturally dried and regenerated at ambient conditions. However, for currently developed moisture swing materials, the CO2 capacity would drop significantly at high relative humidity. The CO2 capture amount can be reduced by the poor thermodynamics and kinetics at high relative humidity or low temperature. Similar challenges also exist for thermal or vacuum swing sorbents. Developing sorbent materials which adapt to specific environments, such as high humidity or low temperature, can ensure sufficient capture capacity on the one hand, and realize better economics on the other hand (Figure 1) .An environment adaptive sorbent should have the abilities of tunable capacity and fast kinetics at extreme conditions, such as high humidity or low temperature. In this presentation, the possibility of tuning CO2 absorption capacity of a polymerized ionic liquid material is discussed. The energy requirement evaluation shows that tuning the CO2 binding energy of sorbent, rather than increasing the temperature or reducing the humidity of air, could be much more economic. By determining whether the absorption process is controlled by physical diffusion controlled or chemical reaction, an effective approach to fast kinetics at extreme conditions is proposed. A shrinking core model for mass transfer kinetics is modified to cope with the relatively poor kinetics of air capture. For the studied sample which has a heterogeneous structure, the kinetic analysis indicates a preference of sorbent particle size optimization, rather than support layer

  8. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E Ayala; V.S. Venkataramani; Javad Abbasian; Rachid B. Slimane; Brett E. Williams; Minoo K. Zarnegar; James R. Wangerow; Andy H. Hill

    2000-03-31

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000 F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost

  9. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM; DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AYALA, R E; VENKATARAMANI, V S

    1998-09-30

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 °C (900-1000 °F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 °C (650 °F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 °C (650-1000 °F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a

  10. Highly attrition resistant sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, R.B.; Abbasian, J.; Zarnegar, M.K. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)] [and others

    1998-04-01

    One of the main obstacles in the commercialization of high-temperature desulfurization systems for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation processes is the development of regenerable sulfur sorbents with suitable physical and chemical characteristics. The focus of much of the current research on sorbent development has been on the use of zinc-based sorbents. These sorbents have been the subject of extensive pilot-scale and process development work; however, they have been shown to suffer from sulfate formation and zinc volatilization, leading to sorbent degradation over multi-cycle use. Therefore, investigation of non-zinc based sorbents is a logical approach to develop an effective alternative. An effective alternative to zinc-based sorbents could be manganese-based sorbents which have recently been shown to withstand high temperature ({ge} 750{degrees}C) operation and also maintain structural and reactive integrity over many cycles. However, because of process equipment limitations and other process variables such as fuel gas alkali content, a number of investigators have recently argued that the benefit to be gained by lower temperature application may outweigh the slight loss of efficiency, resulting in lower overall cost of electricity. Desulfurization temperatures {le} 538{degrees}C have been recommended to provide the best compromise between process equipment limitations and higher temperature operation.

  11. Solid sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35.degree. C.

  12. Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35 degrees C.

  13. The desert moss Pterygoneurum lamellatum (Pottiaceae) exhibits an inducible ecological strategy of desiccation tolerance: effects of rate of drying on shoot damage and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lloyd R; Greenwood, Joshua L; Brinda, John C; Oliver, Melvin J

    2013-08-01

    Bryophytes include clades that incorporate constitutive desiccation tolerance, especially terrestrial species. Here we test the hypothesis that the opposing ecological strategy of desiccation tolerance, inducibility, is present in a desert moss, and address this hypothesis by varying rates of drying in a laboratory study. Desiccation tolerance is arguably the most important evolutionary innovation relevant to the colonization of land by plants; increased understanding of the ecological drivers of this trait will eventually illuminate the responsible mechanisms and ultimately open doors to the potential for the application of this trait in cultivated plants. Plants were cloned, grown in continuous culture (dehardened) for several months, and subjected to rates of drying (drying times) ranging from 30 min to 53 h, rehydrated and tested for recovery using chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf damage, and regeneration of protonema and shoots. Rate of drying significantly affected all recovery responses, with very rapid drying rates severely damaging the entire shoot except the shoot apex and resulting in slower growth rates, fewer regenerative shoots produced, and a compromised photosynthetic system as inferred from fluorescence parameters. For the first time, a desert moss is shown to exhibit an ecological strategy of desiccation tolerance that is inducible, challenging the assumption that arid-land bryophytes rely exclusively on constitutive protection. Results indicate that previous considerations defining a slow-dry event in bryophytes need reevaluation, and that the ecological strategy of inducible desiccation tolerance is probably more common than currently understood among terrestrial bryophytes.

  14. KINETICS OF Mn-BASED SORBENTS FOR HOT COAL GAS DESULFURIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.J. BERNS; K.A. SADECKI; M.T. HEPWORTH

    1997-09-15

    Mixed manganese oxide sorbents have been investigated for high-temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide (the primary sulfur bearing compound) from hot coal gases. The sorbents were screened by thermodynamic equilibrium considerations for sulfidation. Preliminary experimental work using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated titania to be a superior substrate than alumina. Four formulations showing superior reactivity in a TGA were then tested in an ambient pressure fixed-bed reactor to determine steady state H 2 S concentrations, breakthrough times and effectiveness of the sorbent when subjected to cyclic sulfidation and regeneration testing. Eight tests were conducted with each test consisting of five cycles of sulfidation and regeneration. Sulfidation occurred at 600 o C using a simulated coal gas at an empty-bed space velocity of approximately 12,000 per hour. Manganese-based sorbents with molar ratios > 1:1 Mn:Substrate were effective in reducing the H 2 S concentration in simulated coal gases to less than 100 ppmv over five cycles. Actual breakthrough time for formulation C6-2-1100 was as high as 73% of breakthrough time based on wt% Mn in sorbent at 600 o C. Regeneration tests determined that loaded pellets can be essentially completely regenerated in an air/steam mixture at 750 o C with minimal sulfate formation. The leading formulation (designated C6-2) from the fixed-bed tests was then further tested under varying sorbent induration temperature, sulfidation temperature and superficial gas velocity. Four tests were conducted with each test consisting of four cycles of sulfidation and regeneration. Results showed that the induration temperature of the sorbent and the reaction temperature greatly affected the H 2 S removal capacity of the sorbent while the superficial gas velocity between 1090 and 1635 cm/min had minimal affect on the sorbent's breakthrough capacity. Testing showed that the sorbent's strength was a strong function of the sorbent

  15. Highly attrition resistant sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, R.B.; Abbasian, J.; Zarnegar, M.K.; Wangerow, J.R.; Carty, R.H.

    1998-07-01

    One of the main obstacles in the commercialization of high-temperature desulfurization systems for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation processes is the development of regenerable sulfur sorbents with suitable physical and chemical characteristics. The focus of much of the current research on sorbent development has been on the use of zinc-based sorbents. These sorbents have been the subject of extensive pilot-scale and process development work; however, they have been shown to suffer from sulfate formation and zinc volatilization, leading to sorbent degradation over multi-cycle use. Therefore, investigation of non-zinc based sorbents is a logical approach to develop an effective alternative. An effective alternative to zinc-based sorbents could be manganese-based sorbents which have recently been shown to withstand high temperature ({gt} 750 C) operation and also maintain structural and reactive integrity over many cycles. However, because of process equipment limitations and other process variables such as fuel gas alkali content, a number of investigators have recently argued that the benefit to be gained by lower temperature application may outweigh the slight loss of efficiency, resulting in lower overall cost of electricity. Desulfurization temperatures {lt} 538 C have been recommended to provide the best compromise between process equipment limitations and higher temperature operation. This paper reports on an on-going research program to develop novel, highly reactive, attrition-resistant, and regenerable manganese-based sorbents for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal-derived fuel gases at temperatures of 316 to 538 C and pressures up to 300 psig. The primary focus of this study is placed on the preparation (method and composition), characterization, and evaluation of a number of sorbent formulations to identify the most suitable manganese-based sorbent. The manganese-based sorbent formulations prepared to

  16. Sorbent Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Carlsbad, NM (United States). Difficult Waste Team

    2016-11-14

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory – Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) office was tasked by the DOE CBFO, Office of the Manager to: • Perform a review of the acceptable knowledge (AK) to identify the oxidizers and sorbents in transuranic (TRU) waste streams. • Conduct scoping studies on the oxidizers and sorbents identified in AK review to inform the Quality Level 1 (QL1) testing. • Conduct a series of QL1 tests to provide the scientific data to support a basis of knowledge document for determining the criteria for: 1) accepting waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without treatment, 2) determining waste that will require treatment, and 3) if treatment is required, how the treatment must be performed. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the AK review of sorbents present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the sorbent list, report the results of the scoping studies for the fastest burning organic sorbent, and provide the list of organic and inorganic sorbents to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-001, Oxidizer Scoping Studies, has similar information for oxidizers identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  17. Treatment of endodontic perforations using guided tissue regeneration and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft: two case reports with 2-4 year post-surgical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenobio, Elton Golçalves; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2004-08-15

    Clinicians often have difficulty with the diagnosis and treatment of root perforation. This paper reports two patients with root perforation treated with periodontal surgery associated with guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA). This combined treatment resulted in minimal probing depths, minimal attachment loss, and radiographic evidence of bone gain after follow-up evaluations that ranged from 2 to 4 years. These case reports show a correct diagnosis and removal of etiologic factors can restore both periodontal and endodontic health.

  18. Modified clay sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1990-04-10

    This patent describes a clay-based sorbent. It comprises a clay having an external surface and lamellar layers; and cationic surfactant ions having a hydrocarbon portion and a cationic head portion, the cationic surfactant ions being irreversibly bound to the external surface by the hydrocarbon portion. This patent also describes cetylpyridinium-aluminum hydroxy-montmorillonite; the clay-based sorbent wherein the clay is a non-expandable clay; and the clay-based sorbent wherein the cationic surfactant ions are selected from the group consisting of ionized cetylpyridinium chloride and cetylakonium chloride.

  19. Effect of drying history on swelling properties and cell attachment to oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for guided tissue regeneration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temenoff, Johnna S; Steinbis, Emily S; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-01-01

    In these experiments, the effects of the drying history of hydrogels made from a novel polymer, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) with two different poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecular weights (approximately 920 (1K) and 9110 (10K) g/mol), were investigated. The hydrogels were either formed, dried and then swelled, representing what may occur in the case of a pre-formed membrane for guided tissue regeneration, or were formed and swelled immediately, as may occur with an injectable material for such applications. Subsequently, swelling properties, sol fraction and polymer network structure (as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry), as well as attachment of human dermal fibroblasts to these hydrogels at 4 and 24 h was examined. It was found that drying before swelling caused a significant reduction in final fold swelling of OPF hydrogels, regardless of OPF formulation or method of drying (air-dried or vacuum-dried) (e.g. PEG 10K swollen first: 13.94 +/- 0.35 vs. vacuum first: 6.53 +/- 0.12; PEG 1K swollen first: 8.99 +/- 0.47 vs. vacuum first: 2.26 +/- 0.08). This decreased swelling correlated to significantly higher cell attachment (% seeded) to these hydrogels at 24 h (PEG 10K vacuum first: 21.1 +/- 4.7% vs. swollen first: 7.1 +/- 5.5%; PEG 1K vacuum first: 58.2 +/- 2% vs. swollen first: 7.4 +/- 2.2%). LIVE/DEAD staining followed by microscopic analysis revealed attached cells were viable, yet rounded, and that, in the case of the PEG 1K dried-first samples, undulations in the surface visible in the hydrated state may have affected cell adhesion. Regardless of treatment, all hydrogels showed significantly less cell attachment than the tissue culture polystyrene control after 24 h (104.9 +/- 4.4%). These results suggest that, by altering the PEG molecular weight used in synthesis, OPF hydrogels may be tailored to produce desired swelling properties and reduce non-specific cell adhesion for either injectable or pre-formed applications, thus

  20. Mercury removal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  1. Reactivity of Metal Oxide Sorbents for Removal of H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.C.; Crowe, E.R. [Chemical Engineering Dept., School of Engineering and Architecture, Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide contained in hot coal gases produced from integrated gasification combined cycle power generation systems is required to protect downstream combustion turbines from being corroded with sulfur compounds. Removal of sulfur compounds from hot coal gas products is investigated by using various metal oxide sorbents and membrane separation methods. The main requirements of these metal oxide sorbents are durability and high sulfur loading capacity during absorption-regeneration cycles. In this research, durable metal oxide sorbents were formulated. Reactivity of the formulated metal oxide sorbents with simulated coal gas mixtures was examined to search for an ideal sorbent formulation with a high-sulfur loading capacity suitable for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gases. The main objectives of this research are to formulate durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur loading capacity by a physical mixing method, to investigate reaction kinetics on the removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases at high temperature and pressure, to study reaction kinetics on the regeneration of sulfided sorbents, to identify effects of hydrogen partial pressures and moisture on equilibrium/dynamic absorption of hydrogen sulfide into formulated metal oxide sorbents as well as initial reaction rates of H{sub 2}S with formulated metal oxide sorbents, and to evaluate intraparticular diffusivity of H{sub 2}S into formulated sorbents at various reaction conditions. The metal oxide sorbents such as TU-1, TU-19, TU-24, TU-25 and TU-28 were formulated with zinc oxide powder as an active sorbent ingredient, bentonite as a binding material and titanium oxide as a supporting metal oxide.

  2. CAN SORBENT-BASED GAS PHASE AIR CLEANING FOR VOCS SUBSTITUTE FOR VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings, as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

  3. Development of a Rapid Cycling CO2 and H2O Removal Sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Cates, Matthew; Bernal, Casey; Dubovik, Margarita; Paul, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) planned future missions set stringent demands on the design of the Portable Life Support System (PLSS), requiring dramatic reductions in weight, decreased reliance on supplies and greater flexibility on the types of missions. Use of regenerable systems that reduce weight and volume of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is of critical importance to NASA, both for low orbit operations and for long duration manned missions. The carbon dioxide and humidity control unit in the existing PLSS design is relatively large, since it has to remove and store eight hours worth of carbon dioxide (CO2). If the sorbent regeneration can be carried out during the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with a relatively high regeneration frequency, the size of the sorbent canister and weight can be significantly reduced. TDA Research, Inc. is developing compact, regenerable sorbent materials to control CO2 and humidity in the space suit ventilation loop. The sorbent can be regenerated using space vacuum during the EVA, eliminating all CO2 and humidity duration-limiting elements in the life support system. The material also has applications in other areas of space exploration including long duration exploration missions requiring regenerable technologies and possibly the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) spacecraft. This paper summarizes the results of the sorbent development, testing, and evaluation efforts to date.

  4. Durable metal oxide-based sorbents for coal gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Wangerow, J.R.; Zarnegar, M.K. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cicero, D.C. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center

    1998-12-31

    Development of high temperature desulfurization regenerable sorbents for the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process has been pursued over the last two decades, primarily using various combinations of transition metal oxides. The primary focus has been directed toward applications above 550 C, restricting the choice of metal oxides to those that possess favorable thermodynamic equilibria. These efforts led to the emergence of zinc-based sorbents, such as zinc titanate, as the leading candidates. Recent studies have indicated that desulfurization system components become prohibitively expensive with increasing operating temperature and that the overall process efficiency gains of conducting desulfurization above 550 C may not be sufficient to justify operation at such high temperatures. The optimum desulfurization temperature appears to be in the range of 350 to 550 C, where technical viability and process efficiency result in lower overall process cost. In addition, because of the more favorable thermodynamic equilibria in the lower temperature range, a large number of metal oxides can be considered for coal gas desulfurization, increasing the likelihood of developing suitable sorbents. This paper reports on the results obtained in an on-going study at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), for the development of durable mixed-metal oxide sorbents for fluidized-bed desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range of 350 to 550 C. The sorbent formulations prepared, their sulfidation performance and regenerability, and the physical and chemical properties of a select group of sorbents are presented and discussed. The results from multi-cycle evaluation tests of a few sorbents in a bench-scale high-pressure high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor are also presented.

  5. Iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents for flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiung-Fang; Shih, Shin-Min

    2004-08-15

    Sorbents prepared from iron blast furnace slag (BFS) and hydrated lime (HL) through the hydration process have been studied with the aim to evaluate their reactivities toward SO2 under the conditions prevailing in dry or semidry flue gas desulfurization processes. The BFS/HL sorbents, having large surface areas and pore volumes due to the formation of products of hydration, were highly reactive toward SO2, as compared with hydrated lime alone (0.24 in Ca utilization). The sorbent reactivity increased as the slurrying temperature and time increased and as the particle size of BFS decreased; the effects of the liquid/solid ratio and the sorbent drying conditions were negligible. The structural properties and the reactivity of sorbent were markedly affected by the BFS/HL ratio; the sorbent with 30/70 ratio had the highest 1 h utilization of Ca, 0.70, and SO2 capture, 0.45 g SO2/g sorbent. The reactivity of a sorbent was related to its initial specific surface area (Sg0) and molar content of Ca (M(-1)); the 1 h utilization of Ca increased almost linearly with increasing Sg0/M. The results of this study are useful to the preparation of BFS/HL sorbents with high reactivity for use in the dry and semidry processes to remove SO2 from the flue gas.

  6. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, D.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-09-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E.T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}/O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This presentation gives the thermodynamic background for consideration of manganese-based sorbents as an alternative to zinc ferrite. To date the work which has been in progress for nine months is limited at this stage to thermogravimetric testing of four formulations of manganese-alumina sorbents to determine the optimum conditions of pelletization and induration to produce reactive pellets.

  7. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  8. Carbon dioxide separation using adsorption with steam regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Jeannine Elizabeth; Copeland, Robert James; Leta, Daniel P.; McCall, Patrick P.; Bai, Chuansheng; DeRites, Bruce A.

    2016-11-29

    A process for separating a carbon dioxide from a gas stream is disclosed. The process can include passing the gas stream over a sorbent that adsorbs the carbon dioxide by concentration swing adsorption and adsorptive displacement. The sorbent can be regenerated and the carbon dioxide recaptured by desorbing the carbon dioxide from the sorbent using concentration swing adsorption and desorptive displacement. A carbon dioxide separation system is also disclosed. Neither the system nor the process rely on temperature swing or pressure swing adsorption.

  9. Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Coated with Freeze-Dried Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional printing is one of the most promising techniques for the manufacturing of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. However, a pure scaffold is limited by its biological properties. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been shown to have the potential to improve the osteogenic effect. In this study, we improved the biological properties of scaffolds by coating 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds with freeze-dried and traditionally prepared PRP, and we evaluated these scaffolds through in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, we evaluated the interaction between dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and the scaffolds by measuring cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and osteogenic differentiation. The results showed that freeze-dried PRP significantly enhanced ALP activity and the mRNA expression levels of osteogenic genes (ALP, RUNX2 (runt-related gene-2, OCN (osteocalcin, OPN (osteopontin of DPSCs (p < 0.05. In vivo, 5 mm calvarial defects were created, and the PRP-PCL scaffolds were implanted. The data showed that compared with traditional PRP-PCL scaffolds or bare PCL scaffolds, the freeze-dried PRP-PCL scaffolds induced significantly greater bone formation (p < 0.05. All these data suggest that coating 3D-printed PCL scaffolds with freeze-dried PRP can promote greater osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs and induce more bone formation, which may have great potential in future clinical applications.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Engineered Structured Sorbents for Atmosphere Revitalization Systems On Board Crewed Space Vehicles and Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.; Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Engineered structured (ES) sorbents are being developed to meet the technical challenges of future crewed space exploration missions. ES sorbents offer the inherent performance and safety attributes of zeolite and other physical adsorbents but with greater structural integrity and process control to improve durability and efficiency over packed beds. ES sorbent techniques that are explored include thermally linked and pressure-swing adsorption beds for water-save dehumidification and sorbent-coated metal meshes for residual drying, trace contaminant control, and carbon dioxide control. Results from sub-scale performance evaluations of a thermally linked pressure-swing adsorbent bed and an integrated sub-scale ES sorbent system are discussed.

  11. Bench-Scale Testing of Zinc Ferrite Sorbent for Hot Gas Clean-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meisheng Liang; Hongyan Xu; Kechang Xie

    2007-01-01

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation systems require the development of high-temperature, regenerable desulfurization sorbents, which are capable of removing hydrogen sulfide from coal gasifier gas to very low levels. In this paper, zinc ferrites prepared by co-precipitation were identified as a novel coal gas desulfurization sorbent at high temperature. Preparation of zinc ferrite and effects of binders on pore volume, strength and desulfurization efficiency of zinc ferrite desulfurizer were studied. Moreover, the behavior of zinc ferrite sorbent during desulfurization and regeneration under the temperature range of 350-400 ℃ are investigated. Effects of binders on the pore volume, mechanical strength and desulfurization efficiency of zinc ferrite sorbents indicated that the addition of kaolinite to zinc ferrite desulfurizer seems to be superior to other binders under the experimental conditions.

  12. Cyclic stability testing of aminated-silica solid sorbent for post-combustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James C; Gray, McMahan

    2015-02-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is examining the use of solid sorbents for CO2 removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas streams. An aminated sorbent (previously reported by the NETL) is tested for stability by cyclic exposure to simulated flue gas and subsequent regeneration for 100 cycles. Each cycle was quantified using a traced gas in the simulated flue gas monitored by a mass spectrometer, which allowed for rapid determination of the capacity.

  13. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, L.; Patel, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. During this quarter cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests of the sorbents Cu{sub 2}Cr-O and Cu-Ce-0 were conducted using different compositions of the feed gases to investigate the effects of H{sub 2}0, H{sub 2} and CO. These tests were conducted in a packed-bed microreactor at 850{degrees}C. The results of these tests showed that H{sub 2} and CO (along with C02) had a significant effect on the H{sub 2}S pre-breakthrough levels, whereas H{sub 2}0 did not have an effect. The physical properties of the fresh and reacted samples of the Cu-2Cr-O and Cu-Ce-0 sorbents prepared in this program and used in the cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests were also measured. In addition, sulfidation/regeneration tests were conducted using two commercial copper chromite sorbents (G-13 and G-89, United Catalyst, Inc.) and a zinc titanate sorbent (L-3014) in a one-inch fluidized-bed reactor at 650{degrees}C. The G-13 sorbent appears to have a much higher sulfur capacity than the G-89 sorbent.

  14. Study of the adsorption reactions of thiophene on Cu(I)/HY-Al2O3 by Fourier transform infrared and temperature-programmed desorption: adsorption, desorption, and sorbent regeneration mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Lin; Shi, Li

    2011-10-04

    This work mainly involved the investigation of the adsorption of thiophene on Cu(I)-supported HY-Al(2)O(3). It demonstrated a high sulfur capacity of 10 mg sulfur/g sorbent when the HY/Al(2)O(3) mass ratio was 3, loaded with 12% copper, calcined at 550 °C, and tested at ambient temperature. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results indicated that the adsorption mechanisms on Cu(I)/HY-Al(2)O(3) primarily were π-complexation and sulfur-adsorbent (S-M; σ) bonds. Pyridine-FTIR showed the total weak Lewis acid contribution to the Cu(I)/HY-Al(2)O(3) adsorption desulfurization performance. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Specific mercury(II) adsorption by thymine-based sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangjun; Qi, Cui; Bing, Tao; Cheng, Xiaohong; Shangguan, Dihua

    2009-04-15

    A new kind of polymer sorbent based on the specific interaction of Hg(II) with nucleic acid base, thymine, is described for the selective adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Two types of sorbents immobilized with thymine were prepared by one-step swelling and polymerization and graft polymerization, respectively. The maximum static adsorption capacity of the new polymer sorbents for Hg(II) is proportional to the density of thymine on their surface, up to 200mg/g. Moreover, the new kind polymer sorbent shows excellent selectivity for Hg(II) over other interfering ions, such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Ca(II) and Mg(II), exhibits very fast kinetics for Hg(II) adsorption from aqueous solution, and can be easily regenerated by 1.0M HCl. It also has been successfully used for the selective adsorption of spiked Hg(II) from real tap water samples. This new thymine polymer sorbent holds a great promise in laboratory and industrial applications such as separation, on-line enrichment, solid-phase extraction, and removal of Hg(II) from pharmaceutical, food and environmental samples.

  16. Dual layer hollow fiber sorbents: Concept, fabrication and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Bhandari, Dhaval

    2013-02-01

    Hollow fiber sorbents are pseudo-monolithic separations materials created with fiber spinning technology using a polymer \\'binder\\', impregnated with high loadings of sorbent \\'fillers\\' [1]. To increase purified gas recovery during the sorption step and to ensure consistent sorption capacity over repeated cycles, a dense, thin polymer barrier layer on the fiber sorbents is needed to allow only thermal interactions between the sorbate loaded layer and the thermal regeneration fluid. This paper considers materials and methods to create delamination-free dual layer fiber sorbents, with a porous core and a barrier sheath layer formed using a simultaneous co-extrusion process. Low permeability polymers were screened for sheath layer creation, with the core layer comprising cellulose acetate polymer as binder and zeolite NaY as sorbent fillers. Appropriate core and sheath layer dope compositions were determined by the cloud-point method and rheology measurements. The morphology of the as-spun fibers was characterized in detail by SEM, EDX and gas permeation analysis. A simplified qualitative model is described to explain the observed fiber morphology. The effects of core, sheath spin dope and bore fluid compositions, spinning process parameters such as air-gap height, spin dope and coagulation bath temperatures, and elongation draw ratio are examined in detail. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cheap carbon sorbents produced from lignite by catalytic pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Schchipko, M.L. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Some data are presented describing the new technology of carbon sorbent production from powdered lignite in the installation with fluidized bed of catalyst. It was shown the different types of char products with extended pore structure and high sorption ability can be produced from cheap and accessible lignite of Kansk-Achinsk coal pit in pilot installation with fluidized bed of Al-Cu-Cr oxide catalyst or catalytically active slag materials. In comparison with the conventional technologies of pyrolysis the catalytic pyrolysis allows to increase by 3-5 times the process productivity and to decrease significantly the formation of harmful compounds. The latter is accomplished by complete oxidation of gaseous pyrolysis products in the presence of catalysts and by avoiding the formation of pyrolysis tars - the source of cancerogenic compounds. The technology of cheap powdered sorbent production from lignites makes possible to obtain from lignite during the time of pyrolysis only a few seconds char products with porosity up to 0.6 cm{sup 3} /g, and specific surface area more than 400 m{sup 3} /g. Some methods of powdered chars molding into carbon materials with the different shape were proved for producing of firmness sorbents. Cheap carbon sorbents obtained by thermocatalytic pyrolysis can be successfully used in purification of different industrial pollutants as one-time sorbent or as adsorbents of long-term application with periodic regeneration.

  18. [Chronology of tropical dry forest regeneration in Santa Rosa, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. II. Vegetation in relation to the soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Jorge A; Rocha, Oscar J; Mata, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Soto, Marco V

    2009-09-01

    Tropical dry forest (TDF) succession was monitored in Santa Rosa, Costa Rica. We analyzed the effect of soil type on forest structure and diversity. Eight seasonally-dry TDF sites located along a successional chrono-sequence (10, 15, 20, 40, 60 and >100 years) were examined in relation to 17 soil pedons and six soil orders. Soils had moderate to high fertility and were classified as Entisols and Vertisols, although Mollisols, Alfisols, Inceptisols and Ultisols were also present. One-hundred and thirty 500 m2 plots were established, 20 plots in secondary and 10 plots in mature TDF sites. Diameter at breast height (dbh) and total tree height were measured for saplings (dbh > or = 1 and trees (dbh > or = 5 cm). With the exception of two sites (40 and 60 years), soil type did not have significant effects on forest structure. However, tree diversity measured with Shannon-Wiener's H' and Fisher's alpha rarefaction curves, showed substantial differences among soil types, which became accentuated in mature forests. This pattern might be explained by non-random distributions of TDF trees, the scale of the study, the plot shape, and the use of systematic sampling designs. Low-fertility sites in general had higher species richness, consistent with idea that more restrictive soils reduce competition among trees and allow co-existence of species with contrasting growth rates. Changes in soil properties along a chrono-sequence of Entisols indicated that trees may experience more severe water stress as succession progresses, which may require adjustments in biomass allocation and phenological behavior of the dominant species. Our results suggest that edaphic specialization is more pronounced in mature TDF forests, and that most TDF trees are generalists in relation to soil type, highly tolerant to site heterogeneity, and show little physiological specializations in response to edaphic heterogeneity.

  19. Supported-sorbent injection. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    A new retrofitable, wastefree acid-rain control concept was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s high-sulfur coal-fired R.E. Burger generating station at the 2-MWe level. During the project, moistened {open_quotes}supported{close_quotes} sorbents, made from a combination of lime and vermiculite or perlite, were injected into a humidified 6,500-acfm flue-gas slipstream. After the sorbents reacted with the sulfur dioxide in the flue gas, they were removed from ductwork with a cyclone and baghouse. The $1.0 million project was co-funded by Sorbent Technologies Corporation, the Ohio Edison Company, and the Ohio Coal Development Office. The project included a preliminary bench-scale testing phase, construction of the pilot plant, parametric studies, numerous series of recycle tests, and a long-term run. The project proceeded as anticipated and achieved its expected results. This duct injection technology successfully demonstrated SO{sub 2}-removal rates of 80 to 90% using reasonable stoichiometric injection ratios (2:1 Ca:S) and approach temperatures (20-25F). Under similar conditions, dry injection of hydrated lime alone typically only achieves 40 to 50% SO{sub 2} removal. During the testing, no difficulties were encountered with deposits in the ductwork or with particulate control, which have been problems in tests of other duct-injection schemes.

  20. H{sub 2}S removal from coal gas at elevated temperature and pressure in fluidized bed with zinc titanate sorbents. 2. Sorbent durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Abbasian, J. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    High-temperature high-pressure sulfur removal is considered as one of the key steps of the hot gas cleanup train of an IGCC process. Coal-derived gasifier gas contains sulfur gases (mainly H{sub 2}S) which are converted to SO{sub 2} when the gas is combusted in the gas turbine. Cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests were carried out in a pressurized fluidized bed reactor to remove H{sub 2}S from a simulated coal gas to below 100 ppmv, using regenerable zinc titanate sorbents. The results, which were reported in part 1 of this paper, showed that the sorbent reactivity deteriorates in the cyclic process. In part 2, physical, chemical, and structural changes which the sorbents undergo in the cyclic tests are reported and discussed. The results of analyses conducted with fresh and used sorbents indicate that the loss of reactivity and sorbent deterioration is probably due to zinc migration to the surface of the sorbent particle during the high-temperature high-pressure cyclic process. 13 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtle

    2001-08-01

    Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}.

  2. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  3. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, Luhong; Patel, C.; Chang, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C. To achieve this objective, several novel binary oxides of copper were systematically evaluated and ranked in terms of their high-temperature stability against reduction to metal, sulfidation reactivity, and regenerability. The sorbents studied included oxides of chromium, cerium, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, titanium, iron, and silicon. The results of initial testing indicated that mixed binary oxides of copper with chromium (CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and cerium (CuO{circle_dot}CeO{sub 2}) were the most promising sorbents for such high temperature gas cleanup applications. These two sorbents were further evaluated in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests in 10--15 cycles to determine the effect of operating conditions on their performance. The results of this investigation indicate that the two selected sorbents, copper-chromium and copper-cerium, are capable of removing H{sub 2}S from the hot fuel gas to very low levels (<10 ppmv) at temperatures as high as 850{degree}C with good sorbent regenerability in cyclic process. These sorbents should be further studied to achieve optimum sorbent composition for hot gas cleanup application.

  4. A comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of guided tissue regeneration by using a collagen membrane with or without decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft in the treatment of infrabony defects: A clinical and radiographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Kher, Vishal Kiran; Manohar L. Bhongade; Shori, Tony D.; Kolte, Abhay P.; Dharamthok, Swarup B.; Shrirao, Tushar S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present, randomized, controlled clinical and radiographic study was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) by using a collagen membrane barrier with or without decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) in the treatment of periodontal infrabony defects characterized by unfavorable architecture. Materials and Methods: Sixteen systemically healthy patients with 20 periodontal infrabony defects were selected for the study. Each patient ha...

  5. A comparative evaluation of freeze-dried bone allograft with and without bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration membrane Healiguide® in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Deept Jain; Dhruvakumar Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Furcation defects represent one of the most demanding therapeutic challenges for periodontal therapy. Various treatment modalities have been tried with different success rates. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) with and without bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane Healiguide® in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with bilateral Grade II furcation defects w...

  6. Inflammatory Response to Sorbent Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Laura; Thijssen, Stephan; Kruse, Anja; Sipahioglu, Murat Hairy; Hirachan, Padam; Raimann, Jochen G; Kuntsevich, Viktoriya; Carter, Mary; Levin, Nathan W; Kotanko, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is common and associated with morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Exposure to endotoxin contained in the dialysate may trigger inflammation. Dialysate volume is substantially reduced in sorbent HD compared with standard single-pass dialysis. In this prospective study (Clinicaltrials.gov, number: NCT00788905), we compared the inflammatory response to single-pass and sorbent HD. Patients receiving single-pass HD were studied during 1 week of sorbent HD (Allient system; Renal Solutions, Warrendale, PA) and 1 week of single-pass HD. Patients were dialyzed using high-flux polysulfone dialyzers. Midweek pre- and post-HD serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and eotaxin were determined and their intradialytic change corrected for hemoconcentration during single-pass HD and sorbent HD compared by paired t-test. We enrolled 18 patients, nine completed the study. Although TNF-α decreased during both single-pass and sorbent HD (p < 0.001), none of the other biomarkers changed significantly during HD. We observed no difference between single-pass and sorbent HD. For the markers investigated in this study, there was no difference in the acute intradialytic inflammatory response to single-pass or sorbent HD.

  7. Solid-Sorbent Air Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Portable unit takes eight 24-hour samples. Volatile organic compounds in air collected for analysis by portable, self-contained sampling apparatus. Sampled air drawn through sorbent material, commercial porous polymer of 2, 3-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide. High-boiling-point organic compounds adsorbed onto polymer, while low-boiling-point organics pass through and returned to atmosphere. Sampler includes eight sample tubes filled with polymeric sorbent. Organic compounds in atmosphere absorbed when air pumped through sorbent. Designed for checking air in spacecraft, sampler adaptable to other applications as leak detection, gas-mixture analysis, and ambient-air monitoring.

  8. K2 CO3/AC常温下脱除密闭空间CO2反应机理%Reaction mechanism of dry potassium-based solid sorbent for CO2 capture in confined spaces at ambient temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭亚飞; 赵传文; 黎昌海; 陆守香

    2014-01-01

    TheremovalofCO2fromconfinedspacestomaintainitsconcentrationatanacceptable level is emerging as a significant task in environmental control and life support system. It is crucial to develop a renewable sorbent with high activity for CO2 capture in confined spaces. A novel potassium-based sorbent of K2 CO3/AC ( AC: activated carbon ) was synthesized via impregnation method. The reaction mechanism and CO2 capture characteristics of the sorbent at ambient temperature were investigated with thermo-gravimetric apparatus ( TGA) . The results showed that weak adsorption capacity of the support of AC on CO2 and H2 O was attributed to the physisorption of its porous structure, while chemisorption was responsible for the CO2 capture process of K2 CO3/AC. It was confirmed that the sorbent exhibited superior capture capacity by converting K2 CO3 into K2 CO3 ·1. 5H2 O in H2 O and KHCO3 in CO2/H2 O with rapid chemical reactions, which were so-called hydration and carbonation. The CO2 capture performance of K2 CO3/AC increased with the increase of CO2 and H2 O concentrations but decreased with the increase of temperature. The results obtained in this study determined the mechanism of K2 CO3/AC for capturing CO2 of low concentration at ambient temperature, which would effectively provide statistical support for CO2 removal from confined spaces.%密闭空间CO2脱除是环境控制和生命保障系统的重要任务,研究适用于密闭空间高活性可再生CO2清除剂至关重要。本文利用热重分析系统对钾基负载型吸收剂K2 CO3/AC ( AC为活性炭)进行实验。在20℃,1%CO2和2%H2 O基准工况下,对比吸收剂和载体AC的反应特性,探索K2 CO3/AC常温下脱除密闭空间CO2反应机理,并探究温度、CO2浓度和H2 O浓度等反应条件对脱碳特性影响。结果表明:载体AC对H2 O和CO2脱除机制为物理吸附作用;K2 CO3/AC主要依靠活性组分K2 CO3与二者的化学反应,在H2 O气氛中通过水

  9. Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjostrom, Sharon [Ada-Es, Inc., Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2016-06-02

    ADA completed a DOE-sponsored program titled Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture under program DE-FE0004343. During this program, sorbents were analyzed for use in a post-combustion CO2 capture process. A supported amine sorbent was selected based upon superior performance to adsorb a greater amount of CO2 than the activated carbon sorbents tested. When the most ideal sorbent at the time was selected, it was characterized and used to create a preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA). A preliminary 550 MW coal-fired power plant using Illinois #6 bituminous coal was designed with a solid sorbent CO2 capture system using the selected supported amine sorbent to both facilitate the TEA and to create the necessary framework to scale down the design to a 1 MWe equivalent slipstream pilot facility. The preliminary techno-economic analysis showed promising results and potential for improved performance for CO2 capture compared to conventional MEA systems. As a result, a 1 MWe equivalent solid sorbent system was designed, constructed, and then installed at a coal-fired power plant in Alabama. The pilot was designed to capture 90% of the CO2 from the incoming flue gas at 1 MWe net electrical generating equivalent. Testing was not possible at the design conditions due to changes in sorbent handling characteristics at post-regenerator temperatures that were not properly incorporated into the pilot design. Thus, severe pluggage occurred at nominally 60% of the design sorbent circulation rate with heated sorbent, although no handling issues were noted when the system was operated prior to bringing the regenerator to operating temperature. Testing within the constraints of the pilot plant resulted in 90% capture of the incoming CO2 at a flow rate equivalent of 0.2 to 0.25 MWe net electrical generating equivalent. The reduction in equivalent flow rate at 90% capture was

  10. Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 sorbent for highly selective CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuwu; Zhai, Xinru; Liu, Dongyang; Sun, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 materials are used as CO2 sorbent to improve the selectivity of CH4/CO2 separation. The SBA-15 sorbents modified by physical CO2 absorbents are very limited to increasing CO2 adsorption and present poor selectivity. However, the SBA-15 sorbents modified by chemical CO2 absorbents increase CO2 adsorption capacity obviously. The separation coefficients of CO2/CH4 increase in this case. The adsorption and regeneration properties of the SBA-15 sorbents modified by TEA, MDEA and DIPA have been compared. The SBA-15 modified by triethanolamine (TEA) presents better CO2/CH4 separation performance than the materials modified by other CO2 absorbents.

