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Sample records for dry electrophysiology sensor

  1. First human trials of a dry electrophysiology sensor using a carbon nanotube array interface

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, G; Fuentemilla, L; Grau, C; Farres, E; Marco-Pallares, J; Watts, P C P; Silva, S R P

    2007-01-01

    Fatigue, sleepiness and disturbed sleep are important factors in health and safety in modern society and there is considerable interest in developing technologies for routine monitoring of associated physiological indicators. Electrophysiology, the measurement of the electrical activity of biological origin, is a key technique for the measurement of physiological parameters in several applications, but it has been traditionally difficult to develop sensors for measurements outside the laboratory or clinic with the required quality and robustness. In this paper we report the results from first human experiments using a new electrophysiology sensor called ENOBIO, using carbon nanotube arrays for penetration of the outer layers of the skin and improved electrical contact. These tests, which have included traditional protocols for the analysis of the electrical activity of the brain--spontaneous EEG and ERP--indicate performance on a par with state of the art research-oriented wet electrodes, suggesting that the ...

  2. A dry electrophysiology electrode using CNT arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, G; Farres, E; Grau, C; Marco-Pallares, J; Mendoza, Eric; Ray, C; Silva, R; Dunne, Stephen; Farres, Esteve; Grau, Carles; Marco-Pallares, Josep; Mendoza, Ernest; Ray, Chris; Ruffini, Giulio; Silva, Ravi

    2006-01-01

    We describe the concept of a dry electrode sensor for biopotential measurement applications (ENOBIO) designed to eliminate the noise and inconvenience associated to the use of electrolytic gel. ENOBIO uses nanotechnology to remove gel-related noise, as well as maintaining a good contact impedance to minimise interference noise. The contact surface of the electrode will be covered with an array/forest of carbon nanotubes and will also be tested with an Ag/AgCl coating to provide ionic-electronic transduction. The nanotubes are to penetrate the outer layers of the skin, the Stratum Corneum, improving electrical contact. We discuss requirements, skin properties, nanotube penetration and transduction, noise sources, prototype design logic and biocompatibility. A future paper will report test results.

  3. Nanomaterial-Enabled Dry Electrodes for Electrophysiological Sensing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Zhu, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Long-term, continuous, and unsupervised tracking of physiological data is becoming increasingly attractive for health/wellness monitoring and ailment treatment. Nanomaterials have recently attracted extensive attention as building blocks for flexible/stretchable conductors and are thus promising candidates for electrophysiological electrodes. Here we provide a review on nanomaterial-enabled dry electrodes for electrophysiological sensing, focusing on electrocardiography (ECG). The dry electrodes can be classified into contact surface electrodes, contact-penetrating electrodes, and noncontact capacitive electrodes. Different types of electrodes including their corresponding equivalent electrode-skin interface models and the sources of the noise are first introduced, followed by a review on recent developments of dry ECG electrodes based on various nanomaterials, including metallic nanowires, metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Their fabrication processes and performances in terms of electrode-skin impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, resistance to motion artifacts, skin compatibility, and long-term stability are discussed.

  4. ENOBIO dry electrophysiology electrode; first human trial plus wireless electrode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Giulio; Dunne, Stephen; Farres, Esteve; Cester, Ivan; Watts, Paul C P; Silva, S P; Grau, Carles; Fuentemilla, Lluis; Marco-Pallares, Josep; Vandecasteele, Bjorn

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the first human trials with the ENOBIO electrophysiology electrode prototype plus the initial results of a new wireless prototype with flexible electrodes based on the same platform. The results indicate that a dry active electrode that employs a CNT array as the electrode interface can perform on a par with traditional "wet" electrodes for the recording of EEG, ECG, EOG and EMG. We also demonstrate a new platform combining wireless technology plus flexible electrodes for improved comfort for applications that take advantage of the dry electrode concept.

  5. Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology in intact adult fruit flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Laurent

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded optical indicators hold the promise of enabling non-invasive monitoring of activity in identified neurons in behaving organisms. However, the interpretation of images of brain activity produced using such sensors is not straightforward. Several recent studies of sensory coding used G-CaMP 1.3-a calcium sensor-as an indicator of neural activity; some of these studies characterized the imaged neurons as having narrow tuning curves, a conclusion not always supported by parallel electrophysiological studies. To better understand the possible cause of these conflicting results, we performed simultaneous in vivo 2-photon imaging and electrophysiological recording of G-CaMP 1.3 expressing neurons in the antennal lobe (AL of intact fruitflies. We find that G-CaMP has a relatively high threshold, that its signal often fails to capture spiking response kinetics, and that it can miss even high instantaneous rates of activity if those are not sustained. While G-CaMP can be misleading, it is clearly useful for the identification of promising neural targets: when electrical activity is well above the sensor's detection threshold, its signal is fairly well correlated with mean firing rate and G-CaMP does not appear to alter significantly the responses of neurons that express it. The methods we present should enable any genetically encoded sensor, activator, or silencer to be evaluated in an intact neural circuit in vivo in Drosophila.

  6. ENOBIO - First tests of a dry electrophysiology electrode using carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, G; Farres, E; Watts, P C P; Mendoza, Eric; Silva, R; Grau, C; Marco-Pallares, J; Fuentemilla, L; Vanfleteren, J; De Moor, P; Van de Casteele, B; Ruffini, Giulio; Dunne, Stephen; Farres, Esteve; Watts, Paul C. P.; Mendoza, Ernest; Silva, Ravi; Grau, Carles; Marco-Pallares, Josep; Fuentemilla, Lluis; Vanfleteren, Jan; Moor, Piet De; Vandecasteele, Bjorn

    2006-01-01

    We describe the development and first tests of Enobio, a dry electrode sensor concept for biopotential applications. In the proposed electrodes, the tip of the electrode is covered with a forest of multi-walled CNTs that will be coated with Ag/AgCl to provide ionic-electronic transduction. The CNT brush-like structure is to penetrate the outer layers of the skin improving electrical contact as well as increae the contact surface area. In this paper, we report the results of the first tests of this concept -- immersion on saline solution and pig skin signal detection. These indicate performance on a par with state of the art research-oriented wet electrodes.

  7. ENOBIO - first tests of a dry electrophysiology electrode using carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Giulio; Dunne, Stephen; Farrés, Esteve; Watts, Paul C P; Mendoza, Ernest; Silva, S Ravi P; Grau, Carles; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Vandecasteele, B Jorn

    2006-01-01

    We describe the development and first tests of ENOBIO, a dry electrode sensor concept for biopotential applications. In the proposed electrodes the tip of the electrode is covered with a forest of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that can be coated with Ag/AgCl to provide ionic-electronic transduction. The CNT brush-like structure is to penetrate the outer layers of the skin improving electrical contact as well as increase the contact surface area. In this paper we report the results of the first tests of this concept--immersion on saline solution and pig skin signal detection. These indicate performance on a par with state of the art research-oriented wet electrodes.

  8. A quantitative evaluation of dry-sensor electroencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy, E. Timothy

    Neurologists, neuroscientists, and experimental psychologists study electrical activity within the brain by recording voltage fluctuations at the scalp. This is electroencephalography (EEG). In conventional or "wet" EEG, scalp abrasion and use of electrolytic paste are required to insure good electrical connection between sensor and skin. Repeated abrasion quickly becomes irritating to subjects, severely limiting the number and frequency of sessions. Several groups have produced "dry" EEG sensors that do not require abrasion or conductive paste. These, in addition to sidestepping the issue of abrasion, promise to reduce setup time from about 30 minutes with a technician to less than 30 seconds without one. The availability of such an instrument would (1) reduce the cost of brain-related medical care, (2) lower the barrier of entry on brain experimentation, and (3) allow individual subjects to contribute substantially more data without fear of abrasion or fatigue. Accuracy of the EEG is paramount in the medical diagnosis of epilepsy, in experimental psychology and in the burgeoning field of brain-computer interface. Without a sufficiently accurate measurement, the advantages of dry sensors remain a moot point. However, even after nearly a decade, demonstrations of dry EEG accuracy with respect to wet have been limited to visual comparison of short snippets of spontaneous EEG, averaged event-related potentials or plots of power spectrum. In this dissertation, I propose a detailed methodology based on single-trial EEG classification for comparing dry EEG sensors to their wet counterparts. Applied to a set of commercially fabricated dry sensors, this work reveals that dry sensors can perform as well their wet counterparts with careful screening and attention to the bandwidth of interest.

  9. Thermoelectric Powered Wireless Sensors for Dry-Cask Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Thomas Alan

    This study focuses on the development of self-powered wireless sensors. These sensors can be used to measure key parameters in extreme environments; e.g., temperature monitoring for spent nuclear fuel during dry-cask storage. This study has developed a design methodology for these self-powered monitoring systems. The main elements that constitute this work consist of selecting and testing a power source for the wireless sensor, determination of the attenuation of the wireless signal, and testing the wireless sensor circuitry in an extreme environment. OrigenArp determined the decay heat and gamma/neutron source strength of the spent fuel throughout the service life of the dry-cask. A first principles analysis modeled the temperatures inside the dry-cask. A finite-element heat transfer code calculated the temperature distribution of the thermoelectric and heat sink. The temperature distributions determine the power produced by the thermoelectric. It was experimentally verified that a thermoelectric generator (HZ-14) with a DC/DC converter (Linear Technology LTC3108EDE) can power a transceiver (EmbedRF) at condition which represent prototypical conditions throughout and beyond the service life of the dry-cask. The wireless sensor is required to broadcast with enough power to overcome the attenuation from the dry-cask. It will be important to minimize the attenuation of the signal in order to broadcast with a small transmission power. To investigate the signal transmission through the dry-cask, CST Microwave Studio was used to determine the scattering parameter S2,1 for a horizontal dry-cask. Important parameters that can influence the transmission of the signal are antenna orientation, antenna placement, and transmission frequency. The thermoelectric generator, DC/DC converter, and transceiver were exposed to 60Co gamma radiation (exposure rate170.3 Rad/min) at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center. The effects of gamma radiation on the

  10. Mucosal environmental sensors in the pathogenesis of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Stern, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    The 4th Cullen Symposium, held April 17 and 18, 2014, included expert researchers in mucosal immunity of the eye and other mucosal surfaces, particularly the gut. The theme of the meeting was environmental sensing mechanisms in mucosal tissues and their relevance for initiating ocular surface inflammation in dry eye. There are a number of shared features between the ocular surface and other mucosal surfaces, but distinct differences may exist in the type and distribution of mucins and microbiota. Mechanisms to regulate DC maturation and prevent tissue-damaging inflammation are shared among these sites. Epithelial and dendritic cells are key environmental sensors participating in initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses in response to a variety of environmental stresses.

  11. Characterizing the Propagation of Uterine Electrophysiological Signals Recorded with a Multi-Sensor Abdominal Array in Term Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona-Vargas, Diana; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Furdea, Adrian; Murphy, Pam; Lowery, Curtis L; Eswaran, Hari

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the number of segments that have contractile activity and determine the propagation speed from uterine electrophysiological signals recorded over the abdomen. The uterine magnetomyographic (MMG) signals were recorded with a 151 channel SARA (SQUID Array for Reproductive Assessment) system from 36 pregnant women between 37 and 40 weeks of gestational age. The MMG signals were scored and segments were classified based on presence of uterine contractile burst activity. The sensor space was then split into four quadrants and in each quadrant signal strength at each sample was calculated using center-of-gravity (COG). To this end, the cross-correlation analysis of the COG was performed to calculate the delay between pairwise combinations of quadrants. The relationship in propagation across the quadrants was quantified and propagation speeds were calculated from the delays. MMG recordings were successfully processed from 25 subjects and the average values of propagation speeds ranged from 1.3-9.5 cm/s, which was within the physiological range. The propagation was observed between both vertical and horizontal quadrants confirming multidirectional propagation. After the multiple pairwise test (99% CI), significant differences in speeds can be observed between certain vertical or horizontal combinations and the crossed pair combinations. The number of segments containing contractile activity in any given quadrant pair with a detectable delay was significantly higher in the lower abdominal pairwise combination as compared to all others. The quadrant-based approach using MMG signals provided us with high spatial-temporal information of the uterine contractile activity and will help us in the future to optimize abdominal electromyographic (EMG) recordings that are practical in a clinical setting.

  12. Automation of peanut drying with a sensor network including an in-shell kernel moisture sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut drying is an essential task in the processing and handling of peanuts. Peanuts leave the fields with kernel moisture contents > 20% wet basis and need to be dried to < 10.5% w.b. for grading and storage purposes. Current peanut drying processes utilize decision support software based on model...

  13. A low-power portable ECG sensor interface with dry electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofei, Pu; Lei, Wan; Hui, Zhang; Yajie, Qin; Zhiliang, Hong

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a low-power portable sensor interface dedicated to sensing and processing electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. Dry electrodes were employed in this ECG sensor, which eliminates the need of conductive gel and avoids complicated and mandatory skin preparation before electrode attachment. This ECG sensor system consists of two ICs, an analog front-end (AFE) and a successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) containing a relaxation oscillator. This proposed design was fabricated in a 0.18 μm 1P6M standard CMOS process. The AFE for extracting the biopotential signals is essential in this ECG sensor. In measurements, the AFE obtains a mid-band gain of 45 dB, a bandwidth from 0.6 to 160 Hz, and a total input referred noise of 2.8 μV rms while consuming 1 μW from the 1.8 V supply. The noise efficiency factor (NEF) of our design is 3.4. After conditioning, the amplified ECG signal is digitized by a 12-bit SAR ADC with 61.8 dB SNDR and 220 fJ/conversion-step. Finally, a complete ECG sensor interface with three dry copper electrodes is demonstrated in real-word setting, showing successful recordings of a capture ECG waveform.

  14. A low-power portable ECG sensor interface with dry electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Xiaofei; Wan Lei; Zhang Hui; Qin Yajie; Hong Zhiliang

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a low-power portable sensor interface dedicated to sensing and processing electrocardiogram (ECG) signals.Dry electrodes were employed in this ECG sensor,which eliminates the need of conductive gel and avoids complicated and mandatory skin preparation before electrode attachment.This ECG sensor system consists of two ICs,an analog front-end (AFE) and a successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) containing a relaxation oscillator.This proposed design was fabricated in a 0.18 μm 1P6M standard CMOS process.The AFE for extracting the biopotential signals is essential in this ECG sensor.In measurements,the AFE obtains a mid-band gain of 45 dB,a bandwidth from 0.6 to 160 Hz,and a total input referred noise of 2.8 μV rms while consuming 1 μW from the 1.8 V supply.The noise efficiency factor (NEF) of our design is 3.4.After conditioning,the amplified ECG signal is digitized by a 12-bit SAR ADC with 61.8 dB SNDR and 220 fJ/conversion-step.Finally,a complete ECG sensor interface with three dry copper electrodes is demonstrated in real-word setting,showing successful recordings of a capture ECG waveform.

  15. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor to Monitor Stress Kinetics in Drying Process of Commercial Latex Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lourenço, Ivo; Possetti, Gustavo R. C.; Muller, Marcia; Fabris, José L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report a study about the application of packaged fiber Bragg gratings used as strain sensors to monitor the stress kinetics during the drying process of commercial latex paints. Three stages of drying with distinct mechanical deformation and temporal behaviors were identified for the samples, with mechanical deformation from 15 μm to 21 μm in the longitudinal film dimension on time intervals from 370 to 600 minutes. Drying time tests based on human sense technique described by the Brazilian Technical Standards NBR 9558 were also done. The results obtained shows that human sense technique has a limited perception of the drying process and that the optical measurement system proposed can be used to characterize correctly the dry-through stage of paint. The influence of solvent (water) addition in the drying process was also investigated. The paint was diluted with four parts paint and one part water (80% paint), and one part paint and one part water (50% paint). It was observed that the increase of the water ratio mixed into the paint decreases both the mechanical deformation magnitude and the paint dry-through time. Contraction of 5.2 μm and 10.4 μm were measured for concentrations of 50% and 80% of paint in the mixture, respectively. For both diluted paints the dry-through time was approximately 170 minutes less than undiluted paint. The optical technique proposed in this work can contribute to the development of new standards to specify the drying time of paint coatings. PMID:22399906

  16. Dry Block Calibrator Using Heat Flux Sensors and an Adiabatic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, M.; Marin, S.; Schalles, M.; Krapf, G.; Fröhlich, T.

    2015-08-01

    The main problems of conventional dry block calibrators are axial temperature gradients and calibration results which are strongly influenced by the geometry and the thermal properties of the thermometers under test. To overcome these disadvantages, a new dry block calibrator with improved homogeneity of the inner temperature field was developed for temperatures in the range from room temperature up to . The inner part of the dry block calibrator is a cylindrical normalization block which is divided into three parts in the axial direction. Between these parts, heat flux sensors are placed to measure the heat flux in the axial direction inside the normalization block. Each part is attached to a separate tube-shaped heating zone of which the heating power can be controlled in a way that the axial heat flux measured by means of the heat flux sensors is zero. Additionally, an internal reference thermometer is used to control the absolute value of the temperature inside the normalization block. To minimize the radial heat flux, an adiabatic shield is constructed which is composed of a secondary heating zone that encloses the whole assembly. For rapid changes of the set point from high to low temperatures, the design contains an additional ventilation system to cool the normalization block. The present paper shows the operating principle as well as the results of the design process, in which numerical simulations based on the finite element method were used to evaluate and optimize the design of the dry block calibrator. The final optimized design can be used to build a prototype of the dry block calibrator.

  17. Study of the physicochemical properties of tulobuterol dry syrups using taste and smell sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yutaka; Shimazaki, Hironori; Murata, Isamu; Kimura, Masayuki; Kanamoto, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the taste and smell of Tulobuterol Dry Syrup (TB-DS) in its original form (formulation A) and generic form (formulations B and C) by means of gustatory sensation tests and taste and smell sensors. In addition, the physicochemical properties of the syrups in a solid state were compared. Evaluation of sweetness with a powdered sample revealed significant differences between formulation A and formulation B and between formulation B and formulation C. In contrast, the results of principal component analysis (PCA) with a taste sensor revealed differences in principal component 1 (PC 1) among formulations A, B, and C. Smell sensor measurement of powdered samples revealed differences in products in terms of only PC 1, but these results were not related to the results of gustatory sensation testing with a smell sensor. Measurement of particle size distribution and scanning electron microscopy revealed differences in the particle diameter and particle surface shape for each product. Formulation B had the strongest absorption in the near-infrared spectrum, followed by formulation A and then formulation C. Accordingly, differences in preparations were presumably caused by variations in manufacturing specifications, such as types of additives and their content and coating methods used. In other words, the characteristics of each product were revealed by evaluation of their physical properties, sensing of taste and smell, and human gustatory sensation tests.

  18. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  19. Design, Fabrication and Experimental Validation of a Novel Dry-Contact Sensor for Measuring Electroencephalography Signals without Skin Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Teng Lin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, novel dry-contact sensors for measuring electro-encephalography (EEG signals without any skin preparation are designed, fabricated by an injection molding manufacturing process and experimentally validated. Conventional wet electrodes are commonly used to measure EEG signals; they provide excellent EEG signals subject to proper skin preparation and conductive gel application. However, a series of skin preparation procedures for applying the wet electrodes is always required and usually creates trouble for users. To overcome these drawbacks, novel dry-contact EEG sensors were proposed for potential operation in the presence or absence of hair and without any skin preparation or conductive gel usage. The dry EEG sensors were designed to contact the scalp surface with 17 spring contact probes. Each probe was designed to include a probe head, plunger, spring, and barrel. The 17 probes were inserted into a flexible substrate using a one-time forming process via an established injection molding procedure. With these 17 spring contact probes, the flexible substrate allows for high geometric conformity between the sensor and the irregular scalp surface to maintain low skin-sensor interface impedance. Additionally, the flexible substrate also initiates a sensor buffer effect, eliminating pain when force is applied. The proposed dry EEG sensor was reliable in measuring EEG signals without any skin preparation or conductive gel usage, as compared with the conventional wet electrodes.

  20. Design, Fabrication, and Experimental Validation of Novel Flexible Silicon-Based Dry Sensors for Electroencephalography Signal Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Shao-Wei; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available electroencephalography (EEG) sensors, including conventional wet and dry sensors, can cause skin irritation and user discomfort owing to the foreign material. The EEG products, especially sensors, highly prioritize the comfort level during devices wear. To overcome these drawbacks for EEG sensors, this paper designs Societe Generale de Surveillance S [Formula: see text] A [Formula: see text] (SGS)-certified, silicon-based dry-contact EEG sensors (SBDSs) for EEG signal measurements. According to the SGS testing report, SBDSs extract does not irritate skin or induce noncytotoxic effects on L929 cells according to ISO10993-5. The SBDS is also lightweight, flexible, and nonirritating to the skin, as well as capable of easily fitting to scalps without any skin preparation or use of a conductive gel. For forehead and hairy sites, EEG signals can be measured reliably with the designed SBDSs. In particular, for EEG signal measurements at hairy sites, the acicular and flexible design of SBDS can push the hair aside to achieve satisfactory scalp contact, as well as maintain low skin-electrode interface impedance. Results of this paper demonstrate that the proposed sensors perform well in the EEG measurements and are feasible for practical applications.

  1. Sheath-Core Graphite/Silk Fiber Made by Dry-Meyer-Rod-Coating for Wearable Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingchao; Wang, Chunya; Wang, Qi; Jian, Muqiang; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-08-17

    Recent years have witnessed the explosive development of flexible strain sensors. Nanomaterials have been widely utilized to fabricate flexible strain sensors, because of their high flexibility and electrical conductivity. However, the fabrication processes for nanomaterials and the subsequent strain sensors are generally complicated and are manufactured at high cost. In this work, we developed a facile dry-Meyer-rod-coating process to fabricate sheath-core-structured single-fiber strain sensors using ultrafine graphite flakes as the sheath and silk fibers as the core by virtue of their flexibility, high production, and low cost. The fabricated strain sensor exhibits a high sensitivity with a gauge factor of 14.5 within wide workable strain range up to 15%, and outstanding stability (up to 3000 cycles). The single-fiber-based strain sensors could be attached to a human body to detect joint motions or easily integrated into the multidirectional strain sensor for monitoring multiaxial strain, showing great potential applications as wearable strain sensors.

  2. Wearable dry sensors with bluetooth connection for use in remote patient monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Cost reduction has become the primary theme of healthcare reforms globally. More providers are moving towards remote patient monitoring, which reduces the length of hospital stays and frees up their physicians and nurses for acute cases and helps them to tackle staff shortages. Physiological sensors are commonly used in many human specialties e.g. electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes, for monitoring heart signals, and electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes, for sensing the electrical activity of the brain, are the most well-known applications. Consequently there is a substantial unmet need for physiological sensors that can be simply and easily applied by the patient or primary carer, are comfortable to wear, can accurately sense parameters over long periods of time and can be connected to data recording systems using Bluetooth technology. We have developed a small, battery powered, user customizable portable monitor. This prototype is capable of recording three-axial body acceleration, skin temperature, and has up to four bio analogical front ends. Moreover, it is also able of continuous wireless transmission to any Bluetooth device including a PDA or a cellular phone. The bio-front end can use long-lasting dry electrodes or novel textile electrodes that can be embedded in clothes. The device can be powered by a standard mobile phone which has a Ni-MH 3.6 V battery, to sustain more than seven days continuous functioning when using the Bluetooth Sniff mode to reduce TX power. In this paper, we present some of the evaluation experiments of our wearable personal monitor device with a focus on ECG applications.

  3. Optical crop sensor for variable-rate nitrogen fertilization in corn: i - plant nutrition and dry matter production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jardes Bragagnolo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Variable-rate nitrogen fertilization (VRF based on optical spectrometry sensors of crops is a technological innovation capable of improving the nutrient use efficiency (NUE and mitigate environmental impacts. However, studies addressing fertilization based on crop sensors are still scarce in Brazilian agriculture. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of an optical crop sensor to assess the nutritional status of corn and compare VRF with the standard strategy of traditional single-rate N fertilization (TSF used by farmers. With this purpose, three experiments were conducted at different locations in Southern Brazil, in the growing seasons 2008/09 and 2010/11. The following crop properties were evaluated: above-ground dry matter production, nitrogen (N content, N uptake, relative chlorophyll content (SPAD reading, and a vegetation index measured by the optical sensor N-Sensor® ALS. The plants were evaluated in the stages V4, V6, V8, V10, V12 and at corn flowering. The experiments had a completely randomized design at three different sites that were analyzed separately. The vegetation index was directly related to above-ground dry matter production (R² = 0.91; p<0.0001, total N uptake (R² = 0.87; p<0.0001 and SPAD reading (R² = 0.63; p<0.0001 and inversely related to plant N content (R² = 0.53; p<0.0001. The efficiency of VRF for plant nutrition was influenced by the specific climatic conditions of each site. Therefore, the efficiency of the VRF strategy was similar to that of the standard farmer fertilizer strategy at sites 1 and 2. However, at site 3 where the climatic conditions were favorable for corn growth, the use of optical sensors to determine VRF resulted in a 12 % increase in N plant uptake in relation to the standard fertilization, indicating the potential of this technology to improve NUE.

  4. Dry Electrodes for ECG and Pulse Transit Time for Blood Pressure: A Wearable Sensor and Smartphone Communication Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamkumar, Prashanth

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) have been a major cause for deaths in both men and women in United States. Cerebrovascular Diseases like Strokes are known to have origins in CVDs as well. Moreover, nearly 18 Million Americans have a history of myocardial infarction and are currently undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. Consequently, CVDs are the highest costing disease groups and cost more than all types of cancer combined. However, significant cost reduction is possible through the effective use of the vast advances in embedded and pervasive electronic devices for healthcare. These devices can automate and move a significant portion of disease management to the patient's home through cyber connectivity, a concept known as point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and healthcare services. POC can minimize hospital visits and potentially avoid admission altogether with prognostic tools that give advanced notice of any abnormalities or chronic illnesses so that the treatment can be planned in advance. The POC concept requires continuous remote health monitoring. Therefore, the various sensors needed for comprehensive monitoring need to be worn daily and throughout the day. Moreover, true "roaming" capability is necessary so that it does not restrict the user's travel or his/her quotidian activities. Two biomedical signals namely, Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Blood Pressure are important diagnostic tests in assessing the cardiac health of a person. To that end, the research presented in this thesis: First , describes the development of a remote monitoring solution based on Bluetooth(TM), smartphones and cyber infrastructure for cardiac care called e-nanoflex. Second, Sensors for ECG that are compatible with everyday life style namely, (a) dry, gel-less vertically aligned gold nanowire electrodes, (b) dry textile-based conductive sensor electrodes to address the need for this technology to monitor cardiovascular diseases in women are tested with e-nanoflex and discussed. Third, non

  5. Cooperative dry-electrode sensors for multi-lead biopotential and bioimpedance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, M; Proença, M; Braun, F; Meier, C; Solà, J; Ferrario, D; Grossenbacher, O; Porchet, J-A; Chételat, O

    2015-04-01

    Cooperative sensors is a novel measurement architecture that allows the acquiring of biopotential signals on patients in a comfortable and easy-to-integrate manner. The novel sensors are defined as cooperative in the sense that at least two of them work in concert to measure a target physiological signal, such as a multi-lead electrocardiogram or a thoracic bioimpedance.This paper starts by analysing the state-of-the-art methods to simultaneously measure biopotential and bioimpedance signals, and justifies why currently (1) passive electrodes require the use of shielded or double-shielded cables, and (2) active electrodes require the use of multi-wired cabled technologies, when aiming at high quality physiological measurements.In order to overcome the limitations of the state-of-the-art, a new method for biopotential and bioimpedance measurement using the cooperative sensor is then presented. The novel architecture allows the acquisition of the aforementioned biosignals without the need of shielded or multi-wire cables by splitting the electronics into separate electronic sensors comprising each of two electrodes, one for voltage measurement and one for current injection. The sensors are directly in contact with the skin and connected together by only one unshielded wire. This new configuration requires one power supply per sensor and all sensors need to be synchronized together to allow them to work in concert.After presenting the working principle of the cooperative sensor architecture, this paper reports first experimental results on the use of the technology when applied to measuring multi-lead ECG signals on patients. Measurements performed on a healthy patient demonstrate the feasibility of using this novel cooperative sensor architecture to measure biopotential signals and compliance with common mode rejection specification accordingly to international standard (IEC 60601-2-47) has also been assessed.By reducing the need of using complex wiring setups, and

  6. Bristle-sensors--low-cost flexible passive dry EEG electrodes for neurofeedback and BCI applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozea, Cristian; Voinescu, Catalin D; Fazli, Siamac

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new, low-cost dry electrode for EEG that is made of flexible metal-coated polymer bristles. We examine various standard EEG paradigms, such as capturing occipital alpha rhythms, testing for event-related potentials in an auditory oddball paradigm and performing a sensory motor rhythm-based event-related (de-) synchronization paradigm to validate the performance of the novel electrodes in terms of signal quality. Our findings suggest that the dry electrodes that we developed result in high-quality EEG recordings and are thus suitable for a wide range of EEG studies and BCI applications. Furthermore, due to the flexibility of the novel electrodes, greater comfort is achieved in some subjects, this being essential for long-term use.

  7. Gaming control using a wearable and wireless EEG-based brain-computer interface device with novel dry foam-based sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Lun-De

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A brain-computer interface (BCI is a communication system that can help users interact with the outside environment by translating brain signals into machine commands. The use of electroencephalographic (EEG signals has become the most common approach for a BCI because of their usability and strong reliability. Many EEG-based BCI devices have been developed with traditional wet- or micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS-type EEG sensors. However, those traditional sensors have uncomfortable disadvantage and require conductive gel and skin preparation on the part of the user. Therefore, acquiring the EEG signals in a comfortable and convenient manner is an important factor that should be incorporated into a novel BCI device. In the present study, a wearable, wireless and portable EEG-based BCI device with dry foam-based EEG sensors was developed and was demonstrated using a gaming control application. The dry EEG sensors operated without conductive gel; however, they were able to provide good conductivity and were able to acquire EEG signals effectively by adapting to irregular skin surfaces and by maintaining proper skin-sensor impedance on the forehead site. We have also demonstrated a real-time cognitive stage detection application of gaming control using the proposed portable device. The results of the present study indicate that using this portable EEG-based BCI device to conveniently and effectively control the outside world provides an approach for researching rehabilitation engineering.

  8. Gaming control using a wearable and wireless EEG-based brain-computer interface device with novel dry foam-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lun-De; Chen, Chi-Yu; Wang, I-Jan; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Li, Shih-Yu; Chen, Bo-Wei; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2012-01-28

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that can help users interact with the outside environment by translating brain signals into machine commands. The use of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has become the most common approach for a BCI because of their usability and strong reliability. Many EEG-based BCI devices have been developed with traditional wet- or micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-type EEG sensors. However, those traditional sensors have uncomfortable disadvantage and require conductive gel and skin preparation on the part of the user. Therefore, acquiring the EEG signals in a comfortable and convenient manner is an important factor that should be incorporated into a novel BCI device. In the present study, a wearable, wireless and portable EEG-based BCI device with dry foam-based EEG sensors was developed and was demonstrated using a gaming control application. The dry EEG sensors operated without conductive gel; however, they were able to provide good conductivity and were able to acquire EEG signals effectively by adapting to irregular skin surfaces and by maintaining proper skin-sensor impedance on the forehead site. We have also demonstrated a real-time cognitive stage detection application of gaming control using the proposed portable device. The results of the present study indicate that using this portable EEG-based BCI device to conveniently and effectively control the outside world provides an approach for researching rehabilitation engineering.

  9. Visual electrophysiology in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Brecelj

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrophysiological assessment of vision in children helps to recognise abnormal development of the visual system when it is still susceptible to medication and eventual correction. Visual electrophysiology provides information about the function of the retina (retinal pigment epithelium, cone and rod receptors, bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells, optic nerve, chiasmal and postchiasmal visual pathway, and visual cortex.Methods: Electroretinograms (ERG and visual evoked potentials (VEP are recorded non-invasively; in infants are recorded simultaneously ERG with skin electrodes, while in older children separately ERG with HK loop electrode in accordance with ISCEV (International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision recommendations.Results: Clinical and electrophysiological changes in children with nystagmus, Leber’s congenital amaurosis, achromatopsia, congenital stationary night blindness, progressive retinal dystrophies, optic nerve hypoplasia, albinism, achiasmia, optic neuritis and visual pathway tumours are presented.Conclusions: Electrophysiological tests can help to indicate the nature and the location of dysfunction in unclear ophthalmological and/or neurological cases.

  10. Electrophysiological Endophenotypes for Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Emily M; Bachman, Peter; Glahn, David C; Bearden, Carrie E

    2016-01-01

    Endophenotypes are quantitative, heritable traits that may help to elucidate the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying complex disease syndromes, such as schizophrenia. They can be assessed at numerous levels of analysis; here, we review electrophysiological endophenotypes that have shown promise in helping us understand schizophrenia from a more mechanistic point of view. For each endophenotype, we describe typical experimental procedures, reliability, heritability, and reported gene and neurobiological associations. We discuss recent findings regarding the genetic architecture of specific electrophysiological endophenotypes, as well as converging evidence from EEG studies implicating disrupted balance of glutamatergic signaling and GABAergic inhibition in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We conclude that refining the measurement of electrophysiological endophenotypes, expanding genetic association studies, and integrating data sets are important next steps for understanding the mechanisms that connect identified genetic risk loci for schizophrenia to the disease phenotype.

  11. Development and Experimental Validation of a Dry Non-Invasive Multi-Channel Mouse Scalp EEG Sensor through Visual Evoked Potential Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Yeon, Chanmi; Kim, Kiseon

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a dry non-invasive multi-channel sensor for measuring brainwaves on the scalps of mice. The research on laboratory animals provide insights to various practical applications involving human beings and other animals such as working animals, pets, and livestock. An experimental framework targeting the laboratory animals has the potential to lead to successful translational research when it closely resembles the environment of real applications. To serve scalp electroencephalography (EEG) research environments for the laboratory mice, the dry non-invasive scalp EEG sensor with sixteen electrodes is proposed to measure brainwaves over the entire brain area without any surgical procedures. We validated the proposed sensor system with visual evoked potential (VEP) experiments elicited by flash stimulations. The VEP responses obtained from experiments are compared with the existing literature, and analyzed in temporal and spatial perspectives. We further interpret the experimental results using time-frequency distribution (TFD) and distance measurements. The developed sensor guarantees stable operations for in vivo experiments in a non-invasive manner without surgical procedures, therefore exhibiting a high potential to strengthen longitudinal experimental studies and reliable translational research exploiting non-invasive paradigms. PMID:28208777

  12. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  13. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  14. Hearing Aid Fitting & Electrophysiologic Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Jalaei

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of deaf individual is one of the important subjects that has attracted attention of many researchers during past centuries. Different opinions have been established in this direction. Electrophysiologic tests were established and developed parallel to developments in rehabilitation. Therefore, opinion of using electrophysiologic test for evaluation and fitting of hearing aid became gradually popular. Ultimately, the electrophysiologic tests are used in evaluation and fitting of hearing aid in two ways: 1-Direct way 2- Indirect way "nIn direct way aided ABR is obtained and special attention is paid to wave V. This technique has many difficulties. Inindirect way, electrophysiologic tests such, ECochG, OAE and ABR, AMLR, ALR and P300 and other objective tests are used, especially in infants and neonates for evaluating the state of hearing. Researches are continuing in this field. It is probable to have aided electrophysiologic responses with speech stimuli in near future.

  15. Electrophysiological Cardiac Modeling: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological modeling in conjunction with experimental and clinical findings has contributed to better understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in various species. As our knowledge on underlying electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes has improved over time, mathematical models of the cardiac electrophysiology have become more realistic and detailed. These models have provided a testbed for various hypotheses and conditions that may not be easy to implement experimentally. In addition to the limitations in experimentally validating various scenarios implemented by the models, one of the major obstacles for these models is computational complexity. However, the ever-increasing computational power of supercomputers facilitates the clinical application of cardiac electrophysiological models. The potential clinical applications include testing and predicting effects of pharmaceutical agents and performing patient-specific ablation and defibrillation. A review of studies involving these models and their major findings are provided.

  16. Electrophysiological Evaluation in Lumbosacral Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Simindokht Hosseini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy was evaluated.Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 97 consecutive patients with the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Complete neurological examinations and standard electrophysiological evaluation was performed on the patients.Results: Patients under study had the mean age of 46.4 ± 13.1 years (mean ± standard deviation. There were positive MRI findings in 64% of the patients. In 43% L5 root and in 40% S1 root was involved. Abnormal electrophysiological findings were recorded in 82% of the patients. In patients with pretibial muscle weakness, there were significant abnormalities recorded in compound motor action potential (CMAP amplitude of the common peroneal nerve. There was significantly increased frequency of electrophysiological abnormalities in the presence of chronic clinical symptoms (P = 0.001.Conclusion: The 82% positive findings in electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of lumbosacral radiculopathy make it an efficacious tool in the evaluation of the patients suffering from lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  17. Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye > Facts About Dry Eye Facts About Dry Eye This information was developed by the National Eye ... the best person to answer specific questions. Dry Eye Defined What is dry eye? Dry eye occurs ...

  18. A dry 3He-4He dilution refrigerator for a transition edge sensor microcalorimeter spectrometer system mounted on a transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehata, K.; Hara, T.; Ito, T.; Yamanaka, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2014-05-01

    A dry 3He-4He dilution refrigerator (DR) was developed for a superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter installed on a transmission electron microscope. This system could be used for energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) with an excellent energy resolution. A Gifford-McMahon (GM)-type mechanical cryocooler was used as a pre-cooler for the DR to ensure liquid helium was not consumed during operation. To reduce sound and vibrations generated by the GM cryocooler, the DR was separated from the GM cryocooler in a split system. The TES microcalorimeter was glued onto the top of a copper rod referred to as the snout, which was attached to the mixing chamber of the DR. The cooling power in the mixing chamber was 30 μW at 105 mK. The lowest temperature in the mixing chamber was 74 mK, and that at top of the snout was 86 mK. An energy resolution of 7.6 eV full width at half maximum for Si Kα X-rays of 1.74 keV was obtained by TES microcalorimeter EDS performed with the transmission electron microscope.

  19. Electrophysiology in visually impaired children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, Maria Michielde van

    2006-01-01

    Inherited retinal disorders and posterior visual pathway abnormalities are important causes of visual impairment in children. Visual electrophysiology often is indispensable in diagnosing these conditions. This thesis shows the wide range of use of pediatric electro-ophthalmology, and demonstrates i

  20. Electrophysiological findings in Rasmussen's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Kızıltan, Meral E; Coşkun, Tülin; Delil, Şakir; Yeni, Naz; Özkara, Çiğdem

    2016-03-01

    Rasmussen syndrome is a rare, inflammatory and probably autoimmune disease presenting with epilepsia partialis continua which is generally in the form of myoclonic jerks and involves the upper extremities with or without head involvement. We sought to demonstrate the electrophysiological features in patients with Rasmussen syndrome. We performed continuous electrophysiological recordings of involuntary movement, as well as recordings of startle responses and long latency reflex in three patients with a diagnosis of Rasmussen syndrome. Positive and negative myoclonus were recorded. Startle responses were found to be suppressed. However, long latency reflexes were high in amplitude and one patient even had a C reflex. Stimulus-sensitive positive and negative cortical myoclonus are typical in epilepsia partialis continua of Rasmussen syndrome and degeneration of brainstem and reticulospinal pathways may develop in Rasmussen syndrome.

  1. Electrophysiological measures of familiarity memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklinger, Axel

    2006-10-01

    Event-related potentials are a valuable tool for the study of human memory function. This selective review provides a brief introduction in models of recognition memory and then describes how ERPs can be used to investigate familiarity memory, an acontextual form of remembering that can be distinguished from the recollection of detailed information of prior events. ERP studies on the mid-frontal old/new effect, the putative electrophysiological correlate of familiarity memory are reviewed. It will be illustrated how familiarity memory is reflected in this effect, how it can electrophysiologically be dissociated from other forms of memory and which brain systems mediate this form of remembering. Recent studies will be reviewed that illustrate that familiarity is not only restricted to single items but can also support the retrieval of associative information.

  2. The electrophysiology of spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lipin; Chen, Tao; Wu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs) are a group of autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases, involving the cerebellum and the brainstem. Genetic testing is the most important method of diagnosis. Nowadays, nearly 40 types of SCAs have been identified by genetic analysis. Peripheral nerve impairment is common in SCAs: electrophysiological examination of SCA1, SCA2 and SCA3 usually shows sensorimotor and sensory neuropathy, while pure motor neuropathy is more rare, being seen only in SCA2. The abnormal VEP of SCA1, SCA2 and SCA3 include prolonged P100 latencies and reduced P100 amplitudes. Abnormal BAEP involves prolonged interpeak latency of I-III and III-V. Abnormal SEP usually show absent P40 wave and prolonged P40 latency. The abnormal MEP usually shows prolonged central motor conduction time or absent responses. SCA2 is not associated with gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysmetric saccades. SCA3 usually presents as saccadic intrusions and oscillations. Whether peripheral nerves are involved in SCA6 is uncertain; although abnormal electrophysiology has been reported, neuropathological examinations have not found degenerative changes or reductions in the number of neurons in the anterior horns and/or dorsal root ganglia in SCA6. It is therefore hypothesized that this might be a displayed feature of axonopathy. The clinical presentation of most cases of SCA6 includes spontaneous and positional downbeat nystagmus, and perverted head-shaking nystagmus. Opinion about peripheral nerve involvement in SCA7 varies between authors. Losing P100 is a predominant feature of SCA7, while III and IV/V wave absence is common in SCA17. Electrophysiological study of other types is currently limited, requiring large-scale studies for confirmation. Similar and overlapping clinical features make it difficult to differentiate each type. Electrophysiological testing can therefore play an important role in helping to identify the common phenotypes of SCAs, and determine the extent

  3. Olfaction in dragonflies: electrophysiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebora, Manuela; Salerno, Gianandrea; Piersanti, Silvana; Dell'otto, Alessandro; Gaino, Elda

    2012-02-01

    The problem of olfaction in Paleoptera (Odonata, Ephemeroptera) cannot be considered fully elucidated until now. These insects have been traditionally considered anosmic, because their brain lacks glomerular antennal lobes, typically involved in Neoptera odor perception. In order to understand if the presumed coeloconic olfactory receptors described on the antennal flagellum of adult Odonata are really functioning, we performed an electrophysiological investigation with electroantennogram (EAG) and single cell recordings (SCR), using Libellula depressa L. (Odonata, Libellulidae) as a model species. Odors representing different chemical classes such as (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (acetate ester), (E)-2-hexenal, octanal (aldehydes), (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol (alcohol), propionic acid, butyric acid (carboxylic acids), and 1,4-diaminobutane (amine) were tested. Most of the tested chemicals elicited depolarizing EAG responses in both male and female antennae; SCR show unambiguously for the first time the presence of olfactory neurons in the antennae of L. depressa and strongly support the olfactory function of the coeloconic sensilla located on the antennal flagellum of this species. Electrophysiological activity may not necessarily indicate behavioral activity, and the biological role of olfactory responses in Odonata must be determined in behavioral bioassays. This study represents a starting point for further behavioral, electrophysiological, neuroanatomical and molecular investigation on Odonata olfaction, a research field particularly interesting owing to the basal position of Paleoptera, also for tracing evolutionary trends in insect olfaction.

  4. Electrophysiology of pumpkin seeds: Memristors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Tuckett, Clayton; Greeman, Esther A; Markin, Vladislav S

    2016-01-01

    Leon Chua, the discoverer of a memristor, theoretically predicted that voltage gated ion channels can be memristors. We recently found memristors in different plants such as the Venus flytrap, Mimosa pudica, Aloe vera, apple fruits, and in potato tubers. There are no publications in literature about the existence of memristors in seeds. The goal of this work was to discover if pumpkin seeds might have memristors. We selected Cucurbita pepo L., cv. Cinderella, Cucurbita maxima L. cv Warty Goblin, and Cucurbita maxima L., cv. Jarrahdale seeds for this analysis. In these seeds, we found the presence of resistors with memory. The analysis was based on cyclic voltammetry where a memristor should manifest itself as a nonlinear two-terminal electrical element, which exhibits a pinched hysteresis loop on a current-voltage plane for any bipolar cyclic voltage input signal. Dry dormant pumpkin seeds have very high electrical resistance without memristive properties. The electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangular periodic waves induces electrical responses in imbibed pumpkin seeds with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K(+) channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in pumpkin seeds. NPPB (5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) inhibits the memristive properties of imbibed pumpkin seeds. The discovery of memristors in pumpkin seeds creates a new direction in the understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in seeds.

  5. Antivenom Evaluation by Electrophysiological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restano-Cassulini, Rita; Garcia, Walter; Paniagua-Solís, Jorge F.; Possani, Lourival D.

    2017-01-01

    Scorpion stings on humans are medically relevant because they may contain toxins that specifically target ion channels. During antivenom production, pharmaceutical companies must use a large number of experimental animals to ensure the antivenom’s efficacy according to pharmacopeia methods. Here we present an electrophysiological alternative for the evaluation of horse antivenoms produced against two species of Moroccan scorpions: Buthus mardochei and Androctonus mauretanicus. Human sodium and potassium channels and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors were analyzed by standard patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that the antivenom is capable of reversing ion current disruption caused by the venom application. We propose the use of this in vitro technique for antivenom evaluation as an alternative to using a large number of live animals. PMID:28241514

  6. Antivenom Evaluation by Electrophysiological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Restano-Cassulini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion stings on humans are medically relevant because they may contain toxins that specifically target ion channels. During antivenom production, pharmaceutical companies must use a large number of experimental animals to ensure the antivenom’s efficacy according to pharmacopeia methods. Here we present an electrophysiological alternative for the evaluation of horse antivenoms produced against two species of Moroccan scorpions: Buthus mardochei and Androctonus mauretanicus. Human sodium and potassium channels and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors were analyzed by standard patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that the antivenom is capable of reversing ion current disruption caused by the venom application. We propose the use of this in vitro technique for antivenom evaluation as an alternative to using a large number of live animals.

  7. Working memory of emotional stimuli: Electrophysiological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Dominique; García-Rubio, María J; González, E Kirstin; Tapia, Manuel; López-Martín, Sara; Román, Francisco J; Capilla, Almudena; Martínez, Kenia; Colom, Roberto; Carretié, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Memorizing emotional stimuli in a preferential way seems to be one of the adaptive strategies brought on by evolution for supporting survival. However, there is a lack of electrophysiological evidence on this bias in working memory. The present study analyzed the influence of emotion on the updating component of working memory. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices were measured from a 3-back task using negative, neutral, and positive faces. Electrophysiological data evidenced an emotional influence on the working memory sensitive P3 component, which presented larger amplitudes for negative matching faces compared to neutral ones. This effect originated in the superior parietal cortex, previously reported to be involved in N-back tasks. Additionally, P3 results showed a correlation with reaction times, where higher amplitudes were associated with faster responses for negative matching faces. These findings indicate that electrophysiological measures seem to be very suitable indices of the emotional influence on working memory.

