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Sample records for drugs including tricyclic

  1. Tricyclic drugs for depression in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Philip; Mirzaie, Mohsen

    2013-06-18

    There is a need to identify effective and safe treatments for depression in children and adolescents. While tricyclic drugs are effective in treating depression in adults, individual studies involving children and adolescents have been equivocal. Prescribing of tricyclic drugs for depression in children and adolescents is now uncommon, but an accurate estimate of their efficacy is helpful as a comparator for other drug treatments for depression in this age group. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2000 and updated in 2002, 2006 and 2010. To assess the effects of tricyclic drugs compared with placebo for depression in children and adolescents and to determine whether there are differential responses to tricyclic drugs between child and adolescent patient populations. We conducted a search of the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) (to 12 April 2013), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the following bibliographic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (all years), EMBASE (1974-), MEDLINE (1950-) and PsycINFO (1967-). The bibliographies of previously published reviews and papers describing original research were cross-checked. We contacted authors of relevant abstracts in conference proceedings of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and we handsearched the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (1978 to 1999). Randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy of orally administered tricyclic drugs with placebo in depressed people aged 6 to 18 years. One of two review authors selected the trials, assessed their quality, and extracted trial and outcome data. A second review author assessed quality and checked accuracy of extracted data. Most studies reported multiple outcome measures including depression scales and clinical global impression scales. For each study, we took the best

  2. Tricyclic Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gary J.

    The use of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is becoming increasingly prevalent for the treatment of depressed patients. It has been suggested that, analogous to many other drug substances, the tricyclic drugs exhibit clinical effectiveness within a defined therapeutic concentration range (1-10). Very recently, both Dito (11) and Orsulak and Schildkraut (12) have summarized the usefulness of measuring serum concentrations of these drugs. These authors suggest that knowledge of the plasma concentrations of these drugs aid the physician in determining patient compliance and initiating the best possible drug treatment.

  3. Interaction of tricyclic drugs with copper phthalocyanine dye immobilized on magnetic carriers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    3(Suppl.2), - (2002), s. 188-191 ISSN 1473-2262. [International Conference on the Scientific and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Carriers /4./. Tallahassee, 09.05.2002-11.05.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 523.80; GA AV ČR IBS6087204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : magnetic * tricyclic drugs * phthalocyanine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. Synthesis of Quaternary Ammonium Salts of Tricyclic Cationic Drugs: A One-Pot Synthesis for the Bioorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunauer, Linda S.; Mogannam, Abid C.; Hwee, Won B.; Chen, James Y.

    2007-01-01

    A one-pot conversion of tricyclic cationic drugs to their quaternary ammonium forms is described for a widely used bioactive drug: chlorpromazine, a phenothiazine-based antipsychotic. After conversion to its free base, the parent drug was methylated using substoichiometric amounts of methyl iodide dissolved in ether; the charged quaternary…

  5. The Comparison of Efficacy of Tricyclic Antidepressant with and without Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs in Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Yavarikia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Low back pain (LBP is one of common medical problems with several accepted medical modalities such as drugs, physiotherapy, surgery, etc. We studied the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA, and tricyclic antidepressant plus non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (TCA + NSAID in 200 patients with chronic LBP. Materials & Methods: In an experimental clinical trial study on patients with chronic low back pain without organic findings, patients were divided in two groups of 100 cases. At certain times the response to treatment protocols were collected and compared using VAS system. Patient’s data including age, sex, smoking and response to treatment were recorded and analyzed using chi-square, t-tests, ANOVA and SPSS software. Results: 83 (41.5% of patients were males and 117 (58.5% were females. The age range was 21 to 75 (mean age 43.1 14.1y there was no meaning full statistical difference in demographic characteristics such as age, sex (respectively p=0.66, p=0.78 the ultimate pain was less (p0.05.Conclusion: TCA prescription is an efficient method of treatment of low back pain with or with out NSAIDS. But using NSAID+TCA will be almost more powerful and efficient method in the long term period.

  6. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-01-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors

  7. Direct and Indirect Drug Design Approaches for the Development of Novel Tricyclic Antipsychotics: Potential 5-HT2A Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahantesh Namdev Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a mental disorder manifested largely by disintegration of thought processes and emotional responsiveness. Given the therapeutic and toxic limitations of clinically available drugs, it is clear that there is still a need for the development of new generation antipsychotic agents with an improved clinical profile. Development of novel hybrid atypical tricyclic antipsychotic pharmacophore was achieved using direct (by measuring docking score of designed molecules on modelled 5- receptor and indirect (current, clinically available therapeutic agents’ data drug design approaches.

  8. Tricyclic antidepressant radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innis, R.B.; Tune, L.; Rock, R.; Depaulo, R.; U'Prichard, D.C.; Snyder, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A receptor assay for tricyclic antidepressants described here is based on the ability of these drugs to compete with [ 3 H]-3-guinuclidnyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) for binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain membranes. The assay is sensitive, in that it can detect, for example, 2ng/ml nortriptyline in plasma. Seven plasma samples from depressed patients treated with nortriptyline were assayed with the radioreceptor and gas liquid chromatographic methods, and the results from these two methods were almost identical. This assay should be used cautiously, if at all, in patients treated with other drugs that have potent anticholinergic effects. (Auth.)

  9. A brief history of antidepressant drug development: from tricyclics to beyond ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor Silva; Hiroaki-Sato, Vinícius Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Although monoaminergic-targeted drugs have prompted great advances in the development of treatments for depression, the need for new options persists, since these drugs still have a delayed clinical effect and most patients do not respond properly to them. Recently, the observation of the antidepressant effects of ketamine brought on a new wave of studies regarding the comprehension of the neurobiology of depression and the development of new and more effective antidepressant drugs. Thus, in this paper, we present a historical review of the development of monoaminergic antidepressant drugs and the role of ketamine as the introductory agent of a new era in the research of the neurobiology of depression. Firstly, we review how the pharmacological treatment for major depression started, and we point out the main drugs discovered, the researchers involved, and how the studies developed have contributed to the understanding of the neurobiology of depression. Secondly, the major problems regarding the clinical efficacy and acceptance of these drugs are discussed, and the introduction of the glutamatergic system as a target for antidepressant drugs is presented. Finally, we review how ketamine revealed itself as an exciting option towards obtaining pharmacological agents to treat depression, through the understanding of biological markers. Discussion Ketamine contributed to confirm that different targets of the glutamatergic system and neurotrophic pathways are strictly related to the neurobiology of depression. There are several antidepressant drugs based on ketamine's mechanism of action already in the pipeline, and glutamatergic-targeted antidepressants may be on the market in the near future.

  10. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  11. Short-term efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants revisited: a meta-analytic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storosum, J. G.; Elferink, A. J.; van Zwieten, B. J.; van den Brink, W.; Gersons, B. P.; van Strik, R.; Broekmans, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    The original data from the placebo-arms and the tricyclic-arms of all parallel randomized controlled three-arm studies, which had been conducted in the period 1979-1991 for a drug under development in order to obtain marketing authorization for the indication major depression, were included in a

  12. Genotoxic effect of the tricyclic antidepressant drug clomipramine hydrochloride in somatic and germ cells of male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Ahmed El-Fiky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the genotoxic potential of the antidepressant drug clomipramine hydrochloride (CH through different mutagenic end points. Methods: The study included chromosomal aberration analysis of bone marrow cells, primary spermatocytes, morphological sperm abnormalities and histopathological changes of liver cells using both light and electron microscopy. Three doses (0.195, 0.26 and 0.65 mg/20 g body weight were tested. Each dose was given orally to mice for different periods of time (the doses are equivalent to the recommended daily intake doses in man. Results: The tested doses of CH applied for 5 and 30 days increased the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations with dose and time dependant manner. The two high doses, 0.26 and 0.65 mg/20 g body weight revealed significant effect in comparison to the control. Dose -dependent increase in morphological sperm abnormalities and decrease in sperm count were recorded after CH treatment for 5 consecutive days. Pathological changes in liver tissue reached to sever damage were recorded after treatment with the medium and the high doses for 30 days. Ultrastructural examination showed that the low dose had little differences in liver histological architecture as compared to the control group, while prominent pathological changes in nuclei as well as dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum were observed in mice treated with the medium or the high dose of the drug. Conclusions: It is concluded that CH has genotoxic effect in somatic and germ cells of mice as well as damaging effect on liver tissue after treatment with the medium and the high doses. However, the usage of low dose (especially for short time, 5 days can be utilized as a safe therapeutic dose.

  13. Response to tricyclic antidepressants: independent of gender?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlfarth, Tamar; Storosum, Jitschak G.; Elferink, André J. A.; van Zwieten, Barbara J.; Fouwels, Annemarie; van den Brink, Wim

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined gender differences in response to tricyclic antidepressants. METHOD: A total of 30 randomized, placebo-controlled trials that included 3,886 patients (1,555 men and 2,331 women), submitted between 1979 and 1991 in order to obtain marketing authorization, were

  14. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eBeckmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and major depression, as well as viral (e.g. measles virus and bacterial (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug.

  15. Poisoining with Tricyclic Antidepressants and Current Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality compared to all the antidepressants. Main toxic effects are on the cardiovascular system and central nervous system and manifests itself as anticholinergic symptoms. There is no antidote known to be used in the treatment. But sodium bicarbonate treatment is effective in preventing ventricular arrhythmias and hypotension, and resolving metabolic acidosis. There are some treatments that has been used for relief of symptoms and some of them still are in research stage. The drugs that are used can be customized according to the patients symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 608-621

  16. Radiographic abnormalities in tricyclic acid overdose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnell, R.M.; Richardson, M.L.; Vincent, J.M.; Godwin, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several case reports have described adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to tricyclic acid (TCA) overdose. During a 1-year period 83 patients requiring intubation secondary to drug overdose were evaluated. Abnormalities on chest radiographs occurred in 26 (50%) of the 54 patients with TCA overdose, compared to six (21%) of the 29 patients overdosed with other drugs. In addition, five (9%) of the patients with TCA overdose subsequently had radiographic and clinical abnormalities meeting the criteria for ARDS. Only one (3%) of the patients with non-TCA overdose subsequently had change suggesting ARDS. TCAs should be added to the list of drugs associated with ARDS, and TCA overdose should be considered a major risk factor in the development of radiographically evident abnormalities

  17. Radioimmunoassay for nortriptyline (and other tricyclic antidepressants) in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, K.P.; Burrows, G.D.; Norman, T.R.; Scoggins, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay for nortriptyline described here can detect as little 1 μg/liter of plasma. Within-day precision and day-to-day precision (CV) were +-6 and +-11%, respectively, over the concentration range 100 to 200 μg/liter. The major metabolite hydroxy-nortriptyline does not cross react with the antiserum. Results so obtained correlate closely with results by a double-isotope derivative dilution technique. The major advantages of this technique over currently available methods are its sensitivity, convenience (many samples can be processed in one day), simplicity, and cost. Further, prior extraction of plasma samples is not required. Cross-reactivity studies have been carried out with all other available tricyclic antidepressants. The antiserum has the ability to bind these drugs, thus radioimmunoassay for all the tricyclic antidepressant drugs can be set up because concurrent use of more than one of these drugs is rare

  18. Cardiotoxicity of tricyclic antidepressant treated by 2650 mEq sodium bicarbonate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Amiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is an important cause of drug-related self-poisoning in the developed world and a very common cause of poisoning and mortality in developing countries. Electrocardiographic manifestations of most tricyclic antidepressant-poisoned patients resolve by the administration of 1–2 mEq/kg of sodium bicarbonate. Some rare cases have been reported who have been resistant to the long-term or high doses of bicarbonate administration. We present a case of acute tricyclic antidepressant toxicity referring with status epilepticus, hypotension, and refractory QRS complex widening that resolved after the intravenous administration of 2650 mEq sodium bicarbonate.

  19. Extracorporeal treatment for tricyclic antidepressant poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais; Sowinski, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    methodology, the subgroup responsible for this poison reviewed the articles, extracted the data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and RAND......The Extracorporeal Treatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTR) in poisoning. Here, the workgroup presents its results for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). After an extensive literature search, using a predefined...... yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 108 patients, including 12 fatalities, were abstracted. The workgroup concluded that TCAs are not dialyzable and made the following recommendation: ECTR is not recommended in severe TCA poisoning (1D). The workgroup considers...

  20. Determination of the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline, imipramine, desipramine, clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine in dried blood spots using LC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E.J.J.; Paardekooper, J.; Brummel-Mulder, E.; Hak, E.; Wilffert, B.; Maring, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of Tricyclic Antidepressants (TADs) is considered useful in patients with major depressive disorders, since these drugs display large individual differences in clearance and therapeutic windows of these drugs are relatively small. We developed an assay

  1. Not all side effects associated with tricyclic antidepressant therapy are true side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiwan, Syed; Drossman, Douglas A; Morris, Carolyn B; Dalton, Chris; Toner, Brenda B; Diamant, Nicholas E; Hu, J B; Whitehead, William E; Leserman, Jane; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I

    2009-04-01

    Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders treated with tricyclic antidepressants sometimes report nongastrointestinal symptoms; it is unclear whether these are drug side effects or reflect a behavioral tendency to report symptoms. We evaluated whether symptoms reported before treatment with a tricyclic antidepressant (desipramine) increased in number or worsened in severity after 2 weeks of treatment and assessed the baseline factors that predispose patients to report symptoms. Female patients in a multicenter National Institutes of Health trial for functional bowel disorders completed a 15-item symptom questionnaire at baseline (before randomization), 2 weeks after they were given desipramine (n = 81) or placebo (n = 40), and at study completion (12 weeks). Patients were asked about the severity and frequency of 15 symptoms. Results were analyzed from 57 patients given desipramine who completed the questionnaires. Symptoms reported as side effects to have occurred more frequently and also worsened at week 2 in the group given desipramine included dizziness, dry mouth/thirstiness, lightheadedness, jittery feelings/tremors, and flushing. Symptoms that did not change in severity or showed improvement at week 2 in the group given desipramine included morning tiredness, nausea, blurred vision, headaches, appetite reduction, and trouble sleeping. Psychologic distress but not desipramine blood level correlated with symptom reporting. Most symptoms often attributed to side effects of desipramine were present before treatment; only a few, related to anticholinergic effects, worsened 2 weeks after treatment, suggesting that most so-called side effects were not associated specifically with desipramine use. Such symptoms might instead be associated with psychologic distress.

  2. Ergonomic Analysis of Tricycle Sidecar Seats: Basis for Proposed Standard Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Godoy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ergonomics (also called human factors engineering is the study of human characteristics for the appropriate design of the living and work environment. It is applied in various industrial areas which includes transportation.Tricycle being one of the most common means of public transportation in Lipa City has various adaptations to suit the culture, and environment. The purpose of this study is to analyze the variability in design of the tricycles in Lipa City, Philippines and propose a standard ergonomically designed tricycle sidecar seat for a greater population. The study was conducted at 26 tricycle terminals with 232 tricycle samples within Lipa City proper including the public market area where 400 commuters were given questionnaires to determine the risk factors associated with the existing tricycle sidecar seat design. Anthropometric measurements of 100 males and 100 female commuters were obtained together with the sidecar dimensions of 232 tricycles to substantiate the observed variations in design. Using the design for the average and design for the extremes, it was found out that most of the tricycles in Lipa City, Philippines have inappropriate inclined seat and lowered sidecar seat pan height which can result to leg and abdominal pain; narrowed seat pan depth which caused pressure on buttocks and legs; narrowed backrest width which can cause upper and low back pain; low backrest height that can pose upper back pain; which can also result to abdominal pain; inclined backrest and limited vertical clearance which can cause upper back pain and neck pain. The researcher proposed a sidecar seat design standard which can be used by the Land Transportation Office, and Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board to provide ease, comfort, and convenience to the passengers.

  3. Drug: D07334 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant Chemical group: DG01542 ... Tricyclic antidepressant, imipramine type SLC6A4... D07334 Drug Imipraminoxide (INN) ... C19H24N2O D07334.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ...

  4. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose necessitating ICU admission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) overdose necessitating intensive care unit (ICU) admission remains a significant problem in the Western Cape. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the course of life-threatening TCA overdose in our centre to identify potential prognostic indicators. TCA levels >1 000 ng/ml were associated ...

  5. Tritiation of unsaturated tricyclic antidepressants for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchman, O.; Azran, J.; Shimoni, M.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid and convenient method to obtain specific an high activity tritium labelling of tricyclic antidepressants which have a double bond, is described. The procedure is based on the halogenation of the active benzylic positions of the unlabelled material and the selective catalytic removal of the halogen atom by tritium in the presence of a base which inhibits the attack on the olefin bond

  6. Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Tricyclic Anti-Depressants Following Intrathecal Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Lois J.; Wilcox, George L.

    1984-01-01

    The anti-nociceptive effects of three tricyclic anti-depressants (desipramine, protriptyline, fluoxetine) were evaluated in mice following intrathecal administration. Nociceptive behavior was produced by intrathecal administration of Substance P and measured for 60 seconds following subcutaneous and intrathecal administration of vehicle and increasing doses of the drugs being tested. Systemically administered protriptyline produced dose related antinociception in this paradigm. A similar effect was seen following systemic desipramine; while fluoxetine was inactive systemically. Both protriptyline and desipramine given intrathecally were antinociceptive while fluoxetine had a biphasic effect, being analgesic only at low doses. These results indicate that tricyclic antidepressants may produce analgesia at the spinal level in rodents. This action may be related to the therapeutic success of tricyclic antidepressants in chronic pain syndromes. PMID:6335632

  7. Emerging drugs for axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Perez, Noemi; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Emery, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Only non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) and TNF inhibitors (TNFi) are effective in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, not all patients successfully respond to these drugs and a subset may have contraindications to their use. In the last decade, an earlier diagnosis of AS has been achieved due to the increasing availability of MRI. This has led to prompt treatment initiation with improved outcomes. NSAIDs and TNFi are the current treatments for AS which lead to sustained clinical responses in the long term. Recent studies have shown other potential biomarkers in AS, such as the IL-17/IL-23 axis. This has translated into the development of new drugs which interfere with these pathways, such as apremilast and secukinumab, which have shown efficacy in early clinical trials. AS carries considerable short- and long-term disabilities. Anti-TNF-α therapies reduce pain, improve function and decrease inflammation as seen by MRI. New treatment options are being developed which may prove efficacious on those patients not responding to anti-TNF. The ultimate research goal should focus on treatments to prevent and stop new bone formation.

  8. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? The IHE's drug prevention program must, a...

  9. Scaffold-hopping from xanthines to tricyclic guanines: A case study of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pissarnitski, Dmitri A.; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Cole, David; Wu, Wen-Lian; Domalski, Martin; Clader, John W.; Scapin, Giovanna; Voigt, Johannes; Soriano, Aileen; Kelly, Theresa; Powles, Mary Ann; Yao, Zuliang; Burnett, Duane A. (Merck)

    2016-11-01

    Molecular modeling of unbound tricyclic guanine scaffolds indicated that they can serve as effective bioisosteric replacements of xanthines. This notion was further confirmed by a combination of X-ray crystallography and SAR studies, indicating that tricyclic guanine DPP4 inhibitors mimic the binding mode of xanthine inhibitors, exemplified by linagliptin. Realization of the bioisosteric relationship between these scaffolds potentially will lead to a wider application of cyclic guanines as xanthine replacements in drug discovery programs for a variety of biological targets. Newly designed DPP4 inhibitors achieved sub-nanomolar potency range and demonstrated oral activity in vivo in mouse glucose tolerance test.

  10. Common multiple interactions of tricyclic anti-depressants and orphenadrine with liver microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, P H

    1999-06-01

    1. Interactions of tricylic anti-depressants (TCA) and structurally related drugs with rat microsomal cytochromes P450 were studied including competitive inhibition of enzymatic activities and formation of P450 metabolite complexes. 2. All compounds examined that carry a methylated aminoalkyl sidechain formed metabolite complexes with microsomal P450 of the untreated male rat. The extent of complex formation is only slightly altered by rat pre-treatment with P450 inducers indicating that mainly constitutive P450 enzymes are involved. 3. The kinetics of in vitro complex formation differed for the di- and monomethylamino derivatives of the TCA showing either a sigmoidal or hyperbolic shape respectively. Considerable auto-inhibition of complex formation is observed at concentrations > 100 microM only with the dimethyl derivatives. 4. Besides metabolite complex formation, a further effect of the drugs is competitive inhibition of the CYP2B-dependent pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation. The inhibitory potential of the drugs depends on their degree of N-alkyl substitution. Correspondingly, the Ki is in the range of 2.8-7.1, 0.1-0.2 and 0.01 microM for the dimethyl-, monomethyl- and unsubstituted drugs respectively. 5. It has been shown that P450 interactions with tricyclic anti-depressants include several types of mechanisms and several P450 enzymes. It might be pharmacologically important that the dimethylamino compounds are demethylated in vivo by cytochromes P450 giving rise to more potent P450 inhibitors compared with the parent compounds.

  11. [Data-mining characteristics of adverse drug reactions and pharmacovi-gilance of Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Li, Fan; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Xiao-Fen; Piao, Jing-Zhu

    2018-01-01

    The common Aconitum herbs in clinical application mainly include Aconiti Radix(Chuanwu), Aconiti Kusnezoffii Radix(Caowu) and Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparaia(Fuzi), all of which have toxicity. Therefore, the safety of using Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs has become an hot topic in clinical controversy. Based on the data-mining methods, this study explored the characteristics and causes of adverse drug reactions/events (ADR/ADE) of the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, in order to provide pharmacovigilance and rational drug use suggestions for clinical application. The detailed ADR/ADE reports about the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs were retrieved in the domestic literature databases since 1984 to now. The information extraction and data-mining were conducted based on the platforms of Microsoft office Excel 2016, Clementine 12.0 and Cytoscape 3.3.0. Finally, 78 detailed ADR/ADE reports involving a total of 30 varieties were included. 92.31% ADR/ADE were surely or likely led by the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, mostly involving multiple system/organ damages with good prognosis, and even 1 case of death. The incidence of included ADRs/ADEs was associated with various factors such as the patient idiosyncratic, drug toxicity, as well as clinical medication. The patient age was most closely related to ADR/ADEs, and those aged from 60 to 69 were more easily suffered from the ADRs/ADEs of Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum. The probability of ADR/ADEs for the drugs including Chuanwu or Caowu was greater than that of Fuzi, and the using beyond the instructions dose was the most important potential safety hazard in the clinical medication process. For the regular and characteristics of ADR/ADEs led by Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, special attention shall be paid to the elder patients or with the patients with allergies; strictly control the dosage and course of treatment, strengthen the safety medication

  12. Antidepressant-induced lipidosis with special reference to tricyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Z; Ying, G; Hansson, A L; Karlsson, H; Xie, Y; Bergstrand, A; DePierre, J W; Nässberger, L

    2000-04-01

    Cationic amphiphilic drugs, in general, induce phospholipid disturbances. Tricyclic, as well as other antidepressants belong to this group. In experimental animals, antidepressants induce lipid storage disorders in cells of most organs, a so-called generalized phospholipidosis. This disorder is conveniently detected by electron microscopic examination revealing myelin figures. Myelin figures or myeloid bodies are subcellular organelles containing unicentric lamellar layers. The lipidotic induction potency during in vivo is related to the apolarity of the compound. Metabolism of phospholipids takes place within the cell continuously. Several underlying mechanisms may be responsible for the induction of the phospholipid disturbance. For instance, it has been suggested that the compounds bind to phospholipids and such binding may alter the phospholipid's suitability as a substrate for phospholipases. Free TCA or metabolites thereof may also inhibit phospholipases directly, as has been demonstrated for sphingomyelinase in glioma and neuroblastoma cells. Both these mechanisms might result in phospholipidosis. Interaction between drug and phospholipid bilayer has been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance technique. There seems to be large differences in the sensitivities amongst different organs. Steroid-producing cells of the adrenal cortex, testis and ovaries are in particular susceptible to drug-induced lipidosis. The so-called foam cells are lung macrophages located in the interstitium which become densely packed with myelin figures during TCA exposure. It requires about 3-6 weeks of treatment to develop this converted cell. In cell cultures however, phospholipidosis is demonstrated already after 24 h only. It appears that the cells that undergo TCA-induced lipidosis may recover after withdrawal of the drug. The time required to achieve complete recovery ranges from 3-4 weeks to several months, depending on the organ affected. Little is known about the

  13. The effects of tricyclic and 'atypical' antidepressants on spontaneous locomotor activity in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, J C; File, S E

    1986-01-01

    With the exception of amineptin, buproprion and nomifensine all tricyclic and 'atypical' antidepressants have been reported to reduce spontaneous motor activity in rodents, after both acute and chronic administration. However, with the diversity of chemical actions of these drugs it is unlikely that a single neurochemical mechanism is underlying this one behavioral effect. These widespread sedative effects have implications for interpreting behavioral changes in other test situations, since sedation generally occurs at doses that fall within the dose-range effective in other tests. We also review the effects on spontaneous motor activity of withdrawal from chronic antidepressant treatment.

  14. Identification of Drug Characteristics for Implementing Multiregional Clinical Trials Including Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokuda, Mitsuhiro; Matsumaru, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Katsura

    2018-02-01

    Multiregional clinical trials (MRCT) are a standard strategy used to improve global drug approval efficiency and the feasibility of clinical trials. Japan is the world's third largest drug market with a unique health care system, making it a key inclusion as an operational region for MRCT (MRCT-JP) for global drug development. We aimed to identify the factors required for efficient drug development by comprehensively reviewing the clinical trials of drugs approved in Japan to identify the factors associated with whether or not MRCT-JP is implemented. We surveyed the review reports and summaries of application data published by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. We identified drugs for which the clinical trial data package included MRCT-JP and selected the same number of drugs for which the clinical trial data package did not include MRCT-JP from the most recent survey period for comparison. We also examined other publication information, in addition to the review reports, as necessary. The influence of each explanatory variable was analyzed by logistic regression analysis, with whether or not MRCT-JP was implemented as the explanatory variable. Statistical significance was set at 5%. In the survey period up to September 2017, 165 drugs developed with MRCT-JP were approved for manufacture and sale in Japan. "Respiratory system," "inhalation," "biological drug," and "under review" evaluation status for the United States, European Union, and other areas, "approved" evaluation status for the United States, "new ingredients," "priority review," "non-Japanese firm," and "Top 1-10" and "Top 11-20" drug sales rankings for pharmaceutical companies were identified as potential factors leading to the implementation of MRCT-JP. In contrast, "general anti-infectives for systemic use," "various," "external," "chemical compound," "unsubmitted" evaluation status for both the United States and European Union, and "Top 51+" drug sales rankings were potential factors for

  15. Tricyclic Neovibsanin Scaffold Inhibits Glioma by Targeting Glioma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tricyclic neovibsanin scaffold (TCNS) on cell viability, colony formation capacity and induction of apoptosis in glioma cells. Methods: 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2, 5-diphe¬nyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to analyze the effect of TCNS on cell proliferation. Light microscopic ...

  16. Pediatric Tricyclic Antidepressant Poisoning: Approach and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Roldán Ovalle, Tatiana; Hospital Universitario de San Ignacio; López Millán, Angelo; Hospital Universitario de San Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants are agents that cause significant morbidity and mortality with important toxicity particularly on cardiovascular and neurological systems, which is mainly based on their pharmacology and is that determines specific treatment. Unfortunately, children are vulnerable population because the increase in psychiatric disorders which are treated with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review the pharmacokinetics, clinical presentation and treatment of acute poisoning with ...

  17. 14 CFR 1267.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in...

  18. 13 CFR 147.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Requirements for Recipients... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in...

  19. 45 CFR 1155.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  20. 24 CFR 21.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... of Housing and Urban Development GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS...

  1. 22 CFR 1509.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  2. 38 CFR 48.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL...

  3. 20 CFR 439.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  4. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... CONCILIATION SERVICE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  5. 49 CFR 32.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  6. 21 CFR 1405.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  7. 40 CFR 36.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  8. 10 CFR 607.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  9. 32 CFR 26.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL...

  10. 22 CFR 1008.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  11. 22 CFR 210.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  12. 45 CFR 630.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  13. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  14. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  15. 43 CFR 43.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  16. 45 CFR 1173.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  17. 22 CFR 133.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals...