  11. High efficiency nanocomposite sorbents for CO2 capture based on amine-functionalized mesoporous capsules

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel high efficiency nanocomposite sorbent for CO2 capture has been developed based on oligomeric amine (polyethylenimine, PEI, and tetraethylenepentamine, TEPA) functionalized mesoporous silica capsules. The newly synthesized sorbents exhibit extraordinary capture capacity up to 7.9 mmol g-1 under simulated flue gas conditions (pre-humidified 10% CO 2). The CO2 capture kinetics were found to be fast and reached 90% of the total capacities within the first few minutes. The effects of the mesoporous capsule features such as particle size and shell thickness on CO2 capture capacity were investigated. Larger particle size, higher interior void volume and thinner mesoporous shell thickness all improved the CO2 capacity of the sorbents. PEI impregnated sorbents showed good reversibility and stability during cyclic adsorption-regeneration tests (50 cycles). © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Effect of Calcium Oxide Additive on the Performance of Iron Oxide Sorbent for High-Temperature Coal Gas Desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiling Fan; Kechang Xie; Ju Shangguan; Fang Shen; Chunhu Li

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium oxide additive in iron oxide sorbent for hot gas desulfurization was investigated by XRD and TPR techniques. XRD characterization showed that CaO was highly dispersed after the calcination of sorbents. Calcium sulfate formed in the desulfurization was decomposed and regenerated to CaO by reacting with CO before the next sulfidation process. Calcium participated in every sulfidation/regeneration cycle and contributed to the enhancement of sulfur capacity. The TPR results showed that the reduction temperature of the sorbent increased with the increase of the content of calcium. Calcium played a role of retarding reduction. Therefore, the addition of calcium oxide additive will benefit the utilization of iron oxide sorbent in strongly reducing atmospheres.

  13. Lime-based sorbents for high-temperature CO2 capture--a review of sorbent modification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a review of the research on CO(2) capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY's (Ottawa, Canada) research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO(2) capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) reactor which contains a carbonator-a unit for CO(2) capture, and a calciner-a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO(2) carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use.

  14. Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A Review of Sorbent Modification Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Anthony

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the research on CO2 capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY’s (Ottawa, Canada research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO2 capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC reactor which contains a carbonator—a unit for CO2 capture, and a calciner—a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO2 carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use.

  15. Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A Review of Sorbent Modification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the research on CO2 capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY’s (Ottawa, Canada) research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO2 capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) reactor which contains a carbonator—a unit for CO2 capture, and a calciner—a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO2 carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use. PMID:20948952

  16. Copper-based sorbents for coal gas desulfurization at moderate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, R.B.; Abbasian, J.

    2000-05-01

    In a previous paper, the authors reported on the development of a regenerable copper chromite sorbent, designated as CuCr-29, that is capable of achieving less than 5 ppmv H{sub 2}S concentration in the cleaned fuel gas at about 600 C. This paper reports on recent research carried out to develop a new class of copper-based sorbents for hot fuel gas desulfurization applications in the moderate temperature range of 350--550 C that is currently of industrial interest. A reproducible sorbent preparation technique has been extended to the formulation of highly reactive and attrition-resistant sulfur sorbents based on reagent-grade oxides of copper, manganese, and alumina. The results of packed-bed experiments carried out for the evaluation of the performance of several copper-based sorbents at 350 and 450 C as well as the assessment of the long-term durability and regenerability of one selected formulation are presented and discussed. Three copper-based sorbents were shown to exhibit excellent sulfur removal efficiency and effective capacity, with one formulation (IGTSS-145) being particularly effective in the range of 450--600 C and two formulations (IGTSS-179 and IGTSS-326A) for the range of 350--450 C. The IGTSS-326A formulation maintained excellent sulfur removal efficiency (<1 ppmv H{sub 2}S in the cleaned fuel gas) as well as excellent effective sulfur capacity throughout extended durability testing. This sorbent was also shown to have significantly high attrition resistance, as determined in accordance with the ASTM D5757-95 procedure. These results strongly suggest the suitability of this formulation as a candidate sorbent for demonstration in the Sierra Pacific (Pinon Pine) Clean Coal Technology IGCC Demonstration Program.

  17. CFB sorbent selection enhances performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecker, B.; Wofford, J.; DuBose, R.; Ray, D.

    1997-07-01

    The quality and particle size of the sorbent has a direct influence on the efficiency of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. This report outlines tests and subsequent operation of a CFB unit at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Cogeneration Facility (UNC-CH) that proved how dramatically a change in sorbent can change the efficiency of performance.

  18. High capacity immobilized amine sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Soong, Yee; Filburn, Thomas

    2007-10-30

    A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  19. Method and system to reclaim functional sites on a sorbent contaminated by heat stable salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon; Morris, William J.

    2016-03-08

    The objective of this invention is to develop a method to reclaim functional sites on a CO.sub.2 sorbent that have reacted with an acid gas (other than CO.sub.2) to form heat stable salts (HSS). HSS are a significant concern for dry sorbent based CO.sub.2 capture because over time the buildup of HSS will reduce the overall functionality of the CO.sub.2 sorbent. A chemical treatment can remove the non-CO.sub.2 acid gas and reclaim functional sites that can then be used for further CO.sub.2 adsorption.

  20. Efficient CO2 sorbents based on silica foam with ultra-large mesopores

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2012-01-01

    A series of high-capacity, amine impregnated sorbents based on a cost-effective silica foam with ultra-large mesopores is reported. The sorbents exhibit fast CO2 capture kinetics, high adsorption capacity (of up to 5.8 mmol g-1 under 1 atm of dry CO2), as well as good stability over multiple adsorption-desorption cycles. A simple theoretical analysis is provided relating the support structure to sorbent performance. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A.H.; Abbasian, J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li, Li [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents (i.e. copper-chromium and copper-cerium) for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. In this program, structural and kinetic studies are conducted on various compositions of the two selected copper-based sorbents to determine the optimum sorbent composition. The effect of operating conditions on the performance of the sorbents alone with the stability and regenerability of the selected sorbents in successive sulfidation/regeneration operation are determined. Parametric multicycle desulfurization tests were conducted this quarter in a bench-scale (5-cm-diameter) quartz reactor at one atmosphere using the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuO/CeO{sub 2} sorbents. The parameters studied included temperature, space velocity, and feed gas composition. Both sorbents were able to reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration of the reactor feed gas to <10 ppM under all conditions tested. The apparent reactivity of the CuO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent was lower after the first cycle which may be attributed to incomplete regeneration caused by sulfate formation.

  2. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by sorption onto zirconium- and titanium-modified sorbents

    OpenAIRE

    Ignjatović Ljubiša; Roglić Goran; Dojčinović Biljana; Đorđević Dragana; Anđelković Ivan; Manojlović Dragan D.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic reduction in drinking water can include treatment by adsorption, switching to alternative water sources, or blending with water that has a lower arsenic concentration. Commercial sorbents MTM, Greensand and BIRM (Clack Corporation) were modified with zirconium and titanium after activation. The modifications were performed with titanium tetrachloride and zirconium tetrachloride. The modified sorbents were dried at different temperatures. The sorption of arsenate and arsenite dis...

  3. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture From Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Steven [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Srinivasachar, Srivats [Envergex LLC, Sturbridge, MA (United States); Laudal, Daniel [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Browers, Bruce [Barr Engineering, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-31

    A novel hybrid solid sorbent technology for CO₂ capture and separation from coal combustion-derived flue gas was evaluated. The technology – Capture of CO₂ by Hybrid Sorption (CACHYS™) – is a solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: 1) reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, 2) utilization of novel process chemistry, 3) contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO₂ heat of reaction and promote fast CO₂ capture, and 4) low-cost method of heat management. This report provides key information developed during the course of the project that includes sorbent performance, energy for sorbent regeneration, physical properties of the sorbent, the integration of process components, sizing of equipment, and overall capital and operational cost of the integrated CACHYS™ system. Seven sorbent formulations were prepared and evaluated at the lab-scale for energy requirements and CO₂ capture performance. Sorbent heat of regeneration ranged from 30-80 kJ/mol CO₂ and was found to be dependent on process conditions. Two sorbent formulations (designated HCK-4 & HCK-7) were down-selected for additional fixed-bed testing. Additional testing involved subjecting the sorbents to 100 continuous cycles in the fixed-bed reactor to determine performance as a function of time. The working capacity achieved for HCK-4 sorbent ranged from 5.5-8.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent, while the HCK-7 typically ranged from 8.0-10.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent. Overall, there was no deterioration in capacity with continuous cycling for either sorbent. The CACHYS™ bench-scale testing system designed and fabricated under this award consists of a dual circulating fluidized-bed adsorber and a moving-bed regenerator. The system takes a flue gas slipstream from the University of North Dakota’s coal-fired steam plant. Prior to being sent to the adsorber, the flue gas is scrubbed to remove SO₂ and particulate. During parametric testing of the adsorber, CO₂ capture achieved using

  4. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture From Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Steven [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Srinivasachar, Srivats [Envergex LLC, Sturbridge, MA (United States); Laudal, Daniel [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Browers, Bruce [Barr Engineering, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-31

    A novel hybrid solid sorbent technology for CO₂ capture and separation from coal combustion-derived flue gas was evaluated. The technology – Capture of CO₂ by Hybrid Sorption (CACHYS™) – is a solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: 1) reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, 2) utilization of novel process chemistry, 3) contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO₂ heat of reaction and promote fast CO₂ capture, and 4) low-cost method of heat management. This report provides key information developed during the course of the project that includes sorbent performance, energy for sorbent regeneration, physical properties of the sorbent, the integration of process components, sizing of equipment, and overall capital and operational cost of the integrated CACHYS™ system. Seven sorbent formulations were prepared and evaluated at the lab-scale for energy requirements and CO₂ capture performance. Sorbent heat of regeneration ranged from 30-80 kJ/mol CO₂ and was found to be dependent on process conditions. Two sorbent formulations (designated HCK-4 & HCK-7) were down-selected for additional fixed-bed testing. Additional testing involved subjecting the sorbents to 100 continuous cycles in the fixed-bed reactor to determine performance as a function of time. The working capacity achieved for HCK-4 sorbent ranged from 5.5-8.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent, while the HCK-7 typically ranged from 8.0-10.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent. Overall, there was no deterioration in capacity with continuous cycling for either sorbent. The CACHYS™ bench-scale testing system designed and fabricated under this award consists of a dual circulating fluidized-bed adsorber and a moving-bed regenerator. The system takes a flue gas slipstream from the University of North Dakota’s coal-fired steam plant. Prior to being sent to the adsorber, the flue gas is scrubbed to remove SO₂ and particulate. During parametric testing of the adsorber, CO₂ capture achieved using

  5. Durable zinc ferrite sorbent pellets for hot coal gas desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Mahesh C.; Blandon, Antonio E.; Hepworth, Malcolm T.

    1988-01-01

    Durable, porous sulfur sorbents useful in removing hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas are prepared by water pelletizing a mixture of fine zinc oxide and fine iron oxide with inorganic and organic binders and small amounts of activators such as sodium carbonate and molybdenite; the pellets are dried and then indurated at a high temperature, e.g., 1800.degree. C., for a time sufficient to produce crush-resistant pellets.

  6. The effect of preparation of biogenic sorbent on zinc sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jenčárová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prepare biogenic sulphides by using bacteria for the removal of zinc cations from their solutions. Theproduction was realized in a bioreactor under anaerobic conditions at 30 °C. Sorbents were prepared by sulphate-reducing bacteria indifferent nutrient medium modifications, under two modes of bacteria cultivation. Created precipitates of iron sulphides were removedfrom the liquid phase of the cultivation medium by filtration, dried and used for the sorption experiments.

  7. Novel sorbents for environmental remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Werner, David

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, one of the major environmental problems is the pollution of aquatic systems and soil by persistent pollutants. Persistent pollutants have been found widespread in sediments, surface waters, and drinking water supplies. The removal of pollutants can be accomplished prior to their discharge to receiving bodies or by immobilizing them onto soil. Sorption is the most commonly applied process, and activated carbons have been widely used. Rapid progress in nanotechnology and a new focus on biomass-based instead of non-renewable starting materials have produced a wide range of novel engineered sorbents including biosorbents, biochars, carbon-based nanoparticles, bio-nano hybrid materials, and iron-impregnated activated carbons. Sorbent materials have been used in environmental remediation processes and especially in agricultural soil, sediments and contaminated soil, water treatment, and industrial wastewater treatment. Furthermore, sorbents may enhance the synergistic action of other processes, such as volatilization and biodegradation. Novel sorbents have been employed for the removal or immobilization of persistent pollutants such as and include heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Cd, and Hg), halogenated organic compounds, endocrine disrupting chemicals, metalloids and non-metallic elements, and other organic pollutants. The development and evaluation of novel sorbents requires a multidisciplinary approach encompassing environmental, nanotechnology, physical, analytical, and surface chemistry. The necessary evaluations encompass not only the efficiency of these materials to remove pollutants from surface waters and groundwater, industrial wastewater, polluted soils and sediments, etc., but also the potential side-effects of their environmental applications. The aim of this work is to present the results of the use of biochar and impregnated carbon sorbents for the removal of organic pollutants and metals. Furthermore, the new findings from the forthcoming session

  8. Bench-scale testing of novel high-temperature desulfurization sorbents: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, S.K.; Harkins, S.M.; Stogner, J.M.; Woods, M.C.; Rogers, T.N.

    1988-12-01

    Extrudates of regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents including zinc ferrite, copper-modified zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, copper aluminate, copper-iron aluminate, and copper manganate were prepared and tested for their potential to remove hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) from coal gasifier gas in a high-temperature high-pressure (HTHP) fixed-bed reactor. The zinc containing sorbents were found to be more promising than those containing combinations of copper, aluminum, iron, and manganese. Reductions in H/sub 2/S concentration were achieved depending on sorbent, reactor temperature, and steam concentration. The copper-modified zinc ferrite sorbent reduced the H/sub 2/S concentration to less than 1 ppmv at up to 1100/degree/F with 20 volume % steam in the gas. The zinc ferrite sorbent showed no apparent loss in capacity over 15 sulfidation-regeneration cycles but underwent significant strength reduction in a coal-derived gas with 15% or less steam due to soot formation. Zinc titanate exhibited excellent strength and capacity retention at steam levels as low as 5% and temperatures as high as 1350/degree/F. 13 refs., 64 figs., 75 tabs.

  9. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  10. CO{sub 2} Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillerup, Eric; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Wang, Dongxiang; Guo, Jiahua; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2012-08-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a new generation of solid, regenerable polymeric molecular basket sorbent (MBS) for more cost-efficient capture and separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The primary goal is to develop a cost-effective MBS sorbent with better thermal stability. To improve the cost-effectiveness of MBS, we have explored commercially available and inexpensive support to replace the more expensive mesoporous molecular sieves like MCM-41 and SBA- 15. In addition, we have developed some advanced sorbent materials with 3D pore structure such as hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) to improve the CO{sub 2} working capacity of MBS, which can also reduce the cost for the whole CO{sub 2} capture process. During the project duration, the concern regarding the desorption rate of MBS sorbents has been raised, because lower desorption rate increases the desorption time for complete regeneration of the sorbent which in turn leads to a lower working capacity if the regeneration time is limited. Thus, the improvement in the thermal stability of MBS became a vital task for later part of this project. The improvement in the thermal stability was performed via increasing the polymer density either using higher molecular weight PEI or PEI cross-linking with an organic compound. Moreover, we have used the computational approach to estimate the interaction of CO{sub 2} with different MBSs for the fundamental understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption, which may benefit the development, design and modification of the sorbents and the process.

  11. Evaluation of silk-floss fiber and dog fur as sorbent materials for the petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Lucas P. dos [Universidade Federal do Parana (PGMec/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Dubiella, Juliana [Universidade Federal do Parana (DEMEC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Programa Institucional de Bolsas de Iniciacao Cientifica; Perotta, Larissa [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa Interdisciplinar em Engenharia de Petroleo e Gas Natural; Satyanarayana, Kestur G. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Flores-Sahagun, Thais Sydenstricker [Universidade Federal do Parana (DEMEC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2009-07-01

    In this study silk-floss and dog fur were tested as sorbent materials for oils and the results were compared with peat, a commercial sorbent. Sorption tests were carried out in dry and aqueous systems, with and without stirring for different periods of time (5-1440 min). Density, hydrophobicity, buoyancy and water uptake by the fibers of the impregnated sorbents have been determined. The use of silk-floss and dog fur was also tested in columns to purify water containing toluene, benzene, motor oil or sunflower oil. Breakthrough curves during 120 min were drawn for each material with the samples (oily water or water containing benzene or toluene) and were analyzed by ultraviolet spectroscopy. It was concluded that the silk-floss is the best sorbent material (65.3 g oil/g sorbent) followed by the dog fur (34.6 g oil/g sorbent) and peat (19.5 g oil/g sorbent), for sorption time of 1 h in dynamic condition. The efficiency of the pollutant removal from water with the use of adsorption columns was high for both materials although the use of dog fur was preferable because of the slight superiority in efficiency compared to silk-floss and also, due to the easier packing of the dog fur in the column. (author)

  12. Carbon capture test unit design and development using amine-based solid sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, Ronald W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Spenik, James L. [REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV (United States); Shadle, Lawrence J. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Hoffman, James S. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Gray, McMahan L. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Panday, Rupen [REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV (United States); Stehle, Richard C. [ORISE, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This study presents the design and development of a reactor system and the subsequent modifications to evaluate an integrated process to scrub carbon dioxide (CO2) from synthetic flue gas using amine based solid sorbents. The paper presents the initial system design and then discusses the various changes implemented to address the change in sorbent from a 180 μm Geldart group B material to a 115 μm Geldart group A material as well as issues discovered during experimental trials where the major obstacle in system operation was the ability to maintain a constant circulation of a solid sorbent stemming from this change in sorbent material. The system primarily consisted of four fluid beds, through which an amine impregnated solid sorbent was circulated and adsorption, pre-heat, regeneration, and cooling processes occurred. Instrumentation was assembled to characterize thermal, hydrodynamic, and gas adsorption performance in this integrated unit. A series of shakedown tests were performed and the configuration altered to meet the needs of the sorbent performance and achieve desired target capture efficiencies. Finally, methods were identified, tested, and applied to continuously monitor critical operating parameters including solids circulation rate, adsorbed and desorbed CO2, solids inventories, and pressures.

  13. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  14. Comparison of 2 regenerative procedures--guided tissue regeneration and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft--in the treatment of intrabony defects: a clinical and radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashis, A; Andronikaki-Faldami, A; Tsiklakis, K

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinically and radiographically the effectiveness of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), using a bioabsorbable polylactic acid softened with citric acid ester barrier and commercially available demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) in the treatment of 2- and 3-wall intrabony defects. Twelve patients each with one treated defect comprised each group. Conservative treatment was completed 2 to 4 months prior to surgery. Clinical measurements, plaque index, gingival index, probing depths (PD), clinical attachment levels (CAL) and recession (REC), were comparable in both groups at baseline. They were repeated at 12 months. Surgical measurements were also comparable at baseline in both groups. In the GTR group, at baseline the mean distance between the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and base of the defect was 12.3 +/- 2.9 mm and in the DFDBA group 11.3 +/- 1.8 mm. The defect depth was 6.3 +/- 2.0 mm and 5.4 +/- 1.3 mm, respectively. Radiographs were taken at baseline and 12 months later and compared using non-standardized digital subtraction radiography. In the GTR group, mean PD decreased from 7.9 +/- 2.5 mm to 3.5 +/- 1.4 mm and mean CAL from 10.8 +/- 2.8 mm to 7.0 +/- 1.6 mm, the differences being statistically significant (P = 0.002), while REC increased from 2.9 +/- 1.2 mm to 3.5 +/- 1.1 mm. In the DFDBA group, mean PD decreased from 7.1 +/- 1.1 mm to 3.5 +/- 1.1 mm and mean CAL from 9.8 +/- 1.5 mm to 6.6 +/- 1.7 mm (P = 0.002), while REC increased from 2.8 +/- 1.0 mm to 3.1 +/- 1.2 mm. No significant differences were found when the clinical results of the 2 groups were compared. Radiographic differences between the baseline and reconstructed images 12 months later were observed in both groups. Mean crestal bone resorption was 15.3 +/- 22.5% in the GTR group and 10.4 +/- 31.8% in the DFDBA group, and mean improvement in the distance between the CEJ and the base of the defect was 22.8 +/- 18.1% in the GTR group and 15

  15. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li, Z. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650 to 850 C. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet > 750 C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Results of fixed-bed reactor tests conducted in this quarter, indicate that, at 750 C, pre-reduction with H{sub 2} in the presence of H{sub 2}O does not effect the performance of either sorbent for H{sub 2}S removal. For the pre-reduced CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sorbent, copper utilization before the first H{sub 2}S breakthrough is substantially higher in synthesis feed gas mixture than in feed gas containing 30 Vol% H{sub 2}, and slightly lower than in 10 vol% H{sub 2}. In sulfidation-regeneration testing of copper- and additive-rich sorbents, chromium-rich CuO-3Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sorbent demonstrated very high H{sub 2}S removal efficiency and high copper conversion levels (comparable to that of the 1:1 molar composition sorbent). Similar results were obtained with the cerium-rich CuO-3CeO{sub 2} sorbent, but only for the first cycle. The H{sub 2}S removal performance of both copper-rich sorbents was inferior to that of the respective 1:1 molar compositions. CuO-CeO{sub 2} sorbent testing in a TGA indicates no appreciable decrease in the sulfidation rate over 5 1/2 cycles. However, weight changes during regeneration of the CuO-CeO{sub 2} suggest that some copper or cerium sulfates formed.

  16. Development of a Rapid Cycling CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O Removal Sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather; Alptekin, Goekhan; Cates, Matthew; Bernal, Casey; Dubovik, Margarita; Gershanovich, Yevgenia

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) planned future missions set stringent demands on the design of the Portable Life Support System (PLSS), requiring dramatic reductions in weight, decreased reliance on supplies and greater flexibility on the types of missions. Use of regenerable systems that reduce weight and volume of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is of critical importance to NASA, both for low orbit operations and for long duration manned missions. The carbon dioxide and humidity control unit in the existing PLSS design is relatively large, since it has to remove and store 8 hours worth of CO2. If the sorbent regeneration can be carried out during the extravehicular activity (EVA) with a relatively high regeneration frequency, the size of the sorbent canister and weight can be significantly reduced. The progress of regenerable CO2 and humidity control is leading us towards the use of a rapid cycling amine system. TDA Research, Inc. is developing compact, regenerable sorbent materials to control CO2 and humidity in the space suit ventilation loop. The sorbent can be regenerated using space vacuum during the EVA, eliminating all carbon dioxide and humidity duration-limiting elements in the life support system. The material also has applications in other areas of space exploration such as the Orion spacecraft and other longer duration exploration missions requiring regenerable technologies. This paper summarizes the results of the sorbent development, testing, and evaluation efforts to date. The results of a preliminary system analysis are also included, showing the size and volume reductions for PLSS provided by the new system.

  17. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by sorption onto zirconium- and titanium-modified sorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Ljubiša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic reduction in drinking water can include treatment by adsorption, switching to alternative water sources, or blending with water that has a lower arsenic concentration. Commercial sorbents MTM, Greensand and BIRM (Clack Corporation were modified with zirconium and titanium after activation. The modifications were performed with titanium tetrachloride and zirconium tetrachloride. The modified sorbents were dried at different temperatures. The sorption of arsenate and arsenite dissolved in drinking water (200μg L-1 onto the sorbents were tested using a batch procedure. After removal of the sorbent, the concentration of arsenic was determined by HG-AAS. Zirconium-modified BIRM showed the best performance for the removal of both arsenite and arsenate. Modification of the greensand did not affect arsenic sorption ability. Zirconium-modified BIRM diminished the concentration of total As to below 5 μg L-1.

  18. Experimental investigation of various vegetable fibers as sorbent materials for oil spills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunciado, T.R.; Sydenstricker, T.H.D.; Amico, S.C. [Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, (Brazil). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-11-15

    Oil spills are a global concern due to their environmental and economical impact. various commercial systems have been developed to control these spills, including the use of fibers as sorbents. This research investigates the use of various vegetable fibers, namely mixed leaves residues, mixed sawdust, sisal (Agave sisalana), coir fiber (Cocos nucifera), sponge-gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and silk-floss as sorbent materials of crude oil. Sorption tests with crude oil were conducted in deionized and marine water media, with and without agitation. Water uptake by the fibers was investigated by tests in dry conditions and distillation of the impregnated sorbent. The silk-floss fiber showed a very high degree of hydrophobicity and oil sorption capacity of approximately 85 g oil/g sorbent (in 24 hours). Specific gravity measurements and buoyancy tests were also used to evaluate the suitability of these fibers for the intended application. (author)

  19. Hydrogen sulfide removal from coal gas by the metal-ferrite sorbents made from the heavy metal wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ting Ke; Chang, Han Ching; Chu, Hsin; Chen, Hung Ta

    2008-12-30

    The metal-ferrite (chromium-ferrite and zinc-ferrite) sorbents made from the heavy metal wastewater sludge have been developed for the hydrogen sulfide removal from coal gas. The high temperature absorption of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas with the metal-ferrite sorbent in a fixed bed reactor was conducted in this study. The metal-ferrite powders were the products of the ferrite process for the heavy metal wastewater treatment. The porosity analysis results show that the number of micropores of the sorbents after sulfidation and regeneration process decreases and the average pore size increases due to the acute endothermic and exothermic reactions during the sulfidation-regeneration process. The FeS, ZnS, and MnS peaks are observed on the sulfided sorbents, and the chromium extraction of the CFR6 can fulfill the emission standard of Taiwan EPA. The suitable sulfidation temperature range for chromium-ferrite sorbent is at 500-600 degrees C. In addition, effects of various concentrations of H2 and CO were also conducted in the present work at different temperatures. By increasing the H2 concentration, the sulfur sorption capacity of the sorbent decreases and an adverse result is observed in the case of increasing CO concentration. This can be explained via water-shift reaction.

  20. Selective Removal of Nitrosamines from a Model Amine Carbon-Capture Waterwash Using Low-Cost Activated-Carbon Sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Leland R; Combs, Megan; Lohe, Amit R; Lippert, Cameron A; Thompson, Jesse G; Liu, Kunlei

    2017-09-19

    Nitrosamines generated in the amine solvent loop of postcombustion carbon capture systems are potent carcinogens, and their emission could pose a serious threat to the environment or human health. Nitrosamine emission control strategies are critical for the success of amine-based carbon capture as the technology approaches industrial-scale deployment. Waterwash systems have been used to control volatile and aerosol emissions, including nitrosamines, from carbon-capture plants, but it is still necessary to remove or destroy nitrosamines in the circulating waterwash to prevent their subsequent emission into the environment. In this study, a cost-effective method for selectively removing nitrosamines from the absorber waterwash effluent with activated-carbon sorbents was developed to reduce the environmental impact associated with amine-based carbon capture. The results show that the commercial activated-carbon sorbents tested have a high capacity and selectivity for nitrosamines over the parent solvent amines, with capacities up to 190 mg/g carbon, under simulated amine waterwash conditions. To further reduce costs, an aerobic thermal sorbent regeneration step was also examined due to the low thermal stability of nitrosamines. To model the effect of oxidation on the sorbent performance, thermal- and acid-oxidized sorbents were also prepared from the commercial sorbents and analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of nitrosamines, the parent amine, and the influence of the physical properties of the carbon sorbents on nitrosamine adsorption was examined. Key sorbent properties included the sorbent hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity, surface pKa of the sorbent, and chemical structure of the parent amine and nitrosamine.

  1. Developments of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop hot-gas cleanup sorbents for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343-538{degrees}C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt and molybdenum. The specific objective in the successful preparation of H{sub 2}S absorbents will be to generate as high and as stable a surface area as possible, in order to develop suitable sorbent, that are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. A number of formulations will be prepared and screened for testing in a 1/2-inch fixed bed reactor at high pressure (1 to 20 atm) and high temperatures using simulated coal-derived fuel-gases. Screening criteria will include, chemical reactivity, stability, and regenerability over the temperature range of 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) to 538{degrees}C (1000{degrees}F). Each formulation will be tested for up to 5 cycles of absorption and regeneration. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives will be investigated, which would promote a lower ignition of the regeneration. Selected superior formulation will be tested for long term (up to least 30 cycles) durability and chemical reactivity in the reactor.

  2. A study on the regeneration performance characteristics of an internally heated regenerator in a liquid desiccant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Ji Hyun [Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Dong Soon; Kim, Young Lyoul; Kim, Seon Chang [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This paper presents a study on the regeneration performance characteristics of an internally heated regenerator applicable to a liquid desiccant system. The internally heated regenerator used in this study was designed and manufactured to provide better regeneration performance. An experimental setup was established to examine the regeneration performance. LiCl aqueous solution was used as working fluid. Variables to evaluate regeneration performance characteristics of the internally heated regenerator were dry bulb temperature, relative humidity and velocity of regeneration air, mass flow rate, temperature and concentration of the LiCl aqueous solution. The experimental conditions were chosen by using a 1/2 fractional factorial DOE. Regeneration rate and regeneration effectiveness were taken as results. From the results, solution concentration and regeneration air relative humidity have strong effects on the regeneration rate. The regeneration effectiveness was affected mostly by regeneration air velocity.

  3. Development and Evaluation of Nanoscale Sorbents for Mercury Capture from Warm Fuel Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja A. Jadhav

    2006-05-31

    ;'dispersed'' form, with two Cu atoms separated by a distance longer than required to form a Cu{sub 2}S molecule. Thus CuS remains in the stable reactive form as long as H{sub 2}S is present in the gas phase. It was also found that the captured Hg on such supported sorbents could be easily released when the spent sorbent is exposed to a H2-containing stream that is free of Hg and H{sub 2}S. Based on this mechanism, a novel regenerative process has been proposed to remove Hg from fuel gas at high temperature. Limited multicyclic studies carried out on the supported Cu sorbents showed their potential to capture Hg from SFG in a regenerative manner. This study has demonstrated that supported nanocrystalline Cu-based sorbents have potential to capture mercury from coal syngas over multiple absorption/regeneration cycles. Further studies are recommended to evaluate their potential to remove arsenic and selenium from coal fuel gas.

  4. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li Li [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet >750{degree}C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The effect of pre-reduction on the performance of the sorbents as well as the rate of different reactions occurring in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration, were studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Sulfidation was conducted with and without H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and with and without pre-reduction in H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O. The results of these tests indicate that reduction and regeneration of both sorbents occurs rapidly. Sulfidation of CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, in H{sub 2}O-free and H{sub 2}-/H{sub 2}O-free gas indicates the possible sulfidation of both copper and chromium. Small quantities of SO{sub 2}, were released during sulfidation suggesting the possible oxidation of H{sub 2}S by the sorbent. Regeneration of the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was complete while regeneration of the CuO-CeO{sub 2} indicated possible limited sulfate formation.

  5. {sup 18}O{sub 2} label mechanism of sulfur generation and characterization in properties over mesoporous Sm-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.S., E-mail: bingsiliu@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Wan, Z.Y.; Wang, F.; Zhan, Y.P. [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Tian, M.; Cheung, A.S.C. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Formation of sulfur originated from catalytic action of samarium oxysulfide. • Mechanism of sulfur desorption was first confirmed via time of flight MS. • Utilization of mesoporous Sm-based sorbents was favorable for diffusion of H{sub 2}S. • Stability of Sm-based sorbent correlated with reasonable regeneration procedure. - Abstract: Using a sol–gel method, SmMeO{sub x}/MCM-41 or SBA-15 (Me = Fe, Co and Zn) and corresponding unsupported sorbents were prepared. The desulfurization performance of these sorbents was evaluated over a fixed-bed reactor and the effects of reaction temperature, feed and sorbent composition on desulfurization performance were studied. Samarium-based sorbents used to remove H{sub 2}S from hot coal gas were reported for the first time. The results of successive sulfidation/regeneration cycles revealed that SmFeO{sub 3}/SBA-15 sorbent was suitable for desulfurization of hot coal gas in the chemical industry. The formation of elemental sulfur during both sulfidation and regeneration processes depended strongly on the catalytic action of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 2}S species, which was confirmed for the first time via high sensitive time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) using 6%vol{sup 18}O{sub 2}/Ar regeneration gas and can reduce markedly procedural complexity. The sorbents were characterized using N{sub 2}-adsorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction of H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}-TPR), thermogravimetry (TG) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) techniques.

  6. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  7. Periodontal Regeneration of 1-, 2-, and 3-Walled Intrabony Defects Using Accell Connexus Versus Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft: A Randomized Parallel Arm Clinical Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    PERIODONTAL  REGENERATION  OF  1-­‐,  2-­‐,  AND  3-­‐WALLED  INTRABONY  DEFECTS  USING  ACCELL   CONNEXUS... Periodontics  Graduate  Program   Naval  Postgraduate  Dental  School   Uniformed  Services  University  of  the...Peter Bertrand, CAPT (ret), DC, USN Chairman, Periodontics Department Director, Periodontics Dept Glenn Munro, CAPT, DC, USN Dean, Naval Postgraduate

  8. Advanced low-temperature sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.; Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.

    1995-12-01

    A number of promising technologies are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation, including the Integrated-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. If IGCC is to be used successfully for power generation, an economic and efficient way must be found to remove the contaminants, particularly sulfur species, found in coal gas. Except for the hot gas desulfurization system, all major components of IGCC are commercially available or have been shown to meet system requirements. Over the last two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has sponsored development of various configurations of high-temperature desulfurization systems including fixed-bed, moving-bed, transport-bed, and fluidized-bed systems. Because of their mode of operation and requirements for sorbent manufacturing, the fixed-bed systems can generally use the same materials as moving-bed configurations, i.e., pelletized or extruded sorbents, while fluidized-bed (circulating or bubbling configurations) and transport reactor configurations use materials generally described as agglomerated or granulated.The objective of this program is to remove hydrogen sulfides from coal gas using sorbent materials.

  9. Succinic acid adsorption from fermentation broth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Brian H; Nghiem, Nhuan P; Richardson, Gerald L

    2004-01-01

    More than 25 sorbents were tested for uptake of succinic acid from aqueous solutions. The best resins were then tested for successive loading and regeneration using hot water. The key desired properties for an ideal sorbent are high capacity, complete stable regenerability, and specificity for the product. The best resins have a stable capacity of about 0.06 g of succinic acid/g of resin at moderate concentrations (1-5 g/L) of succinic acid. Several sorbents were tested more exhaustively for uptake of succinic acid and for successive loading and regeneration using hot water. One resin, XUS 40285, has a good stable isotherm capacity, prefers succinate over glucose, and has good capacities at both acidic and neutral pH. Succinic acid was removed from simulated media containing salts, succinic acid, acetic acid, and sugar using a packed column of sorbent resin, XUS 40285. The fermentation byproduct, acetate, was completely separated from succinate. A simple hot water regeneration successfully concentrated succinate from 10 g/L (inlet) to 40-110 g/L in the effluent. If successful, this would lower separation costs by reducing the need for chemicals for the initial purification step. Despite promising initial results of good capacity (0.06 g of succinic/g of sorbent), 70% recovery using hot water, and a recovered concentration of >100 g/L, this regeneration was not stable over 10 cycles in the column. Alternative regeneration schemes using acid and base were examined. Two (XUS 40285 and XFS-40422) showed both good stable capacities for succinic acid over 10 cycles and >95% recovery in a batch operation using a modified extraction procedure combining acid and hot water washes. These resins showed comparable results with actual broth.

  10. Development of Gold Nanoparticle-Doped Activated Carbon Sorbent for Elemental Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The control of mercury (Hg) from coal-fired power plants by adsorption in solid sorbents is an attractive way to reduce Hg emissions. In this study, a commercial activated carbon (Norit RB3) was impregnated with gold nanoparticles for the retention of Hg in the gas phase, with the intention to explore their potential to be regenerated in future investigations. The activated carbon (RB3) was impregnated with different gold contents using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosp...