  8. Electrophysiologic Study of Exhaustive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Babaee Bigi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exhaustive exercise is well known to pose a variety ofhealth hazards, such as sudden cardiac death reported in ultra-marathon runners.Depressed parasympathetic tone is associated with increased risk of suddencardiac death, thus parasympathetic withdrawal in post-exercise phase may be ahigh risk period for sudden death. To date, the effect on cardiacelectrophysiology after exhaustive strenuous exercise has not been described.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of severe exhaustive exerciseon cardiac electrophysiology.Methods: The subjects in ranger training were invited to participatein this prospective study. The parameters measured consisted of PR interval, QRSduration, and macro T wave alternans as well as corrected QT, QTc dispersion,Tpeak –Tend interval and Tpeak –Tend dispersion.Results: The study group consisted of 40 consecutive male rangers whocompleted training and the control group (22 healthy age and height matched malesubjects. In regard to electrocardiographic criteria, no differences were foundbetween rangers before and after training program. In respect of therepolarization markers, there were no significant differences between therangers before and after training program.

  9. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart

    OpenAIRE

    Popović Dejana; Brkić Predrag; Nešić Dejan; Stojiljković Stanimir; Šćepanović Ljiljana; Ostojić Miodrag Č.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The athletic heart syndrome is characterized by morphological, functional and electrophysiological alterations as an adaptive response to vigorous physical activity. Athletes heart is predominantly associated with a programmed, intensive training. But as there are different kinds of physical activities, the degree of these changes is highly variable. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart. The response of the body to vigorous physical activity is a multiorga...

  10. Electrophysiological assessment of water stress in fruit-bearing woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Rojas, Liliana; Tapia, Franco; Gurovich, Luis A

    2014-06-15

    Development and evaluation of a real-time plant water stress sensor, based on the electrophysiological behavior of fruit-bearing woody plants is presented. Continuous electric potentials are measured in tree trunks for different irrigation schedules, inducing variable water stress conditions; results are discussed in relation to soil water content and micro-atmospheric evaporative demand, determined continuously by conventional sensors, correlating this information with tree electric potential measurements. Systematic and differentiable patterns of electric potentials for water-stressed and no-stressed trees in 2 fruit species are presented. Early detection and recovery dynamics of water stress conditions can also be monitored with these electrophysiology sensors, which enable continuous and non-destructive measurements for efficient irrigation scheduling throughout the year. The experiment is developed under controlled conditions, in Faraday cages located at a greenhouse area, both in Persea americana and Prunus domestica plants. Soil moisture evolution is controlled using capacitance sensors and solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity and direction are continuously registered with accurate weather sensors, in a micro-agrometeorological automatic station located at the experimental site. The electrophysiological sensor has two stainless steel electrodes (measuring/reference), inserted on the stem; a high precision Keithley 2701 digital multimeter is used to measure plant electrical signals; an algorithm written in MatLab(®), allows correlating the signal to environmental variables. An electric cyclic behavior is observed (circadian cycle) in the experimental plants. For non-irrigated plants, the electrical signal shows a time positive slope and then, a negative slope after restarting irrigation throughout a rather extended recovery process, before reaching a stable electrical signal with zero slope. Well-watered plants presented a

  11. Spatially Modeling the Impact of Terrain on Wind Speed and Dry Particle Deposition Across Lake Perris in Southern California to Determine In Situ Sensor Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    While developed countries have implemented engineering techniques and sanitation technologies to keep water resources clean from runoff and ground contamination, air pollution and its contribution of harmful contaminants to our water resources has yet to be fully understood and managed. Due to the large spatial and temporal extent and subsequent computational intensity required to understand atmospheric deposition as a pollutant source, a geographic information system (GIS) was utilized. This project developed a multi-step workflow to better define the placement of in situ sensors on Lake Perris in Southern California. Utilizing a variety of technologies including ArcGIS 10.1 with 3D and Spatial Analyst extensions and WindNinja, the impact of terrain on wind speed and direction was simulated and the spatial distribution of contaminant deposition across Lake Perris was calculated as flux. Specifically, the flux of particulate matter (PM10) at the air - water interface of a lake surface was quantified by season for the year of 2009. Integrated Surface Hourly (ISH) wind speed and direction data and ground station air quality measurements from the California Air Resources Board were processed and integrated for use within ModelBuilder. Results indicate that surface areas nearest Alessandro Island and the dam of Lake Perris should be avoided when placing in situ sensors. Furthermore, the location of sensor placement is dependent on seasonal fluctuations of PM10 which can be modeled using the techniques used in this study.

  12. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn;

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...... samples from sides at 60% RH and 22 °C took place from 4 to 56 days after casting. At the end of the drying period the measured RH was about 4% lower than the estimated RH at 1/5th depth from the exposed surface for both concretes. In the middle of the samples, the measured RH of concretes 1 and 2 were 2...

  13. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...... samples from sides at 60% RH and 22 °C took place from 4 to 56 days after casting. At the end of the drying period the measured RH was about 4% lower than the estimated RH at 1/5th depth from the exposed surface for both concretes. In the middle of the samples, the measured RH of concretes 1 and 2 were 2...

  14. Historical perspectives on interventional electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2003-10-01

    The history of interventional electrophysiology is long and fascinating. In the beginning, there is not simply the anatomy and physiology of the heart, but also analysis of the pulse, which indicates the activity of the heart. The analysis of the (peripheral) pulse as a mechanical expression of heart activity goes back several millennia. In China, in 280 B.C., Wang Chu Ho wrote ten books about the pulse. The Greeks called the pulse "sphygmos", and the sphygmology thus deals with a theory of this natural occurrence. In Roman times, Galen interpreted the various types of pulse according to the widespread presumption of the time, that each organ in every disease has its own form of pulse. The basic tool for arrhythmia diagnosis became the electrocardiography introduced by Willem Einthoven who obtained the first human electrogram 1902 in Leiden, The Netherlands. The growing clinical importance of electrical cardiac stimulation has been recognized and renewed as Zoll (1911-1999) in 1952 reported a successful resuscitation in cardiac standstill by external stimulation. Meanwhile all over the world, millions of patients with cardiac arrhythmias have been treated with pacemakers in the last 45 years. The concept of a fully automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system (ICD) for recognition and treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias was first suggested in 1970. The first implantation of the device in a human being was performed in February 1980. Further developments concern atrial and atrioventricular defibrillators, radiofrequency ablation, laser therapy and advanced antiarrhythmic surgery, new antiarrhythmic drugs and sophisticated devices for preventive pacing. The advances in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic application of pharmacologic and electrical tools as well as alternative methods will continue as rapidly as before in order to give us further significant aid in taking care of the patient.

  15. Dry Etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-01-01

    Production of large-area flat panel displays (FPDs) involves several pattern transfer and device fabrication steps that can be performed with dry etching technologies. Even though the dry etching using capacitively coupled plasma is generally used to maintain high etch uniformity, due to the need...... for the higher processing rates in FPDs, high-density plasma processing tools that can handle larger-area substrate uniformly are more intensively studied especially for the dry etching of polysilicon thin films. In the case of FPD processing, the current substrate size ranges from 730 × 920 mm (fourth...... generation) to 2,200 × 2,500 mm (eighth generation), and the substrate size is expected to increase further within a few years. This chapter aims to present relevant details on dry etching including the phenomenology, materials to be etched with the different recipes, plasma sources fulfilling the dry...

  16. 气流干燥工序加工强度对烤烟烟叶感官质量的影响%Effect of Pneumatic Drying Process Intensity on Sensor Quality of Flue-cured Tobacco Leaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔学义; 姚光明; 王兵; 申玉军; 刘晓萍

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effect of pneumatic drying process on sensor quality of flue-cured tobacco leaf and find the suitable processing conditions,the flue-cured tobacco leaf from major domestic and foreign production areas were treated by pneumatic drying process with different processing intensity and the sensor quality of tobacco leaf was evaluated and compared. The results showed almost 96% flue-cured tobacco samples which were treated by pneumatic drying process with the first processing intensity remained the same aromatic style; With an increase of the pneumatic drying process intensity, the proportion of flue-cured tobacco sample whose aromatic style changed increased gradually. The proportion with aroma quality,volume of ftroma,offensive taste, smoke concentration,smoke smooth and irritation improved respectively first increased and then decreased gradually,including the highest ones under the second processing intensity as follows: 49%,25%,72%,18%,62% and 23 % ; The proportion of flue-cured tobacco leaf of which physiological strength improved increased gradually,and the highest proportion was 9% ;The proportion of flue-cured tobacco leaf of which dryness and cleanness improved decreased gradually, and the highest proportion was 13% and 35%; The proportion of flue-cured tobacco leaf whose aroma characteristics,smoke characteristics,and taste characteristics deteriorated increased gradually. In summary,under the range of first to second processing intensity (air temperature 200 — 220 ℃), the proportion of flue-cured tobacco leaf whose sensor quality improved and remained was significantly higher than that whose sensor quality deteriorated. The pneumatic drying process setting between the first and second processing intensity is beneficial to maintain and improve the sensor quality of flue-cured tobacco leaf.%为明确气流干燥工序加工强度对烤烟烟叶感官质量的作用特点,寻求气流干燥工序加工烤烟烟叶的适宜条件,以国

  17. century drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  18. Electrophysiological evaluation of psychogenic movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Nitish L; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMD) include a group of neurological symptoms which cannot be explained by any organic syndrome. The diagnosis of PMD is challenging for both neurologist and psychiatrist. Electrophysiological examination is a useful tool to evaluate and support a diagnosis PMD. It includes a set of tests which are chosen appropriate to the clinical setting that provides objective criteria for the diagnosis of PMD. The various tests available include accelerometry, surface electromyography, electroencephalography, jerk locked back averaging and pre-movement potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) etc. Electrophysiologically psychogenic tremors display features of variability, entrainability, coactivation, distractibility and increase in the amplitude and frequency on mass loading. Movement related cortical potentials such as Bereitschaftspotential is seen in psychogenic myoclonus. Presence of triphasic contraction of muscles and absence of co-contraction suggests psychogenic myoclonus. Latency of C-reflex is longer in psychogenic myoclonus as compared to organic myoclonus. The role of TMS to differentiate psychogenic from organic dystonia is still not clear. In conclusion, electrophysiological tests are most useful for tremor, followed by jerks and least for dystonia. In patients with long-standing PMD or those with mixed pathology, electrophysiological tests may not be very useful.

  19. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  20. Design of a new sensor for determination of the effects of tractor field usage in southern Spain: soil sinkage and alterations in the cone index and dry bulk density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Diego L; Gil, Jesús; Agüera, Juan

    2012-10-08

    Variations in sinkage and cone index are of crucial importance when planning fieldwork, and for determining the trafficability of farm machinery. Many studies have highlighted the link between higher values of these parameters and dramatic decreases in crop yield. Variations in the dry bulk density and cone index of clayey soil in Southern Spain were measured following each of five successive passes over the same land with the three types of tractor most widely used in the area (tracked, two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive). In addition, sinkage (rut depth) of the running gear was measured using a laser microrelief profile meter. This device, which integrates three sensors, was specifically designed for these experiments, as was an electrical penetrometer to determine the cone index, and both instruments proved reliable and accurate in the field. The main goal of this study was to design, manufacture and test these new devices. The first pass caused most soil alteration when compared to successive passes for all types of tractor tested and soil conditions prevailing during the tests. (Heavier) four-wheel drive tractors were found to cause greater soil damage (sinkage, cone index and dry bulk density) than two-wheel drive and track tractors. There was no statistically significant difference between the two latter types. The greatest alterations were recorded in the top 10 cm of the soil. The results show that soil compaction should be avoided as much as possible. This can be achieved by ensuring that tractors always travel along the same tracks, especially in the wet season. At present these aspects are not considered by farmers in this area.

  1. Design of a New Sensor for Determination of the Effects of Tractor Field Usage in Southern Spain: Soil Sinkage and Alterations in the Cone Index and Dry Bulk Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego L. Valera

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in sinkage and cone index are of crucial importance when planning fieldwork, and for determining the trafficability of farm machinery. Many studies have highlighted the link between higher values of these parameters and dramatic decreases in crop yield. Variations in the dry bulk density and cone index of clayey soil in Southern Spain were measured following each of five successive passes over the same land with the three types of tractor most widely used in the area (tracked, two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive. In addition, sinkage (rut depth of the running gear was measured using a laser microrelief profile meter. This device, which integrates three sensors, was specifically designed for these experiments, as was an electrical penetrometer to determine the cone index, and both instruments proved reliable and accurate in the field. The main goal of this study was to design, manufacture and test these new devices. The first pass caused most soil alteration when compared to successive passes for all types of tractor tested and soil conditions prevailing during the tests. (Heavier four-wheel drive tractors were found to cause greater soil damage (sinkage, cone index and dry bulk density than two-wheel drive and track tractors. There was no statistically significant difference between the two latter types. The greatest alterations were recorded in the top 10 cm of the soil. The results show that soil compaction should be avoided as much as possible. This can be achieved by ensuring that tractors always travel along the same tracks, especially in the wet season. At present these aspects are not considered by farmers in this area.

  2. Dry Electrodes Facilitate Remote Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Johnson Space Center collaborated with Blacksburg, Virginia-based NanoSonic Inc. through the SBIR program to devise a sensor to replace the traditional electrodes used for an electrocardiogram in space. In 2011, NanoSonic started marketing the dry electrodes as well as an EKGear Sensor Shirt, which is being considered for use in hospital garments, athletic apparel, and dive suits.

  3. Dry Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use a fluoride rinse or brush-on fluoride gel before bedtime. See your dentist at least twice yearly to have your teeth examined and plaque removed, to help prevent tooth decay. Several herbal remedies have been used historically to treat dry ...

  4. Bioinspired vision sensors with hyperacuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.

    2011-04-01

    Musca domestica, the common house fly, possesses a powerful vision system that exhibits features such as fast, analog, parallel operation and motion hyperacuity -- the ability to detect the movement of objects at far better resolution than predicted by their photoreceptor spacing. Researchers at the Wyoming Information, Signal Processing, and Robotics (WISPR) Laboratory have investigated these features for over a decade to develop an analog sensor inspired by the fly. Research efforts have been divided into electrophysiology; mathematical, optical and MATLAB based sensor modeling; physical sensor development; and applications. This paper will provide an in depth review of recent key results in some of these areas including development of a multiple, light adapting cartridge based sensor constructed on both a planar and co-planar surface using off-the-shelf components. Both a photodiode-based approach and a fiber based sensor will be discussed. Applications in UAV obstacle avoidance, long term building monitoring and autonomous robot navigation are also discussed.

  5. Python for large-scale electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A Spacek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54 channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analyzing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation (dimstim; one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting (spyke; and one for spike train and stimulus analysis (neuropy. All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code. The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience.

  6. Python for large-scale electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Martin; Blanche, Tim; Swindale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54-channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analysing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation ("dimstim"); one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting ("spyke"); and one for spike train and stimulus analysis ("neuropy"). All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code). The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience.

  7. Effects of irbesartan on atrial cell electrophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cong-xin; CAO Feng; JIANG Hong; WANG Teng; LI Xia

    2005-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice.1 Its incidence increases with age and the presence of structural heart disease. It is a major cause of stroke, especially in the elderly. It has been shown that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) can reduce the incidence of AF after acute myocardial infarction.2 Several studies have shown that activation of the rennin-angiotensin system is associated with the mechanisms of AF. Irbesartan is a long-acting angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor antagonist used widely in the treatment of hypertension.3 In recent years, it has been demonstrated that patients treated with amiodarone plus irbesartan had a lower rate of recurrence of atrial fibrillation than did patients treated with amiodarone alone.4 These findings suggest that the inhibition of angiotensin Ⅱ may prevent AF, but its underlying electrophysiological mechanisms are obscure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of irbesartan on atrial cell electrophysiology.

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: ... your eyes do not produce enough tears, it is called dry eye. Dry eye is also when ...

  9. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dejana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The athletic heart syndrome is characterized by morphological, functional and electrophysiological alterations as an adaptive response to vigorous physical activity. Athletes heart is predominantly associated with a programmed, intensive training. But as there are different kinds of physical activities, the degree of these changes is highly variable. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart. The response of the body to vigorous physical activity is a multiorgan system phenomenon. The integrated functioning of each of these organ systems is very important, but the cardiovascular system plays a critical role in mediating the activity. Because of that, most changes in the neurohumoral regulation pre- dominantly affect the cardiovascular system. These changes include: depression of sympathetic activity and stimulation of parasympathetic activity, so electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart must differ from the sedentary. Although these facts, are well known, the athlete's heart is not a precisely defined concept. It is a gray zone between physiology and pathology. Conclusion. Considering the number of sudden cardiac deaths in athletes, it is needless to say how important it is to distinguish physiological changes of the heart due to physical activity, and pathological changes due to some cardiac diseases.

  10. Cardiac electrophysiological experiments in numero, Part II: Models of electrophysiological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M; Camm, A J

    1991-11-01

    This article is the second part of a three article series reviewing computer simulation models of the heart, in particular of cardiac electrophysiology. The previous section of the review discussed the methodological principles of the construction and application of computer models. This article overviews the development of mathematical and computer modeling studies applied to cardiology. The models are classified according to the physiological processes that were simulated; this article distinguishes models oriented to cardiac mechanics, hemodynamics, and electrophysiology. The electrophysiology models are discussed in more detail and the review classifies them into four main categories: models of cellular processes, models of tissue behavior, models of the ventricular electric field, and models of macroconduction disturbances. In each category, the historical development of the models and their key achievements are described.

  11. Electrophysiologic properties of ethacrynic acid in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, L; Gopalaswamy, C; Chandy, F; Abdou, O

    1983-11-01

    Ethacrynic acid is a potent oral diuretic and saluretic agent. It has been used extensively in the treatment of heart failure and its effects on cardiovascular dynamics are well established. The clinical relief of the symptoms of pulmonary congestion frequently precedes any demonstrable diuretic effect suggesting that extra renal factors may also be involved. In spite of ethacrynic acid's wide use in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension, there is no information on the electrophysiologic properties of the drug in man. The present study involving 10 human subjects was undertaken to determine what effect intravenously administered ethacrynic acid has on the human conduction system.

  12. The earliest electrophysiological correlate of visual awareness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Mika; Lähteenmäki, Mikko; Sørensen, Thomas Alrik;

    2008-01-01

    To examine the neural correlates and timing of human visual awareness, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in two experiments while the observers were detecting a grey dot that was presented near subjective threshold. ERPs were averaged for conscious detections of the stimulus (hits...... of attention. The early negativity, called 'visual awareness negativity' (VAN), may be a general, primary electrophysiological correlate of visual awareness. The present data show that it can be observed in response to appearance of a stimulus in visual awareness and that it generalizes across different...

  13. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd ... your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  14. Remote monitoring of biodynamic activity using electric potential sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harl, C J; Prance, R J; Prance, H [Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology, Department of Engineering and Design, School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.j.harland@sussex.ac.uk

    2008-12-01

    Previous work in applying the electric potential sensor to the monitoring of body electrophysiological signals has shown that it is now possible to monitor these signals without needing to make any electrical contact with the body. Conventional electrophysiology makes use of electrodes which are placed in direct electrical contact with the skin. The electric potential sensor requires no cutaneous electrical contact, it operates by sensing the displacement current using a capacitive coupling. When high resolution body electrophysiology is required a strong (capacitive) coupling is used to maximise the collected signal. However, in remote applications where there is typically an air-gap between the body and the sensor only a weak coupling can be achieved. In this paper we demonstrate that the electric potential sensor can be successfully used for the remote sensing and monitoring of bioelectric activity. We show examples of heart-rate measurements taken from a seated subject using sensors mounted in the chair. We also show that it is possible to monitor body movements on the opposite side of a wall to the sensor. These sensing techniques have biomedical applications for non-contact monitoring of electrophysiological conditions and can be applied to passive through-the-wall surveillance systems for security applications.

  15. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-01

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Brenda Pagan- ...

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  18. The anatomic and electrophysiological characters of the coronary sinus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Kai; MA Jian; ZHANG Shu

    2005-01-01

    @@ With the development of the technology of electrophysiological study and radiofrequency catheter ablation, electrophysiologists realized that the coronary sinus (CS) was involved in several types of arrhythmias due to its special anatomic and histological characteristics. In this article we review the anatomy, histology and electrophysiology of the CS and the relation between the CS and selected types of arrhythmias.

  19. The effect of head and neck positions on oropharyngeal swallowing: a clinical and electrophysiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, C; Keskin, A; Kiylioglu, N; Kirazli, Y; On, A Y; Tarlaci, S; Aydoğdu, I

    2001-09-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of an electrophysiologic method for evaluating dysphagia and to identify the effects of various head and neck positions on oropharyngeal swallowing. Experimental, with control group. An electromyography laboratory. Patients with neurogenic dysphagia (n = 51) and healthy controls (n = 24). Patients were divided into 2 groups: those patients with unilateral lower cranial lesions (n = 9) and those without laterality in the function of the oropharyngeal muscles (n = 42). Subjects were instructed to swallow doses of water, gradually increasing in quantity from 1 to 25 mL under 5 conditions: neutral, chin up, chin tucked, head rotated right, and head rotated left. Change in dysphagia limit through specified head and neck postures. Oropharyngeal swallowing was evaluated by laryngeal movements that were detected by a piezoelectric sensor and electromyography of the submental muscle complex. Laryngeal sensor signals occurring within 8 seconds of a swallow were accepted as a sign of the dysphagia limit. In the control group, dysphagia limit did not change significantly with changes in head and neck postures, except for the chin-up posture (p Dysphagia limit improved significantly (p dysphagia limit occurred in 50% of patients in chin-tuck position, but in the chin-up position, 55% of the patients experienced a significant (p dysphagia limit. The electrophysiologic method of measuring dysphagia limit confirms neurogenic dysphagia and its severity in the neutral head position. Changes in head and neck positions do not significantly alter dysphagia limit in unimpaired subjects except for the chin-up position. Although the results obtained were not compared with other techniques (eg, videofluoroscopy), this simple electrophysiologic method for describing dysphagia limit may have a place in the evaluation of dysphagia and its variability in various head and neck positions.

  20. Clinically and electrophysiologically diagnosed botulinum intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotan, Dilcan; Aygul, Recep; Ceylan, Mustafa; Yilikoglu, Yalcin

    2013-01-03

    In this case report, clinical and electrophysiological findings of 43-year-old female patient who developed Clostridium botulinum intoxication after consumption of home-made canned food are presented. Following the sudden onset of severe nausea and vomiting, diplopia, blurred vision, bilateral ptosis, weakness, speech and swallowing difficulties have developed and the patient declared that she has just tasted the canned beans after she had rinsed them several times. The case, where serological tests cannot be performed, was diagnosed clinically and treated with antitoxin immediately. During follow-up, consecutive nerve stimulation was performed and significant incremental response was observed. There was an improvement in symptoms within 2 weeks, and in 5 or 6 weeks the symptoms had disappeared completely. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed that the findings turned to normal. The case showed that immediate antitoxin treatment is life-saving even the diagnosis of botulinum intoxication is based on clinical findings.

  1. Electrophysiology of living organs from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Günter

    2010-01-01

    Based on the derivation of the macroscopic Maxwell's equations by spatial averaging of the microscopic equations, we discuss the electrophysiology of living organs. Other methods of averaging (or homogenization) like the bidomain model are not compatible with Maxwell's theory. We also point out that modeling the active cells by source currents is not a suitable description of the situation from first principles. Instead, it turns out that the main source of the measured electrical potentials is the polarization charge density which exists at the membranes of the active cells and adds up to a macroscopic polarization. The latter is the source term in the Laplace equation, the solution of which gives the measured far-field potential. As a consequence it is the polarization or dipole density which is best suited for localization of cardiac arrhythmia.

  2. [Biofeedback in psychomotor training. Electrophysiological bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Mernaia, E M; Shtark, M B

    2008-05-01

    Comparison of influence of usual musical practice and the same trainings but using biofeedback on electrophysiological and psychological markers of optimal psychomotor functioning in 39 students-musicians revealed that the obvious musical practice caused psychomotor pressure in most students (with initially low individual alpha peak frequency), whereas similar practice combined with an individualized session of alpha-EEG/EMG biofeedback was accompanied by increase of alpha-activity in all examinees and a decrease (reduction) of integrated EMG that indicated reaching of optimal psychomotor functioning. It appears that the psychomotor learning ability depends on the baseline individual alpha-activity. Individual alpha peak frequency was associated with fluency and efficiency of psychomotor performance, individual alpha band width--with plasticity and creativity, individual amount of alpha suppression in response to opening eyes--with the level of selfactualization. These alpha activity EEG indices correlated with efficiency of the biofeedback training.

  3. Oyster Electrophysiology: Electrocardiogram Signal Recognition and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After 100 years of published recording traces pertaining to the oyster electrocardiogram (ECG, we revisited the original experiments of Eiger (1913, using state-of-the-art electrophysiology recorders. Our aim was to confirm that a recordable ECG, similar to that of higher vertebrates, is present in the oyster heart. Portuguese oysters Crassostrea angulata, collected from the Guadiana estuary, Portugal, were used. The oysters were drilled through the right valve to reveal the pericardium. Gold and silver electrodes were placed through the hole and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. Stimulation of the oyster heart was performed in vivo and in vitro using a constant current power supply. Placement of electrodes around the heart revealed a trace that very closely matched the published ECG of Eiger (1913. However, we were unable to confirm that the recording was an ECG of the oyster heart. Moreover, measurements on isolated oyster hearts revealed a low conductivity (0.10 S m‒1. We did, however, record a depolarization signal from what we believe to be the visceral ganglia, and this preceded contractions of the oyster heart. Our findings indicate that so-called ECGs, previously recorded by [2] in Ostrea edulis, but also the “ECG” recorded by [4] in C. virginica from oyster hearts, are in fact an artifact arising from relative movement of the recording electrodes, giving rise to a baseline shift that mimics in some ways the P and QRS features of a typical ECG. Nevertheless, such recordings provide information pertaining to heart rate and are not without importance.

  4. Electrophysiological abnormalities associated with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ann Tay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An observational case report of electrophysiological abnormalities in a patient with anisomyopic amblyopia as a result of unilateral extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers (MNFs is illustrated. The electrophysiological readings revealed an abnormal pattern electroretinogram (PERG but normal full-field electroretinogram readings in the affected eye. The visual-evoked potential was also undetectable in that eye. Our findings suggest that extensive MNFs can be associated with electrophysiological abnormalities, in particular the PERG, which can aid in diagnosing the cause of impaired vision when associated with amblyopia.

  5. Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinn, T A; Granite, S; Allessie, M A;

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac experimental electrophysiology is in need of a well-defined Minimum Information Standard for recording, annotating, and reporting experimental data. As a step towards establishing this, we present a draft standard, called Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment....... It is hoped that this will enhance the integration of individual results into experimental, computational, and conceptual models. In its present form, this draft is intended for assessment and development by the research community. We invite the reader to join this effort, and, if deemed productive, implement...... the Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment standard in their own work....

  6. Multi-Sensor Mud Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2010-01-01

    Robust mud detection is a critical perception requirement for Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) autonomous offroad navigation. A military UGV stuck in a mud body during a mission may have to be sacrificed or rescued, both of which are unattractive options. There are several characteristics of mud that may be detectable with appropriate UGV-mounted sensors. For example, mud only occurs on the ground surface, is cooler than surrounding dry soil during the daytime under nominal weather conditions, is generally darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and is highly polarized. However, none of these cues are definitive on their own. Dry soil also occurs on the ground surface, shadows, snow, ice, and water can also be cooler than surrounding dry soil, shadows are also darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and cars, water, and some vegetation are also highly polarized. Shadows, snow, ice, water, cars, and vegetation can all be disambiguated from mud by using a suite of sensors that span multiple bands in the electromagnetic spectrum. Because there are military operations when it is imperative for UGV's to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, passive sensors are desirable. JPL has developed a daytime mud detection capability using multiple passive imaging sensors. Cues for mud from multiple passive imaging sensors are fused into a single mud detection image using a rule base, and the resultant mud detection is localized in a terrain map using range data generated from a stereo pair of color cameras.

  7. Electrophysiological correlates of early attentional feature selection and distractor filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, Elkan G.; Schubö, Anna

    Using electrophysiology, the attentional functions of target selection and distractor filtering were investigated during visual search. Observers searched for multiple tilted line segments amidst vertical distractors. In different conditions, observers were either looking for a specific line

  8. Clinical and electrophysiological efficacy of leaf extract of Gingko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Diabetic polyneuropathy, Diabetes mellitus, Electrophysiological parameters, Gingko biloba,. Sensorimotor ... Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known worldwide seen in many parts of the ..... EGb-761 and zinc in the cat retina. Ophthalmol ...

  9. Whodunnit? Electrophysiological correlates of agency judgements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    Full Text Available Sense of agency refers to the feeling that "I" am responsible for those external events that are directly produced by one's own voluntary actions. Recent theories distinguish between a non-conceptual "feeling" of agency linked to changes in the processing of self-generated sensory events, and a higher-order judgement of agency, which attributes sensory events to the self. In the current study we explore the neural correlates of the judgement of agency by means of electrophysiology. We measured event-related potentials to tones that were either perceived or not perceived as triggered by participants' voluntary actions and related these potentials to later judgements of agency over the tones. Replicating earlier findings on predictive sensory attenuation, we found that the N1 component was attenuated for congruent tones that corresponded to the learned action-effect mapping as opposed to incongruent tones that did not correspond to the previously acquired associations between actions and tones. The P3a component, but not the N1, directly reflected the judgement of agency: deflections in this component were greater for tones judged as self-generated than for tones judged as externally produced. The fact that the outcome of the later agency judgement was predictable based on the P3a component demonstrates that agency judgements incorporate early information processing components and are not purely reconstructive, post-hoc evaluations generated at time of judgement.

  10. Cardiovascular Imaging in the Electrophysiology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Laura; Prat, Susanna; Sitges, Marta

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, rapid technological advances have allowed the development of new electrophysiological procedures that would not have been possible without the parallel development of imaging techniques used to plan and guide these procedures and monitor their outcomes. Ablation of atrial fibrillation is among the interventions with the greatest need for imaging support. Echocardiography allows the appropriate selection of patients and the detection of thrombi that would contraindicate the intervention; cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are also essential in planning this procedure, by allowing a detailed anatomical study of the pulmonary veins. In addition, in cardiac resynchronization therapy, echocardiography plays a central role in both patient selection and, later, in device adjustment and in assessing the effectiveness of the technique. More recently, ablation of ventricular tachycardias has been established as a treatment option; this would not be possible without planning using an imaging study such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial scarring. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrophysiological effects of ATP on brain neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, P; Nieber, K; Nörenberg, W

    1996-12-01

    1. The electrophysiological effects of ATP on brain neurones are either due to the direct activation of P2 purinoceptors by the unmetabolized nucleotide or to the indirect activation of P1. purinoceptors by the degradation product adenosine. 2. Two subtypes of P2 purinoceptors are involved, a ligand-activated ion channel (P2X) and a G protein-coupled receptor (P2Y). Hence, the stimulation of P2X purinoceptors leads to a cationic conductance increase, while the stimulation of P2Y purinoceptors leads to a G protein-mediated opening or closure of potassium channels. 3. ATP may induce a calcium-dependent potassium current by increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This is due either to the entry of Ca2+ via P2X purinoceptors or to the activation of metabotropic P2Y purinoceptors followed by signaling via the G protein/phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) cascade. Eventually, IP3 releases Ca2+ from its intracellular pools. 4. There is no convincing evidence for the presence of P2U purinoceptors sensitive to both ATP and UTP, or pyrimidinoceptors sensitive to UTP only, in the central nervous system (CNS). 5. ATP-sensitive P2X and P2Y purinoceptors show a wide distribution in the CNS and appear to regulate important neuronal functions.

  12. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS, congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation.

  13. Stimfit: quantifying electrophysiological data with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segundo Jose Guzman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular electrophysiological recordings provide crucial insights into elementary neuronal signals such as action potentials and synaptic currents. Analyzing and interpreting these signals is essential for a quantitative understanding of neuronal information processing, and requires both fast data visualization and ready access to complex analysis routines. To achieve this goal, we have developed Stimfit, a free software package for cellular neurophysiology with a Python scripting interface and a built-in Python shell. The program supports most standard file formats for cellular neurophysiology and other biomedical signals through the Biosig library. To quantify and interpret the activity of single neurons and communication between neurons, the program includes algorithms to characterize the kinetics of presynaptic action potentials and postsynaptic currents, estimate latencies between pre- and postsynaptic events, and detect spontaneously occurring events. We validate and benchmark these algorithms, give estimation errors, and provide sample use cases, showing that Stimfit represents an efficient, accessible and extensible way to accurately analyze and interpret neuronal signals.

  14. Integrated platform and API for electrophysiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey eSobolev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in technology and methodology have led to growing amounts of increasingly complex neuroscience data recorded from various species, modalities, and levels of study. The rapid data growth has made efficient data access and flexible, machine-readable data annotation a crucial requisite for neuroscientists. Clear and consistent annotation and organization of data is not only an important ingredient for reproducibility of results and re-use of data, but also essential for collaborative research and data sharing. In particular, efficient data management and interoperability requires a unified approach that integrates data and metadata and provides a common way of accessing this information.In this paper we describe GNData, a data management platform for neurophysiological data. GNData provides a storage system based on a data representation that is suitable to organize data and metadata from any electrophysiological experiment, with a functionality exposed via a common application programming interface (API. Data representation and API structure are compatible with existing approaches for data and metadata representation in neurophysiology. The API implementation is based on the Representational State Transfer (REST pattern, which enables data access integration in software applications and facilitates the development of tools that communicate with the service. Client libraries that interact with the API provide direct data access from computing environments like Matlab or Python, enabling integration of data management into the scientist's experimental or analysis routines.

  15. Electrophysiological measurements of spectral sensitivities: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. DeVoe

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sensitivities of visual systems are specified as the reciprocals of the intensities of light (quantum fluxes needed at each wavelength to elicit the same criterion amplitude of responses. This review primarily considers the methods that have been developed for electrophysiological determinations of criterion amplitudes of slow-wave responses from single retinal cells. Traditional flash methods can require tedious dark adaptations and may yield erroneous spectral sensitivity curves which are not seen in such modifications as ramp methods. Linear response methods involve interferometry, while constant response methods involve manual or automatic adjustments of continuous illumination to keep response amplitudes constant during spectral scans. In DC or AC computerized constant response methods, feedback to determine intensities at each wavelength is derived from the response amplitudes themselves. Although all but traditional flash methods have greater or lesser abilities to provide on-line determinations of spectral sensitivities, computerized constant response methods are the most satisfactory due to flexibility, speed and maintenance of a constant adaptation level

  16. Grafted dopamine neurons: Morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömberg, Ingrid; Bickford, Paula; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2010-02-09

    Grafting of dopamine-rich tissue to counteract the symptoms in Parkinson's disease became a promising tool for future treatment. This article discusses how to improve the functional outcome with respect to graft outgrowth and functions of dopamine release and electrophysiological responses to graft implantation in the host brain striatal target. It has been documented that a subpopulation of the dopamine neurons innervates the host brain in a target-specific manner, while some of the grafted dopamine neurons never project to the host striatum. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that the graft-induced outgrowth synthesize, store, metabolize and release dopamine and possibly other neurotransmitters such as 5-HT. Furthermore, the released dopamine affects the dopamine-depleted brain in areas that are larger than the graft-derived nerve fibers reach. While stem cells will most likely be the future source of cells to be used in grafting, it is important to find the guiding cues for how to reinnervate the dopamine-depleted striatum in a proper way with respect to the dopamine subpopulations of A9 and A10 to efficiently treat the motor abnormalities seen in Parkinson's disease.

  17. Closed-loop, open-source electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Rolston

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple extracellular microelectrodes (multi-electrode arrays, or MEAs effectively record rapidly varying neural signals, and can also be used for electrical stimulation. Multi-electrode recording can serve as artificial output (efferents from a neural system, while complex spatially and temporally targeted stimulation can serve as artificial input (afferents to the neuronal network. Multi-unit or local field potential recordings can not only be used to control real world artifacts, such as prostheses, computers or robots, but can also trigger or alter subsequent stimulation. Real-time feedback stimulation may serve to modulate or normalize aberrant neural activity, to induce plasticity, or to serve as artificial sensory input. Despite promising closed-loop applications, commercial electrophysiology systems do not yet take advantage of the bidirectional capabilities of multi-electrodes, especially for use in freely moving animals. We addressed this lack of tools for closing the loop with NeuroRighter, an open-source system including recording hardware, stimulation hardware, and control software with a graphical user interface. The integrated system is capable of multi-electrode recording and simultaneous patterned microstimulation triggered by recordings with minimal stimulation artifact. The potential applications of closed-loop systems as research tools and clinical treatments are broad; we provide one example where epileptic activity recorded by a multi-electrode probe is used to trigger targeted stimulation, via that probe, to freely moving rodents.

  18. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Watson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre; they were not attenuated by local anesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency. Single-unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  19. Autism--genetics, electrophysiology and clinical syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Plasevska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a severe and the most heritable developmental disorder, whose pathogenesis is still largely unknown. The rising incidence of autism in the last decade has increased the scientific interest and research. More than a thousand papers concerned with information about the etiology of this "static disorder of the immature brain" can be found on Pub Med. The aim of this paper is to give a review of published genetic chromosomal anomalies associated with autistic spectrum disorders, as well as to discuss common syndromes associated with autistic traits. In addition, some of our own findings in genetics, as well as in quantitative electroencephalography and neurofeedback training in autistic children, will be presented and discussed. Generally, the subsequent analyses indicate that the causes of autism include fewer common single-gene mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, as well as multiple interacting genes of weak effect. Genome-wide linkage analysis has identified several susceptibility loci and positional and functional candidate genes which appear to represent possible risks of the autistic spectrum. Electrophysiological findings showed high delta/theta activity in frontal-central regions, while in 25% high beta activity was detected as a result of anxiety. Neurofeedback is a promising therapy for symptom mitigation.

  20. Integrated platform and API for electrophysiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Stoewer, Adrian; Leonhardt, Aljoscha; Rautenberg, Philipp L; Kellner, Christian J; Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in technology and methodology have led to growing amounts of increasingly complex neuroscience data recorded from various species, modalities, and levels of study. The rapid data growth has made efficient data access and flexible, machine-readable data annotation a crucial requisite for neuroscientists. Clear and consistent annotation and organization of data is not only an important ingredient for reproducibility of results and re-use of data, but also essential for collaborative research and data sharing. In particular, efficient data management and interoperability requires a unified approach that integrates data and metadata and provides a common way of accessing this information. In this paper we describe GNData, a data management platform for neurophysiological data. GNData provides a storage system based on a data representation that is suitable to organize data and metadata from any electrophysiological experiment, with a functionality exposed via a common application programming interface (API). Data representation and API structure are compatible with existing approaches for data and metadata representation in neurophysiology. The API implementation is based on the Representational State Transfer (REST) pattern, which enables data access integration in software applications and facilitates the development of tools that communicate with the service. Client libraries that interact with the API provide direct data access from computing environments like Matlab or Python, enabling integration of data management into the scientist's experimental or analysis routines.

  1. Autoclave Sterilization of PEDOT:PSS Electrophysiology Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguz, Ilke; Ganji, Mehran; Hama, Adel; Tanaka, Atsunori; Inal, Sahika; Youssef, Ahmed; Owens, Roisin M; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ghestem, Antoine; Bernard, Christophe; Dayeh, Shadi A; Malliaras, George G

    2016-12-01

    Autoclaving, the most widely available sterilization method, is applied to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) electrophysiology devices. The process does not harm morphology or electrical properties, while it effectively kills E. coli intentionally cultured on the devices. This finding paves the way to widespread introduction of PEDOT:PSS electrophysiology devices to the clinic. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Advances in electrophysiology in the diagnosis of behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutros, Nash N; Gjini, Klevest; Arfken, Cynthia L

    2011-09-01

    Diagnosis in psychiatry remains largely subjective. Developing biological observations in psychiatric disorders into laboratory-based diagnostic tests can significantly impact diagnosis and management of these disorders. Diagnostic electrophysiological techniques are non-invasive and relatively inexpensive. In this review, the authors propose that enough knowledge has accumulated to allow the establishment of psychiatry-based clinical electrophysiology laboratories (PCELs). A brief summary of established clinical indications for electrophysiology tests, summary of highly promising technologies and a presentation of a proposed four-step approach to facilitate the translation of promising biological observations into diagnostic tests are provided. The reader should develop an appreciation of the current status of the clinical applications of psychiatric electrophysiology. The authors propose to capitalize on the widely accepted indication to rule out medical causes of psychiatric symptoms (e.g., epileptic activity) to begin developing PCELs as the equipment and skills necessary are basic to the entire discipline. The potential impact of the growing knowledge on the practice of psychiatry is explored to update clinicians and administrators as they develop laboratory and service plans. Psychiatric electrophysiology currently plays a limited role in the diagnosis and management in psychiatry. This status is not supported by the existing literature. The underutilization of electrophysiological tests in psychiatry is propagated by the fact that the laboratories providing the service are not managed by psychiatrists. The authors propose that the first steps are to establish such laboratories and train psychiatrists to competently provide the service.

  3. Comparison of Electrophysiological Auditory Measures in Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruska, Karen P; Sisneros, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Sounds provide fishes with important information used to mediate behaviors such as predator avoidance, prey detection, and social communication. How we measure auditory capabilities in fishes, therefore, has crucial implications for interpreting how individual species use acoustic information in their natural habitat. Recent analyses have highlighted differences between behavioral and electrophysiologically determined hearing thresholds, but less is known about how physiological measures at different auditory processing levels compare within a single species. Here we provide one of the first comparisons of auditory threshold curves determined by different recording methods in a single fish species, the soniferous Hawaiian sergeant fish Abudefduf abdominalis, and review past studies on representative fish species with tuning curves determined by different methods. The Hawaiian sergeant is a colonial benthic-spawning damselfish (Pomacentridae) that produces low-frequency, low-intensity sounds associated with reproductive and agonistic behaviors. We compared saccular potentials, auditory evoked potentials (AEP), and single neuron recordings from acoustic nuclei of the hindbrain and midbrain torus semicircularis. We found that hearing thresholds were lowest at low frequencies (~75-300 Hz) for all methods, which matches the spectral components of sounds produced by this species. However, thresholds at best frequency determined via single cell recordings were ~15-25 dB lower than those measured by AEP and saccular potential techniques. While none of these physiological techniques gives us a true measure of the auditory "perceptual" abilities of a naturally behaving fish, this study highlights that different methodologies can reveal similar detectable range of frequencies for a given species, but absolute hearing sensitivity may vary considerably.

  4. Direct fabrication of thin film gold resistance temperature detection sensors on a curved surface using a flexible dry film photoresist and their calibration up to 450 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C. H.; Park, H. W.; Kim, H. H.; Park, S. H.; Son, C.; Kim, M. C.; Lee, J. H.; Go, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    High efficiency heat exchangers, such as intercoolers and recuperators, are composed of complex and compact structures to enhance heat transfer. This limits the installation of conventional temperature sensors to measure the temperature inside the heat exchanger without flow disturbance. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a direct patterning method in which metal is sputtered onto a curved surface using film photoresist and the fabrication of thin film Au resistance temperature detection (RTD) temperature sensors. A photosensitive film resist has been used to overcome the difficulty of 3-dimensional photolithography on a curved surface. The film resist after 2-dimensional photolithography is laminated over an alumina rod which is deposited with Au as an RTD sensing material. The Au metal is etched chemically, and the film resist is removed to form the thin film Au-RTD temperature sensors. They are calibrated by measuring the resistance change against temperature in a thermally controlled furnace. The second order polynomial fit shows good agreement with the measured temperatures with a standard deviation of 0.02 for the temperature range of 20-450 °C. Finally, the performance of the Au-RTD temperature sensors was evaluated.

  5. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under th

  6. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  7. Energy Efficient Textile Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Brunzell, Lena

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, textiles were dried outdoors with the wind and the sun enhancing the drying process. Tumble dryers offer a fast and convenient way of drying textiles independent of weather conditions. Tumble dryers, however, consume large amounts of electrical energy. Over 4 million tumble dryers are sold each year in Europe and a considerable amount of energy is used for drying of clothes. Increasing energy costs and the awareness about environmental problems related to a large energy use has...

  8. The electrophysiologic profile of Dejerine-Sottas disease (HMSN III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstead, T J; Kuntz, N L; Miller, R G; Daube, J R

    1990-07-01

    Electrophysiologic studies in 11 patients with Dejerine-Sottas disease (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III, HMSN III) showed median and ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities less than 6 m/sec in all but 1 patient. Marked temporal dispersion without conduction block was present in all patients. Uniform slowing in adjacent motor nerves was consistent with other studies of inherited neuropathies, although marked temporal dispersion may make HMSN III more difficult to distinguish from acquired neuropathies than other hereditary conditions. The electrophysiologic features of HMSN III patients were significantly different from a series of patients with other hereditary neuropathies chosen because of very slow nerve conduction velocity.

  9. Electrophysiologic features of inherited demyelinating neuropathies: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1999-09-14

    The observation that inherited demyelinating neuropathies tend to have uniform conduction slowing and acquired disorders (CIDP and variants) have nonuniform or multifocal slowing was made before the identification of genetic defects of specific myelin constituents that cause the different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth and other inherited disorders involving peripheral nerve myelin. It is becoming clear that the electrophysiologic aspects of these disorders are more complex than previously realized. We review the current information available on the electrophysiologic features of the inherited demyelinating neuropathies in hopes of clarifying the clinical electrodiagnostic features of these disorders as well as to shed light on the physiologic consequences of the different genetic mutations.

  10. Automatic Segmentation of Cardiac CTs: Personalized Atrial Models Augmented with Electrophysiological Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neher, P.; Barschdorf, H.; Dries, S.; Weber, F.M.; Krueger, M.W.; Doessel, O.; Lorenz, C.

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological simulations of the atria could improve diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, like atrial fibrillation or flutter. For this purpose, a precise segmentation of both atria is needed. However, the atrial epicardium and the electrophysiological structures needed for electrop

  11. Dry vacuum pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibuet, R.

    2008-05-01

    For decades and for ultimate pressure below 1 mbar, oil-sealed Rotary Vane Pumps have been the most popular solution for a wide range of vacuum applications. In the late 80ies, Semiconductor Industry has initiated the development of the first dry roughing pumps. Today SC applications are only using dry pumps and dry pumping packages. Since that time, pumps manufacturers have developed dry vacuum pumps technologies in order to make them attractive for other applications. The trend to replace lubricated pumps by dry pumps is now spreading over many other market segments. For the Semiconductor Industry, it has been quite easy to understand the benefits of dry pumps, in terms of Cost of Ownership, process contamination and up-time. In this paper, Technology of Dry pumps, its application in R&D/industries, merits over conventional pumps and future growth scope will be discussed.

  12. Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T; Knowles, T P J

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach for interfacing an electromechanical sensor with a microfluidic device for the accurate quantification of the dry mass of analytes within microchannels. We show that depositing solutes onto the active surface of a quartz crystal microbalance by means of an on-chip microfluidic spray nozzle and subsequent solvent removal provides the basis for the real-time determination of dry solute mass. Moreover, this detection scheme does not suffer from the decrease in the sensor quality factor and the viscous drag present if the measurement is performed in a liquid environment, yet allows solutions to be analysed. We demonstrate the sensitivity and reliability of our approach by controlled deposition of nanogram levels of salt and protein from a micrometer-sized channel.