  18. 28 CFR 83.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation...) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  19. 2 CFR 182.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE...

  20. 15 CFR 29.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  1. 36 CFR 1212.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE...

  2. 7 CFR 3021.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 3021.215 What must I...

  3. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 94.215 What must I...

  4. 22 CFR 312.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 312.215 What must I...

  5. Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs, Including LSD, PCP, Ketamine, Dextromethorphan. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Research is developing a clearer picture of the dangers of mind-altering drugs. The goal of this report is to present the latest information to providers to help them strengthen their prevention and treatment efforts. A description is presented of dissociative drugs, and consideration is given as to why people take hallucinogens. The physical…

  6. Novel tricyclic-alpha-alkyloxyphenylpropionic acids: dual PPARalpha/gamma agonists with hypolipidemic and antidiabetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerberg, Per; Pettersson, Ingrid; Jeppesen, Lone; Bury, Paul S; Mogensen, John P; Wassermann, Karsten; Brand, Christian L; Sturis, Jeppe; Wöldike, Helle F; Fleckner, Jan; Andersen, Anne-Sofie T; Mortensen, Steen B; Svensson, L Anders; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Lehmann, Søren V; Polivka, Zdenek; Sindelar, Karel; Panajotova, Vladimira; Ynddal, Lars; Wulff, Erik M

    2002-02-14

    Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of tricyclic alpha-ethoxy-phenylpropionic acid derivatives guided by in vitro PPARalpha and PPARgamma transactivation data and computer modeling led to the identification of the novel carbazole analogue, 3q, with dual PPARalpha (EC(50) = 0.36 microM) and PPARgamma (EC(50) = 0.17 microM) activity in vitro. Ten days treatment of db/db mice with 3q improved the insulin sensitivity, as measured by OGTT, better than that seen with both pioglitazone and rosiglitazone treatment, suggesting in vivo PPARgamma activity. Likewise, 3q lowered plasma triglycerides and cholesterol in high cholesterol fed rats after 4 days treatment, indicating in vivo PPARalpha activity. Investigations of the pharmacokinetics of selected compounds suggested that extended drug exposure improved the in vivo activity of in vitro active compounds.

  7. Drug treatment for myotonia (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, J.; Drost, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Faber, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal delayed relaxation of skeletal muscles, known as myotonia, can cause disability in myotonic disorders. Sodium channel blockers, tricyclic antidepressive drugs, benzodiazepines, calcium-antagonists, taurine and prednisone may be of use in reducing myotonia. OBJECTIVES: To

  8. Drug: D07623 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 01942 ... Iminobenzyl antipsychotic Chemical group: DG01312 ... Tricyclic antidepressant, Iminodibenzyl derivativ... D07623 Drug Carpipramine (INN) ... C28H38N4O D07623.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG

  9. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Applying quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methodology for modeling postmortem redistribution of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    Postmortem redistribution (PMR) constitutes a multifaceted process, which complicates the interpretation of drug concentrations by forensic toxicologists. The present study aimed to apply quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for modeling PMR data of structurally related drugs, 10 benzodiazepines and 10 tricyclic antidepressants. For benzodiazepines, an adequate QSAR model was obtained (R(2) = 0.98, Q(2) = 0.88, RMSEE = 0.12), in which energy, ionization and molecular size exerted significant impact. For tricyclic antidepressants, an adequate QSAR model with slightly inferior statistics (R(2) = 0.95, Q(2) = 0.87, RMSEE = 0.29) was established after exclusion of maprotiline, in which energy parameters, basicity character and lipophilicity exerted significant contribution. Thus, QSAR analysis could be used as a complementary tool to provide an informative illustration of the contributing molecular, physicochemical and structural properties in PMR process. However, the complexity, non-static and time-dependent nature of PMR endpoints raises serious concerns whether QSAR methodology could predict the degree of redistribution, highlighting the need for animal-derived PMR data.

  11. Surgical Treatment of Complications of Pulmonary Tuberculosis, including Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajhmun Madansein

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for drug-resistant tuberculosis has been shown to be safe and effective, with similar level of mortalities associated with surgical intervention observed with that for lung cancer. While surgery has been an option to treat TB in the pre-antibiotic era, it is now increasingly used to treat complications of pulmonary TB, particularly in patients with drug-resistant TB who do not respond to medical treatment. The two most frequent indications for lung resection in drug- resistant TB, are i failed medical treatment with persistent sputum positivity or ii patients who have had medical treatment and are sputum negative, but with persistent localized cavitary disease or bronchiectasis. Massive hemoptysis is a potentially life-threatening complication of TB. Lung resection is potentially curative in patients with massive hemoptysis and cavitary or bronchiectatic disease. Bronchial artery embolization in these patients has a high success rate but bears also the risk of recurrence. Lung resection can be safely undertaken in selected patients with HIV co-infection and pulmonary complications of TB. Ambulatory drainage is a novel, safe, affordable and effective method of draining a chronic TB associated empyema thoracis. We review here the current surgical treatment of the complications of pulmonary TB and discuss the experience from the Durban Cardiothoracic Surgery Unit for the surgical treatment of patients with complicated pulmonary TB.

  12. Sol-Gel Behavior of Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC in Ionic Media Including Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil C. Joshi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel transformations in HPMC (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose are being increasingly studied because of their role in bio-related applications. The thermo-reversible behavior of HPMC is particularly affected by its properties and concentration in solvent media, nature of additives, and the thermal environment it is exposed to. This article contains investigations on the effects of salt additives in Hofmeister series on the HPMC gelation. Various findings regarding gelation with salt ions as well as with the ionic and non-ionic surfactants are presented. The gel formation in physiological salt fluids such as simulated gastric and intestine fluids is also examined with the interest in oral drug delivery systems. The processes of swelling, dissolution and dispersion of HPMC tablets in simulated bio-fluids are explored and the release of a drug from the tablet affected by such processes is studied. Explanations are provided based on the chemical structure and the molecular binding/association of HPMC in a media. The test results at the body or near-body temperature conditions helped in understanding the progress of the gelation process within the human body environment. The detailed interpretation of various molecule level interactions unfolded the sol-gel mechanisms and the influence of a few other factors. The obtained test data and the established mathematical models are expected to serve as a guide in customizing applications of HPMC hydrogels.

  13. Sol-Gel Behavior of Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC) in Ionic Media Including Drug Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sunil C.

    2011-01-01

    Sol-gel transformations in HPMC (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) are being increasingly studied because of their role in bio-related applications. The thermo-reversible behavior of HPMC is particularly affected by its properties and concentration in solvent media, nature of additives, and the thermal environment it is exposed to. This article contains investigations on the effects of salt additives in Hofmeister series on the HPMC gelation. Various findings regarding gelation with salt ions as well as with the ionic and non-ionic surfactants are presented. The gel formation in physiological salt fluids such as simulated gastric and intestine fluids is also examined with the interest in oral drug delivery systems. The processes of swelling, dissolution and dispersion of HPMC tablets in simulated bio-fluids are explored and the release of a drug from the tablet affected by such processes is studied. Explanations are provided based on the chemical structure and the molecular binding/association of HPMC in a media. The test results at the body or near-body temperature conditions helped in understanding the progress of the gelation process within the human body environment. The detailed interpretation of various molecule level interactions unfolded the sol-gel mechanisms and the influence of a few other factors. The obtained test data and the established mathematical models are expected to serve as a guide in customizing applications of HPMC hydrogels. PMID:28824113

  14. Complexation studies of cyclodextrins with tricyclic antidepressants using ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsami, G N; Koupparis, M A; Macheras, P E

    1992-01-01

    The complexation of six tricyclic antidepressant drugs [amitriptylin (AMN), nortriptylin (NRN), imipramin (IMN), doxepin (DXN), protriptylin (PTN), and maprotilin (MPN)] with alpha- and beta-cyclodextrins (CDs) using ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) as drug ion sensors is described. Binding parameters were calculated by nonlinear fitting of the model described by the Scatchard equation, to the experimental data of a titration of a CD solution with the ion of interest. One binding site (the CD cavity) was found in all cases with both CDs. The calculated association constants at 25 degrees C using CD concentrations in the range of 0.0100-0.0010 M, varied from 4.81 x 10(3) M-1 (MPN) to 23.9 x 10(3) M-1 (AMN) in the case of beta-CD and from 50 M-1 (DXN) to 123 M-1 (MPN) in the case of alpha-CD. The precision for the estimation of the binding parameters was 0.1-5.0% (within-run RSD%) and 8-10% (between-run RSD%; n = 3). The complexation of the drugs with beta-CD was also examined as a function of temperature in the range of 5-37 degrees C; it was found to decrease by increasing temperature. Van't Hoff analysis gave good correlations (r greater than or equal to 0.989) for all drug ions studied. The estimates of the thermodynamic parameters indicate that the formation of inclusion complexes is enthalpy driven. A compensation plot based on the thermodynamic parameters delta H and delta S resulted in a linear relationship, which is indicative of a common type of force involved in the complexation of drugs to beta-CD.

  15. Current status of hyphenated mass spectrometry in studies of the metabolism of drugs of abuse, including doping agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific contributions on the identification and/or quantification of metabolites of drugs of abuse in in vitro assays or various body samples using hyphenated mass spectrometry. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approaches are considered and discussed if they have been reported in the last five years and are relevant to clinical and forensic toxicology or doping control. Workup and artifact formation are discussed, and typical examples of studies of the metabolism of designer drugs, doping agents, herbal drugs, and synthetic cannabinoids are provided. Procedures for quantifying metabolites in body samples for pharmacokinetic studies or in enzyme incubations for enzyme kinetic studies are also reviewed. In conclusion, the reviewed papers showed that both GC-MS and LC-MS still have important roles to play in research into the metabolism of drugs of abuse, including doping agents.

  16. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Pickar, James H

    2016-02-01

    We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk.

  17. Novel drugs and vaccines based on the structure and function of HIV pathogenic proteins including Nef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Ahmed A

    2005-11-01

    Evidence is presented to suggest that HIV-1 accessory protein Nef could be involved in AIDS pathogenesis. When present in extracellular medium, Nef causes the death of a wide variety of cells in vitro and may therefore be responsible for the depletion of bystander cells in lymphoid tissues during HIV infection. When present inside the cell, Nef could prevent the death of infected cells and thereby contribute to increased viral load. Intracellular Nef does this by preventing apoptosis of infected cells by either inhibiting proteins involved in apoptosis or preventing the infected cells from being recognized by CTLs. Neutralization of extracellular Nef could prevent the death of uninfected immune cells and thereby the destruction of the immune system. Neutralization of intracellular Nef could hasten the death of infected cells and help reduce the viral load. Nef is therefore a very important molecular target for developing therapeutics that slow progression to AIDS. The N-terminal region of Nef and the naturally occurring bee venom mellitin have very similar primary and tertiary structures, and they both act by destroying membranes. Chemical analogs of a mellitin inhibitor prevent Nef-mediated cell death and inhibit the interaction of Nef with cellular proteins involved in apoptosis. Naturally occurring bee propolis also contains substances that prevent Nef-mediated cell lysis and increases proliferation of CD4 cells in HIV-infected cultures. These chemical compounds and natural products are water soluble and nontoxic and are therefore potentially very useful candidate drugs.

  18. HIV Model Parameter Estimates from Interruption Trial Data including Drug Efficacy and Reservoir Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rutao; Piovoso, Michael J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) have had significant impact on understanding HIV disease dynamics and optimizing patient treatment. A model that characterizes the essential disease dynamics can be used for prediction only if the model parameters are identifiable from clinical data. Most previous parameter identification studies for HIV have used sparsely sampled data from the decay phase following the introduction of therapy. In this paper, model parameters are identified from frequently sampled viral-load data taken from ten patients enrolled in the previously published AutoVac HAART interruption study, providing between 69 and 114 viral load measurements from 3–5 phases of viral decay and rebound for each patient. This dataset is considerably larger than those used in previously published parameter estimation studies. Furthermore, the measurements come from two separate experimental conditions, which allows for the direct estimation of drug efficacy and reservoir contribution rates, two parameters that cannot be identified from decay-phase data alone. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method is used to estimate the model parameter values, with initial estimates obtained using nonlinear least-squares methods. The posterior distributions of the parameter estimates are reported and compared for all patients. PMID:22815727

  19. Synthesis of a tricyclic lactam via Beckmann rearrangement and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A tricyclic lactam is reported in a four step synthesis sequence via Beckmann rearrangement and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps. Here, we used a simple starting material such as dicyclopentadiene.

  20. Hydrogels synthesised through photoinitiator-free photopolymerisation technique for delivering drugs including a tumour-tracing porphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Loo-Teck; Swami, Salesh; Gordon-Thomson, Clare

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogels were synthesised using the photoinitiator-free photopolymerisation technique involving interactions between donor/acceptor pairs for delivering drugs of different molecular weights including a porphyrin used as a tumour-tracing agent. N-(5-hydroxy) pentylmaleimide, an acceptor, formed hydrogels with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and N-vinylcaprolactum. Glucosamine, an effective H-donor in enhancing polymerisation as shown by Differential Photocalorimetric results, was found unsuitable for hydrogel preparation. Drugs of different molecular weights releasing at the same rate was discussed. The hydrogels were found to have no toxic effects and were biocompatible with a human keratinocyte cell line

  1. The radioimmunoassay of clomipramine (Anafranil-Geigy): a tricyclic antidepressant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, G.F.; Riad-Fahmy, D.

    1977-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the tricyclic antidepressant, clomipramine (Anafranil-Geigy) which allows accurate determination of plasma levels without a pr-assay purification step. This is achieved by generation of specific antisera using an antigen produced by conjugation of clomipramine to bovine serum albumin via the 10,11 bridge positions. As expected cross reaction of the pharmacologically active major metabolite, desmethylclomipramine was 5% and that of didesmethyclomipramine 1%. Specificity was confirmed by comparing titres achieved in the routine assay with those observed in an assay incorporating a pre-assay thin layer chromatographic purification step. Pharmacokinetic data were in agreement with double radioisotope derivative assays and also with previously reported assays using G.C. or G.C./M.S. techniques. The sensitivity is superior to any previous assay known to us for this class of compound. The specificity and precision, coupled with the high sample turnover (greater than 300 samples/week per technician) make the assay ideal for supervision of patient compliance and routine assay of samples generated in large clinical trials. (orig.) [de

  2. Inhibition of /sup 22/Na influx by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine in bovine adrenal medullary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arita, M.; Wada, A.; Takara, H.; Izumi, F.

    1987-10-01

    In bovine adrenal medullary cells we investigated the effects of antidepressants on ionic channels and secretion of catecholamines. Tricyclic (imipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline) and tetracyclic (maprotiline and mianserin) antidepressants inhibited carbachol-induced influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines (IC50, 14-96 microM). Influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines due to veratridine also were inhibited by these drugs (IC50, 10-17 microM). However, antidepressants did not suppress high concentration of K-induced 45Ca influx and catecholamine secretion, suggesting that antidepressants do not inhibit voltage-dependent Ca channels. (/sup 3/H)Imipramine bound specifically to adrenal medullary cells. Binding was saturable, reversible and with two different equilibrium dissociation constants (13.3 and 165.0 microM). Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants competed for the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine at the same concentrations as they inhibited /sup 22/Na influx caused by carbachol or veratridine. Carbachol, d-tubocurarine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin, veratridine and scorpion venom did not inhibit the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine. These results suggest that tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants bind to two populations of binding sites which are functionally associated with nicotinic receptor-associated ionic channels and with voltage-dependent Na channels, and inhibit Na influx. Inhibition of Na influx leads to the reduction of Ca influx and catecholamine secretion caused by carbachol or veratridine.

  3. Inhibition of 22Na influx by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and binding of [3H]imipramine in bovine adrenal medullary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, M.; Wada, A.; Takara, H.; Izumi, F.

    1987-01-01

    In bovine adrenal medullary cells we investigated the effects of antidepressants on ionic channels and secretion of catecholamines. Tricyclic (imipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline) and tetracyclic (maprotiline and mianserin) antidepressants inhibited carbachol-induced influx of 22 Na, 45 Ca and secretion of catecholamines (IC50, 14-96 microM). Influx of 22 Na, 45 Ca and secretion of catecholamines due to veratridine also were inhibited by these drugs (IC50, 10-17 microM). However, antidepressants did not suppress high concentration of K-induced 45Ca influx and catecholamine secretion, suggesting that antidepressants do not inhibit voltage-dependent Ca channels. [ 3 H]Imipramine bound specifically to adrenal medullary cells. Binding was saturable, reversible and with two different equilibrium dissociation constants (13.3 and 165.0 microM). Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants competed for the specific binding of [ 3 H]imipramine at the same concentrations as they inhibited 22 Na influx caused by carbachol or veratridine. Carbachol, d-tubocurarine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin, veratridine and scorpion venom did not inhibit the specific binding of [ 3 H]imipramine. These results suggest that tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants bind to two populations of binding sites which are functionally associated with nicotinic receptor-associated ionic channels and with voltage-dependent Na channels, and inhibit Na influx. Inhibition of Na influx leads to the reduction of Ca influx and catecholamine secretion caused by carbachol or veratridine

  4. Applicability of bioanalysis of multiple analytes in drug discovery and development: review of select case studies including assay development considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2006-05-01

    The development of sound bioanalytical method(s) is of paramount importance during the process of drug discovery and development culminating in a marketing approval. Although the bioanalytical procedure(s) originally developed during the discovery stage may not necessarily be fit to support the drug development scenario, they may be suitably modified and validated, as deemed necessary. Several reviews have appeared over the years describing analytical approaches including various techniques, detection systems, automation tools that are available for an effective separation, enhanced selectivity and sensitivity for quantitation of many analytes. The intention of this review is to cover various key areas where analytical method development becomes necessary during different stages of drug discovery research and development process. The key areas covered in this article with relevant case studies include: (a) simultaneous assay for parent compound and metabolites that are purported to display pharmacological activity; (b) bioanalytical procedures for determination of multiple drugs in combating a disease; (c) analytical measurement of chirality aspects in the pharmacokinetics, metabolism and biotransformation investigations; (d) drug monitoring for therapeutic benefits and/or occupational hazard; (e) analysis of drugs from complex and/or less frequently used matrices; (f) analytical determination during in vitro experiments (metabolism and permeability related) and in situ intestinal perfusion experiments; (g) determination of a major metabolite as a surrogate for the parent molecule; (h) analytical approaches for universal determination of CYP450 probe substrates and metabolites; (i) analytical applicability to prodrug evaluations-simultaneous determination of prodrug, parent and metabolites; (j) quantitative determination of parent compound and/or phase II metabolite(s) via direct or indirect approaches; (k) applicability in analysis of multiple compounds in select

  5. Tricyclic sesquiterpene copaene prevents H2O2-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Turkez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Copaene (COP, a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is present in several essential oils of medicinal and aromatic plants and has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic features. But, very little information is known about the effects of COP on oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. Method: We used hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 exposure for 6 h to model oxidative stress. Therefore, this experimental design allowed us to explore the neuroprotective potential of COP in H2O2-induced toxicity in rat cerebral cortex cell cultures for the first time. For this purpose, methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assays were carried out to evaluate cytotoxicity. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidative stress (TOS parameters were used to evaluate oxidative changes. In addition to determining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG levels, the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or comet assay was also performed for measuring the resistance of neuronal DNA to H2O2-induced challenge. Result: The results of this study showed that survival and TAC levels of the cells decreased, while TOS, 8-OH-dG levels and the mean values of the total scores of cells showing DNA damage increased in the H2O2 alone treated cultures. But pre-treatment of COP suppressed the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress which were increased by H2O2. Conclusion: It is proposed that COP as a natural product with an antioxidant capacity in mitigating oxidative injuries in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 21-28

  6. Quality of the paratransit service (tricycle and its operation in Aba, Nigeria: An analysis of customers' opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obioma R. Nwaogbe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the quality of the paratransit service and its operations in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria, with a view to identifying its challenges and contributions to informal transport and equitable service distribution to the residents of Aba. Structured questionnaires and past literature were used as sources of data. The primary data included road networks, number of trips per day by operators, operating speed, and purpose of travel, passengers' security, tricycle speed, and waiting time. The study was conducted by using two questionnaires: one for the operators and the other for tricycle users. The total number of completed questionnaires for the survey was 100 for operators and 229 for users. The sampling technique used was random sampling from several zones of the study area. Data were analysed using percentage and Chi-square statistical techniques for testing the hypotheses with the Minitab 11.0 version package. The study found that 92% of operators reported a high level of road network deterioration, and 61% reported making 9-12 trips per day. The hypothesis test was used to study people's feelings about the attributes of the service provided for paratransit users, such as affordability, regularity, comfort and safety. It was found that there is no significant difference at the 5% level between the various categories of these respondents.

  7. Development of new extraction method based on liquid-liquid-liquid extraction followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for extraction of three tricyclic antidepressants in plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Abbaspour, Maryam

    2018-03-27

    In the present study, a new extraction method based on a three-phase system liquid-liquid-liquid extraction followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction has been developed and validated for the extraction and preconcentration of three commonly prescribed tricyclic antidepressant drugs including amitriptyline, imipramine, and clomipramine in human plasma prior to their analysis by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. Three phases are an aqueous phase (plasma), acetonitrile, and n-hexane. The extraction mechanism is based on the different affinities of components of the biological sample (lipids, fatty acids, pharmaceuticals, inorganic ions, etc.) towards each of the involved phase. This provides high selectivity towards the analytes since most interferences are transferred into n-hexane. In this procedure, a homogeneous solution of the aqueous phase (plasma) and acetonitrile (water-soluble extraction solvent) is broken by adding sodium sulfate (as a phase separating agent) and the analytes are extracted into the fine droplets of the formed acetonitrile. In the following, acetonitrile phase is mixed with 1,2-dibromoethane (as a preconcentration solvent at μL-level) and then the microextraction procedure mentioned above is performed for further enrichment of the analytes. Under the optimum extraction conditions, limits of detection and lower limits of quantification for the analytes were obtained in the ranges of 0.001-0.003 and 0.003-0.010 μg mL -1 , respectively. The obtained extraction recoveries were in the range of 79-98%. Intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 7.5%. The validated method was successfully applied for determination of the selected drugs in human plasma samples obtained from the patients who received them. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. 41 CFR 105-74.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... Regional Offices-General Services Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE...

  9. Get Your Hotel Operations Team Onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Doug

    2018-01-01

    As hospitality industry trainers know, using symbols and models can help trainees grasp abstract concepts and make seemingly-complex paradigms easy to understand. Seems like is a good time for the hotel industry to update its model, so let’s get your team onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service. When you think about it, a tricycle is a perfect model for a positive guest experience. For one, it has three wheels, just like the three components of a memorable guest stay. The back wheels repres...

  10. Posaconazole Tablets in Real-Life Lung Transplantation: Impact on Exposure, Drug-Drug Interactions, and Drug Management in Lung Transplant Patients, Including Those with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Manon; Roux, Antoine; Beaumont, Laurence; Douvry, Benoit; Lecuyer, Lucien; Douez, Emmanuel; Picard, Clément; Grenet, Dominique; Jullien, Vincent; Boussaud, Véronique; Guillemain, Romain; Billaud, Eliane M

    2018-03-01

    Appropriate exposure to posaconazole (PSZ) has been limited until the recent approval of the delayed-release oral tablet formulation. Our goal was to determine the exposure obtained by using the standard dose of 300 mg once a day in lung transplant (LT) patients, including patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). PSZ trough concentrations ( C 0 ) were determined using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Indicative thresholds of interest were asterisk means that statistical test is significant]), and the PSZ C 0 exposures for these patients were 1.9 ± 1.5, 1.1 ± 0.8, and 2.4 ± 1.8 mg/liter, respectively ( P < 0.00001*). More than 60% of the concentrations were in the therapeutic range. In CFLT patients, the administration of one 300-mg PSZ tablet quickly achieved an exposure similar to that achieved with the PSZ oral suspension formulation (OSF) administered 3 or 4 times a day for several months. The TRL C 0 /dose ratio ( C 0 / D ) was 7.4 ± 4.4 mg/liter with PSZ tablets, whereas it was 4.6 ± 0.8 mg/liter with the PSZ oral solution ( P = 0.034*). The ERL C 0 / D was similar with both formulations. PPI had no impact on the PSZ concentration (1.49 ± 1.07 mg/liter without PPI versus 1.33 ± 1.17 mg/liter with PPI; P = 0.4134*). Despite the high levels of exposure, PSZ remained well tolerated (one case of diarrhea and one case of fatigue were reported). PSZ tablet administration allows satisfactory exposure, even in CFLT patients, with a dosage lower than that of the PSZ OSF. This once-a-day formulation was not impacted by PPI, which are extensively used in CF patients. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Intramolecular Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction as a strategy for the construction of tricyclic sesquiterpene cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Clovis; Geoffroy, Philippe; Miesch, Michel

    2018-02-21

    Starting from a common polyfunctionalized bicyclo[3.2.1]octane-6,8-dione intermediate, a concise synthetic route to tricyclic cores found in quadrane, suberosane, cedrane and related sesquiterpenes was developed using a Morita-Baylis-Hillman intramolecular reaction as a key step.

  12. Rapid improvement of depressive symptoms in suicide attempters following treatment with milnacipran and tricyclic antidepressants – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirino E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino, Masao GitohDepartment of Psychiatry, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Shizuoka, JapanAbstract: Suicide is a serious social problem in many countries, including Japan. The majority of people who commit suicide suffer from depression. Suicide attempt patients suffering from serious physical injuries are initially treated in hospital emergency departments. The present post hoc analysis examined data from patients admitted to an emergency hospital for treatment of physical injuries, resulting from a suicide attempt, and initial psychiatric treatment for depression and prevention of future suicide attempts. The effects on depressive symptoms were studied in two groups of patients using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAMD. One group (n = 6 had received intravenous tricyclic antidepressants (TCA (amitriptyline or clomipramine while the other group (n = 7 had been treated orally with milnacipran, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant. Prior to treatment the four highest scoring items on the HAMD scale were the same in both groups namely, item 1 (depressed mood, item 3 (suicidality, item 7 (interest in work and activities, and item 10 (psychic anxiety. After 1 week of treatment, mean global HAMD scores were significantly reduced in both groups. Treatment resulted in a significant reduction of five HAMD items in the TCA group, whereas in the milnacipran group 12 HAMD items were significantly reduced. Suicidality (item 3 was significantly improved by 1 week treatment with milnacipran, but not by TCAs. Milnacipran rapidly improved a wide range of depressive symptoms, including suicidality within the first week. The improvement with milnacipran would appear to be, at least, equivalent to that achieved with TCAs, possibly affecting a wider range of symptoms. Since milnacipran has been shown in comparative studies to be better tolerated than TCAs, this antidepressant offers an interesting option for the

  13. A systematic review and meta-analysis of lithium augmentation of tricyclic and second generation antidepressants in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J Craig; Baumann, Pierre; Delucchi, Kevin; Joffe, Russell; Katona, Cornelius

    2014-10-01

    Lithium augmentation of antidepressants for treatment of unipolar major depression was one of the first adjunctive strategies based on a neuropharmacologic rationale. Randomized controlled trials supported its efficacy but most trials added lithium to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). Despite its efficacy, use of lithium augmentation remains infrequent. The current systematic review and meta-analysis examines the efficacy of lithium augmentation as an adjunct to second generation antidepressants as well as to TCAs and considers reasons for its infrequent use. A systematic search of Medline and the Cochrane Clinical Trials database was performed. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of lithium augmentation were selected. A fixed-effects meta-analysis was performed. Odds ratios for response were calculated for each treatment-control contrast, for the trials grouped by type of initial antidepressant (TCA or second generation antidepressant), and as a meta-analytic summary for all treatments combined. Nine trials that included 237 patients were selected. The odds ratio for response to lithium vs. placebo in all contrasts combined was 2.89 (95% CI 1.65, 5.05, z=3.72, p=0.0002). Heterogeneity was very low, I(2)=0%. Adjunctive lithium was effective with TCAs (7 contrasts) and with second generation agents (3 contrasts). Discontinuation due to adverse events was infrequent and did not differ between lithium and placebo. The meta-analysis is limited by the small size and number of trials and limited data for treatment resistant patients. Adjunctive lithium appears to be as effective for second generation antidepressants as it was for the tricyclics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a 'ready-to-use' tool that includes preventability, for the assessment of adverse drug events in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Guillaume; Netzer, Florence; Kouakou, Sylvain Landry; Lemare, François; Minvielle, Etienne

    2018-02-14

    Background Adverse drug events (ADEs) occur frequently in oncology and justify continuous assessment and monitoring. There are several methods for detecting them, but the trigger tool method seems the most appropriate. Although a generic tool exists, its use for ADEs in oncology has not been convincing. The development of a focused version is therefore necessary. Objective To provide an oncology-focused trigger tool that evaluates the prevalence, harm, and preventability in a standardised method for pragmatic use in ADE surveillance. Setting Hospitals with cancer care in France. Method The tool has been constructed in two steps: (1) constitution of an oncology-centred list of ADEs; 30 pharmacists/practitioners in cancer care from nine hospitals selected a list of ADEs using a method of agreement adapted from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method; and (2) construction of three standardised dimensions for the characterisation of each ADE (including causality, severity, and preventability). Main outcome measure The main outcome measure was validation of the tool, including preventability criteria. Results The tool is composed of a final list of 15 ADEs. For each ADE, a 'reviewer form' has been designed and validated by the panel. It comprises (1) the trigger(s), (2) flowcharts to guide the reviewer, (3) criteria for grading harm, and (4) a standardised assessment of preventability with 6-14 closed sentences for each ADE in terms of therapeutic management and/or prevention of side-effects. Conclusion A complete 'ready-to-use' tool for ADE monitoring in oncology has been developed that allows the assessment of three standardised dimensions.