  11. Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature Range During Coal Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2007-06-30

    sorbent weight, both of which are less than those at 973 K as expected. In chapter 5 we investigated the performance of CaO sorbents by flame spray pyrolysis at higher temperature with much shorter duration period. Stable high conversions were attained after 40 cycles The results show that the sorbent could reach high CO{sub 2} capture capacity, be completely regenerated in short time and be quite stable even at these severe conditions. Several studies were devoted to identify sorbents which could effectively capture CO{sub 2} while survive in SO{sub 2} atmosphere. From the group of sorbents we checked, a couple of sorbents showed very promising behavior, namely CO{sub 2} uptakes higher than 60% (wt/wt sorbent) while they acquired higher than 95% of their original activity/performance characteristics in a short period of time.

  12. Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture Process Through Heat Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjostrom, Sharon [Ada-Es, Inc., Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2016-03-18

    The focus of this project was the ADAsorb™ CO2 Capture Process, a temperature-swing adsorption process that incorporates a three-stage fluidized bed as the adsorber and a single-stage fluidized bed as the regenerator. ADAsorb™ system was designed, fabricated, and tested under DOE award DEFE0004343. Two amine-based sorbents were evaluated in conjunction with the ADAsorb™ process: “BN”, an ion-exchange resin; and “OJ”, a metal organic framework (MOF) sorbent. Two cross heat exchanger designs were evaluated for use between the adsorber and regenerator: moving bed and fluidized bed. The fluidized bed approach was rejected fairly early in the project because the additional electrical load to power blowers or fans to overcome the pressure drop required for fluidization was estimated to be nominally three times the electrical power that could be generated from the steam saved through the use of the cross heat exchanger. The Energy Research Center at Lehigh University built and utilized a process model of the ADAsorb™ capture process and integrated this model into an existing model of a supercritical PC power plant. The Lehigh models verified that, for the ADAsorb™ system, the largest contributor to parasitic power was lost electrical generation, which was primarily electric power which the host plant could not generate due to the extraction of low pressure (LP) steam for sorbent heating, followed by power for the CO2 compressor and the blower or fan power required to fluidize the adsorber and regenerator. Sorbent characteristics such as the impacts of moisture uptake, optimized adsorption and regeneration temperature, and sensitivity to changes in pressure were also included in the modeling study. Results indicate that sorbents which adsorb more than 1-2% moisture by weight are unlikely to be cost competitive unless they have an extremely high CO2 working capacity that well exceeds 15% by weight. Modeling also revealed

  13. Experiment and modeling of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases at high temperature in a fluidized bed reactor with Ca-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Fang; Zhen-Shan Li; Ning-Sheng Cai [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of the Ministry of Education (MOE)

    2009-01-15

    The cyclic CO{sub 2} capture and CaCO{sub 3} regeneration characteristics in a small fluidized bed reactor were experimentally investigated with limestone and dolomite sorbents. Kinetic rate constants for carbonation and calcination were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data. Mathematical models developed to model the Ca-based sorbent multiple cycles of CO{sub 2} capture and calcination in the bubbling fluidized bed reactor agreed with the experimental data. The experimental and simulated results showed that the CO{sub 2} in flue gases could be absorbed efficiently by limestone and dolomite. The time for high-efficiency CO{sub 2} capture decreased with an increasing number of cycles because of the loss of sorbent activity, and the final CO{sub 2} capture efficiency remained nearly constant as the sorbent reached its final residual capture capacity. In a continuous carbonation and calcination system, corresponding to the sorbent activity loss, the carbonation kinetic rates of sorbent undergoing various cycles are different, and the carbonation kinetic rates of sorbent circulating N times in the carbonation/calcination cycles are also different because of the different residence time of sorbent in the carbonator. Therefore, the average carbonation rate was given based on the mass balance and exit age distribution for sorbent in the carbonator. The CO{sub 2} capture characteristics in a continuous carbonation/calcination system were predicted, taking into consideration the mass balance, sorbent circulation rate, sorbent activity loss, and average carbonation kinetic rate, to give useful information for the reactor design and operation of multiple carbonation/calcination reaction cycles. 27 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Silver containing sorbents: Physicochemical and biological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Rachkovskaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New silver containing sorbents, based on mineral carriers, such as alumina and silica systems with a meso- and macro- porous structure, have a higher mechanical resistance and, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemical composition of the surface. These sorbents are easy to find and relatively inexpensive, compared to their known equivalents. They are furthermore characterised by high specific surface and simple preparation, whilst the addition of silver considerably increases their antiseptic activity. The results of research of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the developed substances, as well as bio-comparability of sorbents with biological tissues, are presented in this paper. The modified material acts simultaneously as the carrier for active substances to the area of therapeutic application and as a sorbent used to remove toxic agents from such areas. This approach led us to modify the sorbent, and prolong the delivery of substances such as silver, as an effective antibacterial and antimycotic agent.

  15. Liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-04-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review provides an overview of the models of study currently used in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus is placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration, including small-for-size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting-edge topics in liver regeneration, including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a 3-dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation, are proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration.

  16. Waste Derived Sorbents and Their Potential Roles in Heavy Metal Remediation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Y. W.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic waste materials that have the suitable inherent characteristics could be used as precursors for the synthesis of micro- and mesoporous materials, which present great potential to be re-utilized as sorbent materials for heavy metal remediation. Three inorganic waste materials were studied in the present work: water treatment residuals (WTRs from an integrated drinking water/wastewater treatment plant, and fly ash and bottom ash samples from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI. These wastes were converted into three sorbent materials: ferrihydrite-like materials derived from drying of WTRs, hydroxyapatite-like material derived from ultrasound assisted synthesis of MSWI fly ash with phosphoric acid solution, and a zeolitic material derived from alkaline hydrothermal conversion of MSWI bottom ash. The performance of these materials, as well as their equivalent commercially available counterparts, was assessed for the adsorption of multiple heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn from synthetic solutions, contaminated sediments and surface waters; and satisfactory results were obtained. In addition, it was observed that the combination of sorbents into sorbent mixtures enhanced the performance levels and, where applicable, stabilized inherently mobile contaminants from the waste derived sorbents.

  17. EVALUATION OF SOLID SORBENTS AS A RETROFIT TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly Krutka; Sharon Sjostrom

    2011-07-31

    field sites. ADA designed and fabricated a slipstream pilot to allow an evaluation of the kinetic behavior of sorbents and provide some flexibility for the physical characteristics of the materials. The design incorporated a transport reactor for the adsorber (co-current reactor) and a fluidized-bed in the regenerator. This combination achieved the sorbent characterization goals and provided an opportunity to evaluate whether the potential cost savings associated with a relatively simple process design could overcome the sacrifices inherent in a co-current separation process. The system was installed at two field sites during the project, Luminant's Martin Lake Steam Electric Station and Xcel Energy's Sherburne County Generating Station (Sherco). Although the system could not maintain continuous 90% CO{sub 2} removal with the sorbents evaluated under this program, it was useful to compare the CO{sub 2} removal properties of several different sorbents on actual flue gas. One of the supported amine materials, sorbent R, was evaluated at both Martin Lake and Sherco. The 1 kWe pilot was operated in continuous mode as well as batch mode. In continuous mode, the sorbent performance could not overcome the limitations of the cocurrent adsorbent design. In batch mode, sorbent R was able to remove up to 90% CO{sub 2} for several cycles. Approximately 50% of the total removal occurred in the first three feet of the adsorption reactor, which was a transport reactor. During continuous testing at Sherco, CO{sub 2} removal decreased to approximately 20% at steady state. The lack of continuous removal was due primarily to the combination of a co-current adsorption system with a fluidized bed for regeneration, a combination which did not provide an adequate driving force to maintain an acceptable working CO{sub 2} capacity. In addition, because sorbent R consisted of a polymeric amine coated on a silica substrate, it was believed that the 50% amine loaded resulted in mass

  18. Sorption of methylxanthines by different sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, S. G.; Andreeva, E. Yu.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Terent'eva, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Sorption of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine, diprophylline, and pentoxyphylline on different sorbents (supercross-linked polystyrene, surface-modified copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene Strata-X, and carbon nanomaterials Taunit and Diasorb-100-C16T) was studied in a static mode in an effort to find new sorbents suitable for sorption isolation and concentration of methylxanthines. The peculiarities of sorption of methylxanthines were explained in relation to the solution acidity, the nature of the sorbates and their concentration, the nature of the solvent, and the structural characteristics of the sorbents.

  19. Functionalized iron oxide/SBA-15 sorbent: investigation of adsorption performance towards glyphosate herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoira, Luca; Appendini, Marta; Fiorilli, Sonia; Onida, Barbara; Del Bubba, Massimo; Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta

    2016-11-01

    Glyphosate is a worldwide-used herbicide occurring in many monitoring campaigns. Efficient technologies are currently unavailable for glyphosate removal from waters. In this work, a SBA-15 mesoporous silica-based material (Fe-NH2-SBA-15) was synthesized and studied for the adsorption of glyphosate from waters. In order to promote specific interactions between the sorbent and glyphosate via phosphoric group, iron oxide nanoparticles were encapsulated and a surface functionalization with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane was accomplished. The adsorption of glyphosate on Fe-NH2-SBA-15 was investigated as a function of (i) pH, (ii) ionic strength (I), and (iii) adsorbate to adsorbent ratio (C), using a two-level, three-factor experimental design. The experimental design allowed for understanding the effect of the abovementioned variables and for proposing experimental conditions for quantitative removal (pH = 2.1, I = 1⋅10(-2) M and C = 0.35) under both batch and dynamic conditions. Interaction mechanism between glyphosate and Fe-NH2-SBA-15 sorbent was elucidated by studying the adsorption behavior of sorbents derived from the intermediate stages of synthesis and by desorption tests. Fe-NH2-SBA-15 sorbent can be quantitatively regenerated by 12.5 mM NaOH, and can be reused at least for five adsorption/desorption cycles. Quantitative removal of glyphosate from inlet and effluent wastewaters from a wastewater treatment plant is shown.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF SORBENT PRODUCED THROUGH IMMOBILIZATION OF HUMIC ACID ON CHITOSAN USING GLUTARALDEHYDE AS CROSS-LINKING AGENT AND Pb(II ION AS ACTIVE SITE PROTECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uripto Trisno Santoso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorbent produced through immobilization of humic acid (HA on chitosan using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent and Pb(II ions as active site protector has been characterized. Active sorption site of HA was protected by reacting HA with Pb(II ion, and the protected-HA was then activated by glutaraldehyde, crosslinked onto chitosan, and deprotected by 0.1 M disodium ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (Na2EDTA. The protected-crosslinking method enhanced the content of immobilized-HA and its chemical stability. Based on the FTIR spectra, crosslinking of HA on chitosan probably occurred through a chemical reaction. The sorption capacity of sorbent still remains unchanged after the second regeneration, but some of HA start to be soluble. The latter shows that cross-linking reaction between HA and chitosan is through formation an unstable product. The effectiveness of sorbent regeneration can also be identified by the XRD pattern.

  1. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  2. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Final technical report, 1 September 1992--31 August, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A.H.; Abbasian, J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely Cu-Cr and Cu-Ce, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650 to 850 C. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle systems. Structural and kinetic studies were conducted on various compositions of the two Cu-based sorbents to determine the optimum sorbent composition. The effect to operating conditions on the performance of the sorbents along with the stability and regenerability of the selected sorbents in successive sulfidation/regeneration operation were determined. Overall, the CuO-lean binaries (with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or CeO{sub 2}) may benefit the H{sub 2}S breakthrough levels. While this is at the expense of sulfur capacity for the Cu-Cr-O sorbents, it may not affect the capacity of the Cu-Ce-O sorbents. Parametric multicycle desulfurization tests were conducted in a bench-scale quartz reactor at one atmosphere using the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuO-CeO{sub 2} sorbents. The parameters studied included temperature, space velocity, and feed gas composition. Both sorbents were able to reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration of the reactor feed gas from 5,000 ppmv to less than 1 ppmv to 10 ppmv at 750 to 850 C. Both sorbents were found to consume H{sub 2} and produce SO{sub 2} during the initial stages of sulfidation. Analysis of partially sulfided samples identified predominantly Cu metal, the additive oxide and small amounts of oxidic copper. For the Cu-Cr-O sorbents, the latter is apparently sufficient to keep the H{sub 2}S pre-breakthrough levels as low as has been reported in this work. For the Cu-Ce-O sorbents, in which very little or no oxidic copper remained, the low H{sub 2}S levels may be due to the participation of CeO{sub 2}, whose sulfidation is promoted by Cu.

  3. 7 CFR 2902.23 - Sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Sorbents. (a) Definition. Materials formulated for use in the cleanup and bioremediation of oil and chemical spills, the disposal of liquid materials, or the prevention of leakage or leaching in...

  4. Experimental study on SO2 recovery using a sodium-zinc sorbent based flue gas desulfurization technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhang; Tao Wang; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Xuyi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    A sodium–zinc sorbent based flue gas desulfurization technology (Na–Zn-FGD) was proposed based on the experiments and analyses of the thermal decomposition characteristics of CaSO3 and ZnSO3·2.5H2O, the waste products of calcium-based semi-dry and zinc-based flue gas desulfurization (Ca–SD-FGD and Zn–SD-FGD) tech-nologies, respectively. It was found that ZnSO3·2.5H2O first lost crystal H2O at 100 °C and then decomposed into SO2 and solid ZnO at 260 °C in the air, while CaSO3 is oxidized at 450 °C before it decomposed in the air. The ex-perimental results confirm that Zn–SD-FGD technology is good for SO2 removal and recycling, but with problem in clogging and high operational cost. The proposed Na–Zn-FGD is clogging proof, and more cost-effective. In the new process, Na2CO3 is used to generate Na2SO3 for SO2 absorption, and the intermediate product NaHSO3 reacts with ZnO powders, producing ZnSO3·2.5H2O precipitate and Na2SO3 solution. The Na2SO3 solution is clogging proof, which is re-used for SO2 absorption. By thermal decomposition of ZnSO3·2.5H2O, ZnO is re-generated and SO2 with high purity is co-produced as well. The cycle consumes some amount of raw material Na2CO3 and a small amount of ZnO only. The newly proposed FGD technology could be a substitute of the traditional semi-dry FGD technologies.

  5. Stability of a Benzyl Amine Based CO2 Capture Adsorbent in View of Regeneration Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the chemical and thermal stability of a primary amine-functionalized ion-exchange resin (Lewatit VP OC 1065) is studied in view of the potential options of regenerating this sorbent in a CO2 removal application. The adsorbent was treated continuously in the presence of air, different O2/CO2/N2 mixtures, concentrated CO2, and steam, and then the remaining CO2 adsorption capacity was measured. Elemental analysis, BET/BJH analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis were applied to characterize adsorbent properties. This material was found to be thermally and hydrothermally stable at high temperatures. However, significant oxidative degradation occurred already at moderate temperatures (above 70 °C). Temperatures above 120 °C lead to degradation in concentrated dry CO2. Adding moisture to the concentrated CO2 stream improves the CO2-induced stability. Adsorbent regeneration with nitrogen stripping is studied with various parameters, focusing on minimizing the moles of purge gas required per mole of CO2 desorbed. PMID:28405055

  6. Study on the reaction activity of CuO/y-Al2O3 for dry flue gas desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; ZHANG Chao; ZHENG Ying; ZHENG Chu-guang

    2004-01-01

    The copper oxide bed regenerable adsorber process can efficiently remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) and reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas with no solid or liquid byproducts. This paper investigates the dry flue gas desulfurization activities of the CuO/γ-Al2O3 under different operation conditions finding that the dispersion degree of copper oxide can achieve a threshold value, which is 0.47mg/m2 carriers. The conclusion confirms that the sulfur capacity of desulfurizer is associated with flue gas' space velocity, reaction temperature, copper content and the structure of sorbent pellet, etc. And with the condition of the desulfurization reaction temperature 673 K, the space velocity 11 200 h-1 and the S/Cu mole ratio under 1, the sulfur removal efficiency can go upwards to 95%.

  7. CO2 Capture from Ambient Air by Crystallization with a Guanidine Sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipp, Charles A; Williams, Neil J; Kidder, Michelle K; Custelcean, Radu

    2017-01-19

    Carbon capture and storage is an important strategy for stabilizing the increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2 and the global temperature. A possible approach toward reversing this trend and decreasing the atmospheric CO2 concentration is to remove the CO2 directly from air (direct air capture). Herein we report a simple aqueous guanidine sorbent that captures CO2 from ambient air and binds it as a crystalline carbonate salt by guanidinium hydrogen bonding. The resulting solid has very low aqueous solubility (Ksp =1.0(4)×10(-8) ), which facilitates its separation from solution by filtration. The bound CO2 can be released by relatively mild heating of the crystals at 80-120 °C, which regenerates the guanidine sorbent quantitatively. Thus, this crystallization-based approach to CO2 separation from air requires minimal energy and chemical input, and offers the prospect for low-cost direct air capture technologies.

  8. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Soukri, Mustapha [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Farmer, Justin [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Mobley, Paul [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Tanthana, Jak [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Dongxiang [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Song, Chunshan [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  9. Improvement of metal adsorption onto chitosan/Sargassum sp. composite sorbent by an innovative ion-imprint technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huijuan; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Yuming; Kang, Jin; Qu, Jiuhui; Chen, J Paul

    2011-01-01

    Technology for immobilization of biomass has attracted a great interest due to the high sorption capacity of biomass for sequestration of toxic metals from industrial effluents. However, the currently practiced immobilization methods normally reduce the metal sorption capacities. In this study, an innovative ion-imprint technology was developed to overcome the drawback. Copper ion was first imprinted onto the functional groups of chitosan that formed a pellet-typed sorbent through the granulation with Sargassum sp.; the imprinted copper ion was chemically detached from the sorbent, leading to the formation of a novel copper ion-imprinted chitosan/Sargassum sp. (CICS) composite adsorbent. The copper sorption on CICS was found to be highly pH-dependent and the maximum uptake capacity was achieved at pH 4.7-5.5. The adsorption isotherm study showed the maximum sorption capacity of CICS of 1.08 mmol/g, much higher than the non-imprinted chitosan/Sargassum sp. sorbent (NICS) (0.49 mmol/g). The used sorbent was reusable after being regenerated through desorption. The FTIR and XPS studies revealed that the greater sorption of heavy metal was attributed to the large number of primary amine groups available on the surfaces of the ion-imprinted chitosan and the abundant carboxyl groups on Sargassum sp. Finally, an intraparticle surface diffusion controlled model well described the sorption history of the sorbents.

  10. A decontamination system for chemical weapons agents using a liquid solution on a solid sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waysbort, Daniel [Israel Institute for Biological Research, PO Box 19, Ness-Ziona 74100 (Israel); McGarvey, David J. [R and T Directorate, Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood Area, MD 21010 (United States)], E-mail: david.mcgarvey@us.army.mil; Creasy, William R.; Morrissey, Kevin M.; Hendrickson, David M. [SAIC, P.O. Box 68, Gunpowder Branch, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Durst, H. Dupont [R and T Directorate, Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood Area, MD 21010 (United States)

    2009-01-30

    A decontamination system for chemical warfare agents was developed and tested that combines a liquid decontamination reagent solution with solid sorbent particles. The components have fewer safety and environmental concerns than traditional chlorine bleach-based products or highly caustic solutions. The liquid solution, based on Decon Green{sup TM}, has hydrogen peroxide and a carbonate buffer as active ingredients. The best solid sorbents were found to be a copolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and n-lauryl methacrylate (Polytrap 6603 Adsorber); or an allyl methacrylate cross-linked polymer (Poly-Pore E200 Adsorber). These solids are human and environmentally friendly and are commonly used in cosmetics. The decontaminant system was tested for reactivity with pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (Soman, GD), bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (Mustard, HD), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by using NMR Spectroscopy. Molybdate ion (MoO{sub 4}{sup -2}) was added to the decontaminant to catalyze the oxidation of HD. The molybdate ion provided a color change from pink to white when the oxidizing capacity of the system was exhausted. The decontaminant was effective for ratios of agent to decontaminant of up to 1:50 for VX (t{sub 1/2} {<=} 4 min), 1:10 for HD (t{sub 1/2} < 2 min with molybdate), and 1:10 for GD (t{sub 1/2} < 2 min). The vapor concentrations of GD above the dry sorbent and the sorbent with decontamination solution were measured to show that the sorbent decreased the vapor concentration of GD. The E200 sorbent had the additional advantage of absorbing aqueous decontamination solution without the addition of an organic co-solvent such as isopropanol, but the rate depended strongly on mixing for HD.

  11. Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye > Facts About Dry Eye Facts About Dry Eye This information was developed by the National Eye ... the best person to answer specific questions. Dry Eye Defined What is dry eye? Dry eye occurs ...

  12. Design of a sorbent to enhance reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long-Jiang; Fan, Hui-Ling; Shangguan, Ju; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Wang, Hui; Mi, Jie

    2014-12-10

    A series of novel zinc oxide-silica composites with three-dimensionally ordered macropores (3DOM) structure were synthesized via colloidal crystal template method and used as sorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal at room temperature for the first time. The performances of the prepared sorbents were evaluated by dynamic breakthrough testing. The materials were characterized before and after adsorption using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the composite with 3DOM structure exhibited remarkable desulfurization performance at room temperature and the enhancement of reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide was attributed to the unique structure features of 3DOM composites; high surface areas, nanocrystalline ZnO and the well-ordered interconnected macroporous with abundant mesopores. The introduction of silica could be conducive to support the 3DOM structure and the high dispersion of zinc oxide. Moisture in the H2S stream plays a crucial role in the removal process. The effects of Zn/Si ratio and the calcination temperature of 3DOM composites on H2S removal were studied. It demonstrated that the highest content of ZnO could reach up to 73 wt % and the optimum calcination temperature was 500 °C. The multiple adsorption/regeneration cycles showed that the 3DOM ZnO-SiO2 sorbent is stable and the sulfur capacity can still reach 67.4% of that of the fresh sorbent at the fifth cycle. These results indicate that 3DOM ZnO-SiO2 composites will be a promising sorbent for H2S removal at room temperature.

  13. The potential of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana peel extract, combined with demineralized freeze-dried bovine bone xenograft, to reduce ridge resorption and alveolar bone regeneration in preserving the tooth extraction socket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utari Kresnoadi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The induction of MPEs and DFBBX is effective in reducing inflammation, lowering osteoclasts, decreasing alveolar bone resorption, and also increasing BMP2 expression and alveolar bone regeneration.

  14. A comparative evaluation of freeze-dried bone allograft with and without bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration membrane Healiguide® in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deept Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Furcation defects represent one of the most demanding therapeutic challenges for periodontal therapy. Various treatment modalities have been tried with different success rates. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA with and without bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane Healiguide® in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with bilateral Grade II furcation defects were selected for the study. After phase I therapy, subjects were divided into two arms and treated in a split-mouth design. Ten defects were treated with FDBA alone in the control arm. Ten defects were treated with FDBA in conjunction with bioabsorbable GTR membrane Healiguide® in test arm. Clinical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, vertical probing depth, horizontal probing depth, and relative attachment level (RAL were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Results: At 6 months, clinical improvement was seen in both the arms with mean pocket depth reduction of 1.2 ± 1.032 mm and 1.7 ± 0.948 mm and mean horizontal probing depth reduction being 2.1 ± 1.969 mm and 1.6 ± 1.264 mm in control and test arm, respectively. Both surgical procedures resulted in a statistically significant reduction in vertical and horizontal probing depths. Conclusion: Both the arms demonstrated a significant improvement in the probing depth, horizontal furcation depth, and RAL at 6 months postsurgery in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects. However, on the intergroup comparison, there was no statistically significant difference in the results achieved between two arms.

  15. A comparative evaluation of freeze-dried bone allograft with and without bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration membrane Healiguide® in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects: A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deept; Deepa, Dhruvakumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Furcation defects represent one of the most demanding therapeutic challenges for periodontal therapy. Various treatment modalities have been tried with different success rates. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) with and without bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane Healiguide® in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with bilateral Grade II furcation defects were selected for the study. After phase I therapy, subjects were divided into two arms and treated in a split-mouth design. Ten defects were treated with FDBA alone in the control arm. Ten defects were treated with FDBA in conjunction with bioabsorbable GTR membrane Healiguide® in test arm. Clinical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, vertical probing depth, horizontal probing depth, and relative attachment level (RAL) were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Results: At 6 months, clinical improvement was seen in both the arms with mean pocket depth reduction of 1.2 ± 1.032 mm and 1.7 ± 0.948 mm and mean horizontal probing depth reduction being 2.1 ± 1.969 mm and 1.6 ± 1.264 mm in control and test arm, respectively. Both surgical procedures resulted in a statistically significant reduction in vertical and horizontal probing depths. Conclusion: Both the arms demonstrated a significant improvement in the probing depth, horizontal furcation depth, and RAL at 6 months postsurgery in the treatment of Grade II furcation defects. However, on the intergroup comparison, there was no statistically significant difference in the results achieved between two arms. PMID:26941515

  16. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two

  17. Development of a Microwave Regenerative Sorbent-Based Hydrogen Purifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Dewberry, Ross H.; McCurry, Bryan D.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Microwave Regenerative Sorbent-based Hydrogen Purifier (MRSHP). This unique microwave powered technology was developed for the purification of a hydrogen stream produced by the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA). The PPA is a hydrogen recovery (from methane) post processor for NASA's Sabatier-based carbon dioxide reduction process. Embodied in the Carbon dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), currently aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Sabatier reaction employs hydrogen to catalytically recover oxygen, in the form of water, from respiratory carbon dioxide produced by the crew. This same approach is base-lined for future service in the Air Revitalization system on extended missions into deep space where resupply is not practical. Accordingly, manned exploration to Mars may only become feasible with further closure of the air loop as afforded by the greater hydrogen recovery permitted by the PPA with subsequent hydrogen purification. By utilizing the well-known high sorbate loading capacity of molecular sieve 13x, coupled with microwave dielectric heating phenomenon, MRSHP technology is employed as a regenerative filter for a contaminated hydrogen gas stream. By design, freshly regenerated molecular sieve 13x contained in the MRSHP will remove contaminants from the effluent of a 1-CM scale PPA for several hours prior to breakthrough. By reversing flow and pulling a relative vacuum the MRSHP prototype then uses 2.45 GHz microwave power, applied through a novel coaxial antenna array, to rapidly heat the sorbent bed and drive off the contaminants in a short duration vacuum/thermal contaminant desorption step. Finally, following rapid cooling via room temperature cold plates, the MRSHP is again ready to serve as a hydrogen filter.

  18. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Sorption Enhanced Steam Reforming of Woodgas Containing TAR over a Commercial Ni Catalyst and Calcined Dolomite as CO2 Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Naso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the catalytic steam reforming of a gaseous fuel obtained by steam biomass gasification to convert topping atmosphere residue (TAR and CH4 and to produce pure H2 by means of a CO2 sorbent. This experimental work deals with the demonstration of the practical feasibility of such concepts, using a real woodgas obtained from fluidized bed steam gasification of hazelnut shells. This study evaluates the use of a commercial Ni catalyst and calcined dolomite (CaO/MgO. The bed material simultaneously acts as reforming catalyst and CO2 sorbent. The experimental investigations have been carried out in a fixed bed micro-reactor rig using a slipstream from the gasifier to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. The reforming/sorption tests were carried out at 650 °C while regeneration of the sorbent was carried out at 850 °C in a nitrogen environment. Both combinations of catalyst and sorbent are very effective in TAR and CH4 removal, with conversions near 100%, while the simultaneous CO2 sorption effectively enhances the water gas shift reaction producing a gas with a hydrogen volume fraction of over 90%. Multicycle tests of reforming/CO2 capture and regeneration were performed to verify the stability of the catalysts and sorbents to remove TAR and capture CO2 during the duty cycle.

  19. Controlling mercury and selenium emissions from coal-fired combustors using a novel regenerable natural product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlager, R.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Roberts, D.L. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This program successfully demonstrated the key components that are needed for a practical, regenerable sorption process for removing and recovering mercury from flue gas streams: (1) a proprietary natural product removed mercuric chloride from synthetic flue gas, (2) several new noble metal sorbents were shown to capture elemental gas-phase mercury from synthetic coal combustion flue gas, and (3) both the natural product and the noble metal sorbents could be regenerated in the laboratory (chemical method for the natural product, thermal method for noble metal sorbents). Several sorbents were tested for their ability to collect selenium oxide during the program. These tests, however, were not definitive due to inconclusive analytical results. If follow-on testing is funded, the ability of the proposed sorbents to collect selenium and other metals will be evaluated during the field testing phase of the program. A preliminary economic analysis indicates that the cost of the process appears to be substantially less than the cost of the state-of-the-art method, namely injection of activated carbon, and it also appears to cost less than using noble metal sorbents alone.

  20. Super-Hydrophobic High Throughput Electrospun Cellulose Acetate (CA) Nanofibrous Mats as Oil Selective Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao

    The threat of oil pollution increases with the expansion of oil exploration and production activities, as well as the industrial growth around the world. Use of sorbents is a common method to deal with the oil spills. In this work, an advanced sorbent technology is described. A series of non-woven Cellulose Acetate (CA) nanofibrous mats with a 3D fibrous structure were synthesized by a novel high-throughput electrospinning technique. The precursor was solutions of CA/ acetic acid-acetone in various concentrations. Among them, 15.0% CA exhibits a superhydrophobic surface property, with a water contact angle of 128.95°. Its oil sorption capacity is many times higher the oil sorption capacity of the best commercial sorbent available in the market. Also, it showed good buoyancy properties on the water both as dry-mat and oil-saturated mat. In addition, it is biodegradable, easily available, easily manufactured, so the CA nanofibrous mat is an excellent candidate as oil sorbent for oil spill in water treatment.

  1. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  2. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-02-05

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  3. My Regeneration:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Dale

    2016-01-01

    and cultural referents shows that it offers an index to the album. Using its frontier setting and a variety of sacred and secular myths, symbols and icons, ‘Heroes and Villains,’ like Smile as a whole, offers historically-informed visions of national decline, crisis and regeneration that are at once critical...

  4. Preliminary carbon dioxide capture technical and economic feasibility study evaluation of carbon dioxide capture from existing fired plants by hybrid sorption using solid sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Steven; Envergex, Srivats; Browers, Bruce; Thumbi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Barr Engineering Co. was retained by the Institute for Energy Studies (IES) at University of North Dakota (UND) to conduct a technical and economic feasibility analysis of an innovative hybrid sorbent technology (CACHYS™) for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation from coal combustion–derived flue gas. The project team for this effort consists of the University of North Dakota, Envergex LLC, Barr Engineering Co., and Solex Thermal Science, along with industrial support from Allete, BNI Coal, SaskPower, and the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council. An initial economic and feasibility study of the CACHYS™ concept, including definition of the process, development of process flow diagrams (PFDs), material and energy balances, equipment selection, sizing and costing, and estimation of overall capital and operating costs, is performed by Barr with information provided by UND and Envergex. The technology—Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents Capture (CACHYS™)—is a novel solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, utilization of novel process chemistry, contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO2 heat of reaction and promote fast CO2 capture, and a low-cost method of heat management. The technology’s other key component is the use of a low-cost sorbent.

  5. Topical Report 5: Sorbent Performance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon

    2011-05-31

    ADA-ES has completed an extensive sorbent screening program funded primarily through DOE NETL cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649 with support from EPRI and industry cost-share participants. Tests were completed on simulated and actual flue gas. The overall project objective is to address the viability and accelerate development of a solid-based postcombustion CO2 capture technology that can be retrofit to the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants. An important component of the viability assessment was to evaluate the state of development of sorbents and measure key performance characteristics under realistic operating conditions.

  6. Poly(ethyleneimine) infused and functionalized Torlon®-silica hollow fiber sorbents for post-combustion CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials functionalized with amine-containing reagents are emerging as an important class of materials for capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymeric silica hollow fiber sorbents are fabricated through the proven dry-jet/wet-quench spinning process. In our study, a new technique for functionalizing polymeric silica hollow fiber sorbents with poly(ethyleneimine), followed by a post-spinning infusion step was studied. This two step process introduces a sufficient amount of poly(ethyleneimine) to the polymeric silica hybrid material support to improve the CO2 sorption capacity due to the added amine groups. The poly(ethyleneimine) infused and functionalized hollow fiber sorbents are also characterized by a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) to assess their CO2 sorption capacities. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improvement of CaO-based sorbent performance for CO{sub 2} looping cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony [CANMET Energy Technology Centre-Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents research on CO{sub 2} capture by lime-based looping cycles. This is a new and promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as the developing technologies for CO{sub 2} capture, especially those based on CaO looping cycles. This technology is at the pilot plant demonstration stage and there are still significant challenges that require solutions. The technology is based on a dual fluidized bed reactor which contains a carbonator - a unit for CO{sub 2} capture, and a calciner - a unit for CaO regeneration. The major technology components are well known from other technologies and easily applicable. However, even though CaO is a very good candidate as a solid CO{sub 2} carrier, its performance in a practical system still has significant limitations. Thus, research on CaO performance is critical and this paper discusses some of the more important problems and potential solutions that are being examined at CETC-O. To date, the most promising methods were reactivation of spent sorbent by steam, thermal pretreatment of sorbent, and doping, most likely with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The combination of these methods, including pelletization, should provide us with enhanced sorbent performance. 75 refs., 19 figs.

  8. Functionalized Organosilicate Sorbents for Air Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    synthesized for reactive capture of targets. ADC-10 focused on incorporation of carbonyls for reactive removal of ammonia . CAR-40 focused on...16 Fig. 12 Ammonia breakthrough for E50 sorbents...23 Fig. 21 Ammonia breakthrough for the Cu DIX materials

  9. Boron removal by a composite sorbent: Polyethylenimine/tannic acid derivative immobilized in alginate hydrogel beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Caroline; Grishin, Andrey; Vincent, Thierry; Guibal, Eric

    2017-03-21

    A novel composite material was prepared by the grafting of tannic acid on polyethylenimine (PEI), which allows an efficient sorption of boron (sorption capacity close to 0.89 mmol B g(-1)). The encapsulation of this chelating sorbent (finely crushed) facilitates its use (readily solid/liquid separation, use in fixed-bed columns) at the expense of a loss in sorption capacity (proportionally decreased by the introduction of alginate having poor efficiency for boron uptake). Sorption isotherms are modeled using the Langmuir equation, while the kinetic profiles are presented a good fit by pseudo-second order rate equation. In addition, the encapsulating matrix introduces supplementary resistance to intraparticle diffusion, especially when the resin is dried without control: freeze-drying partially limits this effect. The stability (at long-term storage) of the sorbent is improved when the sorbent is stored under nitrogen atmosphere. The presence of an excess of NaCl was investigated. The degradation of the hydrogel (by ion-exchange of Ca(II) with Na(I)) leads to a decrease in the sorption performance of composite material but the action of Ca(II) ions in the solutions re-stabilizes the hydrogel.

  10. Application of Chemically Modified and Unmodified Waste Biological Sorbents in Treatment of Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kanayochukwu Nduka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein wastes (feathers, goat hair and cellulosic wastes (corn cob, coconut husks were collected and washed with detergent solution, thoroughly rinsed and sun dried for 2 days before drying in an oven, and then ground. One-half of ground material was carbonized at a maximum temperature of 500°C after mixing with H2SO4. The carbonized parts were pulverized; both carbonized and uncarbonized sorbents were sieved into two particle sizes of 325 and 625 μm using mechanical sieve. Sorbents of a given particle size were packed into glass column.Then, textile wastewater that had its physicochemical parameters previously determined was eluted into each glass column and a contact time of 60 and 120 mins was allowed before analysis. Results showed 48.15–99.98 percentage reduction of NO3−, EC, Cl−, BOD, COD, DO, TSS, and TDS, 34.67–99.93 percentage reduction of NO3−, EC, Cl−, BOD, COD, DO, TSS, and TDS, 52.83–97.95 percentage reduction of Pb2+, Ni2+, Cr3+ and Mn2+ and 34.59–94.87 percentage reduction of Pb2+, Ni2+, Cr3+ and Mn2+. Carbonization, small particle, size and longer contact time enhanced the sorption capabilities of the sorbents. These show that protein and cellulosic wastes can be used to detoxify wastewater.

  11. Periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  12. New high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents, calcium silicate sorbents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, M.E.

    1996-02-28

    A search is being carried out for new calcium-based SO{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The current year objectives include the study of sorbents made by hydrating ordinary or Type I portland cement or portland cement clinker (a cement intermediate) under carefully selected conditions. Results of this study show that an excellent portland cement sorbent can be prepared by milling cement at 120{degrees}C at 600 rpm for 15 minutes with MgO-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} beads. They also show that clinker, which is cheaper than cement can be used interchangeably with cement as a starting material. Further, it is clear that while a high surface area may be a desirable property of a good sorbent, it is not a requisite property. Among the hydration reaction variables, milling time is highly important, reaction temperature is important and stirring rate and silicate-to-H{sub 2}O ratio are moderately important. The components of hydrated cement sorbent are various combinations of C-S-H, calcium silicate hydrate:Ca(OH){sub 2};AFm. a phase in hydrated cement.