  13. Electrophysiological Techniques for Sea Lion Population-Level Audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Audiometry James J. Finneran Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, Biosciences Division, Code 71510, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA...DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrophysiological Techniques For Sea Lion Population-Level Audiometry 5a

  14. Electrophysiological assessment in patients with Mobius syndrome and clumsiness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors studied the nature of clumsiness in Mobius syndrome in terms of motor or sensory deficits, and sought to clarify the pathophysiological mechanism of the syndrome. Standardized electrophysiologic studies were conducted, with special emphasis on the long motor and sensory tracts and periph

  15. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SCREENING IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şedat IŞIKAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The involvement of the peripheral nervous system in children with celiac disease is particularly rare. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the need for neurophysiological testing in celiac disease patients without neurological symptoms in order to detect early subclinical neuropathy and its possible correlations with clinical and demographic characteristics. Methods Two hundred and twenty consecutive children with celiac disease were screened for neurological symptoms and signs, and those without symptoms or signs were included. Also, patients with comorbidities associated with peripheral neuropathy or a history of neurological disease were excluded. The remaining 167 asymptomatic patients as well as 100 control cases were tested electro-physiologically for peripheral nervous system diseases. Motor nerve conduction studies, including F-waves, were performed for the median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial nerves, and sensory nerve conduction studies were performed for the median, ulnar, and sural nerves with H reflex of the soleus muscle unilaterally. All studies were carried out using surface recording electrodes. Normative values established in our laboratory were used. Results Evidence for subclinical neuropathy was not determined with electrophysiological studies in any of the participants. Conclusion In this highly selective celiac disease group without any signs, symptoms as well as the predisposing factors for polyneuropathy, we did not determine any cases with neuropathy. With these results we can conclude that in asymptomatic cases with celiac disease electrophysiological studies are not necessary. However, larger studies with the electrophysiological studies performed at different stages of disease at follow-ups are warranted.

  16. Error and reinforcement processing in ADHD : An electrophysiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Objective(s) Current explanatory models of ADHD suggest abnormal reinforcement sensitivity, but the exact nature of this deficit is unclear. In this study we investigate electrophysiological reactions to positive/negative reinforcement as well as correct/error responses to gain more

  17. Early electrophysiological findings in Fisher-Bickerstaff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, M A; Povedano, M; Montero, J; Casasnovas, C

    2017-09-06

    The term Fisher-Bickerstaff syndrome (FBS) has been proposed to describe the clinical spectrum encompassing Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis. The pathophysiology of FBS and the nature of the underlying neuropathy (demyelinating or axonal) are still subject to debate. This study describes the main findings of an early neurophysiological study on 12 patients diagnosed with FBS. Retrospective evaluation of clinical characteristics and electrophysiological findings of 12 patients with FBS seen in our neurology department within 10 days of disease onset. Follow-up electrophysiological studies were also evaluated, where available. The most frequent electrophysiological finding, present in 5 (42%) patients, was reduced sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude in one or more nerves. Abnormalities were rarely found in motor neurography, with no signs of demyelination. The cranial nerve exam revealed abnormalities in 3 patients (facial neurography and/or blink reflex test). Three patients showed resolution of SNAP amplitude reduction in serial neurophysiological studies, suggesting the presence of reversible sensory nerve conduction block. Results from cranial MRI scans were normal in all patients. An electrophysiological pattern of sensory axonal neuropathy, with no associated signs of demyelination, is an early finding of FBS. Early neurophysiological evaluation and follow-up are essential for diagnosing patients with FBS. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxic neuropathy versus diabetic neuropathy : an electrophysiological study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Hendriksen, P.H.; Oey, P.L.; Wieneke, G.H.; Huffelen, A.C. van

    1992-01-01

    In the experimental rat model of diabetes a slowing of nerve conduction velocity and a resistance to ischemic conduction failure have been found as an indication of polyneuropathy. The same electrophysiological abnormalities have been demonstrated in a model in which healthy rats are kept under hypo

  19. Electrophysiology and Biopotential Issues on Human Electrocardiogram-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A.S. Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The heart is the first organ and most importantly to form in the body, where is found the most powerful generator of electromagnetic energy in the human body. Electrophysiology is the best method used to diagnose human heart problem. Knowledge of the electrical potentials in human heart is a quantum leap in the science of the human heart. Recently, there has been a growing interest in studying the human ECG. However, is unfortunately a very complicated issue which requires a relatively good understanding of everything that has been said about the heart. Focus on the review of physical, electromagnetic basis of human heart's biopotentials and understanding the basic equations of cardiac electrophysiology that represents the basis to all clinicians whether in postnatal (pediatric or adult or prenatal (foetal Medicine. Approach: Mathematical method used for derivation of the essential equations of human heart electrical potentials, this equation will develop the principle sciences of human heart, the equation also outlier finding of the electromagnetic base of human electrophysiology. Results: Heart is important electrical generator in human body. The voltage and current which was generated in human heart represent the basis of heart biosciences. The electromagnetic energy of the heart not only envelops every cell of the human body, but also extends out in all directions in the space around human body. Conclusion: The proposed technique for electrophysiology and potentials on human ECG was useful and the results may contribute to the references for later studies.

  20. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome.

  1. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  2. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  3. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  4. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  5. Software and Hardware Infrastructure for Research in Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman eMouček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly.This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research.After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software.

  6. Software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouček, Roman; Ježek, Petr; Vařeka, Lukáš; Rondík, Tomáš; Brůha, Petr; Papež, Václav; Mautner, Pavel; Novotný, Jiří; Prokop, Tomáš; Stěbeták, Jan

    2014-01-01

    As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly. This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research. After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software.

  7. Drying and energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, A

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of essential topics related to conventional and advanced drying and energy technologies, especially motivated by increased industry and academic interest. The main topics discussed are: theory and applications of drying, emerging topics in drying technology, innovations and trends in drying, thermo-hydro-chemical-mechanical behaviors of porous materials in drying, and drying equipment and energy. Since the topics covered are inter- and multi-disciplinary, the book offers an excellent source of information for engineers, energy specialists, scientists, researchers, graduate students, and leaders of industrial companies. This book is divided into several chapters focusing on the engineering, science and technology applied in essential industrial processes used for raw materials and products.

  8. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  9. Ocean Dynamics: Vietnam DRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Dynamics: Vietnam DRI Robert Pinkel Marine Physical Laboratory Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla California 92093-0213 Phone: (858) 534...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Vietnam DRI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...cycle.. The Thorpe-scale estimates are local to Site III. South China Sea Process Cruise 2014 Under Vietnam DRI funding, Researcher Drew Lucas

  10. Dry etching for microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, RA

    1984-01-01

    This volume collects together for the first time a series of in-depth, critical reviews of important topics in dry etching, such as dry processing of III-V compound semiconductors, dry etching of refractory metal silicides and dry etching aluminium and aluminium alloys. This topical format provides the reader with more specialised information and references than found in a general review article. In addition, it presents a broad perspective which would otherwise have to be gained by reading a large number of individual research papers. An additional important and unique feature of this book

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  12. Dry imaging cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I K Indrajit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow.

  13. Sensor Compendium

    CERN Document Server

    Artuso, M; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Caberera, B; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cooper, W; Da Via, C; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Frisch, H; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Golwala, S; Haber, C; Hall, J; Hoppe, E; Irwin, K D; Kagan, H; Kenney, C; Lee, A T; Lynn, D; Orrell, J; Pyle, M; Rusack, R; Sadrozinski, H; Sanchez, M C; Seiden, A; Trischuk, W; Vavra, J; Wetstein, M; Zhu, R-Y

    2013-01-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future ...

  14. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrophysiological methods that can be used to objectively evaluate dysphagia in PD. We discuss the electrophysiological abnormalities that can be observed in PD, their clinical correlates and the pathophysiology underlying these findings. PMID:25360228

  15. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cumhur Ertekin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrophysiological methods that can be used to objectively evaluate dysphagia in PD. We discuss the electrophysiological abnormalities that can be observed in PD, their clinical correlates and the pathophysiology underlying these findings.

  16. Research progress of electrophysiology for the diagnosis of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZHAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic myopathies comprise a group of diverse disorders characterized by defects ofn energy metabolism in skeletal muscle cells, including glycogen storage disease (GSD, lipid storage myopathy (LSM and mitochondrial myopathy. The diagnosis of metabolic myopathies is often challenging due to the clinical and etiological heterogeneity between different metabolic myopathies. Generally, the diagnosis of metabolic myopathies is mainly based on the age of onset, family history, clinical manifestation, electrophysiological examinations, serological screening of metabolic markers, muscle biopsy and the DNA testing for specific mutations. The classical electrophysiological diagnostic methods and the corresponding manifestation of metabolic myopathies were reviewed and some new diagnostic techniques, including new motor unit potential (MUP parameters were introduced in this article. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.002

  17. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in acute secondary hyperkalemic paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkal R Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia manifests clinically with acute neuromuscular paralysis, which can simulate Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS and other causes of acute flaccid paralysis. Primary hyperkalemic paralysis occurs from genetic defects in the sodium channel, and secondary hyperkalemic paralysis (SHP from diverse causes including renal dysfunction, potassium retaining drugs, Addison′s disease, etc. Clinical characteristics of SHP have been addressed in a number of publications. However, electrophysiological evaluations of these patients during neuromuscular paralysis are infrequently reported and have demonstrated features of demyelination. The clinical features and electrophysiological abnormalities in secondary hyperkalemia mimic GBS, and pose diagnostic challenges. We report the findings of nerve conduction studies in a middle-aged man who was admitted with rapidly reversible acute quadriplegia resulting from secondary hyperkalemic paralysis.

  18. REAL TIME REGISTRATION OF THE ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNALS SPECTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Tolkovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issues of spectra acquisition for the electrophysiological signals, diagnostics result dependence on the noise level and expert’s qualification. A real-time module for amplitude-frequency spectra estimation of electrophysiological signals is designed. A general diagram of connection between measuring module and spectrum analyzer (as a part of multifunctional diagnostic system is shown. The module is realized on the base of Cubieboard A20 minicomputer. It provides continuous decomposition of signals (up to 32 channels into fragments of equal length and their independent mathematical processing for each measuring channel. The suggested device makes it possible to analyze the real-time dynamics of spectrum changes.

  19. Pants on fire: the electrophysiological signature of telling a lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roland; Foerster, Anna; Kunde, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Even though electroencephalography has played a prominent role for lie detection via personally relevant information, the electrophysiological signature of active lying is still elusive. We addressed this signature with two experiments in which participants helped a virtual police officer to locate a knife. Crucially, before this response, they announced whether they would lie or tell the truth about the knife's location. This design allowed us to study the signature of lie-telling in the absence of rare and personally significant oddball stimuli that are typically used for lie detection via electrophysiological markers, especially the P300 component. Our results indicate that active lying attenuated P300 amplitudes as well as N200 amplitudes for such non-oddball stimuli. These results support accounts that stress the high cognitive demand of lie-telling, including the need to suppress the truthful response and to generate a lie.

  20. Breadboard Amplifier: Building and Using Simple Electrophysiology Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Kevin M; Lin, Hunter; Prosper, Issa

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiology is a valuable skill for the neuroscientist, but the learning curve for students can be steep. Here we describe a very simple electromyography (EMG) amplifier that can be built from scratch by students with no electronics experience in about 30 minutes, making it ideal for incorporating into a laboratory activity. With few parts and no adjustments except the gain, students can begin physiology experiments quickly while having the satisfaction of having built the equipment themselves. Because the output of the circuit goes to a computer sound card, students can listen to electrophysiological activity as they see it on the computer screen, a feature many of our students greatly appreciated. Various applications are discussed, including dual channel recording, using streaming media platforms with remote lab partners and acquiring data in the field on a smart phone. Our students reported that they enjoyed being able to build a working device and using it to record from their own muscles.

  1. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy in Children; Clinical and Electrophysiologic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Hasan Tonekaboni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiologic findings of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS in children and their relation with clinical progress of the disease. Methods:Twenty-three children with GBS were evaluated between 2005 and 2007. Electrophysiologic evaluations were performed at admission and one month later. Findings: Five patients needed respirator, 15 were bedridden, 1 developed recurrence 6 months later, and 2 experienced chronic GBS. The most common findings included: decreased amplitude of muscle action potential (CMAP (96%, increased distal latency (74%, increased F wave latency (69%, and decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV (61%. Sensory nerve conduction (evaluating sural nerve was normal in 78% of the cases. These measures did not significantly change after 1 month. Conclusion:Electrodiagnostic evaluations are helpful at the primary stages of GBS for diagnosis. Fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves showing denervation and axonal injury are presentative of longer duration of the disease and a worse prognosis.

  2. Wind Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiaoyang; Ni, Jiqin

    2014-01-01

    Wind measurement is needed in many practical and scientific research situations. Some specific applications require to precisely measuring both wind direction and wind speed at the same time. Current commercial sensors for wind direction and wind speed measurement usually use ultrasonic technology and the sensors are very expensive (> $1500). In addition, the sensors are large in dimension and cannot measure airflow patterns in high spatial resolution. Therefore new and low cost wind speed an...

  3. Subjective Stress, Salivary Cortisol, and Electrophysiological Responses to Psychological Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Mingming; Gao, Heming; Guan, Lili; Liu, Guangyuan; Yang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the subjective stress, salivary cortisol, and electrophysiological responses to psychological stress induced by a modified version of a mental arithmetic task. Fifteen participants were asked to estimate whether the multiplication product of two-decimal numbers was above 10 or not either with a time limit (the stress condition) or without a time limit (the control condition). The results showed that participants reported higher levels of stress, anxiety,...

  4. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular physiological characteristics of muscles with active myofascial trigger points, thereby providing a quantitative evaluation of myofascial pain syndrome and clinical foundational data for its diagnosis. [Subjects] Ninety adults in their 20s participated in this study. Subjects were equally divide...

  5. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of dysphagia in myasthenia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate dysphagia at the oropharyngeal stage of swallowing and to determine the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysphagia in patients with myasthenia gravis.
METHODS—Fifteen patients with myasthenia gravis with dysphagia and 10 patients without dysphagia were investigated by a combined electrophysiological and mechanical method described previously. Laryngeal movements were detected by a piezoelectric transducer and the related submental EMG (SM-EMG) and somet...

  6. Computational Intelligence Techniques for Electro-Physiological Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Riera Sardà, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This work contains the efforts I have made in the last years in the field of Electrophysiological data analysis. Most of the work has been done at Starlab Barcelona S.L. and part of it at the Neurodynamics Laboratory of the Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology of the University of Barcelona. The main work deals with the analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) signals, although other signals, such as electrocardiography (ECG), electroculography (EOG) and electromiography (EMG) ...

  7. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    OpenAIRE

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah

    2007-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came...

  8. Dynamics of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in spinal cord neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    . The intrinsic response properties of spinal neurones--determined by the particular set and distribution of voltage sensitive channels and their dynamic non-linear interactions--show a high degree of functional specialisation as reflected by the differences of intrinsic response patterns in different cell types....... Specialised, cell specific electrophysiological phenotypes gradually differentiate during development and are continuously adjusted in the adult animal by metabotropic synaptic interactions and activity-dependent plasticity to meet a broad range of functional demands....

  9. Electrophysiological evaluation of ulnar nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impairment of ulnar nerve and its relationship with sensory symptoms in the ulnar territory in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS)through electrophysiological approach.Methods We retrospectively reviewed 55 cases with CTS admitted in our hospital from January 2012 to February 2013.Patients with CTS were graded as mild-moderate(35 cases)andsevere(20 cases)according to Stevens standard and were divided into symptomatic and non-symptomatic group according

  10. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  11. Sensor web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  12. Atrial Electrophysiological Remodeling and Fibrillation in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sandeep V.; Workman, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) causes complex, chronic changes in atrial structure and function, which can cause substantial electrophysiological remodeling and predispose the individual to atrial fibrillation (AF). Pharmacological treatments for preventing AF in patients with HF are limited. Improved understanding of the atrial electrical and ionic/molecular mechanisms that promote AF in these patients could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Animal models of HF have identified numerous changes in atrial ion currents, intracellular calcium handling, action potential waveform and conduction, as well as expression and signaling of associated proteins. These studies have shown that the pattern of electrophysiological remodeling likely depends on the duration of HF, the underlying cardiac pathology, and the species studied. In atrial myocytes and tissues obtained from patients with HF or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the data on changes in ion currents and action potentials are largely equivocal, probably owing mainly to difficulties in controlling for the confounding influences of multiple variables, such as patient’s age, sex, disease history, and drug treatments, as well as the technical challenges in obtaining such data. In this review, we provide a summary and comparison of the main animal and human electrophysiological studies to date, with the aim of highlighting the consistencies in some of the remodeling patterns, as well as identifying areas of contention and gaps in the knowledge, which warrant further investigation. PMID:27812293

  13. Functional identification of islet cell types by electrophysiological fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Vergari, Elisa; Kellard, Joely A.; Rodriguez, Blanca; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Rorsman, Patrik

    2017-01-01

    The α-, β- and δ-cells of the pancreatic islet exhibit different electrophysiological features. We used a large dataset of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cells in intact mouse islets (N = 288 recordings) to investigate whether it is possible to reliably identify cell type (α, β or δ) based on their electrophysiological characteristics. We quantified 15 electrophysiological variables in each recorded cell. Individually, none of the variables could reliably distinguish the cell types. We therefore constructed a logistic regression model that included all quantified variables, to determine whether they could together identify cell type. The model identified cell type with 94% accuracy. This model was applied to a dataset of cells recorded from hyperglycaemic βV59M mice; it correctly identified cell type in all cells and was able to distinguish cells that co-expressed insulin and glucagon. Based on this revised functional identification, we were able to improve conductance-based models of the electrical activity in α-cells and generate a model of δ-cell electrical activity. These new models could faithfully emulate α- and δ-cell electrical activity recorded experimentally. PMID:28275121

  14. Clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of neuropathy associated with Tangier disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyss, Julie; Béhin, Anthony; Couvert, Philippe; Bouhour, Françoise; Sassolas, Agnès; Kolev, Ivan; Denys, Violaine; Vial, Christophe; Lacour, A; Carrié, Alain; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2012-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) (OMIM#205400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the ABCA1 gene, leading to decreased levels of plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Peripheral neuropathy is a common finding in this disease, and may present as relapsing/remitting mono/polyneuropathies or as syringomyelia-like neuropathy. We retrospectively analyzed four patients, and report here their clinical, biological, electrophysiological, imaging, and genetic findings. Three patients had a typical pseudosyringomyelic neuropathy including facial diplegia, but asymmetrical onset was observed in one patient who had first been misdiagnosed with Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Electrophysiological pattern was heterogeneous, showing both signs of demyelination and axonal degeneration. Truncating mutations of the ABCA1 gene, including two previously undescribed mutations, were constantly found. Atypical symptom onset and demyelinating features on electrophysiological examination can be misleading in case of pseudosyringomyelic neuropathy. These reports illustrate two different neurological phenotypes in TD, namely the pseudosyringomyelic type and the Lewis-Sumner-like type, and advocate for a systematic assessment of lipid profile including HDL cholesterol in demyelinating neuropathies.

  15. AV nodal dual pathway electrophysiology and Wenckebach periodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhua; Mazgalev, Todor N

    2011-11-01

    The precise mechanism(s) governing the phenomenon of AV nodal Wenckebach periodicity is not fully elucidated. Currently 2 hypotheses, the decremental conduction and the Rosenbluethian step-delay, are most frequently used. We have provided new evidence that, in addition, dual pathway (DPW) electrophysiology is directly involved in the manifestation of AV nodal Wenckebach phenomenon. AV nodal cellular action potentials (APs) were recorded from 6 rabbit AV node preparations during standard A1A2 and incremental pacing protocols. His electrogram alternans, a validated index of DPW electrophysiology, was used to monitor fast (FP) and slow (SP) pathway conduction. The data were collected in intact AV nodes, as well as after SP ablation. In all studied hearts the Wenckebach cycle started with FP propagation, followed by transition to SP until its ultimate block. During this process complex cellular APs were observed, with decremental foot formations reflecting the fading FP and second depolarizations produced by the SP. In addition, the AV node cells exhibited a progressive loss in maximal diastolic membrane potential (MDP) due to incomplete repolarization. The pause created with the blocked Wenckebach beat was associated with restoration of MDP and reinitiation of the conduction cycle via the FP wavefront. DPW electrophysiology is dynamically involved in the development of AV nodal Wenckebach periodicity. In the intact AV node, the cycle starts with FP that is progressively weakened and then replaced by SP propagation, until block occurs. AV nodal SP modification did not eliminate Wenckebach periodicity but strongly affected its paradigm. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Electrophysiologic evaluation of intravenous L-propionylcarnitine in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biase, M; Tritto, M; Pitzalis, M V; Favale, S; Rizzon, P

    1991-03-01

    L-propionylcarnitine, a short-chain acylcarnitine, has been shown in experimental studies to induce, during acidic and hypoxic conditions, some electrophysiological changes such as an increase of duration of the action potential and of the effective refractory period. In this study, the acute electrophysiological effects of intravenous L-propionylcarnitine (30 mg/kg in 3 min) were studied in 12 subjects with estimated normal function of the sinus node and normal parameters for atrioventricular conduction. Statistically significant changes were observed 2 min after infusion. The sinus cycle length shortened (866 +/- 138 vs 818 +/- 124 msec, P less than 0.05) while refractory periods of the atrioventricular node increased (effective by 30-50 msec in four cases; functional from 425 +/- 52 to 436 +/- 55 msec, P less than 0.05). Sinuatrial conduction time, atrial refractory periods, infranodal conduction, bundle branch, His-Purkinje system and ventricular refractoriness were unchanged. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were also unchanged. Because of the limited effects on electrophysiological parameters, L-propionylcarnitine should be used as a metabolic drug even in patients with mild disturbances of conduction.

  17. A Wireless Optogenetic Headstage with Multichannel Electrophysiological Recording Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gagnon-Turcotte

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a small and lightweight fully wireless optogenetic headstage capable of optical neural stimulation and electrophysiological recording. The headstage is suitable for conducting experiments with small transgenic rodents, and features two implantable fiber-coupled light-emitting diode (LED and two electrophysiological recording channels. This system is powered by a small lithium-ion battery and is entirely built using low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components for better flexibility, reduced development time and lower cost. Light stimulation uses customizable stimulation patterns of varying frequency and duty cycle. The optical power that is sourced from the LED is delivered to target light-sensitive neurons using implantable optical fibers, which provide a measured optical power density of 70 mW/mm2 at the tip. The headstage is using a novel foldable rigid-flex printed circuit board design, which results into a lightweight and compact device. Recording experiments performed in the cerebral cortex of transgenic ChR2 mice under anesthetized conditions show that the proposed headstage can trigger neuronal activity using optical stimulation, while recording microvolt amplitude electrophysiological signals.

  18. Exploring the unknown: electrophysiological and behavioural measures of visuospatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Brendan; Butler, John S; Ridwan, Abdur Raquib; Beiser, Ines; Williams, Laura; McGovern, Eavan; O'Riordan, Sean; Hutchinson, Michael; Reilly, Richard B

    2016-05-01

    Visuospatial memory describes our ability to temporarily store and manipulate visual and spatial information and is employed for a wide variety of complex cognitive tasks. Here, a visuospatial learning task requiring fine motor control is employed to investigate visuospatial learning in a group of typically developing adults. Electrophysiological and behavioural data are collected during a target location task under two experimental conditions: Target Learning and Target Cued. Movement times (MTs) are employed as a behavioural metric of performance, while dynamic P3b amplitudes and power in the alpha band (approximately 10 Hz) are explored as electrophysiological metrics during visuospatial learning. Results demonstrate that task performance, as measured by MT, is highly correlated with P3b amplitude and alpha power at a consecutive trial level (trials 1-30). The current set of results, in conjunction with the existing literature, suggests that changes in P3b amplitude and alpha power could correspond to different aspects of the learning process. Here it is hypothesized that changes in P3b correspond to a diminishing inter-stimulus interval and reduced stimulus relevance, while the corresponding changes in alpha power represent an automation of response as habituation occurs in participants. The novel analysis presented in the current study demonstrates how gradual electrophysiological changes can be tracked during the visuospatial learning process under the current paradigm.

  19. Effects of Morphology Constraint on Electrophysiological Properties of Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Geng; Du, Liping; Jin, Lei; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    There is growing interest in engineering nerve cells in vitro to control architecture and connectivity of cultured neuronal networks or to build neuronal networks with predictable computational function. Pattern technologies, such as micro-contact printing, have been developed to design ordered neuronal networks. However, electrophysiological characteristics of the single patterned neuron haven’t been reported. Here, micro-contact printing, using polyolefine polymer (POP) stamps with high resolution, was employed to grow cortical neurons in a designed structure. The results demonstrated that the morphology of patterned neurons was well constrained, and the number of dendrites was decreased to be about 2. Our electrophysiological results showed that alterations of dendritic morphology affected firing patterns of neurons and neural excitability. When stimulated by current, though both patterned and un-patterned neurons presented regular spiking, the dynamics and strength of the response were different. The un-patterned neurons exhibited a monotonically increasing firing frequency in response to injected current, while the patterned neurons first exhibited frequency increase and then a slow decrease. Our findings indicate that the decrease in dendritic complexity of cortical neurons will influence their electrophysiological characteristics and alter their information processing activity, which could be considered when designing neuronal circuitries.

  20. Stripping with dry ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  1. [Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: from electrophysiology to electrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Quiles, C; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review of the literature is to summarize the state of the knowledge concerning the relationship between negative symptoms in schizophrenia, electrophysiology and electrotherapy. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed during August and September 2015 using the PubMed electronic database. We used the following MeSH terms: "Negative symptoms", "Schizophrenia", "Electrophysiology", "Neurophysiology", "EEG power", "Alpha rhythm", "Transcranial magnetic stimulation", "Transcranial direct current stimulation", "Electroconvulsive therapy", "Neurofeedback", "Vagus Nerve Stimulation", "Deep Brain Stimulation", and "State dependent". Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are associated with altered activity in prefrontal cortex in functional neuroimaging studies. This is in line with electrophysiological measurements that found a change in EEG spectral power in the alpha frequency band over prefrontal brain regions. The notion of functional hypofrontality has led to hypotheses that electrotherapy applied to the prefrontal cortex may be an effective treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) were used to increase cortical activity in schizophrenia and achieve a clinical effect on negative symptoms. Three meta-analyses confirmed, with a moderate effect size, that rTMS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The two subsequently published prospective multicenter studies, however, found opposite results from each other. Two randomized controlled studies suggested that tDCS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms. There is no study on the efficacy of neurofeedback, vagal nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Additional studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of rTMS and tDCS on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Influencing factors

  2. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  3. [Little Dry Creek Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map of the drainage boundary, direction of flow, canals and ditches, and streets for the drainage study plan and profile for Little Dry Creek sub area in the North...

  4. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a ... the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media ...

  5. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  6. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye ... What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ...

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dry Eye Symptoms Related Ask an Ophthalmologist Answers Can a six-month dissolvable punctal plug be removed ... insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can you explain why I have halos and blurry ...

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide ... What Is Dry Eye? Written By: Kierstan Boyd ...

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear- ... Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology ...

  10. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  11. Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, C.

    2007-01-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refers to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduced inside the sensor some of the basic functions of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, non-uniformity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the front end of FPA microbolometers processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation thresholding.

  12. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  13. Depth Attenuation Degree Based Visualization for Cardiac Ischemic Electrophysiological Feature Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zuo, Wangmeng; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Although heart researches and acquirement of clinical and experimental data are progressively open to public use, cardiac biophysical functions are still not well understood. Due to the complex and fine structures of the heart, cardiac electrophysiological features of interest may be occluded when there is a necessity to demonstrate cardiac electrophysiological behaviors. To investigate cardiac abnormal electrophysiological features under the pathological condition, in this paper, we implement a human cardiac ischemic model and acquire the electrophysiological data of excitation propagation. A visualization framework is then proposed which integrates a novel depth weighted optic attenuation model into the pathological electrophysiological model. The hidden feature of interest in pathological tissue can be revealed from sophisticated overlapping biophysical information. Experiment results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method for intuitively exploring and inspecting cardiac electrophysiological activities, which is fundamental in analyzing and explaining biophysical mechanisms of cardiac functions for doctors and medical staff. PMID:28004002

  14. Electrophysiological identification of thermo- and hygro-sensitive receptor neurons on the antennae of the dragonfly Libellula depressa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Silvana; Rebora, Manuela; Almaas, Tor Jorgen; Salerno, Gianandrea; Gaino, Elda

    2011-10-01

    Recent ultrastructural investigations on Odonata antennal flagellum describe two types of sensilla styloconica, T1 and T2. The styloconic sensilla are located in pits, at the bottom of deep cavities, and share common features typical of thermo-hygroreceptors. In order to ascertain if the Odonata antennae are involved in hygroreception and thermoreception, we carried out electrophysiological recordings (single cell recordings, SCR) from adult males and females of Libellula depressa L., 1758. After contact was established, the antenna was stimulated by rapid changes in temperature and humidity. The present research shows the occurrence of a dry (DC), a moist (MC) and a cold (CC) receptor neurons on the antennal flagellum of L. depressa. These data demonstrate for the first time the presence of functional thermo-hygroreceptors on the antennal flagellum of dragonflies. The present results extend our knowledge of the not visual sensory modalities of Odonata, a field of research unexplored so far.

  15. Craniomandibular System and Postural Balance after 3-Day Dry Immersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Treffel

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the influence of simulated microgravity by exposure to dry immersion on the craniomandibular system. Twelve healthy male volunteers participated in a 3-day dry immersion study. Before and immediately after exposure we measured maximal bite force using piezoresistive sensors. The mechanical properties of the jaw and cervical muscles were evaluated before, during, and after dry immersion using MyotonPRO. Because recent studies reported the effects of jaw motor activity on the postural stability of humans, stabilometric measurements of center of pressure were performed before and after dry immersion in two mandibular positions: rest position without jaw clenching, and intercuspidal position during voluntary teeth clenching. Results revealed no significant changes of maximal bite force after dry immersion. All postural parameters were significantly altered by dry immersion. There were however no significant differences in stabilometric data according to mandibular position. Moreover the masseter tonicity increased immediately after the end of dry immersion period. Dry immersion could be used as a valid model for studying the effects of microgravity on human subjects. However, 3 days appear insufficient in duration to evaluate the effects of weightlessness on maximal bite force. Our research suggests a link between postural disturbance after dry immersion and masseter tonicity.

  16. Automotive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Jiri; Illing, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Sensors are an essential component of most electronic systems in the car. They deliver input parameters for comfort features, engine and emission control as well as for the active and passive safety systems. New technologies such as silicon micromachining play an important role for the introduction of these sensors in all vehicle classes. The importance and use of these sensor technologies in today"s automotive applications will be shown in this article. Finally an outlook on important current developments and new functions in the car will be given.

  17. Piezoceramic Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Valeriy

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the latest and complete information about various types of piezosensors. A sensor is a converter of the measured physical size to an electric signal. Piezoelectric transducers and sensors are based on piezoelectric effects. They have proven to be versatile tools for the measurement of various processes. They are used for quality assurance, process control and for research and development in many different industries. In each area of application specific requirements to the parameters of transducers and sensors are developed. This book presents the fundamentals, technical des

  18. The Drosophila neuropeptides PDF and sNPF have opposing electrophysiological and molecular effects on central neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Christopher G; Pírez, Nicolás; Griffith, Leslie C

    2014-03-01

    Neuropeptides have widespread effects on behavior, but how these molecules alter the activity of their target cells is poorly understood. We employed a new model system in Drosophila melanogaster to assess the electrophysiological and molecular effects of neuropeptides, recording in situ from larval motor neurons, which transgenically express a receptor of choice. We focused on two neuropeptides, pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) and small neuropeptide F (sNPF), which play important roles in sleep/rhythms and feeding/metabolism. PDF treatment depolarized motor neurons expressing the PDF receptor (PDFR), increasing excitability. sNPF treatment had the opposite effect, hyperpolarizing neurons expressing the sNPF receptor (sNPFR). Live optical imaging using a genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensor for cyclic AMP (cAMP) showed that PDF induced a large increase in cAMP, whereas sNPF caused a small but significant decrease in cAMP. Coexpression of pertussis toxin or RNAi interference to disrupt the G-protein Gαo blocked the electrophysiological responses to sNPF, showing that sNPFR acts via Gαo signaling. Using a fluorescent sensor for intracellular calcium, we observed that sNPF-induced hyperpolarization blocked spontaneous waves of activity propagating along the ventral nerve cord, demonstrating that the electrical effects of sNPF can cause profound changes in natural network activity in the brain. This new model system provides a platform for mechanistic analysis of how neuropeptides can affect target cells at the electrical and molecular level, allowing for predictions of how they regulate brain circuits that control behaviors such as sleep and feeding.

  19. The tarsal taste of honey bees: behavioral and electrophysiological analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela eDe Brito Sanchez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Taste plays a crucial role in the life of honey bees as their survival depends on the collection and intake of nectar and pollen, and other natural products. Here we studied the tarsal taste of honey bees through a series of behavioral and electrophysiological analyses. We characterized responsiveness to various sweet, salty and bitter tastants delivered to gustatory sensilla of the fore tarsi. Behavioral experiments showed that stimulation of opposite fore tarsi with sucrose and bitter substances or water yielded different outcomes depending on the stimulation sequence. When sucrose was applied first, thereby eliciting proboscis extension, no bitter substance could induce proboscis retraction, thus suggesting that the primacy of sucrose stimulation induced a central excitatory state. When bitter substances or water were applied first, sucrose stimulation could still elicit proboscis extension but to a lower level, thus suggesting central inhibition based on contradictory gustatory input on opposite tarsi. Electrophysiological experiments showed that receptor cells in the gustatory sensilla of the tarsomeres are highly sensitive to saline solutions at low concentrations. No evidence for receptors responding specifically to sucrose or to bitter substances was found in these sensilla. Receptor cells in the gustatory sensilla of the claws are highly sensitive to sucrose. Although bees do not possess dedicated bitter-taste receptors on the tarsi, indirect bitter detection is possible because bitter tastes inhibit sucrose receptor cells of the claws when mixed with sucrose solution. By combining behavioral and electrophysiological approaches, these results provide the first integrative study on tarsal taste detection in the honey bee.

  20. Electrophysiological effects of hydrogen sulfide on human atrial fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Meng; WU Yu-ming; LI Qian; LIU Su; HE Rui-rong

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been reported that endogenous or exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exerts physiological effects in the vertebrate cardiovascular system.We have also demonstrated that H2S acts as an important regulator of electrophysiological properties in guinea pig papillary muscles and on pacemaker cells in sinoatrial nodes of rabbits.This study was to observe the electrophysiological effects of H2S on human atrial fibers.Methods Human atrial samples were collected during cardiac surgery.Parameters of action potential in human atrial specialized fibers were recorded using a standard intracellular microelectrode technique.Results NaHS (H2S donor) (50,100 and 200 μmol/L) decreased the amplitude of action potential (APA),maximal rate of depolarization (Vmax),velocity of diastolic (phase 4) depolarization (VDD) and rate of pacemaker firing (RPF),and shortened the duration of 90% repolarization (APD90) in a concentration-dependent manner.ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP)channel blocker glibenclamide (Gli,20 μmol/L) partially blocked the effects of NaHS (100 μmol/L) on human atrial fiber cells.The L-type Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K8644 (0.5 μmol/L) also partially blocked the effects of NaHS (100 μmol/L).An inhibitor of cystathionine y-lyase (CSE),DL-propargylglycine (PPG,200 μmol/L),increased APA,Vmax,VDD and RPF,and prolonged APD90.Conclusions H2S exerts a negative chronotropic action and accelerates the repolarization of human atrial specialized fibers,possibly as a result of increases in potassium efflux through the opening of KATP channels and a concomitant decrease in calcium influx.Endogenous H2S may be generated by CSE and act as an important regulator of electrophysiological properties in human atrial fibers.

  1. Dry electrode bio-potential recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; McEwan, Alistair; Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Calvo, Rafael A; Romano, Maria; Ruffo, Mariano; Shephard, Richard; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; Mohamed, Armin; van Schaik, André

    2010-01-01

    As wireless bio-medical long term monitoring moves towards personal monitoring it demands very high input impedance systems capable to extend the reading of bio-signal during the daily activities offering a kind of "stress free", convenient connection, with no need for skin preparation. In particular we highlight the development and broad applications of our own circuits for wearable bio-potential sensor systems enabled by the use of an FET based amplifier circuit with sufficiently high impedance to allow the use of passive dry electrodes which overcome the significant barrier of gel based contacts. In this paper we present the ability of dry electrodes in long term monitoring of ECG, EEG and fetal ECG.

  2. Autochthonous "Bjelovars dried cheese"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available «Dried cheese» is in autochthonous group of Bjelovar region cheeses which is still produced in rural domestic scale. The name of cheese originates from production procedure - drying for longer or shorter period in airy place after which the cheese is smoked, or is smoked only without drying. This type of cheese is produced in whole central region of Croatia which includes Međimurje, Podravina, Bilogora; Moslavina, Posavina and region around the capital. The aim of this paper is to describe and determine sensory, chemical and microbiological composition to determine its characteristics and production standards. As standards for sensory properties following characteristics can be used: a Outer shape: dimensions: diameter: 140-145 mm, height: 58-61 mm, mass: 700-750 g, equal, rounded shape, smooth skin, equal colour; b Consistency: easily cut, elastic, soft; c Cut: nicely combined white body, few improper holes of equal size; d Odour: pleasant milky acid odour, fairly smoky; e Taste: Fairly milky acidic taste, medium salty, fairly smoky taste. Depending on fat in dry matter content and water content in non fat dry matter, analyzed samples can be characterized as quarter fat, soft and semidry cheese. Higher acidity and saltiness was determined in some samples, microbiological analyses has shown that the most common contaminants are yeasts and moulds.

  3. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Rouhani, Sherin; Saliba, Kevin J.; Shen, Crystal; Solomon, Tsione; Thomas, Serge L. Y.; Verloo, Patrick; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2009-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came together for a week of discussion and experimentation. In this article, the various models for altered transport are reviewed, together with the areas of consensus in the field and those that require a better understanding. PMID:17292372

  4. Ulnar neuropathy at Guyon's canal: electrophysiological and surgical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, E S; Loizides, A; Panayiotou, P; Papacostas, S S; Kleopa, K A

    2005-03-01

    Published correlations between electrophysiological and surgical findings are relatively rare in cases of ulnar nerve compression at the wrist, compared to the more common compression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. We describe a patient who presented with clinical and electrodiagnostic findings of a pure motor ulnar neuropathy involving the territory of the deep branch. Surgical exploration revealed that a ganglion cyst caused compression of the deep ulnar motor branch at Guyon's canal. This case illustrates the usefulness of electrodiagnostic studies in the localization of nerve entrapment prior to surgery.

  5. Drying of Malaysian Capsicum annuum L. (Red Chili) Dried by Open and Solar Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Fudholi; Mohd Yusof Othman; Mohd Hafidz Ruslan; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of solar drying in the Malaysian red chili (Capsicum annuum L.). Red chilies were dried down from approximately 80% (wb) to 10% (wb) moisture content within 33 h. The drying process was conducted during the day, and it was compared with 65 h of open sun drying. Solar drying yielded a 49% saving in drying time compared with open sun drying. At the average solar radiation of 420 W/m2 and air flow rate of 0.07 kg/s, the collector, drying system, and pickup de...

  6. Vibrissa Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Docket No. 300119 1 of 11 VIBRISSA SENSOR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by...REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention provides a... measured as strain. [0009] Thus, there is a need for a sensor utilizing a vibrissa that can detect dynamic and high frequency movement of the

  7. Trigger Point Dry Needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Increasingly, physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to treat musculoskeletal pain, even though this treatment has been a controversial addition to practice. To better generalize to physical therapy practice the findings about dry needling thus far, the authors of a study published in the March 2017 issue of JOSPT identified the need for a systematic review examining the effectiveness of dry needling performed by physical therapists on people with musculoskeletal pain. Their review offers a meta-analysis of data from several included studies and assesses the evidence for risks of bias. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):150. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0502.

  8. Vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, Ranvir; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Mahesh

    2003-10-01

    Today, vibration sensors with low and medium sensitivities are in great demand. Their applications include robotics, navigation, machine vibration monitoring, isolation of precision equipment & activation of safety systems e.g. airbags in automobiles. Vibration sensors have been developed at SSPL, using silicon micromachining to sense vibrations in a system in the 30 - 200 Hz frequency band. The sensing element in the silicon vibration sensor is a seismic mass suspended by thin silicon hinges mounted on a metallized glass plate forming a parallel plate capacitor. The movement of the seismic mass along the vertical axis is monitored to sense vibrations. This is obtained by measuring the change in capacitance. The movable plate of the parallel plate capacitor is formed by a block connected to a surrounding frame by four cantilever beams located on sides or corners of the seismic mass. This element is fabricated by silicon micromachining. Several sensors in the chip sizes 1.6 cm x 1.6 cm, 1 cm x 1 cm and 0.7 cm x 0.7 cm have been fabricated. Work done on these sensors, techniques used in processing and silicon to glass bonding are presented in the paper. Performance evaluation of these sensors is also discussed.

  9. Magnetically responsive dry fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Bustamante, Rodney; Millán, Angel; Palacio, Fernando; Trindade, Tito; Silva, Nuno J. O.

    2013-07-01

    Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid.Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01784b

  10. Cleaning properties of dry adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.; P.; DíAZ; TéLLEZ; D.; SAMEOTO; C.; MENON

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study into the cleaning properties of synthetic dry adhesives. We have manufactured the adhesive micro-fibres through a low-cost, high yield fabrication method using Sylgard 184 Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the structural material. We deliberately contaminated the adhesive samples with different sized particles in the micro and macro scales and tested different cleaning methods for their efficacy with respect to each particle size. We investigated different cleaning methods, which included the use of wax moulding, vibration and pressure sensitive adhesives. For adhesion testing we used a custom system with a linear stage and a force sensor indenting a hemispherical probe into the adhesive surface and measuring the pull-off force. To characterize the cleaning efficacy we visually inspected each sample in a microscope and weighed the samples with a microgram-accuracy analytical balance. Results showed that the moulding method induced adhesion recovery in a greater percentage than the other cleaning methods and even helped with the recovery of collapsed posts in some cases. On the other hand pressure sensitive adhesives seem to have the upper hand with regards to certain particle sizes that can potentially pose problems with the moulding method.

  11. Electrophysiologic abnormalities of children with ostium secundum atrial septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschhaupt, D G; Khoury, L; Thilenius, O G; Replogle, R L; Arcilla, R A

    1984-06-01

    Sinus node (SN) and atrioventricular node (AVN) function were evaluated in 49 patients with secundum type atrial septal defect (ASD). Automaticity and conduction system function were assessed by intracardiac recording of the AH and HV intervals at rest, corrected SN recovery time, sinoatrial conduction time, AVN refractory period and the ability of the AVN to conduct rapidly paced atrial beats to the ventricles. Electrophysiologic abnormalities were found in 41% of the 34 patients who were studied before surgery. However, no preoperative abnormalities were present in children younger than 2.5 years. If only children older than 2.5 years were analyzed, the incidence of conduction abnormalities was similar for the patients studied before operation (62%) and those studied after operation (71%). The size and ejection fractions of the right and left ventricles, the magnitude of shunt flow and the size of the ASD did not differ between the patients with and those without electrophysiologic abnormalities. AVN dysfunction was present in 40% of the patients who were studied after surgical repair. While this frequency was more than twice the preoperative incidence of AVN dysfunction, it was not statistically significant. The data suggest that patient age is the major factor that influences the presence of conduction system dysfunction in patients with ASD.

  12. Electrophysiologic Assessments of Involuntary Movements: Tremor and Myoclonus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Dong Park

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tremor is defined as a rhythmical, involuntary oscillatory movement of a body part. Although neurological examination reveals information regarding its frequency, regularity, amplitude, and activation conditions, the electrophysiological investigations help in confirming the tremor, in differentiating it from other hyperkinetic disorders like myoclonus, and may provide etiological clues. Accelerometer with surface electromyogram (EMG can be used to document the dominant frequency of a tremor, which may be useful as certain frequencies are more characteristic of specific etiologies than others hyperkinetic disorders. It may show rhythmic bursts, duration and activation pattern (alternating or synchronous. Myoclonus is a quick, involuntary movement. Electrophysiological studies may helpful in the evaluation of myoclonus, not only for confirming the clinical diagnosis but also for understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms. Electroencephalogram (EEG-EMG correlates can give us important information about myoclonus. Jerk-locked back-averaging and evoked potentials with recording of the long-latency, long-loop reflexes are currently available to study the pathophysiology of myoclonus.

  13. Simultaneous electrophysiological recording and calcium imaging of suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Robert P; Allen, Charles N

    2013-12-08

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and fluorescent imaging recording methods were used to study the role of changes of membrane potential or current in regulating the intracellular calcium concentration. Changing environmental conditions, such as the light-dark cycle, can modify neuronal and neural network activity and the expression of a family of circadian clock genes within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the location of the master circadian clock in the mammalian brain. Excitatory synaptic transmission leads to an increase in the postsynaptic Ca(2+) concentration that is believed to activate the signaling pathways that shifts the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes. Hypothalamic slices containing the SCN were patch clamped using microelectrodes filled with an internal solution containing the calcium indicator bis-fura-2. After a seal was formed between the microelectrode and the SCN neuronal membrane, the membrane was ruptured using gentle suction and the calcium probe diffused into the neuron filling both the soma and dendrites. Quantitative ratiometric measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration were recorded simultaneously with membrane potential or current. Using these methods it is possible to study the role of changes of the intracellular calcium concentration produced by synaptic activity and action potential firing of individual neurons. In this presentation we demonstrate the methods to simultaneously record electrophysiological activity along with intracellular calcium from individual SCN neurons maintained in brain slices.

  14. How do astrocytes shape synaptic transmission? Insights from electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn eDallérac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A major breakthrough in neuroscience has been the realization in the last decades that the dogmatic view of astroglial cells as being merely fostering and buffering elements of the nervous system is simplistic. A wealth of investigations now shows that astrocytes actually participate in the control of synaptic transmission in an active manner. This was first hinted by the intimate contacts glial processes make with neurons, particularly at the synaptic level, and evidenced using electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Calcium imaging has provided critical evidence demonstrating that astrocytic regulation of synaptic efficacy is not a passive phenomenon. However, given that cellular activation is not only represented by calcium signaling, it is also crucial to assess concomitant mechanisms. We and others have used electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously record neuronal and astrocytic activity, thus enabling the study of multiple ionic currents and in depth investigation of neuro-glial dialogues. In the current review, we focus on the input such approach has provided in the understanding of astrocyte-neuron interactions underlying control of synaptic efficacy.