  15. Chemotherapy of Rodent Malaria. Evaluation of Drug Action against Normal and Resistant Strains including Exo-Erythrocytic Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    quinoline-methanols and allied compounds Quinine and a variety of drugs with comparable structures retain their activity against malaria parasites that...E. E., Warhurst, D. C. and Peters, W. (1975). The chemotherapy of rodent malaria , XXI. Action of quinine and WR 122,455 (a 9-phenanthrene methanol) on...AD-RI35 058 CHEMOTHERAPY’OF RODENT MALARIA EVALUATION OF DRUG I/i ACTION AGAINST NORMAL R-.(U) LIVERPOQL SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE ENGLAND) DEPT OF

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 12N-substituted tricyclic matrinic derivatives as a novel family of anti-influenza agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sheng; Li, Yu-Huan; Cheng, Xin-Yue; Yin, Jin-Qiu; Li, Ying-Hong; Song, Dan-Qing; Wang, Yan-Xiang; Liu, Zhan-Dong

    2018-02-21

    Influenza is still a serious threat to human health with significant morbidity and mortality, so it is desirable to develop novel anti-flu drug agents with novel structures. The main purpose of this research was to explore broad-spectrum anti-flu agents and provide antiviral stockpiles in response to potential future influenza pandemics. Fifteen novel 12N-substituted tricyclic matrinic derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-influenza activities against H1N1 subtype taking 12N-p-cyanobenzenesulfonyl matrinane (1) as the lead. All prepared compounds were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and ESI-HRMS. The pharmacokinetics (PK) profile of the key compound was also examined in this study. The structure-activity relationship study indicated that a suitable benzyl groups on 12N atom might be beneficial for the activity. Among them, 12N-p-carboxybenzyl matrinic butane (17g) exhibited the most promising activity with an IC50 value of 16.2 μM and a selective index (SI) value of over 33.4. In addition, compound 17g displayed a good in vivo pharmacokinetic profile with area under the curve (AUC0-∞) value of 9.89 μM•h. We consider tricyclic matrinic butane derivatives to be a new class of anti-influenza agents and this study provided useful information on further optimization. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Drug: D03071 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... CAS: 135928-30-2 PubChem: 17397226 ChEMBL: CHEMBL494892 LigandBox: D03071 ... ... D03071 Drug Beloxepin (USAN/INN) ... C19H21NO2 D03071.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ...

  18. Evaluation of three rapid oral fluid test devices on the screening of multiple drugs of abuse including ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Magdalene H Y; Ching, C K; Poon, Simon; Chan, Suzanne S S; Ng, W Y; Lam, M; Wong, C K; Pao, Ronnie; Lau, Angus; Mak, Tony W L

    2018-05-01

    Rapid oral fluid testing (ROFT) devices have been extensively evaluated for their ability to detect common drugs of abuse; however, the performance of such devices on simultaneous screening for ketamine has been scarcely investigated. The present study evaluated three ROFT devices (DrugWipe ® 6S, Ora-Check ® and SalivaScreen ® ) on the detection of ketamine, opiates, methamphetamine, cannabis, cocaine and MDMA. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS) assay was firstly established and validated for confirmation analysis of the six types of drugs and/or their metabolites. In the field test, the three ROFT devices were tested on subjects recruited from substance abuse clinics/rehabilitation centre. Oral fluid was also collected using Quantisal ® for confirmation analysis. A total of 549 samples were collected in the study. LCMS analysis on 491 samples revealed the following drugs: codeine (55%), morphine (49%), heroin (40%), methamphetamine (35%), THC (8%), ketamine (4%) and cocaine (2%). No MDMA-positive cases were observed. Results showed that the overall specificity and accuracy were satisfactory and met the DRUID standard of >80% for all 3 devices. Ora-Check ® had poor sensitivities (ketamine 36%, methamphetamine 63%, opiates 53%, cocaine 60%, THC 0%). DrugWipe ® 6S showed good sensitivities in the methamphetamine (83%) and opiates (93%) tests but performed relatively poorly for ketamine (41%), cocaine (43%) and THC (22%). SalivaScreen ® also demonstrated good sensitivities in the methamphetamine (83%) and opiates (100%) tests, and had the highest sensitivity for ketamine (76%) and cocaine (71%); however, it failed to detect any of the 28 THC-positive cases. The test completion rate (proportion of tests completed with quality control passed) were: 52% (Ora-Check ® ), 78% (SalivaScreen ® ) and 99% (DrugWipe ® 6S). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical characteristics, pharmacotherapy, and healthcare resource use among patients with fibromyalgia newly prescribed pregabalin or tricyclic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Mugdha; Tai, Kei-Sing; Chandran, Arthi; Zlateva, Gergana; Leslie, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    To examine treatment patterns and costs among patients with fibromyalgia prescribed pregabalin or tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). Using the LifeLink™ Health Plan Claims Database, patients with fibromyalgia (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 729.1X) newly prescribed (index date) TCAs (n = 898) were identified and propensity score-matched (PSM) with patients newly prescribed pregabalin (n = 898). Pain-related pharmacotherapy, comorbidities, and healthcare resource use/costs were examined during the 12 months, pre-index, and follow-up periods. Both patient groups reported multiple comorbidities and received pain medications in the pre-index and follow-up periods. Among patients prescribed pregabalin, use of non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (43.3% vs 39.8%), other anticonvulsants (28.6% vs 23.3%), and tetracyclic/miscellaneous antidepressants (28.5% vs 25.8%) significantly decreased, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors (7.7% vs 10.4%), TCAs (4.8% vs 7.9%), and topical agents (10.8% vs 15.1%) increased in the follow-up period (p fibromyalgia to pregabalin. Patients with fibromyalgia prescribed pregabalin or TCAs had multiple comorbidities and a sizeable pain medication burden, which increased in the follow-up period for both cohorts. Only 5% of pregabalin initiators had been treated with concomitant TCAs at baseline, suggesting that TCAs were inappropriate for these patients owing to their contraindications.

  20. Absorption-enhancing effects of gemini surfactant on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbed hydrophilic drugs including peptide and protein drugs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alama, Tammam; Kusamori, Kosuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-02-29

    In general, the intestinal absorption of small hydrophilic molecules and macromolecules like peptides, after oral administration is very poor. Absorption enhancers are considered to be one of the most promising agents to enhance the intestinal absorption of drugs. In this research, we focused on a gemini surfactant, a new type of absorption enhancer. The intestinal absorption of drugs, with or without sodium dilauramidoglutamide lysine (SLG-30), a gemini surfactant, was examined by an in situ closed-loop method in rats. The intestinal absorption of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) was significantly enhanced in the presence of SLG-30, such effect being reversible. Furthermore, the calcium levels in the plasma significantly decreased when calcitonin was co-administered with SLG-30, suggestive of the increased intestinal absorption of calcitonin. In addition, no significant increase in the of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity or in protein release from the intestinal epithelium was observed in the presence of SLG-30, suggestive of the safety of this compound. These findings indicate that SLG-30 is an effective absorption-enhancer for improving the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbed drugs, without causing serious damage to the intestinal epithelium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Smooth Jerk-Bounded Optimal Path Planning of Tricycle Wheeled Mobile Manipulators in the Presence of Environmental Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moharam Habibnejad Korayem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a computational algorithm is developed for the smooth-jerk optimal path planning of tricycle wheeled mobile manipulators in an obstructed environment. Due to a centred orientable wheel, the tricycle mobile manipulator exhibits more steerability and manoeuvrability over traditional mobile manipulators, especially in the presence of environmental obstacles. This paper presents a general formulation based on the combination of the potential field method and optimal control theory in order to plan the smooth point-to-point path of the tricycle mobile manipulators. The nonholonomic constraints of the tricycle mobile base are taken into account in the dynamic formulation of the system and then the optimality conditions are derived considering jerk restrictions and obstacle avoidance. Furthermore, by means of the potential field method, a new formulation of a repulsive potential function is proposed for collision avoidance between any obstacle and each part of the mobile manipulator. In addition, to ensure the accurate placement of the end effector on the target point an attractive potential function is applied to the optimal control formulation. Next, a mixed analytical-numerical algorithm is proposed to generate the point-to-point optimal path. Finally, the proposed method is verified by a number of simulations on a two-link tricycle manipulator.

  2. 1,4-Benzodiazepine N-Nitrosoamidines: Useful Intermediates in the Synthesis of Tricyclic Benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos del Pozo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available 1,4-Benzodiazepine N-nitrosoamidines have been used as scaffolds for the preparation of different tricyclic derivatives. Replacement of the N-nitrosoamidine moiety through treatment with the nucleophiles acetylhydrazine, aminoacetaldehyde dimethylacetal and 1-amino-2-propanol, followed by an acid-catalyzed cyclization step, afforded triazolo and imidazobenzodiazepines 1, 6, and 7, respectively, in good yields. When acetylhydrazine is used as a nucleophile, the overall process provides an alternative route to alprazolam (1b and triazolam (1c, respectively.

  3. Vinylogous Nicholas reactions in the synthesis of bi- and tricyclic cycloheptynedicobalt complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Izabela; Green, James R

    2015-11-28

    The Lewis acid mediated intramolecular Nicholas reactions of allylic acetate enyne-Co2(CO)6 complexes afford cycloheptenyne-Co2(CO)6 complexes in three manifestations. Electron rich aryl substituted alkyne complexes give tricyclic 6,7,x-benzocycloheptenyne complexes, with x = 5, 6, or 7. Allylsilane substituted complexes afford exo methylene bicyclic x,7-cycloheptenyne complexes (x = 6,7). The allyl acetate function may also be replaced by a benzylic acetate, to afford dibenzocycloheptyne-Co2(CO)6 complexes. Following reductive complexation, the methodology may be applied to the synthesis of the icetexane diterpene carbon framework.

  4. Synthesis of some new tricyclic 4(3H)-quinazolinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, E; Khodarahmi, G A; Hakimelahi, G H; Tsai, F Y; Hassanzadeh, F

    2011-07-01

    Quinazolinones are interesting molecules with a wide range of biological activities. We prepared a number of quinazolinone derivatives by the condensation of 5-bromo- or 5-nitro-substituted anthranilic acids with chloro-acyl chlorides. Anthranilic acid derivatives were treated with either 3-chloro-propionyl chloride or 4-chloro-butyryl chloride to yield the corresponding N-acyl-anthranilic acids. The resultants were reacted with acetic anhydride to afford the benzoxazinone intermediates, which upon condensation with elected amines in either DMF or ethanol gave the corresponding tricyclic 4(3H)-quinazolinone derivatives. It was found that reactions in DMF produced higher yields.

  5. Structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of the tricycle-like phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wu, Zhi-Feng; Gao, Peng-Fei; Fang, Dang-Qi; Zhang, Er-Hu; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2017-01-18

    Phosphorene exhibits great potential applications in nanoelectronics due to its relatively large and direct band gap and good charge carrier mobility, and thus has attracted extensive attentions over the past few years. In this study, a novel hybrid phosphorene with a tricycle-like bulge is proposed using density functional theory calculations. Herein, structural stability, elastic, electronic, and optical properties have been addressed. It is found that all the hybrid phosphorenes are stable, and their cohesive energies are very close to that of black phosphorene monolayer. Due to the tricycle-like bulge, these hybrid layers are much softer than the black phosphorene. Their electronic band structures show that they are semiconductors with a robust indirect band gap, and their band gaps are strongly dependent on the sizes. Spatial charge distribution to the valence band maximum and the conduction band minimum is analyzed to explore the origin of the indirect band gap features. By calculating the complex dielectric function, optical properties have been discussed. Our results suggest that the hybrid phosphorenes with well structural stability, robust indirect band gaps, flexible property, and good optical absorption hold great promise for applications in the field of visible light harvesting and flexible nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Electrodes for high-definition transcutaneous DC stimulation for applications in drug delivery and electrotherapy, including tDCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Preet; Bansal, Varun; Patel, Jinal; Ho, Johnson S; Diaz, Julian; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom

    2010-07-15

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation is applied in a range of biomedical applications including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). tDCS is a non-invasive procedure where a weak direct current (<2 mA) is applied across the scalp to modulate brain function. High-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) is a technique used to increase the spatial focality of tDCS by passing current across the scalp using <12 mm diameter electrodes. The purpose of this study was to design and optimize "high-definition" electrode-gel parameters for electrode durability, skin safety and subjective pain. Anode and cathode electrode potential, temperature, pH and subjective sensation over time were assessed during application of 2 mA direct current, for up to 22 min on agar gel or subject forearms. A selection of five types of solid-conductors (Ag pellet, Ag/AgCl pellet, rubber pellet, Ag/AgCl ring and Ag/AgCl disc) and seven conductive gels (Signa, Spectra, Tensive, Redux, BioGel, Lectron and CCNY-4) were investigated. The Ag/AgCl ring in combination with CCNY-4 gel resulted in the most favorable outcomes. Under anode stimulations, electrode potential and temperature rises were generally observed in all electrode-gel combinations except for Ag/AgCl ring and disc electrodes. pH remained constant for all solid-conductors except for both Ag and rubber pellet electrodes with Signa and CCNY-4 gels. Sensation ratings were independent of stimulation polarity. Ag/AgCl ring electrodes were found to be the most comfortable followed by Ag, rubber and Ag/AgCl pellet electrodes across all gels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrodes for high-definition transcutaneous DC stimulation for applications in drug-delivery and electrotherapy, including tDCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Preet; Bansal, Varun; Patel, Jinal; Ho, Johnson S.; Diaz, Julian; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation is applied in a range of biomedical applications including Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). tDCS is a non-invasive procedure where a weak direct current (<2 mA) is applied across the scalp to modulate brain function. High-Definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) is a technique used to increase the spatial focality of tDCS by passing current across the scalp using <12 mm diameter electrodes. The purpose of this study was to design and optimize “high-definition” electrode-gel parameters for electrode durability, skin safety, and subjective pain. Anode and cathode electrode potential, temperature, pH, and subjective sensation over time were assessed during application of 2 mA direct current, for up to 22 minutes on agar gel or subject forearms. A selection of 5 types of solid-conductors (Ag pellet, Ag/AgCl pellet, Rubber pellet, Ag/AgCl ring, and Ag/AgCl disc) and 7 conductive gels (Signa, Spectra, Tensive, Redux, BioGel, Lectron, and CCNY-4) were investigated. The Ag/AgCl ring in combination with CCNY-4 gel resulted in the most favorable outcomes. Under anode stimulations, electrode potential and temperature rises were generally observed in all electrode-gel combinations except for Ag/AgCl ring and disc electrodes. pH remained constant for all solid-conductors except for both Ag and Rubber pellet electrodes with Signa and CCNY-4 gels. Sensation ratings were independent of stimulation polarity. Ag/AgCl ring electrodes were found to be the most comfortable followed by Ag, Rubber, and Ag/AgCl pellet electrodes across all gels. PMID:20488204

  8. Inadequate recording of alcohol-drinking, tobacco-smoking and discharge diagnosis in medical in-patients: failure to recognize risks including drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairstow, B M; Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Deutscher, C

    1993-11-01

    The records of 62 men and 43 women, 14-88 years old, admitted to general medical wards in a public teaching hospital during 1991 were examined for discharge medications and for the recording of alcohol-drinking, tobacco-smoking and discharge diagnosis. Drinking and smoking status was unrecorded in 22.9% and 21.9% of patients respectively. Twenty-four patients had 31 potential drug interactions which were related to the number of drugs prescribed and to drinking alcohol; 10.5% of the patients had interactions involving alcohol and 2.9% tobacco. Six patients received relatively or absolutely contraindicated drugs, including one asthmatic given two beta-blockers. The drugs prescribed indicated that some patients had conditions such as gastro-oesophageal disorders, diabetes and obstructive airways disease which had not been recorded. Inadequate recording of diagnoses, alcohol and smoking status creates risks to patients and may cause opportunities for preventive care to be missed. This study provides the basis for the development of undergraduate and postgraduate education programmes to address these issues and so decrease risks to patients which arise from inadequate recording practices. Incomplete diagnoses also adversely affect hospital funding where this depends on case-mix diagnostic groups. Quality assurance programmes and other strategies are being implemented to improve medical recording and prescribing habits.

  9. [Cappuccino coffee treatment of xerostomia in patients taking tricyclic antidepressants: preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt

    2002-01-01

    10 patients underwent a trial treatment with Cappuccino coffee. All of them (8 university lecturers and 2 clerks) aged from 60 to 69 (average 63) years old, used tricyclic antidepressant because of insomnia as a monosymptomatic type of depression or insomnia as a dominant symptom in the course of depression. One, evening dose of doxepine was from 150 to 250 (average 225) mg, causing xerostomia next day usually between 9-15 o'clock. The five-minute--chewing of 15.0 g of Cappuccino coffee increased the amount of saliva, decreased xerostomia and improved the ability of speech. Beneficial effect of coffee lasted from 0.5 to 4 (average about 2) hours. To the best of our knowledge there are no publications dealing with the positive effect of coffee in xerostomia.

  10. Synthesis, antimicrobial, DNA cleavage and antioxidant activities of tricyclic sultams derived from saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghamry, Ibrahim; Youssef, Magdy M; Al-Omair, Mohammed A; Elsawy, Hany

    2017-10-20

    Two series of fused tricyclic sultams (carboxylates, 3a, b and 5a, f, g and anilides 5b-e) were synthesized from saccharin and their chemical structures were confirmed by spectroscopic tools. Then, their antibacterial activities and MIC were evaluated against two strains of gram positive and gram-negative bacteria. The MIC values of the tested compounds are in the of range 8-33 μg/ml. In addition, their DNA cleavage ability, binding affinity and their anticancer activities against hepatic cancer cell were tested. And their antioxidant activities were also measured. Four carboxylate derivatives (3a, 5a, 5f and 5g) and one anilide (5d) of the tested compounds proved to be the highest activity all over the study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Tricyclic antidepressants for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otasowie, John; Castells, Xavier; Ehimare, Umonoibalo P; Smith, Clare H

    2014-09-19

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood onset, which may persist into adulthood. ADHD has a significant impact on a child's daily life, affecting relationships and academic performance. Its core symptoms include developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsive behaviour. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are sometimes used as second line of treatment in the reduction of ADHD symptoms in children and adolescents with ADHD. However, their efficacy is not yet known. To assess the efficacy of TCAs in the reduction of ADHD symptoms within the broad categories of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattentiveness in young people aged 6 to 18 years with established diagnoses of ADHD. On 26 September 2013, we searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, seven other databases, and two trials registers. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, and contacted manufacturers and known experts in the field to determine if there were any ongoing trials or unpublished studies available. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including both parallel group and cross-over study designs, of any dose of TCA compared with placebo or active medication in children or adolescents with ADHD, including those with comorbid conditions.  Working in pairs, three review authors independently screened records, extracted data, and assessed trial quality. We calculated the standardised mean differences (SMD) for continuous data, the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for both. We conducted the meta-analyses using a random-effects model throughout. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool to assess the risk of bias of each included trial and the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the body evidence. We included six RCTs with a total of 216 participants. Five of the six trials compared desipramine with placebo; the remaining trial compared

  12. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors versus tricyclic antidepressants in young patients: a meta-analysis of efficacy and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bin; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhou, Xinyu; Cheng, Pengfei; Liu, Yiyun; Chen, Jin; Fu, Yuying; Luo, Qinghua; Xie, Peng

    2014-07-01

    A meta-analysis comparing the efficacy and acceptability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) versus tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in depressed children, adolescents, and young adults was performed. A comprehensive literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycINFO databases was conducted from 1970 to December 2013. Only clinical trials that randomly assigned one SSRI or TCA to patients aged 7 to 25 years who met the diagnostic criteria for unipolar depressive disorder were included. Primary efficacy was determined by the pooling of standardized mean differences (SMDs) calculated from the difference in the reduction in mean depression rating scale scores for the 2 antidepressants. Acceptability was determined by pooling the risk ratios (RRs) of dropouts for all reasons and for adverse effects as well as the suicide-risk outcome. Five trials with a total of 422 patients were considered to be eligible for inclusion. SSRIs were significantly more effective than TCAs in primary efficacy (SMD = -0.52; 95% CI, -0.81 to -0.24; P = 0.0003). Patients taking SSRIs had a significantly greater response to depressive symptoms than patients taking TCAs (RR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.29; P = 0.03). On an individual SSRI basis, fluoxetine had a significantly greater efficacy than TCAs (SMD = -0.82; 95% CI, -1.34 to -0.29; P = 0.003). On an individual TCA basis, only imipramine was not significantly worse than SSRIs (SMD = -0.27; 95% CI, -0.56 to 0.02; P = 0.06). Significantly more patients taking TCAs discontinued treatment than patients taking SSRIs (35.8% vs 25.1%; RR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.93; P = 0.02). SSRI therapy has a superior efficacy and is better tolerated compared with TCA therapy in young patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug and Nondrug Treatment in Tension-type Headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    . Combination analgesics, triptans, muscle relaxants and opioids should not be used, and it is crucial to avoid frequent and excessive use of simple analgesics to prevent the development of medication-overuse headache. The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline is drug of first choice for the prophylactic...

  14. Review: Drug and nondrug treatment in tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    . Combination analgesics, triptans, muscle relaxants and opioids should not be used, and it is crucial to avoid frequent and excessive use of simple analgesics to prevent the development of medication-overuse headache. The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline is drug of first choice for the prophylactic...

  15. Chronic Pain Treatment: The Influence of Tricyclic Antidepressants on Serotonin Release and Uptake in Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Ferjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of serotonin (5-HT in chronic pain mechanisms is established. 5-HT inhibits central painful stimuli, but recent data suggests that 5-HT could also enhance pain stimulus from the periphery, where mast cells play an important role. We aimed in our study to clarify the influence of selected tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs on mast cell function: secretion, uptake, and reuptake of 5-HT, that could interfere with 5-HT levels and in this way contribute to the generation of pain. As an experimental model, we used isolated rat peritoneal mast cells and incubated them with selected TCAs (clomipramine, amitriptyline, doxepin, and imipramine under different experimental conditions. 5-HT release, uptake, and reuptake were determined spectrofluorometrically. We showed that TCAs were able to inhibit 5-HT secretion from mast cells, as well as uptake of exogenous 5-HT and reuptake of secreted 5-HT back into mast cells. The effects of TCAs were concentration dependent; higher concentrations of TCAs inhibited the secretion of 5-HT induced by compound 48/80, whereas lower concentrations of TCAs inhibited 5-HT uptake. The most effective TCA was halogenated clomipramine. As TCAs are well introduced in chronic pain treatment, the insight into mechanisms of action is important for an understanding of their effect in various pain conditions.

  16. Impending cardiogenic shock due to tricyclic antidepressant toxicity, computed tomography findings: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghasem Hanafi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A computed tomographic (CT with contrast enhancement is extensively used for assessment of a wide range of thoracic and abdominal circumstances. Thus, as the use of CT in the evaluation of unstable patients increases, the chance to see the CT features of imminent cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest also increases during scanning. The patient was a 27 year old man who brought to the emergency department by paramedics unresponsive, After physical examination and obtaining ECG due to presence of hypotension ,with suspicion to traumatic injury, Thoracoabdominal CT was done for patient which show dense opacification of the right hepatic lobe, that resembling contrast extravasations from IVC and the hepatic vein, laparatmy was done for patient which were normal .Patient Has developed cardiac arrest and died at the end of surgery. Postmortem autopsy and toxicology revealed Tricyclic antidepressant intoxication as a cause of cardiac arrest and death. TCA poisoned Patients may have normal ECG findings on arrival. In spite of infrequent reports of cardiogenic shock that occurring during CT scan, knowledge of distinctive CT findings of these patients is very essential for precise analysis of images, in addition to informing clinical physician for malpractice avoidance and immediate initiation of resuscitation.

  17. [Clinically relevant drug interactions with new generation antidepressants and antipsychotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Anne

    2009-06-01

    Because antidepressants and antipsychotics are commonly described in combination with drugs used to treat comorbid psychiatric or somatic disorders (e.g. anxiolytics, mood stabilizers, cardiovascular drugs, antimicrobial agents), they may be involved in drug interactions. Furthermore, agents such as lithium and atypical antipsychotics may be used to augment the antidepressant response in cases of refractory depression. Based on their mechanisms, drug-drug interactions can be classified either as pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic in nature. The well-documented risk of potentially harmful pharmacodynamic drug interactions with first-generation anti-depressants, e.g. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), with regard to the induction of the serotonin syndrome, has contributed to a gradual decline in their use in clinical practise. Second- and third-generation antidepressants have gradually replaced tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and MAOIs, mainly because of their improved tolerability and safety profile. The second- and third-generation antidepressants include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and other compounds with different mechanisms of action. These drugs and also the majority of antipsychotics are metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system. Therefore, the use of these compounds may be associated with clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions with other medications. The knowledge about the CYP metabolism of drugs may be used to guide the selection of an antidepressant or an anti-psychotic with a low drug-drug interaction potential for an individual patient. The aim of the present article is to review drug-interaction potentials with specific focus on second-generation antidepressants (SSRIs), newer antidepressants (SNRIs: venlafaxine and duloxetine; bupropion, mirtazapine, trazodone), novel atypical antidepressants (agomelatine), as well as new generation

  18. Synthesis of tricyclic butenolides and comparison their effects with known smoke-butenolide, KAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Ewa; Koprowski, Marek; Cembrowska-Lech, Danuta; Wójcik, Agata; Kępczyński, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Plant-derived smoke - butenolide, called at present karrikin 1 (KAR 1 ) is known as an important inductor of seed germination and seedling growth. In this study, tricyclic butenolides were synthesized and their effects on germination of dormant and non-dormant Avena fatua caryopses were compared, as were also their effects versus those of KAR 1 on seedling growth. KAR 1 was found to be most effective and to completely remove dormancy. Butenolides, rac-8 and (S)-8a, showed a low stimulatory effect on germination of dormant caryopses, visible only when applied at very high concentrations. These compounds used at concentrations 100 times those of KAR 1 similarly increased the speed of germination and vigor of non-dormant caryopses. Likewise, growth of coleoptiles and their fresh weight were increased by KAR 1 as well as by rac-8 and (S)-8a to a similar value. KAR 1 and rac-8 were more effective than (S)-8a in increasing root growth. The results shown indicate that the presence of an aromatic ring in the absence of methyl group at C3 induced a much lower, or a similar, effect on germination of dormant and non-dormant Avena fatua caryopses and seedling growth compared to KAR 1 , but only when used at much higher concentrations. The simultaneous presence of a methyl group at C3 and an aromatic ring in the compound rac-7 exerted only a slight effect on the root growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Tricyclic coumarin sulphonate derivatives with alkaline phosphatase inhibitory effects: in vitro and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Jamshed; El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2018-12-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) is an important isozyme of alkaline phosphatases, which plays different pivotal roles within the human body. Most importantly, it is responsible for maintaining the balanced ratio of phosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate, thus regulates the extracellular matrix calcification during bone formation and growth. The elevated level of TNAP has been linked to vascular calcification and end-stage renal diseases. Consequently, there is a need to search for highly potent and selective inhibitors of alkaline phosphatases (APs) for treatment of disorders associated with the over-expression of APs. Herein, a series of tricyclic coumarin sulphonate 1a-za with known antiproliferative activity, was evaluated for AP inhibition against human tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (h-TNAP) and human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (h-IAP). The methylbenzenesulphonate derivative 1f (IC 50  = 0.38 ± 0.01 μM) was found to be the most active h-TNAP inhibitor. Another 4-fluorobenzenesulphonate derivative 1i (IC 50  = 0.45 ± 0.02 μM) was found as the strongest inhibitor of h-IAP. Some of the derivatives were also identified as highly selective inhibitors of APs. Detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) was investigated to identify the functional groups responsible for the effective inhibition of AP isozymes. The study was also supported by the docking studies to rationalise the most possible binding site interactions of the identified inhibitors with the targeted enzymes.