  13. Determination of carbon monoxide with a modified zeolite sorbent and methanization-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarawijit, C; Poovey, H G; Rando, R J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative sorbent sampling technique to concentrate CO from an air sample for subsequent instrumental analysis. Y52 zeolite doped with 9.4 wt % cuprous ions was found to have high capacity, stability to air, and thermal reversibility for CO. The Cu(I)-modified zeolite was packed in glass tubes, preceded by a drying tube containing silica gel. Air was sampled through the tubes at the flow rate of 100 mL/min. Collected CO was thermally desorbed at 300 degrees C and determined by gas chromatography with reduction of CO to methane and flame ionization detection (TD-GC-CH4-FID). Breakthrough capacity of the sorbent was found to be 2.74 mg CO per gram of sorbent. For 2-L air samples containing 12.5 to 100 ppm CO and 50% relative humidity at room temperature, recovery of CO was found to be 96.6% with pooled relative standard deviation of 5.8%. The estimated detection limit for a 2-L sample was 0.2 ppm. Collected CO was stable at room temperature for 1 day and up to 7 days at 4 degrees C if the sorbent tube was flushed with helium before storage. In field testing, the ratio of CO measured by the new technique and by a reference technique was found to be 0.93 with pooled relative standard deviation of 6.3%. This unique new sorbent coupled with TD-GC-CH4-FID shows promise as a sensitive and specific alternative for measurement of CO in air.

  14. The antimicrobial efficiency of silver activated sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Đolić, Maja B., E-mail: mirkovic.maja@gmail.com [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Rajaković-Ognjanović, Vladana N. [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Štrbac, Svetlana B. [ICTM-Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Belgrade, Njegoševa 12, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakočević, Zlatko Lj. [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Veljović, Đorđe N.; Dimitrijević, Suzana I.; Rajaković, Ljubinka V. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Different sorbents were activated by Ag{sup +}-ions and modified sorbents were determined by sorption capacities, in range of values: 42.06–3.28 mg/g. • Granulated activated carbon (GAC), natural zeolit (Z) and titanium dioxide (T) activated by Ag{sup +}-ions were tested against E. coli, S. aureus and C. albicans. • The most successful bacteria removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, while the yeast cell reduction reached unsatisfactory effect for all three activated sorbents. • XRD, XPS and FE-SEM analysis showed that the chemical state of the silver activating agent affects the antimicrobial activity, as well as the structural properties of the material. • An overall microbial cell reduction, which is performed by separated antimicrobial tests on the Ag{sup +}-activated surface and Ag{sup +}-ions in aquatic solutions, is a consequence of both mechanisms. - Abstract: This study is focused on the surface modifications of the materials that are used for antimicrobial water treatment. Sorbents of different origin were activated by Ag{sup +}-ions. The selection of the most appropriate materials and the most effective activation agents was done according to the results of the sorption and desorption kinetic studies. Sorption capacities of selected sorbents: granulated activated carbon (GAC), zeolite (Z), and titanium dioxide (T), activated by Ag{sup +}-ions were following: 42.06, 13.51 and 17.53 mg/g, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of Ag/Z, Ag/GAC and Ag/T sorbents were tested against Gram-negative bacteria E. coli, Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and yeast C. albicans. After 15 min of exposure period, the highest cell removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, 98.8 and 93.5%, respectively. Yeast cell inactivation was unsatisfactory for all three activated sorbents. The antimicrobial pathway of the activated sorbents has been examined by two separate tests – Ag{sup +}-ions desorbed from

  15. Inlfuence of Carbon Content on S Zorb Sorbent Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Li

    2013-01-01

    The reaction activity of S Zorb sorbents with different sulfur contents was investigated, and the structure and composition of carbon-containing sorbents were characterized by XRD, FT-IR and TG-MS in order to delve into the kind and morphology of carbon on the sorbent. Test results have revealed that coke could be deposited on the S Zorb sorbent dur-ing the operating process, and the coke content was an important factor inlfuencing the reaction performance of the S Zorb sorbent. Retention of a deifnite amount of coke on the sorbent while securing the desulfurization activity of the S Zorb sor-bent would be conducive to the reduction of octane loss of reaction product.

  16. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2012-10-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  17. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silaban, A.; Narcida, M.; Harrison, D.P.

    1992-02-01

    The expected commercialization of coal gasification technology in the US and world-wide will create a need for advanced gas purification and separation processes capable of operating at higher temperatures and in more hostile environments than is common today. For example, a high-temperature, high-pressure process capable of separating CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gas may find application in purifying synthesis gas for H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, or CH{sub 3}OH production. High temperature CO{sub 2} removal has the potential for significantly improving the operating efficiency of integrated gasification-molten carbonate fuel cells for electric power generation. This study proved the technical feasibility of a CO{sub 2}-separation process based upon the regenerable noncatalytic gas-solid reaction between CaO and CO{sub 2} to form CACO{sub 3}. Such a process operating at 650{degree}C and 15 atm with 15% CO{sub 2} in the coal gas has the potential for removing in excess of 99% of the CO{sub 2} fed. Selection of a sorbent precursor which, upon calcination, produces high-porosity CaO is important for achieving rapid and complete reaction. The addition of magnesium to the sorbent appears to improve the multicycle durability at a cost of reduced CO{sub 2} capacity per unit mass of sorbent. Reaction conditions, principally calcination and carbonation temperatures, are important factors in multicycle durability. Reaction pressure and CO{sub 2} concentration are important in so far as the initial rapid reaction rate is concerned, but are relatively unimportant in terms of sorbent capacity and durability. Indirect evidence for the simultaneous occurrence of the shift reaction and CO{sub 2}-removal reaction creates the possibility of a direct one-step process for the production of hydrogen from coal-derived gas.

  18. Sulfur dioxide removal by sol-gel sorbent derived CuO/Alumina sorbents in fixed bed adsorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Min Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured alumina supported copper oxide granular sorbents were prepared by the sol-gel method. The properties of the sol-gel derived sorbents were compared with a similar commercial sorbent which has been used in the pilot scale moving-bed copper oxide process for flue gas treatment. The crushing strength of the sol-gel derived sorbents is about 6–7 times that of the commercial samples, while the attrition rate of the former is at least 3 times smaller. At temperatures below 400 °C, SO2 sorption capacity of the sol-gel derived sorbent is about 3 times that of the commercial sorbent with a similar amount of CuO loading (7–9 wt%. The better mechanical properties and higher sulfation capacity of the sol-gel derived alumina supported copper oxide sorbents are due to their unique microstructure and the coating method for CuO.

  19. Composition modification of zinc titanate sorbents for hot gas desulfurization. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    For new coal gasification systems, zinc titanate sorbents are being developed to remove sulfur from the hot product gas prior to its use in combined cycle turbines and high temperature fuel cells. Although most of the properties of these sorbents are very attractive, there are still concerns about durability over many sulfidation-regeneration cycles and zinc losses due to vaporization. Doping the zinc titanate with other metal ions could alleviate both concerns, which are the objectives of this project. After a screening study was completed, it was decided that Cr offered more promise as a dopant than Ni, Cu, Mg, and Al. Therefore six new sorbent formulations containing Cr were prepared, and they are now being evaluated with a series of bulk density, X-ray diffraction, crush strength and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements. Results to date suggest that, while Zn vaporization losses can be reduced with Cr additions, a penalty in chemical reactivity occurs. A fixed bed test was also completed this quarter on a Cr-containing formulation. The H{sub 2}S breakthrough time was about 11 hours, and utilization of Zn in the sorbent was 60.5%.

  20. Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Jeannine [TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)

    2013-08-31

    TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO2 removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO2 capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO2 produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO2 produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

  1. Hybrid Polymer/UiO-66(Zr) and Polymer/NaY Fiber Sorbents for Mercaptan Removal from Natural Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Grace; Koros, William J; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-04-20

    Zeolite NaY and metal organic frameworks MIL-53(Al) and UiO-66(Zr) are spun with cellulose acetate (CA) polymer to create hybrid porous composite fibers for the selective adsorption of sulfur odorant compounds from pipeline natural gas. Odorant removal is desirable to limit corrosion associated with sulfur oxide production, thereby increasing lifetime in gas turbines used for electricity generation. In line with these goals, the performance of the hybrid fibers is evaluated on the basis of sulfur sorption capacity and selectivity, as well as fiber stability and regenerability, compared to their polymer-free sorbent counterparts. The capacities of the powder sorbents are also measured using various desorption temperatures to evaluate the potential for lower temperature, energy, and cost-efficient system operation. Both NaY/CA and UiO-66(Zr)/CA hybrid fibers are prepared with high sorbent loadings, and both have high capacities and selectivities for t-butyl mercaptan (TBM) odorant sorption from a model natural gas (NG), while being stable to multiple regeneration cycles. The different advantages and disadvantages of both types of fibers relative are discussed, with both offering the potential advantages of low pressure drop, rapid heat and mass transfer, and low energy requirements over traditional sulfur removal technologies such as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) or adsorption in a pellet packed beds.

  2. Evaluation of Ohio fly ash/hydrated lime slurries and Type 1 cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. Pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.; Meyers, G.R. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this year`s work included an evaluation of the performance of fly ash/hydrated lime as well as hydrated cement sorbents for spray drying adsorption (SDA) of SO{sub 2} from a simulated high-sulfur flue gas. These sorbents were evaluated for several different hydration methods, and under different SDA operating conditions. In addition, the physical properties of surface area and porosity of the sorbents was determined. The most reactive fly ash/hydrated lime sorbent studied was prepared at room temperature with milled fly ash. Milling fly ash prior to hydration with lime did have a beneficial effect on calcium utilization. No benefit in utilization was experienced either by hydrating the slurries at a temperature of 90{degrees}C as compared to hydration at room temperature, or by increasing hydration time. While the surface areas varied greatly from sorbent to sorbent, the pore size distributions indicated ``ink bottle`` pores with surface porosity on the order of 0.5 microns. No correlation could be drawn between the surface area of the sorbents and calcium utilization. These results suggest that the composition of the resulting sorbent might be more important than its surface area. The most effective sorbent studied this year was produced by hydrating cement for 3 days at room temperature. This sorbent provided a removal efficiency and a calcium utilization over 25 percent higher than baseline results at an approach to saturation temperature of 30{degrees}F and a stoichiometric ratio of 0.9. A maximum SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of about 90 percent was experienced with this sorbent at an approach to saturation temperature of 20{degrees}F.

  3. Evaluation of Solid Sorbents As A Retrofit Technology for CO{sub 2} Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon

    2011-07-31

    field sites. ADA designed and fabricated a slipstream pilot to allow an evaluation of the kinetic behavior of sorbents and provide some flexibility for the physical characteristics of the materials. The design incorporated a transport reactor for the adsorber (co-current reactor) and a fluidized-bed in the regenerator. This combination achieved the sorbent characterization goals and provided an opportunity to evaluate whether the potential cost savings associated with a relatively simple process design could overcome the sacrifices inherent in a co-current separation process. The system was installed at two field sites during the project, Luminant’s Martin Lake Steam Electric Station and Xcel Energy’s Sherburne County Generating Station (Sherco). Although the system could not maintain continuous 90% CO{sub 2} removal with the sorbents evaluated under this program, it was useful to compare the CO{sub 2} removal properties of several different sorbents on actual flue gas. One of the supported amine materials, sorbent R, was evaluated at both Martin Lake and Sherco. The 1 kWe pilot was operated in continuous mode as well as batch mode. In continuous mode, the sorbent performance could not overcome the limitations of the co-current adsorbent design. In batch mode, sorbent R was able to remove up to 90% CO{sub 2} for several cycles. Approximately 50% of the total removal occurred in the first three feet of the adsorption reactor, which was a transport reactor. During continuous testing at Sherco, CO{sub 2} removal decreased to approximately 20% at steady state. The lack of continuous removal was due primarily to the combination of a co-current adsorption system with a fluidized bed for regeneration, a combination which did not provide an adequate driving force to maintain an acceptable working CO{sub 2} capacity. In addition, because sorbent R consisted of a polymeric amine coated on a silica substrate, it was believed that the 50% amine loaded resulted in mass diffusion

  4. Assessment of Solid Sorbent Systems for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture at Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glier, Justin C.

    liquid amine-systems in the absence of significant new improvements in solid sorbent properties and process system design to reduce the heat exchange surface area in the regenerator and cross-flow heat exchanger. Finally, the importance of these estimates for policy makers is discussed.

  5. KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-02-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of EX-SO3 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 110 {micro}m particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-550 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

  6. KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 130 mm particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-525 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

  7. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li, Zhijiang [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet >750{degree}C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The effect of pre-reduction with H{sub 2}, in the presence of H{sub 2}O on the performance of the sorbents in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration, was studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and in a fixed-bed reactor at 750{degree}C. The results of the TGA tests indicate that pre-reduction of the sorbents is very fast in either 10% or 30% H{sub 2}. Without sorbent pre-reduction, sulfidation consists of two-stages, a reduction-dominating and a sulfidation-dominating stage. Sulfidation apparently takes place before reduction is complete. During regeneration some copper/cerium sulfates may have formed and Cu{sub 2}O may have formed in addition to CuO. The fixed-bed reactor tests show that at 750{degree}C: (1) prereducing the CuO-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} with H{sub 2} does not effect the reactivity of the sorbent towards H{sub 2}S at either the high or low H{sub 2} feed gas concentrations and (2) when 30% H{sub 2} was used during sulfidation of either sorbent, the first H{sub 2}S breakthrough occurs earlier than when 10% H{sub 2} was used.

  8. Nanoporous carbon sorbent for molecular-sieve chromatography of lipoprotein complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimkulova, A. R.; Mansurova, B. B.; Gil'manov, M. K.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2012-06-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of carbon sorbents are investigated. Electron microscopy data for the sorbent and separated lipoprotein complex are presented. It is found that the obtained carbon sorbent possess high porosity. Nanoporous carbon sorbents for the chromatography of molecular-sieve markers are obtained and tested. The applicability of nanoporous carbon sorbents for separation of lipoprotein complexes (LPC) is investigated.

  9. Regenerator seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  10. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2013-02-25

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  11. Sulfation behavior of CuO/γ-Al2O3 sorbent for the removal of SO2 from flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingchun Yu; Shichao Zhang; Xindong Wang; Jie Zhang; Zhenming Lu

    2008-01-01

    s: Cl10/γ-A12O3 has been considered as a promising and recycling sorbent to remove sulfur dioxide from flue gas. In this study, a series of CuO/γ-AI2O3 sorbents with different CuO loadings were prepared by impregnation. The monolayer coverage of CuO supported on γ,-AI2O3 determined by X-ray quantitative analysis was 0.275 g CuO/g (γ-AI2O3). Below the monolayer coverage, CuO was found highly dispersed on γ-AI2O3. Thermogravimetric technique was used to study sulfation kinetics and sulfation recycling. It was found that the Langmuir kinetic adsorption model described well the experimental data at the rapid sulfation region of the CuO/γ-AI2O3 sorbent. The adsorption activation energy was 19.98 kJ/mol and the pre-exponential factor was 9.97×10-5 s-1.Pa-1. The CuO/γ-AI2O3 sorbent has shown good performance on regeneration, but long sulfation time might cause the deactivation of the CuO/γ-AI2O3sorbent. It was also seen that the sulfatedγ-AI2O3 support could not be reduced at 400℃.

  12. Kinetics and structural evolution of sorbents at high temperatures. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Dastidar, A.G.; Mahuli, S.; Agnihotri, R.

    1993-09-01

    The focus of this project is on furnace sorbent injection technology using dry, calcium-based sorbents for flue gas desulfurization. The goal is to provide fundamental research kinetics and the effects of sorbent properties, aimed at improving SO{sub 2} removal and increasing sorbent utilization in a cost-effective fashion. The main focus of the third year work has been to obtain fundamental kinetic data for calcination, sintering and sulfation of calcium hydroxide sorbent. The results, their interpretation, and discussions are the primary focus of this report. Other major portions of this year`s work covered in the report include the additions and modifications made to the experimental system, and preliminary results of the studies with modified Ca(OH){sub 2}. Most of the reactor system and the analytical and measurement techniques were developed in the second year and formed the necessary framework for realizing the project goal. A few design and experimental constraints necessitated modifications and additions which were made in the beginning of this year. A continuous micro-feeder was built in order to feed very small quantities of sorbent, which is essential to maintain differential conditions with respect to SO{sub 2} during sulfation experiments. The particle collection probe was modified with an insulating ceramic cover and cap, in order to reduce its cooling effect and achieve better isothermality within the reactor. A cascade cyclone sampler was added to replace the impactor because the particle loading capacity of the impactor was not sufficient to hold enough powder required for post-reaction analyses.

  13. Simple test guidelines for screening oilspill sorbents for toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blenkinsopp, S.A.; Sergy, G. [Environment Canada, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada); Huybers, A. [Harris Industrial Testing Services Ltd., Milford, NS (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    Environment Canada`s Emergencies Science Division has established a program to develop a standard test method suitable for evaluating the toxicity of common sorbent materials. Sorbents are used to absorb or adsorb spilled oil and other hazardous materials. They vary widely in composition and packaging. They are often treated with oleophilic and hydrophobic compounds to improve performance and have been used in large quantities during oil spills. Until now, their potential toxicity has never been considered. Three tests have been evaluated to determine how appropriate they are in screening the toxicity of sorbents. Seven toxicity test recommendations for sorbents were presented. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  14. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1988-11-14

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  15. Study of physical chemical properties of nanostructured carbon sorbent for cleanup of biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Almagul Kerimkulova; M. Koldasbekova; Аmіr Kenzhehan; Moldir Kerimkulova; Zulkhair Mansurov; Murat Gilmanov

    2012-01-01

    The technology of nanostructured carbon sorbent. Optimized the conditions of carbonization of plant material and studied the basic structural and physicochemical properties of the sorbent. Studied the molecular-sieve and adsorption characteristics of the sorbent.

  16. Study of physical chemical properties of nanostructured carbon sorbent for cleanup of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagul Kerimkulova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of nanostructured carbon sorbent. Optimized the conditions of carbonization of plant material and studied the basic structural and physicochemical properties of the sorbent. Studied the molecular-sieve and adsorption characteristics of the sorbent.

  17. Sorbent, Sublimation, and Icing Modeling Methods: Experimental Validation and Application to an Integrated MTSA Subassembly Thermal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Chad; Padilla, Sebastian; Iacomini, Christie; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details the validation of modeling methods for the three core components of a Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) subassembly, developed for use in a Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The first core component in the subassembly is a sorbent bed, used to capture and reject metabolically produced carbon dioxide (CO2). The sorbent bed performance can be augmented with a temperature swing driven by a liquid CO2 (LCO2) sublimation heat exchanger (SHX) for cooling the sorbent bed, and a condensing, icing heat exchanger (CIHX) for warming the sorbent bed. As part of the overall MTSA effort, scaled design validation test articles for each of these three components have been independently tested in laboratory conditions. Previously described modeling methodologies developed for implementation in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT are reviewed and updated, their application in test article models outlined, and the results of those model correlations relayed. Assessment of the applicability of each modeling methodology to the challenge of simulating the response of the test articles and their extensibility to a full scale integrated subassembly model is given. The independent verified and validated modeling methods are applied to the development of a MTSA subassembly prototype model and predictions of the subassembly performance are given. These models and modeling methodologies capture simulation of several challenging and novel physical phenomena in the Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT software suite. Novel methodologies include CO2 adsorption front tracking and associated thermal response in the sorbent bed, heat transfer associated with sublimation of entrained solid CO2 in the SHX, and water mass transfer in the form of ice as low as 210 K in the CIHX.

  18. Cesium removal demonstration utilizing crystalline silicotitanate sorbent for processing Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, P.A.; Cummins, R.L. [and others

    1998-03-01

    This report provides details of the Cesium Removal Demonstration (CsRD), which was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on radioactive waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. The CsRD was the first large-scale use of state-of-the-art sorbents being developed by private industry for the selective removal of cesium and other radionuclides from liquid wastes stored across the DOE complex. The crystalline silicotitanate sorbent used in the demonstration was chosen because of its effectiveness in laboratory tests using bench-scale columns. The demonstration showed that the cesium could be removed from the supernate and concentrated on a small-volume, solid waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Nevada Test Site. During this project, the CsRD system processed > 115,000 L (30,000 gal) of radioactive supernate with minimal operational problems. Sluicing, drying, and remote transportation of the sorbent, which could not be done on a bench scale, were successfully demonstrated. The system was then decontaminated to the extent that it could be contact maintained with the use of localized shielding only. By utilizing a modular, transportable design and placement within existing facilities, the system can be transferred to different sites for reuse. The initial unit has now been removed from the process building and is presently being reinstalled for use in baseline operations at ORNL.

  19. H{sub 2}S removal from coal gas at elevated temperature and pressure in fluidized bed with zinc titanate sorbents. 1. Cyclic tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Abbasian, J. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1995-05-01

    Simplified integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) processes are considered to be among the most efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for power generation from coal. In such processes the coal is gasified at pressure and the coal gas is cleaned and combusted in a gas turbine. Coal gas cleanup at elevated pressure and temperature in the IGCC processes offers advantages in higher power generation efficiency and simpler plant configuration. Regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbents are the prime candidates for removal of hydrogen sulfide (the main pollutant) from the hot coal gas in the simplified IGCC processes. In this paper, the results of cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests conducted with two zinc titanate sorbents are presented and discussed. These tests were carried out at high pressure and temperature (20 bar, 550-650{degree}C) in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The results indicate that the reactivity of both sorbents towards H{sub 2}S gradually decline in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests. 20 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Potential of alternative sorbents for desulphurization: from laboratory tests to the full-scale combustion unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbyszek Szeliga; Dagmar Juchelkova; Bohumir Cech; Pavel Kolat; Franz Winter; Adam J. Campen; Tomasz S. Wiltowski [Technical University of Ostrava (VSB), Ostrava (Czech Republic). Department of Energy Engineering

    2008-09-15

    At present, natural limestone is used for the desulphurization of waste gases from the combustion of fossil fuels. However, it is important to save all primary resources, such as limestone, for the future. The researchers focused on finding alternative sorbents for the purpose of desulphurization in a dry additive method, which would become the alternative for natural limestone. This paper is primarily focused on desulphurization tests of selected substances. Tests were initially conducted on the laboratory scale, followed by pilot and full-scale combustion units. 15 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. The enhanced adsorption of sulfur compounds onto mesoporous Ni-AlKIT-6 sorbent, equilibrium and kinetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhan, Fazle, E-mail: fazle@awkum.edu.pk [Department of Chemistry, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, K.P.K (Pakistan); State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China); Yan, Zifeng, E-mail: zfyancat@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China); Peng, Peng [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China); Ikram, Muhammad [Department of Chemistry, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, K.P.K (Pakistan); Rehman, Sadia [Department of Chemistry, Sarhad University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar, K.P.K (Pakistan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • High stable and regenerable 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) were synthesized. • High dispersion of nickel correlated with ultrasonic dispersion and three-dimensional pore network of AlKIT-6(15). • Sulfur adsorption capacity increases with increasing Lewis acid sites. • The kinetic pseudo second-order model and Langmuir isotherm fit the adsorption of sulfur compounds. - Abstract: High performance nickel supported on mesoporous AlKIT-6 (Si/Al = 15, 25, 50, 100) sorbents were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) with ultrasonic aid for adsorptive desulfurization of commercial diesel and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, XRD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, Py-FT-IR, HRTEM, SEM and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The analysis results confirmed that Aluminum atoms entered the framework and 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) can still retain three dimensional structure of AlKIT-6(15) and Ni is highly dispersed in the support. The kinetic pseudo second-order model and Langmuir isotherm are shown to exhibits the best fits of experimental data for the adsorption of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over AlKIT-6 and 5–30%Ni-AlKIT-6. Intraparticle diffusion and steric hindrance were the rate controlling step of the adsorption of T and DBT over AlKIT-6(15) and 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) as verified through the intraparticle diffusion model. The characterization of regenerated 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) revealed that three-dimensional cubic Ia3d symmetric structure was maintained in the sorbent after 6 successive desulfurization–regeneration cycles.

  2. Microlith-based Structured Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide, Humidity, and Trace Contaminant Control in Manned Space Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, SUbir; Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2011-01-01

    To support continued manned space exploration, the development of atmosphere revitalization systems that are lightweight, compact, durable, and power efficient is a key challenge. The systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of habitats and should offer operational functionality to either expel removed constituents or capture them for closedloop recovery. As mission durations increase and exploration goals reach beyond low earth orbit, the need for regenerable adsorption processes for continuous removal of CO2 and trace contaminants from cabin air becomes critical. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA Marshall (MSFC) have been developing an Engineered Structured Sorbents (ESS) approach based on PCI s patented Microlith technology to meet the requirements of future, extended human spaceflight explorations. This technology offers the inherent performance and safety attributes of zeolite and other sorbents with greater structural integrity, regenerability, and process control, thereby providing potential durability and efficiency improvements over current state-of-the-art systems. The major advantages of the ESS explored in this study are realized through the use of metal substrates to provide structural integrity (i.e., less partition of sorbents) and enhanced thermal control during the sorption process. The Microlith technology also offers a unique internal resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirement compared to conventional systems. This paper presents the design, development, and performance results of the integrated adsorber modules for removing CO2, water vapor, and trace chemical contaminants. A related effort that utilizes the adsorber modules for sorption of toxic industrial chemicals is also discussed. Finally, the development of a 4-person two-leg ESS system for continuous CO2 removal is also presented.

  3. Evaluation of Solid Sorbents As A Retrofit Technology for CO{sub 2} Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon

    2011-07-31

    field sites. ADA designed and fabricated a slipstream pilot to allow an evaluation of the kinetic behavior of sorbents and provide some flexibility for the physical characteristics of the materials. The design incorporated a transport reactor for the adsorber (co-current reactor) and a fluidized-bed in the regenerator. This combination achieved the sorbent characterization goals and provided an opportunity to evaluate whether the potential cost savings associated with a relatively simple process design could overcome the sacrifices inherent in a co-current separation process. The system was installed at two field sites during the project, Luminant’s Martin Lake Steam Electric Station and Xcel Energy’s Sherburne County Generating Station (Sherco). Although the system could not maintain continuous 90% CO{sub 2} removal with the sorbents evaluated under this program, it was useful to compare the CO{sub 2} removal properties of several different sorbents on actual flue gas. One of the supported amine materials, sorbent R, was evaluated at both Martin Lake and Sherco. The 1 kWe pilot was operated in continuous mode as well as batch mode. In continuous mode, the sorbent performance could not overcome the limitations of the co-current adsorbent design. In batch mode, sorbent R was able to remove up to 90% CO{sub 2} for several cycles. Approximately 50% of the total removal occurred in the first three feet of the adsorption reactor, which was a transport reactor. During continuous testing at Sherco, CO{sub 2} removal decreased to approximately 20% at steady state. The lack of continuous removal was due primarily to the combination of a co-current adsorption system with a fluidized bed for regeneration, a combination which did not provide an adequate driving force to maintain an acceptable working CO{sub 2} capacity. In addition, because sorbent R consisted of a polymeric amine coated on a silica substrate, it was believed that the 50% amine loaded resulted in mass diffusion

  4. EVALUATION OF SOLID SORBENTS AS A RETROFIT TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly Krutka; Sharon Sjostrom

    2011-07-31

    field sites. ADA designed and fabricated a slipstream pilot to allow an evaluation of the kinetic behavior of sorbents and provide some flexibility for the physical characteristics of the materials. The design incorporated a transport reactor for the adsorber (co-current reactor) and a fluidized-bed in the regenerator. This combination achieved the sorbent characterization goals and provided an opportunity to evaluate whether the potential cost savings associated with a relatively simple process design could overcome the sacrifices inherent in a co-current separation process. The system was installed at two field sites during the project, Luminant's Martin Lake Steam Electric Station and Xcel Energy's Sherburne County Generating Station (Sherco). Although the system could not maintain continuous 90% CO{sub 2} removal with the sorbents evaluated under this program, it was useful to compare the CO{sub 2} removal properties of several different sorbents on actual flue gas. One of the supported amine materials, sorbent R, was evaluated at both Martin Lake and Sherco. The 1 kWe pilot was operated in continuous mode as well as batch mode. In continuous mode, the sorbent performance could not overcome the limitations of the cocurrent adsorbent design. In batch mode, sorbent R was able to remove up to 90% CO{sub 2} for several cycles. Approximately 50% of the total removal occurred in the first three feet of the adsorption reactor, which was a transport reactor. During continuous testing at Sherco, CO{sub 2} removal decreased to approximately 20% at steady state. The lack of continuous removal was due primarily to the combination of a co-current adsorption system with a fluidized bed for regeneration, a combination which did not provide an adequate driving force to maintain an acceptable working CO{sub 2} capacity. In addition, because sorbent R consisted of a polymeric amine coated on a silica substrate, it was believed that the 50% amine loaded resulted in mass

  5. Development and Testing of a Sorbent-Based Atmosphere Revitalization System for the Crew Exploration Vehicle 2007/2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James C.; Howard, David; Miller, Lee

    2008-01-01

    The design of a Vacuum-Swing Adsorption (VSA) system to remove metabolic water and metabolic carbon dioxide from the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) atmosphere is presented. The approach for Orion is a VSA system that removes not only 100 percent of the metabolic CO2 from the atmosphere, but also 100% of the metabolic water as well, a technology approach that has not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. The design and development of the Sorbent Based Atmosphere Regeneration (SBAR) system, including test articles, a facility test stand, and full-scale testing in late 2007 and early 2008 is discussed.

  6. New high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents, calcium silicate sorbents. Final report, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, M.C.; Chiang, R.K.; Fillgrove, K.L. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    A search is being carried out for new calcium-based S0{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The objectives for the current year include the study of sorbents made from Ca(OH){sub 2}, from mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and from portland cement. They also include the study of sorbents made from model compounds. During this year, sorbents prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and from mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and fumed SiO{sub 2} were investigated. The results show that very good SiO{sub 2}-modified Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents in which the Si-to-Ca reactant ratio is low can be prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and fumed SiO{sub 2}. Sorbents prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and natural SiO{sub 2} or natural SiO{sub 2} sources were also studied. The results obtained show that very good SiO{sub 2}-modified Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents and calcium silicate hydrate sorbents, C-S-H sorbents, can be prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and diatomite, pumice or perlite, minerals that are readily available. In addition. sorbents prepared from Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5} and {beta}-Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and from mixtures of these compounds and SiO{sub 2} were studied. The results secured demonstrate that very good C-S-H rich sorbents can be prepared from these compounds and from mixtures of them with SiO{sub 2}. They also provide information useful for interpreting the cement sorbent results. Sorbents prepared from cement and from mixtures of cement and natural SiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} sources were investigated as well. The results secured show that cement and mixtures of it with diatomite, pumice or perlite rapidly yield excellent sorbents with the proper reaction conditions.

  7. IGCC sulfur compounds abatement with earth alkaline sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramon Alvarez-Rodriguez; Carmen Clemente-Jul [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros de Minas

    2007-07-01

    In Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process, in the reference plant built in Puertollano, Spain by Elcogas, a consortium formed by several utilities and engineering companies with a technology that is one of the most promising electricity generation options, both from the environmental and the efficiency point of view and that allows an efficient and environmentally friendly use of national coal, and also a refinery residue, petroleum coke, the high sulphur contents in coal and specially in petcoke, their presence in the feedstock, led to significant contents of gaseous sulphur compounds whose advanced removal has been the aim of this project. Different sorbents to reduce the presence of H{sub 2}S have been researched and between them the earth alkaline compounds, dolomite and calcite that react with H{sub 2}S to give calcium sulphide have been chosen due to their properties and low cost. The calcium sulphide is a reactive product because it reacts with water to regenerate the H{sub 2}S but it can be converted in calcium sulphate, inert product with diverse uses. This conversion to sulphate present some problems of possible lack of total conversion and different conditions to improve this conversion have been investigated. The tests have been carried out with dolomite and calcite and firstly the sulphuration of the same have been produced using a mixture of gases that simulates the IGCC gas and after their oxidation has been studied. The influence of the conditions of sulfurization and oxidation on the final conversion of calcium sulphide to sulphate as the presence of H{sub 2}O vapour, the variation in the composition of the gases, the temperature and the bed length have been evaluated. The solid products obtained have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy and chemical analysis to assess the evolution and progress of the reactions. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Soukri, Mustapha [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Farmer, Justin [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Mobley, Paul [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Tanthana, Jak [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Dongxiang [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Song, Chunshan [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  9. Monitoring solid oxide CO2 capture sorbents in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keturakis, Christopher J; Ni, Fan; Spicer, Michelle; Beaver, Michael G; Caram, Hugo S; Wachs, Israel E

    2014-12-01

    The separation, capture, and storage of CO2 , the major greenhouse gas, from industrial gas streams has received considerable attention in recent years because of concerns about environmental effects of increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. An emerging area of research utilizes reversible CO2 sorbents to increase conversion and rate of forward reactions for equilibrium-controlled reactions (sorption-enhanced reactions). Little fundamental information, however, is known about the nature of the sorbent surface sites, sorbent surface-CO2 complexes, and the CO2 adsorption/desorption mechanisms. The present study directly spectroscopically monitors Na2 O/Al2 O3 sorbent-CO2 surface complexes during adsorption/desorption with simultaneous analysis of desorbed CO2 gas, allowing establishment of molecular level structure-sorption relationships between individual surface carbonate complexes and the CO2 working capacity of sorbents at different temperatures.

  10. Application potential of grapefruit peel as dye sorbent: Kinetics, equilibrium and mechanism of crystal violet adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Asma, E-mail: asmadr@wol.net.pk [Environmental Biotechnology Group, Biotechnology and Food Research Centre, PCSIR Laboratories Complex, Ferozepur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Sharif, Mehwish [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Muhammad [Environmental Biotechnology Group, Biotechnology and Food Research Centre, PCSIR Laboratories Complex, Ferozepur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

    2010-07-15

    This study reports the sorption of crystal violet (CV) dye by grapefruit peel (GFP), which has application potential in the remediation of dye-contaminated wastewaters using a solid waste generated by the citrus fruit juice industry. Batch adsorption of CV was conducted to evaluate the effect of initial pH, contact time, temperature, initial dye concentration, GFP adsorbent dose, and removal of the adsorbate CV dye from aqueous solution to understand the mechanism of sorption involved. Sorption equilibrium reached rapidly with 96% CV removal in 60 min. Fit of the sorption experimental data was tested on the pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics mathematical equations, which was noted to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetics better, with coefficient of correlation {>=}0.992. The equilibrium process was well described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with maximum sorption capacity of 254.16 mg g{sup -1}. The GFP was regenerated using 1 M NaOH, with up to 98.25% recovery of CV and could be reused as a dye sorbent in repeated cycles. GFP was also shown to be highly effective in removing CV from aqueous solution in continuous-flow fixed-bed column reactors. The study shows that GFP has the potential of application as an efficient sorbent for the removal of CV from aqueous solutions.

  11. Active magnetic regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  12. Helping the Retina Regenerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Briefs > Helping the retina regenerate Helping the retina regenerate NEI Audacious Goals Initiative report outlines strategies to replace or reprogram neurons in the retina News Brief 03/30/17 ...

  13. Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where

  14. Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection - Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOx. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOx to diatomic nitrogen (N2). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (SI) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot

  15. The ADESORB Process for Economical Production of Sorbents for Mercury Removal from Coal Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Stewart

    2008-03-12

    The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) currently manages the largest research program in the country for controlling coal-based mercury emissions. NETL has shown through various field test programs that the determination of cost-effective mercury control strategies is complex and highly coal- and plant-specific. However, one particular technology has the potential for widespread application: the injection of activated carbon upstream of either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter baghouse. This technology has potential application to the control of mercury emissions on all coal-fired power plants, even those with wet and dry scrubbers. This is a low capital cost technology in which the largest cost element is the cost of sorbents. Therefore, the obvious solutions for reducing the costs of mercury control must focus on either reducing the amount of sorbent needed or decreasing the cost of sorbent production. NETL has researched the economics and performance of novel sorbents and determined that there are alternatives to the commercial standard (NORIT DARCO{reg_sign} Hg) and that this is an area where significant technical improvements can still be made. In addition, a key barrier to the application of sorbent injection technology to the power industry is the availability of activated carbon production. Currently, about 450 million pounds ($250 million per year) of activated carbon is produced and used in the U.S. each year - primarily for purification of drinking water, food, and beverages. If activated carbon technology were to be applied to all 1,100 power plants, EPA and DOE estimate that it would require an additional $1-$2 billion per year, which would require increasing current capacity by a factor of two to eight. A new facility to produce activated carbon would cost approximately $250 million, would increase current U.S. production by nearly 25%, and could take four to five years to build. This means that there could be

  16. Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where

  17. Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection - Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOx. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOx to diatomic nitrogen (N2). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (SI) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot

  18. SO2/Hg removal from flue gas by dry FGD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fan; Wang Hongmei; Zhang Fan; Zhu Jinwei; Tian Gang; Liu Yu; Mao Jixian

    2012-01-01

    To study the mechanism of SO2 and Hg removal from flue gas,an experimental packed bed reactor was designed to simulate the dry FGD,where a mixture of lime and fly ash in ratio 1∶3 w/w was used as the SO2 and Hg sorbent,and steam at temperature of 100 ℃ was applied for activation of the sorbent,while the activation time set to 20 min.The experimental factors including the SO2/Hg sorbent characteristics,50% breakthrough time for SO2/Hg removal,sorbent packed bed depth and reaction temperature were investigated.The experimental results show that after steam activation,the BET specific surface area and specific pore volume increased from 37.8 to 45.5 m2/g and from 0.42 to 0.51 cm3/g,respectively.With activation of the sorbent by steam,the 50% breakthrough times of SO2 and Hg removal increased from 34 to 42 min and from 23 to 45 min,respectively.When the packed bed depth was increased from 5 to 25 mm,the 50% breakthrough times for Hg and SO2 removal increased from 12 to 52 min and from 6 to 47 min,respectively.With the increase of the reaction temperature,the 50% breakthrough of SO2/Hg removal decreased accordingly.Steam activation can efficiently improve SO2/Hg removal simultaneously.