  15. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Fen Song

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives. One hundred college students, aged 18 to 25 years, were categorized into four groups of equal size on the basis of body mass index and cardiovascular fitness: a normal-weight and high-fitness (NH group, an obese-weight and high-fitness (OH group, a normal-weight and low-fitness (NL group, and an obese-weight and low-fitness (OL group. Behavioral measures of response time and number of errors, as well as event-related potential (ERP measures of P3 and N1, were assessed during the Stroop Task. The results revealed that, in general, the NH group exhibited shorter response times and larger P3 amplitudes relative to the OH, NL, and OL groups, wherein the OL group exhibited the longest response time in the incongruent condition. No group differences in N1 indices were also revealed. These findings suggest that the status of being both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness is associated with better behavioral and later stages of electrophysiological indices of inhibition. However, these benefits in inhibition function would be lost in an individual who is obese or has low cardiovascular fitness, reflecting the importance keeping both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness.

  16. Modern Electrophysiological Methods for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Grave de Peralta Menendez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern electrophysiological studies in animals show that the spectrum of neural oscillations encoding relevant information is broader than previously thought and that many diverse areas are engaged for very simple tasks. However, EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI still employ as control modality relatively slow brain rhythms or features derived from preselected frequencies and scalp locations. Here, we describe the strategy and the algorithms we have developed for the analysis of electrophysiological data and demonstrate their capacity to lead to faster accurate decisions based on linear classifiers. To illustrate this strategy, we analyzed two typical BCI tasks. (1 Mu-rhythm control of a cursor movement by a paraplegic patient. For this data, we show that although the patient received extensive training in mu-rhythm control, valuable information about movement imagination is present on the untrained high-frequency rhythms. This is the first demonstration of the importance of high-frequency rhythms in imagined limb movements. (2 Self-paced finger tapping task in three healthy subjects including the data set used in the BCI-2003 competition. We show that by selecting electrodes and frequency ranges based on their discriminative power, the classification rates can be systematically improved with respect to results published thus far.

  17. Electrophysiologic Effects of Propafenone on Ischemic Ventricular Tachyarrhythmias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Musheng; Ma Yanfeng; Guo Zhibin

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To observe the electrophysiologic effects of propafenone (Prop) on ischemic ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods A canine ischemic ventricular tachyarrhythmia model was established in open-chest dogs subjected to programmed electrical stimulation (PES) on 5~8 days after acute myocardial infarction. The electrophysiologic effects of propafenone were observed in the model. Results Propafenone distinctly lengthened the QTc interval (P> 0.01) and effective refractory period (ERP) of normal and ischemic ventricular myocardium (NERP and IERP) respectively (P > 0.01), decreased the dispersion of ERP in ischemic myocardium and in left ventricle (P > 0.01), and increased the diastolic excitability threshold of normal and ischemic ventricular myocardium remarkably (P > 0.01). Propafenone effectively prevented PES-induced ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF)(P > 0.01) and ischemia-induced VT/VF (P > 0.05).Conclusions The results indicated that the canine model produced by our methods is a worthy and reliable one, propafenone may be effective in preventing the onset of VT/VF after myocardial ischemic damage in dogs, and deserve further attention as an antifibrillatory agent.

  18. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular physiological characteristics of muscles with active myofascial trigger points, thereby providing a quantitative evaluation of myofascial pain syndrome and clinical foundational data for its diagnosis. [Subjects] Ninety adults in their 20s participated in this study. Subjects were equally divided into three groups: the active myofascial trigger point group, the latent myofascial trigger point group, and the control group. [Methods] Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), endurance, median frequency (MDF), and muscle fatigue index were measured in all subjects. [Results] No significant differences in MVIC or endurance were revealed among the three groups. However, the active trigger point group had significantly different MDF and muscle fatigue index compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Given that muscles with active myofascial trigger points had an increased MDF and suffered muscle fatigue more easily, increased recruitment of motor unit action potential of type II fibers was evident. Therefore, electrophysiological analysis of these myofascial trigger points can be applied to evaluate the effect of physical therapy and provide a quantitative diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome.

  19. SYMMETRY AS A PRINCIPLE OF ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESSES COGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Dmitrieva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is considering the problem of general principals of symmetry for the definition of the connections of oscillation processes in an organism. The symmetry as the condition of a system organization determines the capacity of evaluating of its accuracy and integrity. The methods of cognitive graphic and artificial intelligence algorithms are the power tools for a system analysis of physiological processes. For a long-term the polyparametric methodology of the system analysis of electrophysiological processes with modeling of them on the basis of the fractal geometry and cognitive graphic was developed. The gist of this methodology consists in a parameterization of electrophysiological processes, construction of the geometric model with the uniform set of parameters and using general principals of symmetry and the algorithms of artificial intelligence systems to analyze multi-dimension physiological data. On this base the methods for the system analysis of electrocardiogram, electroreovasogram, electroencephalogram, polyparametric method for an evaluation of human functional state and others were developed.

  20. Clinical and electrophysiological study of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦绍森; 玛依努尔; 王湘

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and electrophysiological features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) . Methods The clinical symptoms and signs of 11 patients with CIDP were studied, motor conduction velocity( MCV), sensory con-duction velocity (SCV) and Electromyography (EMG) were also respectively carried out on 54 motor nerves, 28 sensory nerves and 21 musclesof these 11 cases. The amplitudes of compound muscle action potential(CAMP) obtained from distal and proximal ends were compared to as-certain the presence of conduction block (CB) by stimulating the segments starting from the distal ends. Results More than 3 nerves werefound involved in 10 out of 11 cases, slow MCV were found in 52%, prolongation of the distal latency in 64%, reduction of the amplitudes ofCAMP in 68%, CB in 26%, slow SCV in 85. 7%. EMG revealed neurogenic damage in 81%. Conclusion CIDP is a peripheral de- myelinating neuropathy involving not only the prox imal and distal segments but also the sensory and motor nerves. If there were no conditionsto perform nerve biopsy, testing of protein in CSF and electrophysiology mightbe of important diagnostic value for CIDP.

  1. Electrophysiological correlates of reading the single- and interactive-mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen eWang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding minds is the cognitive basis of successful social interaction. In everyday life, human mental activity often happens at the moment of social interaction among two or multiple persons instead of only one person. Understanding the interactive mind of two- or multi-person is more complex and higher than understanding the single-person mind in the hierarchical structure of theory-of-mind. Understanding the interactive mind maybe differentiate from understanding the single mind. In order to examine the dissociative electrophysiological correlates of reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind, the 64 channels event-related potentials (ERP were recorded while 16 normal adults were observing three kinds of Chinese idioms depicted physical scenes, one-person with mental activity and two- or multi-person with mental interaction. After the equivalent N400, in the 500- to 700-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of late positive component (LPC over frontal for reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind were significantly more positive than for physical representation, while there was no difference between the former two. In the 700-to 800-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of LPC over frontal-central for reading the interactive mind were more positive than for reading the single mind and physical representation, while there was no difference between the latter two. The present study provides electrophysiological signature of the dissociations between reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind.

  2. Automatic fitting of spiking neuron models to electrophysiological recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Rossant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Spiking models can accurately predict the spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents. Since the specific characteristics of the model depend on the neuron, a computational method is required to fit models to electrophysiological recordings. The fitting procedure can be very time consuming both in terms of computer simulations and in terms of code writing. We present algorithms to fit spiking models to electrophysiological data (time-varying input and spike trains that can run in parallel on graphics processing units (GPUs. The model fitting library is interfaced with Brian, a neural network simulator in Python. If a GPU is present it uses just-in-time compilation to translate model equations into optimized code. Arbitrary models can then be defined at script level and run on the graphics card. This tool can be used to obtain empirically validated spiking models of neurons in various systems. We demonstrate its use on public data from the INCF Quantitative Single-Neuron Modeling 2009 competition by comparing the performance of a number of neuron spiking models.

  3. COMMUNICATION: Electrophysiological response dynamics during focal cortical infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiganos, Terry C., Jr.; Jensen, Winnie; Rousche, Patrick J.

    2006-12-01

    While the intracellular processes of hypoxia-induced necrosis and the intercellular mechanisms of post-ischemic neurotoxicity associated with stroke are well documented, the dynamic electrophysiological (EP) response of neurons within the core or periinfarct zone remains unclear. The present study validates a method for continuous measurement of the local EP responses during focal cortical infarction induced via photothrombosis. Single microwire electrodes were acutely implanted into the primary auditory cortex of eight rats. Multi-unit neural activity, evoked via a continuous 2 Hz click stimulus, was recorded before, during and after infarction to assess neuronal function in response to local, permanent ischemia. During sham infarction, the average stimulus-evoked peak firing rate over 20 min remained stable at 495.5 ± 14.5 spikes s-1, indicating temporal stability of neural function under normal conditions. Stimulus-evoked peak firing was reliably reduced to background levels (firing frequency in the absence of stimulus) following initiation of photothrombosis over a period of 439 ± 92 s. The post-infarction firing patterns exhibited unique temporal degradation of the peak firing rate, suggesting a variable response to ischemic challenge. Despite the inherent complexity of cerebral ischemia secondary to microvascular occlusion, complete loss of EP function consistently occurred 300-600 s after photothrombosis. The results suggest that microwire recording during photothrombosis provides a simple and highly efficacious strategy for assessing the electrophysiological dynamics of cortical infarction.

  4. Individual differences in reinforcement learning: behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Diane L; Dillon, Daniel G; Birk, Jeffrey L; Holmes, Avram J; Goetz, Elena; Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2008-08-15

    During reinforcement learning, phasic modulations of activity in midbrain dopamine neurons are conveyed to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and basal ganglia (BG) and serve to guide adaptive responding. While the animal literature supports a role for the dACC in integrating reward history over time, most human electrophysiological studies of dACC function have focused on responses to single positive and negative outcomes. The present electrophysiological study investigated the role of the dACC in probabilistic reward learning in healthy subjects using a task that required integration of reinforcement history over time. We recorded the feedback-related negativity (FRN) to reward feedback in subjects who developed a response bias toward a more frequently rewarded ("rich") stimulus ("learners") versus subjects who did not ("non-learners"). Compared to non-learners, learners showed more positive (i.e., smaller) FRNs and greater dACC activation upon receiving reward for correct identification of the rich stimulus. In addition, dACC activation and a bias to select the rich stimulus were positively correlated. The same participants also completed a monetary incentive delay (MID) task administered during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Compared to non-learners, learners displayed stronger BG responses to reward in the MID task. These findings raise the possibility that learners in the probabilistic reinforcement task were characterized by stronger dACC and BG responses to rewarding outcomes. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of the dACC to probabilistic reward learning in humans.

  5. Electrophysiological Correlates of Reading the Single- and Interactive-Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wen; Zheng, Yu-Wei; Lin, Chong-De; Wu, Jie; Shen, De-Li

    2011-01-01

    Understanding minds is the cognitive basis of successful social interaction. In everyday life, human mental activity often happens at the moment of social interaction among two or multiple persons instead of only one-person. Understanding the interactive mind of two- or multi-person is more complex and higher than understanding the single-person mind in the hierarchical structure of theory of mind. Understanding the interactive mind maybe differentiate from understanding the single mind. In order to examine the dissociative electrophysiological correlates of reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind, the 64 channels event-related potentials were recorded while 16 normal adults were observing three kinds of Chinese idioms depicted physical scenes, one-person with mental activity, and two- or multi-person with mental interaction. After the equivalent N400, in the 500- to 700-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of late positive component (LPC) over frontal for reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind were significantly more positive than for physical representation, while there was no difference between the former two. In the 700- to 800-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of LPC over frontal–central for reading the interactive mind were more positive than for reading the single mind and physical representation, while there was no difference between the latter two. The present study provides electrophysiological signature of the dissociations between reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind. PMID:21845178

  6. Electrophysiological findings of Turkish patients with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özsimsek, Ahmet; Koyuncuoglu, Hasan Rifat

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate changes in electrophysiological findings in Turkish patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS), including F-wave latency (FWL), peripheral silent period (PSP), and Hoffmann reflex. The study took place in a university hospital in Turkey and involved 30 newly diagnosed RLS patients and 30 healthy controls who were matched for age and gender. Participant's demographics (age, gender, weight, and height), laboratory findings, and electrophysiological test outcomes were gathered and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the FWL of the median and ulnar nerves, whereas the H-wave maximum amplitude and H/M ratio were significantly higher in the RLS patients than in the controls at rest. All of the PSP parameters were similar between patients and controls for the abductor pollicis brevis and gastrocnemius muscles. However, for the tibialis anterior muscle, all the PSP duration parameters were shorter in the RLS patients, whereas the PSP latency parameters were similar. The data suggest that there may be a reduction in spinal segmental inhibition at the L4-L5-S1 level, but the mechanisms of inhibition at the L4-L5 and S1 levels may be different; furthermore, there may be no pathology in the peripheral nerves. Further prospective studies with larger cohorts are now needed to evaluate the pathophysiology of RLS with different neurophysiological assessment tools.

  7. MEMS sensor technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zhuangde

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992 the author has led research group in Xi'an Jiaotong University to investigate and develop microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors, including pressure sensor, acceleration sensor, gas sensor, viscosity & density sensor, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip and integrated sensor etc. This paper introduces the technologies and research results related to MEMS sensors we achieved in the last 20 years.

  8. Properties of Spray Dried Food and Spray Drying Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Fumio

    The following conclusions are obtained, studying properties of spray dried food and drying characteristics. (a) Dried particles are similar to spray droplets in size distribution (y=2.5), and particle count distribution is arranged as (dn/dx = ae-bx). (b) The ratio of the particle diameters before and after drying is calculated with moisture before and after drying, and porosity is given as (εp = ww4). (c) The standard drying method is presented to evaluate accurately drying problems at a certain standard. (d) Equilibrium moisture at 20 up to 100°C are summarized in terms of adsorption potential. (e) It makes clear that calulation based on the theory of residence time and drying time represents well complex spray drying characteristics.

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... when I sleep? Feb 10, 2016 Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Find an Ophthalmologist ...

  10. Infrared Drying Parameter Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    In recent years, much research has been done to explore direct printing methods, such as screen and inkjet printing, as alternatives to the traditional lithographic process. The primary motivation is reduction of the material costs associated with producing common electronic devices. Much of this research has focused on developing inkjet or screen paste formulations that can be printed on a variety of substrates, and which have similar conductivity performance to the materials currently used in the manufacturing of circuit boards and other electronic devices. Very little research has been done to develop a process that would use direct printing methods to manufacture electronic devices in high volumes. This study focuses on developing and optimizing a drying process for conductive copper ink in a high volume manufacturing setting. Using an infrared (IR) dryer, it was determined that conductive copper prints could be dried in seconds or minutes as opposed to tens of minutes or hours that it would take with other drying devices, such as a vacuum oven. In addition, this study also identifies significant parameters that can affect the conductivity of IR dried prints. Using designed experiments and statistical analysis; the dryer parameters were optimized to produce the best conductivity performance for a specific ink formulation and substrate combination. It was determined that for an ethylene glycol, butanol, 1-methoxy 2- propanol ink formulation printed on Kapton, the optimal drying parameters consisted of a dryer height of 4 inches, a temperature setting between 190 - 200°C, and a dry time of 50-65 seconds depending on the printed film thickness as determined by the number of print passes. It is important to note that these parameters are optimized specifically for the ink formulation and substrate used in this study. There is still much research that needs to be done into optimizing the IR dryer for different ink substrate combinations, as well as developing a

  11. Quality of dry ginger (Zingiber officinale) by different drying methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Jayashree; R, Visvanathan; T, John Zachariah

    2014-11-01

    Ginger rhizomes sliced to various lengths of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 mm and whole rhizomes were dried from an initial moisture content of 81.3 % to final moisture content of less than 10 % by various drying methods like sun drying, solar tunnel drying and cabinet tray drying at temperatures of 50, 55, 60 and 65 °C. Slicing of ginger rhizomes significantly reduced the drying time of ginger in all the drying methods. It was observed that drying of whole ginger rhizomes under sun took the maximum time (9 days) followed by solar tunnel drying (8 days). Significant reduction in essential oil and oleoresin content of dry ginger was found as the slice length decreased. The important constituents of ginger essential oil like zingiberene, limonene, linalool, geraniol and nerolidol as determined using a gas chromatography was also found to decrease during slicing and as the drying temperature increased. The pungency constituents in the oleoresin of ginger like total gingerols and total shogoals as determined using a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography also showed a decreasing trend on slicing and with the increase in drying temperature. It was observed from the drying studies that whole ginger rhizomes dried under sun drying or in a solar tunnel drier retained the maximum essential oil (13.9 mg/g) and oleoresin content (45.2 mg/g) of dry ginger. In mechanical drying, the drying temperature of 60 °C was considered optimum however there was about 12.2 % loss in essential oil at this temperature.

  12. Optimization of the secondary drying step in freeze drying using TDLAS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneid, Stefan C; Gieseler, Henning; Kessler, William J; Luthra, Suman A; Pikal, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    The secondary drying phase in freeze drying is mostly developed on a trial-and-error basis due to the lack of appropriate noninvasive process analyzers. This study describes for the first time the application of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy, a spectroscopic and noninvasive sensor for monitoring secondary drying in laboratory-scale freeze drying with the overall purpose of targeting intermediate moisture contents in the product. Bovine serum albumin/sucrose mixtures were used as a model system to imitate high concentrated antibody formulations. First, the rate of water desorption during secondary drying at constant product temperatures (-22 °C, -10 °C, and 0 °C) was investigated for three different shelf temperatures. Residual moisture contents of sampled vials were determined by Karl Fischer titration. An equilibration step was implemented to ensure homogeneous distribution of moisture (within 1%) in all vials. The residual moisture revealed a linear relationship to the water desorption rate for different temperatures, allowing the evaluation of an anchor point from noninvasive flow rate measurements without removal of samples from the freeze dryer. The accuracy of mass flow integration from this anchor point was found to be about 0.5%. In a second step, the concept was successfully tested in a confirmation experiment. Here, good agreement was found for the initial moisture content (anchor point) and the subsequent monitoring and targeting of intermediate moisture contents. The present approach for monitoring secondary drying indicated great potential to find wider application in sterile operations on production scale in pharmaceutical freeze drying. © 2011 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

  13. Conductive Hearing Loss during Infancy: Effects on Later Auditory Brain Stem Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; Finitzo, Terese

    1991-01-01

    Long-term effects on auditory electrophysiology from early fluctuating hearing loss were studied in 27 children, aged 5 to 7 years, who had been evaluated originally in infancy. Findings suggested that early fluctuating hearing loss disrupts later auditory brain stem electrophysiology. (Author/DB)

  14. A new remote optical wetness sensor and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.M.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Hillen, W.C.A.M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    An optical wetness sensor (OWS) was developed for continuous surface wetness measurements. The sensor is an all-weather instrument that does not interfere with the surface wetting and drying process and is unaffected by solar radiation. It is equipped with its own light source with which it can scan

  15. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  16. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  17. Clinical and electrophysiological recovery in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy with G3460A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkawi, Eamon; Oleszczuk, Justyna D; Holder, Graham E; Raina, Joyti

    2012-08-01

    To report a case of clinical and electrophysiological recovery in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) with G3460A Mutation. A 10-year-old boy with a three-month history of painless bilateral sequential visual loss upon presentation underwent visual acuity (diminished), anterior and posterior segment examination (normal), fluorescein angiography (normal), Goldman kinetic perimetry (bilateral central scotomata), genetic (a point G3460A mutation) and electrophysiological investigation (undetectable pattern visual evoked potentials (VEP); low amplitude, broadened and reduced flash VEPs and loss of the N95 component in the pattern electroretinograms). Diagnosis of LHON was made. Eighteen months later vision and electrophysiological tests results began spontaneously improving. Kinetic perimetry revealed reduced density and size of scotomata. Two years later, there had been further electrophysiological improvement. This report describes both clinical and electrophysiological improvement in LHON with G3460A mutation.

  18. ROLE OF ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY IN EARLY DETECTION OF HEA RING IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree Devi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In the present study about 72 children with complai nts of hearing impairment attending the Outpatient department of Government Ear, Nose a nd Throat Hospital were taken up. These children were chosen randomly and were followed up from consultation stage till the final diagnosis after completion of all the tests. The age range of children was from 1 year to 7 years. 43 Children were males and 29 children were females. All the ch ildren attended the Government E.N.T. Hospital for evaluation and further evaluations were done at the Hearing Aid Centre. Most of the children were from poor socio-economic status (White Ration Card Holders. Average time taken for each child ranged from 60 minutes to 120 minutes since t he physiological tests have to be done for the children under sedation as they are not co-operativ e. The Aims and Objectives of this study are 1. Early detection of hearing impairment in children h as been the main aim of this study. Children of age groups, ranging from 1 – 7 years with a complaint o f hearing impairment are taken up for this study. Main emphasis being on sensori-neural hearing loss with or without speech impairment, cases of external and middle ear conditions are excluded.2. Assessment of the type and degree of hearing loss and knowing probable site of pathology by conductin g a battery of tests- PTA (pure tone audiometry, FFA(Free field Audiometry, Impedance Audiometry, OAE(otoacoustic emissions, and BERA(Brain stem Evoked Response Audiometry.3. Know ing efficacy and accuracy of Electrophysiological tests in children who are othe rwise uncooperative or cannot understand and follow the subjective tests. 4. Comparing the resul ts of Electrophysiological tests and subjective tes ts. 5. Analyzing the data in terms of gender, etiology, type of hearing loss etc. With the advent of the advanced electrophysiological tests of hearing like BERA, OAE, Electrocochleography and Auditory Steady State Response audiometry

  19. Study on drying rate in contact drying with flexible screen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟宏; 陆仁书; 张显权

    2000-01-01

    The moisture contents (MC) of popular veneers were tested in Composition Board Laboratory of Northeast Forestry University by contact drying with flexible screen. The influence factors considered included temperature, initial moisture contents (IMC), and veneer thickness. Veneer-drying laws under different hot press conditions were analyzed. The results showed that the drying rate increased with temperature rising. 160℃ was considered to be more efficient than 140℃ and 180℃ because excessive high temperature has no significant contribution to drying rate. IMC had significant effect on drying rate. The veneer with high IMC had a higher drying rate at above fiber saturation point (FSP) and a lower drying rate at below FSP, compared to the veneer with low IMC. Average drying rate also varied with thickness in power law.

  20. Dry alcohol production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for dry alcohol production plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects a production plant with a capacity of 40 m3/y was manufactured, at "Zorka Pharma", Šabac in 1995-1996. The product meets all quality demands, as well as environmental regulations. The dry alcohol production process is fully automatized. There is no waste in the process, neither gaseous, nor liquid. The chosen process provides safe operation according to temperature regime and resistance in the pipes, air purification columns and filters. Working at increased pressure is suitable for evaporation and condensation at increased temperatures. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start-up, and repairs.

  1. An unusually dry story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rajagopala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a middle-aged woman with a prior history of central nervous system (CNS demyelinating disorder who presented with an acute onset quadriparesis and respiratory failure. The evaluation revealed distal renal tubular acidosis with hypokalemia and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Weakness persisted despite potassium correction, and ongoing evaluation confirmed recurrent CNS and long-segment spinal cord demyelination with anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies. There was no history of dry eyes or dry mouth. Anti-Sjogren′s syndrome A antigen antibodies were elevated, and there was reduced salivary flow on scintigraphy. Coexistent antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with inferior vena cava thrombosis was also found on evaluation. The index patient highlights several rare manifestations of primary Sjogren′s syndrome (pSS as the presenting features and highlights the differential diagnosis of the clinical syndromes in which pSS should be considered in the Intensive Care Unit.

  2. Drying characteristics and kinetics of fluidized bed dried potato

    OpenAIRE

    S.B. BAKAL; K.H. GEDAM; Sharma, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    In developed countries, more than 50% potatoes are consumed as processed products. As drying is the vital phenomenon in processing, it is necessary to investigate the drying characteristics and its kinetics. In this experimental study, drying kinetics of Potato in two different shape of cuboidal & cylindrical with three aspect ratio was investigated as a function of drying conditions. Experiments were conducted using air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 ºC, at velocity of 7 ms-1. The experimenta...

  3. Dry Eye Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Javadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS, also known as dry eye syndrome, has been changed over recent years. Until lately, the condition was thought to be merely due to aqueous tear insufficiency. Today, it is understood that KCS is a multifactorial disorder due to inflammation of the ocular surface and lacrimal gland, neurotrophic deficiency and meibomian gland dysfunction. This change in paradigm has led to the development of new and more effective medications.

  4. Drying of complex suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lei; Bergés, Alexis; Lu, Peter J.; Studart, André R.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Oki, Hidekazu; Davies, Simon; Weitz, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the 3D structure and drying dynamics of complex mixtures of emulsion droplets and colloidal particles, using confocal microscopy. Air invades and rapidly collapses large emulsion droplets, forcing their contents into the surrounding porous particle pack at a rate proportional to the square of the droplet radius. By contrast, small droplets do not collapse, but remain intact and are merely deformed. A simple model coupling the Laplace pressure to Darcy's law correctly estimates ...

  5. Electrophysiological studies in American Quarter horses with neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, Carrie J; Aleman, Monica; Ofri, Ron; Hollingsworth, Steven R; Madigan, John E; Winfield, Laramie; Bannasch, Danika L

    2012-09-01

    Neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) is a disease characterized by the sudden onset of neurologic signs in horses ranging from 4 to 36 months of age. Equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (EDM), a disease that has been associated with low vitamin E concentrations, is considered a more advanced form of NAD. The objective of this report is to describe the electrophysiological features of NAD/EDM in American Quarter horses (QHs). HORSES: Six NAD/EDM-affected QHs and six unaffected QHs were evaluated by ophthalmic examination and electroretinography. Five of the NAD/EDM-affected QH and five unaffected QHs were also evaluated by electroencephalography (EEG). Ophthalmic examination, ERGs, and EEGs were unremarkable in NAD/EDM cases. Neuroaxonal dystrophy/EDM does not appear to cause clinical signs of ocular disease or functional ERG/EEG deficits in QHs. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  6. Reentry confined to the atrioventricular node: electrophysiologic and anatomic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, M M; Gonzalez, R; Thomas, A; Ullyot, D; Bharati, S; Lev, M

    1982-05-01

    A patient with recurrent disabling, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia refractory to drug treatment underwent electrophysiologic studies. The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia was found to be due to atrioventricular (A-V) nodal reentry. The patient died shortly after surgical His bundle section and detailed anatomic studies were performed. These showed fatty infiltration of the approaches to the sinoatrial node, atrial preferential pathways, and A-V node and common bundle. The A-V node was mechanically damaged and the common His bundle was completely severed. These abnormalities were clearly delineated and there was no evidence of an atrio-His bundle bypass tract to an accessory A-V node. Specifically, the central fibrous body and pars membranacea were defined and no atrial muscular fibers pierced these structures to joint the A-V bundle. It is concluded that paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia due to A-V nodal reentry can be confined to the A-V node.

  7. Electrophysiological correlates of language switching in second language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Meij, Maartje; Cuetos, Fernando; Carreiras, Manuel; Barber, Horacio A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the electrophysiological correlates of language switching in second language learners. Participants were native Spanish speakers classified in two groups according to English proficiency (high and low). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while they read English sentences, half of which contained an adjective in Spanish in the middle of the sentence. The ERP results show the time-course of language switch processing for both groups: an initial detection of the switch driven by language-specific orthography (left-occipital N250) followed by costs at the level of the lexico-semantic system (N400), and finally a late updating or reanalysis process (LPC). In the high proficiency group, effects in the N400 time window extended to left anterior electrodes and were followed by larger LPC amplitudes at posterior sites. These differences suggest that proficiency modulates the different processes triggered by language switches. Copyright © 2010 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  8. Electrophysiological responses of the mouse retina to 12C ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannita, Walter G; Peachey, Neal S; Strettoi, Enrica; Ball, Sherry L; Belli, Francesco; Bidoli, Vittorio; Carozzo, Simone; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pignatelli, Vincenzo; Rinaldi, Adele; Saturno, Moreno; Schardt, Dieter; Vazquez, Marcelo; Zaconte, Veronica; Narici, Livio

    2007-04-18

    Phosphenes ("light flashes") have been reported by most astronauts on space missions and by healthy subjects whose eyes were exposed to ionizing radiation in early experiments in particle accelerators. The conditions of occurrence suggested retinal effects of heavy ions. To develop an in vivo animal model, we irradiated the eyes of anesthetized wild-type mice with repeated bursts of 12C ions delivered under controlled conditions in accelerator. 12C ions evoked electrophysiological retinal mass responses and activated the visual system as indicated by responses recorded from the visual cortex. No retinal immunohistological damage was detected. Mice proved a suitable animal model to study radiation-induced phosphenes in vivo and our findings are consistent with an origin of phosphenes in radiation activating the retina.

  9. Electrophysiological ratio markers for the balance between reward and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Van Honk, Jack

    2005-08-01

    It has been argued that prototypical forms of psychopathology result from an imbalance in reward and punishment systems. Recent studies suggest that the ratios between slower and faster waves of the electroencephalogram (EEG) index this motivational balance and might therefore have diagnostic value for psychopathology. To scrutinize this notion, the present study investigated whether resting state EEG ratios would predict decision making on the Iowa gambling task (Iowa-GT), a well-known marker for motivational imbalance. A resting state EEG recording was acquired followed by the Iowa-GT in twenty-eight healthy right-handed volunteers. Results showed that higher versus lower EEG ratios were associated with disadvantageous versus advantageous decision making strategies indicating motivational imbalances in reward- and punishment-driven behavior, respectively. This finding provides the first direct evidence that the electrophysiologically derived EEG ratios can serve as biological markers for balance and imbalance in motivation.

  10. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2003-01-01

    characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion....... The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery.......Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels...

  11. Encoding of electrophysiology and other signals in MR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G; Lund, Torben E; Hanson, Christian G

    2007-01-01

    to the "magstripe" technique used for encoding of soundtracks in motion pictures, the electrical signals are in this way encoded as artifacts appearing in the MR images or spectra outside the region of interest. The encoded signals are subsequently reconstructed from the signal recorded by the scanner. RESULTS......: Electrophysiological (EP) eye and heart muscular recording (electrooculography [EOG] and electrocardiography [ECG]) during fast echo planar imaging (EPI) is demonstrated with an expandable, modular 8-channel prototype implementation. The gradient artifacts that would normally be dominating EOG are largely eliminated....... CONCLUSION: The method provides relatively inexpensive sampling with inherent microsecond synchronization and it reduces gradient artifacts in physiological recordings significantly. When oversampling is employed, the method is compatible with all MR reconstruction and postprocessing techniques....

  12. Electrophysiological biomarkers for improved etiological diagnosis of cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Takao Yamasaki,1,2 Shozo Tobimatsu1 1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Institute, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Department of Neurology, Minkodo Minohara Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD, Lewy body disease (LBD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD are three major types of neurodegenerative dementia. Intervention and treatment differ significantly among these major dementias, necessitating early and accurate diagnosis. Patients with AD, LBD, and FTLD exhibit specific patterns of visual dysfunction as early behavioral signs. These visual impairments are the manifestations of topographic patterns of neuropathology specific to each type of dementia. Electrophysiological measurements, such as visual evoked potentials and event-related potentials, are objective and noninvasive tools that can detect subtle functional changes in human brain. Therefore, with the use of visual evoked potentials and event-related potentials, early detection of specific patterns of visual dysfunction may be useful for differential diagnosis of dementia. In this review, we first summarize current knowledge about the relevant aspects of the human visual system. Second, we outline clinical characteristics, including visual perceptual abnormalities, of each type of degenerative dementia. Finally, we describe the application of visual evoked potential and event-related potential recording techniques to study visual perception in patients with mild cognitive impairment (prodromal stage of dementia. We stress that electrophysiological signals have potential as reliable biomarkers in the diagnosis of different types of dementia, especially in the case of overlapping phenotypes. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, visual evoked potentials, event-related potentials, parallel visual pathways

  13. Behavioural, modeling, and electrophysiological evidence for supramodality in human metacognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Nathan; Filevich, Elisa; Solovey, Guillermo; Kühn, Simone; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-09-15

    Human metacognition, or the capacity to introspect on one's own mental states, has been mostly characterized through confidence reports in visual tasks. A pressing question is to what extent results from visual studies generalize to other domains. Answering this question allows determining whether metacognition operates through shared, supramodal mechanisms, or through idiosyncratic, modality-specific mechanisms. Here, we report three new lines of evidence for decisional and post-decisional mechanisms arguing for the supramodality of metacognition. First, metacognitive efficiency correlated between auditory, tactile, visual, and audiovisual tasks. Second, confidence in an audiovisual task was best modeled using supramodal formats based on integrated representations of auditory and visual signals. Third, confidence in correct responses involved similar electrophysiological markers for visual and audiovisual tasks that are associated with motor preparation preceding the perceptual judgment. We conclude that the supramodality of metacognition relies on supramodal confidence estimates and decisional signals that are shared across sensory modalities.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTMetacognitive monitoring is the capacity to access, report and regulate one's own mental states. In perception, this allows rating our confidence in what we have seen, heard or touched. While metacognitive monitoring can operate on different cognitive domains, we ignore whether it involves a single supramodal mechanism common to multiple cognitive domains, or modality-specific mechanisms idiosyncratic to each domain. Here, we bring evidence in favor of the supramodality hypothesis by showing that participants with high metacognitive performance in one modality are likely to perform well in other modalities. Based on computational modeling and electrophysiology, we propose that supramodality can be explained by the existence of supramodal confidence estimates, and by the influence of decisional cues on

  14. Incorporating inductances in tissue-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Simone; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2017-09-01

    In standard models of cardiac electrophysiology, including the bidomain and monodomain models, local perturbations can propagate at infinite speed. We address this unrealistic property by developing a hyperbolic bidomain model that is based on a generalization of Ohm's law with a Cattaneo-type model for the fluxes. Further, we obtain a hyperbolic monodomain model in the case that the intracellular and extracellular conductivity tensors have the same anisotropy ratio. In one spatial dimension, the hyperbolic monodomain model is equivalent to a cable model that includes axial inductances, and the relaxation times of the Cattaneo fluxes are strictly related to these inductances. A purely linear analysis shows that the inductances are negligible, but models of cardiac electrophysiology are highly nonlinear, and linear predictions may not capture the fully nonlinear dynamics. In fact, contrary to the linear analysis, we show that for simple nonlinear ionic models, an increase in conduction velocity is obtained for small and moderate values of the relaxation time. A similar behavior is also demonstrated with biophysically detailed ionic models. Using the Fenton-Karma model along with a low-order finite element spatial discretization, we numerically analyze differences between the standard monodomain model and the hyperbolic monodomain model. In a simple benchmark test, we show that the propagation of the action potential is strongly influenced by the alignment of the fibers with respect to the mesh in both the parabolic and hyperbolic models when using relatively coarse spatial discretizations. Accurate predictions of the conduction velocity require computational mesh spacings on the order of a single cardiac cell. We also compare the two formulations in the case of spiral break up and atrial fibrillation in an anatomically detailed model of the left atrium, and we examine the effect of intracellular and extracellular inductances on the virtual electrode phenomenon.

  15. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modeling with Chaste and CellML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jonathan; Spiteri, Raymond J; Mirams, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository. The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file), and all model code is auto-generated at compile or run time; it never has to be manually edited. We use ontological annotation to identify model variables describing certain biological quantities (membrane voltage, capacitance, etc.) to allow us to import any relevant CellML models into the Chaste framework in consistent units and to interact with them via consistent interfaces. This approach provides a great deal of flexibility for analysing different models of the same system. Chaste provides a wide choice of numerical methods for solving the ordinary differential equations that describe the models. Fixed-timestep explicit and implicit solvers are provided, as discussed in previous work. Here we introduce the Rush-Larsen and Generalized Rush-Larsen integration techniques, made available via symbolic manipulation of the model equations, which are automatically rearranged into the forms required by these approaches. We have also integrated the CVODE solvers, a 'gold standard' for stiff systems, and we have developed support for symbolic computation of the Jacobian matrix, yielding further increases in the performance and accuracy of CVODE. We discuss some of the technical details of this work and compare the performance of the available numerical methods. Finally, we discuss how this is generalized in our functional curation framework, which uses a domain-specific language for defining complex experiments as a basis for comparison of model behavior.

  16. A Wireless Headstage for Combined Optogenetics and Multichannel Electrophysiological Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon-Turcotte, Gabriel; LeChasseur, Yoan; Bories, Cyril; Messaddeq, Younes; De Koninck, Yves; Gosselin, Benoit

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a wireless headstage with real-time spike detection and data compression for combined optogenetics and multichannel electrophysiological recording. The proposed headstage, which is intended to perform both optical stimulation and electrophysiological recordings simultaneously in freely moving transgenic rodents, is entirely built with commercial off-the-shelf components, and includes 32 recording channels and 32 optical stimulation channels. It can detect, compress and transmit full action potential waveforms over 32 channels in parallel and in real time using an embedded digital signal processor based on a low-power field programmable gate array and a Microblaze microprocessor softcore. Such a processor implements a complete digital spike detector featuring a novel adaptive threshold based on a Sigma-delta control loop, and a wavelet data compression module using a new dynamic coefficient re-quantization technique achieving large compression ratios with higher signal quality. Simultaneous optical stimulation and recording have been performed in-vivo using an optrode featuring 8 microelectrodes and 1 implantable fiber coupled to a 465-nm LED, in the somatosensory cortex and the Hippocampus of a transgenic mouse expressing ChannelRhodospin (Thy1::ChR2-YFP line 4) under anesthetized conditions. Experimental results show that the proposed headstage can trigger neuron activity while collecting, detecting and compressing single cell microvolt amplitude activity from multiple channels in parallel while achieving overall compression ratios above 500. This is the first reported high-channel count wireless optogenetic device providing simultaneous optical stimulation and recording. Measured characteristics show that the proposed headstage can achieve up to 100% of true positive detection rate for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) down to 15 dB, while achieving up to 97.28% at SNR as low as 5 dB. The implemented prototype features a lifespan of up to 105

  17. Meralgia paresthetica: clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis in 120 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, P; Seror, R

    2006-05-01

    We report the results of clinical and electrophysiological examinations in 131 cases of meralgia paresthetica (MP) among 120 unselected patients, 69 men and 51 women, aged 15-81 years. All patients experienced permanent or intermittent pain, and all but one had permanent sensory impairment of the thigh. The lateral aspect of the thigh was solely involved in 88 cases and the anterior aspect was also or exclusively involved in 32 cases. The right thigh was involved 62 times and the left 58 times. Symptom duration varied from 2 weeks to 20 years. The initial diagnosis was meralgia paresthetica in 47 cases (39%), root disease in 35 cases, and osteoarthritis in 6 cases; no diagnosis was proposed in the 32 remaining cases. Two cases had undergone previous spine surgery for disk herniation, with no benefit. A precise cause could explain the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) lesion in 46 cases, the other 74 cases being considered idiopathic (25% of patients were obese). Only one case required surgery to relieve symptoms. LFCN conduction was studied orthodromically, distally from the anterior superior iliac spine. The side-to-side amplitude ratio (ssRatio) was greater than 2.3 in 118 of 120 patients (98.3%) and was a better index to confirm a lesion of the LFCN than SNAP amplitude, which was abnormal (less than 3 microV) in 88 cases (73.3%). Only two of the 11 bilateral cases had an ssRatio lower than 2.3 (they were both 2.0). An ssRatio of 2.3 or more and a SNAP amplitude lower than 3 microV provided a specificity of 98.75% or more. The mean axonal loss was 88%. These clinical and electrophysiological data highlight the central role the neurophysiologist should play in diagnosing MP by means of an LFCN conduction study.

  18. Electrophysiological mechanisms of sophocarpine as a potential antiarrhythmic agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-fang YANG; Ci-zhen LI; Wei WANG; Ying-min CHEN; Ying ZHANG; Yuan-mou LIU; Hong-wei WANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the electrophysiological effects of sophocarpine on action potentials (AP) and ionic currents of cardiac myocytes and to compare some of these effects with those of amiodarone.Methods: Langendorff perfusion set-up was used in isolated guinea pig heart, and responses to sophocarpine were monitored using electrocardiograph. Conventional microelectrode, voltage clamp technique and perforated patch were employed to record fast response AP (fAP), slow response AP (sAP) and ionic currents in guinea pig papillary muscle or rabbit sinus node cells.Results: Tachyarrhythmia produced by isoprenaline (15 μmol/L) could be reversed by sophocarpine (300 μmol/L). Sophocarpine (10 μmol/L) decreased the amplitude by 4.0%, maximal depolarization velocity (Vmax) of the fAP by 24.4%, and Na+ current (INa) by 18.0%,while it prolonged the effective refractory period (ERP) by 21.1%. The same concentration of sophocarpine could also decrease the amplitude and Vmax of the sAP, by 26.8% and 25.7%, respectively, and attenuated the Ca2+ current (ICaL) and the K+ tail current substantially. Comparison of sophocarpine with amiodarone demonstrated that both prolonged the duration and the ERP of fAP and sAP, both decreased the amplitude and Vmax of the fAP and sAP, and both slowed the automatic heart rate.Conclusion: Sophocarpine could reverse isoprenaline-induced arrhythmia and inhibit INa, IcaL, and Ikr currents. The electrophysiological effects of sophocarpine are similar to those of amiodarone, which might be regarded as a prospective antiarrhythmic agent.

  19. Individual Differences in Reinforcement Learning: Behavioral, Electrophysiological, and Neuroimaging Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Diane L.; Dillon, Daniel G.; Birk, Jeffrey L.; Holmes, Avram J.; Goetz, Elena; Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2008-01-01

    During reinforcement learning, phasic modulations of activity in midbrain dopamine neurons are conveyed to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and basal ganglia and serve to guide adaptive responding. While the animal literature supports a role for the dACC in integrating reward history over time, most human electrophysiological studies of dACC function have focused on responses to single positive and negative outcomes. The present electrophysiological study investigated the role of the dACC in probabilistic reward learning in healthy subjects using a task that required integration of reinforcement history over time. We recorded the feedback-related negativity (FRN) to reward feedback in subjects who developed a response bias toward a more frequently rewarded (“rich”) stimulus (“learners”) versus subjects who did not (“non-learners”). Compared to non-learners, learners showed more positive (i.e., smaller) FRNs and greater dACC activation upon receiving reward for correct identification of the rich stimulus. In addition, dACC activation and a bias to select the rich stimulus were positively correlated. The same participants also completed a monetary incentive delay (MID) task administered during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Compared to non-learners, learners displayed stronger basal ganglia responses to reward in the MID task. These findings raise the possibility that learners in the probabilistic reinforcement task were characterized by stronger dACC and basal ganglia responses to rewarding outcomes. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of the dACC to probabilistic reward learning in humans. PMID:18595740

  20. Electrophysiological characteristics and radiofrequency ablation of right atrial flutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elaborate the electrophysiology characteristics and radiofrequency ablation (RFA results of atrial flutter (AFL which has not been established in Indonesia. Three multipolar catheters were inserted percutaneously and positioned into coronary sinus (CS, His bundle area and around tricuspid annulus. Eight mm ablation catheter was used to make linear ablation at CTI of typical and reverse typical AFL. Bidirectional block was confirmed by conduction time prolongation of more than 90 msec from low lateral to CS ostium and vice versa, and/or by means of differential pacing. Thirty AFL from 27 patients comprised of 19 typical AFL, 5 reverse typical AFL and 6 atypical AFL enrolled the study. Mean tachycardia cycle length (TCL were 261.8 ± 42.84, 226.5 ± 41.23, and 195.4 ± 9.19 msec, respectively (p = 0.016. CTI conduction time occupied up to 60% of TCL with mean conduction time of 153.0 ± 67.37 msec. CS activation distributed to three categories which comprised of proximal to distal, distal to proximal and fusion activation. Only nine of 27 patients had no structural heart disease. RFA of symptomatic typical and reverse typical AFL demonstrated 96% success and 4.5 % recurrence rate during 13 ± 8 months follow up. Typical AFL is the predominant type of AFL in our population. The majority of AFL cases suffered from structural heart disease. RFA was highly effective to cure typical and reverse typical AFL. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:151-8 Keywords: atrial flutter, electrophysiology, ablation

  1. Evaluation of a radiation protection cabin for invasive electrophysiological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, Octavian; Weerasooriya, Rukshen; Jaïs, Pierre; Hocini, Mélèze; Ector, Joris; Takahashi, Yoshihide; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Bosmans, Hilde; Heidbüchel, Hein

    2007-01-01

    Complex invasive electrophysiological procedures may result in high cumulative operator radiation exposure. Classical protection with lead aprons results in discomfort while radioprotection is still incomplete. This study evaluated the usefulness of a radiation protection cabin (RPC) that completely surrounds the operator. The evaluation was performed independently in two electrophysiology laboratories (E1-Leuven, Belgium; E2-Bordeaux, France), comparing operator radiation exposure using the RPC vs. a 0.5 mm lead-equivalent apron (total of 135 procedures). E1 used thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDs) placed at 16 positions in and out of the RPC and nine positions in and out of the apron. E2 used more sensitive electronic personal dosimeters (EPD), placed at waist and neck. The sensitivity thresholds of the TLDs and EPDs were 10-20 microSv and 1-1.5 microSv, respectively. All procedures could be performed unimpeded with the RPC. Median TLD dose values outside protected areas were in the range of 57-452 microSv, whereas doses under the apron or inside the RPC were all at the background radiation level, irrespective of procedure and fluoroscopy duration and of radiation energy delivered. In addition, the RPC was protecting the entire body (except the hands), whereas lead apron protection is incomplete. Also with the more sensitive EPDs, the radiation dose within the RPC was at the sensitivity threshold/background level (1.3+/-0.6 microSv). Again, radiation to the head was significantly lower within the RPC (1.9+/-1.2 microSv) than with the apron (102+/-23 microSv, P<0.001). The use of the RPC allows performing catheter ablation procedures without compromising catheter manipulation, and with negligible radiation exposure for the operator.