  20. Tricyclic antidepressant-induced lipidosis in human peripheral monocytes in vitro, as well as in a monocyte-derived cell line, as monitored by spectrofluorimetry and flow cytometry after staining with Nile red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Z; Appelkvist, E L; DePierre, J W; Nässberger, L

    1997-05-15

    Human mono- and lymphocytes from peripheral blood and the monoblastoid cell line U-937 were used in this in vitro study of drug-induced lipidosis. Mono- and lymphocytes were exposed for 4 days to three different tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), imipramine (25 microM), clomipramine (10 microM) and citalopram (80 microM). The lipophilic fluorophore Nile red, which stains intracellular lipid structures selectively, was used as a lipid probe. Fluorescence microscopy, spectrofluorimetry and flow cytometry were used to detect cellular lipidosis, as verified by electron microscopy. Our results demonstrate that imipramine, clomipramine and citalopram induce lipidosis in monocytes and U-937 cells, but not in lymphocytes. An accurate quantitation of induced intracellular lipidosis can be achieved by spectrofluorimetric and flow cytometric analysis.

  1. Central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farde, L.; Wiesel, F.A.; Halldin, C.; Sedvall, G.

    1988-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography and the carbon 11-labeled ligand raclopride, central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in the putamen was determined in psychiatric patients treated with clinical doses of psychoactive drugs. Receptor occupancy in drug-treated patients was defined as the percent reduction of specific carbon 11-raclopride binding in relation to the expected binding in the absence of drug treatment. Clinical treatment of schizophrenic patients with 11 chemically distinct antipsychotic drugs (including both classic and atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine) resulted in a 65% to 85% occupancy of D2-dopamine receptors. In a depressed patient treated with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, no occupancy was found. The time course for receptor occupancy and drug levels was followed after withdrawal of sulpiride or haloperidol. D2-dopamine receptor occupancy remained above 65% for many hours despite a substantial reduction of serum drug concentrations. In a sulpiride-treated patient, the dosage was reduced in four steps over a nine-week period and a curvilinear relationship was demonstrated between central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy and serum drug concentrations. The results demonstrate that clinical doses of all the currently used classes of antipsychotic drugs cause a substantial blockade of central D2-dopamine receptors in humans. This effect appears to be selective for the antipsychotics, since it was not induced by the antidepressant nortriptyline

  2. Five-year examination of utilization and drug cost outcomes associated with benefit design changes including reference pricing for proton pump inhibitors in a state employee health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill T; Neill, Kathryn K; Davis, Dwight A

    2011-04-01

    The Arkansas State Employee Benefits Division (EBD) is a self-insured program comprising public school and other state employees, their spouses, and dependents. Previous research published in JMCP (2006) showed drug cost savings of $2.20 per member per month (PMPM; 37.6%) or annualized savings of $3.4 million associated with a benefit design change and coverage of the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole over-the-counter (OTC) beginning in March 2004. On May 1, 2005, brand esomeprazole was excluded from coverage, with current users grandfathered for 4 months until September 2005. Reference pricing for PPIs, including esomeprazole but excluding generic omeprazole, was implemented on September 1, 2005, and the beneficiary cost share for all PPIs except generic omeprazole was determined from comparison of the PPI actual price to the $0.90 omeprazole OTC reference price per unit. To examine PPI utilization and drug costs before and after (a) excluding esomeprazole from coverage (with grandfathering current users) and (b) implementing a therapeutic maximum allowable cost (TMAC), or reference-pricing benefit design, for the PPI class in a large state employee health plan with fairly stable enrollment of approximately 127,500 members in 2005 through 2008 and approximately 128,000 members in 2009 Q1. The pharmacy claims database for the EBD was used to examine utilization and cost data for PPIs in a longitudinal analysis for the 61-month period from March 1, 2004, through March 31, 2009. Pharmacy claims data were compared for the period 14 months prior to esomeprazole exclusion (preperiod), 4 months during the esomeprazole exclusion (postperiod 1), and the ensuing 43 months of PPI reference pricing (postperiod 2). PPI cost and utilization data for the intervention group of approximately 127,500 beneficiaries were compared with a group of 122 self-insured employers with a total of nearly 1 million beneficiaries whose pharmacy benefits did not include reference pricing for

  3. Discovery of Novel Tricyclic Heterocycles as Potent and Selective DPP-4 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Lian; Hao, Jinsong; Domalski, Martin; Burnett, Duane A.; Pissarnitski, Dmitri; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Stamford, Andrew; Scapin, Giovanna; Gao, Ying-Duo; Soriano, Aileen; Kelly, Terri M.; Yao, Zuliang; Powles, Mary Ann; Chen, Shiying; Mei, Hong; Hwa, Joyce (Merck)

    2016-05-12

    In our efforts to develop second generation DPP-4 inhibitors, we endeavored to identify distinct structures with long-acting (once weekly) potential. Taking advantage of X-ray cocrystal structures of sitagliptin and other DPP-4 inhibitors, such as alogliptin and linagliptin bound to DPP-4, and aided by molecular modeling, we designed several series of heterocyclic compounds as initial targets. During their synthesis, an unexpected chemical transformation provided a novel tricyclic scaffold that was beyond our original design. Capitalizing on this serendipitous discovery, we have elaborated this scaffold into a very potent and selective DPP-4 inhibitor lead series, as highlighted by compound 17c.

  4. Organic anion and cation transport in vitro by dog choroid plexus: Effects of neuroleptics and tricyclic antidepressants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barany, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    Dog lateral choroid plexus accumulates the cation 14 C-emepronium and the divalent anion 125 I-iodipamide in vitro. At 10 μM, high potency neuroleptics with a substituted piperazine side chain and also haloperidol depress only the uptake of the cation and even stimulate the uptake of the anion. In contrast, at 1-10μM, the accumulation of both test substances is inhibited by neuroleptics and tricyclic antidepresssants with an aliphatic side chain. Such unspecific effects on seemingly unrelated transport systems at concentrations reached clinically in the CSF might explain some side actions of low potency neuroleptics and antidepressants. (author)

  5. A pilot pharmacokinetic study of tricyclic antidepressant ovine Fab for TCA poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalindağ-Oztürk, Nilüfer; Goto, Collin S; Shepherd, Greene; Torres, Olivia Nayeli; Giroir, Brett

    2010-06-01

    A pilot study of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA)-specific antibody fragments (TCA Fab) in TCA-intoxicated adults showed a marked increase in serum total TCA concentrations following TCA Fab infusion with no worsening signs of TCA toxicity. TCA Fab pharmacokinetics (PK) was not described in this adult study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK of TCA Fab in children with TCA poisoning. This was an open-label, single-center, dose escalation pilot trial of three patients. Inclusion criteria were documented TCA ingestion with at least one serious complication (QRS prolongation, dysrhythmia, hypotension, seizure, or coma). Patients were assigned to either a low-dose intravenous TCA Fab regimen (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg) or a high-dose regimen (30, 60, and 120 mg/kg) as needed to reverse TCA toxicity. Following the administration of TCA Fab, samples of blood and urine were obtained for PK evaluations. The outcomes of interest were serum and urine TCA concentrations (free and total), serum and urine Fab concentrations, improvement or worsening of TCA toxicity, and adverse effects. Three study patients were 11, 11, and 14 years of age. Two patients received 15 mg/kg of TCA Fab and one patient received a total of 90 mg/kg of TCA Fab (30 + 60 mg/kg). Serum-bound TCA increased significantly following TCA Fab administration with concomitant enhanced urinary elimination. Serum-free TCA concentrations were minimal to undetectable. Fab data were available for two patients. The serum TCA Fab area under the curve was 306.12 mg/L/h for the 15 mg/kg dose and 2,198.10 mg/L/h for the 90 mg/kg dose of TCA Fab. Maximum Fab concentrations correlated with maximum bound TCA in serum. The volume of distribution (V(D)) of TCA Fab was 0.2-0.3 L/kg. The clearance was 0.036-0.05 L/kg/h and the elimination half-life was 4 h. No adverse effects were observed. The limited PK data from this study are consistent with binding of TCA to TCA Fab and redistribution of TCA from the tissue to

  6. Design and Elaboration of a Tractable Tricyclic Scaffold To Synthesize Druglike Inhibitors of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4), Antagonists of the C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 5 (CCR5), and Highly Potent and Selective Phosphoinositol-3 Kinase δ (PI3Kδ) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwehm, Carolin; Kellam, Barrie; Garces, Aimie E; Hill, Stephen J; Kindon, Nicholas D; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Li, Jin; Macdonald, Simon J F; Rowedder, James E; Stoddart, Leigh A; Stocks, Michael J

    2017-02-23

    A novel molecular scaffold has been synthesized, and its incorporation into new analogues of biologically active molecules across multiple target classes will be discussed. In these studies, we have shown use of the tricyclic scaffold to synthesize potent inhibitors of the serine peptidase DPP-4, antagonists of the CCR5 receptor, and highly potent and selective PI3K δ isoform inhibitors. We also describe the predicted physicochemical properties of the resulting inhibitors and conclude that the tractable molecular scaffold could have potential application in future drug discovery programs.

  7. Docking Based 3D-QSAR Study of Tricyclic Guanidine Analogues of Batzelladine K as anti-malarial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nafees; Anwar, Sirajudheen; Thet Htar, Thet

    2017-06-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum Lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme (PfLDH) catalyzes inter-conversion of pyruvate to lactate during glycolysis producing the energy required for parasitic growth. The PfLDH has been studied as a potential molecular target for development of anti-malarial agents. In an attempt to find the potent inhibitor of PfLDH, we have used Discovery studio to perform molecular docking in the active binding pocket of PfLDH by CDOCKER, followed by three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies of tricyclic guanidine batzelladine compounds, which were previously synthesized in our laboratory. Docking studies showed that there is a very strong correlation between in silico and in vitro results. Based on docking results, a highly predictive 3D-QSAR model was developed with q2 of 0.516. The model has predicted r2 of 0.91 showing that predicted IC50 values are in good agreement with experimental IC50 values. The results obtained from this study revealed the developed model can be used to design new anti-malarial compounds based on tricyclic guanidine derivatives and to predict activities of new inhibitors.

  8. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents.......To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  9. [Interactions of cytostatic agents with other drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, C

    1991-08-31

    With the degree of polypharmacy currently practiced in the field of oncology, there are undoubtedly many drug interactions. In the present study the influence of "non-cytotoxic" drugs on anticancer drugs is discussed, but not the reverse. Not only is the augmentation (reversal of multidrug resistance) or the reduction of antitumor properties of cytotoxic drugs observed, but also cytostatic activities of "non-cytotoxic" drugs themselves. Examples are calmodulin inhibitors such as phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. Interactions may also increase side effects of cytostatic drugs or even neutralize the antitumoral activity. To ensure that interactions are not overlooked, all medicaments being administered should be listed. It is, however, not feasible yet to determine serum concentrations of all the drugs given to the patient. The antitumor activity of supportive care could be evaluated in randomized studies (e.g. cytostatic drugs +/- antidepressants).

  10. A metal-catalyzed enyne-cyclization step for the synthesis of bi- and tricyclic scaffolds amenable to molecular library production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Cohrt, Anders Emil O'Hanlon; Petersen, Rico

    2016-01-01

    A facile metal-catalyzed diversification step for the synthesis of novel bi- and tricyclic scaffolds from enyne substrates is reported in this study. From a single starting material, topologically diverse scaffolds for library synthesis can be generated and decorated in a few steps. The methodology...... was used to produce a library of 490 compounds within the European Lead Factory (ELF) Consortium....

  11. Determination of drugs in surface water and wastewater samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: Methods and preliminary results including toxicity studies with Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, M.; Ferrer, I.; Ginebreda, A.; Figueras, M.; Olivella, L.; Tirapu, L.; Vilanova, M.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work a combined analytical method involving toxicity and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water samples. The drugs investigated were the analgesics: ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, the decomposition product of the acetyl salicylic acid: salicylic acid and one lipid lowering agent, gemfibrozil. The selected compounds are acidic substances, very polar and all of them are analgesic compounds that can be purchased without medical prescription. The developed protocol consisted, first of all, on the use Microtox?? and ToxAlert??100 toxicity tests with Vibrio fischeri for the different pharmaceutical drugs. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values and the toxicity units (TU) were determined for every compound using both systems. Sample enrichment of water samples was achieved by solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE), using the Merck LiChrolut?? EN cartridges followed by LC-ESI-MS. Average recoveries loading 1 l of samples with pH=2 varied from 69 to 91% and the detection limits in the range of 15-56 ng/l. The developed method was applied to real samples from wastewater and surface-river waters of Catalonia (north-east of Spain). One batch of samples was analyzed in parallel also by High Resolution Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HRGC-MS) and the results have been compared with the LC-ESI-MS method developed in this work. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Alcohol or Drug Use and Trauma Recidivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovilla-Guardia, Sergio; Vilar-López, Raquel; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo; Guerrero-López, Francisco; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique

    Alcohol, illicit drugs, and psychotropic medications are well-known causes of traumatic events. However, the association of each type of substance with trauma recidivism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify the strength of associations between the type of substance detected in patients admitted for traumatic injury and trauma recidivism, defined as a documented history of past trauma. The presence of alcohol and drugs (cannabis, cocaine, amphetamines, methamphetamines, benzodiazepines, opiates, methadone, barbiturates, and tricyclic antidepressants) was analyzed in 1,156 patients between 16 and 70 years old, hospitalized in a trauma hospital between November 2011 and March 2015. Their past trauma history was retrieved from the health information system, which included patient health histories since 1999. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the strength of the association between types of substances detected in current trauma patients and trauma recidivism (documented history of past trauma). At least one substance was detected in 521 patients (45.1%): only alcohol in 159 (13.7%), only cannabis in 62 (5.4%), only psychotropic medications/opioids in 145 (12.5%), only cocaine/amphetamines in 14 (1.2%), and a combination of these groups in 141 (12.2%). The consumption of alcohol, illicit drugs, and/or psychotropic medications was associated with increased recidivism in all substance groups; the adjusted odds ratio for multiple recidivism was 3.17 (95% CI [2.29, 4.39]). Patients who screened positive for alcohol, illicit drugs, and/or psychotropic medications had a higher frequency of past trauma history compared with patients with negative tests, independently of age, gender, or the presence of previous psychiatric disorders.

  13. Stereoselective synthesis of tricyclic compounds by intramolecular palladium-catalyzed addition of aryl iodides to carbonyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Saadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from γ-ketoesters with an o-iodobenzyl group we studied a palladium-catalyzed cyclization process that stereoselectively led to bi- and tricyclic compounds in moderate to excellent yields. Four X-ray crystal structure analyses unequivocally defined the structure of crucial cyclization products. The relative configuration of the precursor compounds is essentially transferred to that of the products and the formed hydroxy group in the newly generated cyclohexane ring is consistently in trans-arrangement with respect to the methoxycarbonyl group. A transition-state model is proposed to explain the observed stereochemical outcome. This palladium-catalyzed Barbier-type reaction requires a reduction of palladium(II back to palladium(0 which is apparently achieved by the present triethylamine.

  14. Design and synthesis of tricyclic tetrahydroquinolines as a new series of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoya; Miyakawa, Motonori; Amano, Seiji; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Inoguchi, Kiyoshi

    2011-03-15

    Some tricyclic tetrahydroquinolines (THQs) were found to have the potential of a new series of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Compound 5b was first designed and synthesized under our hypothesis based on a four-point pharmacophoric requirement of the 3-carbonyl, 18-methyl, 17-hydroxyl, and 13-quaternary carbon groups of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). It was revealed that this compound exhibits not only a strong androgen receptor (AR) agonistic activity (EC(50)=9.2 nM) but also the highest selectivity in binding affinity to AR among the steroid hormone receptors. Furthermore, this compound showed a weak virilizing effect with retention of the desired anabolic effect as compared with DHT in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of tdt genes for the degradation of tricyclic diterpenes by Pseudomonas diterpeniphila A19-6a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C A; Wyndham, R C

    2002-01-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic diterpenes that are toxic to aquatic life when released in high concentrations in pulp mill effluents. These naturally formed organic acids are readily degraded by bacteria and fungi; nevertheless, many of the mechanisms involved are still unknown. We report the localization, cloning, and sequencing of genes for abietane degradation (9.18 kb; designated tdt (tricyclic diterpene) LRSABCD) from the gamma-Proteobacterium Pseudomonas diterpeniphila A19-6a. Using gene knockout mutants, we demonstrate that tdtL, encoding a putative CoA ligase, is required for growth on abietic and dehydroabietic acids. A second gene knockout in tdtD, encoding a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, reduced the growth of strain A19-6a on abietic and dehydroabietic acids as sole sources of carbon and energy, but did not eliminate growth. The degree of homology between P450TdtD and P450TerpC, the closest known P450 homologue to TdtD, identifies TdtD as a new member of the P450 superfamily. Hybridization of six of the tdt genes to genomic DNA of a related resin acid degrading bacterium Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9 identified tdt homologues in this strain that utilizes aromatic ring dioxygenase genes (dit) to open the ring structure of abietic and dehydroabietic acids. These results suggest the tdt and dit genes may function in concert to allow these Pseudomonas strains to degrade resin acids. Homologues of several of the tdt genes were detected in resin acid degrading Ralstonia and Comamonas species within the beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria.

  16. Naphthyridine-Benzoazaquinolone: Evaluation of a Tricyclic System for the Binding to (CAG)n Repeat DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Sakata, Akihiro; He, Hanping; Bai, Li-Ping; Murata, Asako; Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-05

    The expansion of CAG repeats in the human genome causes the neurological disorder Huntington's disease. The small-molecule naphthyridine-azaquinolone NA we reported earlier bound to the CAG/CAG motif in the hairpin structure of the CAG repeat DNA. In order to investigate and improve NA-binding to the CAG repeat DNA and RNA, we conducted systematic structure-binding studies of NA to CAG repeats. Among the five new NA derivatives we synthesized, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay showed that all of the derivatives modified from amide linkages in NA to a carbamate linkage failed to bind to CAG repeat DNA and RNA. One derivative, NBzA, modified by incorporating an additional ring to the azaquinolone was found to bind to both d(CAG)9 and r(CAG)9 . NBzA binding to d(CAG)9 was similar to NA binding in terms of large changes in the SPR assay and circular dichroism (CD) as well as pairwise binding, as assessed by electron spray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometry. For the binding to r(CAG)9 , both NA and NBzA showed stepwise binding in ESI-TOF MS, and NBzA-binding to r(CAG)9 induced more extensive conformational change than NA-binding. The tricyclic system in NBzA did not show significant effects on the binding, selectivity, and translation, but provides a large chemical space for further modification to gain higher affinity and selectivity. These studies revealed that the linker structure in NA and NBzA was suitable for the binding to CAG DNA and RNA, and that the tricyclic benzoazaquinolone did not interfere with the binding. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fengabine, a new GABAmimetic agent in the treatment of depressive disorders: an overview of six double-blind studies versus tricyclics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, G; Garreau, M; Orofiamma, B; Palminteri, R

    1989-01-01

    Fengabine is a new GABAmimetic compound active in animal models predictive of antidepressant activity. The present overview reports the results of 6 double-blind trials versus tricyclics (TCAs) (3 in outpatients and 3 in inpatients). Overall, 398 adult patients (149 males and 249 females) were treated; 194 with fengabine and 204 with TCAs (98 clomipramine, 63 amitriptyline and 43 imipramine). 284 suffered from major depression (MD) (including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder, depressed; DSM III) and 114 from minor depression (MiD) including dysthymic disorder, atypical depression and adjustment disorder with depressive mood (DSM III). Dosage ranged from 600 to 2,400 mg/day for fengabine and 50 to 200 mg/day for TCAs. Efficacy was evaluated with the HAM-D scale. 311 subjects (154 fengabine and 157 TCAs) ended the 4-week treatment period. Considering the whole sample and mean IAM-D scores, no significant differences emerged between the 2 treatment groups at any of the assessment periods. Because of a significant treatment x type of depression interaction, MD and MiD were analysed separately, and a different trend appeared in the 2 subgroups with TCAs behaving slightly better than fengabine in MD and fengabine performing slightly better than TCAs in MiD. Using the physician's clinical improvement, 74% of patients under fengabine and 72% of those under TCAs were rated as improved or much improved. Side effects, particularly of the anticholinergic type were significantly more frequent in the TCAs group. Gamma-GT were more frequently altered in the fengabine group (30.4 vs. 10.5%); this increase was interpreted as a consequence of enzymatic induction. Lastly, more patients taking fengabine exhibited an increase in cholesterol values.

  18. An Aggressive Strategy for Maintenance of Sinus Rhythm Including a Combination of Catheter Ablation and Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy Benefits Patients with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Haruna, MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm by a combination of catheter ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs on atrial function in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF remain unknown. In 15 patients with chronic AF (>1 year, we attempted to restore and maintain sinus rhythm by ablation targeting complex fractionated atrial electrocardiograms (CFAEs combined with pulmonary vein isolation with or without AADs. Sinus rhythm was restored in all patients. At 17:7 ± 7:2 months after AF ablation, maintenance of sinus rhythm was achieved in 20% of patients without AADs and in 73.3% of patients with AADs. The left atrial diameter decreased significantly by 9:5 ± 8:1% (P < 0:05 during the 12-month followup. AADs did not have any adverse effects. The aggressive strategy for maintenance of sinus rhythm involving AF ablation and AADs potentially led to recovery of structural changes in the LA in patients with chronic AF.

  19. Factors for incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapy including drug refill and clinic visits among older adults living with human immunodeficiency virus - cross-sectional study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Abbie; Ford, Nathan; El-Khatib, Ziad

    2018-03-01

    To assess adherence outcomes to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of recipients ≥50 years in Soweto, South Africa. This was a secondary data analysis for a cross-sectional study at two HIV clinics in Soweto. Data on ART adherence and covariates were gathered through structured interviews with HIV 878 persons living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving ART. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. PLHIV ≥50 years (n = 103) were more likely to miss clinic visits during the last six months than PLHIV aged 25-49 (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.10-4.18). PLHIV ≥50 years with no or primary-level education were less likely to have missed a clinic visit during the last six months than PLHIV with secondary- or tertiary-level education in the same age category (OR 0.3; 95%CI 0.1-1.1), as were PLHIV who did not disclose their status (OR 0.2; 95%CI 0-1.1). There was no evidence of increased risk for non-adherence to ART pills and drug refill visits among older PLHIV. Missing a clinic visit was more common among older PLHIV who were more financially vulnerable. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and identify new risk factors associated with ART adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Drug: D00484 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepress...ant ATC code: N06AA11 Chemical group: DG00936 ... Tricyclic antidepressant norepinephrine reuptake inhib

  1. Drug: D01285 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1285.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepress...ant Therapeutic category: 1174 ATC code: N06AA07 Chemical group: DG00932 ... Tricyclic antidepressa

  2. Drug: D07872 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sychiatric agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant Cyp... substrate ... DG01644 ... CYP2D6 substrate ATC code: N06AA16 Chemical group: DG00940 ... Tricyclic antidepressant S

  3. Drug: D08447 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant Same as: C07408 ATC code...: N06AA11 Chemical group: DG00936 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... Genomic biomarker: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] CAS: 438

  4. Simplifying sample pretreatment: application of dried blood spot (DBS) method to blood samples, including postmortem, for UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoardi, Sara; Anzillotti, Luca; Strano-Rossi, Sabina

    2014-10-01

    The complexity of biological matrices, such as blood, requires the development of suitably selective and reliable sample pretreatment procedures prior to their instrumental analysis. A method has been developed for the analysis of drugs of abuse and their metabolites from different chemical classes (opiates, methadone, fentanyl and analogues, cocaine, amphetamines and amphetamine-like substances, ketamine, LSD) in human blood using dried blood spot (DBS) and subsequent UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. DBS extraction required only 100μL of sample, added with the internal standards and then three droplets (30μL each) of this solution were spotted on the card, let dry for 1h, punched and extracted with methanol with 0.1% of formic acid. The supernatant was evaporated and the residue was then reconstituted in 100μL of water with 0.1% of formic acid and injected in the UHPLC-MS/MS system. The method was validated considering the following parameters: LOD and LOQ, linearity, precision, accuracy, matrix effect and dilution integrity. LODs were 0.05-1ng/mL and LOQs were 0.2-2ng/mL. The method showed satisfactory linearity for all substances, with determination coefficients always higher than 0.99. Intra and inter day precision, accuracy, matrix effect and dilution integrity were acceptable for all the studied substances. The addition of internal standards before DBS extraction and the deposition of a fixed volume of blood on the filter cards ensured the accurate quantification of the analytes. The validated method was then applied to authentic postmortem blood samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hazardous Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and hazardous drugs in the workplace. Pharmacy . OSHA Hospital eTool. Reviews safety and health topics related to hazardous drugs including drug handling, administration, storage, and disposal. OSHA has identified worker exposure ...

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Zheng, Suqing [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Huang, Jeffrey T.-J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Honda, Tadashi [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T., E-mail: a.dinkovakostova@dundee.ac.uk [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  7. Caracterización de la restenosis de stents coronarios convencionales y liberadores de medicamentos en pacientes incluidos en el registro DRug Eluting STent (DREST Characterization of conventional coronary stents restenosis and drug eluting stents in patients included in the Drug Eluting Stent Registry (DREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A Arroyave C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción y objetivos: los stents convencionales presentan tasas de restenosis intrastent entre 10% y 60%, mientras los stents liberadores de fármacos alcanzan el 10%. Para Latinoamérica, no hay reportes de restenosis intrastent en comparación con los stents convencionales y los stents liberadores de fármacos. En este estudio se describen aspectos asociados a este evento en pacientes atendidos en un centro de alta complejidad en Colombia. Métodos: análisis retrospectivo de pacientes con restenosis intrastent incluidos en el registro DRug ELuting STent (DREST entre los años 1994 y 2011, en el que se compararon características basales, datos técnicos y supervivencia de los pacientes con stent convencional y stent liberador de fármacos. Resultados: se evidenció restenosis intrastent en 269 con stent convencional (11,5% y en 65 con stent liberador de fármacos (12,2%, sin diferencias significativas al comparar por género (p=0,983 o edad (p=0,55. La dislipidemia fue el factor de riesgo más significativo asociado a la restenosis intrastent de los stents liberadores de fármacos (pIntroduction and Objectives: Bare metal stents have stent restenosis rates between 10% and 60%, while drug-eluting stents reach 10%. In Latin America, there are no reports of stent restenosis between bare-metal stents and drug eluting stents. This study describes aspects associated with this event in patients treated at a center of high complexity in Colombia. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with stent restenosis included in the Drug Eluting Stent Registry (DREST between 1994 and 2011, which compared baseline characteristics, technical data and survival of patients with bare metal stents and drug eluting stents. Results: We found stent restenosis with bare metal stents in 269 patients (11.5% and in 65 with drug-eluting stent (12.2% without significant differences between gender (p = 0.983 or age (p = 0 , 55. Dyslipidemia was the most significant

  8. Synthesis of enantioenriched γ-quaternary cycloheptenones using a combined allylic alkylation/Stork–Danheiser approach: preparation of mono-, bi-, and tricyclic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bennett, Nathan B.