  19. Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst. (WRI), Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Project DE-FE0024075 deals with the development of a moderate-temperature sorbent-based oxygen production technology. Sorbent-based oxygen production process utilizes oxygen-storage properties of Perovskites to (1) adsorb oxygen from air in a solid sorbent, and (2) release the adsorbed oxygen into a sweep gas such as CO2 and/or steam for gasification systems or recycled flue gas for oxy-combustion systems. Pure oxygen can be produced by the use of vacuum instead of a sweep gas to affect the pressure swing. By developing more efficient and stable, higher sorption capacity, newer class of materials operating at moderate temperatures this process represents a major advancement in air separation technology. Newly developed perovskite ceramic sorbent materials with order-disorder transition have a higher O2 adsorption capacity, potentially 200 °C lower operating temperatures, and up to two orders of magnitude faster desorption rates than those used in earlier development efforts. The performance advancements afforded by the new materials lead to substantial savings in capital investment and operational costs. Cost of producing oxygen using sorbents could be as much as 26% lower than VPSA and about 13% lower than a large cryogenic air separation unit. Cost advantage against large cryogenic separation is limited because sorbent-based separation numbers up sorbent modules for achieving the larger capacity.

  20. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-10-01

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

  1. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, H.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA subassembly was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort is operations and testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon s EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of this testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. The lunar testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This had not been achieved in any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  2. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silaban, A.; Narcida, M.; Harrison, D.P.

    1992-02-01

    The expected commercialization of coal gasification technology in the US and world-wide will create a need for advanced gas purification and separation processes capable of operating at higher temperatures and in more hostile environments than is common today. For example, a high-temperature, high-pressure process capable of separating CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gas may find application in purifying synthesis gas for H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, or CH{sub 3}OH production. High temperature CO{sub 2} removal has the potential for significantly improving the operating efficiency of integrated gasification-molten carbonate fuel cells for electric power generation. This study proved the technical feasibility of a CO{sub 2}-separation process based upon the regenerable noncatalytic gas-solid reaction between CaO and CO{sub 2} to form CACO{sub 3}. Such a process operating at 650{degree}C and 15 atm with 15% CO{sub 2} in the coal gas has the potential for removing in excess of 99% of the CO{sub 2} fed. Selection of a sorbent precursor which, upon calcination, produces high-porosity CaO is important for achieving rapid and complete reaction. The addition of magnesium to the sorbent appears to improve the multicycle durability at a cost of reduced CO{sub 2} capacity per unit mass of sorbent. Reaction conditions, principally calcination and carbonation temperatures, are important factors in multicycle durability. Reaction pressure and CO{sub 2} concentration are important in so far as the initial rapid reaction rate is concerned, but are relatively unimportant in terms of sorbent capacity and durability. Indirect evidence for the simultaneous occurrence of the shift reaction and CO{sub 2}-removal reaction creates the possibility of a direct one-step process for the production of hydrogen from coal-derived gas.

  3. Development of improved sorbents for the moving-bed copper oxide process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B.; Carty, R.H.; Cengiz, P.A.; Khalili, N.R.

    1999-07-01

    In the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, legislation was introduced requiring electric utilities to adopt available technology for removal of pollutant gases (mainly SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and particulates from coal combustion flue gases so that the increased use of coal is done in an environmentally acceptable manner. The threat from the damaging effects of gaseous pollutants is more of a concern in the state of Illinois where over 90% of the high-sulfur coal mined is consumed by electric utilities that are based on pulverized coal combustion, but only a very small fraction is currently equipped with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) processes. The copper oxide process has been selected as one of the most promising emerging technologies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal from flue gases in the Combustion 2000 program of the US Department of Energy. In particular, the development of the Copper Oxide Bed Regenerable Absorber (COBRA) process, which is based on moving-bed cross-flow reactor design for the combined removal of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and particulates, has been pursued in conjunction with the use of Illinois coal. Given the strict limits on SO{sub 2} emissions (1.2 lbs of SO{sub 2} per million Btu by the year 2000), the high sulfur content of Illinois coal, and the growing concern with the disposal of solid residues from conventional FGD processes, the pursuit of the COBRA technology to meet CAAA emission standards represents a strategic choice for the Illinois coal research and development program. This Study has been directed towards the evaluation of the commodity copper oxide sorbent currently being utilized in the demonstration of the COBRA process, to identify areas of improvement, and to develop and implement a strategy for preparing improved sorbents. In this paper, the results obtained to-date from tests carried out for the evaluation of the commercial sorbent for SO{sub 2} removal, its regenerability, and its effectiveness with repeated use

  4. Advances in organic-inorganic hybrid sorbents for the extraction of organic and inorganic pollutants in different types of food and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Nyuk-Ting; Kamaruddin, Amirah Farhan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Abdul Keyon, Aemi S

    2017-08-21

    The efficiency of the extraction and removal of pollutants from food and the environment has been an important issue in analytical science. By incorporating inorganic species into an organic matrix, a new material known as an organic-inorganic hybrid material is formed. As it possesses high selectivity, permeability, and mechanical and chemical stabilities, organic-inorganic hybrid materials constitute an emerging research field and have become popular to serve as sorbents in various separaton science methods. Here, we review recent significant advances in analytical solid-phase extraction employing organic-inorganic composite/nanocomposite sorbents for the extraction of organic and inorganic pollutants from various types of food and environmental matrices. The physicochemical characteristics, extraction properties, and analytical performances of sorbents are discussed; including morphology and surface characteristics, types of functional groups, interaction mechanism, selectivity and sensitivity, accuracy, and regeneration abilities. Organic-inorganic hybrid sorbents combined with extraction techniques are highly promising for sample preparation of various food and environmental matrixes with analytes at trace levels. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Analysis of drugs of abuse in human plasma using microextraction by packed sorbents and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, P; González, M; Regenjo, M; Ares, A M; Fernández, A M; Lorenzo, R A; Carro, A M

    2017-02-17

    A miniaturized and simple method based on digitally programmed microextraction by packed sorbent (eVol(®)-MEPS) coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) has been developed for quantitative determination of three synthetic cathinones and seven conventional drugs of abuse and metabolites. The influence of several extraction parameters, such as washing and elution solvents were tested. In addition important variables affecting MEPS performance, namely sample volume, sorbent drying time, washing solvent volume, elution volume, number of extraction cycles, sorbent phase and pH, were evaluated using an asymmetrical screening design. The optimal experimental conditions involved 300μL of plasma, loading 10×100μL of sample through a C8/SCX sorbent in a MEPS syringe placed in the semi-automatic eVol(®) system, washing using 150μL H2O:MeOH (90:10, v/v), drying for 0.5min and elution using 200μL dichloromethane:2-propanol:ammonium hydroxide (78:20:2, v/v/v). The drugs separation was achieved using an ACQUITY BEH Shield RP18 column (2.1mm×100mm×1.7μm) in 3min. Under optimized conditions the proposed method was validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ), precision and matrix effect, using standard addition calibration. The combination of MEPS and UPLC provides a method for the primary screening of the analytes in 18min with excellent recoveries at three concentration levels, ranging between 80 and 104% (relative standard deviation <11%). The developed methodology has been successfully applied to plasma samples from polydrug abusers.

  6. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  7. A regenerable oxide-based H2S adsorbent with nanofibrous morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mayank; Yeom, Junghoon; Lineberry, Quentin; Jain, Prashant K; Shannon, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is found in raw fuels such as natural gas and coal/biomass-derived syngas. It is poisonous to catalysts and corrosive to metals and therefore needs to be removed. This is often achieved using metal oxides as reactive adsorbents, but metal oxides perform poorly when subjected to repeated cycles of sulphidation and re-oxidation as a result of complex structural and chemical changes. Here, we show that Zn-Ti-O-based adsorbents with nanofibrous morphology can sustain their initial reactivity and sulphur removal capacity over multiple regeneration cycles. These nanostructured sorbents offer rapid reaction rates that overcome the gas-transport limitations of conventional pellet-based sorbents and allow all of the material to be used efficiently. Regeneration can be carried out at the same temperature as the sulphidation step because of the higher reactivity, which prevents sorbent deterioration and reduces energy use. The efficient regeneration of the adsorbent is also aided by structural features such as the growth of hierarchical nanostructures and preferential stabilization of a wurtzite phase in the sulphidation product.

  8. Dry Etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-01-01

    Production of large-area flat panel displays (FPDs) involves several pattern transfer and device fabrication steps that can be performed with dry etching technologies. Even though the dry etching using capacitively coupled plasma is generally used to maintain high etch uniformity, due to the need...... for the higher processing rates in FPDs, high-density plasma processing tools that can handle larger-area substrate uniformly are more intensively studied especially for the dry etching of polysilicon thin films. In the case of FPD processing, the current substrate size ranges from 730 × 920 mm (fourth...... generation) to 2,200 × 2,500 mm (eighth generation), and the substrate size is expected to increase further within a few years. This chapter aims to present relevant details on dry etching including the phenomenology, materials to be etched with the different recipes, plasma sources fulfilling the dry...

  9. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R.V. Smotraiev; E.O. Sorochkina; А.V. Dzuba; Y.D. Galivets

    2016-01-01

    ...: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process...

  10. Novel Sorbent to Clean Up Biogas for CHPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gökhan O. [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Jayataman, Ambalavanan [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Schaefer, Matthew [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Ware, Michael [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Hunt, Jennifer [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Dobek, Frank [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2015-05-30

    In this project, TDA Research Inc. (TDA) has developed low-cost (on a per unit volume of gas processed basis), high-capacity expendable sorbents that can remove both the H2S and organic sulfur species in biogas to the ppb levels. The proposed sorbents will operate downstream of a bulk desulfurization system as a polishing bed to provide an essentially sulfur-free gas to a fuel cell (or any other application that needs a completely sulfur-free feed). Our sorbents use a highly dispersed mixed metal oxides active phase with desired modifiers prepared over on a mesoporous support. The support structure allows the large organic sulfur compounds (such as the diethyl sulfide and dipropyl sulfide phases with a large kinetic diameter) to enter the sorbent pores so that they can be adsorbed and removed from the gas stream.

  11. Silver-Loaded Aluminosilicate Aerogels As Iodine Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Kroll, Jared O. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Peterson, Jacob A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Matyáš, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Olszta, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Li, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States

    2017-09-14

    This paper discusses the development of aluminosilicates aerogels as scaffolds for Ag0 nanoparticles used for chemisorption of I2(g). The starting materials for these scaffolds included both Na-Al-Si-O and Al-Si-O aerogels, both synthesized from metal alkoxides. The Ag0 particles are added by soaking the aerogels in AgNO3 followed by drying and flowing under H2/Ar to reduce Ag+ → Ag0. In some cases, samples were soaked in 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane under supercritical CO2 to add –SH tethers to the aerogel surfaces for more effective binding of Ag+. During the Ag+-impregnation steps, for the Na-Al-Si-O aerogels, Na was replaced with Ag, and for the Al-Si-O aerogel, Si was replaced with Ag. The Ag-loading of thiolated versus non-thiolated Na-Al-Si-O aerogels was comparable at ~35 at% whereas the Ag-loading in unthiolated Al-Si-O aerogels was significantly lower at ~ 7 at% after identical treatment. Iodine loadings in both thiolated and unthiolated Ag0-functionalized Na-Al-Si-O aerogels were > 0.5 g g-1 showing almost complete utilization of the Ag through chemisorption to form AgI. Iodine loading in the thiolated Al-Si-O aerogel was 0.31 g g-1. The control of Ag uptake over solution residence time and [AgNO3] demonstrates the ability to customize the Ag-loading in the base sorbent to regulate the capacity of iodine chemisorption. Consolidation experimental results are also presented.

  12. Efficacy of the Molded Carbon Sorbent VNIITU-1 Used in Obstetric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Dolgikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to develop a technology for obtaining the molded sorbent VNIITU1, to study its physicochemical and biomedical properties, and to evaluate its efficacy in preventing and treating pyoinflammatory complications in obstetrics.Materials and methods. The molded sorbent VNIITU-1 was designed from the carbon porous material based on nanodispersed carbon by mixing with a vehicle, extruding the mixture, drying the extrudate in an inert atmosphere, thermally treating and activating by steam, followed by washing with distilled water and drying (TU 9398043710698342013. The molded sorbent VNIITU-1 is apyrogenic and nontoxic (Toxicity Study Conclusion No. 1998.013.P dated 14.08.2013; Engineering Testing Assessment No. 12.404 ORTI/2013 dated 26.08.2013, it is destined for single administration, sterile, placed in a removable thread capron mesh container, and used to treat and prevent pyoseptic complications in puerperas at risk for infection, such as acute nonspecific postpartum endometritis. A total of 52 puerperas were examined and treated. They had been divided into 2 groups: a study group (n=37 and a comparison group (n=15. In the study group, the hemosorbent VNIITU1 as a porous carbon applicator was postpartum inserted into the uterine cavity, by concurrently performing traditional antibiotic therapy to prevent infectious complications. The comparison group received only traditional antibiotic therapy. The uterine cavity aspirate was examined for IL1β and IL6 levels, its microbial profile, and microbial growth patterns in culture media. The data were processed using a package of applied STATISTICA6.1 programs and standard mathematical tables in Microsoft Excel. Descriptive and variation statistical methods were applied. The data were presented as Me [low quartilehigh quartile (LQHQ]; two pre and posttreatment dependent variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests.Results. The molded carbon sorbent VNIITU1 was

  13. Oil sorbents from plastic wastes and polymers: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Junaid; Adil Riaz, Muhammad; Gordon, McKay

    2018-01-05

    A large volume of the waste produced across the world is composed of polymers from plastic wastes such as polyethylene (HDPE or LDPE), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) amongst others. For years, environmentalists have been looking for various ways to overcome the problems of such large quantities of plastic wastes being disposed of into landfill sites. On the other hand, the usage of synthetic polymers as oil sorbents in particular, polyolefins, including polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) have been reported. In recent years, the idea of using plastic wastes as the feed for the production of oil sorbents has gained momentum. However, the studies undertaking such feasibility are rather scattered. This review paper is the first of its kind reporting, compiling and reviewing these various processes. The production of an oil sorbent from plastic wastes is being seen to be satisfactorily achievable through a variety of methods Nevertheless, much work needs to be done regarding further investigation of the numerous parameters influencing production yields and sorbent qualities. For example, differences in results are seen due to varying operating conditions, experimental setups, and virgin or waste plastics being used as feeds. The field of producing oil sorbents from plastic wastes is still very open for further research, and seems to be a promising route for both waste reduction, and the synthesis of value-added products such as oil sorbents. In this review, the research related to the production of various oil sorbents based on plastics (plastic waste and virgin polymer) has been discussed. Further oil sorbent efficiency in terms of oil sorption capacity has been described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Notch Signaling Inhibits Axon Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Bejjani, Rachid El; Hammarlund, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Many neurons have limited capacity to regenerate their axons after injury. Neurons in the mammalian CNS do not regenerate, and even neurons in the PNS often fail to regenerate to their former targets. This failure is likely due in part to pathways that actively restrict regeneration; however, only a few factors that limit regeneration are known. Here, using single-neuron analysis of regeneration in vivo, we show that Notch/lin-12 signaling inhibits the regeneration of mature C. elegans neuron...

  15. Efficacy of a new tan doped sol-gel sorbent for uptake of zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A.; Ahmed, S.; Riaz, M. [Nuclear Chemistry Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, F.; Younas Khokhar, M. [Dept. of Chemistry, Bahauddin Zakariya Univ., Multan (Pakistan)

    2003-07-01

    A TAN (1-(2-Thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol) doped sol gel silica sorbent (reddish colour, porous, stable, hard, non-swelling) were prepared and investigated for the removal of Zn (II) from aqueous solutions. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm, equilibration time and pH effect on the removal were studied from non competitive aqueous solution to optimize the conditions to be utilized on a large scale. Fast equilibration was observed and adsorption equilibria were reached within 30 minutes. Adsorption of zinc ions on the blank (un-doped) sol gel was found negligible. The maximum adsorption of Zn (II) ions onto the TAN doped sol-gel from single solutions were 2.33 mg/g (0.035 mmol/g). TAN doped sol gel can be regenerated through washing with a solution of 0.1 M HCl solution. The maximum regeneration value was as high as 99.0%. The TAN-doped sol gel silica is suitable at least for four adsorption-desorption cycles without experiencing considerable loss of adsorption capacity. The uptake route and the nature of the Zn-TAN complex have been discussed. (orig.)

  16. New Sorbents for Removing Arsenic From Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConchie, D. M.; Genc-Fuhrman, H.; Clark, M. W.; Caldicott, W.; Davies-McConchie, F. G.

    2004-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water used in many countries, including some of the poorest developing countries, and recognition that consuming this water can have serious consequences for human health, have led to increased investigations of ways to obtain safe water supplies. Finding new groundwater resources is a possible solution but this is a costly strategy that has no guarantee of success, particularly in areas where water is already a scarce commodity. The alternative is to treat water that is already available, but existing technologies are usually too expensive, too difficult to operate and maintain, or not completely effective when used in less developed countries or remote areas. There is therefore, an urgent need to find a simple and effective but inexpensive sorbent for arsenic that can be used to treat large volumes of water under less than ideal conditions. In this paper we present the results of field and laboratory trials that used a new, highly cost-effective, sorbent to remove arsenic from contaminated water. BauxsolT is the name given to the cocktail of minerals prepared by treating caustic bauxite refinery residues with Mg and Ca to produce a substance with a reaction pH of about 8.5, a high acid neutralizing capacity and an excellent ability to trap trace metals, metalloids and some other ionic species. The trapped ions are tightly bound by processes that include; precipitation of low solubility neoformational minerals, isomorphous substitution, solid-state diffusion, and adsorption; it is also an excellent flocculant. Although ordinary BauxsolT has an excellent ability to bind arsenate, and to a lesser extent arsenite, this ability can be further increased for particular water types by using activated BauxsolT or BauxsolT combined with small amounts of other reagents. Field trials conducted at the Gilt Edge Mine, South Dakota, showed that the addition of BauxsolT to highly sulfidic waste rock reduced the arsenic

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of CO{sub 2} Capture Reaction by Solid Sorbents: Theoretical Predictions and Experimental Validations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Luebke, David; Pennline, Henry; Li, Liyu; King, David; Zhang,; Keling,; Zhao,; Lifeng,; Xiao, Yunhan

    2012-01-01

    anhydrous phase) temperature, which depends on the CO{sub 2} pressure and the steam pressure with the best range being PH{sub 2}O≤1.0 bar. Above the phase-transition temperature, the sorbent will be regenerated into anhydrous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Our theoretical investigations on Na-promoted MgO sorbents revealed that the sorption process takes place through formation of the Na{sub 2}Mg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} double carbonate with better reaction kinetics over porous MgO, that of pure MgO sorbent. The experimental sorption tests also indicated that the Na-promoted MgO sorbent has high reactivity and capacity towards CO{sub 2} sorption and can be easily regenerated either through pressure or temperature swing processes.

  18. Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2006-04-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at DTE Energy's Monroe Power Plant, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results from Monroe indicate that using DARCO{reg_sign} Hg would result in higher mercury removal (80%) at a sorbent cost of $18,000/lb mercury, or 70% lower than the benchmark. These results demonstrate that the goals established by DOE/NETL were exceeded during this test program. The increase in mercury removal over baseline conditions is defined for this program as a comparison in the outlet emissions measured using the Ontario Hydro method during the baseline

  19. Stirling convertor regenerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Mounir B

    2011-01-01

    Stirling Convertor Regenerators addresses the latest developments and future possibilities in the science and practical application of Stirling engine regenerators and technology. Written by experts in the vanguard of alternative energy, this invaluable resource presents integral scientific details and design concepts associated with Stirling converter regenerators. Content is reinforced with novel insights and remarkable firsthand experience that the authors and their colleagues acquired while working at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other leading organizations.

  20. century drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  1. A biomass-supported Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} sorbent for flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, H.; Ouyang, T.; Yang, F.; Kou, Y. [Peking University, Beijing (China). College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering

    2003-06-01

    A novel sorbent for SO{sub 2} removal has been investigated. The sorbent is obtained by conventional incipient wetness impregnation of abandoned biomaterials (straw or dried leaves) with an aqueous solution of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. A material with the composition 80 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/straw shows a desulfurization activity which is both higher and faster than that of the reference sample Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}. The breakthrough and stoichiometric SO{sub 2} adsorption efficiencies for 80 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/straw reach 48.9% and 80.6%, respectively, at a temperature of 80{sup o}C. The adsorption efficiencies are almost constant in the temperature range 70 to 300{sup o}C. According to IR and XPS analysis the main products observed on the spent sorbent are sulfite below 150{sup o}C and sulfate at 300{sup o}C. The Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in 80 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/straw can potentially be recycled by the oxidation of the straw with concomitant reduction of the sulfite species to elemental sulfur, making the proposed process CO{sub 2} neutral. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Effect of the Characters of Chitosans Used and Regeneration Conditions on the Yield and Physicochemical Characteristics of Regenerated Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Hsi Hsu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore the effect of the character of chitosans used, and the regeneration conditions employed on, the yield and physicochemical characteristics of regenerated products. Different concentrations of acetic acid were used to dissolve chitosans of 61.7% and 94.9% degree of deacetylation (DD, and weight-average molecular weight (Mw of 176 and 97 kDa, respectively; they were then precipitated with an 8 N NaOH solution, followed by washing and neutral and freeze drying to get the regenerated products. Yields of regenerated products and their physicochemical properties, such as ash content, bulk density, Mw, polydispersity index (PDI, DD, and crystallinity were measured. A higher concentration of acetic acid used resulted in a higher yield. The purity of the regenerated product increased significantly, whereas the bulk density and crystallinity decreased significantly after regeneration. The regeneration process showed its merits of narrowing down the PDI of regenerated products. The DD and structure of chitosan was changed insignificantly after the regeneration process.

  3. Dry period length of dairy cows :

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Ruben

    2017-01-01

    A dry period of dairy cows is historically seen as a period during which the cow can restore its body condition and regenerate its mammary epithelium in order to be high yielding in the successive lactation. Recent work has indicated that high yielding cows generally experience a severe negative ene

  4. Dry period length of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Ruben

    2017-01-01

    A dry period of dairy cows is historically seen as a period during which the cow can restore its body condition and regenerate its mammary epithelium in order to be high yielding in the successive lactation. Recent work has indicated that high yielding cows generally experience a severe negative

  5. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  6. Polyethyleneimine-Functionalized Polyamide Imide (Torlon) Hollow-Fiber Sorbents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2013-05-24

    Carbon dioxide emitted from existing coal-fired power plants is a major environmental concern due to possible links to global climate change. In this study, we expand upon previous work focused on aminosilane-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents by introducing a new class of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. Different molecular weight PEIs (Mn≈600, 1800, 10 000, and 60 000) were studied as functional groups on polyamide imide (PAI, Torlon) hollow fibers. This imide ring-opening modification introduces two amide functional groups and was confirmed by FTIR attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The carbon dioxide equilibrium sorption capacities of PEI-functionalized Torlon materials were characterized by using both pressure decay and gravimetric sorption methods. For equivalent PEI concentrations, PAI functionalized with lower molecular weight PEI exhibited higher carbon dioxide capacities. The effect of water in the ring-opening reaction was also studied. Up to a critical value, water in the reaction mixture enhanced the degree of functionalization of PEI to Torlon and resulted in higher carbon dioxide uptake within the functionalized material. Above the critical value, roughly 15 % w/w water, the fiber morphology was lost and the fiber was soluble in the solvent. PEI-functionalized (Mn≈600) PAI under optimal reaction conditions was observed to have the highest CO2 uptake: 4.9 g CO2 per 100 g of polymer (1.1 mmol g-1) at 0.1 bar and 35°C with dry 10 % CO2/90 % N2 feed for thermogravimetric analysis. By using water-saturated feeds (10 % CO2/90 % N2 dry basis), CO2 sorption was observed to increase to 6.0 g CO2 per 100 g of sorbent (1.4 mmol g-1). This material also demonstrated stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption operations, even under wet conditions at which some highly effective sorbents tend to lose performance. Thus, PEI-functionalized PAI fibers can be

  7. Desarrollo de sorbentes regenerables de mercurio a partir de materiales de carbono

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Pérez, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    [ES] El mercurio y sus compuestos son especies con una importante contribución a la contaminación ambiental, como consecuencia de su toxicidad, su tendencia a acumularse en los organismos vivos y otros inconvenientes, entre los que se encuentra su alta volatilidad, que dificultan su reducción y control. La emisión de especies de mercurio al medio ambiente se produce, fundamentalmente, como consecuencia de la actividad humana. Concretamente, la combustión de carbón en centrales ...

  8. Hydrogen sulfide removal from hot coal gas by various mesoporous silica supported Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.F.; Liu, B.S., E-mail: bingsiliu@tju.edu.cn; Wang, F.; Wang, W.S.; Xia, C.; Zheng, S.; Amin, R.

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/KIT-1 presented the best desulfurization performance at 600–850 °C. • High sulfur capacity of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/KIT-1 correlated closely with 3-D channel of KIT-1. • Desulfurization character depended strongly on framework structure of sorbents. • High steam content suppressed greatly the occurrence of sulfidation reaction. - Abstract: A series of 50 wt% Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents was prepared using various mesoporous silica, MCM-41, HMS, and KIT-1 as support. The influence of textural parameters of mesoporous silica, especially type of channel on the desulfurization performance of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents was investigated at 600–850 °C using hot coal gas containing 0.33 vol.% H{sub 2}S. The fresh and used sorbents were characterized by means of N{sub 2}-adsorption, x-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM) and H{sub 2} temperature- programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) techniques. The results confirmed that the manganese oxide was dispersed highly in regular pore channel of the mesoporous supports due to high surface area. Compared with the Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/diatomite, all mesoporous silica supported Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents exhibited high breakthrough sulfur capacity and a sharp deactivation rate after the breakthrough point. Compared to Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MCM-41 and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HMS sorbent, the Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/KIT-1 showed better desulfurization performance because of the 3D wormhole-like channel. The high sulfur capacity of the Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/KIT-1 sorbent was maintained during the eight consecutive desulfurization-regeneration cycles. The Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}/KIT-1 still presented high desulfurization activity when hot coal gas contained low steam (<5%)

  9. A NOVEL BIO-WASTE INCORPORATED ALGINATE SORBENT FOR DE-FLUORIDATION OF WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmalin Sophia Ayyappan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the feasibility of using tamarind (Tamarindus indica seed powder for de-fluoridation of fluoride contaminated water. Batch study confirmed that tamarind seeds in dry powder form could remove 87% of fluoride from water. This bio-sorbent can be used effectively in areas where fluoride concentrations are above the permissible limits of 1.5 mg·l-1 as per WHO Standard, 1984. Tamarind seed powder was incorporated in a matrix of sodium alginate and made into gel-beads. The beads were tested for de-fluoridation efficiency by conducting column studies. The effect of various factors, such as flow rate, retention time, and the number of runs on the efficacy of fluoride removal was also studied. The results revealed that flow rate did not seem to have much effect on the percentage fluoride removal but the fluoride concentration decreased drastically upon greater retention time and multiple runs.

  10. Advanced Sorbents for Oil-Spill Cleanup: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jin; Zhao, Hao-Yu; Zhu, Hong-Wu; Huang, Jin; Shi, Lu-An; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-12-01

    Oil sorbents play a very important part in the remediation processes of oil spills. To enhance the oil-sorption properties and simplify the oil-recovery process, various advanced oil sorbents and oil-collecting devices based on them have been proposed recently. Here, we firstly discuss the design considerations for the fabrication of oil sorbents and describe recently developed oil sorbents based on modification strategy. Then, recent advances regarding oil sorbents mainly based on carbon materials and swellable oleophilic polymers are also presented. Subsequently, some additional properties are emphasized, which are required by oil sorbents to cope with oil spills under extreme conditions or to facilitate the oil-collection processes. Furthermore, some oil-collection devices based on oil sorbents that have been developed recently are shown. Finally, an outlook and challenges for the next generation of oil-spill-remediation technology based on oil-sorbents materials are given.

  11. The Analysis of Activated Carbon Regeneration Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚芳

    2014-01-01

    A series of methods for activated carbon regeneration were briefly introduced.Such as thermal regeneration,chemical regeneration,biochemical regeneration,and newly supercritical fluid regeneration, electrochemical regeneration,light-catalyzed regeneration,and microwave radiation method,and the developing trend of activated carbon regeneration was predicted.

  12. Dry Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use a fluoride rinse or brush-on fluoride gel before bedtime. See your dentist at least twice yearly to have your teeth examined and plaque removed, to help prevent tooth decay. Several herbal remedies have been used historically to treat dry ...

  13. Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products that increasingly interfere with the fission process as their concentrations increase. Some of these fission and activation products tend to evolve in gaseous species during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Deep-bed iodine sorption testing has been done to evaluate the performance of solid sorbents for capturing iodine in off-gas streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The objectives of the FY 2011 deep bed iodine sorbent testing are: (1) Evaluate sorbents for iodine capture under various conditions of gas compositions and operating temperature (determine sorption efficiencies, capacities, and mass transfer zone depths); and (2) Generate data for dynamic iodine sorption modeling. Three tests performed this fiscal year on silver zeolite light phase (AgZ-LP) sorbent are reported here. Additional tests are still in progress and can be reported in a revision of this report or a future report. Testing was somewhat delayed and limited this year due to initial activities to address some questions of prior testing, and due to a period of maintenance for the on-line GC. Each test consisted of (a) flowing a synthetic blend of gases designed to be similar to an aqueous dissolver off-gas stream over the sorbent contained in three separate bed segments in series, (b) measuring each bed inlet and outlet gas concentrations of iodine and methyl iodide (the two surrogates of iodine gas species considered most representative of iodine species expected in dissolver off-gas), (c) operating for a long enough time to achieve breakthrough of the iodine species from at least one (preferably the first two) bed segments, and (d) post-test purging

  14. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  15. In-vitro myoglobin clearance by a novel sorbent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsevich, Viktoriya I; Feinfeld, Donald A; Audia, Pat F; Young, Wendell; Capponi, Vincent; Markella, Marianna; Winchester, James F

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis may lead to acute kidney injury following deposition of myoglobin in renal tubules. Although high-flux dialysis membranes may remove a substantial amount of myoglobin from plasma, this may still not be sufficient to prevent renal damage. We tested a new polymer sorbent, X-Sorb, in vitro to determine its potential to clear myoglobin from solutions. Normal saline or human serum in which myoglobin was dissolved was perfused by a peristaltic pump through a column packed with the sorbent. After a 4-hour perfusion, the myoglobin level in normal saline fell from 200,000 ng/ml to virtually undetectable ( 90% over 4 hours. X-Sorb appears to be an effective sorbent for myoglobin and warrants a trial in vivo to determine whether it is equally effective and safe.

  16. Monoecy, anemophily, anemochory and regeneration ecology of Hildegardia populifolia (Roxb. Schott. and Endl. (Malvaceae, an economically important endemic and endangered dry deciduous tree species of southern Eastern Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.S. Raju

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hildegardia populifolia is a critically endangered tree species. All phenological events—leaf flushing, shedding, flowering, fruit dispersal occur one after the other during the dry season. It is morphologically andromonoecious but functionally monoecious. It produces a strikingly male-biased male and bisexual flower ratio; it is self-incompatible and obligately outcrossing. The flowers are nectariferous and the nectar has hexose-rich sugars, some essential and non-essential amino acids. Trigona bee and Rhynchium wasp were the exclusive foragers, though their foraging activity does not promote cross-pollination. The male flower number, the pollen output, the pollen characteristics and the placement of anthers on the top of androphore conform to anemophily. The natural fruit set does not exceed 5%. The fruit is 5-follicled with one or two seeds. The low fruit set is compensated by the production of more 2-seeded follicles. Fruit characteristics such as wing-like follicles, membranous follicle sheath and being very light weight characterize anemochory. Seeds with a hard coat do not germinate readily during the rainy season and their germination depends on the soil chemicals and nutrient environment. The soil is deficient in nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous. Partly burned seeds due to natural or human-caused fires germinate quickly in water saturated soil. The study suggests that seed germination and seedling growth rates are regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors along with natural and anthropogenic fires. We recommend that seedlings should be raised in nurseries and then transferred to natural habitats to build up the population.

  17. Characterization of calcium carbonate sorbent particle in furnace environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Soo [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Hee [Environment Sensor System Research Center, KIST 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Keel, Sang In; Yun, Jin Han; Min, Tai Jin [Environmental Systems Research Division, KIMM 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Soo, E-mail: sskim@kaist.ac.kr [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion system is a promising technology to control CO{sub 2} and NO{sub X} emissions. Furthermore, sulfation reaction mechanism under CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheric condition in a furnace may lead to in-furnace desulfurization. In the present study, we evaluated characteristics of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) sorbent particles under different atmospheric conditions. To examine the physical/chemical characteristics of CaCO{sub 3}, which is used as a sorbent particle for in-furnace desulfurization in the oxy-fuel combustion system, they were injected into high temperature drop tube furnace (DTF). Experiments were conducted at varying temperatures, residence times, and atmospheric conditions in a reactor. To evaluate the aerosolizing characteristics of the CaCO{sub 3} sorbent particle, changes in the size distribution and total particle concentration between the DTF inlet and outlet were measured. Structural changes (e.g., porosity, grain size, and morphology) of the calcined sorbent particles were estimated by BET/BJH, XRD, and SEM analyses. It was shown that sorbent particles rapidly calcined and sintered in the air atmosphere, whereas calcination was delayed in the CO{sub 2} atmosphere due to the higher CO{sub 2} partial pressure. Instead, the sintering effect was dominant in the CO{sub 2} atmosphere early in the reaction. Based on the SEM images, it was shown that the reactions of sorbent particles could be explained as a grain-subgrain structure model in both the air and CO{sub 2} atmospheres.

  18. 40 CFR 75.39 - Missing data procedures for sorbent trap monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missing data procedures for sorbent... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Missing Data Substitution Procedures § 75.39 Missing data procedures for sorbent trap monitoring systems. (a) If a primary sorbent...

  19. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Smotraiev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of water supply in the world and in Ukraine, in particular, is a high level of pollution in water resources and an insufficient level of drinking water purification. With industrial wastewater, a significant amount of pollutants falls into water bodies, including suspended particles, sulfates, iron compounds, heavy metals, etc. Aim: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process. Materials and Methods: The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were prepared by sol-gel method during the hydrolysis of metal chlorides (zirconium oxychloride ZrOCl2, aluminum chloride AlCl3 and manganese chloride MnCl2 with carbamide. Results: The surface and sorption properties of sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were investigated. X-ray amorphous structure and evolved hydroxyl-hydrate cover mainly characterize the obtained xerogels. The composite sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide doped with aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 537 m2/g and manganese oxyhydroxide (aS = 356 m2/g have more developed specific surface area than single-component xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide (aS = 236 m2/g and aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 327 m2/g. The sorbent based on the xerogel of zirconium and manganese oxyhydroxides have the maximum SO42--ions sorption capacity. It absorbs 1.5 times more SO42–-ions than the industrial anion exchanger AN-221. The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide has the sorption capacity of Fe3+-ions that is 1.5…2 times greater than the capacity of the industrial cation exchanger KU-2-8. The Na+-ions absorption capacity is 1.47…1.56 mmol/g for each sorbent. Conclusions: Based on these data it can be concluded that the proposed method is effective for sorbents production based on

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: ... your eyes do not produce enough tears, it is called dry eye. Dry eye is also when ...

  1. Regeneration and reprogramming compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robles Vanesa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dedifferentiation occurs naturally in mature cell types during epimorphic regeneration in fish and some amphibians. Dedifferentiation also occurs in the induction of pluripotent stem cells when a set of transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc is over expressed in mature cell types. Results We hypothesised that there are parallels between dedifferentiation or reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells and the natural process of dedifferentiation during epimorphic regeneration. We analysed expression levels of the most commonly used pluripotency associated factors in regenerating and non-regenerating tissue and compared them with levels in a pluripotent reference cell. We found that some of the pluripotency associated factors (oct4/pou5f1, sox2, c-myc, klf4, tert, sall4, zic3, dppa2/4 and fut1, a homologue of ssea1 were expressed before and during regeneration and that at least two of these factors (oct4, sox2 were also required for normal fin regeneration in the zebrafish. However these factors were not upregulated during regeneration as would be expected if blastema cells acquired pluripotency. Conclusions By comparing cells from the regeneration blastema with embryonic pluripotent reference cells we found that induced pluripotent stem and blastema cells do not share pluripotency. However, during blastema formation some of the key reprogramming factors are both expressed and are also required for regeneration to take place. We therefore propose a link between partially reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells and the half way state of blastema cells and suggest that a common mechanism might be regulating these two processes.