  2. Reentrant Information Flow in Electrophysiological Rat Default Mode Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Zhang, Yunxiang; Guo, Fengru; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A.; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have demonstrated that the rodent brain shows a default mode network (DMN) activity similar to that in humans, offering a potential preclinical model both for physiological and pathophysiological studies. However, the neuronal mechanism underlying rodent DMN remains poorly understood. Here, we used electrophysiological data to analyze the power spectrum and estimate the directed phase transfer entropy (dPTE) within rat DMN across three vigilance states: wakeful rest (WR), slow-wave sleep (SWS), and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS). We observed decreased gamma powers during SWS compared with WR in most of the DMN regions. Increased gamma powers were found in prelimbic cortex, cingulate cortex, and hippocampus during REMS compared with WR, whereas retrosplenial cortex showed a reverse trend. These changed gamma powers are in line with the local metabolic variation of homologous brain regions in humans. In the analysis of directional interactions, we observed well-organized anterior-to-posterior patterns of information flow in the delta band, while opposite patterns of posterior-to-anterior flow were found in the theta band. These frequency-specific opposite patterns were only observed in WR and REMS. Additionally, most of the information senders in the delta band were also the receivers in the theta band, and vice versa. Our results provide electrophysiological evidence that rat DMN is similar to its human counterpart, and there is a frequency-dependent reentry loop of anterior-posterior information flow within rat DMN, which may offer a mechanism for functional integration, supporting conscious awareness. PMID:28289373

  3. Ganzfeld-induced hallucinatory experience, its phenomenology and cerebral electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Jirí; Pütz, Peter; Allefeld, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Ganzfeld, i.e., exposure to an unstructured, uniform stimulation field, elicits in most observers pseudo-hallucinatory percepts, and may even induce global functional state changes ('altered states of consciousness'). The present paper gives a comprehensive overview of the phenomenology of subjective experience in the ganzfeld and its electrophysiological correlates. Laboratory techniques for visual or multi-modal ganzfeld induction are explained. The spectrum of ganzfeld-induced phenomena, ranging from elementary percepts to complex, vivid, dream-like imagery is described, and the latter illustrated by transcripts of subjects' reports. Similarities and differences to related sensory/perceptual phenomena are also discussed. Earlier findings on electrophysiological correlates of the ganzfeld are reviewed. Our own studies of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in the ganzfeld are presented in some detail, and a re-analysis of data on EEG correlates of hallucinatory percepts in statu nascendi is reported. The results do not support the hypothesis of the hypnagogic origin of the percepts; the ganzfeld-induced steady-state is an activated state, and the spectral EEG dynamics in the alpha frequency range reveals processes of attention shifts and percept formation. The final section is devoted to the controversial topic of allegedly anomalous communication between human subjects ('ganzfeld telepathy'). It is shown that the use of ganzfeld in this research field relies partly on unsupported hypotheses concerning ganzfeld-induced states, partly on a weak conceptual background of the experimental procedure. The rôle of a particular belief system shared by the participants and experimenters is critically discussed.

  4. Electrophysiological findings of Turkish patients with restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özsimsek A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Özsimsek,1 Hasan Rifat Koyuncuoglu2 1Neurology Department, Uşak Medical Park Hospital, Uşak, 2Neurology Department, Medical Faculty, Süleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey Abstract: We aimed to investigate changes in electrophysiological findings in Turkish patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS, including F-wave latency (FWL, peripheral silent period (PSP, and Hoffmann reflex. The study took place in a university hospital in Turkey and involved 30 newly diagnosed RLS patients and 30 healthy controls who were matched for age and gender. Participant’s demographics (age, gender, weight, and height, laboratory findings, and electrophysiological test outcomes were gathered and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the FWL of the median and ulnar nerves, whereas the H-wave maximum amplitude and H/M ratio were significantly higher in the RLS patients than in the controls at rest. All of the PSP parameters were similar between patients and controls for the abductor pollicis brevis and gastrocnemius muscles. However, for the tibialis anterior muscle, all the PSP duration parameters were shorter in the RLS patients, whereas the PSP latency parameters were similar. The data suggest that there may be a reduction in spinal segmental inhibition at the L4–L5–S1 level, but the mechanisms of inhibition at the L4–L5 and S1 levels may be different; furthermore, there may be no pathology in the peripheral nerves. Further prospective studies with larger cohorts are now needed to evaluate the pathophysiology of RLS with different neurophysiological assessment tools. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, F wave, peripheral silent period, Hoffmann reflex

  5. Analysis of multiple sclerosis patients with electrophysiological and structural tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamurcu, Mualla; Orhan, Gürdal; Sarıcaoğlu, Murat Sinan; Mungan, Semra; Duru, Zeynep

    2016-08-18

    We aimed to analyze the effects of progressive myelin loss and neurodegeneration seen in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) on visual tract with electrophysiological and structural tests. Fifty-one patients diagnosed with MS in the Neurology Department were followed up in neuro-ophthalmology outpatient clinic irrespective of their visual symptoms, and were included in our study. The patients were classified as the ones with the history of optic neuritis (group II) and ones without the history (group I) of optic neuritis. The data, including clinical presentation, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measurements, pattern visual evoked potential (pVEP) and flash electro retino grams (ERG) test results, were recorded. In our study, comparison of pVEP test latencies of groups I and II with each other, and with those of healthy subjects revealed statistically significant differences (p  0.05). However, both groups showed significantly decreased cone b-wave amplitudes, elongation of latencies, and decreased flicker amplitudes on cone and flicker potentials obtained after light adaptation (p < 0.05). There was significant thinning in RNFLT of the both groups when compared to the normal standards. The difference between two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Axon loss is seen in the optic nerve with subclinical or acute optic neuritis in patients with MS. RNFLT analysis and electrophysiological tests are of great importance in diagnosis of MS, as well as to determine progression and to direct neuroprotective therapy in patients diagnosed with MS. Objective analysis methods gain more importance in the diagnosis and follow-up of MS patients, parallel to technological advancements.

  6. Load sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder for

  7. Gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  8. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000032.htm Dry mouth during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you ...

  9. Nitramine Drying & Fine Grinding Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nitramine Drying and Fine Grinding Facility provides TACOM-ARDEC with a state-of-the-art facility capable of drying and grinding high explosives (e.g., RDX and...

  10. Do we know how plants sense a drying soil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of crop growth and yield in dry areas is largely due to stomatal closure in response to dry soil, which decreases photosynthesis. However, the mechanism that causes stomatal closure in a drying soil is a controversial issue. Experienced and respected plant physiologists around the world have different views about the primary sensor of soil water shortage in plants. The goal of this review is to present a chronological synthesis about the evidence of the possible candidates for the mechanism by which plants sense a drying soil. Hydraulic signals in the leaves as the mechanism that causes stomatal closure dominated the view on how plants sense a drying soil during the 70?s and the early 80?s. In the middle 80?s, studies suggested that stomatal conductance is better correlated with soil and root water status than with leaf water status. Thus, chemical signals produced in the roots dominated the view on how plants sense a drying soil during the late 80?s and early 90?s. During the second half of the 90?s, however, studies provided evidence that hydraulic signals in the leaves are still better candidates for the mechanism by which plants sense a drying soil. After more than 60 years of studies in plant-water relations, the question raised in the title still has no unanimous answer. This controversial issue is a good research rationale for the current generation of plant physiologists.

  11. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also pr

  12. Terrestrial Planets Accreted Dry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2007-12-01

    Plate tectonics shaped the Earth, whereas the Moon is a dry and inactive desert. Mars probably came to rest within the first billion years of its history, and Venus, although internally very active, has a dry inferno for its surface. The strong gravity field of a large planet allows for an enormous amount of gravitational energy to be released, causing the outer part of the planetary body to melt (magma ocean), helps retain water on the planet, and increases the pressure gradient. The weak gravity field and anhydrous conditions prevailing on the Moon stabilized, on top of its magma ocean, a thick buoyant plagioclase lithosphere, which insulated the molten interior. On Earth, the buoyant hydrous phases (serpentines) produced by reactions between the terrestrial magma ocean and the wet impactors received from the outer Solar System isolated the magma and kept it molten for some few tens of million years. The elemental distributions and the range of condensation temperatures show that the planets from the inner Solar System accreted dry. The interior of planets that lost up to 95% of their K cannot contain much water. Foundering of their wet surface material softened the terrestrial mantle and set the scene for the onset of plate tectonics. This very same process may have removed all the water from the surface of Venus 500 My ago and added enough water to its mantle to make its internal dynamics very strong and keep the surface very young. Because of a radius smaller than that of the Earth, not enough water could be drawn into the Martian mantle before it was lost to space and Martian plate tectonics never began. The radius of a planet therefore is the key parameter controlling most of its evolutional features.

  13. Electrohydrodynamic drying of carrot slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Ding

    Full Text Available Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique.

  14. Pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  15. Semiconductor sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Frank, E-mail: frank.hartmann@cern.c [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT, Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  16. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  17. Electrophysiological evaluation in 4 patients with diabetic pseudotabes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofang Cai; Qionghua Huang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Researches on diabetic nervous system lesion are mainly focus on peripheral nerve and vegetative nerve, so there are few investigations on diabetic pseudotabes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the electrophysiological examinations on the diagnosis of diabetic pseudotabes. DESIGN: Case study. SETTING: Department of Electrophysiology and Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital Affiliated to Xiamen University. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 4 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, including 3 males and 1 female aged from 50 to 72 years, were selected from Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital Affiliated to Xiamen University from March 2002 to February 2005. All accepted subjects met the modified diagnostic criteria of diabetes mellitus, which was set by American Diabetes Mellitus Association (ADA) in 1997. Otherwise, the subjects had typical symptoms and physical signs of spinal posterior funiculus damage. However, patients with spinal cord lesion which was caused by other factors were excluded. All accepted subjects provided the confirmed consent.METHODS: Nicolet NT electromyography (EMG)/evoked potential meter (made in the USA) was used to detect spinal cord conduction velocity (SCCV), somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) of lower limbs, motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of extremities.Determining criteria: Measurements were performed based on the laboratory standards. SCCV, which was less than lower limit of normal value (T2-12: 40 - 55 m/s, Ti2 - L4: 20-41 m/s, T2 - L4: 36 - 45 m/s), was regarded as abnormal. SEP value of lower limbs: P40, P60 and PF, which were more than standard deviation of normal value (-x+2.5), were regarded as the abnormality. Normal value of P40, P60 and PF latencies (-x + s) in this study: P40, P60 and PF in males were (37.6±1.9) ms, (59.8±3.9) ms and (7.6±0.9) ms, respectively; meanwhile, those in females were (35.5±1.7) ms, (55.2±2.7) ms and (6.3±0.7) ms, respectively

  18. Development of Pacing, Electrophysiology and Defibrillation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Nair

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available History of cardiac pacing in India dates back to late 1960s. Kar1 reported that cardiac pacing was introduced in India in 1966. Basu2 while discussing on cardiac pacemaking in Calcutta, mentions that the first pacing was performed in April 1967 at the Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research (IPGME&R. Bhatia et al3 started pacemaker implantation at AIIMS, New Delhi in 1968. Their first patient was a doctor from Assam and the pulse generator was supplied by Medtronic Inc. The pulse generator was powered by a mercury-iodide battery which lasted for about 2 ½ years, after which the patient underwent pulse generator replacement. Unfortunately he succumbed to miliary tuberculosis about a year after that. Currently around 8000 pacemakers are being implanted annually in India, in various centers around the country. G.B. Pant Hospital New Delhi has been the pioneering center in the field of Invasive Cardiac Electrophysiology in the country. Bhatia M.L et al9 and Khalilullah M et al 10,11,12,13 were the pioneers in His bundle electrography in the country. Prof. K.K. Sethi was the first to perform catheter ablation in the country. Direct Current ablation was started in 1988 followed by Radio Frequency (RF ablation later on. The number of centres having electrophysiology setup in the country has increased from about 10 in 1997 to around 30 in 2001 (Fig 4. The number of RF ablations being performed in the country has gone up from 800 to 2000 during the same period. Newer insights in the field of atrial fibrillation in rheumatic heart disease have been obtained by electrophysiological studies from the country. Atrial disease due to rheumatic carditis is an important parameter, in addition to valvular involvement in the genesis of atrial fibrillation. Multiple substrates for atrial fibrillation are present in these cases, namely: stretch, fibrosis, raised pressures, increased atrial size and increased anisotropy. Atrial fibrillation in

  19. Dry EEG Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lopez-Gordo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications.

  20. Solar drying and agribusiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiana del Monserrate Ruiz Cedeño

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Agribusinesses are the livelihoods of rural populations, but when production increase, many products are damaged and lose their commercial value due to lack of conservation treatments at a local level. Agricultural production represents the foundation of economic development of the province of Manabi. A significant level of agricultural products is lost due to lack of conservation technologies. Solar drying is a way of conserving by dehydration of some products such as: vegetables, fruits, aromatic and medicinal plants. This can be achieved by a process of proper conservation that is conducive to reduce losses using technologies easy to build, as are the different types of solar dryers which are already used in different parts of the South American region. This article proposes to introduce solar-drying technology in agricultural areas of the province of Manabi. And thereby achieve the regaining of different products that today are lost, incorporating new and attractive, marketable lines based on agricultural products naturally dehydrated with a high nutritionalvalue, capable of contributing to human health not only in the province but also in the country.

  1. Electrophysiology of regular firing cells in the rat perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antuono, M; Biagini, G; Tancredi, V; Avoli, M

    2001-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of neurons in the rat perirhinal cortex were analyzed with intracellular recordings in an in vitro slice preparation. Cells included in this study (n = 59) had resting membrane potential (RMP) = -73.9 +/- 8.5 mV (mean +/- SD), action potential amplitude = 95.5 +/- 10.4 mV, input resistance = 36.1 +/- v 15.7 M omega, and time constant = 13.9 +/- 3.4 ms. When filled with neurobiotin (n = 27) they displayed a pyramidal shape with an apical dendrite and extensive basal dendritic tree. Injection of intracellular current pulses revealed: 1) a tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM)-sensitive, inward rectification in the depolarizing direction (n = 6), and 2) a time- and voltage-dependent hyperpolarizing sag that was blocked by extracellular Cs+ (3 mM, n = 5) application. Prolonged (up to 3 s) depolarizing pulses made perirhinal cells discharge regular firing of fast action potentials that diminished over time in frequency and reached a steady level (i.e., adapted). Repetitive firing was followed by an afterhyperpolarization that was decreased, along with firing adaptation, by the Ca(2+)-channel blocker Co2+ (2 mM, n = 6). Action potential broadening became evident during repetitive firing. This behavior, which was more pronounced when larger pulses of depolarizing current were injected (and thus when repetitive firing attained higher rates), was markedly decreased by Co2+ application. Subthreshold membrane oscillations at 5-12 Hz became apparent when cells were depolarized by 10-20 mV from RMP, and action potential clusters appeared with further depolarization. Application of glutamatergic and GABAA receptor antagonists (n = 4), CO2+ (n = 6), or Cs+ (n = 5) did not prevent the occurrence of these oscillations that were abolished by TTX (n = 6). Our results show that pyramidal-like neurons in the perirhinal cortex are regular firing cells with electrophysiological features resembling those of other cortical pyramidal elements. The ability to

  2. Thermal flow micro sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Elwenspoek, M.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow sensors and time of flight flow sensors. Anemometers may comprise several heaters and temperature sensors and from a geometric point of view are similar sometimes for calorimetric flow sensors. We fi...

  3. Upscaling and automation of electrophysiology: toward high throughput screening in ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Margit; Oswald, Nicholas; Krzywkowski, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    Effective screening of large compound libraries in ion channel drug discovery requires the development of new electrophysiological techniques with substantially increased throughputs compared to the conventional patch clamp technique. Sophion Bioscience is aiming to meet this challenge...

  4. Dry aging of beef; Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashdorj, Dashmaa; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Cho, Soohyun; Kim, Younghoon; Hwang, Inho

    2016-01-01

    The present review has mainly focused on the specific parameters including aging (aging days, temperature, relative humidity, and air flow), eating quality (flavor, tenderness and juiciness), microbiological quality and economic (shrinkage, retail yields and cost) involved beef dry aging process. Dry aging is the process where beef carcasses or primal cuts are hanged and aged for 28 to 55 d under controlling environment conditions in a refrigerated room with 0° to 4 °C and with relative humidity of 75 to 80 %. However there are various opinions on dry aging procedures and purveyors of such products are passionate about their programs. Recently, there has been an increased interest in dry aging process by a wider array of purveyors and retailers in the many countries. Dry aging process is very costly because of high aging shrinkage (6 to15 %), trims loss (3 to 24 %), risk of contamination and the requirement of highest grades meat with. The packaging in highly moisture-permeable bag may positively impact on safety, quality and shelf stability of dry aged beef. The key effect of dry aging is the concentration of the flavor that can only be described as "dry-aged beef". But the contribution of flavor compounds of proteolysis and lipolysis to the cooked dry aged beef flavor is not fully known. Also there are limited scientific studies of aging parameters on the quality and palatability of dry aged beef.

  5. Electrophysiological and functional connectivity of the human supplementary motor area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Laird, Angela R; Tandon, Nitin; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L; Fox, Peter T

    2012-08-01

    Neuro-imaging methods for detecting functional and structural inter-regional connectivity are in a rapid phase of development. While reports of regional connectivity patterns based on individual methods are becoming common, studies comparing the results of two or more connectivity-mapping methods remain rare. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation during PET imaging (TMS/PET), a stimulation-based method, and meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM), a task-based method to map the connectivity patterns of the supplementary motor area (SMA). Further, we drew upon the behavioral domain meta-data of the BrainMap® database to characterize the behavioral domain specificity of two maps. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected multi-synaptic connectivity patterns, with the MACM-detected connections being more extensive. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected connections belonging to multiple behavioral domains, including action, cognition and perception. Finally, we show that the two connectivity-mapping methods are complementary in that, the MACM informed on the functional nature of SMA connections, while TMS/PET identified brain areas electrophysiologically connected with the SMA. Thus, we demonstrate that integrating multimodal database and imaging techniques can derive comprehensive connectivity maps of brain areas.

  6. Electrophysiological studies in mild idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlanda, P; Quartarone, A; Sinicropi, S; Pronestì, C; Nicolosi, C; Macaione, V; Picciolo, G; Messina, C

    1998-02-01

    Many techniques have been reported to improve the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), but there is no agreement on the diagnostic yield of these different methods. We used an electrophysiological protocol including the assessment of the orthodromic sensory conduction velocity of the median nerve along the carpal tunnel, comparison of median and ulnar sensory conduction between the ring finger and wrist, short segment incremental median sensory nerve conduction across the carpal tunnel recording from the III digit ('inching test'), the study of the refractory period of transmission (RPT) and calculation of the distoproximal ratio obtained by dividing the nerve conduction velocity in the median nerve between the third digit and the palm and between the palm and wrist in 41 patients with mild CTS (75 symptomatic hands) and in 45 control subjects. The distoproximal ratio calculation was the most sensitive technique (81%), but was also the least specific. The 'inching test', even though less sensitive, had the advantage of localising focal abnormalities of the median nerve along the carpal tunnel. RPT was abnormal in patients with recent symptoms. Combining the different techniques, an overall sensitivity of 92% was reached, 11% higher than the yield of the single best test suggesting that a multimodal approach could be useful. The best procedure for electrodiagnosis of mild CTS was to combine the median/ulnar comparison test with calculation of the disto-proximal ratio.

  7. Visual search elicits the electrophysiological marker of visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Stephen M; Al-Aidroos, Naseem; Pratt, Jay; Ferber, Susanne

    2009-11-26

    Although limited in capacity, visual working memory (VWM) plays an important role in many aspects of visually-guided behavior. Recent experiments have demonstrated an electrophysiological marker of VWM encoding and maintenance, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), which has been shown in multiple tasks that have both explicit and implicit memory demands. Here, we investigate whether the CDA is evident during visual search, a thoroughly-researched task that is a hallmark of visual attention but has no explicit memory requirements. The results demonstrate that the CDA is present during a lateralized search task, and that it is similar in amplitude to the CDA observed in a change-detection task, but peaks slightly later. The changes in CDA amplitude during search were strongly correlated with VWM capacity, as well as with search efficiency. These results were paralleled by behavioral findings showing a strong correlation between VWM capacity and search efficiency. We conclude that the activity observed during visual search was generated by the same neural resources that subserve VWM, and that this activity reflects the maintenance of previously searched distractors.

  8. Myokit: A simple interface to cardiac cellular electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerx, Michael; Collins, Pieter; de Lange, Enno; Volders, Paul G A

    2016-01-01

    Myokit is a new powerful and versatile software tool for modeling and simulation of cardiac cellular electrophysiology. Myokit consists of an easy-to-read modeling language, a graphical user interface, single and multi-cell simulation engines and a library of advanced analysis tools accessible through a Python interface. Models can be loaded from Myokit's native file format or imported from CellML. Model export is provided to C, MATLAB, CellML, CUDA and OpenCL. Patch-clamp data can be imported and used to estimate model parameters. In this paper, we review existing tools to simulate the cardiac cellular action potential to find that current tools do not cater specifically to model development and that there is a gap between easy-to-use but limited software and powerful tools that require strong programming skills from their users. We then describe Myokit's capabilities, focusing on its model description language, simulation engines and import/export facilities in detail. Using three examples, we show how Myokit can be used for clinically relevant investigations, multi-model testing and parameter estimation in Markov models, all with minimal programming effort from the user. This way, Myokit bridges a gap between performance, versatility and user-friendliness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory neurones in cultured dissociated hippocampal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskaliuk, A O; Kolodin, Iu O; Kravchenko, M O; Fedulova, S A; Veselovs'kyĭ, M S

    2004-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory (GABAergic) neurones were studied in dissociated hippocampal culture using simultaneous whole cell recordings from pairs of monosynaptically coupled neurons. Reliable identification of GABAergic neuron was performed by presence of monosynaptic inhibitory currents at postsynaptic cell in response to action potentials at stimulated cell. It was shown that GABAergic neurons in hippocampal culture are divided in two groups by their firing characteristics: first type generates action potentials at high frequency in response to injection of current (duration 0.5 s)--fast-spiking neurons (FS), cells from second type has no ability for high-frequency action potential generation--regular spiking neurons (RS). These two groups were distinguished by kinetic characteristics of action potentials, adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials and inhibitory effect making on postsynaptic cell. Application of potassium channel blocker 4-AP to somas of FS neurons in concentration, which selectively inhibits Kv3 potassium channels evoked reversible changes in kinetic of action potentials, frequency and adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials. It was concluded that there is hight level of expression of Kv3 potassium channels in the first group of neurons.

  10. The sense of smell in Odonata: an electrophysiological screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Silvana; Frati, Francesca; Conti, Eric; Rebora, Manuela; Salerno, Gianandrea

    2014-11-01

    Volatile chemicals mediate a great range of intra- and interspecific signalling and information in insects. Olfaction has been widely investigated mostly in Neoptera while the knowledge of this sense in most basal insects such as Paleoptera (Odonata and Ephemeroptera) is still poor. In the present study we show the results of an electrophysiological screening on two model species, Libellula depressa (Libellulidae) and Ischnura elegans (Coenagrionidae), representatives of the two Odonata suborders Anisoptera and Zygoptera, with the aim to deep the knowledge on the sense of smell of this insect order. The antennal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of these two species responded to the same 22 compounds (out of 48 chemicals belonging to different functional groups) encompassing mostly amines, carboxylic acids or aldehydes and belonging to green leaf volatiles, vertebrate related volatiles and volatiles emitted by standing waters bacteria. The properties of Odonata OSNs are very similar to those of ionotropic receptors (IRs) expressing OSNs in other insects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrophysiological correlates of cognition improve with nap during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Usha; Ray, Koushik; Chatterjee, Abhirup; Bhaumik, Sangeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-02-01

    The efficacy of a 30-min nap as a countermeasure in the reduction of cognitive decline following 24 h of sleep deprivation (SD) on subjective sleepiness scales, event-related potential (ERP) P300, and contingent negative variation (CNV) was evaluated. The experiment was performed in three sessions on different days between 7 and 8 a.m. on nine normal, healthy males, of age 25-30 years: Session 1. Baseline recordings; Session 2, after one night's total sleep deprivation, and; Session 3, after 1 week of Session 1, following one night's sleep deprivation along with a 30-min nap opportunity between 1.00 and 3.00 a.m. Subjective sleepiness scores increased after SD as compared to baseline, but reduced significantly after nap (P peak latency of ERP following SD (16%, P peak latency after SD (18%) which decreased with the use of nap (12.5%) (P time increased following SD (39.3%) and decreased with the use of nap (24%) (P peak latencies and M1, and M2 amplitudes were observed. It was concluded that a 30-min nap, between 1.00 and 3.00 a.m. during night SD, reduces the cognitive decline following 24 h of SD in terms of its electro-physiological correlates. The study is of applied value in optimization of cognitive performance in professions demanding night work schedules.

  12. Electrophysiological measurement of interest during walking in a simulated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yuji; Okuma, Takashi; Kimura, Motohiro; Kurata, Takeshi; Takenaka, Takeshi; Iwaki, Sunao

    2014-09-01

    A reliable neuroscientific technique for objectively estimating the degree of interest in a real environment is currently required in the research fields of neuroergonomics and neuroeconomics. Toward the development of such a technique, the present study explored electrophysiological measures that reflect an observer's interest in a nearly-real visual environment. Participants were asked to walk through a simulated shopping mall and the attractiveness of the shopping mall was manipulated by opening and closing the shutters of stores. During the walking task, participants were exposed to task-irrelevant auditory probes (two-stimulus oddball sequence). The results showed a smaller P2/early P3a component of task-irrelevant auditory event-related potentials and a larger lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials in an interesting environment (i.e., open-shutter condition) than in a boring environment (i.e., closed-shutter condition); these findings can be reasonably explained by supposing that participants allocated more attentional resources to visual information in an interesting environment than in a boring environment, and thus residual attentional resources that could be allocated to task-irrelevant auditory probes were reduced. The P2/early P3a component and the lambda response may be useful measures of interest in a real visual environment.

  13. Processing fluency hinders subsequent recollection: An electrophysiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing eLi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although many behavioural studies have investigated the effect of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory, little research has examined the neural mechanism of this phenomenon. The present study aimed to explore the electrophysiological correlates of the effects of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory by using an event-related potential (ERP approach. The masked repetition priming paradigm was used to manipulate processing fluency in the study phase, and the R/K paradigm was utilised to investigate which recognition memory process (familiarity or recollection was affected by processing fluency in the test phase. Converging behavioural and ERP results indicated that increased processing fluency impaired subsequent recollection. Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory. These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect. However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

  14. Electrophysiological Correlates of Long-Term Soto Zen Meditation

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    Henrique Adam Pasquini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the electrophysiological correlates of the changes in long-term regular meditators. We use modern techniques of high-resolution electroencephalography applied to slow potentials, power spectra, and potencies related to the events. To obtain encephalographic records, we use an assembly of 128 channels in 31 subjects (17 Soto Zen Buddhist meditators. The motivation of this study was to determine whether the induced beta power would present an increase in meditators as well as a decrease in induced theta/beta ratio in absolute and relative values. However, opposite to what we expected, no significant change was found in the beta frequency. In contrast, the main findings of the study were correlations between the frequency of weekly meditation practice and the increased theta induced relative power, increase of induced power ratio (ratio theta/beta, and increase of the ratio of induced relative powers (theta/beta ratio during our task that featured an “adapted meditation,” suggesting that the meditative state of “mindfulness” is much more related to the permittivity of “distractions” by the meditators, with a deliberate reduction of attention.

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  16. Drug-induced proarrhythmia: risk factors and electrophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmias can be caused by cardiovascular drugs, noncardiovascular drugs, and even nonprescription agents. They can result in arrhythmic emergencies and sudden cardiac death. If a new arrhythmia or aggravation of an existing arrhythmia develops during therapy with a drug at a concentration usually considered not to be toxic, the situation can be defined as proarrhythmia. Various cardiovascular and noncardiovascular drugs can increase the occurrence of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia of the 'torsade de pointes' type. Antiarrhythmic drugs, antimicrobial agents, and antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are the most important groups. Age, female sex, and structural heart disease are important risk factors for the occurrence of torsade de pointes. Genetic predisposition and individual pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic sensitivity also have important roles in the generation of arrhythmias. An increase in spatial or temporal dispersion of repolarization and a triangular action-potential configuration have been identified as crucial predictors of proarrhythmia in experimental models. These studies emphasized that sole consideration of the QT interval is not sufficient to assess the proarrhythmic risk. In this Review, we focus on important triggers of proarrhythmia and the underlying electrophysiological mechanisms that can enhance or prevent the development of torsade de pointes.

  17. Electrophysiological evaluation in myotonic dystrophy: correlation with CTG length expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeilsticker Beatriz Helena Miranda

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In myotonic dystrophy (MD, disease severity has been correlated with expansion of CTG repeats in chromosome 19. The aims of this study were to evaluate efficacy of electromyography in the diagnosis of MD, access the frequency and the characteristics of peripheral involvement in the disease and to verify whether the CTG repeats correlated with the electrophysiological abnormalities. Twenty-five patients and six relatives at risk of carrying the MD gene were examined. Electrical myotonia (EM was scored. Sensory and motor conduction velocity (CV were studied in five nerves. Leukocyte DNA analysis was done in 26 subjects. Myopathy and myotonia were found in 27 cases. EM was most frequent in muscles of hand and in tibialis anterior. No significant correlation was found between EM scores and length of CTG expansions. EM scores correlated significantly with the degree of clinical myopathy, expressed by a muscular disability scale. Peripheral neuropathy was found in eight subjects and was not restricted to those who were diabetics.

  18. Differential Electrophysiological Responses to Odorant Isotopologues in Drosophilid Antennae123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drimyli, Efstathia; Gaitanidis, Alexandros; Maniati, Klio; Turin, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Olfaction presents the ultimate challenge to molecular recognition as thousands of molecules have to be recognized by far fewer olfactory receptors. We have presented evidence that Drosophila readily distinguish odorants based on their molecular vibrations using a battery of behavioral assays suggesting engagement of a molecular vibration-sensing component. Here we interrogate electrophysiologically the antennae of four Drosophilids and demonstrate conserved differential response amplitudes to aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, nitriles, and their deuterated isotopologues. Certain deuterated odorants evoked larger electroantennogram (EAG) amplitudes, while the response to the normal odorant was elevated in others. Significantly, benzonitrile isotopologues were not distinguishable as predicted. This suggests that isotopologue-specific EAG amplitudes result from differential activation of specific olfactory receptors. In support of this, odorants with as few as two deuteria evoke distinct EAG amplitudes from their normal isotopologues, and this is independent of the size of the deuterated molecule. Importantly, we find no evidence that these isotopologue-specific amplitudes depend on perireceptor mechanisms or other pertinent physical property of the deuterated odorants. Rather, our results strongly suggest that Drosophilid olfactory receptors are activated by molecular vibrations differentiating similarly sized and shaped odorants in vivo, yielding sufficient differential information to drive behavioral choices. PMID:27351023

  19. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli.

  20. Combined expectancies: electrophysiological evidence for the adjustment of expectancy effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münte Thomas F

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When subjects use cues to prepare for a likely stimulus or a likely response, reaction times are facilitated by valid cues but prolonged by invalid cues. In studies on combined expectancy effects, two cues can independently give information regarding two dimensions of the forthcoming task. In certain situations, cueing effects on one dimension are reduced when the cue on the other dimension is invalid. According to the Adjusted Expectancy Model, cues affect different processing levels and a mechanism is presumed which is sensitive to the validity of early level cues and leads to online adjustment of expectancy effects at later levels. To examine the predictions of this model cueing of stimulus modality was combined with response cueing. Results Behavioral measures showed the interaction of cueing effects. Electrophysiological measures of the lateralized readiness potential (LRP and the N200 amplitude confirmed the predictions of the model. The LRP showed larger effects of response cues on response activation when modality cues were valid rather than invalid. N200 amplitude was largest with valid modality cues and invalid response cues, medium with invalid modality cues, and smallest with two valid cues. Conclusion Findings support the view that the validity of early level expectancies modulates the effects of late level expectancies, which included response activation and response conflict in the present study.

  1. Electrophysiological correlates of morphological processing in Chinese compound word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingchun; Hu, Weiping; Fang, Zhuo; Zhang, John X

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the electrophysiological correlates of morphological processing in Chinese compound word reading using a delayed repetition priming paradigm. Participants were asked to passively view lists of two-character compound words containing prime-target pairs separated by a few items. In a Whole Word repetition condition, the prime and target were the same real words (e.g., , manager-manager). In a Constituent repetition condition, the prime and target were swapped in terms of their constituent position (e.g., , the former is a pseudo-word and the later means nurse). Two ERP components including N200 and N400 showed repetition effects. The N200 showed a negative shift upon repetition in the Whole Word condition but this effect was delayed for the Constituent condition. The N400 showed comparable amplitude reduction across the two priming conditions. The results reveal different aspects of morphological processing with an early stage associated with N200 and a late stage with N400. There was also a possibility that the N200 effect reflect general cognitive processing, i.e., the detection of low-probability stimuli.

  2. Application of Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC to Electrophysiological Data

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    Sarah Katharina eSchmitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of important features in multi-electrode recordings requires the decomposition of data in order to disclose relevant features and to offer a clear graphical representation. This can be a demanding task. Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC; Hitchcock, 1927; Carrol & Chang, 1970; Harshman, 1970 is a method to decompose multi-dimensional arrays in order to focus on the features of interest, and provides a distinct illustration of the results. We applied PARAFAC to analyse spatio-temporal patterns in the functional connectivity between neurons, as revealed in their spike trains recorded in cat primary visual cortex (area 18. During these recordings we reversibly deactivated feedback connections from higher visual areas in the pMS (posterior middle suprasylvian cortex in order to study the impact of these top-down signals. Cross correlation was computed for every possible pair of the electrodes in the electrode array. PARAFAC was then used to reveal the effects of time, stimulus, and deactivation condition on the correlation patterns. Our results show that PARAFAC is able to reliably extract changes in correlation strength for different experimental conditions and display the relevant features. Thus, PARAFAC proves to be well-suited for the use in the context of electrophysiological (action potential recordings.

  3. Application of Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) to electrophysiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, S Katharina; Hasselbach, Philipp P; Ebisch, Boris; Klein, Anja; Pipa, Gordon; Galuske, Ralf A W

    2014-01-01

    The identification of important features in multi-electrode recordings requires the decomposition of data in order to disclose relevant features and to offer a clear graphical representation. This can be a demanding task. Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC; Hitchcock, 1927; Carrol and Chang, 1970; Harshman, 1970) is a method to decompose multi-dimensional arrays in order to focus on the features of interest, and provides a distinct illustration of the results. We applied PARAFAC to analyse spatio-temporal patterns in the functional connectivity between neurons, as revealed in their spike trains recorded in cat primary visual cortex (area 18). During these recordings we reversibly deactivated feedback connections from higher visual areas in the pMS (posterior middle suprasylvian) cortex in order to study the impact of these top-down signals. Cross correlation was computed for every possible pair of the 16 electrodes in the electrode array. PARAFAC was then used to reveal the effects of time, stimulus, and deactivation condition on the correlation patterns. Our results show that PARAFAC is able to reliably extract changes in correlation strength for different experimental conditions and display the relevant features. Thus, PARAFAC proves to be well-suited for the use in the context of electrophysiological (action potential) recordings.

  4. The electrophysiological underpinnings of processing gender stereotypes in language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Siyanova-Chanturia

    Full Text Available Despite the widely documented influence of gender stereotypes on social behaviour, little is known about the electrophysiological substrates engaged in the processing of such information when conveyed by language. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs, we examined the brain response to third-person pronouns (lei "she" and lui "he" that were implicitly primed by definitional (passeggera(FEM "passenger", pensionato(MASC "pensioner", or stereotypical antecedents (insegnante "teacher", conducente "driver". An N400-like effect on the pronoun emerged when it was preceded by a definitionally incongruent prime (passeggera(FEM--lui; pensionato(MASC--lei, and a stereotypically incongruent prime for masculine pronouns only (insegnante--lui. In addition, a P300-like effect was found when the pronoun was preceded by definitionally incongruent primes. However, this effect was observed for female, but not male participants. Overall, these results provide further evidence for on-line effects of stereotypical gender in language comprehension. Importantly, our results also suggest a gender stereotype asymmetry in that male and female stereotypes affected the processing of pronouns differently.

  5. [Clinical, immunological, and electrophysiological matching in Raynaud's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, M M; Cherdyntsev, M G

    2005-01-01

    Detailed description of Raynaud's syndrome (RS) dates back to the 19th century; nevertheless, this problem is still topical because of high prevalence of the syndrome (4 to 5% of population), and the fact that different specialists have to deal with it. The authors of the article studied clinical, immunological, and electrophysiological peculiarities of 103 patients with RS, both primary and secondary one. The examination included measurement of the level of antibodies to nerve growth factor (NGF) and myeline basic protein (MBP) and electroneuromyography. All the subjects displayed significant elevation of serum titer of MBP and NGF antibodies, and lowered peripheral nerve impulse conduction velocity (ICV). There was a direct correlation between antibody titer and the severity of the disease, and inverse correlation between ICV of sensory nervous fibers and the severity of the disease. Thus, RS is almost always associated with peripheral sensory fiber pathology, whose clinical manifestation consists in demyelinating polyneuropathy of autoimmune origin; the more prominent demyelinization, the higher the degree of disease severity.

  6. Perception of Chinese poem and its electrophysiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Yang, Y

    2010-07-14

    A neural correlate for phrase boundary perception in language has recently been identified as a reliable and replicable brain effect. It is called the closure positive shift (CPS) and has an equivalent in the perception of music (music CPS). Nevertheless, either in language or in music, this component is elicited by phrase boundary embedded in sentence or melody. Poetry, as the interlude of language and music, is a special kind of discourse and promising material to explore prosodic boundary processing beyond sentence level. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cognitive processing of hierarchical prosodic boundaries in Chinese Tang poem using rhythm matching task. There are generally four hierarchical levels in each poem, including foot boundary, phonological phrase boundary, intonational phrase boundary, and couplet boundary. The electrophysiological results indicated that all the prosodic boundaries of different levels in poems could give rise to the CPS reflecting prosodic phrasing. Furthermore, as the prosodic hierarchical level became higher, the onset latency of the CPS got longer, suggesting the influence of retrospective processing of former information. With regard to the amplitude, we analyzed the CPS amplitude in every 100 ms time window. It was showed that phonological phrase boundary elicited higher CPS amplitude as compared to that evoked by couplet boundary in an earlier time window, whereas in a later time window both of them were lower than the CPS correlated to intonational phrase boundary. The present results further shape our understanding of the CPS component and its relation to the processes involved in prosodic phrasing.

  7. First steps towards initial registration for electrophysiology procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Yatziv, Liron; Koch, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. The treatment option of choice is radio-frequency catheter ablation, which is performed in electrophysiology labs using C-Arm X-ray systems for navigation and guidance. The goal is to electrically isolate the pulmonary vein-left atrial junction thereby rendering myocardial fibers responsible for induction and maintenance of AF inactive. The use of overlay images for fluoroscopic guidance may improve the quality of the ablation procedure, and can reduce procedure time. Overlay images, acquired using CT, MRI, or C-arm CT, can add soft-tissue information, otherwise not visible under X-ray. MRI can be used to image a wide variety of anatomical details without ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present a method to register a 3-D MRI volume to 2-D biplane X-ray images using the coronary sinus. Current approaches require registration of the overlay images to the fluoroscopic images to be performed after the trans-septal puncture, when contast agent can be administered. We present a new approach for registration to align overlay images before the trans-septal puncture. To this end, we manually extract the coronary sinus from pre-operative MRI and register it to a multi-electorde catheter placed in the coronary sinus.

  8. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Jensen, Bo Skaaning; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Christophersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels. A cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion channel targets accessible for drug screening. Specifically, genuine HTS parallel processing techniques based on arrays of planar silicon chips are being developed, but also lower throughput sequential techniques may be of value in compound screening, lead optimization, and safety screening. The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery.

  9. Audiological and electrophysiological assessment of professional pop/rock musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra G Samelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated peripheral and central auditory pathways in professional musicians (with and without hearing loss compared to non-musicians. The goal was to verify if music exposure could affect auditory pathways as a whole. This is a prospective study that compared the results obtained between three groups (musicians with and without hearing loss and non-musicians. Thirty-two male individuals participated and they were assessed by: Immittance measurements, pure-tone air conduction thresholds at all frequencies from 0.25 to 20 kHz, Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR, and Cognitive Potential. The musicians showed worse hearing thresholds in both conventional and high frequency audiometry when compared to the non-musicians; the mean amplitude of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions was smaller in the musicians group, but the mean latencies of Auditory Brainstem Response and Cognitive Potential were diminished in the musicians when compared to the non-musicians. Our findings suggest that the population of musicians is at risk for developing music-induced hearing loss. However, the electrophysiological evaluation showed that latency waves of ABR and P300 were diminished in musicians, which may suggest that the auditory training to which these musicians are exposed acts as a facilitator of the acoustic signal transmission to the cortex.

  10. Effects of context on electrophysiological response to musical accents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline; Jewett, Lisa R; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2009-07-01

    Listeners' aesthetic and emotional responses to music typically occur in the context of long musical passages that contain structures defined in terms of the events that precede them. We describe an electrophysiological study of listeners' brain responses to musical accents that coincided in longer musical sequences. Musically trained listeners performed a timbre-change detection task in which a single-tone timbre change was positioned within 4-bar melodies composed of 350-ms tones to coincide or not with melodic contour accents and temporal accents (induced with temporal gaps). Event-related potential responses to (task-relevant) attended timbre changes elicited an early negativity (MMN/N2b) around 200 ms and a late positive component around 350 ms (P300), reflecting updating of the timbre change in working memory. The amplitudes of both components changed systematically across the sequence, consistent with expectancy-based context effects. Furthermore, melodic contour changes modulated the MMN/N2b response (but not the P300) to timbre changes in later sequence positions. In contrast, task-irrelevant temporal gaps elicited an MMN that was not modulated by position within the context; absence of a P300 indicated that temporal-gap accents were not updated in working memory. Listeners' neural responses to musical structure changed systematically as sequential predictability and listeners' expectations changed across the melodic context.

  11. Logo Effects on Brand Extension Evaluations from the Electrophysiological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Qian; Pei, Guanxiong; Dai, Shenyi; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Brand extension typically has two strategies: brand name extension (BN) and brand logo extension (BL). The current study explored which strategy (BN or BL) better enhanced the success of dissimilar brand extension and product promotion in enterprises. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to investigate electrophysiological processes when subjects evaluated their acceptance of the brand extension using a combined picture of S1 and S2. S1 was a famous brand presented by two identity signs (brand name and brand logo). S2 was a picture of an extension product that belonged to a dissimilar product category than S1. The behavior data showed that BL was more acceptable than BN in the dissimilar brand extension. The neurophysiology process was reflected by a less negative N2 component and a larger P300 component in the BL than in the BN. We suggested that N2 reflected a whole conflict between the brand-product combination and the long-term memory and that P300 could be regarded as the reflection of the categorization process in the working memory.

  12. Logo Effects on Brand Extension Evaluations from the Electrophysiological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Qian; Pei, Guanxiong; Dai, Shenyi; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Brand extension typically has two strategies: brand name extension (BN) and brand logo extension (BL). The current study explored which strategy (BN or BL) better enhanced the success of dissimilar brand extension and product promotion in enterprises. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to investigate electrophysiological processes when subjects evaluated their acceptance of the brand extension using a combined picture of S1 and S2. S1 was a famous brand presented by two identity signs (brand name and brand logo). S2 was a picture of an extension product that belonged to a dissimilar product category than S1. The behavior data showed that BL was more acceptable than BN in the dissimilar brand extension. The neurophysiology process was reflected by a less negative N2 component and a larger P300 component in the BL than in the BN. We suggested that N2 reflected a whole conflict between the brand-product combination and the long-term memory and that P300 could be regarded as the reflection of the categorization process in the working memory.

  13. Dry ice blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  14. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  15. Feasibility of real-time magnetic resonance imaging for catheter guidance in electrophysiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Saman; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Zviman, Menekhem M; Meininger, Glenn R; Kato, Ritsushi; Susil, Robert C; Roguin, Ariel; Dickfeld, Timm L; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Calkins, Hugh; Berger, Ronald D; Bluemke, David A; Lardo, Albert C; Halperin, Henry R

    2008-07-15

    Compared with fluoroscopy, the current imaging standard of care for guidance of electrophysiology procedures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides improved soft-tissue resolution and eliminates radiation exposure. However, because of inherent magnetic forces and electromagnetic interference, the MRI environment poses challenges for electrophysiology procedures. In this study, we sought to test the feasibility of performing electrophysiology studies with real-time MRI guidance. An MRI-compatible electrophysiology system was developed. Catheters were targeted to the right atrium, His bundle, and right ventricle of 10 mongrel dogs (23 to 32 kg) via a 1.5-T MRI system using rapidly acquired fast gradient-echo images (approximately 5 frames per second). Catheters were successfully positioned at the right atrial, His bundle, and right ventricular target sites of all animals. Comprehensive electrophysiology studies with recording of intracardiac electrograms and atrial and ventricular pacing were performed. Postprocedural pathological evaluation revealed no evidence of thermal injury to the myocardium. After proof of safety in animal studies, limited real-time MRI-guided catheter mapping studies were performed in 2 patients. Adequate target catheter localization was confirmed via recording of intracardiac electrograms in both patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the feasibility of real-time MRI-guided electrophysiology procedures. This technique may eliminate patient and staff radiation exposure and improve real-time soft tissue resolution for procedural guidance.

  16. Dried fruit and dental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Michèle Jeanne

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature has found that the common perceptions that dried fruits are "sticky", adhere to teeth, and are detrimental to dental health on account of their sugar content are based on weak evidence. There is a lack of good quality scientific data to support restrictive advice for dried fruit intake on the basis of dental health parameters and further research is required. A number of potentially positive attributes for dental health, such as the need to chew dried fruits which encourages salivary flow, and the presence of anti-microbial compounds and of sorbitol, also require investigation to establish the extent of their effects and whether they balance against any potentially negative attributes of dried fruit. Advice on dried fruit consumption should also take account of the nutritional benefits of dried fruit, being high in fibre, low in fat and containing useful levels of micronutrients.

  17. Neurochip Based on Light-addressable Potentiometric Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingjun Liu; Hua Cai; Ying Xu; Lifeng Qin; Lijiang Wang; Ping Wang

    2006-01-01

    A novel neurochip based on light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) is designed. Using its light addressable characteristic. The problems of the limitations of restricted discrete active sites of current neurochips, such as microelectrode array and field effect transistor array can be settled easily. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interface between cells and LAPS, spontaneously discharges of hippocampal neurons induced by Mg2+-free media treatment were recorded by LAPS. The results demonstrate that this kind of neurochip has potential to monitor electrophysiology of cultured cells in a non-invasive way.

  18. Microcantilever sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat, T.G.; Wachter, E.A.

    1998-02-17

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. 16 figs.

  19. Convective drying of sludge cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Peng, Xiaofeng; Xue, Yuan; Lee, Duujong; Chu, Chingping

    2002-08-01

    This paper presented an experimental study on convective drying of waste water sludge collected from Beijing GaoBeiDian Sewage Treatment Plant, particularly on the correlation between the observed shrinkage dynamics of sludge cake and the drying curve. During the initial stage of drying the process resembles to that of a particulate bed, in which moisture diffuses and evaporates at the upper surface. Conventional drying theory assuming a diffusion-evaporating front interprets this period of drying. Consequently, owing to the very large shrinkage ratio of the dried cake, cracks emerges and propagates on and within the cake body, whence inducing evaporating channel that facilitates the water removal. This occurrence compensates the reduction of surface area for evaporation, whence extending the constant-rate period during the test. Afterwards, the cracks meet with each other and form isolated cake piles, while the subsequent drying occur mainly within these piles and the conventional theory fails. The transition between the drying on a plain cake layer and that on the isolated piles demonstrates the need to adopt distinct descriptions on these two regimes of drying for the sludge cake.