    2012-01-01

    A general method for the synthesis of β-substituted and unsubstituted cycloheptenones bearing enantioenriched all-carbon γ-quaternary stereocenters is reported. Hydride or organometallic addition to a seven-membered ring vinylogous ester followed by finely tuned quenching parameters achieves elimination to the corresponding cycloheptenone. The resulting enones are elaborated to bi- and tricyclic compounds with potential for the preparation of non-natural analogs and whose structures are embedded in a number of cycloheptanoid natural products.

  9. Effect of tricyclic antidepressants on transmitter-stimulated inositol phosphate production in rat brain cortex in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, S.; Enna, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have anticholinergic and α-adrenergic blocking properties. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of amitriptyline, imipramine, and desipramine on inositol phosphate accumulation, a brain second messenger system associated with cholinergic and adrenergic receptors. Whereas the TCAs were 28 to 400-fold weaker than atropine as inhibitors of 3 H-QNB binding to brain cholinergic receptors, they were 600 to 2000-fold less active than atropine as inhibitors of carbachol-stimulated IP accumulation in brain. In contrast, the relative potencies of the TCAs and prazosin to inhibit norepinephrine-stimulated IP accumulation and 3 H-prazosin binding appeared to be similar in the two assays. The results suggest pharmacological differences between the cholinergic receptors labeled in the ONB binding assay and those mediating the IP response, whereas the α 1 -adrenergic receptors appear to be similar in the two systems. Since atropine is considered a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, it is possible that the TCAs may differentiate between cholinergic receptor subtypes, which may be an important component of their clinical response

  10. Functionalized tricyclic cytosine analogues provide nucleoside fluorophores with improved photophysical properties and a range of solvent sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Brittney J; Elsharif, Nada A; Vashisht, Nisha; Mingus, Macy M; Mulvahill, Mark A; Stengel, Gudrun; Kuchta, Robert D; Purse, Byron W

    2014-02-10

    Tricyclic cytosines (tC and tC(O) frameworks) have emerged as a unique class of fluorescent nucleobase analogues that minimally perturb the structure of B-form DNA and that are not quenched in duplex nucleic acids. Systematic derivatization of these frameworks is a likely approach to improve on and diversify photophysical properties, but has not so far been examined. Synthetic methods were refined to improve on tolerance for electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups, resulting in a series of eight new, fluorescent cytidine analogues. Photophysical studies show that substitution of the framework results in a pattern of effects largely consistent across tC and tC(O) and provides nucleoside fluorophores that are brighter than either parent. Moreover, a range of solvent sensitivities is observed, offering promise that this family of probes can be extended to new applications that require reporting on the local environment. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Differential Risk of Peptic Ulcer Among Users of Antidepressants Combined With Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju-Young; Song, Inmyung; Lee, Jin-Ho; Yoon, Jong Lull; Kwon, Jun Soo; Park, Byung-Joo

    2017-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to have an increased risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, and the risk may be further increased by combined use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, little has been known about the risk of peptic ulcer associated with other classes of antidepressants or individual antidepressants combined with NSAIDs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to define the risk of peptic ulcer associated with combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs, as compared with use of antidepressants alone. Using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database, we identified a total of 1,127,622 patients who began receiving antidepressants between 2009 and 2012. Propensity-based matching and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of peptic ulcer between antidepressant users with NSAIDs and those without NSAIDs matched in a 1:1 ratio, for a total of 768,850 patients. The risk of peptic ulcer did not increase with combined use of overall antidepressants and NSAIDs, as compared with antidepressant use alone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.06). A slightly increased risk was observed for combined use of NSAIDs with tricyclic antidepressants (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.09-1.21) and with SSRIs (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16). We found that although concomitant use of NSAIDs and antidepressants was not associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer for antidepressants in general, it was so for some specific classes including tricyclic antidepressants and SSRIs. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the increased risk was solely due to NSAID use.

  12. Examination of the regulatory frameworks applicable to biologic drugs (including stem cells and their progeny) in Europe, the U.S., and Australia: part I--a method of manual documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Nina; Savic, Snezana; Siegel, Evan; Atkinson, Kerry; Tasic, Ljiljana

    2012-12-01

    Recent development of a wide range of regulatory standards applicable to production and use of tissues, cells, and other biologics (or biologicals), as advanced therapies, indicates considerable interest in the regulation of these products. The objective of this study was to analyze and compare high-tier documents within the Australian, European, and U.S. biologic drug regulatory environments using qualitative methodology. Cohort 1 of the selected 18 high-tier regulatory documents from the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulatory frameworks were subject to a manual documentary analysis. These documents were consistent with the legal requirements for manufacturing and use of biologic drugs in humans and fall into six different categories. Manual analysis included a terminology search. The occurrence, frequency, and interchangeable use of different terms and phrases were recorded in the manual documentary analysis. Despite obvious differences, manual documentary analysis revealed certain consistency in use of terminology across analyzed frameworks. Phrase search frequencies have shown less uniformity than the search of terms. Overall, the EMA framework's documents referred to "medicinal products" and "marketing authorization(s)," the FDA documents discussed "drug(s)" or "biologic(s)," and the TGA documents referred to "biological(s)." Although high-tier documents often use different terminology they share concepts and themes. Documents originating from the same source have more conjunction in their terminology although they belong to different frameworks (i.e., Good Clinical Practice requirements based on the Declaration of Helsinki, 1964). Automated (software-based) documentary analysis should be obtained for the conceptual and relational analysis.

  13. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2001-11-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment.

  14. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline indirectly increases the proliferation of adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursors: an involvement of astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuken Boku

    Full Text Available Antidepressants increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult dentate gyrus (DG, which is considered to be involved in the therapeutic action of antidepressants. However, the mechanism underlying it remains unclear. By using cultured adult rat DG-derived neural precursors (ADP, we have already shown that antidepressants have no direct effects on ADP. Therefore, antidepressants may increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult DG via unknown indirect mechanism. We have also shown that amitriptyline (AMI, a tricyclic antidepressant, induces the expressions of GDNF, BDNF, FGF2 and VEGF, common neurogenic factors, in primary cultured astrocytes (PCA. These suggest that AMI-induced factors in astrocytes may increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult DG. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of AMI-induced factors and conditioned medium (CM from PCA treated with AMI on ADP proliferation. The effects of CM and factors on ADP proliferation were examined with BrdU immunocytochemistry. AMI had no effect on ADP proliferation, but AMI-treated CM increased it. The receptors of GDNF, BDNF and FGF2, but not VEGF, were expressed in ADP. FGF2 significantly increased ADP proliferation, but not BDNF and GDNF. In addition, both of a specific inhibitor of FGF receptors and anti-FGF2 antibody significantly counteracted the increasing effect of CM on ADP proliferation. In addition, FGF2 in brain is mainly derived from astrocytes that are key components of the neurogenic niches in adult DG. These suggest that AMI may increase ADP proliferation indirectly via PCA and that FGF2 may a potential candidate to mediate such an indirect effect of AMI on ADP proliferation via astrocytes.

  15. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern

    2001-01-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment

  16. Ynamide carbopalladation: a flexible route to mono-, bi- and tricyclic azacycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Craig D; Greenaway, Rebecca L; Holton, Oliver T; Walker, P Ross; Chapman, Helen A; Russell, C Adam; Carr, Greg; Thomson, Amber L; Anderson, Edward A

    2015-09-01

    Bromoenynamides represent precursors to a diversity of azacycles by a cascade sequence of carbopalladation followed by cross-coupling/electrocyclization, or reduction processes. Full details of our investigations into intramolecular ynamide carbopalladation are disclosed, which include the first examples of carbopalladation/cross-coupling reactions using potassium organotrifluoroborate salts; and an understanding of factors influencing the success of these processes, including ring size, and the nature of the coupling partner. Additional mechanistic observations are reported, such as the isolation of triene intermediates for electrocyclization. A variety of hetero-Diels-Alder reactions using the product heterocycles are also described, which provide insight into Diels-Alder regioselectivity. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a compact tricyclic resorcinol from (+)- and (-)-3-pinanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dai; Nikas, Spyros P; Han, Xiu-Wen; Parrish, Damon A; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-08-29

    Resorcinol derivatives are important building blocks in the synthesis of natural products and pharmaceutical compounds including cannabinoids. Here we describe the synthesis and the structural characterization of a key resorcinol which carries a fully restricted bridged bicyclic group. We also report a potential mechanism for the acid catalyzed condensation of (+)- or (-)-3-pinanol with 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. The synthesized resorcinol facilitates the development of novel conformationally restricted cannabinoid analogs.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a compact tricyclic resorcinol from (+)- and (−)-3-pinanol

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Dai; Nikas, Spyros P.; Han, Xiu-Wen; Parrish, Damon A.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    Resorcinol derivatives are important building blocks in the synthesis of natural products and pharmaceutical compounds including cannabinoids. Here we describe the synthesis and the structural characterization of a key resorcinol which carries a fully restricted bridged bicyclic group. We also report a potential mechanism for the acid catalyzed condensation of (+)- or (−)-3-pinanol with 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. The synthesized resorcinol facilitates the development of novel conformationally restr...

  19. Biological activity of bicyclic and tricyclic diterpenoids from Salvia species of immediate pharmacological and pharmaceutical interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, Maria Carmela; Cicala, Carla; Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Maione, Francesco; Mascolo, Nicola

    2011-08-01

    Diterpenoids are a class of compounds that derive from the condensation of four isoprene units that leads to a wide variety of complex chemical structures, including acyclic bi-, tri-and tetra-cyclic compounds; in Salvia species, only bi-, tri-and tetra-cyclic compounds have been found. This review covers a wide range of biological activities and mode of action of diterpenoids isolated from Salvia species that might raise some pharmacological and pharmaceutical interest. We have produced a synoptic table where the biological activities of the main active principles are summarized. Our analysis emphasizes that diterpenoids from Salvia species continue to be a plant defence system since their antimicrobic activity. Experimental studies show that most of diterpenoids considered have cytotoxic and/or antiproliferative activity. Some of them have also cardiovascular and central effects. In a less extended manner, diterpenoids from Salvia species show gastrointestinal, urinary, antinflammatory, antidiabetic, ipolipidemic and antiaggregating effects. In the last decade, several clinical trials have been developed in order to investigate the real value of Salvia extracts treatment; results obtained are promising and confer scientific basis in the use of medicinal plants from folk medicine.

  20. Stereoselective Construction of Spiro-Fused Tricyclic Frameworks by Sequential Reaction of Enynes, Imines, and Diazoalkenes with Rh(I) and Rh(II) Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hato, Yoshio; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Nakajima, Kiyohiko; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-02

    Stereoselective construction of spiro-fused tricyclic compounds from enynes having a tethered imine with diazoalkenes was achieved by Rh(I)- and Rh(II)-catalyzed sequential reactions. This method consists of three reactions, i.e., Rh(I)-catalyzed cyclization of enynes with a tethered imine, Rh(II)-catalyzed cyclopropanation with diazoalkenes, and Cope rearrangement. Notably, the sequential reactions can be operated in one pot, in which Rh(I) and Rh(II) catalysts work in relay without any serious catalyst deactivation to afford the spirocycles in a stereoselective manner.

  1. Rave drug (ecstasy) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor anti-depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A N; Catalan, J

    2000-04-01

    3, 4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) also known as Ecstasy is a common recreational drug of abuse and reports of abuse of tricyclic antidepressants are also known. We report two cases of misuse of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants in combination with Ecstasy and their beneficial subjective effects experienced by misusers. We hypothesise the probable underlying pharmacological reasons and recommend its use in the treatment of neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  2. RAVE DRUG (ECSTASY) AND SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITOR ANTI-DEPRESSANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A.N.; Catalan, J.

    2000-01-01

    3, 4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) also known as Ecstasy is a common recreational drug of abuse and reports of abuse of tricyclic antidepressants are also known. We report two cases of misuse of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants in combination with Ecstasy and their beneficial subjective effects experienced by misusers. We hypothesise the probable underlying pharmacological reasons and recommend its use in the treatment of neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  3. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV. Drug-resistance testing results are used to decide which HIV medicines to include in a person’s first HIV regimen. After treatment is started, drug-resistance testing is repeated if ...

  4. Should vitamin B12 tablets be included in more Canadian drug formularies? An economic model of the cost-saving potential from increased utilisation of oral versus intramuscular vitamin B12 maintenance therapy for Alberta seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Sherilyn K D; Kolber, Michael R; Chuck, Anderson W

    2014-05-02

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-savings attainable if all patients aged ≥65 years in Alberta, Canada, currently on intramuscular therapy were switched to oral therapy, from the perspective of a provincial ministry of health. Primary care setting in Alberta, Canada. Seniors of age 65 years and older currently receiving intramuscular vitamin B12 therapy. Oral vitamin B12 therapy at 1000 μg/day versus intramuscular therapy at 1000 μg/month. Cost saving from oral therapy over intramuscular therapy, from the perspective of the Alberta Ministry of Health, including drug costs, dispensing fees, injection administration fees, additional laboratory monitoring and physician visit fees. Over 5 years, if all Albertans aged 65 years and older who currently receive intramuscular B12 are switched to oral therapy, our model found that $C13 975 883 can be saved. Even if no additional physician visits are billed for among patients receiving intramuscular therapy, $C8 444 346 could be saved from reduced administration costs alone. Oral B12 therapy has been shown to be an effective therapeutic option for patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, yet only three provinces and the Non-Insured Health Benefits program include oral tablets on their formulary rather than the parenteral preparation. To ensure judicious use of limited health resources, clinicians and formulary committees are encouraged to adopt oral B12 therapy as a clinically and cost-effective first-line therapy for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  5. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE) Inhibitors: A New Class of Broad-Spectrum Dual-Targeting Antibacterial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tari, Leslie W.; Li, Xiaoming; Trzoss, Michael; Bensen, Daniel C.; Chen, Zhiyong; Lam, Thanh; Zhang, Junhu; Lee, Suk Joong; Hough, Grayson; Phillipson, Doug; Akers-Rodriguez, Suzanne; Cunningham, Mark L.; Kwan, Bryan P.; Nelson, Kirk J.; Castellano, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroq...

  8. Effects of antidepressant drugs on histamine-H1 receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, H.; Oegren, S.O.

    1984-01-01

    The histamine-H 1 receptor blocking properties of a number of structurally different antidepressant drugs have been evaluated using a 3 H-mepyramine binding assay and a guinea-pig ileum preparation. The tricyclic antidepressants all inhibited the histamine-H 1 receptor. Some newer antidepressant drugs, such as zimeldine and nomifensine were devoid of activity while others, such as iprindole and mianserin were very potent. It is concluded that antagonistic effects on the histamine-H 1 receptor is not associated with the therapeutic efficacy in depression, but may contribute to the sedative effects of the antidepressant drugs

  9. The Efficacy and Safety of Treatments for Acute Gout: Results from a Series of Systematic Literature Reviews Including Cochrane Reviews on Intraarticular Glucocorticoids, Colchicine, Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs, and Interleukin-1 Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Vinik, Ophir; Moi, John H. Y.; Sivera, Francisca; van Echteld, Irene A. A. M.; van Durme, Caroline; Falzon, Louise; Bombardier, Claire; Carmona, Loreto; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewé, Robert B.; van der Heijde, Désirée M. F. M.; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the efficacy and safety of glucocorticoids (GC), colchicine, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID), interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors, and paracetamol to treat acute gout. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to

  10. Enantioselective synthesis of tricyclic amino acid derivatives based on a rigid 4-azatricyclo[5.2.1.02,6]decane skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Breuning

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An enantioselective route to four tricyclic amino acids and N-tosylamides, composed of a central norbornane framework with a 2-endo,3-endo-annelated pyrrolidine ring and a 5-endo-C1 or -C2 side chain, has been developed. A key intermediate was the chiral, N-Boc-protected ketone (1R,2S,6S,7R-4-azatricyclo[5.2.1.02,6]decan-8-one, available from inexpensive endo-carbic anhydride in five steps and 47% yield. The rigid scaffold makes these amino acid derivatives promising candidates for β-turn-inducing building blocks in peptidomimetics and for chiral auxiliaries in asymmetric organocatalysis.

  11. Management of chronic tension-type headache with tricyclic antidepressant medication, stress management therapy, and their combination: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, K A; O'Donnell, F J; Stensland, M; Lipchik, G L; Cordingley, G E; Carlson, B W

    2001-05-02

    Chronic tension-type headaches are characterized by near-daily headaches and often are difficult to manage in primary practice. Behavioral and pharmacological therapies each appear modestly effective, but data are lacking on their separate and combined effects. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of behavioral and pharmacological therapies, singly and combined, for chronic tension-type headaches. Randomized placebo-controlled trial conducted from August 1995 to January 1998 at 2 outpatient sites in Ohio. Two hundred three adults (mean age, 37 years; 76% women) with diagnosis of chronic tension-type headaches (mean, 26 headache d/mo). Participants were randomly assigned to receive tricyclic antidepressant (amitriptyline hydrochloride, up to 100 mg/d, or nortriptyline hydrochloride, up to 75 mg/d) medication (n = 53), placebo (n = 48), stress management (eg, relaxation, cognitive coping) therapy (3 sessions and 2 telephone contacts) plus placebo (n = 49), or stress management therapy plus antidepressant medication (n = 53). Monthly headache index scores calculated as the mean of pain ratings (0-10 scale) recorded by participants in a daily diary 4 times per day; number of days per month with at least moderate pain (pain rating >/=5), analgesic medication use, and Headache Disability Inventory scores, compared by intervention group. Tricyclic antidepressant medication and stress management therapy each produced larger reductions in headache activity, analgesic medication use, and headache-related disability than placebo, but antidepressant medication yielded more rapid improvements in headache activity. Combined therapy was more likely to produce clinically significant (>/=50%) reductions in headache index scores (64% of participants) than antidepressant medication (38% of participants; P =.006), stress management therapy (35%; P =.003), or placebo (29%; P =.001). On other measures the combined therapy and its 2 component therapies produced similar outcomes. Our results

  12. Salt Effect on the Cloud Point Phenomenon of Amphiphilic Drug-Hydroxypropylmethyl Cellulose System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Sajid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of two amphiphilic drugs (tricyclic antidepressant, nortriptyline hydrochloride (NORT, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, sodium salt of ibuprofen (IBF on the cloud point of biopolymer hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC was studied. Effect of NaCl was also seen on the CP of HPMC-drug system. CP of HPMC increases uniformly on increasing the (drug. Both drugs, though one being anionic (IBF and other cationic (NORT, affect the CP in almost the same manner but with different extent implying the role of hydrophobicity in the interaction between drug and polymer. Salt affects the CP of the drug in a dramatic way as low concentration of salt was only able to increase the value of the CP, though not affecting the pattern. However, in presence of high concentration of salts, minimum was observed on CP versus (drug plots. Various thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and discussed on the basis of the observed results.

  13. Drug: D07335 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tric agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ATC code:... N06AA19 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... CAS: 57574-09-1 PubChem: 51091672 ChEBI: 32499 ChEMBL: CHEMBL418995 LigandBox: D07335 NIKKAJI: J11.860E ...

  14. Drug: D01110 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sychiatric agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ATC... code: N06AA14 Chemical group: DG00938 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... CAS: 10563-70-9 PubChem: 7848173 ChEBI: 31815 ChEMBL: CHEMBL2107109 LigandBox: D01110 NIKKAJI: J369.070I ...

  15. Drug: D08140 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available G01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ATC code: N06AA07 Chem...ical group: DG00932 ... Tricyclic antidepressant, imipramine type SLC6A4 (HTT) [HSA:6532] [KO:K05037]; SLC6A2

  16. Drug: D08171 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ATC code: N06A...A14 Chemical group: DG00938 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... CAS: 5118-29-6 PubChem: 96024861 ChEMBL: CHEMBL110094 LigandBox: D08171 NIKKAJI: J9.633D ...

  17. Drug: D07812 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ATC code: N06AA08 Chemica...l group: DG00933 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... CAS: 4498-32-2 PubChem: 96024509 ChEMBL: CHEMBL1442422 LigandBox: D07812 NIKKAJI: J8.740H ...

  18. Drug: D01314 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available opsychiatric agent ... DG01730 ... Non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant A...TC code: N06AA08 Chemical group: DG00933 ... Tricyclic antidepressant ... CAS: 315-80-0 PubChem: 7848377 ChEBI: 31476 ChEMBL: CHEMBL2104287 LigandBox: D01314 ...

  19. Drug discrimination models in anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J S; Stephens, D N

    1990-01-01

    Drug discrimination is a technique for investigating the stimulus properties of centrally active drugs. Although many studies have employed animals to investigate the stimulus properties of substances used clinically for the treatment of anxiety and depression, it would be a mistake to consider the internal discriminative stimuli as being related specifically to the anxiolytic or antidepressant properties of these drugs. Rather drug cues are better considered as relating to the pharmacological action of classes of compounds. Thus, benzodiazepine cues generalize to other compounds acting at benzodiazepine receptors, but not to substances (anxiolytic or otherwise) acting at 5-HT1A receptors. Similarly, antidepressants with different pharmacological properties, for example the tricyclic imipramine, or the phenylaminoketone buproprion produce distinct, unrelated discriminative stimuli. For this reason, the limits of drug discrimination techniques for investigating novel anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs should be clearly recognized. Attempts to identify an anxiogenic discriminative stimulus using pentylenetetrazole have also been misguided. In this technique it has proven difficult to separate unequivocally the pharmacological proconvulsant effects of the drug from the psychological construct anxiety. Nevertheless, drug discrimination remains a valuable technique for investigating pharmacological interactions in animals and man.

  20. Drug allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrington Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  1. [NEPHROTOXIC DRUGS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, B; Šutić, I; Marković, N Bašić

    2016-12-01

    Renal tissue is sensitive to the effect of potentially nephrotoxic drugs and other substances that are available over-the-counter or can be purchased at healthy food stores or elsewhere, and harmful substances from the environment. The harmful effects of these substances lead to the development of recognizable clinical syndromes, including acute or chronic renal failure, tubulopathy, and proteinuria. Risk factors that influence the development of kidney disease induced by drugs are divided into those related to patient characteristics, drug characteristics, and renal function. Drugs that commonly exhibit nephrotoxic effects are analgesics, antimicrobials, chemotherapeutics, contrast agents, immunosuppressants, herbal preparations and substances containing heavy metals. Family physician must carefully observe their patients, nurturing individual approach to drug selection and determining the dose. Renal function can quickly return to normal if the damage is recognized on time. Recent research yields insights into the identification of new biomarkers that will contribute to early detection of drug induced kidney damage.

  2. The effects of selected drugs, including chlorpromazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, on polyclonal IgG synthesis and interleukin 1 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, F; Coleman, J W

    1989-01-01

    We tested a range of drugs for their effects on in vitro polyclonal IgG synthesis by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the lectin pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The test drugs were selected on the basis of reported disruptive effects on immune function in vivo. IgG production between day 4 and days 7 or 8 of culture was measured by biotin-streptavidin sandwich ELISA. The anti-psychotic agent chlorpromazine (0.55-1.7 microM) enhanced IgG synthesis to approximately double control levels. In contrast, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin, piroxicam, ibuprofen and aspirin inhibited IgG synthesis by up to 50%, with a rank order of potency that reflects their activity as inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Phenytoin, procainamide, propylthiouracil, methimazole, D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine all failed to modulate IgG synthesis at non-toxic concentrations. The potentiation and inhibition of IgG synthesis by chlorpromazine and indomethacin, respectively, was observed only when the drug was present during the first 24 h of culture. Neither chlorpromazine nor indomethacin, at non-toxic concentrations, affected PHA- and PWM-stimulated proliferation of PBMC. In addition, chlorpromazine, indomethacin and piroxicam, at concentrations which produced maximal modulation of IgG synthesis, and D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine at 10 microM failed to influence production of interleukin-1-like activity. We conclude that chlorpromazine and NSAIDs, although they exert opposite effects on IgG synthesis, act at an early stage of B cell differentiation that appears to be independent of interleukin 1 synthesis and early proliferative events. PMID:2788047

  3. Imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-ones and related tricyclic water-soluble purine derivatives: potent A(2A)- and A(3)-adenosine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christa E; Thorand, Mark; Qurishi, Ramatullah; Diekmann, Martina; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Padgett, William L; Daly, John W

    2002-08-01

    A series of tricyclic imidazo[2,1-i]purinones and ring-enlarged analogues derived from xanthine derivatives have been prepared as adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists. In comparison with xanthines, the tricyclic compounds exhibit increased water solubility due to a basic nitrogen atom, which can be protonated under physiological conditions. Substituents were introduced that confer high affinity for A(2A) or A(3) ARs, respectively. A new capillary electrophoresis method was developed for the determination of the enantiomeric purity of selected chiral products using native and modified beta-cyclodextrins as chiral discriminators. The compounds were investigated in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A(1) and A(2A) ARs. Selected compounds were additionally investigated in radioligand binding assays at human recombinant A(3) ARs and in functional studies (adenylate cyclase assays) at A(1) ARs of rat fat cell membranes, A(2A) ARs of rat PC 12 cell membranes, and mouse A(2B) ARs of NIH 3T3 cell membranes. Structure-activity relationships were similar to those of corresponding xanthine derivatives. The 2-styrylimidazopurinones were less potent at A(2A) ARs as compared to 8-styrylxanthine derivatives. The most potent compound at A(2A) ARs was (S)-1,4-dimethyl-8-ethyl-2-styryl-imidazo[2,1-i]purinone (S-25) exhibiting a K(i) value of 424 nM at rat A(2A) ARs. The compound was highly selective for A(2A) receptors vs A(1) and A(3) ARs. Selectivity vs A(2B) ARs, however, was low. Among the 1-unsubstituted 2-phenyl-imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-one derivatives, very potent and highly selective antagonists for human A(3) ARs were identified. The most potent A(3) antagonist of the present series was (R)-4-methyl-8-ethyl-2-phenyl-imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-one (R-24) exhibiting a K(i) value of 2.3 nM and high selectivity for A(3) receptors vs all other AR subtypes.

  4. Interaction of cationic drugs with liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Brett A; Chauhan, Anuj

    2009-10-20

    Interactions between cationic drugs and anionic liposomes were studied by measuring binding of drugs and the effect of binding on liposome permeability. The measurements were analyzed in the context of a continuum model based on electrostatic interactions and a Langmuir isotherm. Experiments and modeling indicate that, although electrostatic interactions are important, the fraction of drug sequestered in the double-layer is negligible. The majority of drug enters the bilayer with the charged regions interacting with the charged lipid head groups and the lipophilic regions associated with the bilayer. The partitioning of the drug can be described by a Langmuir isotherm with the electrostatic interactions increasing the sublayer concentration of the drug. The binding isotherms are similar for all tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Bupivacaine (BUP) binds significantly less compared to TCA because its structure is such that the charged region has minimal interactions with the lipid heads once the BUP molecule partitions inside the bilayer. Conversely, the TCAs are linear with distinct hydrophilic and lipophilic regions, allowing the lipophilic regions to lie inside the bilayer and the hydrophilic regions to protrude out. This conformation maximizes the permeability of the bilayer, leading to an increased release of a hydrophilic fluorescent dye from liposomes.

  5. Drugs Approved for Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for rhabdomyosarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. There may be drugs used in rhabdomyosarcoma that are not listed here.

  6. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs are bad for you, and they’re bad for your baby. About 1 in 20 women (5 percent) take street drugs during pregnancy. Street drugs include: Cocaine Ecstasy, methamphetamine and other club drugs Heroin Marijuana Prescription drugs that are abused How can street ...