  2. Chalcogenide aerogels as sorbents for radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subrahmanyam, Kota S.; Sarma, Debajit; Malliakas, Christos; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-04-14

    Iodine (129I) is one of the radionuclides released in nuclear fuel reprocessing and poses risk to public safety due to its involvement in human metabolic processes. In order to prevent the leaching of hazardous radioactive iodine into the environment, its effective capture and sequestration is pivotal. In the context of finding a suitable matrix for capturing radioactive iodine the chalcogels, NiMoS4, CoMoS4, Sb4Sn4S12, Zn2Sn2S6, and CoSx (x = 4-5) were explored as iodine sorbents. All the chalcogels showed high uptake, reaching up to 225 mass% (2.25 g/g) of the final mass owing to strong chemical and physical iodine-chalcogen interactions. Analysis of the iodine-loaded specimens revealed that the iodine chemically reacted with Sb4Sn4S12, Zn2Sn2S6, and CoSx to form metal complexes SbI3, SnI4, and, KI respectively. The NiMoS4 and CoMoS4 chalcogels did not appear to undergo a chemical reaction with iodine since iodide complexes were not observed with these samples. Once heated, the iodine-loaded chalcogels released iodine in the temperature range of 75 °C to 220 °C, depending on the nature of iodine speciation. In the case of Sb4Sn4S12 and Zn2Sn2S6 iodine release was observed around 150 °C in the form of SnI4 and SbI3, respectively. The NiMoS4, CoMoS4, and CoSx released iodine at ~75 °C, which is consistent with physisorbed iodine. Preliminary investigations on consolidation of iodine-loaded Zn2Sn2S6 with Sb2S3 as a glass forming additive showed the content of iodine in consolidated glass ingots at around 25 mass%.

  3. Strategies for lung regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Petersen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limited ability of the adult lung to regenerate and the frequency of lung disease, the lung is a tissue that can especially benefit from regenerative medicine. Prospects for lung regeneration have made great strides in the past year. In this review, we summarize recent progress and key challenges for approaches in lung regenerative medicine. With a focus on the matrix components critical for the development of regenerative lung tissues, we discuss possible cell sources for lung regeneration, key matrix effects on cell repopulation, and physical stimuli that will aid in the growth of lung tissues in vitro.

  4. Tooth regeneration: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadu Shifali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  5. Tooth regeneration: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadu, Shifali S

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  6. Regeneration Heat Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Lin

    2003-07-30

    The original project goals were to establish the viability of the proposed gas turbine regenerator concept by performing the following tasks: (1) Perform detailed design of a working model of the regenerator concept. (2) Construct a ''bench-top'' model of the regenerator concept based upon the detail design. (3) Test the bench-top model and gather data to support the concept's viability. The project funding was used to acquire the tools and material to perform the aforementioned tasks.

  7. Preparation and characterization of an organic/inorganic hybrid sorbent (PLE) to enhance selectivity for As(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byungryul; Kim, Hakchan; Park, Chanhyuk; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2015-05-30

    For the selective removal of arsenate (As(V)) a hybrid sorbent was prepared using a non-toxic natural organic material, chitosan, by loading a transition metal, nickel. The immobilization of nickel was achieved by coordination with a deprotonated amino group (NH2) in the chitosan polymer chain. The amount of nickel was directly correlated to the presence of the amino group and was calculated to be 62 mg/g. FTIR spectra showed a peak shift from 1656 to 1637 cm(-1) after Ni(2+) loading, indicating the complexation between the amino group and nickel, and a peak of As(V) was observed at 834 cm(-1). An increase of sulfate concentration from 100 mg/L to 200 mg/L did not significantly affect As(V) sorption, and an increase in the concentration of bicarbonate reduced the As(V) uptake by 33%. The optimal pH of the solution was determined at pH 10, which is in accordance with the fraction of HAsO4(2-) and AsO4(-3). According to a fixed column test, a break through behavior of As(V) revealed that selectivity for As(V) was over sulfate. Regeneration using 5% NaCl extended the use of sorbent to up to uses without big loss of sorption capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High capacity MnOx:ZrO2 sorbent for elementary mercury capture: preparation, characterization and comparison to other sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, J.; Snape, C. E.

    2017-02-01

    Manganese oxide-zirconia type (MnOx:ZrO2) sorbents were prepared using the sol-gel technique by co precipitation ZrO(NO3)2.xH2O and Mn(NO3)2 xH2O. The heat treatment below 500°C resulted a high surface area solid structure which consists of amorphous Mn2O3 (Bixbyite) and amorphous ZrO2 phases. This material was found a high capacity oxidative sorbent for mercury removal from gas streams.

  9. Testing of hydrotalcite based sorbents for CO2 and H2S capture for use in sorption enhanced water gas shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Walspurger, S.; Cobden, P.D.; Van den Brink, R.W. [ECN Hydrogen and Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    The feasibility of the sorption enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) process under sour conditions is shown. The sour-SEWGS process constitutes a second generation pre-combustion carbon capture technology for the application in an IGCC. As a first critical step, the suitability of a K2CO3 promoted hydrotalcite-based CO2 sorbent is demonstrated by means of adsorption and regeneration experiments in the presence of 2000 ppm H2S. In multiple cycle experiments at 400C and 5 bar, the sorbent displays reversible co-adsorption of CO2 and H2S. The CO2 sorption capacity is not significantly affected compared to sulphur-free conditions. A mechanistic model assuming two different sites for H2S interaction explains qualitatively the interactions of CO2 and H2S with the sorbent. On the type A sites, CO2 and H2S display competitive sorption where CO2 is favoured. The type B sites only allow H2S uptake and may involve the formation of metal sulphides. This material behaviour means that the sour-SEWGS process likely eliminates CO2 and H2S simultaneously from the syngas and that an almost CO2 and H2S-free H2 stream and a CO2 + H2S stream can be produced.

  10. Chemical genetics and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sumitra; Zhang, Liyun; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration involves interactions between multiple signaling pathways acting in a spatially and temporally complex manner. As signaling pathways are highly conserved, understanding how regeneration is controlled in animal models exhibiting robust regenerative capacities should aid efforts to stimulate repair in humans. One way to discover molecular regulators of regeneration is to alter gene/protein function and quantify effect(s) on the regenerative process: dedifferentiation/reprograming, stem/progenitor proliferation, migration/remodeling, progenitor cell differentiation and resolution. A powerful approach for applying this strategy to regenerative biology is chemical genetics, the use of small-molecule modulators of specific targets or signaling pathways. Here, we review advances that have been made using chemical genetics for hypothesis-focused and discovery-driven studies aimed at furthering understanding of how regeneration is controlled.

  11. A highly efficient polyampholyte hydrogel sorbent based fixed-bed process for heavy metal removal in actual industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guiyin; Luo, Jinming; Liu, Chengbin; Chu, Lin; Ma, Jianhong; Tang, Yanhong; Zeng, Zebing; Luo, Shenglian

    2016-02-01

    High sorption capacity, high sorption rate, and fast separation and regeneration for qualified sorbents used in removing heavy metals from wastewater are urgently needed. In this study, a polyampholyte hydrogel was well designed and prepared via a simple radical polymerization procedure. Due to the remarkable mechanical strength, the three-dimensional polyampholyte hydrogel could be fast separated, easily regenerated and highly reused. The sorption capacities were as high as 216.1 mg/g for Pb(II) and 153.8 mg/g for Cd(II) owing to the existence of the large number of active groups. The adsorption could be conducted in a wide pH range of 3-6 and the equilibrium fast reached in 30 min due to its excellent water penetration for highly accessible to metal ions. The fixed-bed column sorption results indicated that the polyampholyte hydrogel was particularly effective in removing Pb(II) and Cd(II) from actual industrial effluent to meet the regulatory requirements. The treatment volumes of actual smelting effluent using one fixed bed column were as high as 684 bed volumes (BV) (7736 mL) for Pb(II) and 200 BV (2262 mL) for Cd(II). Furthermore, the treatment volumes of actual smelting effluent using tandem three columns reached 924 BV (31,351 mL) for Pb(II) and 250 BV (8483 mL) for Cd(II), producing only 4 BV (136 mL) eluent. Compared with the traditional high density slurry (HDS) process with large amount of sludge, the proposed process would be expected to produce only a small amount of sludge. When the treatment volume was controlled below 209.3 BV (7103 mL), all metal ions in the actual industrial effluent could be effectively removed (hydrogel sorbents for the removal of heavy metal ions from practical wastewater.

  12. Air regenerating and conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishayenkov, B. G.

    1975-01-01

    Various physicochemical methods of regenerating and conditioning air for spacecraft are described with emphasis on conditions which affect efficiency of the system. Life support systems used in closed, hermetically sealed environments are discussed with references to actual application in the Soviet Soyuz and Voskhod manned spacecraft. Temperature and humidity control, removal of carbon dioxide, oxygen regeneration, and removal of bacteria and viruses are among the factors considered.

  13. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article...

  14. Recent developments in novel sorbents for flue gas clean up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan; Bisson, Teresa M.; Yang, Hongqun; Xu, Zhenghe [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Coal combustion is one of the most important energy sources for electricity generation, but also produces airborne pollutants. The amount of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} for example, is in the order of hundreds to thousands of ppm, and tens to hundreds of ppm, respectively, while Hg in flue gases could be up to tens to hundreds of ppb. Flue gas desulphurization technology is already in place for SO{sub 2} removal, and new sorbents such as zeolites are being investigated for such an application. NO{sub x} can be removed by selective catalytic reduction with various catalysts. Mercury is the hardest to remove due to its persistent nature and relatively low concentration in flue gases. New sorbents have also been developed for mercury removal applications. A current trend in flue gas emission control is to remove Hg, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} simultaneously. Various catalytic sorbents have been investigated to remove two or more of these pollutants concurrently. This article reviews recent developments made for emission control of coal-fired power plant flue gases using novel sorbents to target individual or multiple pollutants. (author)

  15. MERCURY CONTROL WITH CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS AND OXIDIZING AGENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2002-06-01

    The initial tasks of this DOE funded project to investigate mercury removal by calcium-based sorbents have been completed, and initial testing results have been obtained. Mercury monitoring capabilities have been obtained and validated. An approximately 1MW (3.4 Mbtu/hr) Combustion Research Facility at Southern Research Institute was used to perform pilot-scale investigations of mercury sorbents, under conditions representative of full-scale boilers. The initial results of ARCADIS G&M proprietary sorbents, showed ineffective removal of either elemental or oxidized mercury. Benchscale tests are currently underway to ascertain the importance of differences between benchscale and pilot-scale experiments. An investigation of mercury-capture temperature dependence using common sorbents has also begun. Ordinary hydrated lime removed 80 to 90% of the mercury from the flue gas, regardless of the temperature of injection. High temperature injection of hydrated lime simultaneously captured SO{sub 2} at high temperatures and Hg at low temperatures, without any deleterious effects on mercury speciation. Future work will explore alternative methods of oxidizing elemental mercury.

  16. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cespedes, F.F.; Sanchez, M.V.; Garcia, S.P.; Perez, M.F. [University of Almeria, Almeria (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2007-10-15

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism.

  17. Evaluation of inorganic sorbent treatment for LWR coolant process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roddy, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents results of a survey of the literature and of experience at selected nuclear installations to provide information on the feasibility of replacing organic ion exchangers with inorganic sorbents at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants. Radioactive contents of the various streams in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors were examined. In addition, the methods and performances of current methods used for controlling water quality at these plants were evaluated. The study also includes a brief review of the physical and chemical properties of selected inorganic sorbents. Some attributes of inorganic sorbents would be useful in processing light water reactor (LWR) streams. The inorganic resins are highly resistant to damage from ionizing radiation, and their exchange capacities are generally equivalent to those of organic ion exchangers. However, they are more limited in application, and there are problems with physical integrity, especially in acidic solutions. Research is also needed in the areas of selectivity and anion removal before inorganic sorbents can be considered as replacements for the synthetic organic resins presently used in LWRs. 11 figures, 14 tables.

  18. Monolithic natural gas storage delivery system based on sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-09-27

    The invention provides methods for producing a strong, light, sorbent-based storage/dispenser system for gases and fuels. The system comprises a porous monolithic material with an adherent strong impervious skin that is capable of storing a gas under pressure in a safe and usable manner.

  19. Monolithic natural gas storage delivery system based on sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-09-27

    The invention provides methods for producing a strong, light, sorbent-based storage/dispenser system for gases and fuels. The system comprises a porous monolithic material with an adherent strong impervious skin that is capable of storing a gas under pressure in a safe and usable manner.

  20. Modeling of calcium-based sorbent reactions with sulfur dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomanović Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of calcium sorbent reactions for simulation of sulfur dioxide reduction from pulverized coal combustion fl e gasses is developed, implemented within numerical code and validated against available measurements under controlled conditions. The model attempts to closely resemble reactions of calcination, sintering and sulfation, occurring during the sorbent particles motion in the furnace. The sulfation is based on PSSM (Partially Sintered Spheres Model, coupled with simulated particle calcination and sintering. Complex geometry of the particle is taken into account, with the assumption that it consists of spherical grains in contact with each other. Numerical simulations of drop down tube reactors were performed for both CaCO3 and Ca(OH2 sorbent particles and results were compared with available experimental data from literature. The sorbent reactions model will be further used for simulations of desulfurization reactions in turbulent gas-particle flow under coalcombustion conditions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018: Increase in energy and ecology efficiency of processes in pulverized coal-fired furnace and optimization of utility steam boiler air preheater by using in-house developed software tools

  1. A selective sorbent for removing bacterial endotoxins from blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. S.; Kopitsyna, M. N.; Bessonov, I. V.; Karelina, N. V.; Nuzhdina, A. V.; Sarkisov, I. Yu.; Pavlova, L. A.; Tsyurupa, M. P.; Blinnikova, Z. K.; Davankov, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic ligands carrying a positive charge and capable of selective binding of bacterial endotoxins are covalently immobilized on surfaces of domestic hemosorbent Styrosorb-514 based on hypercrosslinked polystyrene. It is shown that the resulting sorbent aimed at treating sepsis exceeds imported specific hemosorbent in Toraymyxin™ columns in removing lipopolysaccharides, and can be used in domestically-produced Desepta columns.

  2. The role of humic acids and biochar as specific sorbents of pesticides in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwieląg-Piasecka, Irmina; Dębicka, Magdalena; Medyńska-Jureszek, Agnieszka; Weber, Jerzy; Jamroz, Elżbieta

    2017-04-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agriculture to prevent or control different pests and increase yield as well as products quality. Despite of the strict regulations concerning sustainable use of plant protection products, their residues are very often present in soil. Depending on their chemical and physical properties, they undergo various transformations in the soil. This results in their retention on different sorbents, degradation by microorganisms or leaching to the groundwater. Biochar is a carbon-rich byproduct of thermal biomass conversion, and due to its high sorption properties can be an efficient sorbent for pesticides in soil. The aim of the research was to compare the effect of two types of organic sorbents - humic acids (HA) and biochar (BC) - in sorption-desorption processes of different pesticides, which residues are commonly present in arable soils and thus are potentially harmful for the environment. The humic acids were extracted from topsoil horizon of arable cambisoil derived from loam (Lower Silesia, Poland) by Shnitzer's method, then purified using XAD resin and freeze-dried. Biochar was produced from wheat straw in gasification process at 550˚C, remaining 30 minutes in the reactor. Investigated pesticides belong to three different chemical classes: carbamates (carbaryl and carbofuran), phenoxyacetic acids (2,4-D and MCPA) and aniline derivatives (metolachlor), and are active substances of commonly used plant protection products in agriculture. To obtain the experimental goal the sorption experiment was conducted. To the investigated organic matter samples (HA or BC) aliquots of pesticides solutions in 10M CaCl2 were added and the mixtures were shaken for 24h. Afterwards the samples were centrifuged and supernatants analyzed by LC-MS/MS for the pesticides content. After that the same samples were refilled with CaCl2 and analyzed in the same way for desorption studies. Humic acids exhibited strong affinity for the ionic substances (2,4-D, MCPA

  3. Experiences in construction of liquid manure regeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, D.

    1981-08-01

    We have to divide the main problems of the development of the liquid manure regeneration into three steps of procedure, especially the regeneration in pig production units up to 200,000 animal places: 1. solid-liquid-separation, 2. microbiological processing, 3. bio-sludge processing. The aim of the processing method is the production: of a chargeable solid matter with 30% dried matter especially for fertilization; of a cleaned waste water for the using in sprinkling irrigation systems or ponds or usual sewage treatment plants of a proteinaceous dried bio-matter with about 50% raw protein, that will be used after an elucidation of the conditions as a special compost in the champignon production, as aggregates for fish food, as primary material for other feed. The arrangement and structure of such a liquid manure regeneration plant will be illustrated by some pictures and tables.

  4. Evaluation of electrospun polyvinyl chloride/polystyrene fibers as sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haitao; Qiu, Shanshan; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying

    2011-05-15

    A novel, high-capacity oil sorbent consisting of polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/polystyrene (PS) fiber was prepared by an electrospinning process. The sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity, and sorption mechanism of the PVC/PS sorbent were studied. The results showed that the sorption capacities of the PVC/PS sorbent for motor oil, peanut oil, diesel, and ethylene glycol were 146, 119, 38, and 81 g/g, respectively. It was about 5-9 times that of a commercial polypropylene (PP) sorbent. The PVC/PS sorbent also had excellent oil/water selectivity (about 1000 times) and high buoyancy in the cleanup of oil over water. The SEM analysis indicated that voids among fibers were the key for the high capacity. The electrospun PVC/PS sorbent is a better alternative to the widely used PP sorbent for oil spill cleanup.

  5. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Céspedes, F; Villafranca Sánchez, M; Pérez García, S; Fernández Pérez, M

    2007-10-01

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T(50), were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. Sorption capacity of the sorbents for chloridazon and metribuzin, ranging from 0.53mgkg(-1) for the metribuzin sorption on bentonite to 2.03x10(5)mgkg(-1) for the sorption of chloridazon on the activated carbon, was the most important factor modulating the herbicide release.

  6. Electrochemical sensor for organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents using zirconia nanoparticles as selective sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-09-15

    An electrochemical sensor for detection of organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents using zirconia (ZrO2) nanoparticles as selective sorbents is presented. Zirconia nanoparticles were electrodynamically deposited onto the polycrystalline gold electrode by cyclic voltammetry. Because of the strong affinity of zirconia for the phosphoric group, nitroaromatic OPs strongly bind to the ZrO2 nanoparticle surface. The electrochemical characterization and anodic stripping voltammetric performance of bound OPs were evaluated using cyclic voltammetric and square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis. SWV was used to monitor the amount of bound OPs and provide simple, fast, and facile quantitative methods for nitroaromatic OP compounds. The sensor surface can be regenerated by successively running SWV scanning. Operational parameters, including the amount of nanoparticles, adsorption time, and pH of the reaction medium have been optimized. The stripping voltammetric response is highly linear over the 5-100 ng/mL (ppb) methyl parathion range examined (2-min adsorption), with a detection limit of 3 ng/mL and good precision (RSD = 5.3%, n = 10). The detection limit was improved to 1 ng/mL by using 10-min adsorption time. The promising stripping voltammetric performances open new opportunities for fast, simple, and sensitive analysis of OPs in environmental and biological samples. These findings can lead to a widespread use of electrochemical sensors to detect OP contaminates.

  7. Polyethyleneimine-functionalized polyamide imide (Torlon) hollow-fiber sorbents for post-combustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie; Qiu, Wulin; Lively, Ryan P; Lee, Jong Suk; Rownaghi, Ali A; Koros, William J

    2013-07-01

    Carbon dioxide emitted from existing coal-fired power plants is a major environmental concern due to possible links to global climate change. In this study, we expand upon previous work focused on aminosilane-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents by introducing a new class of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. Different molecular weight PEIs (M(n) ≈600, 1800, 10,000, and 60,000) were studied as functional groups on polyamide imide (PAI, Torlon) hollow fibers. This imide ring-opening modification introduces two amide functional groups and was confirmed by FTIR attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The carbon dioxide equilibrium sorption capacities of PEI-functionalized Torlon materials were characterized by using both pressure decay and gravimetric sorption methods. For equivalent PEI concentrations, PAI functionalized with lower molecular weight PEI exhibited higher carbon dioxide capacities. The effect of water in the ring-opening reaction was also studied. Up to a critical value, water in the reaction mixture enhanced the degree of functionalization of PEI to Torlon and resulted in higher carbon dioxide uptake within the functionalized material. Above the critical value, roughly 15% w/w water, the fiber morphology was lost and the fiber was soluble in the solvent. PEI-functionalized (Mn ≈600) PAI under optimal reaction conditions was observed to have the highest CO2 uptake: 4.9 g CO2 per 100 g of polymer (1.1 mmol g(-1)) at 0.1 bar and 35 °C with dry 10% CO2/90% N2 feed for thermogravimetric analysis. By using water-saturated feeds (10% CO2 /90% N2 dry basis), CO2 sorption was observed to increase to 6.0 g CO2 per 100 g of sorbent (1.4 mmol g(-1)). This material also demonstrated stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption operations, even under wet conditions at which some highly effective sorbents tend to lose performance. Thus, PEI-functionalized PAI fibers can be

  8. Impact of regeneration process on the crystalline structure and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose obtained from ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuefei; Peng, Xinwen; Sun, Shaoni; Zhong, Linxin; Wang, Sha; Lu, Fachuang; Sun, Runcang

    2014-10-13

    The present study investigated the impact of regeneration process on the crystalline structure and enzymatic hydrolysis behaviors of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) regenerated from ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. The crystalline structures of these regenerated samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Results suggested that almost amorphous cellulose was obtained by regenerating MCC in acetone (DRC-a), while partial cellulose II structure could be found in these regenerated samples from water and ethanol. Additionally, the enzymatic hydrolysis behaviors of MCC and its regenerated samples were comparatively studied. Results showed that above 90% of cellulose could be converted into glucose within 4h for DRC-a and regenerated cellulose without drying (WRC-w) as compared to that of MCC (9.7%). Therefore, the regeneration process could significantly influence the crystallinity and digestibility of cellulose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perfluorodecalin and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Tamimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorodecalin (PFD is a chemically and biologically inert biomaterial and, as many perfluorocarbons, is also hydrophobic, radiopaque and has a high solute capacity for gases such as oxygen. In this article we have demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, that PFD may significantly enhance bone regeneration. Firstly, the potential benefit of PFD was demonstrated by prolonging the survival of bone marrow cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. These findings translated in vivo, where PFD incorporated into bone-marrow-loaded 3D-printed scaffolds substantially improved their capacity to regenerate bone. Secondly, in addition to biological applications, we have also shown that PFD improves the radiopacity of bone regeneration biomaterials, a key feature required for the visualisation of biomaterials during and after surgical implantation. Finally, we have shown how the extreme hydrophobicity of PFD enables the fabrication of highly cohesive self-setting injectable biomaterials for bone regeneration. In conclusion, perfluorocarbons would appear to be highly beneficial additives to a number of regenerative biomaterials, especially those for bone regeneration.

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd ... your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  11. Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; You, Changfu; Zhao, Suwei; Chen, Changhe; Qi, Haiying

    2008-03-01

    Semidry flue gas desulfurization with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH)2 content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH)2 particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH)2 particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH)2 particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray.

  12. Development of low-cost amine-enriched solid sorbent for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelor, Thuy Thi Nguyen; Toochinda, Pisanu

    2012-12-01

    CO2 capture amine-enriched solid sorbent using agricultural wastes, such as bagasse, or industrial wastes, such as mullite, as support materials could provide efficient alternative CO2 reduction due to their low cost and ability to shape into many forms. These amine-enriched solid sorbents were prepared by treatment with monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine, piperazine (PZ), 2-(2-aminoethyl-amino) ethanol (AEEA) and mixtures of these amines. The performance of amine-enriched solid sorbents with various amine compositions was studied in a tubular column at 1 atm and an adsorption temperature of 303 K. The CO2 capture capacities of the amine-enriched solid sorbents were determined by gas chromatography at a desorption temperature of 393 K. Amine-enriched solid sorbents in this study exhibited high performance CO2 capture. The MEA-PZ-enriched solid sorbent does have the highest CO2 capture performance of the amine-enriched bagasse support-based sorbents, and the results indicate that PZ is the most effective promoter in this study. The CO2 capture performances of solid sorbents in this study were compared with commercial solid sorbents. This study could lead to the development of low-cost solid sorbents for CO2 capture that can be used in many industrial applications.

  13. Bioelectricity and epimorphic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Scott; Rojas-Muñoz, Agustin; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2007-11-01

    All cells have electric potentials across their membranes, but is there really compelling evidence to think that such potentials are used as instructional cues in developmental biology? Numerous reports indicate that, in fact, steady, weak bioelectric fields are observed throughout biology and function during diverse biological processes, including development. Bioelectric fields, generated upon amputation, are also likely to play a key role during vertebrate regeneration by providing the instructive cues needed to direct migrating cells to form a wound epithelium, a structure unique to regenerating animals. However, mechanistic insight is still sorely lacking in the field. What are the genes required for bioelectric-dependent cell migration during regeneration? The power of genetics combined with the use of zebrafish offers the best opportunity for unbiased identification of the molecular players in bioelectricity.

  14. Forward Osmosis Brine Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Hyde, Deirdre; Beeler, David; Parodi, Jurek

    2015-01-01

    The Forward Osmosis Brine Drying (FOBD) system is based on a technique called forward osmosis (FO). FO is a membrane-based process where the osmotic potential between brine and a salt solution is equalized by the movement of water from the brine to the salt solution. The FOBD system is composed of two main elements, the FO bag and the salt regeneration system. This paper discusses the results of testing of the FO bag to determine the maximum water recovery ratio that can be attained using this technology. Testing demonstrated that the FO bag is capable of achieving a maximum brine water recovery ratio of the brine of 95%. The equivalent system mass was calculated to be 95 kg for a feed similar to the concentrated brine generated on the International Space Station and 86 kg for an Exploration brine. The results have indicated that the FOBD can process all the brine for a one year mission for between 11% to 10% mass required to bring the water needed to make up for water lost in the brine if not recycled. The FOBD saves 685 kg and when treating the International Space Station brine and it saves 829 kg when treating the Exploration brine. It was also demonstrated that saturated salt solutions achieve a higher water recovery ratios than solids salts do and that lithium chloride achieved a higher water recovery ratio than sodium chloride.

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Brenda Pagan- ...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  17. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a Steel-Slag-Based, Iron-Functionalized Sorbent for an Autothermal Carbon Dioxide Capture Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Hosseini, Davood; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka M; Imtiaz, Qasim; Broda, Marcin; Müller, Christoph R

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new class of autothermal CO2 -capture process that relies on the integration of chemical looping combustion (CLC) into calcium looping (CaL). In the new process, the heat released during the oxidation of a reduced metallic oxide is utilized to drive the endothermic calcination of CaCO3 (the regeneration step in CaL). Such a process is potentially very attractive (both economically and technically) as it can be applied to a variety of oxygen carriers and CaO is not in direct contact with coal (and the impurities associated with it) in the calciner (regeneration step). To demonstrate the practical feasibility of the process, we developed a low-cost, steel-slag-based, Fe-functionalized CO2 sorbent. Using this material, we confirm experimentally the feasibility to heat-integrate CaCO3 calcination with a Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox cycle (with regards to the heat of reaction and kinetics). The autothermal calcination of CaCO3 could be achieved for a material that contained a Ca/Fe ratio of 5:4. The uniform distribution of Ca and Fe in a solid matrix provides excellent heat transfer characteristics. The cyclic CO2 uptake and redox stability of the material is good, but there is room for further improvement.

  19. Polymer sorbent with the properties of an artificial cholesterol receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, I. V.; Ezhova, N. M.; Osipenko, A. A.; Pisarev, O. A.

    2015-02-01

    A cholesterol-imprinted polymer sorbent and the corresponding reticular control copolymer were synthesized from hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. The sorption isotherms of cholesterol were analyzed using the generalized Langmuir and Freundlich equations. In the case of the imprinted reticular polymer, cholesterol sorption occurred on the energetically homogeneous binding centers, forming one monolayer, while the nonspecific sorption of cholesterol on the control copolymer occurred with energetically nonhomogeneous binding of the sorbate and depended on the physicochemical conditions of sorption.

  20. Pilot plant tests of Z-Sorb{trademark} sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, G.J.; Khare, G.P.; Kubicek, D.H.; Delzer, G.A.; Kinsinger, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of Phillips Petroleum Company`s (PPCo`s) proprietary Z-Sorb{trademark} sorbent. Materials developed for fixed-, moving- and fluid bed desulfurization of coal derived gases at high pressure (5-20 atm) and moderate operating temperatures (600-1000{degrees}F) will be discussed.

  1. Sorbents for CO2 capture from high carbon fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto-Valer, M Mercedes; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Yinzhi; Tang, Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Fly ashes with high-unburned-carbon content, referred to as fly ash carbons, are an increasing problem for the utility industry, since they cannot be marketed as a cement extender and, therefore, have to be disposed. Previous work has explored the potential development of amine-enriched fly ash carbons for CO2 capture. However, their performance was lower than that of commercially available sorbents, probably because the samples investigated were not activated prior to impregnation and, therefore, had a very low surface area. Accordingly, the work described here focuses on the development of activated fly ash derived sorbents for CO2 capture. The samples were steam activated at 850 degrees C, resulting in a significant increase of the surface area (1075 m2/g). The activated samples were impregnated with different amine compounds, and the resultant samples were tested for CO2 capture at different temperatures. The CO2 adsorption of the parent and activated samples is typical of a physical adsorption process. The impregnation process results in a decrease of the surface areas, indicating a blocking of the porosity. The highest adsorption capacity at 30 and 70 degrees C for the amine impregnated activated carbons was probably due to a combination of physical adsorption inherent from the parent sample and chemical adsorption of the loaded amine groups. The CO2 adsorption capacities for the activated amine impregnated samples are higher than those previously published for fly ash carbons without activation (68.6 vs. 45 mg CO2/g sorbent).

  2. Enhanced capture of elemental mercury by bamboo-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zengqiang [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Xiang, Jun, E-mail: xiangjun@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Su, Sheng, E-mail: susheng_sklcc@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Zeng, Hancai; Zhou, Changsong; Sun, Lushi; Hu, Song; Qiu, Jianrong [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The KI-modified BC has excellent capacity for elemental mercury removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemisorption plays a dominant role for the modified BC materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The BC-I has strong anti-poisoning ability with the presence of NO or SO{sub 2}. - Abstract: To develop cost-effective sorbent for gas-phase elemental mercury removal, the bamboo charcoal (BC) produced from renewable bamboo and KI modified BC (BC-I) were used for elemental mercury removal. The effect of NO, SO{sub 2} on gas-phase Hg{sup 0} adsorption by KI modified BC was evaluated on a fixed bed reactor using an online mercury analyzer. BET surface area analysis, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the pore structure and surface chemistry of the sorbents. The results show that KI impregnation reduced the sorbents' BET surface area and total pore volume compared with that of the original BC. But the BC-I has excellent adsorption capacity for elemental mercury at a relatively higher temperature of 140 Degree-Sign C and 180 Degree-Sign C. The presence of NO or SO{sub 2} could inhibit Hg{sup 0} capture, but BC-I has strong anti-poisoning ability. The specific reaction mechanism has been further analyzed.

  3. Infection and Pulp Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahng G. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex has been a great challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Previous work has shown that the presence of prior infection may influence the characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space after regenerative endodontic treatment. The formation of ectopic tissues such as periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum has been observed in the root canal space of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis, while the regeneration of dentin and pulp has been identified in previously non-infected teeth. The current regenerative endodontic therapy utilizes disinfection protocols, which heavily rely on chemical irrigation using conventional disinfectants. From a microbiological point of view, the current protocols may not allow a sufficiently clean root canal microenvironment, which is critical for dentin and pulp regeneration. In this article, the significance of root canal disinfection in regenerating the pulp-dentin complex, the limitations of the current regenerative endodontic disinfection protocols, and advanced disinfection techniques designed to reduce the microorganisms and biofilms in chronic infection are discussed.

  4. Peat hybrid sorbents for treatment of wastewaters and remediation of polluted environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Burlakovs, Juris; Robalds, Artis; Ansone-Bertina, Linda

    2015-04-01

    For remediation of soils and purification of polluted waters, wastewaters, sorbents might be considered as an prospective group of materials and amongst them peat have a special role due to low cost, biodegradability, high number of functional groups, well developed surface area and combination of hydrophilic/hydrophobic structural elements. Peat as sorbent have good application potential for removal of trace metals, and we have demonstrated peat sorption capacities, sorption kinetics, thermodynamics in respect to metals with different valencies - Tl(I), Cu(II), Cr(III). However peat sorption capacity in respect to nonmetallic (anionic species) elements is low. Also peat mechanical properties do not support application in large scale column processes. To expand peat application possibilities the approach of biomass based hybrid sorbents has been elaborated. The concept "hybrid sorbent" in our understanding means natural, biomass based sorbent modified, covered with another sorbent material, thus combining two types of sorbent properties, sorbent functionalities, surface properties etc. As the "covering layer" both inorganic substances, mineral phases (iron oxohydroxides, oxyapatite) both organic polymers (using graft polymerization) were used. The obtained sorbents were characterised by their spectral properties, surface area, elemental composition. The obtained hybrid sorbents were tested for sorption of compounds in anionic speciation forms, for example of arsenic, antimony, tellurium and phosphorous compounds in comparison with weakly basic anionites. The highest sorption capacity was observed when peat sorbents modified with iron compounds were used. Sorption of different arsenic speciation forms onto iron-modified peat sorbents was investigated as a function of pH and temperature. It was established that sorption capacity increases with a rise in temperature, and the calculation of sorption process thermodynamic parameters indicates the spontaneity of sorption

  5. Adsorption refinement of waste transformer oil using industrial montmorillonite-containing sorbents

    OpenAIRE

    Koval, Е. О.; Bogomolov, М. S.; Mayer, E. А.; Bondaletov, V. G.

    2007-01-01

    The possibilities of adsorption contact refining of waste transformer oil with active montmorillonite-containing sorbents of «Filtrol» series of BASF Catalysts LLC corporation and Zikeevsk М-80 deposit sorbent have been investigated. Usage of F-160 sorbents of «Filtrol» series in the refinement process allows achieving high quality degree of lean transformer oil, permitting its further use in the equipment with operating voltage to 750 kV.

  6. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  7. Development of the preparation technology of macroporous sorbent for industrial off-gas treatment including {sup 14}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Il Hoon; Cho, Young Hyun; Park, Guen Il; Kim, In Tae; Kim, June Hyung; Ahn, Byung Kil

    2001-01-01

    For environmental and health effects due to increasing levels of pollution in the atmosphere, it is necessary to develop environmentally sound technologies for the treatment of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CFC, etc.) and acid gases (SOx, NOx, etc.). Specifically, advanced technology for CO{sub 2} capturing is currently one of the most important environmental issues in worldwide. {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, specially which has been gradually emerging issue in the nuclear facilities, is generated about 330 ppm from the CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor) nuclear power plant and the DUPIC (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) process which is the process of spent fuel treatment. For this purpose, it is necessary to develop the most efficient treatment technology of CO{sub 2} capture by various lime materials in semi- or dry process, it should be also considering a removal performance, waste recycling and safety of disposal. In order to develop a highly active slaked lime as a sorbent for CO{sub 2} and high temperature desulfurization, macroporous slaked lime is necessarily prepared by modified swelling process and equipment, which was developed under carrying out this project. And also for the optimal removal process of off-gases the removal performance tests of various sorbents and the effects of relative humidity and bed depth on the removal capacity must be considered.

  8. Magnetic sorbents added to soil slurries lower Cr aqueous concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravantinos, Konstantinos; Isari, Ekavi; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Werner, David

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) acts as a strong binding agent that lowers the pollutant concentration and, thus its toxicity. Another promising sorbent material in environmental applications is biochar (BC) which is obtained from the incomplete combustion of carbon-rich biomass under oxygen-limited conditions. Both of these materials could be used as soil or sediment amendments that would lower the toxicity in the aqueous phase. A draw back of this technique is that although the pollutant will remain non- bioavailable for many years being sorbed into these sorbents, it actually stays into the system. The objective of this study was (a) to synthesize a magnetic powdered activated carbon (AC/Fe) and magnetic powdered biochar (BC/Fe) produced from a commercial AC sample and BC, respectively and (b) to evaluate the potential use of AC/Fe and BC/Fe to lower Cr concentration that desorb from two soils in their soil slurries. The two soil samples originate from the vicinity of a local metal shop. The BC was produced from olive pomace. The surface area, the pore volume, and the average pore size of each sorbent were determined using gas (N2) adsorption-desorption cycles and the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) equation. Isotherms with 30 adsorption and 20 desorption points were conducted at liquid nitrogen temperature (77K). Open surface area and micropore volume were determined using t-plot method and Harkins & Jura equation. For both AC/Fe, surface area measurements resulted in 66% those of corresponding AC. For BC/Fe, the surface area was 82% that of BC. Our previous studies have shown that both AC/Fe and BC/Fe are effective sorbents for mercury in aqueous solutions but with lower sorption capacity compared to the initial materials (50-75% lower). Batch experiments with all sorbent samples and each soil were conducted at room temperature (25oC) in order to compare the sorption properties of the materials. The soil slurries demonstrated low Cr concentrations (10.9 and 14.6

  9. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  10. Research on using Mineral Sorbents for A Sorption Process in the Environment Contaminated with Petroleum Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pijarowski Piotr Marek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A research on diatomite sorbents was carried out to investigate their ability to remove hazardous substances from oil spillages. We used two types of sorbents available on the market with differences in material density and particles size of composition. As sorbents we used Ekoterm oil and unleaded petrol 95 coming from refinery PKN Orlen S.A. Two types of sorbents with similar chemical composition but different granulometric composition were used. They are marked as D1 and C1 samples. The fastest absorbent was C1, but D1 sample was the most absorptive.