  20. Drying Spirulina with Foam Mat Drying at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji Prasetyaningrum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina is a single cell blue green microalgae (Cyanobacteria containing many Phytonutrients (Beta-carotene, Chlorophyl, Xanthophyl, Phyocianin using as anti-carcinogen in food. Producing dry spirulina by quick drying process at medium temperature is very important to retain the Phytonutrient quality. Currently, the work is still challenging due to the gel formation that block the water diffusion from inside to the surface.  This research studies the performance of foam-mat drying on production of dry spirulina. In this method the spirulina was mixed with foaming agent (glair/egg albumen, popular as white egg at 2.5% by weight at air velocity 2.2 m/sec. Here, the effect of spirulina thickness and operational temperature on drying time and quality (Beta-carotene and color were observed. The drying time was estimated based on the measurement of water content in spirulina versus time. Result showed that the thicker spirulina, the longer drying time. Conversely, the higher operational temperature, faster drying time. At thickness ranging 1-3 mm and operational temperature below 70oC, the quality of spirulina can fit the market requirement

  1. Carrageenan drying with dehumidified air: drying characteristics and product quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djaeni, M.; Sasongko, S.B.; Prasetyaningrum, Aji A A.A.; Jin, X.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Applying dehumidified air is considered as an option to retain quality in carrageenan drying. This work concerns the effects of operational temperature, air velocity, and carrageenan thickness on the progress of drying and product quality when using dehumidified air. Final product quality and progre

  2. Sensors for Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-07-15

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on "Sensors for Entertainment", developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored.

  3. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  4. Novel Multipin Electrode Cap System for Dry Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, P; Pedrosa, P; Griebel, S; Fonseca, C; Vaz, F; Supriyanto, E; Zanow, F; Haueisen, J

    2015-09-01

    Current usage of electroencephalography (EEG) is limited to laboratory environments. Self-application of a multichannel wet EEG caps is practically impossible, since the application of state-of-the-art wet EEG sensors requires trained laboratory staff. We propose a novel EEG cap system with multipin dry electrodes overcoming this problem. We describe the design of a novel 24-pin dry electrode made from polyurethane and coated with Ag/AgCl. A textile cap system holds 97 of these dry electrodes. An EEG study with 20 volunteers compares the 97-channel dry EEG cap with a conventional 128-channel wet EEG cap for resting state EEG, alpha activity, eye blink artifacts and checkerboard pattern reversal visual evoked potentials. All volunteers report a good cap fit and good wearing comfort. Average impedances are below 150 kΩ for 92 out of 97 dry electrodes, enabling recording with standard EEG amplifiers. No significant differences are observed between wet and dry power spectral densities for all EEG bands. No significant differences are observed between the wet and dry global field power time courses of visual evoked potentials. The 2D interpolated topographic maps show significant differences of 3.52 and 0.44% of the map areas for the N75 and N145 VEP components, respectively. For the P100 component, no significant differences are observed. Dry multipin electrodes integrated in a textile EEG cap overcome the principle limitations of wet electrodes, allow rapid application of EEG multichannel caps by non-trained persons, and thus enable new fields of application for multichannel EEG acquisition.

  5. Electrophysiological correlates of binocular stereo depth without binocular disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Spang

    Full Text Available A small region of background presented to only one eye in an otherwise binocular display may, under certain conditions, be resolved in the visual system by interpreting the region as a small gap between two similar objects placed at different depths, with the gap hidden in one eye by parallax. This has been called monocular gap stereopsis. We investigated the electrophysiological correlate of this type of stereopsis by means of sum potential recordings in 12 observers, comparing VEP's for this stimulus ("Gillam Stereo", Author BG has strong reservations about this term with those for similar stimuli containing disparity based depth and with no depth (flat. In addition we included several control stimuli. The results show a pronounced early negative potential at a latency of around 170 ms (N170 for all stimuli containing non- identical elements, be they a difference caused by binocular disparity or by completely unmatched monocular contours. A second negative potential with latency around 270 ms (N270, on the other hand, is present only with stimuli leading to fusion and the perception of depth. This second component is similar for disparity-based stereopsis and monocular gap, or "Gillam Stereo" although slightly more pronounced for the former. We conjecture that the first component is related to the detection of differences between the images of the two eyes that may then either be fused, leading to stereopsis and the corresponding second potential, or else to inhibition and rivalry without a later trace in the VEP. The finding that that "Gillam Stereo" leads to cortical responses at the same short latencies as disparity based stereopsis indicates that it may partly rely on quite early cortical mechanisms.

  6. Electrophysiological Correlates of Binocular Stereo Depth without Binocular Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Karoline; Gillam, Barbara; Fahle, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    A small region of background presented to only one eye in an otherwise binocular display may, under certain conditions, be resolved in the visual system by interpreting the region as a small gap between two similar objects placed at different depths, with the gap hidden in one eye by parallax. This has been called monocular gap stereopsis. We investigated the electrophysiological correlate of this type of stereopsis by means of sum potential recordings in 12 observers, comparing VEP's for this stimulus (“Gillam Stereo”, Author BG has strong reservations about this term) with those for similar stimuli containing disparity based depth and with no depth (flat). In addition we included several control stimuli. The results show a pronounced early negative potential at a latency of around 170 ms (N170) for all stimuli containing non- identical elements, be they a difference caused by binocular disparity or by completely unmatched monocular contours. A second negative potential with latency around 270 ms (N270), on the other hand, is present only with stimuli leading to fusion and the perception of depth. This second component is similar for disparity-based stereopsis and monocular gap, or “Gillam Stereo” although slightly more pronounced for the former. We conjecture that the first component is related to the detection of differences between the images of the two eyes that may then either be fused, leading to stereopsis and the corresponding second potential, or else to inhibition and rivalry without a later trace in the VEP. The finding that that “Gillam Stereo” leads to cortical responses at the same short latencies as disparity based stereopsis indicates that it may partly rely on quite early cortical mechanisms. PMID:22876281

  7. The Automation of Electrophysiological Experiments and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, David L.

    The role of computation in science is continually growing and neuroscience is no exception. Despite this, a severe lack of scientific software infrastructure persists, slowing progress in many domains. In this thesis, we will see how the combination of neuroscience and software engineering can build infrastructure that enables discovery. The first chapter discusses the Turtle Electrophysiology Project, or TEP, an experiment-automation and data-management system. This system has allowed us to automate away some of the most tedious tasks involved in conducting experiments. As a result, we can collect more data in less time, and with fewer errors related to the loss of metadata (information about how the data were collected). Also, since all of the metadata is automatically digitized during the experiment we can now completely automate our analyses. Chapters two and three are examples of research conducted using the ever-evolving TEP system. In the first instance, we used TEP to deliver visual stimuli and handle data-management. In chapter three, the experiments involved delivering electrical stimuli instead of visual stimuli, and much more rigorous analysis. And even though TEP was not specifically designed to handle collecting data this way, the flexible tags system enabled us to do so. Finally, chapter four details the construction of a robust analysis tool called Spikepy. Whereas TEP is specially designed for the turtle preparation we have, Spikepy is a general-purpose spike-sorting application and framework. Spikepy takes flexibility to the extreme by being a plugin-based framework, yet maintaining a very easy to use interface.

  8. Electrophysiological properties of inferior olive neurons: A compartmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, N; Doya, K; Kawato, M

    1999-08-01

    As a step in exploring the functions of the inferior olive, we constructed a biophysical model of the olivary neurons to examine their unique electrophysiological properties. The model consists of two compartments to represent the known distribution of ionic currents across the cell membrane, as well as the dendritic location of the gap junctions and synaptic inputs. The somatic compartment includes a low-threshold calcium current (I(Ca_l)), an anomalous inward rectifier current (I(h)), a sodium current (I(Na)), and a delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K_dr)). The dendritic compartment contains a high-threshold calcium current (I(Ca_h)), a calcium-dependent potassium current (I(K_Ca)), and a current flowing into other cells through electrical coupling (I(c)). First, kinetic parameters for these currents were set according to previously reported experimental data. Next, the remaining free parameters were determined to account for both static and spiking properties of single olivary neurons in vitro. We then performed a series of simulated pharmacological experiments using bifurcation analysis and extensive two-parameter searches. Consistent with previous studies, we quantitatively demonstrated the major role of I(Ca_l) in spiking excitability. In addition, I(h) had an important modulatory role in the spike generation and period of oscillations, as previously suggested by Bal and McCormick. Finally, we investigated the role of electrical coupling in two coupled spiking cells. Depending on the coupling strength, the hyperpolarization level, and the I(Ca_l) and I(h) modulation, the coupled cells had four different synchronization modes: the cells could be in-phase, phase-shifted, or anti-phase or could exhibit a complex desynchronized spiking mode. Hence these simulation results support the counterintuitive hypothesis that electrical coupling can desynchronize coupled inferior olive cells.

  9. StimDuino: an Arduino-based electrophysiological stimulus isolator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinin, Anton; Lavi, Ayal; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2015-03-30

    Electrical stimulus isolator is a widely used device in electrophysiology. The timing of the stimulus application is usually automated and controlled by the external device or acquisition software; however, the intensity of the stimulus is adjusted manually. Inaccuracy, lack of reproducibility and no automation of the experimental protocol are disadvantages of the manual adjustment. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed StimDuino, an inexpensive Arduino-controlled stimulus isolator allowing highly accurate, reproducible automated setting of the stimulation current. The intensity of the stimulation current delivered by StimDuino is controlled by Arduino, an open-source microcontroller development platform. The automatic stimulation patterns are software-controlled and the parameters are set from Matlab-coded simple, intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface. The software also allows remote control of the device over the network. Electrical current measurements showed that StimDuino produces the requested current output with high accuracy. In both hippocampal slice and in vivo recordings, the fEPSP measurements obtained with StimDuino and the commercial stimulus isolators showed high correlation. Commercial stimulus isolators are manually managed, while StimDuino generates automatic stimulation patterns with increasing current intensity. The pattern is utilized for the input-output relationship analysis, necessary for assessment of excitability. In contrast to StimuDuino, not all commercial devices are capable for remote control of the parameters and stimulation process. StimDuino-generated automation of the input-output relationship assessment eliminates need for the current intensity manually adjusting, improves stimulation reproducibility, accuracy and allows on-site and remote control of the stimulation parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrophysiological biomarkers in spinal muscular atrophy: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Arnold, W; Porensky, Paul N; McGovern, Vicki L; Iyer, Chitra C; Duque, Sandra; Li, Xiaobai; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Kaspar, Brian K; Kolb, Stephen J; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Preclinical therapies that restore survival motor neuron (SMN) protein levels can dramatically extend survival in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) mouse models. Biomarkers are needed to effectively translate these promising therapies to clinical trials. Our objective was to investigate electrophysiological biomarkers of compound muscle action potential (CMAP), motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and electromyography (EMG) using an SMA mouse model. Methods Sciatic CMAP, MUNE, and EMG were obtained in SMNΔ7 mice at ages 3–13 days and at 21 days in mice with SMN selectively reduced in motor neurons (ChATCre). To investigate these measures as biomarkers of treatment response, measurements were obtained in SMNΔ7 mice treated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or gene therapy. Results CMAP was significantly reduced in SMNΔ7 mice at days 6–13 (P < 0.01), and MUNE was reduced at days 7–13 (P < 0.01). Fibrillations were present on EMG in SMNΔ7 mice but not controls (P = 0.02). Similar findings were seen at 21 days in ChATCre mice. MUNE in ASO-treated SMNΔ7 mice were similar to controls at day 12 and 30. CMAP reduction persisted in ASO-treated SMNΔ7 mice at day 12 but was corrected at day 30. Similarly, CMAP and MUNE responses were corrected with gene therapy to restore SMN. Interpretation These studies confirm features of preserved neuromuscular function in the early postnatal period and subsequent motor unit loss in SMNΔ7 mice. SMN restoring therapies result in preserved MUNE and gradual repair of CMAP responses. This provides preclinical evidence for the utilization of CMAP and MUNE as biomarkers in future SMA clinical trials. PMID:24511555

  11. Electrophysiological effects of trace amines on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada eLedonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trace amines (TAs are a class of endogenous compounds strictly related to classic monoamine neurotransmitters with regard to their structure, metabolism and tissue distribution. Although the presence of TAs in mammalian brain has been recognized for decades, until recently they were considered to be by-products of amino acid metabolism or as ‘false’ neurotransmitters. The discovery in 2001 of a new family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely trace amines receptors, has re-ignited interest in TAs. In particular, two members of the family, trace amine receptor 1 (TA1 and trace amine receptor 2 (TA2, were shown to be highly sensitive to these endogenous compounds. Experimental evidence suggests that TAs modulate the activity of catecholaminergic neurons and that TA dysregulation may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and Parkinson’s disease, all of which are characterised by altered monoaminergic networks. Here we review recent data concerning the electrophysiological effects of TAs on the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. In the context of recent data obtained with TA1 receptor knockout mice, we also discuss the mechanisms by which the activation of these receptors modulates the activity of these neurons. Three important new aspects of TAs action have recently emerged: (a inhibition of firing due to increased release of dopamine; (b reduction of D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory responses (excitatory effects due to dysinhibition; and (c a direct TA1 receptor-mediated activation of GIRK channels which produce cell membrane hyperpolarization. While the first two effects have been well documented in our laboratory, the direct activation of GIRK channels by TA1 receptors has been reported by others, but has not been seen in our laboratory (Geracitano et al., 2004. Further research is needed to address this point, and to further

  12. Electrophysiological signatures of atypical intrinsic brain connectivity networks in autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Guofa; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Wang, Jun; Ethridge, Lauren E.; Sweeney, John A.; Ding, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Abnormal local and long-range brain connectivity have been widely reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet the nature of these abnormalities and their functional relevance at distinct cortical rhythms remains unknown. Investigations of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) and their coherence across whole brain networks hold promise for determining whether patterns of functional connectivity abnormalities vary across frequencies and networks in ASD. In the present study, we aimed to probe atypical intrinsic brain connectivity networks in ASD from resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) data via characterizing the whole brain network. Approach. Connectivity within individual ICNs (measured by spectral power) and between ICNs (measured by coherence) were examined at four canonical frequency bands via a time-frequency independent component analysis on high-density EEG, which were recorded from 20 ASD and 20 typical developing (TD) subjects during an eyes-closed resting state. Main results. Among twelve identified electrophysiological ICNs, individuals with ASD showed hyper-connectivity in individual ICNs and hypo-connectivity between ICNs. Functional connectivity alterations in ASD were more severe in the frontal lobe and the default mode network (DMN) and at low frequency bands. These functional connectivity measures also showed abnormal age-related associations in ICNs related to frontal, temporal and motor regions in ASD. Significance. Our findings suggest that ASD is characterized by the opposite directions of abnormalities (i.e. hypo- and hyper-connectivity) in the hierarchical structure of the whole brain network, with more impairments in the frontal lobe and the DMN at low frequency bands, which are critical for top-down control of sensory systems, as well as for both cognition and social skills.

  13. Clinical and Electrophysiological Report of a Unilateral Retinitis Pigmentosa Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedaghat MR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To describe clinical and electrophysiological features of a patient with unilateral Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP. Case: A 29-year-old female with a long history of progressive visual disturbance in the right eye has undergone multiple eye examinations during the past eight years. There was nothing noticeable in her past medical and ocular history. Comprehensive eye examinations were done in the first visit. All data was suggestive of right eye RP. Posterior segment fundal examination findings were: a pallor waxy disc, vessel attenuation, and extended pigmentary degeneration of the mid-peripheral retina. The left eye examination was normal. Comparing the automated 60 degree and 30 degree visual fields of both eyes obviously showed significant defects in the right eye visual field but normal in the left eye.  All of the probable infectious agents, which can cause similar ocular manifestations, were ruled out by serological tests. The standard photopic and scotopic electroretinographies were significantly reduced in amplitude in the right eye; however, they were normal in the left eye. Also, the standard Electro-Oculography (EOG results were the same as the Electro-Retinography (ERG ones in both eyes. Eye examinations were normal in other family members. Over an eight-year follow-up period, progressive deteriorating vision has gradually become more noticeable in the right eye. The left eye has been completely normal since.  This data was compatible with the Francois and Verriesr unilateral RP diagnostic criteria. Conclusion: Clinical signs and symptoms, a minimum of a five-year follow-up period, and confirmatory ERG and EOG are very helpful to diagnose andaffirm the case of unilateral RP.

  14. Visual adaptation provides objective electrophysiological evidence of facial identity discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retter, Talia L; Rossion, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Discrimination of facial identities is a fundamental function of the human brain that is challenging to examine with macroscopic measurements of neural activity, such as those obtained with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). Although visual adaptation or repetition suppression (RS) stimulation paradigms have been successfully implemented to this end with such recording techniques, objective evidence of an identity-specific discrimination response due to adaptation at the level of the visual representation is lacking. Here, we addressed this issue with fast periodic visual stimulation (FPVS) and EEG recording combined with a symmetry/asymmetry adaptation paradigm. Adaptation to one facial identity is induced through repeated presentation of that identity at a rate of 6 images per second (6 Hz) over 10 sec. Subsequently, this identity is presented in alternation with another facial identity (i.e., its anti-face, both faces being equidistant from an average face), producing an identity repetition rate of 3 Hz over a 20 sec testing sequence. A clear EEG response at 3 Hz is observed over the right occipito-temporal (ROT) cortex, indexing discrimination between the two facial identities in the absence of an explicit behavioral discrimination measure. This face identity discrimination occurs immediately after adaptation and disappears rapidly within 20 sec. Importantly, this 3 Hz response is not observed in a control condition without the single-identity 10 sec adaptation period. These results indicate that visual adaptation to a given facial identity produces an objective (i.e., at a pre-defined stimulation frequency) electrophysiological index of visual discrimination between that identity and another, and provides a unique behavior-free quantification of the effect of visual adaptation.

  15. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario E Giardini

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT. Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1 accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord, and 2 identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3 check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention.

  16. Evolving anatomic and electrophysiologic considerations associated with Fontan conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl Lewis; Deal, Barbara J; Stewart, Robert D; Franklin, Wayne H; Tsao, Sabrina; Ward, Kendra

    2007-01-01

    The principles of Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery are to restore the cardiac anatomy by converting the original atriopulmonary connection to a total cavopulmonary artery extracardiac connection and treat the underlying atrial arrhythmias. Successful outcomes of this procedure are dependent on a thorough understanding of several factors: the patient's fundamental diagnosis of single-ventricle anatomy, the resultant cardiac configuration from the original atriopulmonary Fontan connection, right atrial dilatation that leads to atrial flutter or fibrillation, and associated congenital cardiac anomalies. The purpose of this article is to present some of the more challenging anatomic and electrophysiologic problems we have encountered with Fontan conversion and arrhythmia surgery and the innovative solutions we have used to treat them. The cases reviewed herein include: takedown of a Bjork-Fontan modification, right ventricular hypertension and tricuspid regurgitation after atriopulmonary Fontan for pulmonary atresia and intact ventricular septum, takedown of atrioventricular valve isolation patch for right-sided maze procedure, resultant hemodynamic considerations leading to intraoperative pulmonary vein stenosis after Fontan conversion, unwanted inferior vena cava retraction during the extracardiac connection, right atrial cannulation in the presence of a right atrial clot, distended left superior vena cava causing left pulmonary vein stenosis, dropped atrial septum, and the modified right-sided maze procedure for various single-ventricle pathology. Since 1994 we have performed Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery on 109 patients with a 0.9% mortality rate. We attribute our program's success in no small measure to the strong collaborative efforts of the cardiothoracic surgery and cardiology teams.

  17. Staying dry under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Megaridis, Constantine; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Patankar, Neelesh

    2012-11-01

    Lotus leaves are known for their non-wetting properties due to the presence of surface texture. The superhydrophobic behavior arises because of the prevention of liquid water from entering the pores of the roughness. Present superhydrophobic materials rely on air trapped within the surface pores to avoid liquid permeation. This is typically unsustainable for immersed bodies due to dissolution of the air, especially under elevated pressures. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to demonstrate the non-wetting behavior of an immersed ten-nanometer pore. This is accomplished by establishing thermodynamically sustained vapor pockets of the surrounding liquid medium. Over 300,000 atoms were used to construct the nanopore geometry and simulate SPC/E water molecules. Ambient pressure was varied along two isotherms (300 K, and 500 K). This approach for vapor-stabilization could offer valuable guidance for maintaining surfaces dry even in a submerged state without relying on trapped air. The approach may be extended to control general phase behavior of water adjacent to textured surfaces. ISEN support is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Forward Osmosis Brine Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Hyde, Deirdre; Beeler, David; Parodi, Jurek

    2015-01-01

    The Forward Osmosis Brine Drying (FOBD) system is based on a technique called forward osmosis (FO). FO is a membrane-based process where the osmotic potential between brine and a salt solution is equalized by the movement of water from the brine to the salt solution. The FOBD system is composed of two main elements, the FO bag and the salt regeneration system. This paper discusses the results of testing of the FO bag to determine the maximum water recovery ratio that can be attained using this technology. Testing demonstrated that the FO bag is capable of achieving a maximum brine water recovery ratio of the brine of 95%. The equivalent system mass was calculated to be 95 kg for a feed similar to the concentrated brine generated on the International Space Station and 86 kg for an Exploration brine. The results have indicated that the FOBD can process all the brine for a one year mission for between 11% to 10% mass required to bring the water needed to make up for water lost in the brine if not recycled. The FOBD saves 685 kg and when treating the International Space Station brine and it saves 829 kg when treating the Exploration brine. It was also demonstrated that saturated salt solutions achieve a higher water recovery ratios than solids salts do and that lithium chloride achieved a higher water recovery ratio than sodium chloride.

  19. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations.

  20. Advances in wireless sensors and sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Leung, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Written by experts, this book illustrates and collects recent advances in wireless sensors and sensor networks. It provides clever support for scientists, students and researchers in order to stimulate exchange and discussions for further developments.

  1. Machine Learning Assessments of Soil Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E. J.; Minsker, B. S.; Wenzel, C.; Gilmore, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural activities require the use of heavy equipment and vehicles on unpaved farmlands. When soil conditions are wet, equipment can cause substantial damage, leaving deep ruts. In extreme cases, implements can sink and become mired, causing considerable delays and expense to extricate the equipment. Farm managers, who are often located remotely, cannot assess sites before allocating equipment, causing considerable difficulty in reliably assessing conditions of countless sites with any reliability and frequency. For example, farmers often trace serpentine paths of over one hundred miles each day to assess the overall status of various tracts of land spanning thirty, forty, or fifty miles in each direction. One means of assessing the moisture content of a field lies in the strategic positioning of remotely-monitored in situ sensors. Unfortunately, land owners are often reluctant to place sensors across their properties due to the significant monetary cost and complexity. This work aspires to overcome these limitations by modeling the process of wetting and drying statistically - remotely assessing field readiness using only information that is publically accessible. Such data includes Nexrad radar and state climate network sensors, as well as Twitter-based reports of field conditions for validation. Three algorithms, classification trees, k-nearest-neighbors, and boosted perceptrons are deployed to deliver statistical field readiness assessments of an agricultural site located in Urbana, IL. Two of the three algorithms performed with 92-94% accuracy, with the majority of misclassifications falling within the calculated margins of error. This demonstrates the feasibility of using a machine learning framework with only public data, knowledge of system memory from previous conditions, and statistical tools to assess "readiness" without the need for real-time, on-site physical observation. Future efforts will produce a workflow assimilating Nexrad, climate network

  2. Wireless sensor platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Pooran C.; Killough, Stephen M.; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2017-08-08

    A wireless sensor platform and methods of manufacture are provided. The platform involves providing a plurality of wireless sensors, where each of the sensors is fabricated on flexible substrates using printing techniques and low temperature curing. Each of the sensors can include planar sensor elements and planar antennas defined using the printing and curing. Further, each of the sensors can include a communications system configured to encode the data from the sensors into a spread spectrum code sequence that is transmitted to a central computer(s) for use in monitoring an area associated with the sensors.

  3. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate

  4. Viscous property of dried clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-sheng; LI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    One dimensional and triaxial compression tests of air-dried and oven-dried Fujinomori clay and Pisa clay were carried out. Water content is less than 4.5 % and 1.0% for air-dried and oven-dried clay specimens, respectively. In all tests, axial strain rate was changed stepwise many times and drained creep tests were performed several times during monotonic loading at a constant strain rate. Global unloading (and also reloading in some tests) was applied during which creep loading tests were performed several times. Cyclic loading with small stress amplitude and several cycles was also performed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the clay in tests. Local displacement transducer was used in triaxial compression test to increase measuring accuracy of axial strain. The results show that air-dried and oven-dried clay have noticeable viscous properties; during global unloading, creep deformation changes from positive to negative, i.e. there exist neutral points (zero creep deformation or no creep deformation point) in global unloading part of strain-stress curve; viscous property of Fujinomori clay decreases when water content decreases, i.e. viscous property of air-dried Fujinomori clay is more significant than that of oven-dried Fujinomori clay.

  5. Microwave Drying of Moist Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomatov, Vl. V.; Karelin, V. A.; Sladkov, S. O.; Salomatov, Vas. V.

    2017-03-01

    Physical principles and examples of practical implementation of drying large bodies of coal by microwave radiation are considered. It is shown that energy consumption in microwave drying of brown coals decreases to 1.5-1.8 (kW·h)/ kg as compared with traditional types of drying, for which the expenditures of energy amount to 3.0 (kW·h)/kg. In using microwave drying, the technological time of drying decreases to 4 h, whereas the time of convective drying, with other things being equal, comes to 8-20 h. Parallel with microwave radiation drying, grinding of a fuel takes place, as well as entrainment of such toxic and ecologically harmful elements as mercury, chlorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and nitrogen. An analysis of the prospects of using a microwave energy for drying coal fuel has shown that microwave radiation makes it possible to considerably economize in energy, increase explosional safety, improve the ecological situation, and reduce the metal content and overall dimensions of the equipment.

  6. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.;

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer of photo......A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer......, the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  7. Dry Block Calibrator with Improved Temperature Field and Integrated Fixed-Point Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Michael; Marin, Sebastian; Schalles, Marc; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    To reduce uncertainty of calibrations of contact thermometers using dry block calibrators, a concept was developed at Institute for Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of Technische Universität Ilmenau. This concept uses a multi-zone heating, heat flux sensors and a multiple fixed-point cell. The paper shows the concept and its validation on the basis of a dry block calibrator with a working temperature range of 70°C to 430°C. The experimental results show a stability of ± 4 mK for the reference temperature and axial temperature differences in the normalization block less than ± 55 mK.

  8. Drying Characteristics of Garcinia atroviridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waigoon RITTIRUT

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Some physical and chemical properties of fresh garcinia fruits are reported. The most suitable drying conditions for garcinia material in a tray dryer based on the final moisture content were determined by extensive testing. It was found that for the material thickness of 2, 4 and 6 mm, a temperature of 55 °C and air velocity of 1.2 m/s are suitable for drying. The most suitable time where the final moisture content met the commercial standard was found to be 199, 256 and 427 min, respectively. The higher the temperature, the shorter the drying time. It was also observed that the suitable drying time for 2-mm thick material and air velocity of 1.2 m/s was 199, 159 and 99 min for drying temperature of 55, 65 and 75 °C, respectively. Drying characteristics are also reported. Most of the drying rate curves appear in a falling rate period except at low temperature and low velocity of operation parameters i.e. 55 °C and 0.5 m/s for 4-mm thick material, where the constant drying rate is approximately 0.09 kg water/min.m2. The sorption isotherm is sigmoidal shape at 30 °C and monolayer moisture content is 14.78 kg water/100 kg dry solid. Soaking material in 1.5 and 3.0 %w/w sodium chloride did not affect the drying rate. Effective moisture diffusivities were evaluated to be  5.57´10-10, 6.94´10-10 and 1.11´10-9 m2/s at temperatures 55, 65 and 75 °C, respectively.

  9. Space and Industrial Brine Drying Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.; Wisniewski, Richard S.; Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali

    2014-01-01

    This survey describes brine drying technologies that have been developed for use in space and industry. NASA has long considered developing a brine drying system for the International Space Station (ISS). Possible processes include conduction drying in many forms, spray drying, distillation, freezing and freeze drying, membrane filtration, and electrical processes. Commercial processes use similar technologies. Some proposed space systems combine several approaches. The current most promising candidates for use on the ISS use either conduction drying with membrane filtration or spray drying.

  10. Direct cooling of the catheter tip increases safety for CMR-guided electrophysiological procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Theresa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the safety concerns when performing electrophysiological (EP procedures under magnetic resonance (MR guidance is the risk of passive tissue heating due to the EP catheter being exposed to the radiofrequency (RF field of the RF transmitting body coil. Ablation procedures that use catheters with irrigated tips are well established therapeutic options for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and when used in a modified mode might offer an additional system for suppressing passive catheter heating. Methods A two-step approach was chosen. Firstly, tests on passive catheter heating were performed in a 1.5 T Avanto system (Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany using a ASTM Phantom in order to determine a possible maximum temperature rise. Secondly, a phantom was designed for simulation of the interface between blood and the vascular wall. The MR-RF induced temperature rise was simulated by catheter tip heating via a standard ablation generator. Power levels from 1 to 6 W were selected. Ablation duration was 120 s with no tip irrigation during the first 60 s and irrigation at rates from 2 ml/min to 35 ml/min for the remaining 60 s (Biotronik Qiona Pump, Berlin, Germany. The temperature was measured with fluoroscopic sensors (Luxtron, Santa Barbara, CA, USA at a distance of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the catheter tip. Results A maximum temperature rise of 22.4°C at the catheter tip was documented in the MR scanner. This temperature rise is equivalent to the heating effect of an ablator's power output of 6 W at a contact force of the weight of 90 g (0.883 N. The catheter tip irrigation was able to limit the temperature rise to less than 2°C for the majority of examined power levels, and for all examined power levels the residual temperature rise was less than 8°C. Conclusion Up to a maximum of 22.4°C, the temperature rise at the tissue surface can be entirely suppressed by using the catheter's own irrigation

  11. Drying of α-amylase by spray drying and freeze-drying - a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. de Jesus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at comparing two traditional methods of drying of enzymes and at verifying the efficiency of each one and their advantages and disadvantages. The experiments were performed with a laboratory spray dryer and freeze-dryer using α-amylase as the model enzyme. An experimental design in star revealed that spray drying is mainly influenced by the inlet air temperature and feed flow rate, which were considered to be the main factors influencing the enzymatic activity and water activity; the long period of material exposure to high temperatures causes a partial activity loss. In the experiments of freeze drying, three methods of freezing were used (freezer, acetone and dry ice, and liquid nitrogen and samples subsequently freeze-dried for times ranging between 0-24 hours. The product obtained from the two techniques showed high enzymatic activity and low water activity. For the drying of heat-resistant enzymes, in which the product to be obtained does not have high added value, spray drying may be more economically viable because, in the freeze drying process, the process time can be considered as a limiting factor when choosing a technique.

  12. Denervation syndromes of the shoulder girdle: MR imaging with electrophysiologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredella, M.A.; Wischer, T.K.; Stork, A.; Genant, H.K. [Dept. of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco (United States); Tirman, P.F.J. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, CA (United States); Fritz, R.C. [National Orthopaedic Imaging Associates, Greenbrae, CA (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Objective. To investigate the use of MR imaging in the characterization of denervated muscle of the shoulder correlated with electrophysiologic studies.Design and patients. We studied with MR imaging five patients who presented with shoulder weakness and pain and who underwent electrophysiologic studies. On MR imaging the distribution of muscle edema and fatty infiltration was recorded, as was the presence of masses impinging on a regional nerve.Results. Acute/subacute denervation was best seen on T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with fat saturation, showing increased SI related to neurogenic edema. Chronic denervation was best seen on T1-weighted spin-echo images, demonstrating loss of muscle bulk and diffuse areas of increased signal intensity within the muscle. Three patients showed MR imaging and electrophysiologic findings of Parsonage Turner syndrome. One patient demonstrated an arteriovenous malformation within the spinoglenoid notch, impinging on the suprascapular nerve with associated atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle. The fifth patient demonstrated fatty atrophy of the teres minor muscle caused by compression by a cyst of the axillary nerve and electrophysiologic findings of an incomplete axillary nerve block.Conclusion. MR imaging is useful in detecting and characterizing denervation atrophy and neurogenic edema in shoulder muscles. MR imaging can provide additional information to electrophysiologic studies by estimating the age (acute/chronic) and identifying morphologic causes for shoulder pain and atrophy. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac differentiation and electrophysiology characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo-wu; AI Shi-yi; L(U) An-lin; HOU Jing; HUANG Wei; LI Yao; HOU Zhao-lei; HOU Hong; DA Jing; YANG Na

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the progress of cardiac differentiation and electrophysiological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.Data sources The databases of PubMed,Springer Link,Science Direct and CNKI were retrieved for papers published from January 2000 to January 2012 with the key words of “bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,cardiac or heart,electrophysiology or electrophysiological characteristics”.Study selection The articles concerned cardiac differentiation and electrophysiological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were collected.After excluding papers that study purposes are not coincident with this review or contents duplicated,56 papers were internalized at last.Results For the treatment of myocardial infarction and myocardiac disease,the therapeutic effects of transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which have the ability to develop into functional myocardial cells by lots of methods have been proved by many researches.But the arrhythmogenic effect on ventricles affer transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells derived myocardial cells is still controversial in animal models.Certainly,the low differentiation efficiency and heterogeneous development of electricial function could be the most important risk for proarrhythmia.Conclusion Many studies of cardiac differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have paid attention to improve the cardiac differentiation rate,and the electrophysiology characteristics of the differentiated cells should be concerned for the risk for proarrhythmia as well.

  14. The emerging role of in vitro electrophysiological methods in CNS safety pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Michael V; Pugsley, Michael K; Forster, Roy; Troncy, Eric; Huang, Hai; Authier, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Adverse CNS effects account for a sizeable proportion of all drug attrition cases. These adverse CNS effects are mediated predominately by off-target drug activity on neuronal ion-channels, receptors, transporters and enzymes - altering neuronal function and network communication. In response to these concerns, there is growing support within the pharmaceutical industry for the requirement to perform more comprehensive CNS safety testing prior to first-in-human trials. Accordingly, CNS safety pharmacology commonly integrates several in vitro assay methods for screening neuronal targets in order to properly assess therapeutic safety. One essential assay method is the in vitro electrophysiological technique - the 'gold standard' ion channel assay. The in vitro electrophysiological method is a useful technique, amenable to a variety of different tissues and cell configurations, capable of assessing minute changes in ion channel activity from the level of a single receptor to a complex neuronal network. Recent advances in automated technology have further expanded the usefulness of in vitro electrophysiological methods into the realm of high-throughput, addressing the bottleneck imposed by the manual conduct of the technique. However, despite a large range of applications, manual and automated in vitro electrophysiological techniques have had a slow penetrance into the field of safety pharmacology. Nevertheless, developments in throughput capabilities and in vivo applicability have led to a renewed interest in in vitro electrophysiological techniques that, when complimented by more traditional safety pharmacology methods, often increase the preclinical predictability of potential CNS liabilities.

  15. Utility of electrophysiological studies to predict arrhythmic events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela; Hilfiker; Andreas; W; Schoenenberger; Paul; Erne; Richard; Kobza

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the prognostic value of electrophysiological stimulation(EPS) in the risk stratification for tachyarrhythmic events and sudden cardiac death(SCD).METHODS:We conducted a prospective cohort study and analyzed the long-term follow-up of 265 consecutive patients who underwent programmed ventricular stimulation at the Luzerner Kantonsspital(Lucerne,Switzerland) between October 2003 and April 2012. Patients underwent EPS for SCD risk evaluation because of structural or functional heart disease and/or electrical conduction abnormality and/or after syncope/cardiac arrest. EPS was considered abnormal,if a sustained ventricular tachycardia(VT) was inducible. The primary endpoint of the study was SCD or,in implanted patients,adequate ICD-activation.RESULTS:During EPS,sustained VT was induced in 125 patients(47.2%) and non-sustained VT in 60 patients(22.6%); in 80 patients(30.2%) no arrhythmia could be induced. In our cohort,153 patients(57.7%) underwent ICD implantation after the EPS. During follow-up(mean duration 4.8 ± 2.3 years),a primary endpoint event occurred in 49 patients(18.5%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve(AUROC) was 0.593(95%CI:0.515-0.670) for a left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF) < 35% and 0.636(95%CI:0.563-0.709) for inducible sustained VT during EPS. The AUROC of EPS was higher in the subgroup of patients with LVEF ≥ 35%(0.681,95%CI:0.578-0.785). Cox regression analysis showed that both,sustained VT during EPS(HR:2.26,95%CI:1.22-4.19,P = 0.009) and LVEF < 35%(HR:2.00,95%CI:1.13-3.54,P = 0.018) were independent predictors of primary endpoint events.CONCLUSION:EPS provides a benefit in risk stratificationfor future tachyarrhythmic events and SCD and should especially be considered in patients with LVEF ≥ 35%.

  16. Small Ion Channel Linking Molecular Simulations and Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    channel are described sufficiently accurately. To our knowledge, long time scale stability (approx.10 micro-sec) and the correct electrophysiology have been shown so far for only one channel - the synthetic LS3 hexamer). In this presentation, this approach will be discussed in application to two viral channels - Vpu, encoded by the HIV-1 genome and p7 of hepatitis C.

  17. Electrophysiological Evidence for Hyperfocusing of Spatial Attention in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreither, Johanna; Lopez-Calderon, Javier; Leonard, Carly J; Robinson, Benjamin M; Ruffle, Abigail; Hahn, Britta; Gold, James M; Luck, Steven J

    2017-04-05

    people with schizophrenia (PSZ) tend to concentrate processing resources more intensely but more narrowly than healthy control subjects (HCS). Using electrophysiological measures of sensory and cognitive processing, we found that PSZ were actually superior to HCS in focusing attention at the point of gaze and filtering out peripheral distractors when the task required a narrow focusing of attention. This finding of superior filtering in PSZ supports the hyperfocusing hypothesis, which may provide the mechanism underlying a broad range of cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/373813-11$15.00/0.

  18. Drying of thin colloidal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Alexander F.

    2013-04-01

    When thin films of colloidal fluids are dried, a range of transitions are observed and the final film profile is found to depend on the processes that occur during the drying step. This article describes the drying process, initially concentrating on the various transitions. Particles are seen to initially consolidate at the edge of a drying droplet, the so-called coffee-ring effect. Flow is seen to be from the centre of the drop towards the edge and a front of close-packed particles passes horizontally across the film. Just behind the particle front the now solid film often displays cracks and finally the film is observed to de-wet. These various transitions are explained, with particular reference to the capillary pressure which forms in the solidified region of the film. The reasons for cracking in thin films is explored as well as various methods to minimize its effect. Methods to obtain stratified coatings through a single application are considered for a one-dimensional drying problem and this is then extended to two-dimensional films. Different evaporative models are described, including the physical reason for enhanced evaporation at the edge of droplets. The various scenarios when evaporation is found to be uniform across a drying film are then explained. Finally different experimental techniques for examining the drying step are mentioned and the article ends with suggested areas that warrant further study.

  19. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Charles [ZoomEssence, Inc., Hebron, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  20. Cassava Sun Drying Performance on Various Surfaces and Drying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a raw material in the production of starch, tapioca and snack foods ... The material was dried for 8 hours daily after which it was kept indoors overnight. The surface with .... statistical package (MS Office, 2007). .... preservation and marketing.

  1. EFFECT OF DRYING CONDITIONS ON MUSHROOM QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANOJ KULSHRESHTHA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed drying of mushroom was undertaken to study the drying characteristics and quality of the dried mushrooms. Drying was done at drying air temperatures of 50, 70, and 90oC and air velocities of 1.71 and 2.13 m/s. Two batch sizes, namely, 0.5 kg and 1 kg of sliced milky mushrooms were dried. Drying characteristics and the quality of dried mushrooms were analyzed. The results indicated that the drying time decreased only marginally with increase in air velocity. Drying air temperature of 50oC was better as it resulted in a dried product having better rehydration characteristics, lesser shrinkage and lighter color. Highest energy efficiency (79.74% was observed while drying a batch size of 1 kg at a drying air temperature of 50oC, using an air velocity of 1.7 m/s.

  2. Wireless ferroelectric resonating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikari, Ville; Seppa, Heikki; Mattila, Tomi; Alastalo, Ari

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless resonating sensor that is based on a ferroelectric varactor. The sensor replies with its data at an intermodulation frequency when a reader device illuminates it at 2 closely located frequencies. The paper derives a theoretical equation for the response of such a sensor, verifies the theory by simulations, and demonstrates a temperature sensor based on a ferroelectric varactor.

  3. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  4. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul V.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  5. Natural wind drying of willow stems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigler, J.K.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Berg, van den J.V.; Sonneveld, C.; Meerdink, G.

    2000-01-01

    The process of natural wind drying of willow (Salix viminalis) stems in large piles was investigated. A simple drying model was developed for stems. Large-scale drying experiments were conducted and drying data were statistically analysed. Whether drying in a pile of willow stems was uniform was inv

  6. A Mathematical Model for Freeze-Drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the experiments on freeze-drying carrot and potato slabs, the effects of some parameters, such as heating temperature and pressure on the freeze-drying process are examined. A simple model of freeze-drying is established to predict drying time and the mass variations of materials during the drying. The experimental results agree well with those calculated by the model.

  7. Boron doped diamond biotechnology: from sensors to neurointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, C; Scorsone, E; Bendali, A; Kiran, R; Cottance, M; Girard, H A; Degardin, J; Dubus, E; Lissorgues, G; Rousseau, L; Mailley, P; Picaud, S; Bergonzo, P

    2014-01-01

    Boron doped nanocrystalline diamond is known as a remarkable material for the fabrication of sensors, taking advantage of its biocompatibility, electrochemical properties, and stability. Sensors can be fabricated to directly probe physiological species from biofluids (e.g. blood or urine), as will be presented. In collaboration with electrophysiologists and biologists, the technology was adapted to enable structured diamond devices such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs), i.e. common electrophysiology tools, to probe neuronal activity distributed over large populations of neurons or embryonic organs. Specific MEAs can also be used to build neural prostheses or implants to compensate function losses due to lesions or degeneration of parts of the central nervous system, such as retinal implants, which exhibit real promise as biocompatible neuroprostheses for in vivo neuronal stimulations. New electrode geometries enable high performance electrodes to surpass more conventional materials for such applications.

  8. Electrophysiological properties and calcium handling of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Boum Youm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs hold great interest in many fields of research including clinical applications such as stem cell and gene therapy for cardiac repair or regeneration. ESC-CMs are also used as a platform tool for pharmacological tests or for investigations of cardiac remodeling. ESC-CMs have many different aspects of morphology, electrophysiology, calcium handling, and bioenergetics compared with adult cardiomyocytes. They are immature in morphology, similar to sinus nodal-like in the electrophysiology, higher contribution of trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx to Ca2+ handling, and higher dependence on anaerobic glycolysis. Here, I review a detailed electrophysiology and Ca2+ handling features of ESC-CMs during differentiation into adult cardiomyocytes to gain insights into how all the developmental changes are related to each other to display cardinal features of developing cardiomyocytes.

  9. Electrophysiological indices of memory for temporal order in early childhood: implications for the development of recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Tracy; Miller, Neely C; Bauer, Patricia J; Georgieff, Michael K; Nelson, Charles A

    2009-03-01

    The ability to recall contextual details associated with an event begins to develop in the first year of life, yet adult levels of recall are not reached until early adolescence. Dual-process models of memory suggest that the distinct retrieval process that supports the recall of such contextual information is recollection. In the present investigation, we used both behavioral and electrophysiological measures to assess the development of memory for contextual details, as indexed by memory for temporal order, in early childhood. Results revealed age-related improvements in memory for temporal order despite similar levels of memory for the individual items themselves. Furthermore, this pattern of recall was associated with specific components in the electrophysiological response. Consistent with electrophysiological research in adults, distributed, positive-going activity late in the waveform was associated with increases in recall of contextual details and the development of recollective processes.

  10. Plant cell electrophysiology: applications in growth enhancement, somatic hybridisation and gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochatt, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    The use and exploitation of electrophysiology with plant cells have witnessed a slow but steady increase for a number of purposes in recent years. First envisaged only as a tool for the recovery of somatic hybrid plants following protoplast electrofusion, or for transient and/or stable genetic transformation following electroporation-mediated entry of foreign genes into protoplasts and cells, electrophysiological studies with plant cells and tissues have since spanned into other areas, and particularly for the assessment of the possible effects of electric and electromagnetic fields on the subsequent growth and differentiation competences of the electro-treated cells. This review will critically discuss these various applications of electrophysiology and will also aim at analysing the fundamental physiological and physico-chemical mechanisms underlying them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrophysiology: a review of signal origins and applications to investigating glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S L; Klistorner, A

    1998-02-01

    Because different electrophysiological responses can be isolated to different retinal and cortical cell types and levels, the proportion in which the different signals are reduced can reflect the primary areas of damage. The knowledge of electrophysiology component sources can thus be applied when examining ophthalmic disorders. The present review covers the proposed origins and the usefulness of the conventional electrophysiological responses. Their application to glaucoma is discussed, with particular reference to the pattern electroretinogram. In the second part of the current review, we present some recent developments that relate to the use of multifocal pseudorandomly stimulated recording. This technique enables a new approach to the electrical assessment of visual responses. Analysis for temporal non-linearities and spatial distribution of the response throughout the visual field can be implemented. This type of recording has the potential to provide a method of objective visual field assessment in glaucoma and other disorders of the visual system.

  12. Sensor sentinel computing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  13. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional...... mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have...... not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water.In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical...

  14. 10-minute consultation Dry mouth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Taubert; Eleanor M R Davies; Ian Back

    2007-01-01

    @@ A 67 year old man presents with a six week history of dry mouth (xerostomia). He has prostate cancer, which has spread to his spine, and he takes opiates for pain relief. Recently, he started taking an antidepressant.

  15. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-08-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  16. Dry skin - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... moisture Hot, dry air in desert environments Air conditioners that cool the air and remove moisture Taking ... scrubbing your skin. Shave right after bathing, when hair is soft. Wear soft, comfortable clothing next to ...

  17. An electrophysiological approach to the diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia: implications for botulinum toxin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, E; Merlo, I M; Ponzio, M; Montomoli, C; Tassorelli, C; Biancardi, C; Lozza, A; Martignoni, E

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) injection into the cricopharyngeal (CP) muscle has been proposed for the treatment of neurogenic dysphagia due to CP hyperactivity. The aim was to determine whether an electrophysiological method exploring oropharyngeal swallowing could guide treatment and discriminate responders from non-responders, based on the association of CP dysfunction with other electrophysiological abnormalities of swallowing. Patients with different neurological disorders were examined: Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy-Parkinson variant, multiple system atrophy cerebellar variant, stroke, multiple sclerosis and ataxia telangiectasia. All patients presented with clinical dysphagia, and with complete absence of CP muscle inhibition during the hypopharyngeal phase of swallowing. Each patient underwent clinical and electrophysiological investigations before and after treatment with BTX into the CP muscle of one side (15 units of Botox). Clinical and electrophysiological procedures were performed in a blind manner by two different investigators. The following electrophysiological measures were analysed: (1) duration of EMG activity of suprahyoid/submental muscles (SHEMG-D); (2) duration of laryngopharyngeal mechanogram (LPM-D); (3) duration of the inhibition of the CP muscle EMG activity (CPEMG-ID); and (4) interval between onset of EMG activity of suprahyoid/submental muscles and onset of laryngopharyngeal mechanogram (I-SHEMG-LPM). Two months after treatment, 50% of patients showed a significant improvement. Patients with prolonged or reduced SHEMG-D values and prolonged I-SHEMG-LPM values did not respond to BTX. Therefore, values for which BTX had no effect (warning values) were identified. This electrophysiological method can recognise swallowing abnormalities which may affect the outcome of the therapeutic approach to dysphagia with BTX treatment.