  7. 4-IBP, a σ1 Receptor Agonist, Decreases the Migration of Human Cancer Cells, Including Glioblastoma Cells, In Vitro and Sensitizes Them In Vitro and In Vivo to Cytotoxic Insults of Proapoptotic and Proautophagic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Mégalizzi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the molecular function of cr receptors has not been fully defined and the natural ligand(s is still not known, there is increasing evidence that these receptors and their ligands might play a significant role in cancer biology. 4-(N-tibenzylpiperidin-4-yl-4iodobenzamide (4-IBP, a selective σ1, agonist, has been used to investigate whether this compound is able to modify: 1 in vitro the migration and proliferation of human cancer cells; 2 in vitro the sensitivity of human glioblastoma cells to cytotoxic drugs; and 3 in vivo in orthotopic glioblastoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC models the survival of mice coadministered cytotoxic agents. 4-IBP has revealed weak anti proliferative effects on human U373-MG glioblastoma and C32 melanoma cells but induced marked concentration-dependent decreases in the growth of human A549 NSCLC and PC3 prostate cancer cells. The compound was also significantly antimigratory in all four cancer cell lines. This may result, at least in U373-MG cells, from modifications to the actin cytoskeleton. 4-IBP modified the sensitivity of U373-MG cells in vitro to proapoptotic lomustin and proautophagic temozolomide, and markedly decreased the expression of two proteins involved in drug resistance: glucosylceramide synthase and Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. In vivo, 4-IBP increased the antitumor effects of temozolomide and irinotecan in immunodeficient mice that were orthotopically grafted with invasive cancer cells.

  8. Black Youths and Illegal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Janice; Pearson, Patricia G.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the effect of drugs on black youths, discussing different types of drug involvement, reasons for drug involvement, extent and nature of involvement, drugs and crime, drugs and health issues, drug control strategies, and prevention. Policy implications include prioritizing drug prevention among black youths, providing alternatives to drug…

  9. HPLC and HPLC/MS/MS Studies on Stress, Accelerated and Intermediate Degradation Tests of Antivirally Active Tricyclic Analog of Acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniewska, Monika A; Dereziński, Paweł; Klupczyńska, Agnieszka; Kokot, Zenon J; Ostrowski, Tomasz; Zeidler, Joanna; Muszalska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    The degradation behavior of a tricyclic analog of acyclovir [6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV] was determined in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines for good clinical practice under different stress conditions (neutral hydrolysis, strong acid/base degradation, oxidative decomposition, photodegradation, and thermal degradation). Accelerated [40±2°C/75%±5% relative humidity (RH)] and intermediate (30±2°C/65%±5% RH) stability tests were also performed. For observation of the degradation of the tested compound the RP-HPLC was used, whereas for the analysis of its degradation products HPLC/MS/MS was used. Degradation of the tested substance allowed its classification as unstable in neutral environment, acidic/alkaline medium, and in the presence of oxidizing agent. The tested compound was also light sensitive and was classified as photolabile both in solution and in the solid phase. However, the observed photodegradation in the solid phase was at a much lower level than in the case of photodegradation in solution. The study showed that both air temperature and RH had no significant effect on the stability of the tested substance during storage for 1 month at 100°C (dry heat) as well as during accelerated and intermediate tests. Based on the HPLC/MS/MS analysis, it can be concluded that acyclovir was formed as a degradation product of 6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV.

  10. Bio-inspired synthesis yields a tricyclic indoline that selectively resensitizes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, Jessica D; Liu, Yongxiang; Chang, Le; Walls, Shane; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiang

    2013-09-24

    The continuous emergence of resistant bacteria has become a major worldwide health threat. The current development of new antibacterials has lagged far behind. To discover reagents to fight against resistant bacteria, we initiated a chemical approach by synthesizing and screening a small molecule library, reminiscent of the polycyclic indole alkaloids. Indole alkaloids are a class of structurally diverse natural products, many of which were isolated from plants that have been used as traditional medicine for millennia. Specifically, we adapted an evolutionarily conserved biosynthetic strategy and developed a concise and unified diversity synthesis pathway. Using this pathway, we synthesized 120 polycyclic indolines that contain 26 distinct skeletons and a wide variety of functional groups. A tricyclic indoline, Of1, was discovered to selectively potentiate the activity of β-lactam antibiotics in multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but not in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. In addition, we found that Of1 itself does not have antiproliferative activity but can resensitize several MRSA strains to the β-lactam antibiotics that are widely used in the clinic, such as an extended-spectrum β-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and a first-generation cephalosporin cefazolin. These data suggest that Of1 is a unique selective resistance-modifying agent for β-lactam antibiotics, and it may be further developed to fight against resistant bacteria in the clinic.

  11. Comparative study of cognitive impairment between medicated and medication-free patients with remitted major depression: class-specific influence by tricyclic antidepressants and newer antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagane, Akiko; Baba, Hajime; Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Hukatsu, Mana; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2014-08-15

    Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are known to present with cognitive deficits; however, the presence of these deficits in the remitted state have been inconsistent. One of the most important factors potentially contributing to inconsistencies between studies may be the influence of medications. To explore the influence of antidepressants on cognitive performance in remitted MDD, we evaluated memory and executive functions using Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and Stroop Color and Word Test, and compared performance among 50 medicated (29 treated with tricyclic antidepressants [TCA], 21 treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) and 19 medication-free MDD patients and 31 controls. The results showed that all 3 MDD groups had significantly lower performance for verbal memory compared with controls. Both medicated groups showed significantly lower performance for visual memory compared with controls; however, the medication-free group did not differ from controls. For the executive function, only the TCA group showed a significantly lower performance compared with controls. These results suggest that cognitive impairment remained even in remitted patients with MDD, however, part of this impairment may be influenced by class-specific antidepressant side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combination of electromembrane extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatographic analysis as a fast and sensitive technique for determination of tricyclic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidi, Shahram; Yamini, Yadollah; Rezazadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-15

    For the first time, combination of electromembrane extraction (EME) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC/FID) was developed for determination of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in untreated human plasma and urine samples. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimization of experimental parameters, so that extraction time of 14min, voltage of 240V, donor phase of 64mM HCl and acceptor phase of 100mM HCl were obtained as optimal extraction conditions. Matrix effect and carry-over were investigated in this work. The results indicated matrix effect for urine and plasma samples in comparison with neat solutions, so match matrix method was used for drawing working calibration curves. However, no carry-over was appeared at the retention time of investigated TCAs (S/N86.5%. The results showed that EME-DLLME-GC/FID is a promising combination for analysis of TCAs present at low concentrations in biological matrices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug ... Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug ...

  14. A Comparative Effectiveness Meta-Analysis of Drugs for the Prophylaxis of Migraine Headache.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Jackson

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness and side effects of migraine prophylactic medications.We performed a network meta-analysis. Data were extracted independently in duplicate and quality was assessed using both the JADAD and Cochrane Risk of Bias instruments. Data were pooled and network meta-analysis performed using random effects models.PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Trial Registry, bibliography of retrieved articles through 18 May 2014.We included randomized controlled trials of adults with migraine headaches of at least 4 weeks in duration.Placebo controlled trials included alpha blockers (n = 9, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n = 3, angiotensin receptor blockers (n = 3, anticonvulsants (n = 32, beta-blockers (n = 39, calcium channel blockers (n = 12, flunarizine (n = 7, serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 6, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (n = 1 serotonin agonists (n = 9 and tricyclic antidepressants (n = 11. In addition there were 53 trials comparing different drugs. Drugs with at least 3 trials that were more effective than placebo for episodic migraines included amitriptyline (SMD: -1.2, 95% CI: -1.7 to -0.82, -flunarizine (-1.1 headaches/month (ha/month, 95% CI: -1.6 to -0.67, fluoxetine (SMD: -0.57, 95% CI: -0.97 to -0.17, metoprolol (-0.94 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.4 to -0.46, pizotifen (-0.43 ha/month, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.21, propranolol (-1.3 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.62, topiramate (-1.1 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.9 to -0.73 and valproate (-1.5 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.8. Several effective drugs with less than 3 trials included: 3 ace inhibitors (enalapril, lisinopril, captopril, two angiotensin receptor blockers (candesartan, telmisartan, two anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and several beta-blockers (atenolol, bisoprolol, timolol. Network meta-analysis found amitriptyline to be better than several other medications including candesartan, fluoxetine, propranolol, topiramate and valproate and no different than

  15. A Comparative Effectiveness Meta-Analysis of Drugs for the Prophylaxis of Migraine Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and side effects of migraine prophylactic medications. Design We performed a network meta-analysis. Data were extracted independently in duplicate and quality was assessed using both the JADAD and Cochrane Risk of Bias instruments. Data were pooled and network meta-analysis performed using random effects models. Data Sources PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Trial Registry, bibliography of retrieved articles through 18 May 2014. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies We included randomized controlled trials of adults with migraine headaches of at least 4 weeks in duration. Results Placebo controlled trials included alpha blockers (n = 9), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n = 3), angiotensin receptor blockers (n = 3), anticonvulsants (n = 32), beta-blockers (n = 39), calcium channel blockers (n = 12), flunarizine (n = 7), serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 6), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (n = 1) serotonin agonists (n = 9) and tricyclic antidepressants (n = 11). In addition there were 53 trials comparing different drugs. Drugs with at least 3 trials that were more effective than placebo for episodic migraines included amitriptyline (SMD: -1.2, 95% CI: -1.7 to -0.82), -flunarizine (-1.1 headaches/month (ha/month), 95% CI: -1.6 to -0.67), fluoxetine (SMD: -0.57, 95% CI: -0.97 to -0.17), metoprolol (-0.94 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.4 to -0.46), pizotifen (-0.43 ha/month, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.21), propranolol (-1.3 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.62), topiramate (-1.1 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.9 to -0.73) and valproate (-1.5 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.8). Several effective drugs with less than 3 trials included: 3 ace inhibitors (enalapril, lisinopril, captopril), two angiotensin receptor blockers (candesartan, telmisartan), two anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, levetiracetam), and several beta-blockers (atenolol, bisoprolol, timolol). Network meta-analysis found amitriptyline to be better than several other medications including

  16. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie W Tari

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB and topoisomerase IV (ParE have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD, we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  6. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE) inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Leslie W; Li, Xiaoming; Trzoss, Michael; Bensen, Daniel C; Chen, Zhiyong; Lam, Thanh; Zhang, Junhu; Lee, Suk Joong; Hough, Grayson; Phillipson, Doug; Akers-Rodriguez, Suzanne; Cunningham, Mark L; Kwan, Bryan P; Nelson, Kirk J; Castellano, Amanda; Locke, Jeff B; Brown-Driver, Vickie; Murphy, Timothy M; Ong, Voon S; Pillar, Chris M; Shinabarger, Dean L; Nix, Jay; Lightstone, Felice C; Wong, Sergio E; Nguyen, Toan B; Shaw, Karen J; Finn, John

    2013-01-01

    Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParE) have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD), we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  7. A thermodynamic study of the amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in water/ethanol solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheema, Mohammad Arif; Barbosa, Silvia; Taboada, Pablo; Castro, Emilio; Siddiq, Mohammad; Mosquera, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of the tricyclic antidepressant amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in the temperature range 20-50 deg. C and in the presence of ethanol have been measured. The phenothiazine tranquillizing drugs have interesting association characteristics that derive from their rigid, tricyclic hydrophobic groups. Thioridazine hydrochloride is a drug used in treatment of mental illness that shows side effects. Therefore, it is interesting to study the change of its physico-chemical properties with temperature and with the surrounding environment to understand the action mechanism of the drug. Densities, conductivities, and surface tension were measured to obtain surface and bulk solution properties. Critical concentrations, cc, at different temperatures and in the presence of ethanol, and partition coefficients, K, have been calculated, the latter using an indirect method based in the pseudophase model with the help of apparent molar volume data. This method has the advantage that allows calculating the distribution coefficients at solubilizate concentrations below the saturation. Conductivity data show two critical concentrations. The second critical concentration is not clear by density data. The effect of the alcohol is to decrease the first critical concentration due to a decrease in headgroup repulsion. The molar apparent volumes at infinite dilution and in the aggregate in water and in presence of ethanol have been also obtained

  8. A thermodynamic study of the amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in water/ethanol solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheema, Mohammad Arif [Laboratorio de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Barbosa, Silvia [Laboratorio de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: fmsilvia@usc.es; Taboada, Pablo [Laboratorio de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Castro, Emilio [Laboratorio de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Siddiq, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mosquera, Victor [Laboratorio de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: fmvictor@usc.es

    2006-09-29

    The thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of the tricyclic antidepressant amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in the temperature range 20-50 deg. C and in the presence of ethanol have been measured. The phenothiazine tranquillizing drugs have interesting association characteristics that derive from their rigid, tricyclic hydrophobic groups. Thioridazine hydrochloride is a drug used in treatment of mental illness that shows side effects. Therefore, it is interesting to study the change of its physico-chemical properties with temperature and with the surrounding environment to understand the action mechanism of the drug. Densities, conductivities, and surface tension were measured to obtain surface and bulk solution properties. Critical concentrations, cc, at different temperatures and in the presence of ethanol, and partition coefficients, K, have been calculated, the latter using an indirect method based in the pseudophase model with the help of apparent molar volume data. This method has the advantage that allows calculating the distribution coefficients at solubilizate concentrations below the saturation. Conductivity data show two critical concentrations. The second critical concentration is not clear by density data. The effect of the alcohol is to decrease the first critical concentration due to a decrease in headgroup repulsion. The molar apparent volumes at infinite dilution and in the aggregate in water and in presence of ethanol have been also obtained.

  9. Drug: D02034 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available psychiatric agent ... DG01729 ... Tetracyclic antidepressant ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepress...ant Therapeutic category: 1179 Chemical group: DG01231 ... tetracyclic antidepressants ADRA2 [HSA:150 151

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, ... Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and ... Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used ...

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DRUG INTOXICATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cheraghali M. Taymori

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Unintentional drug intoxication is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children. In order to study the epidemiological pattern of childhood drug poisoning in Golestan province, all cases diagnosed with poisoning from 1997 to 2002 in the only pediatric hospital in province were recruited. During this period 563 cases of poisoned children were hospitalized in Taleqani hospital, of these 305 cases were due to drug poisoning. Opium was responsible for more than half of the poisoning cases, and 91% of deaths, among drug intoxicated children. Metoclopramide, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants were among the other frequent causes of poisoning. Neurological symptoms were the most prominent symptoms of poisoning and more than 80% of cases showed some neurological symptoms. Mortality rate among the cases was 3.6% and of total of 11 deaths, 10 were poisoned with opium. About 61% of cases were hospitalized between 24-48 hrs. Most of the poisoning cases in young children were unintentional and in many cases, their parents played a critical role in their intoxication. This role specially is crucial in infants and children under one year of age. Parents in Golestan province use opium widely for symptomatic treatment of routine illnesses in their young children and overdose of opium may cause severe intoxication and even death of the child.

  14. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  15. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  16. An assessment of quality of sleep and the use of drugs with sedating properties in hospitalized adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumann Terryn

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalization can significantly disrupt sleeping patterns. In consideration of the previous reports of insomnia and apparent widespread use of benzodiazepines and other hypnotics in hospitalized patients, we conducted a study to assess quality of sleep and hypnotic drug use in our acute care adult patient population. The primary objectives of this study were to assess sleep disturbance and its determinants including the use of drugs with sedating properties. Methods This single-centre prospective study involved an assessment of sleep quality for consenting patients admitted to the general medicine and family practice units of an acute care Canadian hospital. A validated Verran and Snyder-Halpern (VSH Sleep Scale measuring sleep disturbance, sleep effectiveness, and sleep supplementation was completed daily by patients and scores were compared to population statistics. Patients were also asked to identify factors influencing sleep while in hospital, and sedating drug use prior to and during hospitalization was also assessed. Results During the 70-day study period, 100 patients completed at least one sleep questionnaire. There was a relatively even distribution of males versus females, most patients were in their 8th decade of life, retired, and suffered from multiple chronic diseases. The median self-reported pre-admission sleep duration for participants was 8 hours and our review of PharmaNetR profiles revealed that 35 (35% patients had received a dispensed prescription for a hypnotic or antidepressant drug in the 3-month period prior to admission. Benzodiazepines were the most common sedating drugs prescribed. Over 300 sleep disturbance, effective and supplementation scores were completed. Sleep disturbance scores across all study days ranged 16–681, sleep effectiveness scores ranged 54–402, while sleep supplementation scores ranged between 0–358. Patients tended to have worse sleep scores as compared to healthy non

  17. Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attempt to stop taking the drug Recognizing unhealthy drug use in family members Sometimes it's difficult to ... sold to support drug use Recognizing signs of drug use or intoxication Signs and symptoms of drug ...

  18. Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seizure Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days ... reaction the first time you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can ...

  19. Drugs reviews

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angel_D

    chlorpropamide] and biguanides [e.g. metformin]), steroids and dapsone. The effectiveness of these drugs is likely to be reduced. Side-effects are uncommon but include: ▫ Skin reactions: rash, urticaria, flushing. Fortunately many of these reactions are self-limiting and gradually clear; the patient only needs symptomatic ...

  20. Drugs@FDA Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information about FDA-approved brand name and generic prescription and over-the-counter human drugs and biological therapeutic products. Drugs@FDA includes most of...

  1. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include opioids, sedatives, ...

  2. Tricyclic Antidepressants and Tetracyclic Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. Amoxapine (prescribing information). Verna, Salcette Goa, India: Watson Pharma; 2014. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_ ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/antidepressants/ART-20046983 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely ... So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug ...

  4. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or reduce their drug use and related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an important role in ...

  6. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  7. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or reduce their drug use and related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an important role in providing ...

  9. THE IMPACT OF OPIATE PAIN MEDICATIONS AND PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS ON THE QUALITY OF COLON PREPARATION IN OUTPATIENT COLONOSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Bhat, Pavan; Chokshi, Reena V.; Lee, Alexander; Borg, Brian B.; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Sayuk, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal colon preparation is a significant barrier to quality colonoscopy. The impact of pharmacologic agents associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility on quality of colon preparation has not been well characterized. Aims Evaluate impact of opiate pain medication and psychoactive medications on colon preparation quality in outpatient undergoing colonoscopy. Methods Outpatients undergoing colonoscopy at a single medical center during a 6-month period were retrospectively identified. Demographics, clinical characteristics and pharmacy records were extracted from electronic medical records. Colon preparation adequacy was evaluated using a validated composite colon preparation score. Results 2600 patients (57.3±12.9 years, 57% female) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. 223 (8.6%) patients were regularly using opioids, 92 antipsychotics, 83 tricyclic antidepressants and 421 non-tricyclic antidepressants. Opioid use was associated with inadequate colon preparation both with low dose (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.0-2.1, p=0.05) and high dose opioid users (OR=1.7, 95%CI 1.1-2.9, p=0.039) in a dose dependent manner. Other significant predictors of inadequate colon preparation included use of tricyclics (OR=1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.0, p=0.012), non-tricyclic antidepressants (OR=1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0, p=0.013), and antipsychotic medications (OR=2.2, 95%CI 1.4-3.4, p=0.001). Conclusions Opiate pain medication use independently predict inadequate quality colon preparation in a dose dependent fashion; furthermore psychoactive medications have even more prominent effects and further potentate the negative impact of opiates with concurrent use. PMID:24012559

  10. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for multiple myeloma and other plasma cell neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on ... Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug ...

  18. Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ... Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use ...

  20. Effects of antidepressant drugs on different receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, H.; Oegren, S.-O.

    1981-01-01

    Radioligand receptor binding techniques were used to characterize the effects of different structural types of antidepressant drugs on neurotransmitter receptors. The tricyclic antidepressants more or less potently inhibited the binding to rat brain preparations of several different radiolabelled ligands ([ 3 H]WB4101, [ 3 H]QNB, [ 3 H]d-LSD, [ 3 H]mepyramine). The potency of the nontricyclic antidepressants varied greatly. Mianserin, potently displaced [ 3 H]mepyramine, [ 3 H]d-LSD and [ 3 H]WB4101 while it was very weak on [ 3 H]QNB-binding. Nomifensine and the specific 5-HT uptake inhibitors zimelidine and alaproclate had very low affinity for these receptors. All the antidepressants tested were practically devoid of activity on [ 3 H]DHA binding, [ 3 H]spiroperidol binding, [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding, [ 3 H]muscimol binding and [ 3 H]naloxone binding. The implications of these findings for biogenic amine theories of affective disorders are discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  2. Using molecular similarity to highlight the challenges of routine immunoassay-based drug of abuse/toxicology screening in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siam Mohamed G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laboratory tests for routine drug of abuse and toxicology (DOA/Tox screening, often used in emergency medicine, generally utilize antibody-based tests (immunoassays to detect classes of drugs such as amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, opiates, and tricyclic antidepressants, or individual drugs such as cocaine, methadone, and phencyclidine. A key factor in assay sensitivity and specificity is the drugs or drug metabolites that were used as antigenic targets to generate the assay antibodies. All DOA/Tox screening immunoassays can be limited by false positives caused by cross-reactivity from structurally related compounds. For immunoassays targeted at a particular class of drugs, there can also be false negatives if there is failure to detect some drugs or their metabolites within that class. Methods Molecular similarity analysis, a computational method commonly used in drug discovery, was used to calculate structural similarity of a wide range of clinically relevant compounds (prescription and over-the-counter medications, illicit drugs, and clinically significant metabolites to the target ('antigenic' molecules of DOA/Tox screening tests. These results were compared with cross-reactivity data in the package inserts of immunoassays marketed for clinical testing. The causes for false positives for phencyclidine and tricyclic antidepressant screening immunoassays were investigated at the authors' medical center using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as a confirmatory method. Results The results illustrate three major challenges for routine DOA/Tox screening immunoassays used in emergency medicine. First, for some classes of drugs, the structural diversity of common drugs within each class has been increasing, thereby making it difficult for a single assay to detect all compounds without compromising specificity. Second, for some screening assays, common 'out-of-class' drugs may be structurally similar to the target

  3. Pleuromutilins: Potent Drugs for Resistant Bugs-Mode of Action and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukner, Susanne; Riedl, Rosemarie

    2017-01-03

    Pleuromutilins are antibiotics that selectively inhibit bacterial translation and are semisynthetic derivatives of the naturally occurring tricyclic diterpenoid pleuromutilin, which received its name from the pleuromutilin-producing fungus Pleurotus mutilus Tiamulin and valnemulin are two established derivatives in veterinary medicine for oral and intramuscular administration. As these early pleuromutilin drugs were developed at a time when companies focused on major antibacterial classes, such as the β-lactams, and resistance was not regarded as an issue, interest in antibiotic research including pleuromutilins was limited. Over the last decade or so, there has been a resurgence in interest to develop this class for human use. This has resulted in a topical derivative, retapamulin, and additional derivatives in clinical development. The most advanced compound is lefamulin, which is in late-stage development for the intravenous and oral treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin infections. Overall, pleuromutilins and, in particular, lefamulin are characterized by potent activity against Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative pathogens as well as against mycoplasmas and intracellular organisms, such as Chlamydia spp. and Legionella pneumophila Pleuromutilins are unaffected by resistance to other major antibiotic classes, such as macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactam antibiotics, and others. Furthermore, pleuromutilins display very low spontaneous mutation frequencies and slow, stepwise resistance development at sub-MIC in vitro. The potential for resistance development in clinic is predicted to be slow as confirmed by extremely low resistance rates to this class despite the use of pleuromutilins in veterinary medicine for >30 years. Although rare, resistant strains have been identified in human- and livestock-associated environments and as with any antibiotic class, require close monitoring as well as prudent

  4. Drugs of Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Donald E., Ed.

    This Drug Enforcement Administration publication delivers clear, scientific information about drugs in a factual, straightforward way, combined with precise photographs shot to scale. The publication is intended to serve as an A to Z guide for drug history, effects, and identification information. Chapters are included on the Controlled Substances…

  5. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  6. Drug and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basic Facts & Information What does “Drug and Substance Abuse” mean? Most drugs and other chemical substances are helpful when used ... medications, and pain medications. Some older adults also abuse illegal drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, hallucinogens, and injected narcotics. Some ...

  7. Dynamics of Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Joan H.; Holden, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper analyzes data from interviews with 167 drug users in the community, including age, sex, birth order, education, family constellation, and circumstances of first drug use. The majority of subjects had tried to stop using drugs, but most had been unsuccessful at the time of the interview. (Author)

  8. Drugs in sport

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, D

    2007-01-01

    This new edition includes fresh information regarding drugs use and abuse in sport and the updated worldwide anti-doping laws, and changes to the prohibited and therapeutic use exemption lists. The objectives of the book are to review/discuss the latest information on drugs in sport by considering i) actions of drugs and hormones, ii) medication and nutritional supplements in sport, iii) the latest doping control regulations of the WADA, iv) the use of banned therapeutic drugs in sport, v) an...

  9. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  10. Drugs Approved for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gestational trophoblastic disease. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. [Drug-Drug Interactions with Consideration of Pharmacogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shogo

    2018-01-01

     Elderly patients often suffer from a variety of diseases and therefore may be prescribed several kinds of drugs. Interactions between these drugs may cause problems in some patients. Guidelines for drug interactions were released on July 8, 2014 "Drug Interaction Guideline for Drug Development and Labeling Recommendations (Final Draft)". These guidelines include the theoretical basis for evaluating the mechanisms of drug interaction, the possible extent of drug interactions, and take into consideration special populations (e.g., infants, children, elderly patients, patients with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and subjects with minor deficient alleles for drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters). In this symposium article, I discuss this last special population: altered drug metabolism and drug interactions in subjects with minor alleles of genes encoding deficient drug metabolizing enzymes. I further discuss a drug label for eliglustat (Cerdelga) with instructions for patients with ultra-rapid, extensive, intermediate, and poor metabolizer phenotypes that arise from different CYP2D6 gene alleles.

  15. IMPROVING ACCESS TO DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although essentially not all therapies need drug intervention, drugs is still an important components in health sector, either in preventive, curative, rehabilitative or promotion efforts. Hence the access to drugs is a main problem, either in international or national scale even to the smallest unit. The problem on access to drugs is very complicated and cannot be separated especially from pharmacy management problems; moreover in general from the overall lack of policy development and effective of health policy, and also the implementation process. With the policy development and effective health policy, rational drug uses, sufficient health service budget so a country can overcome the health problems. Besides infrastructures, regulations, distribution and cultural influences; the main obstacles for drug access is drugs affordability if the price of drugs is an important part and determined by many factors, especially the drug status whether is still patent orgenerics that significantly decrease cost of health cares and enhance the drugs affordability. The determination of essential drug prices in developing countries should based on equity principal so that poor people pay cheaper and could afford the essential drugs. WHO predicts two third of world population can not afford the essential drugs in which in developing countries, some are because of in efficient budget allocation in consequence of drug distribution management, including incorrect selection and allocation and also irrational uses. In part these could be overcome by enhancing performances on the allocation pharmacy needs, including the management of information system, inventory management, stock management and the distribution. Key words: access, drugs, essential drugs, generic drugs

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What ... Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency ...

  17. Drugs and drug policy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuw, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The Dutch parliament enacted the revised Opium Act in 1976. This penal law is part of the Dutch drug policy framework that includes tolerance for nonconforming lifestyles, risk reduction in regard to the harmful health and social consequences of drug taking, and penal measures directed against

  18. Divergent Strategy for the Diastereoselective Synthesis of the Tricyclic 6,7-Diaryltetrahydro-6H-benzo[c]chromene Core via Pt(IV)-Catalyzed Cycloaddition of o-Quinone Methides and Olefin Ring-Closing Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangdenpaisal, Kassrin; Chuayboonsong, Kanokpish; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Ploypradith, Poonsakdi

    2017-03-03

    A divergent strategy for the synthesis of the tricyclic 6,7-diaryltetrahydro-6H-benzo[c]chromene core was successfully developed. The 2,3-trans, 2,4-cis trisubstituted chroman moiety was formed via highly efficient and stereoselective Pt(IV)-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions of the corresponding quinone methides with chalcones. Subsequent steps provided the common diene alcohol, which underwent BF 3 ·Et 2 O-mediated Et 3 SiH reduction and olefin ring-closing metathesis (RCM) using Ru(II) catalysts. The sequence of the final two steps provided a handle to diversify the stereochemical outcomes at C6 as well as C10a.