  11. Use of biomass sorbents for oil removal from gas station runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Eakalak; Virojnagud, Wanpen; Ratpukdi, Thunyalux

    2004-11-01

    The use of biomass sorbents, which are less expensive and more biodegradable than synthetic sorbents, for oil removal from gas station runoff was investigated. A bench-scale flume experiment was conducted to evaluate the oil removal and retention capabilities of the biomass sorbents which included kapok fiber, cattail fiber, Salvinia sp., wood chip, rice husk, coconut husk, and bagasse. Polyester fiber, a commercial synthetic sorbent, was also experimented for comparison purpose. Oil sorption and desorption tests were performed at a water flow rate of 20 lmin-1. In the oil sorption tests, a 50 mgl(-1) of used engine oil-water mixture was synthesized to simulate the gas station runoff. The mass of oil sorbed for all sorbents, except coconut husk and bagasse, was greater than 70%. Cattail fiber and polyester fiber were the sorbents that provided the least average effluent oil concentrations. Oil selectivity (hydrophobic properties) and physical characteristics of the sorbents are the two main factors that influence the oil sorption capability. The used sorbents from the sorption tests were employed in the desorption tests. Results indicated that oil leached out of all the sorbents tested. Polyester fiber released the highest amount of oil, approximately 4% (mass basis) of the oil sorbed.

  12. Limb regeneration: a new development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Eugen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2011-01-01

    Salamander limb regeneration is a classical model of tissue morphogenesis and patterning. Through recent advances in cell labeling and molecular analysis, a more precise, mechanistic understanding of this process has started to emerge. Long-standing questions include to what extent limb regeneration recapitulates the events observed in mammalian limb development and to what extent are adult- or salamander- specific aspects deployed. Historically, researchers studying limb development and limb regeneration have proposed different models of pattern formation. Here we discuss recent data on limb regeneration and limb development to argue that although patterning mechanisms are likely to be similar, cell plasticity and signaling from nerves play regeneration-specific roles.

  13. Effects of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} on the Capture Capacity of a Primary-Amine Based Polymeric CO{sub 2} Sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallenbeck, Alexander P; Kitchin, John R

    2013-08-01

    Post combustion CO{sub 2} capture is most commonly carried out using an amine solution that results in a high parasitic energy cost in the stripper unit due to the need to heat the water which comprises a majority of the amine solution. It is also well known that amine solvents suffer from stability issues due to amine leaching and poisoning by flue gas impurities. Solid sorbents provide an alternative to solvent systems that would potentially reduce the energy penalty of carbon capture. However, the cost of using a particular sorbent is greatly affected by the usable lifetime of the sorbent. This work investigated the stability of a primary amine-functionalized ion exchange resin in the presence of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}, both of which are constituents of flue gas that have been shown to cause degradation of various amines in solvent processes. The CO{sub 2} capture capacity was measured over multiple capture cycles under continuous exposure to two simulated flue gas streams, one containing 12 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 84% N{sub 2}, and the other containing 12.5 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 431 ppm SO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2} using a custom-built packed bed reactor. The resin maintained its CO{sub 2} capture capacity of 1.31 mol/kg over 17 capture cycles in the presence of O{sub 2} without SO{sub 2}. However, the CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the resin decreased rapidly under exposure to SO{sub 2} by an amount of 1.3 mol/kg over 9 capture cycles. Elemental analysis revealed the resin adsorbed 1.0 mol/kg of SO{sub 2}. Thermal regeneration was determined to not be possible. The poisoned resin was, however, partially regenerated with exposure to 1.5M NaOH for 3 days resulting in a 43% removal of sulfur, determined through elemental analysis, and a 35% recovery of CO{sub 2} capture capacity. Evidence was also found for amine loss upon prolonged (7 days) continuous exposure to high temperatures (120 C) in air. It is concluded that desulfurization of the flue gas

  14. Comparative DNA isolation behaviours of silica and polymer based sorbents in batch fashion: monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore size distribution as a new sorbent for DNA isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günal, Gülçin; Kip, Çiğdem; Eda Öğüt, S; İlhan, Hasan; Kibar, Güneş; Tuncel, Ali

    2017-03-22

    Monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore-size distribution were proposed as a high performance sorbent for DNA isolation in batch fashion under equilibrium conditions. The proposed sorbent including both macroporous and mesoporous compartments was synthesized 5.1 μm in-size, by a "staged shape templated hydrolysis and condensation method". Hydrophilic polymer based sorbents were also obtained in the form of monodisperse-macroporous microspheres ca 5.5 μm in size, with different functionalities, by a developed "multi-stage microsuspension copolymerization" technique. The batch DNA isolation performance of proposed material was comparatively investigated using polymer based sorbents with similar morphologies. Among all sorbents tried, the best DNA isolation performance was achieved with the monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore size distribution. The collocation of interconnected mesoporous and macroporous compartments within the monodisperse silica microspheres provided a high surface area and reduced the intraparticular mass transfer resistance and made easier both the adsorption and desorption of DNA. Among the polymer based sorbents, higher DNA isolation yields were achieved with the monodisperse-macroporous polymer microspheres carrying trimethoxysilyl and quaternary ammonium functionalities. However, batch DNA isolation performances of polymer based sorbents were significantly lower with respect to the silica microspheres.

  15. Experimental study on the reuse of spent rapidly hydrated sorbent for circulating fluidized bed flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Zheng, Kai; You, Changfu

    2011-11-01

    Rapidly hydrated sorbent, prepared by rapidly hydrating adhesive carrier particles and lime, is a highly effective sorbent for moderate temperature circulating fluidized bed flue gas desulfurization (CFB-FGD) process. The residence time of fine calcium-containing particles in CFB reactors increases by adhering on the surface of larger adhesive carrier particles, which contributes to higher sorbent calcium conversion ratio. The circulation ash of CFB boilers (α-adhesive carrier particles) and the spent sorbent (β and γ-adhesive carrier particles) were used as adhesive carrier particles for producing the rapidly hydrated sorbent. Particle physical characteristic analysis, abrasion characteristics in fluidized bed and desulfurization characteristics in TGA and CFB-FGD systems were investigated for various types of rapidly hydrated sorbent (α, β, and γ-sorbent). The adhesion ability of γ-sorbent was 50.1% higher than that of α-sorbent. The abrasion ratio of β and γ-sorbent was 16.7% lower than that of α-sorbent. The desulfurization abilities of the three sorbent in TGA were almost same. The desulfurization efficiency in the CFB-FGD system was up to 95% at the bed temperature of 750 °C for the β-sorbent.

  16. Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlish, John; Thompson, Jeffrey; Dunham, Grant

    2014-09-30

    Owners of fossil fuel-fired power plants face the challenge of measuring stack emissions of trace metals and acid gases at much lower levels than in the past as a result of increasingly stringent regulations. In the United States, the current reference methods for trace metals and halogens are wet-chemistry methods, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 29 and 26 or 26A, respectively. As a possible alternative to the EPA methods, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a novel multielement sorbent trap (MEST) method to be used to sample for trace elements and/or halogens. Sorbent traps offer a potentially advantageous alternative to the existing sampling methods, as they are simpler to use and do not require expensive, breakable glassware or handling and shipping of hazardous reagents. Field tests comparing two sorbent trap applications (MEST-H for hydrochloric acid and MEST-M for trace metals) with the reference methods were conducted at two power plant units fueled by Illinois Basin bituminous coal. For hydrochloric acid, MEST measured concentrations comparable to EPA Method 26A at two power plant units, one with and one without a wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber. MEST-H provided lower detection limits for hydrochloric acid than the reference method. Results from a dry stack unit had better comparability between methods than results from a wet stack unit. This result was attributed to the very low emissions in the latter unit, as well as the difficulty of sampling in a saturated flue gas. Based on these results, the MEST-H sorbent traps appear to be a good candidate to serve as an alternative to Method 26A (or 26). For metals, the MEST trap gave lower detection limits compared to EPA Method 29 and produced comparable data for antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cobalt, manganese, selenium, and mercury for most test runs. However, the sorbent material produced elevated blanks for cadmium, nickel, lead, and chromium at levels

  17. Highly effective sorbents obtained by treating agrowaste products in cold plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Sorbents are widely used in purification of various liquids and gases, offering a universal means for wastewater and air cleaning. The most promising sorbents are those obtained from agrowaste products such as rice or buckwheat husk. Processing of husk in cold plasma modifies the composition, structure and surface properties of the raw material and raises its porosity, thus substantially improving the sorption properties of the final product.Husk as a raw material for producing sorbents has the following advantageous properties: (1) appropriate chemical composition; (2) low cost; (3) high dispersity, due to which there is no need in any special treatment of the material prior to its exposing to plasma; (4) scaly structure and developed porous surface ensuring a high surface-to-volume ratio. The best properties are displayed by the sorbents obtained in cold plasma under reduced pressures of 53.2 Pa. The raw naterial traverses the region occupied by the plasma and, as it does so, it gets heated up to a temperature of 250 - 350 ℃. The whole process involves two stages: combustion of the raw material and modification of its properties under the action of the plasma. The combustion proceeds due to the oxygen contained in the starting material. During the combustion, the hydrogen contained in the starting material and some part of the carbon also burn out.The resultant scaly sorbent is accumulated in a cooler. The scales are black; they range in sizes from 1mm to 5 mm.The sorbents obtained are remarkable for their useful properties and outperform most of the traditional sorbents used in modern industry. The starting materials are inexpensive, and their resources are almost unlimited. The sorbents have rather a low production cost (1.8-2.5($)/kg). The sorbents can be used for cleaning hydrosphere from water pollutants on a large scale. The degree of cleaning water surface from oil products with sorbents was a subject of investigation. The highest degree of purification

  18. ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2004-03-01

    The injection of sorbents upstream of a particulate control device is one of the most promising methods for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers with electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Studies carried out at the bench-, pilot-, and full-scale have shown that a wide variety of factors may influence sorbent mercury removal effectiveness. These factors include mercury species, flue gas composition, process conditions, existing pollution control equipment design, and sorbent characteristics. The objective of the program is to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. Prior to injection testing, a number of sorbents were tested in a slipstream fixed-bed device both in the laboratory and at two field sites. Based upon the performance of the sorbents in a fixed-bed device and the estimated cost of mercury control using each sorbent, seventeen sorbents were chosen for screening in a slipstream injection system at a site burning a Western bituminous coal/petcoke blend, five were chosen for screening at a site burning a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, and nineteen sorbents were evaluated at a third site burning a PRB coal. Sorbents evaluated during the program were of various materials, including: activated carbons, treated carbons, other non-activated carbons, and non-carbon material. The economics and performance of the novel sorbents evaluated demonstrate that there are alternatives to the commercial standard. Smaller enterprises may have the opportunity to provide lower price mercury sorbents to power generation customers under the right set of circumstances.

  19. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  20. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  1. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  2. Low Temperature Regenerator Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    effect. The idealized cycle achieves the same theoretical coefficient of performance (COP) as the theoretical Carnot cycle , whose limiting performance...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract *irt.,ed in Block 20, iI different it oe) I8. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES I9. KEY WORDS (Continute on reverse @do of noco*oy...PERFORMANCE ............ 64 3.1 Introduction ..... 0 ... . ......... ... . 64 3.2 Stirling Cycle Analysis ................. 71 3.2.1 Simple Regenerator Model

  3. [Periodontitis and tissue regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2005-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a destructive disease that affects the supporting structures of the teeth including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. If left untreated, patients may lose multiple teeth and extensive prosthetic treatment will be required. In order to re-engineer lost tooth-supporting tissues, various therapeutic modalities have been used clinically. Periodontal regeneration procedures including guided tissue regeneration have achieved substantial effects. However, there are several issues to be solved. They are highly technique-sensitive, applicable to limited cases which are susceptible to treatment, and supposed to have relatively low predictability. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new approaches to improve the predictability and effectiveness of regenerative therapies for periodontal tissues. Recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been introduced to restore lost tissues more effectively where the biological process of healing is mimicked. To achieve this, integration of three key elements is required: progenitor/stem cells, growth factors and the extracellular matrix scaffold. Although it has been shown that implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into periodontal osseous defects induced regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in dogs, further extensive preclinical studies are required. On the other hand, application of growth factors, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor in the treatment of human periodontitis, is promising and is now in clinical trial. Furthermore, the rate of release of growth factor from the scaffold also can profoundly affect the results of tissue engineering strategies and the development of new materials is expected. In addition, as tissue regenerative potential is negatively regulated by aging, the effects of aging have to be clarified to gain complete regeneration.

  4. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  5. ISLET FORMATION AND REGENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanisms of differentiation and development of pancreatic endocrine cells as well as pancreatic regeneration. Methods Human embryonic pancreatic tissue at 7-14 weeks of gestation was collected. Diabetes mellitus rat model was induced with 65 mg/kg of streptozotocin. Insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, nestin, and cytokeratin 19 (CK19)of pancreatic tissues were observed by immunohistochemistry. Results At 9 weeks of gestation, pancreatic epithelial cells began to co-express insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and CK19 before migration. Islet cells gradually congregated along with the increase of aging, and at 14 weeks of gestation histological examination showed islet formation. At 12 weeks of gestation, nestin-positive cells could be seen in the pancreatic mesenchyme. During early embryogenesis, islet cells of pancreatic ducts co-expressed insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. During pancreatic regeneration after damage, nestin expression of islet cells increased. Conclusion In the early stage of embryogenesis, islet cells of primary pancreatic ducts can be differentiated to multipotential endocrine cells before migration. During tissue regeneration, pancreatic stem cells may differentiate and proliferate to form pancreatic islet.

  6. Fluorinated Epoxy Resins-based Sorbent Coating Materials for Quartz Piezoelectric Crystal Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C Gupta

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorinated epoxy resins were synthesised and evaluated as sorbent coating materials for the detection of organophosphorus compounds using quartz piezoelectric crystal detector. These resins were prepared by reacting excess of epichlorohydrin with each of or in combination of fluorinated diols, ie, a, a, a', a' tetrakis (trifluoromethyl 1,3 benzene dimethanol (TTFMBD, 4,4'bis-2-hydroxy hexafluoro isopropyl biphenyl (BHHFIBP, 4,4'dihydroxyocta fluorodiphenyl (DHOFDP and 2,2,3,3,4,4 hexafluoro 1,5 pentanediol (HFPD in the presence of sodium hydroxide at reflux temperature. These polymers were extracted in organic solvents and dried. Each of these fluoroepoxy resins were coated over quartz piezoelectric crystal by solution-casting method and tested using dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP as model compound. Change in the  frequency (AF of quartz piezoelectric crystal oscillator was recorded. Sensitive and potential fluorinated epoxy resins, ie, diglycidylethers (DGE of HFPD-TTFMBD (in the molar ratio 6:4 and DGE (HFPD-BHHFIBP in the molar ratio 4:6 were characterised by viscosity, number average molecular weight (Mn, epoxy equivalent, infrared spectroscopy, and thermal stability.

  7. Iodine Sorbent Performance in FY 2012 Deep Bed Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I-129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Iodine capture is an important aspect of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign Off-gas Sigma Team (Jubin 2011, Pantano 2011). Deep-bed iodine sorption tests for both silver-functionalized Aerogel and silver zeolite sorbents were performed during Fiscal Year 2012. These tests showed that: • Decontamination factors were achieved that exceed reasonably conservative estimates for DFs needed for used fuel reprocessing facilities in the U.S. to meet regulatory requirements for I-129 capture. • Silver utilizations approached or exceeded 100% for high inlet gas iodine concentrations, but test durations were not long enough to approach 100% silver utilization for lower iodine concentrations. • The depth of the mass transfer zone was determined for both low iodine concentrations (under 10 ppmv) and for higher iodine concentrations (between 10-50 ppmv); the depth increases over time as iodine is sorbed. • These sorbents capture iodine by chemisorption, where the sorbed iodine reacts with the silver to form very non-volatile AgI. Any sorbed iodine that is physisorbed but not chemically reacted with silver to form AgI might not be tightly held by the sorbent. The portion of sorbed iodine that tends to desorb because it is not chemisorbed (reacted to form AgI) is small, under 1%, for the AgZ tests, and even smaller, under 0.01%, for the silver-functionalized Aerogel.

  8. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  9. Rainfall-tuned management facilitates dry forest recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, J.; Holmgren, M.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; López, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of original dry forests and shrublands in degraded arid and semiarid ecosystems can be a slow and difficult process. It has been hypothesized that restoration efforts during periods of increased water availability may potentially trigger shifts back to a high vegetation cover depending

  10. Activated-Carbon Sorbent With Integral Heat-Transfer Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1996-01-01

    Prototype adsorption device used, for example, in adsorption heat pump, to store natural gas to power automobile, or to separate components of fluid mixtures. Device includes activated carbon held together by binder and molded into finned heat-transfer device providing rapid heating or cooling to enable rapid adsorption or desorption of fluids. Concepts of design and fabrication of device equally valid for such other highly thermally conductive devices as copper-finned tubes, and for such other high-surface-area sorbents as zeolites or silicates.

  11. Stability of Tritium and Iodine Sorbents in TPOG Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Jacob A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    US regulations could require the removal of both iodine and tritium from the off-gas stream of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility. Advanced tritium pretreatment is a pretreatment step that uses high concentrations of NOR2R in a gas stream to volatilize tritium and iodine from UNF prior to traditional dissolution. The gaseous effluent from this process would then require abatement to remove tritium and iodine, but high levels of NOR2R could have a detrimental effect on the ability of various solid sorbents to remove the volatile radionuclides. For tritium and iodine, the sorbents of interest are 3Å molecular sieve (3AMS) for tritium and reduced silver mordenite (AgP0 PZ), silver-functionalized silica-aerogel (AgAerogel), and silver-nitrate-impregnated alumina (AgA) for iodine. Prior research has demonstrated that exposure to high concentrations of NOR2R can reduce the iodine loading capacity of AgP0 PZ by > 90% when exposed for 1 week. Research in Japan has demonstrated that AgA is more robust to NOR2R exposure than AgZ. The testing described here was intended to assess the effects of high concentrations of NOR2R on the iodine capture capacity of AgA and the water adsorption capacity of 3AMS. To determine the effect of extended exposure of the sorbents to NOR2R, both 3AMS and AgA were aged in a 75% NOR2R environment prior to loading. The 3AMS samples were aged for 1, 4, and 5.5 weeks at 40°C. They were then loaded with water in a 10°C dew point stream (corresponding to a water concentration of ~12,000 ppmv) at 40°C. There was no significant change in the water adsorption capacity of the 3AMS upon exposure to 75% NOR2R. The AgA samples were aged for 1, 2, and 4 weeks at 150°C and were loaded with 50 ppmv IR2R at 150°C. The results show that the iodine capture capacity of AgA is reduced by exposure to high concentrations of NOR2R. The iodine capacity reductions were 16%, 36%, and 76% for 1, 2, and 4 week exposures, respectively

  12. Microwave synthesis of nanostructured oxide sorbents doped with lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, Andrey A., E-mail: mitrofanov-a@icloud.com; Silyavka, Elena S.; Shilovskikh, Vladimir V.; Kolonitckii, Petr D.; Sukhodolov, Nikolai G.; Selyutin, Artem A., E-mail: selutin@inbox.ru [Saint Petersburg State University, 7/9, Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg, 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    A number of nanostructured mesoporous oxide systems based on aluminum oxide, doped with lanthanide ions have been obtained in this study. Structure and morphology of oxides obtained have been examined by X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of the samples was determined by the BET method. The dependence of the adsorption of insulin on synthesized oxides from the concentration was investigated. The containing of insulin in solutions after adsorption was determined by the Bradford method. The isotherms of adsorption of insulin on resulting oxide sorbents were plotted, the dependence capacity of the sorption of insulin from the lanthanide dopant was determined.

  13. Waste-Heat-Driven Cooling Using Complex Compound Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocketfeller, Uwe; Kirol, Lance; Khalili, Kaveh

    2004-01-01

    Improved complex-compound sorption pumps are undergoing development for use as prime movers in heat-pump systems for cooling and dehumidification of habitats for humans on the Moon and for residential and commercial cooling on Earth. Among the advantages of sorption heat-pump systems are that they contain no moving parts except for check valves and they can be driven by heat from diverse sources: examples include waste heat from generation of electric power, solar heat, or heat from combustion of natural gas. The use of complex compound sorbents in cooling cycles is not new in itself: Marketing of residential refrigerators using SrCl2 was attempted in the 1920s and 30s and was abandoned because heat- and mass-transfer rates of the sorbents were too low. Addressing the issue that gave rise to the prior abandonment of complex compound sorption heat pumps, the primary accomplishment of the present development program thus far has been the characterization of many candidate sorption media, leading to large increases in achievable heat- and mass-transfer rates. In particular, two complex compounds (called "CC260-1260" and "CC260-2000") were found to be capable of functioning over the temperature range of interest for the lunar-habitat application and to offer heat- and mass-transfer rates and a temperature-lift capability adequate for that application. Regarding the temperature range: A heat pump based on either of these compounds is capable of providing a 95-K lift from a habitable temperature to a heat-rejection (radiator) temperature when driven by waste heat at an input temperature .500 K. Regarding the heat- and mass-transfer rates or, more precisely, the power densities made possible by these rates: Power densities observed in tests were 0.3 kilowatt of cooling per kilogram of sorbent and 2 kilowatts of heating per kilogram of sorbent. A prototype 1-kilowatt heat pump based on CC260-2000 has been built and demonstrated to function successfully.

  14. Carrageenan-grafted magnetite nanoparticles as recyclable sorbents for dye removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L., E-mail: ana.luisa@ua.pt; Salgueiro, Ana M., E-mail: a38242@ua.pt; Creaney, Bianca, E-mail: bianca.creaney@gmail.com; Oliveira-Silva, Rui, E-mail: ruipedro.silva@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Chemistry, CICECO, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Silva, Nuno J. O., E-mail: nunojoao@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Physics, CICECO, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Trindade, Tito, E-mail: tito@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Chemistry, CICECO, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    The efforts dedicated to improving water decontamination procedures have prompted the interest in the development of efficient, inexpensive, and reusable sorbents for the uptake of dye pollutants. In this work, novel sorbents consisting of carrageenan polysaccharides grafted to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared. κ- and ι-carrageenan were first chemically modified by carboxymethylation and then covalently attached via amide bond to the surface of aminated silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles, both steps monitored using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The kinetics and the equilibrium behavior of the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) adsorption onto the carrageenan sorbents were investigated. ι-carrageenan sorbents displayed higher MB adsorption capacity that was ascribed to high content of sulfonate groups. Overall, the pseudo-second order equation provided a good description of the adsorption kinetics. The κ-carrageenan sorbents followed an unusual Z-type equilibrium adsorption isotherm whereas the isotherm of ι-carrageenan sorbents, although displaying a conventional shape, could not be successfully predicted by isotherm models commonly used. Noteworthy, both sorbents were long-term stable and could easily be recycled by simply rinsing with KCl aqueous solution. The removal efficiency of κ-carrageenan sorbents was 92 % in the first adsorption cycle and kept high (>80 %) even after six consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles.

  15. SORBENT/UREA SLURRY INJECTION FOR SIMULTANEOUS SO2/NOX REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of sorbent injection and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) technologies has been investigated for simulataneous SO2/NOx removal. A slurry composed of a urea-based solution and various Ca-based sorbents was injected at a range of tempera...

  16. ROLE OF POROSITY LOSS IN LIMITING SO2 CAPTURE BY CALCIUM BASED SORBENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of high temperature (900-1,300°C), short time (capture was found to be limited by temperature-dependent losses in the porosity of calcium based sorbents. At 970°C these porosity losses were caused by CO2-activated sintering. Sulfation of the sorbents either p...

  17. Continuous CO2 capture in a circulating fluidized bed using supported amine sorbents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, R.; Li, Z.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Brilman, D.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, supported amine sorbents were prepared by physical impregnation of silica and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) and studied for post-combustion CO2 capture purposes in a lab scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor. Sorbent amine loading and support

  18. Adsorption of H2O and CO2 on supported amine sorbents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, Rens; Frigka, Natalia; Zhao, Wenying; Li, Zhenshan; Kersten, Sascha; Brilman, Wim

    2015-01-01

    In this work the adsorption of H2O and CO2 on Lewatit VP OC 1065 was studied in view of the potential application of this sorbent in post combustion CO2 capture. Both CO2 and H2O were found to adsorb on the amine active sites present on the pore surface of the sorbent material. However, where the in

  19. The use of carbon sorbents and sorption technologies for cleaning water systems of petroleum products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л.І. Павлюх

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  Sorbtional properties of carbonic sorbents on the base of pine sawdust in the processes of purification of water mediums and complicated technological solution from petroleum products and phosphorus compounds are investigated. The possibility of carbonic sorbents modification by halogen organic compounds to increase the degree of purification of water ecosystems is analyzed.

  20. THE RESEARCH OF SORBENT PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED PEAT OF TOMSK REGION

    OpenAIRE

    CHUHAREVA N.V.; MARTYNIUK A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Extraction of different components (bitumen) from thermoprocessed up to 200-300°С peat puts the task of searching new alternative decisions of using the obtained remains. They can be used as cheap sorbent materials. The aim of this research is to estimate sorbent properties of peat remains after the extraction bitumen from them.

  1. THE RESEARCH OF SORBENT PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED PEAT OF TOMSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUHAREVA N.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of different components (bitumen from thermoprocessed up to 200-300°С peat puts the task of searching new alternative decisions of using the obtained remains. They can be used as cheap sorbent materials. The aim of this research is to estimate sorbent properties of peat remains after the extraction bitumen from them.

  2. Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

    2002-09-20

    In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Sorbents for the Collection and Recovery of Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Cynthia L.; Mackie, Katherine E.; Warner, Marvin G.; Gill, Gary A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-02-07

    The ability to collect uranium from seawater offers the potential for a long-term green fuel supply for nuclear energy. However, extraction of uranium, and other trace minerals, is challenging due to the high ionic strength and low mineral concentrations in seawater. Herein we evaluate the use of nanostructured metal oxide sorbents for the collection and recovery of uranium from seawater. Chemical affinity, chemical adsorption capacity and kinetics of preferred sorbent materials were evaluated. High surface area manganese and iron oxide nanomaterials showed excellent performance for uranium collection from seawater. Inexpensive nontoxic carbonate solutions were demonstrated to be an effective and environmental benign method of stripping the uranium from the metal oxide sorbents. Various formats for the utilization of the nanostructured metals oxide sorbent materials are discussed including traditional and nontraditional methods such as magnetic separation. Keywords: Uranium, nano, manganese, iron, sorbent, seawater, magnetic, separations, nuclear energy

  4. Low-cost sorbents for demetalisation of waste oils via pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, M.J.; Moliner, R. [Department of Energy and Environment, Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Maria de Luna 12, 50.015, Zaragoza (Spain); Domeno, C.; Nerin, C. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Centro Politecnico Superior, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50.015, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of several solid sorbents during the pyrolysis process of industrial waste oils in a bench-scale pyrolysis unit is studied. The concentrations of V, Ni, Pb, Cd, Cu and Cr in the waste oils and in the original sorbents as well as that obtained in the final valuable product liquid fraction are measured. Limestone, commercial active char, Samca char, activated Samca char and sepiolite were the solid sorbents used. 100% of the lead from the waste oils can be retained on limestone. The behaviour of both metals and sorbents and the influence of specific surface area as well as chemical nature of metals and sorbents are discussed. Final liquid fractions resulted in valuable industrial products.

  5. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or s...

  6. Treatment of model solutions and wastewater containing selected hazardous metal ions using a chitin/lignin hybrid material as an effective sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Przemysław; Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Wysokowski, Marcin; Majchrzak, Izabela; Czernicka, Weronika; Piasecki, Adam; Ehrlich, Hermann; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2017-12-15

    A chitin/lignin material with defined physicochemical and morphological properties was used as an effective adsorbent of environmentally toxic metals from model systems. Particularly significant is its use in the neutralization of real industrial wastes. The ions Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+) were adsorbed on the functional sorbent, confirming the high sorption capacity of the newly obtained product, primarily due to the presence on its surface of numerous active functional groups from the component biopolymers. The kinetics of the process of ion adsorption from model solution were investigated, and the experimental data were found to fit significantly better to a type 1 pseudo-second-order kinetic model, as confirmed by the high correlation coefficient of 0.999 for adsorption of both nickel(II) copper(II) zinc(II) and lead(II) ions. The experimental data obtained on the basis of adsorption isotherms corresponded to the Langmuir model. The sorption capacity of the chitin/lignin material was measured at 70.41 mg(Ni(2+))/g, 75.70 mg(Cu(2+))/g, 82.41 mg(Zn(2+))/g and 91.74 mg(Pb(2+))/g. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters confirmed the endothermic nature of the process. It was also shown that nitric acid is a very effective desorbing (regenerating) agent, enabling the chitin/lignin material to be reused as an effective sorbent of metal ions. The sorption abilities of the chitin/lignin system with respect to particular metal ions can be ordered in the sequence Ni(2+)sorbent to adsorb harmful ions from real industrial wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  8. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  9. QUANTITATIVE LAWS IN REGENERATION : III. THE QUANTITATIVE BASIS OF POLARITY IN REGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, J

    1922-03-20

    It is well known that a long defoliated piece of stem of Bryophyllum calycinum forms shoots only at the apical or the two apical nodes, while when such a stem is cut into as many pieces as there are nodes each node produces shoots. It is shown in this paper that the dry weight of shoots produced in the apical nodes of a long piece of stem is approximately equal to the dry weight of shoots the same stem would have produced if it had been cut into as many pieces as it possesses nodes. Hence all the material which can be used for the growth of shoots goes into the most apical part of the stem and this accounts for the polar character of regeneration in this case. It seems that the mass of basal roots produced by a piece of defoliated stem also increases with the mass of the stem.

  10. Arsenic removal using natural biomaterial-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansone, Linda; Klavins, Maris; Viksna, Arturs

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of water is a major problem worldwide. A possible solution can be approached through developing new sorbents based on cost-effective and environmentally friendly natural biomaterials. We have developed new sorbents based on biomaterial impregnation with iron oxyhydroxide. In this study, raw peat material, iron-modified peat, iron-modified biomass (shingles, straw, sands, cane and moss) as well as iron humate were used for the removal of arsenate from contaminated water. The highest sorption capacity was observed in iron-modified peat, and kinetic studies indicated that the amount of arsenic sorbed on this material exceeds 90 % in 5 h. Arsenate sorption on iron-modified peat is characterised by the pseudo-second-order mechanism. The results of arsenic sorption in the presence of competing substances indicated that sulphate, nitrate, chloride and tartrate anions have practically no influence on As(V) sorption onto Fe-modified peat, whereas the presence of phosphate ions and humic acid significantly lowers the arsenic removal efficiency.

  11. Desulfurization of fuels with calcium-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Rehmat, A.; Leppin, D.; Banerjee, D.D. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Calcium-based sorbents, such as limestone and dolomite, are viable candidates for sulphur-capturing agents in an in-situ coal gasification/desulfurization process. The effect of limestone addition on the hydrodynamics of a fluidized-bed gasifier, desulfurization of the product gas, and stabilization of the solid wastes have been studied. The hydrodynamic characteristics of coal char/limestone mixtures, such as mixing and fines retention, have been studied in a 0.2 m diameter fluidization column. Kinetic data pertaining to the reaction between calcium oxide (which is obtained by calcination of limestone and dolomite) and hydrogen sulfide have been obtained by a gravimetric technique in the temperature range of 650 to 1050{degree}C. Kinetic data relating to the reaction between calcium sulfide (which is obtained by sulfidation of calcium-based sorbents) and oxygen have been obtained in the temperature range of 800 to 1050{degree}C and in the pressure range of 2 to 3.1 MPa. The operating conditions for these reactions have been chosen to be within the application range of a commercial coal gasification process that is accompanied by in situ desulfurization. 14 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Trapping of aromatic compounds by adsorption on hydrophobic sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, I. [Institute National Agronomique Paris Grignon (France); Rojas, J.A.; Voilley, A. [Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Trapping by adsorption on hydrophobic porous polymers was the selected method for removing aromatic compounds from aqueous diluted medium. The study was done with four aromatic compounds which are often found in foods and which play a role in organoleptic qualities at low concentrations: ethyl acetate, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 1-octen 3-ol, and {gamma}-decalactone. Several sorbents were tested: activated carbon and three porous polystyren-type polymers (Porapak Q, Chromosorb 105, and Amberlite XAD-4). Kinetic and equilibrium sorptions were investigated. The adsorption isotherms were determined for the four aromatics and all the adsorbents, and equilibrium data were correlated with a Freundlich or a Langmuir-type of isotherm equation. Kinetic experimental results were simulated for 1-octen 3-ol using an internal-external mass transfer resistance model. Good agreement was observed for the diffusion coefficient in the sorbent in the range of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s{sup {minus}1}.

  13. In vivo bone regeneration using a novel porous bioactive composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie En [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Hu Yunyu [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: orth1@fmmn.edu.cn; Chen Xiaofeng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Bai Xuedong; Li Dan [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ren Li [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang Ziru [Foreign Languages School, Northwest University Xi' an (China)

    2008-11-15

    Many commercial bone graft substitutes (BGS) and experimental bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been developed for bone repair and regeneration. This study reports the in vivo bone regeneration using a newly developed porous bioactive and resorbable composite that is composed of bioactive glass (BG), collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HYA) and phosphatidylserine (PS), BG-COL-HYA-PS. The composite was prepared by a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. A rabbit radius defect model was used to evaluate bone regeneration at time points of 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Techniques including radiography, histology, and micro-CT were applied to characterize the new bone formation. 8 weeks results showed that (1) nearly complete bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composite that was combined with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); (2) partial bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composites alone; and (3) control remained empty. This study demonstrated that the novel BG-COL-HYA-PS, with or without the grafting of BMP incorporation, is a promising BGS or a tissue engineering scaffold for non-load bearing orthopaedic applications.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of K2CO3-promoted hydrotalcite from hydroxide-form precursors for novel high-temperature CO2 sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hee Jin; Lee, Chan Hyun; Kim, Suji; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Ki Bong

    2014-05-14

    In many materials for CO2 sorption, hydrotalcite is attracting substantial attention as a high temperature (200-500 °C) CO2 sorbent because of its fast sorption/desorption kinetics and easy regenerability. However, the CO2-sorption capacity of conventional hydrotalcite is relatively low for large-scale commercial use. To enhance CO2-sorption capacity, hydrotalcite is conventionally impregnated with alkali metals such as K2CO3. Although K2CO3-impregnated hydrotalcite has high CO2-sorption capacity, the preparation method takes long time and is inconvenient because hydrotalcite synthesis step and alkali metal impregnation step are separated. In this study, K2CO3-promoted hydrotalcite was newly synthesized from hydroxide-form percursors by a simple and eco-friendly method without a solvent-consuming washing step. Analysis based on X-ray diffraction indicated that the prepared samples had structures of well-defined hydrotalcite crystalline and un-reacted Mg(OH)2 precursor. Moreover, K2CO3 was successfully incorporated in hydrotalcite during the synthesis step. The prepared K2CO3-promoted hydrotalcite showed high CO2-sorption capacity and had potential for use as a high-temperature CO2 sorbent.

  15. Development of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NaNO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}Mg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} sorbent for CO{sub 2} capture with facilitated sorption kinetics at intermediate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hwimin; Min, Da Young; Kang, Na Young; Choi, Won Choon; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Yong-Ki [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deuk Ki [Gwangju University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    For the development of a dry solid sorbent having quite fast CO{sub 2} sorption kinetics in an intermediate temperature range of 245-300 .deg. C to be applicable to a riser-type fluidized bed carbonator, samples of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported MgCO{sub 3} (1.2mmol/g) promoted with different molar amounts of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (1.2, 1.8mmol/g) and/or NaNO{sub 3} (0.6mmol/ g) were prepared by incipient wetness pore volume impregnation. For a reference, an unsupported bulk phase sorbent of NaNO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}Mg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} was also prepared. From the sorption reaction using a gas mixture containing CO{sub 2} by 2.5- 10% at 1 bar for the sorbents after their activation to MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported sorbents were featured by their rapid carbonation kinetics in contrast to the unsupported sorbent showing a quite slow carbonation behavior. The addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to the MgCO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent made MgO species more reactive for the carbonation, bringing about a markedly enhanced kinetic rate and conversion, as compared with the unpromoted MgCO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent having a small negligible reactivity. The addition of NaNO{sub 3} to MgCO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-MgCO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced the same promotional effects, but to a lesser magnitude, as observed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. It was also characteristic for all these MgCO{sub 3}-based sorbents that initial carbonation conversions with time appeared as sigmoid curves. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported sorbent comprised of NaNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and MgCO{sub 3} by 0.6, 1.8, and 1.2mmols, respectively, per gram sorbent, showing the best kinetic performance, a kinetic equation capable of reflecting such sigmoid conversion behavior was established, and its applicability to a riser carbonator was examined throughout a simple model calculation based on the kinetics obtained.