  18. Feasibility and safety of Reveal LINQ insertion in a sterile procedure room versus electrophysiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Geoffrey R; Lau, Dennis H; Middeldorp, Melissa E; Harrington, Judith A; Stolcman, Simon; Wilson, Lauren; Twomey, Darragh J; Kumar, Sharath; Munawar, Dian A; Khokhar, Kashif B; Mahajan, Rajiv; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2016-11-15

    Insertable cardiac monitors (ICMs) are increasingly utilized for diagnosis of unexplained syncope and arrhythmia monitoring. The Reveal LINQ is a novel miniaturized ICM with improved algorithms. The feasibility and safety of insertion outside the traditional electrophysiology laboratory is unknown. Here we compare outcomes of Reveal LINQ insertion in different environments. We report on a prospective, single-centre, non-randomized, observational experience of consecutive Reveal LINQ implantation in the electrophysiology laboratory or a procedure room between October 2013 and October 2015. Of 178 consecutive patients who underwent LINQ device insertion, 80 were implanted in the electrophysiology laboratory and 98 in a procedure room. There were no significant differences in baseline patient characteristics. All implants were performed in the recommended manufacturer method with the exception of 1 which required suture closure. Only a minority received peri-procedural antibiotics with a greater number in the electrophysiology laboratory group (11 [14%] versus 1 [1%], p=0.007). Overall, there were 3 (1.7%) complications with no significant difference between the electrophysiology laboratory and the procedure room groups (2 [3%] versus 1 [1%], p=0.45). There was 1 superficial infection in the procedure room group and 1 superficial infection with device extrusion and 1 traumatic extrusion in the electrophysiology laboratory group. Procedure room implantation subjectively improved laboratory efficiency and patient flow. Reveal LINQ insertion can be safely performed outside of the cardiac laboratory provided a sterile technique is followed by the operator using manufacturer recommendations for insertion. These findings have significant resource implications for hospitals undertaking such procedures. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dry aging of beef; Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dashdorj, Dashmaa; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Cho, Soohyun; Kim, Younghoon; Hwang, Inho

    2016-01-01

    The present review has mainly focused on the specific parameters including aging (aging days, temperature, relative humidity, and air flow), eating quality (flavor, tenderness and juiciness), microbiological quality and economic (shrinkage, retail yields and cost) involved beef dry aging process. Dry aging is the process where beef carcasses or primal cuts are hanged and aged for 28 to 55 d under controlling environment conditions in a refrigerated room with 0° to 4 °C and with relative humid...

  20. Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

  1. Intraoperative monitoring by imaging and electrophysiological techniques during giant intracranial aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, A; Penchet, G; Thines, L

    2016-02-01

    Difficulties in giant intracranial aneurysm surgery are the consequence of aneurysmal wall histology and the complex angioarchitecture of the vascular tree. In order to reduce complications and risks of those procedures, various imaging and electrophysiological techniques can be implemented perioperatively. The authors review the principles, goals and main results in this context of micro-Doppler and flowmeter techniques, near-infrared spectroscopy, operative microscope-integrated indocyanine green video-angiography, neuro-endoscopy, selective intraoperative angiography and electrophysiological monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  3. Morphology of drying blood pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  4. Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble email Send this article ... disease bothers the patient more. What Causes Dry Eye Syndrome? Dry eye can be caused by many ...

  5. Parameters Online Detection and Model Predictive Control during the Grain Drying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the grain drying quality and automation level, combined with the structural characteristics of the cross-flow circulation grain dryer designed and developed by us, the temperature, moisture, and other parameters measuring sensors were placed on the dryer, to achieve online automatic detection of process parameters during the grain drying process. A drying model predictive control system was set up. A grain dry predictive control model at constant velocity and variable temperature was established, in which the entire process was dried at constant velocity (i.e., precipitation rate per hour is a constant and variable temperature. Combining PC with PLC, and based on LabVIEW, a system control platform was designed.

  6. Electrophysiological Data and the Biophysical Modelling of Local Cortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-03-01

    neuroscience, see e.g. [2] for a review. In summary, neural fields include horizontal intrinsic connections within layers or laminae of the cortical sheet and prescribe the time evolution of cell activity – such as mean depolarization or (average action potential density. These models characterize current fluxes as continuous processes on the cortical sheet, using partial differential equations (PDEs. The key advance that neural field models offer, over other population models (like neural masses, is that they embody spatial parameters (like the density and extent of lateral connections. This allows one to model responses not just in time but also over space. Conversely, these models are particularly useful for explaining observed cortical responses over different spatial scales; for example, with high-density recordings, at the epidural or intracortical level. However, the impact of spatially extensive dynamics is not restricted to expression over space but can also have profound effects on temporal (e.g., spectral responses at one point (or averaged locally over the cortical surface. This means that neural field models may also play a key role in the modelling of non-invasive electrophysiological data that does not resolve spatial activity directly. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. This application of neural fields follows the tradition of many studies, in which neural fields (and mean field models in general have been used to explain cortical activity based on qualitative changes of models activity induced by changes in model parameters, like synaptic efficacy and connection strengths, see e.g.[3–8] . We will focus on the links between neuronal oscillations – mediated by the lateral propagation of neuronal spiking

  7. The acute effects of intravenously administered mibefradil, a new calcium antagonist, on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenquist, M; BrembillaPerrot, B; Meinertz, T; Neugebauer, A; Crijns, HJMG; Smeets, JLRM; vanderVring, JAFM; Fromer, M; Kobrin, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    Objective: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was designed to assess the acute effects of intravenous mibefradil on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the human heart. Methods: Seventy-one patients referred for routine electrophysiologic testing were rand

  8. SQUID sensor array configurations for magnetoencephalography applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, J.; Robinson, S.E. [CTF Systems Inc., A subsidiary of VSM MedTech Ltd, Port Coquitlam, BC (Canada)

    2002-09-01

    Electrophysiological activity in the human brain generates a small magnetic field from the spatial superposition of individual neuronal source currents. At a distance of about 15 mm from the scalp, the observed field is of the order of 10{sub -13} to 10{sub -12} T peak-to-peak. This measurement process is termed magnetoencephalography (MEG). In order to minimize instrumental noise, the MEG is usually detected using superconducting flux transformers, coupled to SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors. Since MEG signals are also measured in the presence of significant environmental magnetic noise, flux transformers must be designed to strongly attenuate environmental noise, maintain low instrumental noise and maximize signals from the brain. Furthermore, the flux transformers must adequately sample spatial field variations if the brain activity is to be imaged. The flux transformer optimization for maximum brain signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requires analysis of the spatial and temporal properties of brain activity, the environmental noise and how these signals are coupled to the flux transformer. Flux transformers that maximize SNR can detect the smallest brain signals and have the best ability to spatially separate dipolar sources. An optimal flux transformer design is a synthetic higher-order gradiometer based on relatively short-baseline first-order radial gradiometer primary sensors. (author)

  9. High-intensity drying processes-impulse drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1991-06-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. To eliminate sheet delamination, low thermal mass ceramic press roll coatings were developed to reduce heat transfer to the sheet, while maintaining high heat flux during early stages of the process. In so doing, most of the transferred energy is used to form steam that displaces liquid water, rather than in excessively heating the sheet. During this period, a prototype ceramic coating was developed and its impulse drying performance was compared to that of steel surfaces. It was observed that ceramic platens can be operated at higher temperatures and pressures resulting in improved water removal and physical properties without inducing sheet delamination. Heat flux measurement techniques were developed to provide a mechanistic explanation for the superior performance of the prototype. The work confirmed that the prototype ceramic coating is more energy efficient than the steel surface.

  10. High-intensity drying processes-impulse drying. Yearly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1991-06-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. To eliminate sheet delamination, low thermal mass ceramic press roll coatings were developed to reduce heat transfer to the sheet, while maintaining high heat flux during early stages of the process. In so doing, most of the transferred energy is used to form steam that displaces liquid water, rather than in excessively heating the sheet. During this period, a prototype ceramic coating was developed and its impulse drying performance was compared to that of steel surfaces. It was observed that ceramic platens can be operated at higher temperatures and pressures resulting in improved water removal and physical properties without inducing sheet delamination. Heat flux measurement techniques were developed to provide a mechanistic explanation for the superior performance of the prototype. The work confirmed that the prototype ceramic coating is more energy efficient than the steel surface.

  11. Sensors an introductory course

    CERN Document Server

    Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Sensors: An Introductory Course provides an essential reference on the fundamentals of sensors. The book is designed to help readers in developing skills and the understanding required in order to implement a wide range of sensors that are commonly used in our daily lives. This book covers the basic concepts in the sensors field, including definitions and terminologies. The physical sensing effects are described, and devices which utilize these effects are presented. The most frequently used organic and inorganic sensors are introduced and the techniques for implementing them are discussed. This book: Provides a comprehensive representation of the most common sensors and can be used as a reference in relevant fields Presents learning materials in a concise and easy to understand manner Includes examples of how sensors are incorporated in real life measurements Contains detailed figures and schematics to assist in understanding the sensor performance Sensors: An Introductory Course is ideal for university stu...

  12. Smart Sensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Stetter, J. R.; Hesketh, P. J.; Liu, C. C.

    Sensors and sensor systems are vital to our awareness of our surroundings and provide safety, security, and surveillance, as well as enable monitoring of our health and environment. A transformative advance in the field of sensor technology has been the development of "Smart Sensor Systems". The definition of a Smart Sensor may vary, but typically at a minimum a Smart Sensor is the combination of a sensing element with processing capabilities provided by a microprocessor. That is, Smart Sensors are basic sensing elements with embedded intelligence. The sensor signal is fed to the microprocessor, which processes the data and provides an informative output to an external user. A more expansive view of a Smart Sensor System, which is used in this article, is illustrated in Fig. 19.1: a complete self-contained sensor system that includes the capabilities for logging, processing with a model of sensor response and other data, self-contained power, and an ability to transmit or display informative data to an outside user. The fundamental idea of a smart sensor is that the integration of silicon microprocessors with sensor technology cannot only provide interpretive power and customized outputs, but also significantly improve sensor system performance and capabilities.

  13. Ubiquitous Sensor Network for Chemical Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-Young Chung; Risto Myllylae

    2006-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks have been identified as one of the most important technologies for the 21st century. Recent advances in micro sensor fabrication technology and wireless communication technology enable the practical deployment of large-scale, low-power, inexpensive sensor networks. Such an approach offers an advantage over traditional sensing methods in many ways: large-scale, dense deployment not only extends spatial coverage and achieves higher resolution, but also increases the system's fault-tolerance and robustness. Moreover, the ad-hoc nature of wireless sensor networks makes them even more attractive for military and other risk-associated applications, such as environmental observation and habitat monitoring.

  14. Refractive index sensor based on a 1D photonic crystal in a microfluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André; Mortensen, Asger; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2010-01-01

    A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC) embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental...

  15. Gas storage in "dry water" and "dry gel" clathrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Benjamin O; Wang, Weixing; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2010-03-02

    "Dry water" (DW) is a free-flowing powder prepared by mixing water, hydrophobic silica particles, and air at high speeds. We demonstrated recently that DW can be used to dramatically enhance methane uptake rates in methane gas hydrate (MGH). Here, we expand on our initial work, demonstrating that DW can be used to increase the kinetics of formation of gas clathrates for gases other than methane, such as CO(2) and Kr. We also show that the stability of the system toward coalescence can be increased via the inclusion of a gelling agent to form a "dry gel", thus dramatically improving the recyclability of the material. For example, the addition of gellan gum allows effective reuse over at least eight clathration cycles without the need for reblending. DW and its "dry gel" modification may represent a potential platform for recyclable gas storage or gas separation on a practicable time scale in a static, unmixed system.

  16. PREBIOTICS AS DRYING AIDS FOR SPRAY DRYING FRUIT JUICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. FREIXO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural fruit juices are difficult to transform into powder because they are rich in sugars and acids with low glass transition temperatures, resulting in a sticky behaviour during spray drying. The present research work aimed to test the prebiotics maltodextrin and arabic gum as drying agents in order to be able to produce dehydrated powder from pineapple, strawberry and apple juices. 2 % of maltodextrin and an inlet air temperature of 130 °C are recommended to spray dry apple juice, reaching 60 % yield of powder with a water activity below 0.40. For strawberry juice, 2 % of this carrier is recommended and the inlet air temperature, 120 °C or 130 °C, did not seem relevant. For pineapple, neither the concentration of the carrier nor the inlet air temperature seemed to be relevant.

  17. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  18. Think Globally: Cross-Linguistic Variation in Electrophysiological Activity during Sentence Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Kretzschmar, Franziska; Tune, Sarah; Wang, Luming; Genc, Safiye; Philipp, Markus; Roehm, Dietmar; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates systematic cross-linguistic differences in the electrophysiological correlates of conflicts between form and meaning ("semantic reversal anomalies"). These engender P600 effects in English and Dutch (e.g. [Kolk et al., 2003] and [Kuperberg et al., 2003]), but a biphasic N400--late positivity pattern in German (Schlesewsky…

  19. The value of electrophysiology results in patients with epilepsy and vigabatrin associated visual field loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardus, P; Verduin, WM; Berendschot, TTJM; Kamermans, M; Postma, G; Stilma, JS; van Veelen, CWM

    Purpose: To determine the value of electrophysiological findings in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and to relate these findings to the amount of concentric contraction of the visual field and the use of vigabatrin, Methods: Electro-retinograms and electro-oculograms were done on 30 patients,

  20. Evidence for Acute Electrophysiological and Cognitive Changes Following Routine Soccer Heading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Di Virgilio

    2016-11-01

    Discussion: Sub-concussive head impacts routine in soccer heading are associated with immediate, measurable electrophysiological and cognitive impairments. Although these changes in brain function were transient, these effects may signal direct consequences of routine soccer heading on (long-term brain health which requires further study.

  1. Clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging features during recurrent ictal cortical blindness associated with chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pesch, V; Hernalsteen, D; van Rijckevorsel, K; Duprez, Th; Boschi, A; Ivanoiu, A; Sindic, C J M

    2006-12-01

    Transient neuroimaging features indicating primary cortical and secondary subcortical white matter cytotoxic oedema have been described in association with prolonged or intense seizures. We describe the unusual condition of recurrent ictal cortical blindness due to focal occipital status epilepticus, in the context of chronic hepatic failure. There was a close association between the onset and disappearance of clinical, electrophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities.

  2. Electrophysiologic and antiarrhythmic effects of intravenous bisoprolol in atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vandeVen, LLM; Crijns, HJGM; deMuinck, ED; VanGelder, IC; VanWijk, LM; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    Beta-blockade may be useful in the termination and prevention of atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT), An electrophysiologic study was performed in 9 patients (4 men and 5 women; mean +/- SD age, 56 +/- 16 years) with documented AVNRT before and after the intravenous administration of

  3. Candidate Electrophysiological Endophenotypes of Hyper-Reactivity to Change in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomot, Marie; Blanc, Romuald; Clery, Helen; Roux, Sylvie; Barthelemy, Catherine; Bruneau, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Although resistance to change is a main feature of autism, the brain processes underlying this aspect of the disorder remain poorly understood. The aims of this study were to examine neural basis of auditory change-detection in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; N = 27) through electrophysiological patterns (MMN, P3a) and to test…

  4. Electrophysiological safety of sertindole in dogs with normal and remodeled hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Volders, Paul G A; Stengl, Milan

    2003-01-01

    Inhibition of the potassium current IKr and QT prolongation are associated with drug-induced torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the cardiac electrophysiological effects of sertindole, an antipsychotic drug reported to prolong the QT interval in schizop...

  5. FieldTrip: Open source software for advanced analysis of MEG, EEG, and invasive electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Maris, E.; Schoffelen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow experimenta

  6. Electrophysiological characterization of olfactory cell types in the antennae and palps of the housefly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelling, FJ; Biancaniello, G; den Otter, CJ

    2002-01-01

    A set of odours was presented to the housefly Musca domestica and the electrophysiological responses of single olfactory receptor cells in the antennae and palps were recorded. The olfactory cells in the antennae of the housefly showed a large variability of response profiles, but multidimensional c

  7. Book review of Electrophysiological Recording Techniques, edited by Robert P Vertes and Robert W Stackman, Jr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolev Vasil

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The review presents the newly published book "Electrophysiological Recording Techniques" by Humana Press. This is an important collection of articles devoted to an issue that has gained increasing attention in modern neuroscience research - electrophysiological recording techniques. The present book is a timely update of methods spanning from single cell recordings to local field potentials, cortical, and scalp EEG recordings. The book presents the progressive development of electrophysiological recording methods by including both existing and new advanced technologies. Theoretical considerations on important issues like current source density analysis, local field potential and signal generation are also in focus. In most of the chapters, methods are illustrated with specific experimental results and are discussed towards future developments and applications. Chapters can be read independently because each chapter appears with its own theoretical background, literature survey and specific methodology. The book can be of interest to a broader audience willing to look at the contemporary state of development of electrophysiological methods. Also, it can be of special interest to scientists with high expertise working in the field of neuroscience and behavior.

  8. Positive Behavioral and Electrophysiological Changes following Neurofeedback Training in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, J. A.; Brang, D.; Hecht, E.; Edwards, L.; Carey, S.; Bacon, M.; Futagaki, C.; Suk, D.; Tom, J.; Birnbaum, C.; Rork, A.

    2008-01-01

    Two electrophysiological studies tested the hypothesis that operant conditioning of mu rhythms via neurofeedback training can renormalize mu suppression, an index of mirror neuron activity, and improve behavior in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In Study 1, eight high-functioning ASD participants were assigned to placebo…

  9. Follow up of patients with signs and symptoms of polyneuropathy not confirmed by electrophysiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, NR; Slotema, CW; Hoogendijk, JE

    2005-01-01

    The outcome and final diagnoses of patients with symptoms and/or signs suggestive of polyneuropathy, but with normal electrophysiological studies, were investigated. All patients who presented at the outpatient clinic between 1993 and 1998 with signs and symptoms suggestive of polyneuropathy, but in

  10. Serum cytokine contents in schizophrenia patient with metabolic syndrome and their correlation with nerve electrophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yong Chen; Zhong Chen; Xue-Jing Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze serum cytokine contents in schizophrenia patient with metabolic syndrome (MS) and their correlation with nerve electrophysiology.Methods:A total of 90 chizophrenia patient with MS, including 41 cases with simple schizophrenia and 39 cases with simple metabolic syndrome were included for study. The values of nerve electrophysiology indexes and serum illness-related indexes were compared among included patients, and the correlation between the two was further analyzed.Results:Compared with simple schizophrenia group and simple MS group, P300 latency of schizophrenia with MS group was longer, and the amplitude was shorter; N2-P3 latency and amplitude were shorter (P<0.05); serum SOD, S100b, BDNF, ABAb, PAI-1,α-HBDH, AST, cystatin c, TG, FBG and 2hPG values of schizophrenia with MS group were higher, IGF1, HMW-APN and HDL-C levels were lower, and compared with simple schizophrenia group and simple MS group, differences were significant (P<0.05); P300 latency, P300 amplitude, N2-P3 latency and N2-P3 amplitude of schizophrenia with MS group were directly correlated with serum cytokine contents (P<0.05).Conclusions:There are significantly abnormal serum cytokines and nerve electrophysiology indexes in schizophrenia patient with MS, and nerve electrophysiology detection can be used as the means to judge disease and guide treatment.

  11. Electrophysiological correlates of associative visual agnosia lesioned in the ventral pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takao; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Tobimatsu, Shozo; Arakawa, Kenji; Kuba, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yoshihisa; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Shida, Kenshiro; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2004-06-15

    Visual agnosia has been well studied by anatomical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies. However, functional changes in the brain have been rarely assessed by electrophysiological methods. We carried out electrophysiological examinations on a 23-year-old man with associative visual agnosia, prosopagnosia and cerebral achromatopsia to evaluate the higher brain dysfunctions of visual recognition. Electrophysiological methods consisted of achromatic, chromatic and category-specific visual evoked potentials (CS-VEPs), and event-related potentials (ERPs) with color and motion discrimination tasks. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed large white matter lesions in the bilateral temporo-occipital lobes involving the lingual and fusiform gyri (V4) and inferior longitudinal fasciculi due to multiple sclerosis. Examinations including CS-VEPs demonstrated dysfunctions of face and object perception while sparing semantic word perception after primary visual cortex (V1) in the ventral pathway. ERPs showed abnormal color perception in the ventral pathway with normal motion perception in the dorsal pathway. These electrophysiological findings were consistent with lesions in the ventral pathway that were detected by clinical and neuroimaging findings. Therefore, CS-VEPs and ERPs with color and motion discrimination tasks are useful methods for assessing the functional changes of visual recognition such as visual agnosia.

  12. Agreement Mechanisms in Native and Nonnative Language Processing: Electrophysiological Correlates of Complexity and Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the neural and behavioral correlates of grammatical agreement computation during language comprehension in native English speakers and highly advanced L1 Spanish-L2 English bilinguals. In a series of electrophysiological (event-related brain potential (ERP)) and behavioral (acceptability judgment and self-paced…

  13. Electrophysiological Indices of Abnormal Error-Processing in Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Madeleine J.; Cahill, John D.; Bates, Alan T.; Jackson, Georgina M.; Calton, Timothy G.; Liddle, Peter F.; Hollis, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Background: Impaired cognitive control has been frequently observed in children and young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and might underlie the excessive hyperactivity and impulsivity in this population. We investigated behavioural and electrophysiological indices relevant to one domain of cognitive control; namely…

  14. Candidate Electrophysiological Endophenotypes of Hyper-Reactivity to Change in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomot, Marie; Blanc, Romuald; Clery, Helen; Roux, Sylvie; Barthelemy, Catherine; Bruneau, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Although resistance to change is a main feature of autism, the brain processes underlying this aspect of the disorder remain poorly understood. The aims of this study were to examine neural basis of auditory change-detection in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; N = 27) through electrophysiological patterns (MMN, P3a) and to test…

  15. Double-staining techniques allows electrophysiological identification of monoamine-containing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T E; Audesirk, G J

    1985-08-01

    Electrophysiological recording provides important evidence for positive identification of many neurons in gastropods. We describe a technique which combines intracellular recording and injection of a persistent, non-fluorescent dye (Fast Green) with subsequent histofluorescence treatment using a modification of the wholemount glyoxylic acid procedure developed by Barber (1983) to establish the presence or absence of monoamine transmitters in positively identified single gastropod neurons.

  16. NeuroElectro: A Window to the World's Neuron Electrophysiology Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreejoy J Tripathy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of neural circuits is determined largely by the electrophysiological properties of the neurons they contain. Understanding the relationships of these properties requires the ability to first identify and catalog each property. However, information about such properties is largely locked away in decades of closed-access journal articles with heterogeneous conventions for reporting results, making it difficult to utilize the underlying data. We solve this problem through the NeuroElectro project: a Python library, RESTful API, and web application (at http://neuroelectro.org for the extraction, visualization, and summarization of published data on neurons' electrophysiological properties. Information is organized both by neuron type (using neuron definitions provided by NeuroLex and by electrophysiological property (using a newly developed ontology. We describe the techniques and challenges associated with the automated extraction of tabular electrophysiological data and methodological metadata from journal articles. We further discuss strategies for how to best combine, normalize and organize data across these heterogeneous sources. NeuroElectro is a valuable resource for experimental physiologists looking to supplement their own data, for computational modelers looking to constrain their model parameters, and for theoreticians searching for undiscovered relationships among neurons and their properties.

  17. NeuroElectro: a window to the world's neuron electrophysiology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J; Savitskaya, Judith; Burton, Shawn D; Urban, Nathaniel N; Gerkin, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of neural circuits is determined largely by the electrophysiological properties of the neurons they contain. Understanding the relationships of these properties requires the ability to first identify and catalog each property. However, information about such properties is largely locked away in decades of closed-access journal articles with heterogeneous conventions for reporting results, making it difficult to utilize the underlying data. We solve this problem through the NeuroElectro project: a Python library, RESTful API, and web application (at http://neuroelectro.org) for the extraction, visualization, and summarization of published data on neurons' electrophysiological properties. Information is organized both by neuron type (using neuron definitions provided by NeuroLex) and by electrophysiological property (using a newly developed ontology). We describe the techniques and challenges associated with the automated extraction of tabular electrophysiological data and methodological metadata from journal articles. We further discuss strategies for how to best combine, normalize and organize data across these heterogeneous sources. NeuroElectro is a valuable resource for experimental physiologists attempting to supplement their own data, for computational modelers looking to constrain their model parameters, and for theoreticians searching for undiscovered relationships among neurons and their properties.

  18. Wrist Ultrasonography vs. Electrophysiological Studies in the Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Hashemi Attar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nIntroduction: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is characterized by pain or paresthesia in areas innervated by the median nerve. Electrophysiological studies are gold standard diagnostic tests for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare ultrasonography and electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of CTS. "nMaterials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 100 wrists of 50 consecutive patients referred to 22-Bahman hospital (Mashhad with the clinical diagnosis of CTS from spring 2007 to summer 2008. These patients suspicious for CTS in at least one of their wrists (based on their complaints and neurological examination including Tinel’s test and Phallen test, were referred for electrophysiological studies including nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. All the patients underwent ultrasonography of both wrists within a week after electrophysiological studies. Ultrasonographies were performed by a radiologist using a high frequency (12 MHz linear probe (PHILIPS Envisor C. The cross sectional area of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel. Measurements equal or more than 10 mm2 were considered as the CTS. Ultrasonographic findings and also clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were compared with electrophysiological studies (as the gold standard diagnostic test for each wrist separately. "nResults: Of the 100 wrists (50 patients, 53 wrists were diagnosed as CTS based on the electrophysiological studies. Ninety one percent of the wrists with CTS were in female patients. The mean age was 52.1 years (23-75 years. There was no predisposing factor for most cases; however, 6% were affected by diabetes, 6% by hypertriglyceridemia, and 2% by hypothyroidism. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were 59%, 88

  19. Embedded sensor systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Dharma Prakash

    2017-01-01

    This inspiring textbook provides an introduction to wireless technologies for sensors, explores potential use of sensors for numerous applications, and utilizes probability theory and mathematical methods as a means of embedding sensors in system design. It discusses the need for synchronization and underlying limitations, inter-relation between given coverage and connectivity to number of sensors needed, and the use of geometrical distance to determine location of the base station for data collection and explore use of anchor nodes for relative position determination of sensors. The book explores energy conservation, communication using TCP, the need for clustering and data aggregation, and residual energy determination and energy harvesting. It covers key topics of sensor communication like mobile base stations and relay nodes, delay-tolerant sensor networks, and remote sensing and possible applications. The book defines routing methods and do performance evaluation for random and regular sensor topology an...

  20. Towards Sensor Database Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe; Gehrke, Johannes; Seshadri, Praveen

    2001-01-01

    Sensor networks are being widely deployed for measurement, detection and surveillance applications. In these new applications, users issue long-running queries over a combination of stored data and sensor data. Most existing applications rely on a centralized system for collecting sensor data....... These systems lack flexibility because data is extracted in a predefined way; also, they do not scale to a large number of devices because large volumes of raw data are transferred regardless of the queries that are submitted. In our new concept of sensor database system, queries dictate which data is extracted...... from the sensors. In this paper, we define the concept of sensor databases mixing stored data represented as relations and sensor data represented as time series. Each long-running query formulated over a sensor database defines a persistent view, which is maintained during a given time interval. We...

  1. Sensors for Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschulena, G.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors are one of the key elements for the automation in the manufacturing and process technology. The sensor field is presently within a restructuring process, directed to a stronger utilization of solid state technologies. This restructuring is governed by the utilization of solid state physical effects, by the use of reproducible fabrication techniques, and by the market driving forces. The state of the art of sensors in modern fabrication techniques will be demonstrated in examples, namely for sensors in silicon technology, in thin film technology and in thick film/screen printing technology. Some important physical and technological problems to be solved for the development of new and advanced sensor families will be outlined. Sensor development is strongly directed to the minaturization of devices and to the integration of different sensors to multisensors, as well as the integration between sensors and microelectronics.

  2. Air Sensor Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Sensor Toolbox provides information to citizen scientists, researchers and developers interested in learning more about new lower-cost compact air sensor technologies and tools for measuring air quality.

  3. Drying characteristics and kinetics of fluidized bed dried potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. BAKAL

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, more than 50% potatoes are consumed as processed products. As drying is the vital phenomenon in processing, it is necessary to investigate the drying characteristics and its kinetics. In this experimental study, drying kinetics of Potato in two different shape of cuboidal & cylindrical with three aspect ratio was investigated as a function of drying conditions. Experiments were conducted using air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 ºC, at velocity of 7 ms-1. The experimental moisture data were fitted to Page and simple models available in the literature, and a good agreement was observed. The Page model gave better fit than simple model. In the ranges covered, the values of the effective moisture diffusivity, Deff were obtained between 2.278 × 10-9 to 3.314 × 10-8 m2s-1 from the Fick's diffusion model. Using Deff, the value of activation energy (Ea was determined assuming the Arrhenius-type temperature relationship.

  4. Permeability characterization of stitched carbon fiber preforms by fiber optic sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Antonucci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The in-plane and through thickness permeability of unidirectional stitched carbon fiber preforms have been determined through vacuum infusion tests. The impregnation of various dry preforms with different stitching characteristics has been monitored by fiber optic sensors that have been stitched together with the dry tow to manufacture the dry preform. The experimental infusion times have been fitted by a numerical procedure based on Finite Element (FE processing simulations. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental infusion times has been found demonstrating the potentiality of the fiber sensor system as suitable tool to evaluate impregnation times and permeability characteristics.

  5. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  6. Electrophysiological Studies and Radiofrequency Ablations in Children and Adolescents with Arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus Nardi; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Pires, Leonardo Martins; SantAnna, Roberto Tofani; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation is the standard non-pharmacological treatment for arrhythmias in pediatric patients. However, arrhythmias and their associated causes have particular features in this population. Objective To analyze the epidemiological characteristics and findings of electrophysiological diagnostic studies and radiofrequency ablations in pediatric patients referred to the Electrophysiology Unit at Instituto de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, in order to characterize the particularities of this population. Methods Cross-sectional study with 330 electrophysiological procedures performed in patients aged less than 20 years between June 1997 and August 2013. Results In total, 330 procedures (9.6% of the overall procedures) were performed in patients aged less than 20 years (14.33 ± 3.25 years, age range 3 months to 19 years), 201 of which were males (60.9%). A total of 108 (32.7%) electrophysiological diagnostic studies were performed and of these, 48.1% showed abnormal findings. Overall, 219 radiofrequency ablations were performed (66.3%) with a success rate of 84.8%. The presence of an accessory pathway was the most prevalent finding, occurring in 158 cases (72.1%), followed by atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (16.8%), typical atrial flutter (3.1%) and extrasystoles originating from the right ventricular outflow tract (2.7%). Three patients developed complications during ablation (1.4%). Among congenital heart diseases, which occurred in 51 (15.4%) patients, atrial sept defect was the most frequent (27.4%), followed by ventricular sept defect (25.4%) and Ebstein's anomaly (17.6%). Conclusion Electrophysiological study and radiofrequency ablation are effective tools for diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias in the pediatric population. PMID:25372472

  7. An Investigation of Correlation between Electrophysiological and Functional Recovery after the Sciatic Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Guven

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Video or photo assisted footprint analysis method is used to determine the motor and sensorial development instead of classic walking track footprint analysis in experimental peripheral nerve injury. Besides, the sucrose-gap method is used for measuring the electrophysiological activity in the sciatic nerves in-vitro. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between functional and electrophysiological recovery during the nerve regeneration in Wistar rats. Methods: In the experiments, after the unilateral sciatic nerve crushing, the rats were evaluated at the preoperative and 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks postoperative using the sucrose gap method, and photo assisted footprint method. The compound action potentials (CAP, the Peak- time (PT and the ½ Falling- time (1/2FT were measured, and compared to functional results. Results: Two weeks after being crushed sciatic nerves, complete function loss was seen operated legs in all rats. The amplitude of CAP was determined too small. The PT and the 1/2FT values were three fold longer than intact. However, following 4th – 8th weeks, the amplitude of CAP and other parameters of CAP were closed to intact values. Conclusion: The findings indicated that the results of the functional recovery were correlated to electrophysiological results. However, functional results showed almost full functional recovery in the 4th week, the electrophysiological results did not reach to intact values in the 8th week. We conclude that photo assisted footprint analysis method and sucrose-gap technique, which are useful functional and electrophysiological methods to produce complementary knowledge with each other in the investigation of experimental peripheral nerve regeneration. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 177-185

  8. Mathematical modeling of heterogeneous electrophysiological responses in human β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Riz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical activity plays a pivotal role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. Recent findings have shown that the electrophysiological characteristics of human β-cells differ from their rodent counterparts. We show that the electrophysiological responses in human β-cells to a range of ion channels antagonists are heterogeneous. In some cells, inhibition of small-conductance potassium currents has no effect on action potential firing, while it increases the firing frequency dramatically in other cells. Sodium channel block can sometimes reduce action potential amplitude, sometimes abolish electrical activity, and in some cells even change spiking electrical activity to rapid bursting. We show that, in contrast to L-type Ca2+-channels, P/Q-type Ca2+-currents are not necessary for action potential generation, and, surprisingly, a P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonist even accelerates action potential firing. By including SK-channels and Ca2+ dynamics in a previous mathematical model of electrical activity in human β-cells, we investigate the heterogeneous and nonintuitive electrophysiological responses to ion channel antagonists, and use our findings to obtain insight in previously published insulin secretion measurements. Using our model we also study paracrine signals, and simulate slow oscillations by adding a glycolytic oscillatory component to the electrophysiological model. The heterogenous electrophysiological responses in human β-cells must be taken into account for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying insulin secretion in health and disease, and as shown here, the interdisciplinary combination of experiments and modeling increases our understanding of human β-cell physiology.

  9. Subjective symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome correlate more with psychological factors than electrophysiological severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firosh Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is one of the most common requests for electrodiagnosis. We aimed to note the relationship of subjective symptom severity of CTS, with objective electrophysiological severity and psychological status of patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients of CTS referred to neurophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital over 1 year were prospectively studied. Boston CTS Assessment Questionnaire (BCTSAQ and visual analog scale (VAS were used to assess subjective symptom severity. Psychological status was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Electrophysiological severity of CTS was estimated by median motor distal latency and median to ulnar peak sensory latency difference across the wrist. Each parameter in both hands was scored from 0 to 3 depending on the severity grade, and a composite electrophysiological severity score (CEPSS was calculated for each patient by summing up the scores in both hands. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman's rank correlation test. Results: There was significant correlation of BCTSAQ with VAS (P = 0.001, HADS anxiety score (P < 0.001, and HADS depression score (P = 0.01. CEPSS had no significant correlation with VAS (P = 0.103, HADS anxiety score (P = 0.211, or HADS depression score (P = 0.55. CEPSS had a borderline correlation with BCTSAQ (P = 0.048. Conclusions: While the subjective symptoms of CTS are well correlated with psychological factors, their correlation with objective electrophysiological severity is weak. Hence, prompt treatment of psychological comorbidity is important in symptomatic management of CTS; decision about surgical intervention should be based on electrophysiological severity rather than symptom severity.

  10. Computational models of atrial cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling, and their role in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijman, Jordi; Erfanian Abdoust, Pegah; Voigt, Niels; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-02-01

    The complexity of the heart makes an intuitive understanding of the relative contribution of ion channels, transporters and signalling pathways to cardiac electrophysiology challenging. Computational modelling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has proven useful to integrate experimental findings, extrapolate results obtained in expression systems or animal models to other systems, test quantitatively ideas based on experimental data and provide novel hypotheses that are experimentally testable. While the bulk of computational modelling has traditionally been directed towards ventricular bioelectricity, increasing recognition of the clinical importance of atrial arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, has led to widespread efforts to apply computational approaches to understanding atrial electrical function. The increasing availability of detailed, atrial-specific experimental data has stimulated the development of novel computational models of atrial-cellular electrophysiology and Ca(2+) handling. To date, more than 300 studies have employed mathematical simulations to enhance our understanding of atrial electrophysiology, arrhythmogenesis and therapeutic responses. Future modelling studies are likely to move beyond current whole-cell models by incorporating new data on subcellular architecture, macromolecular protein complexes, and localized ion-channel regulation by signalling pathways. At the same time, more integrative multicellular models that take into account regional electrophysiological and Ca(2+) handling properties, mechano-electrical feedback and/or autonomic regulation will be needed to investigate the mechanisms governing atrial arrhythmias. A combined experimental and computational approach is expected to provide the more comprehensive understanding of atrial arrhythmogenesis that is required to develop improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Here, we review this rapidly expanding area, with a particular focus on Ca(2+) handling, and

  11. Solar Drying of Red Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, John L.

    Solar drying of thickened red mud is the latest method for its disposal in an economical and environmentally acceptable way. Two years full scale experience with this method in Jamaica has shown that its success depends on accurate grading of the solar drying area and accurate control of the pre-dewatering of the mud in the alumina plant. Experience with the use of deep thickening for pre-dewatering is described, together with a novel method for measurement and control of thickened mud rheology.

  12. Development of freeze dried vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    The development of freeze dried vegetables to be used in the Apollo food system is discussed. After the initial selection and screening of vegetables, several types of freeze dried vegetables were prepared in small batches. From these small batches, two vegetables were judged satisfactory for further testing and evaluation. These vegetables, mashed potatoes and asparagus, were subjected to storage at 100 deg plus or minus 5 F. for two weeks and then taste tested. The vegetables were also tested to determine if they complied with the microbiological requirements for Apollo food. The space food prototype production guide for the vegetables is submitted.

  13. Dry technologies and community bureaucracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Irrigation channels criss-cross the Andes, bringing water to the dry soils of the peasants' fields. To obtain water, people must deal not only with the amount of water and the physical terrain, but also with concerns of others and matters of the social terrain.......Irrigation channels criss-cross the Andes, bringing water to the dry soils of the peasants' fields. To obtain water, people must deal not only with the amount of water and the physical terrain, but also with concerns of others and matters of the social terrain....

  14. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of reducing development time for new pharmaceutical products, formulation and process development scientists must continually look for ways to "work smarter, not harder." Within the product development arena, this means reducing the amount of trial and error empiricism in arriving at a formulation and identification of processing conditions which will result in a quality final dosage form. Characterization of the freezing behavior of the intended formulation is necessary for developing processing conditions which will result in the shortest drying time while maintaining all critical quality attributes of the freeze-dried product. Analysis of frozen systems was discussed in detail, particularly with respect to the glass transition as the physical event underlying collapse during freeze-drying, eutectic mixture formation, and crystallization events upon warming of frozen systems. Experiments to determine how freezing and freeze-drying behavior is affected by changes in the composition of the formulation are often useful in establishing the "robustness" of a formulation. It is not uncommon for seemingly subtle changes in composition of the formulation, such as a change in formulation pH, buffer salt, drug concentration, or an additional excipient, to result in striking differences in freezing and freeze-drying behavior. With regard to selecting a formulation, it is wise to keep the formulation as simple as possible. If a buffer is needed, a minimum concentration should be used. The same principle applies to added salts: If used at all, the concentration should be kept to a minimum. For many proteins a combination of an amorphous excipient, such as a disaccharide, and a crystallizing excipient, such as glycine, will result in a suitable combination of chemical stability and physical stability of the freeze-dried solid. Concepts of heat and mass transfer are valuable in rational design of processing conditions. Heat transfer by conduction

  15. 7 CFR 58.813 - Dry whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry whey. 58.813 Section 58.813 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.813 Dry whey. The quality requirements for dry whey shall be in accordance with the U.S. Standards for Dry Whey. Supplemental Specifications for...

  16. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  17. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  18. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  19. Promoting Mouth-Drying Responses to Reduce Drooling Effects by Persons with Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Study of Two Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.; Pichierri, Sabrina; Groeneweg, Jop

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the use of microswitch technology to promote mouth-drying responses and thereby reduce the effects of drooling by two adults with severe intellectual and multiple disabilities. Mouth-drying responses were performed via a special napkin that contained pressure sensors, a microprocessor and an MP3 to monitor the responses and…

  20. Thermal flow micro sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, M.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow se

  1. Sensors for Entertainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on “Sensors for Entertainment”, developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored. PMID:27428981

  2. Environmental Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Kirk; Hart, Jane; Ong, Royan

    2004-01-01

    Sensor networks for the natural environment require an understanding of earth science, combined with sensor, communications and computer technology. We discuss the evolution from data logging to sensor networks, describe our research from a glacial environment and highlight future challenges in this field.

  3. Optical waveguide sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluitman, J.; Popma, Th.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the field of optical waveguide sensors is presented. Some emphasis is laid on the development of a single scheme under which the diversity of sensor principles can be arranged. First three types of sensors are distinguished: intrinsic, extrinsic and active. Next, two steps are disting

  4. Sensors and actuators, Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the organization and the research programme of the Sensor and Actuator (S&A) Research Unit of the University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands. It includes short descriptions of all present projects concerning: micromachined mechanical sensors and actuators, optical sensors,

  5. Automotive vehicle sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  6. Sensors for Entertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Lamberti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on “Sensors for Entertainment”, developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored.

  7. Methods for Examining Electrophysiological Coherence in Epileptic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine eSong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy may reflect a focal abnormality of cerebral tissue, but the generation of seizures typically involves propagation of abnormal activity through cerebral networks. We examined epileptiform discharges (spikes with dense array electroencephalography (dEEG in five patients to search for the possible engagement of pathological networks. Source analysis was conducted with individual electrical head models for each patient, including sensor position measurement for registration with MRI with geodesic photogrammetry; tissue segmentation and skull conductivity modeling with an atlas skull CT warped to each patient’s MRI; cortical surface extraction and tessellation into 1 square cm equivalent dipole patches; inverse source estimation with either minimum norm or cortical surface Laplacian constraints; and spectral coherence computed among equivalent dipoles aggregated within Brodmann areas with 1 Hz resolution from 1 to 70 Hz. These analyses revealed characteristic source coherence patterns in each patient during the pre-spike, spike, and post-spike intervals. For one patient with both spikes and seizure onset localized to a single temporal lobe, we observed a cluster of apparently abnormal coherences over the involved temporal lobe. For the other patients, there were apparently characteristic coherence patterns associated with the discharges, and in some cases these appeared to reflect abnormal temporal lobe synchronization, but the coherence patterns for these patients were not easily related to an unequivocal epileptogenic zone. In contrast, simple localization of the site of onset of the spike discharge, and/or the site of onset of the seizure, with noninvasive 256 dEEG was useful in predicting the characteristic site of seizure onset for those cases that were verified by intracranial EEG and/or by surgical outcome.

  8. Rotorwash wind sensor evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoff, Curtis L.; Lake, Robert E.; Gordge, Dennis N.

    1993-08-01

    This project's purpose was to assess and document the ability of the Qualimetrics, Inc. model 2132 wind sensor (a cup and vane type sensor) to measure a rotor wash flow field as compared to the TSI, Inc. model 204D ion beam deflection sensor. The tests concentrated on the sensor's ability to capture dynamic characteristics of a helicopter rotor wash flow field. The project was conducted from April to November 1992 and consisted of quantitative laboratory and field testing. The laboratory testing included 9.5 hours of wind tunnel test time, subjecting each sensor to three step input tests at velocities of 20 knots, 50 knots, and 80 knots. Field test data were collected during one hour of SH-60B helicopter hover time at heights of 15 and 25 feet above ground level at distances of 35 and 70 feet from the wind sensors. Aircraft gross weights ranged between 19,600 and 20,500 pounds. All field test data were obtained in ambient wind conditions of approximately 8 knots at 40 degrees relative to the aircraft nose, -40 feet pressure altitude in an ambient temperature of 85 F. Laboratory data analysis indicates the model 2132 cup and vane sensor's time constant values were significantly higher than those of the model 204D ion beam sensor and varied relative to wind tunnel velocity settings. This indicates the model 2132 sensor's ability to accurately capture oscillations in a dynamic flow field is significantly less than the model 204D sensor. The model 2132 sensor did detect periodic or pulsating velocity magnitudes, but failed to capture significant oscillations as compared to the model 204D sensor. Comparative analysis of all field test event data indicate the model 2132 sensor only detected frequencies below 1.5 Hz and only captured an average of 46 percent of the model 204D sensor's maximum amplitude pulse values that were below 1.5 Hz. The model 2132 sensor's inability to capture many of the maximum pulse amplitudes is evidence of the sensor's limited capability to

  9. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  10. Hybrid Rice for Dry Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Luo Lijun, director of the Shanghai Agrobiological Gene Center, recently announced that Hanyou No. 3 - a genetically modified rice capable of producing high yields in dry areas - has been developed at the center.The hybrid yields 7,571 kilograms per hectare, about the same as ordinary rice.

  11. Apparatus for drying sugar cubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derckx, H.A.J.; Torringa, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Device for drying sugar cubes containing a heating apparatus for heating and dehumidifying the sugar cubes, a conditioning apparatus for cooling off and possibly further dehumidifying the sugar cubes and a conveying apparatus for conveying the sugar cubes through the heating apparatus and the condit

  12. Apparatus for drying sugar cubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derckx, H.A.J.; Torringa, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Device for drying sugar cubes containing a heating apparatus for heating and dehumidifying the sugar cubes, a conditioning apparatus for cooling off and possibly further dehumidifying the sugar cubes and a conveying apparatus for conveying the sugar cubes through the heating apparatus and the

  13. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  14. Apparatus for drying sugar cubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derckx, H.A.J.; Torringa, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Device for drying sugar cubes containing a heating apparatus for heating and dehumidifying the sugar cubes, a conditioning apparatus for cooling off and possibly further dehumidifying the sugar cubes and a conveying apparatus for conveying the sugar cubes through the heating apparatus and the condit

  15. Flavour release from dried vegetables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was focused on the development of an in vitro model system for isolation of volatile compounds from dried vegetables under mouth conditions, such as volume of the mouth, temperature, salivation and mastication. Instrumental analysis of these volatile compoun

  16. Determination of drying characteristics and quality properties of eggplant in different drying conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Bayraktaroglu Urun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Drying is the most traditional process used for preserving eggplant a long time. The aim of this study was to determining drying characteristics and quality properties of eggplant dried by sun drying, hot air convective drying and infrared assisted convective drying. Convective drying and infrared assisted convective were carried out in a convective dryer at three different temperatures(40°, 50°, 60°C and air velocity at 5 m/s.The increasing of temperatures during the drying of eggplant led to a significant reduction of the drying time. However loss of nutrition was observed in eggplant samples dried at higher temperature.The biggest change in colour parameters was observed in samples dried with sun drying.So it was thought that sun drying had a negative effect on quality properties of eggplant samples.