  19. Continuous brachial plexus block as treatment for the Pancoast syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Six patients with severe neuropathic pain caused by a Pancoast tumor were treated with the continuous administration of local anesthetics. These patients had not responded to any other treatment, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, dexamethasone, tricyclic antidepressants,

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Where Can Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking ... You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English ...

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment ...

  2. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as ginkgo and blood thinners ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to ...

  4. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... regarding prevention and treatment of MDMA. ( September 2017 ) View all related publications Related NIDA Notes Articles Narrative ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen ... to prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ...

  7. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What Are the Treatment Options? What Is Recovery? ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her ...

  8. Identification of clinically significant drug-drug interactions in cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions in cardiac intensive care units of two tertiary care hospitals in Peshawar, Pakistan, and to compare the various potential drug-drug interactions related parameters between the government and private hospitals included in the study. Method: A ...

  9. In vitro effects of three antidepressant drugs on plasma paraoxonase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, Mohamed Hachem; Hellara, Ilhem; Neffati, Fadoua; Mechri, Anouar; Douki, Wahiba; Gaha, Lotfi; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2012-01-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is important in organophosphates and xenobiotic metabolism and as an antioxidant bio-scavenger. PON1 activity was shown to significantly decrease in depressed patients after antidepressant treatment instauration. Our aim was to investigate the in vitro inhibitory effects of three antidepressants (imipramine, amitriptyline and fluoxetine) on PON1 activity. Plasma from healthy volunteers was spiked with antidepressant drugs. The working solutions were then diluted with plasma to obtain concentrations that covered the therapeutic margin. PON1 was tested by a kinetic method in triplicate after incubation at 37°C for 2 h. Tricyclic antidepressants significantly inhibited PON1. Fluoxetine had no effect. The inhibition percentage for imipramine was 15.6% at 100 μg/L after incubation for 1 h (131±1 vs. 155±2 IU/L; p<0.01). At 350 μg/L, the inhibition percentage for imipramine 19.2% after 1 h and 20.2% after 2 h. Amitriptyline was a stronger inhibitor: 26% after 30 min at 125 μg/L. At 250 μg/L, the inhibition percentage for amitriptyline was 36.5% after 30 min (100±4 vs. 159±2 IU/L; p<0.01). The tested tricyclic antidepressants significantly inhibit PON1 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Amitriptyline had a higher inhibition potency than imipramine.

  10. Clinically significant drug interactions with newer antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Edoardo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Caraci, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    After the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other newer antidepressants with different mechanisms of action have been introduced in clinical practice. Because antidepressants are commonly prescribed in combination with other medications used to treat co-morbid psychiatric or somatic disorders, they are likely to be involved in clinically significant drug interactions. This review examines the drug interaction profiles of the following newer antidepressants: escitalopram, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran, mirtazapine, reboxetine, bupropion, agomelatine and vilazodone. In general, by virtue of a more selective mechanism of action and receptor profile, newer antidepressants carry a relatively low risk for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, at least as compared with first-generation antidepressants, i.e. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). On the other hand, they are susceptible to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. All new antidepressants are extensively metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, and therefore may be the target of metabolically based drug interactions. Concomitant administration of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isoenzymes involved in the biotransformation of specific antidepressants may cause changes in their plasma concentrations. However, due to their relatively wide margin of safety, the consequences of such kinetic modifications are usually not clinically relevant. Conversely, some newer antidepressants may cause pharmacokinetic interactions through their ability to inhibit specific CYPs. With regard to this, duloxetine and bupropion are moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6. Therefore, potentially harmful drug interactions may occur when they are coadministered with substrates of these isoforms, especially compounds with a narrow therapeutic index. The other new antidepressants are only weak inhibitors or are not inhibitors of CYP isoforms at

  11. Potential drug-drug interaction in Mexican patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Zurita, María Conchita; Juárez-Rojop, Isela E; Genis, Alma; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso; González-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Lilia López-Narváez, María; de la O de la O, María Elena; Nicolini, Humberto

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe potential drug-drug interactions in the medication of Mexican schizophrenic patients. We performed a retrospective and cross-sectional study that was carried out in a psychiatric clinic. Only the prescriptions of patients with schizophrenia whose diagnoses were based on the DSM-IV instrument were included in this study. The Drug Interactions Checker software ( http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html ) was used in this study to analyse potential drug-drug interactions. In total, 86 of 126 patients were at risk of potential drug-drug interactions. Haloperidol and biperiden was the most common drug pair of 232 pairs evaluated. In our study, 13.8% of drug-drug interaction showed a major level of severity, whereas in 83.2%, the interaction was moderate. Finally, central nervous system (CNS) depression and anticholinergic effect were the main possible effects of drug-drug interaction. Our results revealed a high number of patients with schizophrenia receiving two or more drugs. The potential drug-drug interactions observed in the Mexican population are consistent with the concomitant use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and antidepressants prescribed in schizophrenia that could cause central nervous system (CNS) depression and anticholinergic effect. Drug-drug interaction must be considered when the patient with schizophrenia is medicated.

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and permanent liver damage. Poor judgment and risky behavior. Drug misuse by any route (not just injection) can ... People who receive treatment stop or reduce their drug use and related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug ...

  13. Drug delivery with living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliervoet, Lies A L; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug delivery has grown tremendously in the past few decades by developing a wide range of advanced drug delivery systems. An interesting category is cell-based drug delivery, which includes encapsulation of drugs inside cells or attached to the surface and subsequent transportation

  14. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Peter J

    2018-01-17

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath ... Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from drugs. But she's afraid ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use ... Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the text to you. This website talks ...

  18. Identifying Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Affect Teens The Negative Health Effects of Marijuana Use State and Federal Drug Laws Treatment and Recovery Federal Student Aid and Consequences of a Drug Conviction School Failure VIDEO: Taking Prescription Drugs to Get High—A Bad Idea Drugged Driving—What You Should Know How ...

  19. 125I-labelled iodothyronines. Useful tools for studies of effects of an antidepressant drug fluoxetine in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislav Pavelka; Masaryk University, Brno

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are supposed to control the activity of some neurotransmitters (e.g., serotonin), which are hypothetically involved in the pathogenesis of depressive illness. A new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs includes selective serotonine re-uptake inhibitors. The most frequently used representative of this group is fluoxetine (Fluox). We followed in the present paper the effects of Fluox, administered subchronicaly (for 25 days) to Wistar rats by itself, or in combination with 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T 3 ). In studies of the interaction of Fluox with the metabolism of TH, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT), as well as our newly developed radiometric assays for iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) of types 1, 2 and 3 (D1, D2 and D3), using 125 I-labelled iodothyronines of high specific radioactivity as substrates. We found about two-fold higher UDP-GT enzyme activities in samples of liver microsomes of rats treated with Fluox, in comparison with control rats. In contrast, the radiometric determination of ST activities in liver and kidney cytosolic fractions did not demonstrate any significant effects of the administration of Fluox, alone or together with T 3 , on the induction of these enzymes. However, profound changes in enzyme activities were determined in case of IDs, especially in the pituitary and cerebellum of treated rats. The adapted and newly elaborated radiometric enzyme assays proved to be very sensitive and rapid and, at the same time, reliable and robust. (author)

  20. Drug: D08511 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ic receptor antagonist ... DG01460 ... alpha2-Adrenergic receptor antagonist Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01729 ... Tetracyclic antidepress...ant ... DG01728 ... Tricyclic antidepressant Chemical group: DG01231 ... tetracyclic antidepr...essant ADRA2 [HSA:150 151 152] [KO:K04138 K04139 K04140]; ADRA1 [HSA:148 147 146] [

  1. Radiopharmaceutical drug review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    To ensure proper radioactive drug use (such as quality, diagnostic improvement, and minimal radioactive exposure), the Food and Drug Administration evaluates new drugs with respect to safety, effectiveness, and accuracy and adequacy of the labeling. The IND or NDA process is used for this purpose. A brief description of the process, including the Chemical Classification System and the therapeutic potential classification, is presented as it applies to radiopharmaceuticals. Also, the status of the IND or NDA review of radiopharmaceuticals is given

  2. Substance use - prescription drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance use disorder - prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs; Narcotics - substance use; Opioid - substance use; Sedative - substance ...

  3. Novas drogas no tratamento da dispepsia funcional New drugs for the treatment of functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ernesto de Almeida TRONCON

    2001-09-01

    any evidence of structural abnormalities or organic disease. Current pharmacological treatment of functional dyspepsia is largely empirical and involves anti-secretory or prokinetic drugs. Aims - To review recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in symptom production in functional dyspepsia, as well as the development of new drugs that may interfere with these mechanisms, which may lead to more rational and effective treatment of this clinical condition. Method - Systematic review of papers published in English for the last 10 years. Results - New drugs that increase propulsive gastroduodenal motor activity include new benzamides similar to cisapride, CCK-A blockers, agonists of opiate receptors and motilin agonists similar to erythromycin. A number of agents, including sumatriptan and buspirone, stimulates serotonin receptors in the myoenteric plexuses and have been shown to increase gastric accommodation to a meal. Finally, a number of new drugs that either increase thresholds for visceral perception or modify sensations is currently under investigation. This includes agents of several groups, such as octreotide, loxiglumide, ondansetron and other serotonin blockers, fedotozine and tricyclic antidepressant at low doses. Conclusions - Although these new drugs may improve the pharmacological approach to the treatment of functional dyspepsia, there is a need for randomized, controlled trials to assess their efficacy. Moreover, difficulties related to the identification of the mechanisms underlying symptoms may limit the utilization of these new drugs.

  4. International Drug Control Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    related substances include precursor chemicals used to make narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances—such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine—which...Department to report the five largest importing and exporting countries of two precursor drugs, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, commonly used to...UNODC, Alternative Development: A Global Thematic Evaluation, Final Synthesis Report, 2005, at http://www.unodc.org/pdf

  5. Drugs, Alcohol & Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Christina

    Expectant parents are introduced to the effects of a variety of drugs on the unborn baby. Material is divided into seven sections. Section 1 deals with the most frequently used recreational drugs, including alcohol, marijuana, narcotics, depressants, stimulants, inhalants, and hallucinogens. Sections 2 and 3 focus on the effects of prescription…

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, which put people at risk for getting HIV ... risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, which put people at risk for getting ... related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone with ... problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ...

  10. Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that ... about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice ( ...

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes ... Options? What Is Recovery? What Is a Relapse? How Can Friends and Family Help? Where Can Someone ...

  14. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Drug metabolism may be defined as the biochemical modifica- tion of one chemical form to another, occurring usually through ..... Endogenous. Enzyme. Drugs. Cofactor. Glucuronidation. UDP glucoronic. UDP-. Chloramphenicol, acid glucuronosyltransferase morphine, paracetamol, salicylic acid, fenoprofen, desipramine,.

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) ... Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted ...

  17. Study Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are Study Drugs? Doctors prescribe medicines like Adderall and Ritalin to treat conditions like attention deficit ... stimulants are used as study drugs: amphetamines like Adderall, Dexedrine, or Vyvanse methylphenidates like Ritalin or Concerta ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth ... 662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter ...

  1. Orphan drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojša; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs ... adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | Contact ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts ... Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the computer will read the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from ...

  7. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  8. Drug delivery and formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Jörg; Boos, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric drug delivery is a major challenge in drug development. Because of the heterogeneous nature of the patient group, ranging from newborns to adolescents, there is a need to use appropriate excipients, drug dosage forms and delivery devices for different age groups. So far, there is a lack of suitable and safe drug formulations for children, especially for the very young and seriously ill patients. The new EU legislation will enforce paediatric clinical trials and drug development. Current advances in paediatric drug delivery include interesting new concepts such as fast-dissolving drug formulations, including orodispersible tablets and oral thin strips (buccal wafers), and multiparticulate dosage forms based on mini-tabletting or pelletization technologies. Parenteral administration is likely to remain the first choice for children in the neonatal period and for emergency cases. Alternative routes of administration include transdermal, pulmonary and nasal drug delivery systems. A few products are already available on the market, but others still need further investigations and clinical proof of concept.

  9. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Systemically Administered Antileishmanial Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    This review describes the pharmacokinetic properties of the systemically administered antileishmanial drugs pentavalent antimony, paromomycin, pentamidine, miltefosine and amphotericin B (AMB), including their absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and potential drug-drug interactions.

  10. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Medicaid Drug Claims Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid Drug Claims Statistics CD is a useful tool that conveniently breaks up Medicaid claim counts and separates them by quarter and includes an annual count.

  12. WAr on DrugS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-12

    Apr 12, 2009 ... tion of drugs, especially hemp (Cannabis. Sativa), became entrenched. Oloruntoba. (2006) explained that the vigour and sus- tained efforts to legislate against drugs in contemporary Nigeria was because of the growing notoriety of the country as a transit point or centre for recruitment of drug couriers, and a ...

  13. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Projecting future drug expenditures--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James M; Li, Edward; Doloresco, Fred; Matusiak, Linda; Hunkler, Robert J; Shah, Nilay D; Vermeulen, Lee C; Schumock, Glen T

    2012-03-01

    Factors likely to influence drug expenditures, drug expenditure trends in 2010 and 2011, and projected drug expenditures for 2012 are discussed. Data were analyzed to provide drug expenditure trends for total drug expenditures and the hospital and clinic sectors. Data were obtained from the IMS Health National Sales Perspectives database. From 2009 to 2010, total U.S. drug expenditures increased by 2.7%, with total spending rising from $299.2 billion to $307.5 billion. Drug expenditures in clinics grew by 6.0% from 2009 to 2010. Hospital drug expenditures increased at the moderate rate of 1.5% from 2009 to 2010; through the first nine months of 2011, hospital drug expenditures increased by only 0.3% compared with the same period in 2010. The dominant trend over the past several years is substantial moderation in expenditure growth for widely used drugs, primarily due to the ongoing introduction and wide use of generic versions of high-cost, frequently used medications. At the end of 2010, generic drugs accounted for 78% of all retail prescriptions dispensed. Another pattern is substantial increases in expenditures for specialized medications, particularly in the outpatient setting as growth in prescription drug expenditures for clinic-administered drugs consistently outpaces growth in total expenditures. Various factors are likely to influence drug expenditures in 2012, including drugs in development, the diffusion of new drugs, generic drugs, drug shortages, and biosimilars. For 2012, we project a 3-5% increase in total drug expenditures across all settings, a 5-7% increase in expenditures for clinic-administered drugs, and a 0-2% increase in hospital drug expenditures.

  15. Abuse of antiretroviral drugs combined with addictive drugs by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports of the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to produce a highly addictive drug called nyaope or whoonga are of major concern as ARVs are easily accessible in sub-Saharan Africa, including to pregnant women. Use of illicit drugs by pregnant women may result in serious adverse effects in their infants. We have ...

  16. COPD - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  17. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembruff, Stacey L; Laberge, Monique L; Villeneuve, David J; Guo, Baoqing; Veitch, Zachary; Cecchetto, Melanie; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2008-01-01

    resistance cannot be attributed solely to changes in drug accumulation or the activity of drug transporters. The identities of these additional drug-transporter-independent mechanisms are discussed, including their likely clinical relevance

  18. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veitch Zachary

    2008-11-01

    occur at the threshold dose, the magnitude of resistance cannot be attributed solely to changes in drug accumulation or the activity of drug transporters. The identities of these additional drug-transporter-independent mechanisms are discussed, including their likely clinical relevance.

  19. [Orphan drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojsa; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in "adopting" them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. THE BEGINNING OF ORPHAN DRUGS DEVELOPMENT: This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the "Orphan Drug Act" was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs.

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an important role in ... increasingly at risk for HIV infection through risky sexual behaviors. NIDA ... of the disease. Since the epidemic began, injection drug use has ...

  1. Drug Abuse in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, James F.

    This report examines the incidence of drug abuse and the methods of treatment and prevention of drug abuse used in Southeast Asia. Countries studied include Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Because of Malaysia's intensive effort to eliminate its drug abuse problem, emphasis is placed on this country's treatment and…

  2. Multifunctional High Drug Loading Nanocarriers for Cancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Erlei

    2011-12-01

    Most anticancer drugs have poor water-solubility, rapid blood clearance, low tumor-selectivity and severe systemic toxicity to healthy tissues. Thus, polymeric nanocarriers have been widely explored for anticancer drugs to solve these problems. However, polymer nanocarriers developed to date still suffer drawbacks including low drug loading contents, premature drug release, slow cellular internalization, slow intracellular drug release and thereby low therapeutic efficiency in cancer thermotherapy. Accordingly, in this dissertation, functional nanocapsules and nanoparticles including high drug loading liposome-like nanocapsules, high drug loading phospholipid-mimic nanocapsules with fast intracellular drug release, high drug loading charge-reversal nanocapsules, TAT based long blood circulation nanoparticles and charge-reversal nuclear targeted nanoparticles are designed and synthesized. These functional carriers have advantages such as high drug loading contents without premature drug release, fast cellular internalization and intracellular drug release, nuclear targeted delivery and long blood circulation. As a result, all these drug carriers show much higher in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities.

  3. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content Drugs Home Drugs Find information on FDA-approved HIV/ ... infection drugs and investigational HIV/AIDS drugs. Search Drugs Search drug Search Icon What's this? Close Popup ...

  4. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  5. [Drug induced diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Isabelle; Hadengue, Antoine

    2008-09-03

    Diarrhea is a frequent adverse event involving the most frequently antibiotics, laxatives and NSAI. Drug induced diarrhea may be acute or chronic. It may be due to expected, dose dependant properties of the drug, to immuno-allergic or bio-genomic mechanisms. Several pathophysiological mechanisms have been described resulting in osmotic, secretory or inflammatory diarrhea, shortened transit time, or malabsorption. Histopathological lesions sometimes associated with drug induced diarrhea are usually non specific and include ulcerations, inflammatory or ischemic lesions, fibrous diaphragms, microscopic colitis and apoptosis. The diagnosis of drug induced diarrhea, sometimes difficult to assess, relies on the absence of other obvious causes and on the rapid disappearance of the symptoms after withdrawal of the suspected drug.

  6. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    .... Completely revised and updated throughout, the new edition focuses only on essential chemical detail and includes patient case histories to illustrate the clinical consequences of changes in drug...

  7. Predictive toxicology in drug safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Jinghai J; Urban, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    .... Each specific area of toxicology relevant for drug discovery is discussed in detail, including theory, experimental approaches, and data interpretation supported by comprehensive up-to-date references...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? ... Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  9. Antineoplastic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the ... Videos Information About ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often ... NIH is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  13. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Chemistry of Drug Metabolism. Drug metabolism is a chemical process, where enzymes play a crucial role in the conversion of one chemical species to another. The major family of enzymes associated with these metabolic reactions is the cytochrome P450 family. The structural features and functional activity of these ...

  14. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Survey Results Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Unpredictable Danger Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2016 Monitoring the Future 2016 Survey Results Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2015 View All NIDA Home ...

  15. Capping Drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the process of treatment, drugs are also used for medical diagnosis and for ... ing cells. Since cancer cells grow at a faster rate than the normal .... ity characteristics. After intake, the N-methyl group is cleaved in the liver to release the physiologically active drug. Similarly, membrane transportation characteristics of the neu-.

  16. [Drugs and light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnesen, H H

    1997-06-30

    The number of drugs that are found to be photochemically unstable or able to induce phototoxic side-effects is steadily increasing. It can be difficult, however, to obtain relevant information on the photoreactivity of drugs or drug products from the commonly used handbooks. This is because of lack of standard methods of evaluation or a requirement for official specifications for a given product. The author points to the main problems connected with interactions between drugs and light in vitro and in vivo. The most obvious result of exposure to light is reduced potency of the drug because of photodecomposition. Adverse effects due to the formation of photodegradation products during storage and use have also been reported. The drug substance can further cause light-induced side-effects after administration to the patient, e.g. phototoxicity and photoallergy. More data on photoreactivity are needed in order to minimize the side-effects of frequently used drugs. The article includes a list of potential photosensitizing drug substances on the Norwegian market.

  17. Adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, K; Borshoff, D C

    2018-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality to patients and a source of financial burden to the healthcare system. Of the wide spectrum of adverse drug reactions, the most concerning to the anaesthetist remain anaphylaxis and malignant hyperthermia. Although the incidence of anaphylaxis under anaesthesia is difficult to ascertain, it occurs commonly enough that most anaesthetists will manage at least one case in their career. The wide range of drugs given in the peri-operative period and the variable presentation in the anaesthetised patient can delay diagnosis and treatment, and adversely affect outcome. Furthermore, despite improvements in testing, causative drugs can still be difficult to identify, as adverse reactions may be mediated by mechanisms other than IgE activation. With an increase in the reporting of anaphylaxis to newer anaesthetic drugs such as sugammadex, combined with change over the recent decades in the most likely causative peri-operative agents, it is imperative anaesthetists remain up to date on recent developments. In addition, they should be vigilant to patient characteristics, including pharmacogenetic variations that may predispose to adverse drug reactions, in order to help minimise risks of a reaction. The severity of adverse drug reactions to peri-operative drugs means morbidity and mortality remain high. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Drug Information in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, Tina M.

    2009-01-01

    Published drug information is widely available for terrestrial conditions. However, information on dosing, administration, drug interactions, stability, and side effects is scant as it relates to use in Space Medicine. Multinational crews on board the International Space Station present additional challenges for drug information because medication nomenclature, information available for the drug as well as the intended use for the drug is not standard across countries. This presentation will look at unique needs for drug information and how the information is managed in Space Medicine. A review was conducted of the drug information requests submitted to the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy by Space Medicine practitioners, astronaut crewmembers and researchers. The information requested was defined and cataloged. A list of references used was maintained. The wide range of information was identified. Due to the information needs for the medications in the on-board medical kits, the Drug Monograph Project was created. A standard method for answering specific drug information questions was generated and maintained by the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy. The Drug Monograph Project will be presented. Topic-centered requests, including multinational drug information, drug-induced adverse reactions, and medication events due to the environment will be highlighted. Information management of the drug information will be explained. Future considerations for drug information needs will be outlined.

  19. Location of the Antidepressant Binding Site in the Serotonin Transporter IMPORTANCE OF SER-438 IN RECOGNITION OF CITALOPRAM AND TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Taboureau, Olivier; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2009-01-01

    SERT belongs to the solute carrier 6 family that includes a bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), for which a high resolution crystal structure has become available. LeuT has proved to be an excellent model for human transporters and has advanced the understanding of solute carrier 6 transporter structure...

  20. DRUGS IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Mottram

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This new edition includes fresh information regarding drugs use and abuse in sport and the updated worldwide anti-doping laws, and changes to the prohibited and therapeutic use exemption lists. The objectives of the book are to review/discuss the latest information on drugs in sport by considering i actions of drugs and hormones, ii medication and nutritional supplements in sport, iii the latest doping control regulations of the WADA, iv the use of banned therapeutic drugs in sport, v an assessment of the prevalence of drug taking in sport. FEATURES A common, uniform strategy and evidence-based approach to organizing and interpreting the literature is used in all chapters. This textbook is composed of twelve parts with sub-sections in all of them. The topics of the parts are: i An introduction to drugs and their use in sport, ii Drug use and abuse in sport, iii Central nervous system stimulants, iv WADA regulations in relation to drugs used in the treatment of respiratory tract disorders, v Androgenic anabolic steroids, vi Peptide and glycoprotein hormones and sport, vii Blood boosting and sport, viii Drug treatment of inflammation in sports injuries, ix Alcohol, anti-anxiety drugs and sport, x Creatine, xi Doping control and sport, xii Prevalence of drug misuse in sport. Each specific chapter has been systematically developed from the data available in prospective, retrospective, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. The tables and figures are numerous, helpful and very useful. AUDIENCE The book provides a very useful resource for students on sports related courses, coaches and trainers, researchers, nutritionists, exercise physiologists, pharmacologists, healthcare professionals in the fields of sports medicine and those involved in the management and administration side of sport. The readers are going to discover that this is an excellent reference book. Extensively revised new edition of this book is also a first-rate resource for

  1. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  2. Drug abuse among the students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Drug abuse is the willful misuse of either licit or illicit drugs for the purpose of recreation, perceived necessity or convenience. Drug abuse is a more intense and often willful misuse of drugs often to the point of addiction. In the eastern world the incidence shows a decline or a static pattern but the number of drug addicts is still enormous.. The major drug of abuse are heroin and marijuana but designer drugs are shown to be on the increase. The aim of the study is to determine the ratio of the drug abuse in student. For this purpose we selected different institutions including “the university of Lahore”, “Forman Christian college”(private sector and Punjab university(Govt sector and conducted survey in 500 student. High proportion of students was found abusing drugs. From this study, we came across multiple factors which are the main cause of drug abuse in medical student including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, as well as personality disorder like antisocial personality disorder. The most commonly abused drugs include stimulants, opioids, and benzodiazepines, antihistamines. Although survey have indicated high rate of illicit and prescription drugs misuse among college students, few have assessed the negative consequences, personel concerns, or interest in intervention for drugs use. Drug abuse although regarded as a personality disorder, may also be seen as worldwide epidemic with evolutionary genetic, physiology and environmental influences Controlling and affecting human behavior. Globally, the use has reached all time high. The study showed males are more drug abusers as compared to females. The drug abuse ratio in students of private sector is more as compared to Govt sector.

  3. Drug treatment of paraphilic and nonparaphilic sexual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, David R P

    2009-01-01

    initiated in all offenders. In those at the highest risk of reoffending, psychotherapy should be initiated at the same time as drug therapy because their combination is associated with better results compared with either as monotherapy (especially in pedophiles). In offenders committing non-"hands-on" or violent paraphilias and those at low risk of reoffending, serotoninergic monotherapies (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] or tricyclic antidepressants) are reasonable choices (SSRIs are preferred). In other offenders, initial dual combination therapy (serotoninergic plus antiandrogenic) is recommended. Progestogens should be used before LHRH agonists or estrogens. Cyproterone acetate and MPA are preferred as oral and IM progestogens, respectively. Failure of dual combination serotoninergic/ progestogen therapy should prompt a change in one or both of the components (eg, SSRI to tricyclic antidepressants or vice versa, or cyproterone acetate to MPA or vice versa) or the addition or substitution of an LHRH agonist (leuprolide or triptorelin) for the progestogen. Estrogens are second- or third-line agents. Rarely, triple combination therapy is necessary (serotoninergic plus LHRH agonist or progestogen plus estrogen). It appears that recidivism rates are reduced by the use of psychotherapy alone, drug therapy alone, and more so by their combination. Although some progress has been made in the therapy of paraphilic and nonparaphilic sexual disorders, much work remains to be done. The development of more specific, more effective, and better-tolerated medications for these disorders should be recognized as a program worthy of greater support from government and pharmaceutical industry sources. Clinical studies performed to date have largely been of poor design, making the recommendations provided in this review tentative at best.

  4. Drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ping; Kong, De-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Given the high risk and lengthy procedure of traditional drug development, drug repurposing is gaining more and more attention. Although many types of drug information have been used to repurpose drugs, drug-drug interaction data, which imply possible physiological effects or targets of drugs, remain unexploited. In this work, similarity of drug interaction was employed to infer similarity of the physiological effects or targets for the drugs. We collected 10,835 drug-drug interactions concerning 1074 drugs, and for 700 of them, drug similarity scores based on drug interaction profiles were computed and rendered using a drug association network with 589 nodes (drugs) and 2375 edges (drug similarity scores). The 589 drugs were clustered into 98 groups with Markov Clustering Algorithm, most of which were significantly correlated with certain drug functions. This indicates that the network can be used to infer the physiological effects of drugs. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of this drug association network to predict drug targets. The results show that the method is effective for 317 of 561 drugs that have known targets. Comparison of this method with the structure-based approach shows that they are complementary. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Transporters and drug-drug interactions: important determinants of drug disposition and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Jörg; Müller, Fabian; Fromm, Martin F

    2013-07-01

    Uptake and efflux transporters determine plasma and tissue concentrations of a broad variety of drugs. They are localized in organs such as small intestine, liver, and kidney, which are critical for drug absorption and elimination. Moreover, they can be found in important blood-tissue barriers such as the blood-brain barrier. Inhibition or induction of drug transporters by coadministered drugs can alter pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the victim drugs. This review will summarize in particular clinically observed drug-drug interactions attributable to inhibition or induction of intestinal export transporters [P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)], to inhibition of hepatic uptake transporters [organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)], or to inhibition of transporter-mediated [organic anion transporters (OATs), organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs), P-gp] renal secretion of xenobiotics. Available data on the impact of nutrition on transport processes as well as genotype-dependent, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions will be discussed. We will also present and discuss data on the variable extent to which information on the impact of transporters on drug disposition is included in summaries of product characteristics of selected countries (SPCs). Further work is required regarding a better understanding of the role of the drug metabolism-drug transport interplay for drug-drug interactions and on the extrapolation of in vitro findings to the in vivo (human) situation.