  16. Diamex solvent regeneration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, C.; Cames, B.; Margot, L.; Ramain, L. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, DRRV, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    The CEA has undertaken the development of the DIAMEX process as the first step in the strategy aiming at recovering minor actinides which could then be transmuted or separately conditioned. The scientific feasibility of this process was demonstrated during counter current hot tests operated in 1993. Then experimental works were conducted, on one hand to optimise the extractant formula, on the other hand to improve the flowsheet. Reference extractant and flowsheet were then chosen, respectively in 1995 and 1996. The next step, still in progress, is the demonstration of the DIAMEX technical feasibility (in 2002); this means that the flowsheet should include solvent regeneration treatments. In this aim, degradation studies were performed to quantify main degradation products, and identify those which could be disturbing in the process. This paper deals with experimental studies performed with intend to propose a regeneration treatment, included in the flowsheet, so that the solvent could be recycled. It comprises: - Quantification of the main degradation products issued from radiolysis or hydrolysis, which are methyl octyl amine (MOA) and carboxylic acids; - Effects of these products on extracting and hydrodynamics performances of the process; - Study of methods able to remove mainly disturbing degradation products. Acidic scrubbing, which are performed in the scrubbing and stripping sections of the DIAMEX process, should allow the quantitative removal of methyl octyl amine. Then basic scrubbings, which were more especially studied, should eliminate at least 80% of carboxylic acids, and part of the cations remaining in the solvent. (authors)

  17. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nuan Chen; Lingling Tian; Liumin He; Seeram Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great lfexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great po-tential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by ifve main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design,in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  18. Progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Fan; Haichao Li; Yuwei Wang; Yanglin Zheng; Lianjun Jia; Zhihui Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of progesterone on peripheral nerve regeneration.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Medline and OVID databases was under taken to identify articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration published in English between January 1990 and June 2004 by using the keywords of "peripheral nerve, injury, progesterone, regeneration".STUDY SELECTION: The data were primarily screened, those correlated with progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were involved, and their original articles were further searched, the repetitive studies or reviews were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 59 articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were collected, and 26 of them were involved, the other 33 excluded ones were the repetitive studies or reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: Recent researches found that certain amount of progesterone could be synthetized in peripheral nervous system, and the expression of progesterone receptor could be found in sensory neurons and Schwann cells. After combined with the receptor, endogenous and exogenous progesterone can accelerate the formation of peripheral nerve myelin sheath, also promote the axonal regeneration.CONCLUSION: Progesterone plays a role in protecting neurons, increasing the sensitivity of nerve tissue to nerve growth factor, and accelerating regeneration of nerve in peripheral nerve regeneration, which provides theoretical references for the treatment of demyelinated disease and nerve injury, as well as the prevention of neuroma, especially that the in vivo level of progesterone should be considered for the elderly people accompanied by neuropathy and patients with congenital luteal phase defect, which is of positive significance in guiding the treatment.

  19. Molecular approach to echinoderm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndyke, M C; Chen, W C; Beesley, P W; Patruno, M

    2001-12-15

    Until very recently echinoderm regeneration research and indeed echinoderm research in general has suffered because of the lack of critical mass. In terms of molecular studies of regeneration, echinoderms in particular have lagged behind other groups in this respect. This is in sharp contrast to the major advances achieved with molecular and genetic techniques in the study of embryonic development in echinoderms. The aim of our studies has been to identify genes involved in the process of regeneration and in particular neural regeneration in different echinoderm species. Our survey included the asteroid Asterias rubens and provided evidence for the expression of Hox gene homologues in regenerating radial nerve cords. Present evidence suggests: 1) ArHox1 expression is maintained in intact radial nerve cord and may be upregulated during regeneration. 2) ArHox1 expression may contribute to the dedifferentiation and/or cell proliferation process during epimorphic regeneration. From the crinoid Antedon bifida, we have been successful in cloning a fragment of a BMP2/4 homologue (AnBMP2/4) and analysing its expression during arm regeneration. Here, we discuss the importance of this family of growth factors in several regulatory spheres, including maintaining the identity of pluripotent blastemal cells or as a classic skeletal morphogenic regulator. There is clearly substantial scope for future echinoderm research in the area of molecular biology and certain aspects are discussed in this review.

  20. Surface Functionalized Nanostructured Ceramic Sorbents for the Effective Collection and Recovery of Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Nell, Kara M.; Clubb, Donald C.; Gill, Gary A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-05-02

    The ability to collect uranium from seawater offers the potential for a nearly limitless fuel supply for nuclear energy. We evaluated the use of functionalized nanostructured sorbents for the collection and recovery of uranium from seawater. Extraction of trace minerals from seawater and brines is challenging due to the high ionic strength of seawater, low mineral concentrations, and fouling of surfaces over time. We demonstrate that rationally assembled sorbent materials that integrate high affinity surface chemistry and high surface area nanostructures into an application relevant micro/macro structure enables collection performance that far exceeds typical sorbent materials. High surface area nanostructured silica with surface chemistries composed of phosphonic acid, phosphonates, 3,4 hydroxypyridinone, and EDTA showed superior performance for uranium collection. A few phosphorous-based commercial resins, specifically Diphonix and Ln Resin, also performed well. We demonstrate an effective and environmentally benign method of stripping the uranium from the high affinity sorbents using inexpensive nontoxic carbonate solutions. The cyclic use of preferred sorbents and acidic reconditioning of materials was shown to improve performance. Composite thin films composed of the nanostructured sorbents and a porous polymer binder are shown to have excellent kinetics and good capacity while providing an effective processing configuration for trace mineral recovery from solutions. Initial work using the composite thin films shows significant improvements in processing capacity over the previously reported sorbent materials.

  1. Thermochemical Characterizations of Novel Vermiculite-LiCl Composite Sorbents for Low-Temperature Heat Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To store low-temperature heat below 100 °C, novel composite sorbents were developed by impregnating LiCl into expanded vermiculite (EVM in this study. Five kinds of composite sorbents were prepared using different salt concentrations, and the optimal sorbent for application was selected by comparing both the sorption characteristics and energy storage density. Textural properties of composite sorbents were obtained by extreme-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (ER-SEM and an automatic mercury porosimeter. After excluding two composite sorbents which would possibly exhibit solution leakage in practical thermal energy storage (TES system, thermochemical characterizations were implemented through simulative sorption experiments at 30 °C and 60% RH. Analyses of thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC curves indicate that water uptake of EVM/LiCl composite sorbents is divided into three parts: physical adsorption of EVM, chemical adsorption of LiCl crystal, and liquid–gas absorption of LiCl solution. Energy storage potential was evaluated by theoretical calculation based on TGA/DSC curves. Overall, EVMLiCl20 was selected as the optimal composite sorbent with water uptake of 1.41 g/g, mass energy storage density of 1.21 kWh/kg, and volume energy storage density of 171.61 kWh/m3.

  2. Removal of elemental mercury by iodine-modified rice husk ash sorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Zhao; Xin Guo; Chuguang Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Iodine-modified calcium-based rice husk ash sorbents (I2/CaO/RHA) were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction,X-ray fluorescence,and N2 isotherm adsorpdon/desorption.Adsorption experiments of vapor-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) were performed in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor.I2/CaO/RHA performances on Hg0 adsorption were compared with those of modified Cabased fly ash sorbents (I2/CaO/FA) and modified fly ash sorbents (I2/FA).Effects of oxidant loading,supports,pore size distribution,iodine impregnation modes,and temperature were investigated as well to understand the mechanism in capturing Hg0.The modified sorbents exhibited reasonable efficiency for Hg0 removal under simulated flue gas.The surface area,pore size distribution,and iodine impregnation modes of the sorbents did not produce a strong effect on Hg0 capture efficiency,while fair correlation was observed between Hg0 uptake capacity and iodine concentration.Therefore,the content of I2 impregnated on the sorbents was identified as the most important factor influencing the capacity of these sorbents for Hg0 uptake.Increasing temperature in the range of 80-140℃ caused a rise in Hg0 removal.A reaction mechanism that may explain the experimental results was presumed based on the characterizations and adsorption study.

  3. Application of a sorbent trap system to gas-phase elemental and oxidized mercury analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zishuo; Eom, Yujin; Lee, Michelle J; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2016-07-01

    A sorbent trap that utilizes activated carbon (AC) as the solid trapping medium is a new technology for measuring total mercury (Hg) emissions from combustion facilities. In this study, sorbent trap technology was further developed, improved and evaluated at the laboratory scale. AC was impregnated with 5% aqua regia to enhance its Hg adsorption capacity. Sorbent traps spiked with an Hg standard solution were found to be reproducibly prepared and highly stable. The effect of the Hg concentration on the spiking efficiency was further investigated. The adsorption of elemental and oxidized Hg by the sorbent trap was studied under various experimental conditions (temperature, flow rate and inlet Hg concentration). The Hg concentration of the flue gas effluent from the sorbent trap was measured. In addition, the concentration of Hg adsorbed on the AC was determined by digesting the used AC with an acid according to US EPA method 3052 and then analyzing it with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Furthermore, the gas-phase Hg emissions from a combustion source were measured using the sorbent trap according to US EPA method 30B. The results showed that the sorbent trap could be used for Hg concentrations between 10.0 and 40.0 μg m(-3) and flow rates between 0.5 and 1.0 lpm with adsorption efficiencies greater than 90%.

  4. Preparation and utilization of wheat straw anionic sorbent for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Bao-yu; Yue, Wen-wen; Yue, Qin-yan

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the impact of eutrophication caused by agricultural residues (i.e., excess nitrate) in aqueous solution, economic and effective anionic sorbents are required. In this article, we prepared anionic sorbent using wheat straw. Its structural characteristics and adsorption properties for nitrate removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The results indicate that the yield of the prepared anionic sorbent, the total exchange capacity, and the maximum adsorption capacity were 350%, 2.57 mEq/g, and 2.08 mmol/g, respectively. The Freundlich isotherm mode is more suitable than the Langmuir mode and the adsorption process accords with the first order reaction kinetic rate equation. When multiple anions (SO4(2-), H2PO4(-), NO3(-), and NO2(-)) were present, the isotherm mode of prepared anionic sorbent for nitrate was consistent with Freundlich mode; however, the capacity of nitrate adsorption was reduced by 50%. In alkaline solutions, about 90% of adsorbed nitrate ions could be desorbed from prepared anionic sorbent. The results of this study confirmed that the wheat straw anionic sorbent can be used as an excellent nitrate sorbent that removes nitrate from aqueous solutions.

  5. Development of the advanced coolside sorbent injection process for SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withum, J.A.; Maskew, J.T.; Rosenhoover, W.A. [Consol, Inc., Library, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a low-capital-cost process capable of over 90% SO{sub 2} removal as an economically attractive option for compliance with the Clean Air Act. The Advanced Coolside Process uses a contactor to simultaneously remove fly ash and saturate the flue gas with water, followed by sorbent injection into the highly humid flue gas and collection of the sorbent by the existing particulate collector High sorbent utilization is achieved by sorbent recycle. The original performance targets of 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization were exceeded in 1000 acfm pilot plant operations using commercial hydrated lime as the only sorbent. Process optimization simplified the process equipment, resulting in significant cost reduction. Recent accomplishments include completion of equipment testing and sorbent optimization, a waste management study, and a long-term performance test. An economic evaluation for the optimized process projects capital costs 55% to 60 % less than those of limestone forced oxidation wet FGD. The projected levelized control cost is 15% to 35% lower than wet FGD (25% lower for a 260 MWe plant burning a 2.5% sulfur coal), depending on plant size and coal sulfur content.

  6. The Basis of Muscle Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Musarò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration recapitulates many aspects of embryonic myogenesis and is an important homeostatic process of the adult skeletal muscle, which, after development, retains the capacity to regenerate in response to appropriate stimuli, activating the muscle compartment of stem cells, namely, satellite cells, as well as other precursor cells. Moreover, significant evidence suggests that while stem cells represent an important determinant for tissue regeneration, a “qualified” environment is necessary to guarantee and achieve functional results. It is therefore plausible that the loss of control over these cell fate decisions could lead to a pathological transdifferentiation, leading to pathologic defects in the regenerative process. This review provides an overview about the general aspects of muscle development and discusses the cellular and molecular aspects that characterize the five interrelated and time-dependent phases of muscle regeneration, namely, degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, remodeling, and maturation/functional repair.

  7. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  8. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO

  9. Metal-organic framework templated synthesis of porous inorganic materials as novel sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, Carter W.

    2017-03-21

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) templated process for the synthesis of highly porous inorganic sorbents for removing radionuclides, actinides, and heavy metals is disclosed. The highly porous nature of the MOFs leads to highly porous inorganic sorbents (such as oxides, phosphates, sulfides, etc) with accessible surface binding sites that are suitable for removing radionuclides from high level nuclear wastes, extracting uranium from acid mine drainage and seawater, and sequestering heavy metals from waste streams. In some cases, MOFs can be directly used for removing these metal ions as MOFs are converted to highly porous inorganic sorbents in situ.

  10. Metal-organic framework templated synthesis of porous inorganic materials as novel sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, Carter W.

    2017-03-21

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) templated process for the synthesis of highly porous inorganic sorbents for removing radionuclides, actinides, and heavy metals is disclosed. The highly porous nature of the MOFs leads to highly porous inorganic sorbents (such as oxides, phosphates, sulfides, etc) with accessible surface binding sites that are suitable for removing radionuclides from high level nuclear wastes, extracting uranium from acid mine drainage and seawater, and sequestering heavy metals from waste streams. In some cases, MOFs can be directly used for removing these metal ions as MOFs are converted to highly porous inorganic sorbents in situ.

  11. Photon Regeneration Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Ringwald, A

    2006-01-01

    Precision experiments exploiting low-energy photons may yield information on particle physics complementary to experiments at high-energy colliders, in particular on new very light and very weakly interacting particles, predicted in many extensions of the standard model. Such particles may be produced by laser photons send along a transverse magnetic field. The laser polarization experiment PVLAS may have seen the first indirect signal of such particles by observing an anomalously large rotation of the polarization plane of photons after the passage through a magnetic field. This can be interpreted as evidence for photon disappearance due to particle production. There are a number of experimental proposals to test independently the particle interpretation of PVLAS. Many of them are based on the search for photon reappearance or regeneration, i.e. for ``light shining through a wall''. At DESY, the Axion-Like Particle Search (ALPS) collaboration is currently setting up such an experiment.

  12. Photon regeneration plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2006-12-15

    Precision experiments exploiting low-energy photons may yield information on particle physics complementary to experiments at high-energy colliders, in particular on new very light and very weakly interacting particles, predicted in many extensions of the standard model. Such particles may be produced by laser photons send along a transverse magnetic field. The laser polarization experiment PVLAS may have seen the first indirect signal of such particles by observing an anomalously large rotation of the polarization plane of photons after the passage through a magnetic field. This can be interpreted as evidence for photon disappearance due to particle production. There are a number of experimental proposals to test independently the particle interpretation of PVLAS. Many of them are based on the search for photon reappearance or regeneration, i.e. for ''light shining through a wall''. At DESY, the Axion-Like Particle Search (ALPS) collaboration is currently setting up such an experiment. (orig.)

  13. A regenerable bitumen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudzuki, K.; Asakava, Y.; Matsui, A.; Ogava, A.

    1982-10-18

    The regenerable bitumin composition includes the bitumen material (asphalt, oxidized bitumen, petroleum or asphalt pitch) emulsified by an cation emulsifier (alkylamine or an imidazole derivative) and additionally by a noniononic emulsifier (polyoxyethylenamine), an amide, which contains greater than 1 amide groups per molecule (amide derivative, imidazoline), an epoxide compound with greater than 1 epoxide group per molecule (preferably with an epoxy equivalent of 180 to 500), an inorganic compound which hardens in water (Portland cement or silicate cement) and additionally, water. The total content of the second third components is 1 to 200 parts per million to 100 parts of the first component, while the content of the fourth component is from 1 to 400 parts. The water content in the composition is 5 to 1,000 percent of the total content of the first three components. The patented composition is characterized by high stability, strength, chemical stability, resistance to water and good adhesion properties.

  14. An enhanced adsorption methodology for the detoxification of chromium using n-octylamine impregnated Amberlite XAD-4 polymeric sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A S Krishna; Rajesh, N; Kalidhasan, S; Rajesh, Vidya

    2011-01-01

    The remediation of heavy metals requires the development of efficient adsorbents. Macroporous polystyrene divinyl benzene based resins are known for their excellent surface characteristics for the effective adsorption of metals. In this paper, we propose an effective adsorption procedure for chromium (VI) using aliphatic primary amine as a guest in Amberlite XAD-4 polymeric sorbent as the host. The adsorption of chromium was quantitative at pH 2.5. The adsorption process was in accordance with pseudo second order kinetics and the maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 75.93 mg g(-1) with good adherence to Langmuir isotherm model. The free energy change ΔG(0) increased with temperature and the negative ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) values indicate the exothermic nature of adsorption and decreased randomness at the adsorbent-solution interface. In aqueous medium, the water molecules surround the hydrophobic host polymeric matrix and this cage effect is responsible for the reduction in entropy of the system. The regeneration of the adsorbent was effective in alkaline medium and the efficacy of the adsorbent was tested for the removal of chromium from tannery waste water.

  15. A Study of Factors involved in possible regeneration of Atlantic White Cedar in a recently burned area in the Great Dismal Swamp

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Historically white cedar has managed to regenerate without benefit of controlled burns and it seems that .most wild fires occur during the dry season. It was...

  16. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world.

  17. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  18. Energy Efficient Textile Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Brunzell, Lena

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, textiles were dried outdoors with the wind and the sun enhancing the drying process. Tumble dryers offer a fast and convenient way of drying textiles independent of weather conditions. Tumble dryers, however, consume large amounts of electrical energy. Over 4 million tumble dryers are sold each year in Europe and a considerable amount of energy is used for drying of clothes. Increasing energy costs and the awareness about environmental problems related to a large energy use has...

  19. Fluidized bed and method and system for gas component capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutka, Holly; Wilson, Cody; Starns, Travis

    2016-05-31

    The present disclosure is directed to a process that allows dry sorbents to remove a target constituent, such as carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from a gas stream. A staged fluidized bed separator enables gas and sorbent to move in opposite directions. The sorbent is loaded with target constituent in the separator. It is then transferred to a regenerator where the target constituent is stripped. The temperature of the separator and regenerator are controlled. After it is removed from the regenerator, the sorbent is then transferred back to the separator.

  20. Application of dry-ice blasting for barrels treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantini Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work was to test a dry-ice basting method to regenerate the barriques in order to prolong their life. In addition, this treatment for barrels can also represent an alternative to the use of sulfur dioxide for the barrique sanitization, in line with the guidelines of oenological practices for sustainable development proposed by the OIV (International Organization of Vine and Wine (sustainable development, food security: reduction the content of sulfites in wine. The effect of the blasting with dry ice for the treatment of barrique has been studied from a microbiological and sensory point of view. Microbiological analyses were carried out using wine contaminated with Brettanomyces and Lactobacillus; results showed a reduction of contaminant of 98–100%. Finally, it was evaluated the impact of this treatment on the sensory profile of wine. In this regard the wine aged in a barrique dry-ice blasted was compared with a wine aged in a barrique treated with sulfur dioxide. From the sensory analysis emerged that the dry-ice blasting treatment can regenerate the barriques, this confers to the wine increased notes of vanilla and boisé. The benefits that derive from the use of this method are: a good sanitization of the barrel, a positive impact on the organo- leptic characteristics of the wine and the ability to regenerate and reuse a barrel, with a positive effect on sustainability.

  1. Neuromuscular Damage and Repair after Dry Needling in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ares Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation.

  2. EXAFS and XRD characterization of palladium sorbents for high temperature mercury capture from fuel gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulston, Stephen; Hyde, Timothy I; Hamilton, Hugh; Mathon, Olivier; Prestipino, Carmelo; Sankar, Gopinathan; Smith, Andrew W J

    2010-01-14

    Removal of pollutants such as mercury at elevated temperatures provides improvements in the overall thermal efficiency during the process of coal gasification. The two high temperature sorbents studied were 5 wt% Pd/Al(2)O(3) and 5 wt% Pd/SiO(2): materials shown to have significantly different Hg adsorption capacities. A combination of XRD and EXAFS has been used to characterize the Pd-Hg alloy formed when these Pd-based sorbents were exposed to fuel gas (CO, CO(2), H(2)) containing Hg vapour at 204 degrees C. Significant differences were found in the nature of the alloy formed on the two sorbents following Hg exposure. The Pd/Al(2)O(3) sorbent produced a single homogeneous solid solution of Pd-Hg whilst the silica-supported Pd produced an alloy of varying composition.

  3. Chitosan-ferrocyanide sorbent for Cs-137 removal from mineralized alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorin, Andrei [Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Ozyorsk Technical Institute MEPHI, Ozersk (Russian Federation); Tokar, Eduard [Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Zemskova, Larisa [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    An organomineral sorbent based on mixed nickel-potassium ferrocyanide and chitosan to be used in removal of Cs-137 radionuclide from highly mineralized media with high pH has been fabricated. The synthesized sorbent was applied to remove Cs-137 from model solutions under static and dynamic conditions. The effects of contact time, pH, and presence of sodium ions and complexing agents in the process of Cs-137 removal have been investigated. The sorbent is distinguished by increased stability to the impact of alkaline media containing complexing agents, whereas the sorbent capacity in solutions with pH 11 exceeds 1000 bed volumes with the Cs-137 removal efficiency higher than 95%.

  4. Zinc-oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasael

    2010-03-23

    Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  5. Humic sorbent from sapropel for purification of waste waters from petroleum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeeva, L. N.; Platonova, D. S.

    2017-08-01

    A sorbent by thermal processing sapropel residue, after the extraction of humic acids, subsequent modification with polyhexamethyleneguanidine and pre-isolated humic acids was synthesized. The transformations of the carbon-mineral humic sorbent at a temperature of 20-1000°C in air have been studied by thermal analysis. The presence of various functional groups on the surface of a carbon-mineral humic sorbent from sapropel is confirmed with an IR-spectroscopy method. Sorption of petroleum from water solutions was studied. The static capacity value of the synthesized humic sorbent for petroleum is 85.5±0.3 mg/g. It is established that the process of sorption is described by the equation of Freundlich isotherm.

  6. Sorbents based on crown ethers: preparation and application for the sorption of strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhin, N. A.; Dovhyi, I. I.

    2015-12-01

    The key approaches to the synthesis of crown ether-based sorbents, including immobilization both with and without covalent bonding, are reviewed. Examples of sorbent preparation using anodic oxidation, chemical modification of polymers, polycondensation reactions, chemical modification of inorganic supports and radiochemical synthesis for covalent bonding of crown ether moieties are considered. Immobilization methods without covalent bonding including support synthesis in the presence of crown ethers, impregnation of supports with a crown ether solution and the use of powdered crown ether as a sorbent are presented. The applications of sorbents for selective removal of strontium from solutions of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, for radiochemical analysis (determination of strontium in water, soil and biological materials) and for separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes are discussed. The bibliography includes 114 references.

  7. Hydroxyapatite-based sorbents: elaboration, characterization and application for the removal of catechol from the aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebei, Haroun; Minh, Doan Pham; Lyczko, Nathalie; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange

    2016-12-26

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is highly considered as good sorbent for the removal of metals from the aqueous phase. However, soluble metals co-exist with organic pollutants in wastewaters. But little work has been devoted to investigate the reactivity of HAP for the removal of organic compounds. The main objective of this work is to study the reactivity of HAP-based sorbents for the removal of catechol as a model organic pollutant from an aqueous solution. Thus, HAP sorbents were firstly synthesized using calcium carbonate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate under moderate conditions (25-80°C, atmospheric pressure). A zinc-doped HAP was also used as sorbent, which was obtained from the contact of HAP with an aqueous solution of zinc nitrate. All the sorbents were characterized by different standard physico-chemical techniques. The sorption of catechol was carried out in a batch reactor under stirring at room temperature and pressure. Zinc-doped HAP sorbent was found to be more reactive than non-doped HAP sorbents for the fixation of catechol. The highest sorption capacity was of 15 mg of C per gram of zinc-doped HAP sorbent. The results obtained suggest the reaction scheme of HAP sorbents with metals and organic pollutants when HAP sorbents were used for the treatment of complex wastewaters.

  8. An experimental study of passive regenerator geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Pryds, Nini

    2011-01-01

    this article studies the effects of regenerator geometry on performance for flat plate regenerators. This paper investigates methods of improving the performance of flat plate regenerators for use in AMR systems and studies how manufacturing variation affects regenerator performance. In order to eliminate...... experimental uncertainty associated with magnetocaloric material properties, all regenerators are made of aluminum. The performance of corrugated plates and dimpled plates are compared to traditional flat plate regenerators for a range of cycle times and utilizations. Each regenerator is built using 18...

  9. Study of application of hydrophobic fibrous sorbents for water purification from metal ions

    OpenAIRE

    Е. V. Petrova; Astashkina, А. P.; Filonenko, D. А.; Otmakhov, V. I.; Izaak, Т. I.; Volokitin, G. G.

    2007-01-01

    Sorption properties of hydrophobic fibrous sorbents on the basis of polypropylene and polyethylene terephthalate produced from thermoplastic polymer wastes to metal ion series in aqueous media has been studied. Based on the experimental data of extraction degree dependencies on fibre laying density, dispersity, presence of air in sorbent, volume of pass solution the mechanism of metal ion sorption from aqueous media with hydrophobic fibrous materials is suggested.

  10. Mixed and Doped Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The objectives of this presentation are to capture CO2 we need materials with optimal performance and low costs; establish a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO2 solid sorbents from a large solid material databank; computational synthesis new materials to fit industrial needs; and explore the optimal working conditions for the promised CO2 solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage.

  11. Theoretical Predictions of the thermodynamic Properties of Solid Sorbents Capture CO2 Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan; Luebke David; Pennline, Henry

    2012-05-02

    We are establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank to meet the DOE programmatic goal for energy conversion; and to explore the optimal working conditions for the promising CO{sub 2} solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage, used for both pre- and post-combustion capture technologies.

  12. Removal of mercury from flue gas using Ca-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, J.L.; Luo, Y.Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhong, Y.J. [Zhejiang Univ. of Technology, Hangzhou (China). MOE Key Laboratory of Mechanical Manufacture and Automation; Zhou, J.S. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou, (China). Inst. of Thermal Power Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization

    2008-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) emissions from power plants raise environmental concerns, particularly in China's coal-fired power plants. Mercury is present mainly in the vapor form (Hg0) and cannot be captured effectively by existing particulate removal systems because of its high volatility and insolubility in water. It is therefore necessary to design and manufacture more cost-effective mercury sorbents to replace conventional sorbents already in use for mercury control. This paper reported on a study in which the characteristics of mercury sorption by 3 kinds of calcium (Ca)based sorbents were studied, notably lime, hydrated lime and a mixture of fly ash and hydrated lime (MFC). Adsorption experiments were performed in a bench-scale fixed-bed mercury sorption facility with a mercury permeation tube embedded in an isothermal water bath and simulated flue gas compositions. The effects of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) on adsorption were investigated along with the adsorption mechanism. The study showed that the performance of Ca-based sorbents was better in the presence of SO{sub 2} than the baseline conditions. In the absence SO{sub 2}, the Hg0 adsorption effectiveness of the 3 kinds of Ca-based sorbents was lower. In the presence of SO{sub 2}, adsorption efficiency improved by 15 to 20 per cent and the adsorption capacity was more than 50 per cent at 30 minutes of exposure of sorbents to the flue gas. Higher temperature was found to be beneficial to the adsorption process. SO{sub 2} reacted with the Ca-based sorbents and produced active adsorption sites on the surface of the sorbents, thus oxidating Hg0 to Hg2+ and improving capture efficiency by chemisorption. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  13. A fibrous hypercrosslinked sorbent prepared on PP-ST-DVB matrix via post-crosslinking reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Liu; Si Guo Yuan; Xiao Li Wang; A.P. Polikarpov; A.A. Shunkevich

    2007-01-01

    A fibrous sorbent possessing abundant micropore structure was firstly prepared via post-crosslinking reaction on the PP-ST-DVB original fiber. Its micromorphology and sorptive properties were investigated, and the results. Demonstrated that the novel fibrous hypercrosslinked sorbent has narrow pore-size distribution, small average porous radius (1.90 nm), high specific surface area (362.31 m2/g), and fine sorptive properties for small organic molecules.

  14. Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents For Cesium, Strontium and Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Nyman, M.; Clearfield, A.; Maginn, E.

    2006-06-01

    The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations.

  15. Metal-organic framework templated inorganic sorbents for rapid and efficient extraction of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, C W; Gilhula, J C; Lu, K; Lin, W

    2014-12-17

    An innovative wet-treatment with Na2 S transforms two indium metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) into a series of porous inorganic sorbents. These MOF-templated materials display remarkable affinity for heavy metals with saturation occurring in less than 1 h. The saturation capacity for Hg(II) exceeds 2 g g(-1) , more than doubling the best thiol-functionalized sorbents in the literature.

  16. Dry vacuum pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibuet, R.

    2008-05-01

    For decades and for ultimate pressure below 1 mbar, oil-sealed Rotary Vane Pumps have been the most popular solution for a wide range of vacuum applications. In the late 80ies, Semiconductor Industry has initiated the development of the first dry roughing pumps. Today SC applications are only using dry pumps and dry pumping packages. Since that time, pumps manufacturers have developed dry vacuum pumps technologies in order to make them attractive for other applications. The trend to replace lubricated pumps by dry pumps is now spreading over many other market segments. For the Semiconductor Industry, it has been quite easy to understand the benefits of dry pumps, in terms of Cost of Ownership, process contamination and up-time. In this paper, Technology of Dry pumps, its application in R&D/industries, merits over conventional pumps and future growth scope will be discussed.

  17. Regenerable Contaminant Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Regenerable Contaminant Removal System (RCRS) is an innovative method to remove sulfur and halide compounds from contaminated gas streams to part-per-billion...

  18. A numerical method of regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Shaowei [Aisin Seiki Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan); Matsubara, Yoichi [Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. of Quantum Science

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect. (author)

  19. A numerical method of regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect.

  20. Instructive composites for bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, D.

    2012-01-01

    Developing new biomaterials for tissue regeneration requires careful balance between many factors, which is challenging because, on one side, such materials must provide complex information, through their physicochemical properties to actively interact with the biological surroundings and induce tis

  1. Testing of zinc titanate desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, R.E.; Gal, E. [General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Dept.; Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Sorbents developed for moving-bed systems must comply with a minimum of chemical and mechanical durability performance characteristics in order to be considered acceptable for long-term operation. Among the desired properties, a sorbent must have: (1) High chemical reactivity, as measured by the rate of sulfur absorption and the total sulfur loading on the sorbent. (2) High mechanical strength, as measured by the pellet crush strength and the attrition resistance; (3) Suitable pellet morphology, as given by pellet size and shape to promote good bulk flow ability and seasonable porosity to increase reactivity. Formulation 2A1.7M (UCI designation L-3787M) was selected by DOE as the baseline formulation for performance evaluation of Option 3 sorbents. This baseline formulation is a rounded zinc titanate sorbent containing a 2:1 Zn:Ti molar ratio, 1.7% molybdenum (equivalent to 2.5% MoO{sub 3}), and 3% bentonite binder that had been previously tested under the Option 2 program. Zinc titanate sorbents were prepared by UCI as rounded spherical or ellipsoidal pellets. The fabrication procedure is targeted at achieving a balance of mechanical strength (crush strength and attrition resistance) and chemical reactivity by controlling the pellet internal porosity.

  2. Qualification of the ALKASORB sorbent for the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Dijk, Van H.A.J.; Walspurger, S.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Jansen, D.

    2013-07-01

    For the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process, a new sorbent material has been qualified in a reactor of 2 m length under conditions close to industrial designs. The sorbent ALKASORB is a potassium-carbonate promoted hydrotalcite-based compound. ALKASORB is shown to have many favourable properties in comparison to the reference sorbent, in particular with respect to mechanical stability. The cyclic capacity of the new compound is substantially higher than the cyclic capacity of the reference sorbent, and it allows a reduction of the steam requirement of 50%. The sorbent has demonstrated catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that is sufficient to omit a separate catalyst. It is demonstrated that the sorbent remains chemically and mechanically stable during operation of at least 2000 adsorption-desorption cycles, even in the presence of H2S in the feed. H2S is shown not to influence CO2 adsorption capacity and is co-captured with the CO2. In contrast to the reference material that showed mechanical degradation during extended adsorption-desorption cycles, the new material is stable and allows to obtain carbon capture levels exceeding 95% more efficiently and more economically since the required size of the vessels will be smaller.

  3. Reactions of calcium-based sorbents with sulfur in coal during gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, M.J.; Leppin, D.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    This status report outlines the results obtained to date of the current research program supported jointly by the Gas Research Institute and the State of Illinois Center for Research on Sulfur in Coal. The overall objective is to obtain data related to the efficient utilization of high-sulfur Illinois coal in a One-Step Desulfurization Process by employing in-situ removal of sulfur using calcium-based sorbents. The project includes a study of fluidization behavior of coal char/sorbent mixtures and the reactions of calcium-based sorbents with sulfur present in the coal during gasification. The tests are conducted in bench-scale units; an 8-inch fluidization column is utilized for fluidization tests, and a thermobalance reactor is used for gas-solid reactions. The test parameters include the choice of sorbent, sorbent size, the effect of temperature on sulfation and sulfidation reactions, the effect of the steam-to-hydrogen sulfide ratio on the sulfidation reaction, the effect of the steam on the sulfation reaction, and the influence of exposure time on sulfation of the presulfided sorbent. The reaction conditions for these reactions have been chosen to be directly applicable to scale-up of the One-Step Desulfurization Process. 7 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Selective extraction of nitroaromatic explosives by using molecularly imprinted silica sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordel, Sonia; Chapuis-Hugon, Florence; Eudes, Véronique; Pichon, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Two molecularly imprinted silicas (MISs) were synthesized and used as selective sorbents for the extraction of nitroaromatic explosives in post-blast samples. The synthesis of the MISs was carried out with phenyltrimethoxysilane as monomer, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) as template and triethoxysilane as cross-linker by a sol-gel approach in two molar ratios: 1/4/20 and 1/4/30 (template/monomer/cross-linker). Non-imprinted silica sorbents were also prepared following the same procedures without introducing the template. An optimized procedure dedicated to the selective treatment of aqueous samples was developed for both MISs for the simultaneous extraction of the template and other nitroaromatic compounds commonly used as explosives. The capacity of the MISs was measured by the extraction of increasing amounts of 2,4-DNT in pure water and is higher than 3.2 mg/g of sorbent for each MIS. For the first time, four nitroaromatic compounds were selectively extracted and determined simultaneously with extraction recoveries higher than 79%. The potential of these sorbents was then highlighted by their use for the clean-up of post-blast samples (motor oil, post-mortem blood, calcined fragments, etc.). The results were compared to those obtained using a conventional sorbent, thus demonstrating the interest of the use of these MISs as selective sorbents.

  5. Tissue engineering for periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Richard T; Conte, Greg; Nishimine, Dee; Dault, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As a result of periodontal regeneration research, a series of clinical techniques have emerged that permit tissue engineering to be performed for more efficient regeneration and repair of periodontal defects and improved implant site development. Historically, periodontal regeneration research has focused on a quest for "magic filler" material. This search has led to the development of techniques utilizing autologous bone and bone marrow, allografts, xenografts, and various man-made bone substitutes. Though these techniques have had limited success, the desire for a more effective regenerative approach has resulted in the development of tissue engineering techniques. Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of reconstructive biology which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biologic mediators to facilitate reconstruction/regeneration of a particular tissue. In periodontology, the concept of tissue engineering had its beginnings with guided tissue regeneration, a mechanical approach utilizing nonresorbable membranes to obtain regeneration in defects. In dental implantology, guided bone regeneration membranes +/- mechanical support are used for bone augmentation of proposed implant placement sites. With the availability of partially purified protein mixture from developing teeth and growth factors from recombinant technology, a new era of tissue engineering whereby biologic mediators can be used for periodontal regeneration. The advantage of recombinant growth factors is this tissue engineering device is consistent in its regenerative capacity, and variations in regenerative response are due to individual healing response and/or poor surgical techniques. In this article, the authors review how tissue engineering has advanced and discuss its impact on the clinical management of both periodontal and osseous defects in preparation for implant placement. An understanding of these new tissue engineering techniques is essential for comprehending today's ever

  6. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; O’Meara, Caitlin C.; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M.; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B.; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F.; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A.; Poss, Kenneth D.; Lee, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte...

  7. Sucrose Diffusion in Decellularized Heart Valves for Freeze-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Goecke, Tobias; Ramm, Robert; Harder, Michael; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Wolkers, Willem Frederik

    2015-09-01

    Decellularized heart valves can be used as starter matrix implants for heart valve replacement therapies in terms of guided tissue regeneration. Decellularized matrices ideally need to be long-term storable to assure off-the-shelf availability. Freeze-drying is an attractive preservation method, allowing storage at room temperature in a dried state. However, the two inherent processing steps, freezing and drying, can cause severe damage to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and the overall tissue histoarchitecture and thus impair biomechanical characteristics of resulting matrices. Freeze-drying therefore requires a lyoprotective agent that stabilizes endogenous structural proteins during both substeps and that forms a protective glassy state at room temperature. To estimate incubation times needed to infiltrate decellularized heart valves with the lyoprotectant sucrose, temperature-dependent diffusion studies were done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Glycerol, a cryoprotective agent, was studied for comparison. Diffusion of both protectants was found to exhibit Arrhenius behavior. The activation energies of sucrose and glycerol diffusion were found to be 15.9 and 37.7 kJ·mol(-1), respectively. It was estimated that 4 h of incubation at 37°C is sufficient to infiltrate heart valves with sucrose before freeze-drying. Application of a 5% sucrose solution was shown to stabilize acellular valve scaffolds during freeze-drying. Such freeze-dried tissues, however, displayed pores, which were attributed to ice crystal damage, whereas vacuum-dried scaffolds in comparison revealed no pores after drying and rehydration. Exposure to a hygroscopic sucrose solution (80%) before freeze-drying was shown to be an effective method to diminish pore formation in freeze-dried ECMs: matrix structures closely resembled those of control samples that were not freeze-dried. Heart valve matrices were shown to be in a glassy state after drying, suggesting that they can

  8. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)