  17. Multi-Sensor Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki; Khan, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    The use of multiple sensors typically requires the fusion of data from different type of sensors. The combined use of such a data has the potential to give an efficient, high quality and reliable estimation. Input data from different sensors allows the introduction of target attributes (target type......, size) into the association logic. This requires a more general association logic, in which both the physical position parameters and the target attributes can be used simultaneously. Although, the data fusion from a number of sensors could provide better and reliable estimation but abundance...... processing units for same type of multiple sensors, typically radar in our case....

  18. Multifuctional integrated sensors (MFISES).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homeijer, Brian D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roozeboom, Clifton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Many emerging IoT applications require sensing of multiple physical and environmental parameters for: completeness of information, measurement validation, unexpected demands, improved performance. For example, a typical outdoor weather station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light intensity, rainfall, wind speed and direction. Existing sensor technologies do not directly address the demand for cost, size, and power reduction in multi-paramater sensing applications. Industry sensor manufacturers have developed integrated sensor systems for inertial measurements that combine accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers, but do not address environmental sensing functionality. In existing research literature, a technology gap exists between the functionality of MEMS sensors and the real world applications of the sensors systems.

  19. The value of clinical electrophysiology in the assessment of the eye and visual system in the era of advanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatham, Andrew R; Nguyen, Vincent; Zhu, Yuan; Hennessy, Michael; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Electrophysiological techniques allow clinical investigations to include a 'dissection' of the visual system. Using suitable electrophysiological techniques, the 'dissection' allows function to be ascribed to the different photoreceptors (rod and cone photoreceptors), retinal layers, retinal location or the visual pathway up to the visual cortex. Combined with advances in genetics, retinal biochemistry, visual fields and ocular imaging, it is now possible to obtain a better understanding of diseases affecting the retina and visual pathways. This paper reviews core electrophysiological principles that can complement other examination techniques, including advanced ocular imaging, and help the interpretation of other clinical data and thus, refine and guide clinical diagnosis.

  20. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  1. Online Distributed Sensor Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, Daniel; Krause, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A key problem in sensor networks is to decide which sensors to query when, in order to obtain the most useful information (e.g., for performing accurate prediction), subject to constraints (e.g., on power and bandwidth). In many applications the utility function is not known a priori, must be learned from data, and can even change over time. Furthermore for large sensor networks solving a centralized optimization problem to select sensors is not feasible, and thus we seek a fully distributed solution. In this paper, we present Distributed Online Greedy (DOG), an efficient, distributed algorithm for repeatedly selecting sensors online, only receiving feedback about the utility of the selected sensors. We prove very strong theoretical no-regret guarantees that apply whenever the (unknown) utility function satisfies a natural diminishing returns property called submodularity. Our algorithm has extremely low communication requirements, and scales well to large sensor deployments. We extend DOG to allow observatio...

  2. Silicon force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  3. MEMS optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical sensor utilizing effective index modulation of a waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of reflected light and a force sensing system accommodating said optical sensor. One embodiment of the invention relates to a sensor system comprising...... at least one multimode light source, one or more optical sensors comprising a multimode sensor optical waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector, at least one transmitting optical waveguide for guiding light from said at least one light source to said one or more multimode sensor optical...... waveguides, a detector for measuring light reflected from said Bragg reflector in said one or more multimode sensor optical waveguides, and a data processor adapted for analyzing variations in the Bragg wavelength of at least one higher order mode of the reflected light....

  4. Intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: an electrophysiological reappraisal and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; García, Antonio; Gallardo, Elena; Peeters, Kristien; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Álvarez-Paradelo, Silvia; Gazulla, José; Martínez-Tames, Miriam; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2017-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy with great variety of phenotypes, inheritance patterns, and causative genes. According to median motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), CMT is divided into demyelinating (CMT1) with MNCV below 38 m/s, axonal (CMT2) with MNCV above 38 m/s, and intermediate CMT with MNCV between 25 and 45 m/s. In each category, transmission may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The nosology of intermediate CMT is controversial because of concerns about electrophysiological delimitation. A systematic computer-based literature search was conducted on PubMed, using the following MeSH: (1) intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth; (2) X-linked intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth; and (3) X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth and electrophysiology. We retrieved 225 articles reporting X-linked CMT or intermediate CMT with electrophysiological information. After eligibility, 156 papers were used for this review. In assessing median MNCV, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were taken into account. In cases with attenuated CMAP and wherever possible, proximal median MNCV was used for accurate definition of conduction slowing in the intermediate range. In the vast majority of males with X-linked CMT associated with GJB1 mutation (CMTX1), median MNCV was intermediate. CMT associated with DRP2 mutation is another well-documented X-linked intermediate disorder. Autosomal dominant intermediate CMT (DI-CMT) encompasses 11 different types; six of them with assigned phenotype MIM number and the remaining five being unnumbered. Based on available electrophysiological information, we wonder if DI-CMTA should be reclassified within CMT2. Autosomal recessive intermediate CMT (RI-CMT) covers four numbered MIM phenotypes though, in accordance with reported electrophysiology, two of them (RI-CMTB and RI-CMTD) should probably be reclassified within AR-CMT2. We conclude that intermediate CMT is a complex

  5. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, Edward L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Mauck, Jerry L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Bockhorst, Richard M. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  6. Long term stability and hysteresis effects in Pt100 sensors used in industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungblad, S.; Holmsten, M.; Josefson, L.-E.; Klevedal, B.

    2013-09-01

    A Pt100 sensor is under normal conditions a very accurate and stable sensor for temperature measurements. Two important factors that can have influence on the results are its drift during time and the hysteresis effect at temperature changes. Different types of Pt100 sensors will show varying sensitivity for these effects. This study includes a number of partially supported wire type Pt100 sensors mainly used as reference sensors at different industries and laboratories. For most of the sensors, there is a history of calibration data for several years. By using a dry block calibrator, the hysteresis effects of the sensors are measured in the temperature range 0 °C up to 500 °C, depending on the calibration range of the sensor. The suitability of the method is evaluated by measurements of the stability of the dry-block and the repeatability of hysteresis tests. The evaluation shows that it is possible to measure hysteresis effects above a few mK. The tested Pt100 sensors exhibits hysteresis effects of 20 mK peak-to-peak as most, which is in the same magnitude as the uncertainty of the calibration and also more significant than the annual drift. The best sensors showed a hysteresis of just a few mK.

  7. HEAT Sensor: Harsh Environment Adaptable Thermionic Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limb, Scott J. [Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This document is the final report for the “HARSH ENVIRONMENT ADAPTABLE THERMIONIC SENSOR” project under NETL’s Crosscutting contract DE-FE0013062. This report addresses sensors that can be made with thermionic thin films along with the required high temperature hermetic packaging process. These sensors can be placed in harsh high temperature environments and potentially be wireless and self-powered.

  8. A Wireless, Passive Sensor for Quantifying Packaged Food Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keat Ghee Ong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the fabrication of a wireless, passive sensor based on aninductive-capacitive resonant circuit, and its application for in situ monitoring of thequality of dry, packaged food such as cereals, and fried and baked snacks. The sensor ismade of a planar inductor and capacitor printed on a paper substrate. To monitor foodquality, the sensor is embedded inside the food package by adhering it to the package’sinner wall; its response is remotely detected through a coil connected to a sensor reader. Asfood quality degrades due to increasing humidity inside the package, the paper substrateabsorbs water vapor, changing the capacitor’s capacitance and the sensor’s resonantfrequency. Therefore, the taste quality of the packaged food can be indirectly determined bymeasuring the change in the sensor’s resonant frequency. The novelty of this sensortechnology is its wireless and passive nature, which allows in situ determination of foodquality. In addition, the simple fabrication process and inexpensive sensor material ensure alow sensor cost, thus making this technology economically viable.

  9. Application of D-S Evidence Fusion Method in the Fault Detection of Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Dou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity and dangerousness of drying process, the fault detection of temperature sensor is very difficult and dangerous in actual working practice and the detection effectiveness is not satisfying. For this problem, in this paper, based on the idea of information fusion and the requirements of D-S evidence method, a D-S evidence fusion structure with two layers was introduced to detect the temperature sensor fault in drying process. The first layer was data layer to establish the basic belief assignment function of evidence which could be realized by BP Neural Network. The second layer was decision layer to detect and locate the sensor fault which could be realized by D-S evidence fusion method. According to the numerical simulation results, the working conditions of sensors could be described effectively and accurately by this method, so that it could be used to detect and locate the sensor fault.

  10. Description and testing of three moisture sensors for measuring surface wetness on carbonate building stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, R.B.; Reddy, M.M.; Martin, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three moisture sensors were tested as a means for determining the surface wetness on carbonate building stones exposed to conditions that produce deposition of moisture. A relative-humidity probe, a gypsum-coated circuit grid, and a limestone-block resistor were tested as sensors for determining surface wetness. Sensors were tested under laboratory conditions of constant relative humidity and temperature and also under on-site conditions of variable relative humidity and temperature for eight weeks at Newcomb, NY. Laboratory tests indicated that relative humidity alone did not cause sensors to become saturated with water. However, the rates of drying indicated by the sensors after an initial saturation were inversely related to the relative humidity. On-site testing of the relative-humidity probe and the gypsum-coated ciruit grid indicated that they respond to a diurnal wetting and drying cycle; the limestone-block resistor responded only to rainfall.

  11. Solar drying of jack fruit almonds

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre J. de M. Queiroz; Dantas,Hermeval J; Figueirêdo,Rossana M. F. de; Karla dos S Melo

    2011-01-01

    Dryers heated by solar energy have been constructed and used in drying whole and half jack fruit almonds. The samples were dried during the day in direct sun and in the conventional solar dryer prepared for this purpose. Another piece of equipment was built for reception and accumulation of sun energy in a body of water, which was used as a heat source for night drying. The drying with the sun energy was compared with artificial drying. The jack fruit almonds were dried whole, half, with pell...

  12. Sensor Management for Tracking in Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fuemmeler, Jason A; Veeravalli, Venugopal V

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of tracking an object moving through a network of wireless sensors. In order to conserve energy, the sensors may be put into a sleep mode with a timer that determines their sleep duration. It is assumed that an asleep sensor cannot be communicated with or woken up, and hence the sleep duration needs to be determined at the time the sensor goes to sleep based on all the information available to the sensor. Having sleeping sensors in the network could result in degraded tracking performance, therefore, there is a tradeoff between energy usage and tracking performance. We design sleeping policies that attempt to optimize this tradeoff and characterize their performance. As an extension to our previous work in this area [1], we consider generalized models for object movement, object sensing, and tracking cost. For discrete state spaces and continuous Gaussian observations, we derive a lower bound on the optimal energy-tracking tradeoff. It is shown that in the low tracking error regime, the g...

  13. Sensor for metal detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-06-26

    NOVELTY - The sensor has a microfluidic flow channel that is provided with an inlet port, an outlet port, and a detection chamber. The detection chamber is provided with a group of sensing electrodes (4) having a working electrode (8), a counter electrode (9), and a reference electrode (10). A flow sensor is configured to measure flow in the channel. A temperature sensor (6) is configured to measure temperature in the channel (3). An electrical connection is configured to connect the sensor to a sensing device. USE - Sensor for detecting metal such as toxic metal in sample such as clinical sample such as stool, saliva, sputum, bronchial lavage, urine, vaginal swab, nasal swab, biopsy, tissue, tears, breath, blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, joint fluid, and amniotic fluid, water sample, food sample, air sample, and soil sample (all claimed). ADVANTAGE - The sensor for use with the portable analytical instrument is configured for detection of metalsin samples. The sensor can provide the excellent solution for on-site metal detection, including heavy metal detection. The sensors can provide significant advantages in higher throughput, lower cost, at the same time being less labor intensive and less dependent on individual skills. The disposable design of the sensor, the enhanced reliability and repeatability of measurements can be obtained. The sensors can be widely applied in various industries. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - INDEPENDENT CLAIMS are included for the following: (1) a system for detecting metal in sample; and (2) a method for using sensor for detecting metal in sample. DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING(S) - The drawing shows a schematic view of the sensor prototype. Channel (3) Sensing electrodes (4) Temperature sensor (6) Working electrode (8) Counter electrode (9) Reference electrode (10)

  14. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  15. IMPROVING QUALITY OF WORK LIFE THROUGH ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY: AN IDEA ACCEPTED BY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanthia Giagloglou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Work Life (QWL and Occupational Health and Safety (OHS are two interconnected and important human needs. Modern industry shows a clear will for improving QWL and OHS, nevertheless, existent automatization and technological advances may negatively influence employees' wellbeing and result as triggers to their health deterioration. Subjective measures of employees workload can help, however, the lack of objectivity may be an issue. Improvement of working life needs objective measures. There is technology for measuring objectively employees' psychophysiology, but is considered to interfere with the flexibility needed for performing working tasks. Today electrophysiological methods require minimal dimensions, are wireless connected, allow movement and are proved to be useful in capturing psychophysical wellbeing. This study shows that the industry is ready to accept electrophysiological measures for monitoring and improving the employees' wellbeing.

  16. Predicting and Improving Recognition Memory Using Multiple Electrophysiological Signals in Real Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keisuke; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2015-07-01

    Although people are capable of storing a virtually infinite amount of information in memory, their ability to encode new information is far from perfect. The quality of encoding varies from moment to moment and renders some memories more accessible than others. Here, we were able to forecast the likelihood that a given item will be later recognized by monitoring two dissociable fluctuations of the electroencephalogram during encoding. Next, we identified individual items that were poorly encoded, using our electrophysiological measures in real time, and we successfully improved the efficacy of learning by having participants restudy these items. Thus, our memory forecasts using multiple electrophysiological signals demonstrate the feasibility and the effectiveness of using real-time monitoring of the moment-to-moment fluctuations of the quality of memory encoding to improve learning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Modelling the effect of gap junctions on tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Doug; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    When modelling tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology, continuum approximations to the discrete cell-level equations are used to maintain computational tractability. One of the most commonly used models is represented by the bidomain equations, the derivation of which relies on a homogenisation technique to construct a suitable approximation to the discrete model. This derivation does not explicitly account for the presence of gap junctions connecting one cell to another. It has been seen experimentally [Rohr, Cardiovasc. Res. 2004] that these gap junctions have a marked effect on the propagation of the action potential, specifically as the upstroke of the wave passes through the gap junction. In this paper we explicitly include gap junctions in a both a 2D discrete model of cardiac electrophysiology, and the corresponding continuum model, on a simplified cell geometry. Using these models we compare the results of simulations using both continuum and discrete systems. We see that the form of the action potent...

  18. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Maier, Elke [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Benz, Roland [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam, E-mail: alange@fmp-berlin.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles.

  19. Electrophysiological characterization of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lih-Wen Huang

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: This study provides basic electrophysiological knowledge about CMT1A in Taiwan. The findings also suggest that the electrophysiological variability in the CMT1A cohort may be at least partially attributable to unknown genetic factors. These data emphasize the role of MNCV in the clinical assessment of CMT1A. A median or ulnar MNCV below 38 m/s can be a sensitive criterion for supporting the diagnosis of CMT1A. A median MNCV can sometimes help to distinguish CMT1A from CMT1B, and CMT1A should be considered in patients with median MNCVs near or above 24 m/s. Moreover, the MNCV may to some degree reflect the severity of CMT1A.

  20. Development of planar patch clamp technology and its application in the analysis of cellular electrophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peihua Chen; Wei Zhang; Jun Zhou; Ping Wang; Lidan Xiao; Mo Yang

    2009-01-01

    A patch clamp chip, as a novel cell-based chip for electrophysiological recordings, has many prominent advantages such as high res-olution, accuracy, high throughput and automation. It can be used to perform multivariate and real-time measurements of cell networks in situ. Therefore, this technology will dramatically promote the research on ionic channels, neuronal networks and the application of this technology in drug screening. This paper reviews the development of planar patch clamp technology and its applications in detail. The latest progress in the research of taste cells electrophysiology and taste transduction is also presented. Finally, this paper analyzes the methodology of neural chips. Based on the current research of our laboratory, the prospective applications of a patch clamp chip in the research of taste sensation and transduction mechanisms at molecular and cellular levels are discussed.

  1. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures; Dosis de radiacion debidas a procedimientos de electrofisiologia cardiaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  2. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures...... are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS...... experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation...

  3. Long-term synchronized electrophysiological and behavioral wireless monitoring of freely moving animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Laszlo; Ftomov, Sergiu; Timofeev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Parallel electrophysiological recording and behavioral monitoring of freely moving animals is essential for a better understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying behavior. In this paper we describe a novel wireless recording technique, which is capable of synchronously recording in vivo multichannel electrophysiological (LFP, MUA, EOG, EMG) and activity data (accelerometer, video) from freely moving cats. The method is based on the integration of commercially available components into a simple monitoring system and is complete with accelerometers and the needed signal processing tools. LFP activities of freely moving group-housed cats were recorded from multiple intracortical areas and from the hippocampus. EMG, EOG, accelerometer and video were simultaneously acquired with LFP activities 24-h a day for 3 months. These recordings confirm the possibility of using our wireless method for 24-h long-term monitoring of neurophysiological and behavioral data of freely moving experimental animals such as cats, ferrets, rabbits and other large animals. PMID:23099345

  4. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures...... are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS...... experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation...

  5. Nanocomposite polymeric electrolytes to record electrophysiological brain signals in prolonged, unconventional or extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licoccia, Silvia; Luisa Di Vona, M; Romagnoli, Paola; Narici, Livio; Acquaviva, Massimo; Carozzo, Simone; Marco, Stefano Di; Saturno, Moreno; Sannita, Walter G; Traversa, Enrico

    2006-09-01

    Chemically stable nanocomposite iono-conducting polymeric membranes (based on lithium salts and nanocrystalline oxide powders dispersed in a polymethyl methacrylate matrix) performed successfully in the recording of human brain responses to visual stimulation. Impedance was higher than that of conventional electrodes. However, the electrophysiological signals recorded by acid Al(2)O(3) and neutral Al(2)O(3) 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% nanocomposite gel electrolytes were comparable to those obtained with standard electrodes, even without preliminary skin cleaning and in the absence of gel electrolytes allowing better contact with and skin-electrode ionic conductance. The electrochemical and mechanical characteristics of these membranes make them fit for human and animal research, for clinical application (specifically in emergencies, prolonged electrophysiological recordings), or in unconventional or extreme conditions when fluid electrolytes are unsuitable (e.g., biomedical space research).

  6. Electrophysiological analysis of neuromuscular synaptic function in myasthenia gravis patients and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Jaap J; Morsch, Marco; Phillips, William D; Verschuuren, Jan J G M

    2015-08-01

    Study of the electrophysiological function of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is instrumental in the understanding of the symptoms and pathophysiology of myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disorder characterized by fluctuating and fatigable muscle weakness. Most patients have autoantibodies to the acetylcholine receptor at the NMJ. However, in recent years autoantibodies to other crucial postsynaptic membrane proteins have been found in previously 'seronegative' MG patients. Electromyographical recording of compound and single-fibre muscle action potentials provides a crucial in vivo method to determine neuromuscular transmission failure while ex vivo (miniature) endplate potential recordings can reveal the precise synaptic impairment. Here we will review these electrophysiological methods used to assess NMJ function and discuss their application and typical results found in the diagnostic and experimental study of patients and animal models of the several forms of MG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drying characteristics of ultrasound assisted hot air drying of Flos Lonicerae

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, YUNHONG; Sun, Yue; Miao, Shuai; Li, Fang; Luo, Denglin

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound assisted hot air drying of Flos Lonicerae was investigated in this study. The effects of drying parameters such as ultrasonic radiation distance, ultrasonic power and drying temperature on drying characteristics were discussed. The results showed that ultrasound application has positive and significant effects on hot air drying. Shortening ultrasonic radiation distance is beneficial to improve both ultrasonic energy efficiency and drying rate. Higher ultrasonic power had more posit...

  8. [Analysis of the clinical, electrophysiological and genetic features of a family affected with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Faying; Che, Fengyuan

    2015-02-01

    To delineate the clinical, electrophysiological and genetics features of a family where 4 members were affected with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Clinical features of the 4 patients were summarized. Electrophysiological examination and genetic analysis were carried out. All of the patients showed recurrent motor and sensory disturbances after minor traction or constriction. Electrophysiology study revealed that the prolonged latency and reduced conduction velocity of peripheral nerve were general and with multiple sites of affection. The nerve locations liable to entrapment showed conduction block. A deletion mutation of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene was identified by genetic analysis. HNPP usually affects areas where nerves are liable to entrapment, and presents with motor and sensory disturbances of the innervated areas. Electrophysiological study reveals general nervous demyelination. Genetic analysis can clarify the diagnosis of HNPP.

  9. Heterogeneity of Monosymptomatic Resting Tremor in a Prospective Study: Clinical Features, Electrophysiological Test, and Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Guang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: mRT is heterogeneous in presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration, which can be determined by DAT-PET brain imaging. Clinical and electrophysiological features may provide clues to distinguish PD from SWEDDs.

  10. An electrophysiological link between the cerebellum, cognition and emotion: Frontal theta EEG activity to single-pulse cerebellar TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Early intracranial electrical stimulation studies in animals demonstrated cerebellar connectivity to brain structures involved in cognitive and emotive functions. Human electrophysiological data to support cerebellum involvement in the latter functions are however lacking. In the present study, elec

  11. Drying poly(ethylene glycol)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) by a simple 6 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. Water is removed from PEG by azeotropic distillation in toluene. The two components are mixed and toluene and water are distilled off by heating the solution to 170°C. This procedure can be implemented in ~2 h. ### Introduction In many ...

  12. Uniaxial tension of drying sieves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojić Nada V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the literature contains numerous studies that have been developed to describe the nonlinear behavior of drying sieves' operation, there are no papers in this which report deeper investigation of the drying sieve behavior when exposed to tension and thermo stabilization. The aim of this paper is to provide insight into the elastoplastic behavior of the thermo stabilized and not stabilized sieves subjected to the tensile force. Within this work both theoretical and experimental investigations were performed. The sieves were joined by using a spiral. In separate experiments tests of wire base and weft of the weave mesh were performed, both for thermo stabilized and not thermo stabilized sieves, sieves joining and the sieve thermo stabilization itself. It was established that the thermo stabilization of sieves provides for stability of sieves' dimensions and that open thermo stabilized drying sieve exhibits better mechanical properties and exploitation characteristics then the sieves joining. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON174004: Micromechanics criteria of damage and fracture and br. TR 32036: Development of software for solving the coupled multi-physical problems

  13. Interfascicular neurolysis in chronic ulnar nerve lesions at the elbow: an electrophysiological study.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Interfascicular neurolysis of the ulnar nerve at the elbow was performed in nine consecutive patients with moderate to severe ulnar palsy. Sensory and motor conduction velocities were determined before and up to six times after the operation, and a follow-up period of three years or more in all but two patients. None of the patients recovered after the operation, and all developed severe and sometimes persistent paraesthesiae. Electrophysiologically there was no evidence of improvement immedi...

  14. Validation of connectivity-based thalamic segmentation with direct electrophysiologic recordings from human sensory thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, W Jeffrey; Zheng, Zhong A; Domer, Paul; Quigg, Mark; Pouratian, Nader

    2012-02-01

    Connectivity-based segmentation has been used to identify functional gray matter subregions that are not discernable on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the accuracy and reliability of this technique has only been validated using indirect means. In order to provide direct electrophysiologic validation of connectivity-based thalamic segmentations within human subjects, we assess the correlation of atlas-based thalamic anatomy, connectivity-based thalamic maps, and somatosensory evoked thalamic potentials in two adults with medication-refractory epilepsy who were undergoing intracranial EEG monitoring with intrathalamic depth and subdural cortical strip electrodes. MRI with atlas-derived localization was used to delineate the anatomic boundaries of the ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus. Somatosensory evoked potentials with intrathalamic electrodes physiologically identified a discrete region of phase reversal in the ventrolateral thalamus. Finally, DTI was obtained so that probabilistic tractography and connectivity-based segmentation could be performed to correlate the region of thalamus linked to sensory areas of the cortex, namely the postcentral gyrus. We independently utilized these three different methods in a blinded fashion to localize the "sensory" thalamus, demonstrating a high-degree of reproducible correlation between electrophysiologic and connectivity-based maps of the thalamus. This study provides direct electrophysiologic validation of probabilistic tractography-based thalamic segmentation. Importantly, this study provides an electrophysiological basis for using connectivity-based segmentation to further study subcortical anatomy and physiology while also providing the clinical basis for targeting deep brain nuclei with therapeutic stimulation. Finally, these direct recordings from human thalamus confirm early inferences of a sensory thalamic component of the N18 waveform in somatosensory evoked potentials.

  15. Electrophysiological heterogeneity of fast-spiking interneurons: chandelier versus basket cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda V Povysheva

    Full Text Available In the prefrontal cortex, parvalbumin-positive inhibitory neurons play a prominent role in the neural circuitry that subserves working memory, and alterations in these neurons contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Two morphologically distinct classes of parvalbumin neurons that target the perisomatic region of pyramidal neurons, chandelier cells (ChCs and basket cells (BCs, are generally thought to have the same "fast-spiking" phenotype, which is characterized by a short action potential and high frequency firing without adaptation. However, findings from studies in different species suggest that certain electrophysiological membrane properties might differ between these two cell classes. In this study, we assessed the physiological heterogeneity of fast-spiking interneurons as a function of two factors: species (macaque monkey vs. rat and morphology (chandelier vs. basket. We showed previously that electrophysiological membrane properties of BCs differ between these two species. Here, for the first time, we report differences in ChCs membrane properties between monkey and rat. We also found that a number of membrane properties differentiate ChCs from BCs. Some of these differences were species-independent (e.g., fast and medium afterhyperpolarization, firing frequency, and depolarizing sag, whereas the differences in the first spike latency between ChCs and BCs were species-specific. Our findings indicate that different combinations of electrophysiological membrane properties distinguish ChCs from BCs in rodents and primates. Such electrophysiological differences between ChCs and BCs likely contribute to their distinctive roles in cortical circuitry in each species.

  16. The effect of tibial lengthening on gastrosoleus muscle function: an electrophysiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Sarisozen, Bartu; Sadik Bilgen, Muhammet; Dinc, Mustafa; Murat Aksakal, Ahmet; Coskun, Ergür

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the changes in electrophysiological characteristics of the contraction forces of the gastrosoleus complex due to stretching in experimental tibial lengthening. Methods: Distraction histiogenesis was performed in 22 guinea pigs weighing 600 to 800 g. Following the application of a semicircular external fixator and right tibial osteotomy, distraction was applied at a rate of 0.25 mm two times a day for 15 days without a latency period. The animals were randomized to ...

  17. Electrophysiological Evidences of Organization of Cortical Motor Information in the Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Hirokazu Iwamuro

    2011-01-01

    During the last two decades, the many developments in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and dystonia have enhanced our understanding on organization of the basal ganglia, and this knowledge has led to other advances in the field. According to many electrophysiological and anatomical findings, it is considered that motor information from different cortical areas is processed through several cortico-basal ganglia loops principally in a parallel fashion and somatotopy...

  18. Mechanisms of electrical activation and conduction in the gastrointestinal system: lessons from cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eTse

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field.

  19. A Quantitative Electrophysiological Biomarker of Duplication 15q11.2-q13.1 Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Joel; Senturk, Damla; Saravanapandian, Vidya; Golshani, Peyman; Reiter, Lawrence T.; Sankar, Raman; Thibert, Ronald L.; DiStefano, Charlotte; Huberty, Scott; Cook, Edwin H.; Jeste, Shafali S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Duplications of 15q11.2-q13.1 (Dup15q syndrome) are highly penetrant for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A distinct electrophysiological (EEG) pattern characterized by excessive activity in the beta band has been noted in clinical reports. We asked whether EEG power in the beta band, as well as in other frequency bands, distinguished children with Dup15q syndrome from those with non-syndromic ASD and then examined the clinical correlates of this electrophysiological biomarker in Dup15q syndrome. Methods In the first study, we recorded spontaneous EEG from children with Dup15q syndrome (n = 11), age-and-IQ-matched children with ASD (n = 10) and age-matched typically developing (TD) children (n = 9) and computed relative power in 6 frequency bands for 9 regions of interest (ROIs). Group comparisons were made using a repeated measures analysis of variance. In the second study, we recorded spontaneous EEG from a larger cohort of individuals with Dup15q syndrome (n = 27) across two sites and examined age, epilepsy, and duplication type as predictors of beta power using simple linear regressions. Results In the first study, spontaneous beta1 (12–20 Hz) and beta2 (20–30 Hz) power were significantly higher in Dup15q syndrome compared with both comparison groups, while delta (1–4 Hz) was significantly lower than both comparison groups. Effect sizes in all three frequency bands were large (|d| > 1). In the second study, we found that beta2 power was significantly related to epilepsy diagnosis in Dup15q syndrome. Conclusions Here, we have identified an electrophysiological biomarker of Dup15q syndrome that may facilitate clinical stratification, treatment monitoring, and measurement of target engagement for future clinical trials. Future work will investigate the genetic and neural underpinnings of this electrophysiological signature as well as the functional consequences of excessive beta oscillations in Dup15q syndrome. PMID:27977700

  20. Differential Electrophysiological Responses to Odorant Isotopologues in Drosophilid Antennae1 2 3

    OpenAIRE

    Drimyli, Efstathia; Gaitanidis, Alexandros; Maniati, Klio; Turin, Luca; Efthimios M C Skoulakis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Olfaction presents the ultimate challenge to molecular recognition as thousands of molecules have to be recognized by far fewer olfactory receptors. We have presented evidence that Drosophila readily distinguish odorants based on their molecular vibrations using a battery of behavioral assays suggesting engagement of a molecular vibration-sensing component. Here we interrogate electrophysiologically the antennae of four Drosophilids and demonstrate conserved differential response amp...

  1. Comparative electrophysiological, functional, and histological studies of nerve lesions in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolthers, M; Moldovan, M; Binderup, T

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a nerve lesion model to compare serial electrophysiological and functional outcome measures with histological findings. The relative significance of the parameters in lesions of diverse severity, the time course of recovery, and the tools for serial longitud...... regeneration. A lack of correlation between evaluation methods supports that functional, morphological, and physiological parameters show different aspects of the recovery process after nerve lesions, and that these outcome measures should be included separately in therapeutic studies....

  2. EPSPs in rat neocortical neurons in vitro. I. Electrophysiological evidence for two distinct EPSPs

    OpenAIRE

    Sutor, Bernd; Hablitz, John H.

    1989-01-01

    1. To investigate excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), intracellular recordings were performed in layer II/III neurons of the rat medial frontal cortex. The average resting membrane potential of the neurons was more than -75 mV and their average input resistance was greater than 20 M omega. The amplitudes of the action potentials evoked by injection of depolarizing current pulses were greater than 100 mV. The electrophysiological properties of the neurons recorded were similar to those...

  3. Brexpiprazole Alters Monoaminergic Systems following Repeated Administration: an in Vivo Electrophysiological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterhof, Chris A.; Mansari, Mostafa El; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Blier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brexpiprazole was recently approved as adjunctive therapy for depression and treatment of schizophrenia in adults. To complement results from a previous study in which its acute effects were characterized, the present study assessed the effect of repeated brexpiprazole administration on monoaminergic systems. Methods: Brexpiprazole (1mg/kg, subcutaneous) or vehicle was administered once daily for 2 and 14 days. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from noradrenaline neurons...

  4. Sensory loss in multifocal motor neuropathy: a clinical and electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecq, Virginie; Krim, Elsa; Rouanet-Larrivière, Marie; Lagueny, Alain

    2009-02-01

    Some patients fulfilling the criteria for the diagnosis of multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block (MMN-CB) at the onset of disease may subsequently develop a sensory loss associated with electrophysiological sensory abnormalities. The latter could represent an overlap between MMN-CB and multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM) neuropathy. The objective was to specify the features of MMN-CB with sensory loss (MMN-CB-Se). Five patients in a series of 11 consecutive patients who fulfilled the criteria of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine for MMN-CB at the first examination and were treated periodically with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) developed sensory loss in the course of the disease. In these five patients we compared the clinical, laboratory, and electrophysiological features found after the development of sensory loss with those at the first examination. The mean time to appearance of objective sensory signs was 7.2 years. In three of the five patients the sensory loss was preceded by intermittent paresthesias in the same nerve territories as the motor involvement. The most frequent electrophysiological abnormality was amplitude reduction of sensory nerve action potentials. There were no bilateral or symmetrical clinical and electrophysiological sensory abnormalities. Anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were positive in four patients. MMN-CB-Se could be an overlap between MMN-CB and MADSAM. It shares the distribution of the sensory disorders encountered in MADSAM, but it is closer to MMN-CB on clinical and therapeutic levels. Study of more patients would be useful to classify this subgroup more accurately.

  5. Effects of caffeine on the electrophysiological, cognitive and motor responses of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Deslandes A.C.; Veiga H.; Cagy M; Piedade R; Pompeu F.; Ribeiro P

    2005-01-01

    Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. The effects of caffeine have been studied using cognitive and motor measures, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) and event-related potentials. However, these methods are not usually employed in combination, a fact that impairs the interpretation of the results. The objective of the present study was to analyze changes in electrophysiological, cognitive and motor variables with the ingestion of caffeine, and to relate c...

  6. HCN channelopathy and cardiac electrophysiologic dysfunction in genetic and acquired rat epilepsy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kim L; Jones, Nigel C; Kennard, Jeremy T; Ng, Caroline; Urmaliya, Vijay; Lau, Shannen; Tran, Adora; Zheng, Thomas; Ozturk, Ezgi; Dezsi, Gabi; Megatia, Ika; Delbridge, Lea M; Pinault, Didier; Reid, Christopher A; White, Paul J; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-04-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies indicates that epilepsy can affect cardiac function, although the molecular basis of this remains poorly understood. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels generate pacemaker activity and modulate cellular excitability in the brain and heart, with altered expression and function associated with epilepsy and cardiomyopathies. Whether HCN expression is altered in the heart in association with epilepsy has not been investigated previously. We studied cardiac electrophysiologic properties and HCN channel subunit expression in rat models of genetic generalized epilepsy (Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg, GAERS) and acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (post-status epilepticus SE). We hypothesized that the development of epilepsy is associated with altered cardiac electrophysiologic function and altered cardiac HCN channel expression. Electrocardiography studies were recorded in vivo in rats and in vitro in isolated hearts. Cardiac HCN channel messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were measured using quantitative PCR and Western blotting respectively. Cardiac electrophysiology was significantly altered in adult GAERS, with slower heart rate, shorter QRS duration, longer QTc interval, and greater standard deviation of RR intervals compared to control rats. In the post-SE model, we observed similar interictal changes in several of these parameters, and we also observed consistent and striking bradycardia associated with the onset of ictal activity. Molecular analysis demonstrated significant reductions in cardiac HCN2 mRNA and protein expression in both models, providing a molecular correlate of these electrophysiologic abnormalities. These results demonstrate that ion channelopathies and cardiac dysfunction can develop as a secondary consequence of chronic epilepsy, which may have relevance for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Reduced-order modeling for cardiac electrophysiology. Application to parameter identification

    CERN Document Server

    Boulakia, Muriel; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    A reduced-order model based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is proposed for the bidomain equations of cardiac electrophysiology. Its accuracy is assessed through electrocardiograms in various configurations, including myocardium infarctions and long-time simulations. We show in particular that a restitution curve can efficiently be approximated by this approach. The reduced-order model is then used in an inverse problem solved by an evolutionary algorithm. Some attempts are presented to identify ionic parameters and infarction locations from synthetic ECGs.

  8. Pediatric Electrophysiology in India: A Sub-speciality Come of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology started in India in the early 70's with the earliest published diagnostic His bundle studies coming from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences by Bhatia ML et al and the GB Pant Hospital by Khalilullah et al . That era was remarkable with the first indigenously made temporary pacemaker being used to treat complete heart block as early as in 1970

  9. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  10. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    OpenAIRE

    Frisardi, Gianni; Iani, Cesare; Sau, Gianfranco; Frisardi, Flavio; Leonardis, Carlo; Lumbau, Aurea Maria Immacolata; Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Staderini, Enrico Maria; Chessa, Giacomo Innocenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods: Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcrania...

  11. Brain imaging and electrophysiology biomarkers: is there a role in poverty and education outcome research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Alexandra E; Noble, Kimberly; Pavlakis, Steven G; Ali, Noorjahan; Frank, Yitzchak

    2015-04-01

    Prekindergarten educational interventions represent a popular approach to improving educational outcomes, especially in children from poor households. Children from lower socioeconomic groups are at increased risk for delays in cognitive development that are important for school success. These delays, which may stem from stress associated with poverty, often develop before kindergarten. Early interventions have been proposed, but there is a need for more information on effectiveness. By assessing socioeconomic differences in brain structure and function, we may better be able to track the neurobiologic basis underlying children's cognitive improvement. We conducted a review of the neuroimaging and electrophysiology literature to evaluate what is known about differences in brain structure and function as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiology and evoked response potentials among children from poor and nonpoor households. Differences in lower socioeconomic groups were found in functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging as well as electroencephalography and evoked response potentials compared with higher socioeconomic groups. The findings suggest a number of neurobiologic correlates for cognitive delays in children who are poor. Given this, we speculate that magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiology parameters might be useful as biomarkers, after more research, for establishing the effectiveness of specific prekindergarten educational interventions. At the very least, we suggest that to level the playing field in educational outcomes, it may be helpful to foster communication and collaboration among all professionals involved in the care and education of children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An electrophysiological dissociation between orbitofrontal reality filtering and context source monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzerda-Wahlen, Aurélie; Nahum, Louis; Liverani, Maria Chiara; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Schnider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Memory influences behavior in multiple ways. One important aspect is to remember in what precise context in the past a piece of information was acquired (context source monitoring). Another important aspect is to sense whether an upcoming thought, composed of fragments of memories, refers to present reality and can be acted upon (orbitofrontal reality filtering). Whether these memory control processes share common underlying mechanisms is unknown. Failures of both have been held accountable for false memories, including confabulation. Electrophysiological and imaging studies suggest a dissociation but used very different paradigms. In this study, we juxtaposed the requirements of context source monitoring and reality filtering within a unique continuous recognition task, which healthy participants performed while high-resolution evoked potentials were recorded. The mechanisms dissociated both behaviorally and electrophysiologically: Reality filtering induced a frontal positivity, absence of a specific electrocortical configuration, and posterior medial orbitofrontal activity at 200-300 msec. Context source monitoring had no electrophysiological expression in this early period. It was slower and less accurate than reality filtering and induced a prolonged positive potential over frontal leads starting at 400 msec. The study demonstrates a hitherto unrecognized separation between orbitofrontal reality filtering and source monitoring. Whereas deficient orbitofrontal reality filtering is associated with reality confusion in thinking, the behavioral correlates of deficient source monitoring should be verified with controlled experimental exploration.

  13. Fluoxetine and the dentate gyrus: memory, recovery of function, and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Julian R; Wu, Ying; Epp, Jonathon R; Sutherland, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Chronic fluoxetine increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG). In view of the widespread clinical use of fluoxetine and the well-established role of the DG in memory, surprisingly few studies have examined the effects of fluoxetine on memory and hippocampal electrophysiology. Additionally, few studies have evaluated the potential for fluoxetine to promote recovery of function after DG damage. Therefore, we studied the effects of long-term administration of fluoxetine on both spatial-reference memory and working memory, recovery of function after intrahippocampal colchicine infusions, which can destroy 50-70% of DG granule cells, and electrophysiological responses in the DG to perforant path stimulation in freely moving rats. Chronic fluoxetine did not affect matching-to-place or reference-memory performance in intact rats in the Morris water-maze task. Surprisingly, in rats with DG damage, recovery of function on both tasks was adversely affected by chronic fluoxetine. Finally, unlike an earlier study that reported fluoxetine-induced increases in hippocampal population spike amplitudes and excitatory postsynaptic potential slopes in urethane-anesthetized rats, electrophysiological measures in DG of freely moving rats were not affected by chronic fluoxetine treatment.

  14. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analyses revealed molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The mammalian brain is heterogeneous, containing billions of neurons and trillions of synapses forming various neural circuitries, through which sense, movement, thought, and emotion arise. The cellular heterogeneity of the brain has made it difficult to study the molecular logic of neural circuitry wiring, pruning, activation, and plasticity, until recently, transcriptome analyses with single cell resolution makes decoding of gene regulatory networks underlying aforementioned circuitry properties possible. Here we report success in performing both electrophysiological and whole-genome transcriptome analyses on single human neurons in culture. Using Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analyses (WGCNA, we identified gene clusters highly correlated with neuronal maturation judged by electrophysiological characteristics. A tight link between neuronal maturation and genes involved in ubiquitination and mitochondrial function was revealed. Moreover, we identified a list of candidate genes, which could potentially serve as biomarkers for neuronal maturation. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analysis will serve as powerful tools in the future to unveil molecular logics for neural circuitry functions.

  15. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences.

  16. Relevance of cellular to clinical electrophysiology in interpreting antiarrhythmic drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1989-12-01

    The usefulness of cellular electrophysiologic techniques in elucidating the fundamental actions of antiarrhythmic drugs is contrasted with their apparent lack of relevance to the selection of drugs for the treatment of particular arrhythmias. Clinical electrophysiologists employ different techniques, but their results may be explained in terms of cellular drug actions. The varying clinical effects of class IA, IB and IC agents are due to differences in the speed of their attachment to, and detachment from, sodium channels. The role of sympathetic activity in arrhythmogenesis is complex, but again readily explicable in terms of the electrophysiologic cellular actions of stimulation of the individual types of adrenoceptors (alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2) and the distribution of these receptors, and of the longterm effects of sympathetic deprivation, either by antisympathetic drugs (class II) or by sympathetic denervation. Delayed repolarization (e.g., by class III drugs or prolonged beta blockade) is antiarrhythmic because it is homogeneous, despite the incidental prolongation of QT. If, however, QT is prolonged by heterogeneity of conduction or repolarization, or by partial sympathetic denervation (long QT syndrome or post myocardial infarction), this indicates increased risk of arrhythmia. Finally, the efficacy of calcium antagonists (class IV) in supraventricular arrhythmias is attributable to the cellular electrophysiologic characteristics of sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodal and transitional elements.

  17. Optical coherence tomography and electrophysiology of retinal and visual pathways in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Litwin, Tomasz; Szulborski, Kamil; Członkowska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated correlations between positive findings of changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and selected morphological and electrophysiological parameters of the retinal and visual systems in Wilson's disease. Fifty-eight Wilson's disease symptomatic patients were divided according to whether they displayed brain changes on MRI (positive, n = 39; negative, n = 19). All participants and healthy control group (n = 30), underwent retinal optical coherence tomography to assess the thickness of macula and the total retinal nerve fiber layer. Visual evoked potentials were measured and electroretinography was performed. Macular and retinal nerve fibers were thinner in participants with changes on MRI than in participants without changes. Electrophysiological parameters were markedly different in the MRI positive group compared with the negative group and 30 healthy controls; however, some abnormalities were evident in cases without visible brain pathology. Morphological and electrophysiological changes of retinal and visual pathways are associated with MRI visualized brain injury in Wilson's disease and may be useful for detecting the degree of neurodegeneration.

  18. Electrophysiological mechanisms of biased response to smoking-related cues in young smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiadong; Guan, Yanyan; Zhang, Yajuan; Bi, Yanzhi; Bu, Limei; Li, Yangding; Shi, Sha; Liu, Peng; Lu, Xiaoqi; Yu, Dahua; Yuan, Kai

    2016-08-26

    Cigarette smoking during young adult may result in serious health issues in later life. Hence, it is extremely necessary to study the smoking neurophysiological mechanisms in this critical transitional period. However, few studies revealed the electrophysiological mechanisms of cognitive processing biases in young adult smokers. In present study, nineteen young smokers with 12h abstinent and 19 matched nonsmokers were recruited. By employing event-related potentials (ERP) measurements during a smoking cue induced craving task, electrophysiological brain responses were compared between the young adult smokers and nonsmokers. The Slow Positive Wave (SPW) amplitude of smoking-related cues was enhanced in young adult smokers compared with nonsmokers. In addition, increased P300/SPW component of smoking-related cues relative to neutral cues were found in young adult smokers. Meanwhile, a positive correlation between Cigarette Per Day (CPD) and the amplitude of ERPs wave (P300/SPW) at anterior (Fz), central (Cz) were observed in young adult smokers. Our findings provided direct electrophysiological evidence for the cognitive processing bias of smoking cue and may shed new insights into the smoking behavior in young adult smokers.

  19. Hand-arm vibration syndrome: clinical characteristics, conventional electrophysiology and quantitative sensory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolke, Roman; Rolke, Silke; Vogt, Thomas; Birklein, Frank; Geber, Christian; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Letzel, Stephan; Voelter-Mahlknecht, Susanne

    2013-08-01

    Workers exposed to vibrating tools may develop hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). We assessed the somatosensory phenotype using quantitative sensory testing (QST) in comparison to electrophysiology to characterize (1) the most sensitive QST parameter for detecting sensory loss, (2) the correlation of QST and electrophysiology, and (3) the frequency of a carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in HAVS. QST, cold provocation tests, fine motor skills, and median nerve neurography were used. QST included thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds. Thirty-two patients were examined (54 ± 11 years, 91% men) at the more affected hand compared to 16 matched controls. Vibration detection threshold was the most sensitive parameter to detect sensory loss that was more pronounced in the sensitivity range of Pacinian (150 Hz, x12) than Meissner's corpuscles (20 Hz, x3). QST (84% abnormal) was more sensitive to detect neural dysfunction than conventional electrophysiology (37% abnormal). Motor (34%) and sensory neurography (25%) were abnormal in HAVS. CTS frequency was not increased (9.4%). Findings are consistent with a mechanically-induced, distally pronounced motor and sensory neuropathy independent of CTS. HAVS involves a neuropathy predominantly affecting large fibers with a sensory damage related to resonance frequencies of vibrating tools. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrophysiologic effects of adenosine triphosphate on rabbit sinoatrial node pace maker cells via P1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RENLei-Ming; LIJun-Xia; SHIChen-Xia; ZHAODing

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the electrophysiologic effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on rabbit sinoatrial node pacemakercells and the receptors related with the action of ATP. METHODS: Intracellular microelectrode method was usedto record the parameters of action potential (AP) in the rabbit sinoatrial nodes. RESULTS: ATP (0.1-3 mmol/L)decreased the rate of pacemaker firing (RPF) by 16 %-43 % and velocity of diastolic depolarization (VDD) by 33 %-67 %, increased the amplitude of AP (APA) by 6 %-9 % and maximal rate of depolarization (Vmax) by 30 %-76 %,shortened APD50 by 7 %-12 % and APD90 by 6.3 %-9 %, concentration-dependently. The effects of ATP, adenos-ine (Ado), and adenosine diphosphate at the same concentration on AP were not different from each other significantly.Neither uridine triphosphate nor, α,β-methylene ATP had significant electrophysiologic effects on the sinoatrialnode of rabbits. Both the electrophysiologic effects of ATP and Ado on pacemaker cells were inhibited by P1receptor antagonist aminophylline 0.1 mmol/L (P0.05). CONCLUSION: There are nofunctional P2X1 and P2Y2 receptors on pacemaker cells of the rabbit sinoatrial nodes, and the electrophysiologiceffects of ATP in the rabbit sinoatrial node pacemaker cells are mediated via P1 receptors by Ado degraded fromATP.