  6. Drug trafficking and drug use among urban African-American adolescents: a causal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Feigelman, S; Stanton, B; Galbraith, J; Huang, W

    1998-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that involvement in drug trafficking leads to illicit drug use among urban African-American adolescents. Self-reports of substance use, illicit drug use, and drug trafficking were obtained at baseline and every 6 months for 24 months from 383 African-American early adolescents. Transitions between involvement in drug trafficking and illicit drug use over time were examined. Path analysis was conducted to examine the causal relation between drug trafficking and drug use. Among the 35 youth who were initially involved only in drug trafficking, 22 (67%) subsequently used illicit drugs. Of the 53 youth who were initially involved only in illicit drug use, only 19 (42%) continued using drugs at later waves (p drug trafficking had a strong effect on subsequent drug trafficking and drug use, whereas baseline drug use did not have an effect on subsequent drug use or drug trafficking. Initiation of drug trafficking by adolescents appears to lead to sustained involvement in drug-related activities, including continued drug trafficking and drug use. By contrast, initiation of drug use does not necessarily lead to continued involvement in drug-related behaviors.

  7. Malignant lymphomas (including myeloproliferative disorders)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, I.D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter deals with the radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy of the malignant lymphomas. Included within this group are Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, mycosis fungoides, and chronic lymphatic leukaemia. A further section deals with the myeloproliferative disorders, including granulocytic leukaemia, polycythaemia vera, and primary thrombocythaemia. Excluded are myeloma and reticulum cell sarcoma of bone and acute leukaemia. With regard to Hodgkin's disease, the past 25 years have seen general recognition of the curative potential of radiotherapy, at least in the local stages, and, more recently, awareness of the ability to achieve long-term survival after combination chemotherapy in generalised or in recurrent disease. At the same time the importance of staging has become appreciated and the introduction of procedures such as lymphography, staging laparotomy, and computer tomography (CT) has enormously increased its reliability. Advances have not been so dramatic in the complex group of non-Hodgkins's lymphomas, but are still very real

  8. Emerging drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael E; Bryant, Sean M; Aks, Steven E

    2014-02-01

    Many new emerging drugs of abuse are marketed as legal highs despite being labeled "not for human consumption" to avoid regulation. The availability of these substances over the Internet and in "head shops" has lead to a multitude of emergency department visits with severe complications including deaths worldwide. Despite recent media attention, many of the newer drugs of abuse are still largely unknown by health care providers. Slight alterations of the basic chemical structure of substances create an entirely new drug no longer regulated by current laws and an ever-changing landscape of clinical effects. The purity of each substance with exact pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles is largely unknown. Many of these substances can be grouped by the class of drug and includes synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, phenethylamines, as well as piperazine derivatives. Resultant effects generally include psychoactive and sympathomimetic-like symptoms. Additionally, prescription medications, performance enhancing medications, and herbal supplements are also becoming more commonly abused. Most new drugs of abuse have no specific antidote and management largely involves symptom based goal directed supportive care with benzodiazepines as a useful adjunct. This paper will focus on the history, epidemiology, clinical effects, laboratory analysis, and management strategy for many of these emerging drugs of abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 77 FR 6463 - Revisions to Labeling Requirements for Blood and Blood Components, Including Source Plasma...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Blood Components, Including Source Plasma; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION..., Including Source Plasma,'' which provided incorrect publication information regarding a 60-day notice that...

  10. Compliance with national guidelines for the management of drug-drug interactions in Dutch community pharmacies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Schalekamp, T.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pharmacists contribute to the detection and prevention of drug therapy-related problems, including drug-drug interactions. Little is known about compliance with pharmacy practice guidelines for the management of drug-drug interaction alerts. OBJECTIVE: To measure the compliance of

  11. Drugs in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, David

    2012-01-01

    Drugs may be used by athletes for a number of reasons, including performance enhancement. The role of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is vital to ensure a winning performance has been achieved by fair means. Substances and methods that are included on the WADA Prohibited List are described. The procedures for testing banned substances are…

  12. Drug Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  13. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco ... Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth ( ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain ... About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other ...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who don't use marijuana. Haga ...

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? ... of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency of the United States Government. NIH is ...

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ... marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and ... Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  4. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of cantilever arms (12) contacting the surface of the test sample when performing the movement....... arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area...

  5. Drug abuse in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon CL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. Keywords: doping, athletes, steroids, drug abuse, mental illness

  6. The War Against Drug Producers

    OpenAIRE

    Herschel I. Grossman; Daniel Mejia

    2005-01-01

    This paper develops a model of a war against the producers of illegal hard drugs. This war occurs on two fronts. First, to prevent the cultivation of crops that are the raw material for producing drugs the state engages the drug producers in conflict over the control of arable land. Second, to impede further the production and exportation of drugs the state attempts to eradicate crops and to interdict drug shipments. The model also includes an interested outsider who uses both a stick and a c...

  7. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  8. New drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Sonophoresis in transdermal drug deliverys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghee; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has several significant advantages compared to oral drug delivery, including elimination of pain and sustained drug release. However, the use of TDD is limited by low skin permeability due to the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin. Sonophoresis is a technique that temporarily increases skin permeability such that various medications can be delivered noninvasively. For the past several decades, various studies of sonophoresis in TDD have been performed focusing on parameter optimization, delivery mechanism, transport pathway, or delivery of several drug categories including hydrophilic and high molecular weight compounds. Based on these various studies, several possible mechanisms of sonophoresis have been suggested. For example, cavitation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for drug delivery in sonophoresis. This review presents details of various studies on sonophoresis including the latest trends, delivery of various therapeutic drugs, sonophoresis pathways and mechanisms, and outlook of future studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahamatullah Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal.

  11. Drug-related problems in hospitalised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Egberts, TCG; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW; Brouwers, JRBJ

    Drug-related problems include medication errors (involving an error in the process of prescribing, dispensing, or administering a drug, whether there are adverse consequences or not) and adverse drug reactions (any response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, and which occurs at doses

  12. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactive molecules; Quantification of tricyclic pyrones from pharmacokinetic studies; Nanodelivery of siRNA; and Synthesis of viral protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekara, Sahani Manjitha

    simulation studies of dsRNA with these polymers revealed that nanoparticles can be formed between dsRNA and modified chitosan and PVP polymers. Nanocarriers of hydroxylated PVP (HO-PVP) and chitosan conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were synthesized, and analyzed using IR spectroscopy. Particle sizes and morphology were evaluated using AFM and encapsulation was studied using UV spectroscopy. However, the formation of stable nanoparticles with dsRNA could not be achieved with either of the polymers, and further efforts are ongoing to discover a better nanocarrier for nanodelivery of siRNA by using chitosan-galactose nanocarrier. In our efforts to discover a novel class of tripeptidyl anti-norovirus compounds that can strongly inhibit NV3CLpro, a set of tripeptidyl molecules were synthesized by modifying the P1 - P3 of the substrate peptide including a warhead. It was found that the replacement of P1 glutamine surrogate with triazole functionality does not improve the inhibitory activities of the compounds. In addition, the synthesis of a known dipeptidyl compound (GC376) was carried out for evaluating its efficacy on feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in cats.

  13. Legal Drugs Are Good Drugs and Illegal Drugs Are Bad Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Indrati, Dina; Prasetyo, Herry

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT : Labelling drugs are important issue nowadays in a modern society. Although it is generally believed that legal drugs are good drugs and illegal drugs are bad drugs, it is evident that some people do not aware about the side effects of drugs used. Therefore, a key contention of this philosophical essay is that explores harms minimisation policy, discuss whether legal drugs are good drugs and illegal drugs are bad drugs and explores relation of drugs misuse in a psychiatric nursing s...

  14. [Drug promiscuity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zong-ru

    2011-04-01

    It is essential for a successful drug to possess two basic characteristics: satisfactory pharmacological action with sufficient potency and selectivity; good druggability with eligible physicochemical, pharmacokinetic and safety profiles, as well as structural novelty. Promiscuity is defined as the property of a drug to act with multiple molecular targets and exhibit distinct pharmacological effects. Promiscuous drugs are the basis of polypharmacology and the causes for side effects and unsuitable DMPK. Drug promiscuity originates from protein promiscuity. In order to accommodate, metabolize and excrete various endo- and exogenous substances, protein acquired the capability during evolution to adapt a wide range of structural diversity, and it is unnecessary to reserve a specific protein for every single ligand. The structures of target proteins are integration of conservativity and diversity. The former is represented by the relatively conservative domains for secondary structures folding, which leads to overlapping in ligand-binding and consequent cross-reactivity of ligands. Diversity, however, embodies the subtle difference in structures. Similar structural domain may demonstrate different functions due to alteration of amino acid sequences. The phenomenon of promiscuity may facilitate the "design in" of multi-target ligands for the treatment of complicated diseases, whereas it should be appropriately handled to improve druggability. Therefore, one of the primary goals in drug design is to scrutinize and manipulate the "merits and faults" of promiscuity. This review discusses the application of promiscuity in drug design for receptors, enzymes, ion channels and cytochrome P450. It also briefly describes the methods to predict ligand promiscuity based on either target or ligand structures.

  15. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Download Drugs@FDA Express for free Search by Drug Name, Active Ingredient, or Application Number Enter at ...

  16. Study Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Stephanie Phuong; Roosta, Natalie; Nielsen, Mikkel Fuhr; Meyer, Maria Holmgaard; Friis, Katrine Birk

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, students around the world, started to use preparations as Ritalin and Modafinil,also known as study drugs, to improve their cognitive abilities1. It is a common use among thestudents in United States of America, but it is a new tendency in Denmark. Our main focus is tolocate whether study drugs needs to be legalized in Denmark or not. To investigate this ourstarting point is to understand central ethical arguments in the debate. We have chosen twoarguments from Nick Bostrom a...

  17. Genotyping for severe drug hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety.

  18. Application of Gelatin Sponge Impregnated with a Mixture of 3 Drugs to Intraoperative Nerve Root Block Combined with Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis: A Clinical Observation Including 96 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jin Peng; Fan, Yong; Liu, Ji Jun; Zhang, Jia Nan; Chang Liu, Shi; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-12-01

    Application of nerve root block is mainly for diagnosis with less application in intraoperative treatment. The aim of this study was to observe clinical and imaging outcomes of application of gelatin sponge impregnated with a mixture of 3 drugs to intraoperative nerve root block combined with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery in to treat adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis. From January 2012 to November 2014, 108 patients with adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis were treated with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery combined with intraoperative gelatin sponge impregnated with a mixture of 3 drugs. Visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Imaging was obtained preoperatively, 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, and at the last follow-up. Fusion status, complications, and other outcomes were assessed. Follow-up was complete for 96 patients. Visual analog scale scores of leg and back pain on postoperative days 1-7 were decreased compared with preoperatively. At 1 week postoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and last follow-up, visual analog scale score, Oswestry Disability Index score, coronal Cobb angle, and coronal and sagittal deviated distance decreased significantly (P = 0.000) and lumbar lordosis angle increased (P = 0.000) compared with preoperatively. Improvement rate of Oswestry Disability Index was 81.8% ± 7.4. Fusion rate between vertebral bodies was 92.7%. Application of gelatin sponge impregnated with 3 drugs combined with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis is safe and feasible with advantages of good short-term analgesia effect, minimal invasiveness, short length of stay, and good long-term clinical

  19. FDA Drug Safety Podcasts: resources for drug information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kimberly; Shepherd, Jennifer; Jackson, Steven; Chew, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    To describe a Web-based drug information service provided by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to increase the reach of Drug Safety Communications to pharmacists and other health professionals. The Division of Drug Information (DDI) within the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Office of Communications, Silver Spring, MD, between January 2010 and April 2012. DDI provides drug information services regarding human drug products and expert advice and guidance on all aspects of CDER activities. Customers include consumers, health professionals, regulated industry, insurance companies, academia, law enforcement, and other government agencies (national and international). Use of audio podcasts to disseminate timely drug safety information targeted toward pharmacists and other health professionals. RESULTS Since 2010, DDI has recorded and published 119 FDA Drug Safety Podcasts that have reached more than 620,000 individuals. FDA Drug Safety Podcasts serve as portable and convenient options for pharmacists to stay current on the latest drug safety information. Pharmacists are encouraged to explore incorporating Web-based technologies, such as audio podcasts, into their practices.

  20. Drug Allergy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Rasha H. El-Owaidy. Immunology Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Ain Shams University, Cairo. Introduction. Adverse reactions to pharmaceutical and diagnostic products constitute a major hazard in the practice of medicine and are responsible for substantial morbidity and cost. Adverse drug reactions can be divided into ...

  1. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure

  2. Capping Drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well documented that till recent times drugs derived from plants were used to relieve patients from suffering. But at the turn of the last century, with the improvement in purification meth- ods using chromatographic techniques, single compounds with well-defined structure became available for testing and treat- ment.

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the ... información sobre el abuso de drogas, y adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse ( ...

  4. Misused Drug

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    analgesic effects by antagonising a subset of glutamate receptors ... unpleasant dreams up to 24hrs after the drug has been given.7 ... are intact. The amnesic effect of ketamine, which often persists for up to one hour after recovery of consciousness, cnsuree that there is no recall of surgery or anaesthesia. Effects on the War ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button ... sobre el abuso de drogas, y adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | ...

  6. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pain Prevention Recovery Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications ... mind-altering ingredient, in the blood. But the role that marijuana plays in crashes is ... age, gender, race, and presence of alcohol. 9 More research ...

  7. Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Future survey shows long term decline in illicit drug use, prescription opioid abuse, cigarette and alcohol use among the nation’s youth. View Online Download PDF Monitoring the Future 2013 Survey Results: College and Adults Published: April 30, 2015 In 2013, ...

  8. Glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia with insulin glargine 300 U/mL compared with glargine 100 U/mL in Japanese adults with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin plus oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs (EDITION JP 2 randomised 12-month trial including 6-month extension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Y; Koyama, M; Cheng, X; Sumi, M; Riddle, M C; Bolli, G B; Hirose, T

    2017-10-01

    To compare insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) with glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in Japanese adults with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes on basal insulin and oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs over 12 months. EDITION JP 2 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 study. Following a 6-month treatment period, participants continued receiving previously assigned once daily Gla-300 or Gla-100, plus oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs, in a 6-month extension period. Glycaemic control, hypoglycaemia and adverse events were assessed. The 12-month completion rate was 88% for Gla-300 and 96% for Gla-100, with comparable reasons for discontinuation. Mean HbA 1c decrease from baseline to month 12 was 0.3% in both groups. Annualised rates of confirmed (≤3.9mmol/L [≤70mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia were lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100 (nocturnal [00:00-05:59h]: rate ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval: 0.18 to 0.92; anytime [24h]: rate ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.44 to 0.94). Cumulative number of hypoglycaemic events was lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100. Adverse event profiles were comparable between treatments. Over 12 months, Gla-300-treated participants achieved sustained glycaemic control and experienced less hypoglycaemia, particularly at night, versus Gla-100, supporting 6-month results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. RESEARCH Tricyclic antidepressant overdose necessitating ICU ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -1-adrenergic receptors, a membrane-stabilising effect on the myocardium and anticholinergic action.1,2 Overdose may result in convulsions, neurological and respiratory depression and cardiac arrhythmias.2. The lifetime prevalence of major ...

  10. Freight tricycle operations in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    As cities become more congested and increasingly focused on sustainability, cargo cycles offer a potential alternative to motorized vehicles for local and : last : - : mile goods delivery. However, few studies have examined this mode in the North Ame...

  11. Drug abuse first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use of these drugs is a form of drug abuse. Medicines that are for treating a health problem ... about local resources. Alternative Names Overdose from drugs; Drug abuse first aid References Myck MB. Hallucinogens and drugs ...

  12. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Kumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, viz., phenytoin (PHT, carbamazepine (CBZ, phenobarbital (PB, lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  13. Women and Drug Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentich, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Presents a feminist perspective which offers a social structural framework for examining women's problematic behavior in traditional gender roles. Examines implications for treatment of women with drug dependence problems including developing the helping agent's awareness of the pervasiveness of sexism and its potentially negative effects.…

  14. Drugs Used in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on drugs used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  15. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  16. Optical sensors for therapeutic drug monitoring of antidepressants for a better medication adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Anne K.; Hess, Stefan; Gauglitz, Günter

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring provides the attending physicians with detailed information on a patient's individual serum level especially during long-term medication. Due to the fact that each patient tolerates drugs or their metabolites differently a medication adjustment can reduce the number and intensity of noticeable side-effects. In particular, psychotropic drugs can cause unpleasant side-effects that affect a patient's life almost as much as the mental disease itself. The tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline is commonly used for treatment of depressions and was selected for the development of an immunoassay using the direct optical sensor technique Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS). RIfS is a simple, robust and label-free method for direct monitoring of binding events on glass surfaces. Binding to the surface causes a shift of the interference spectrum by a change of the refractive index or physical thickness. This technique can be used for time-resolved observation of association and dissociation of amitriptyline (antigen) and a specific antibody using the binding inhibition test format. An amitriptyline derivative is immobilized on the sensor surface and a specific amount of antibodies can bind to the surface unless the binding is inhibited by free amitriptyline in a sample. No fluorescent label is needed making the whole assay less expensive than label-based methods. With this recently developed immunoassay amitriptyline concentrations in buffer (PBS) can easily be detected down to 500 ng/L.

  17. Predicting potential drug-drug interactions by integrating chemical, biological, phenotypic and network data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Liu, Feng; Luo, Fei; Tian, Gang; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-01-05

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major concerns in drug discovery. Accurate prediction of potential DDIs can help to reduce unexpected interactions in the entire lifecycle of drugs, and are important for the drug safety surveillance. Since many DDIs are not detected or observed in clinical trials, this work is aimed to predict unobserved or undetected DDIs. In this paper, we collect a variety of drug data that may influence drug-drug interactions, i.e., drug substructure data, drug target data, drug enzyme data, drug transporter data, drug pathway data, drug indication data, drug side effect data, drug off side effect data and known drug-drug interactions. We adopt three representative methods: the neighbor recommender method, the random walk method and the matrix perturbation method to build prediction models based on different data. Thus, we evaluate the usefulness of different information sources for the DDI prediction. Further, we present flexible frames of integrating different models with suitable ensemble rules, including weighted average ensemble rule and classifier ensemble rule, and develop ensemble models to achieve better performances. The experiments demonstrate that different data sources provide diverse information, and the DDI network based on known DDIs is one of most important information for DDI prediction. The ensemble methods can produce better performances than individual methods, and outperform existing state-of-the-art methods. The datasets and source codes are available at https://github.com/zw9977129/drug-drug-interaction/ .

  18. Ketamine - A Multifaceted Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Li, Jian; Lu, Yi; Sun, Dajin; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Liu, Renyu; Luo, Jin Jun

    There is a petition for tight control of ketamine from the Chinese government to classify ketamine as a Schedule I drug, which is defined as a drug with no currently accepted medical use but a high potential for abuse. However, ketamine has unique properties that can benefit different patient populations. Scholars from the Translational Perioperative and Pain Medicine and the International Chinese Academy of Anesthesiology WeChat groups had an interactive discussion on ketamine, including its current medical applications, future research priorities, and benefits versus risks. The discussion is summarized in this manuscript with some minor edits.

  19. The DrugAge database of aging-related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barardo, Diogo; Thornton, Daniel; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Walsh, Michael; Sharifi, Samim; Ferreira, Susana; Anžič, Andreja; Fernandes, Maria; Monteiro, Patrick; Grum, Tjaša; Cordeiro, Rui; De-Souza, Evandro Araújo; Budovsky, Arie; Araujo, Natali; Gruber, Jan; Petrascheck, Michael; Fraifeld, Vadim E; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Moskalev, Alexey; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2017-06-01

    Aging is a major worldwide medical challenge. Not surprisingly, identifying drugs and compounds that extend lifespan in model organisms is a growing research area. Here, we present DrugAge (http://genomics.senescence.info/drugs/), a curated database of lifespan-extending drugs and compounds. At the time of writing, DrugAge contains 1316 entries featuring 418 different compounds from studies across 27 model organisms, including worms, flies, yeast and mice. Data were manually curated from 324 publications. Using drug-gene interaction data, we also performed a functional enrichment analysis of targets of lifespan-extending drugs. Enriched terms include various functional categories related to glutathione and antioxidant activity, ion transport and metabolic processes. In addition, we found a modest but significant overlap between targets of lifespan-extending drugs and known aging-related genes, suggesting that some but not most aging-related pathways have been targeted pharmacologically in longevity studies. DrugAge is freely available online for the scientific community and will be an important resource for biogerontologists. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Drug Education & Prevention. Chapter 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains seven papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TCs) that deal with drug education and prevention. Papers include: (1) "State of the Art of Drug Prevention Programs: A Five Year Retrospective of School Curricula" (Natalie Silverstein, et al.); (2) "TCs: Education for Wholeness"…

  1. Teratogenic mechanisms of medical drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, Marleen M. H. J.; van Rooij, Iris A. L. M.; Miller, Richard K.; Zielhuis, Gerhard A.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Roeleveld, Nel

    2010-01-01

    Although prescription drug use is common during pregnancy, the human teratogenic risks are undetermined for more than 90% of drug treatments approved in the USA during the past decades. A particular birth defect may have its origins through multiple mechanisms and possible exposures, including

  2. Drugs in Sport: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerleider, Steven

    This literature review addresses the prevalance of drug use and abuse among college athletes and the reasons for such abuse. Among reasons cited are status, peer pressure, boredom, and performance enhancement. Possible interventions that may prevent illegal drug use are also discussed, including educating coaches and trainers to help athletes,…

  3. Microcontainers for Intestinal Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tentor, Fabio; Mazzoni, Chiara; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    Among all the drug administration routes, the oral one is the most preferred by the patients being less invasive, faster and easier. Oral drug delivery systems designed to target the intestine are produced by powder technology and capsule formulations. Those systems including micro- and nano...

  4. Drugs, Herbs and Supplements: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/druginformation.html Drugs, Herbs and Supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... included in drug packages, see DailyMed . Herbs and Supplements Browse dietary supplements and herbal remedies to learn ...

  5. Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the U.S. and state level by selected demographic characteristics, and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug...

  6. Drugs: What You Should Know (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Commonly abused drugs include: alcohol amphetamines bath salts cocaine cough and cold medicines (DXM) crack depressants GHB ... need. Several kinds of treatment are available for drug addiction . The two main types are behavioral (helping a ...

  7. Drug Poisoning Mortality by State: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the U.S. and state level by selected demographic characteristics, and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug...

  8. Monitoring drug markets in the Internet age and the evolution of drug monitoring systems in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lucy; Roxburgh, Amanda; Bruno, Raimondo; Van Buskirk, Joe

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, drug monitoring systems have been in place for more than a decade allowing for the measurement of ongoing trends in drug use and the detection of new drugs. The Drug Trends Unit at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre monitors drugs through four separate systems. The Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS) measures the price, purity, and availability of drugs that are primarily injected. The Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System (EDRS) monitors psychostimulants that are used recreationally. The National Illicit Drugs Indicator Project (NIDIP) analyzes indicator data including drug-related hospitalizations and deaths. Finally, the Drugs and Emerging Technologies Project (DNeT) analyzes the role of the Internet in the procurement and use of novel psychoactive substances. This paper provides an overview of each component of the system, demonstrating how the system has evolved over time. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., including microwave frequencies. 179.30 Section 179.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation, including microwave frequencies, may be safely used for heating food under the following conditions: (a) The radiation...

  10. Drug Control: Observations on Elements of the Federal Drug Control Strategy. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    Although the United States government invests vast sums of money in the war on drugs, the availability of drugs and the number of persons using illegal drugs are still serious problems. Information that Congress can use in improving drug control strategies is provided here. Some of the report's highlights include current research on promising…

  11. Counterfeiting of drugs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Joseane; Souza, Daniele Zago

    2012-02-01

    To identify the main counterfeit drugs seized by the Brazilian Federal Police and the states where seizures have been made. A retrospective descriptive study on expert reports produced by criminal investigators of the Federal Police between January 2007 and September 2010, in relation to counterfeit drugs, was carried out. The drugs with greatest numbers of seizures were selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors that are used for treating male erectile dysfunction (Cialis® and Viagra®, mean = 66% ), followed by anabolic steroids (Durateston® and Hemogenin®: 8.9% and 5.7%, respectively). The greatest proportions of the counterfeit drugs were seized in the states of Paraná, Santa Catarina (both Southeastern Brazil) and São Paulo (Southeastern), and the number of non-authentic drugs sent for investigation increased by more than 200% over the study period. There were increases in seizures of smuggled drugs found together with counterfeit drugs: 67% of the seizures included at least one smuggled drug. Counterfeiting of drugs is a severe public health problem. Identification of the classes of counterfeit drugs present in Brazil and the main Brazilian states with this problem may facilitate future preventive and suppressive actions by the Brazilian bodies responsible for such actions.

  12. Quantitative decisions in drug development

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang-Stein, Christy

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a high-level treatise of evidence-based decisions in drug development. Because of the inseparable relationship between designs and decisions, a good portion of this book is devoted to the design of clinical trials. The book begins with an overview of product development and regulatory approval pathways. It then discusses how to incorporate prior knowledge into study design and decision making at different stages of drug development. The latter include selecting appropriate metrics to formulate decisions criteria, determining go/no-go decisions for progressing a drug candidate to the next stage and predicting the effectiveness of a product. Lastly, it points out common mistakes made by drug developers under the current drug-development paradigm. The book offers useful insights to statisticians, clinicians, regulatory affairs managers and decision-makers in the pharmaceutical industry who have a basic understanding of the drug-development process and the clinical trials conducted to support dru...

  13. The limited utility of electrocardiography variables used to predict arrhythmia in psychotropic drug overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Nicholas A; Chevalier, Stephan; Leditschke, I Anne; O'Connell, Dianne L; Leitch, James; Pond, Susan M

    2003-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between serious arrhythmias in patients with psychotropic drug overdose and electrocardiography (ECG) findings that have been suggested previously to predict this complication. Methods Thirty-nine patients with serious arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia or cardiac arrest) after tricyclic antidepressant overdose or thioridazine overdose were compared with 117 controls with clinically significant overdose matched to each case for the drug ingested. These patients with psychotropic drug overdose had presented for treatment to the Department of Clinical Toxicology, Newcastle and to the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane. The heart rate, the QRS width, the QTc and QT intervals, the QT dispersion, and the R wave and R/S ratios in aVR on the initial ECGs were compared in cases and controls. Results The cases had taken dothiepin (16 patients), doxepin (six patients), thioridazine (five patients), amitriptyline (five patients), nortriptyline (three patients), imipramine (one patient) and a combination of dothiepin and thioridazine (three patients). In 20 of the 39 patients with arrhythmias, the arrhythmia had been a presumed ventricular tachycardia. Of the other 19 patients, 15 patients had a supraventricular tachycardia, two patients had cardiac arrests (one asystole, one without ECG monitoring) and two patients had insufficient data recorded to make classification of the arrhythmias possible. The QRS was ≥ 100 ms in 82% of cases but also in 76% of controls. QRS ≥ 160 ms had a sensitivity of only 13% and occurred in 2% of controls. QRS > 120 ms, QTc > 500 and the R/S ratio in aVR appeared to have a stronger association with the occurrence of arrhythmia: QRS > 120 ms (odds ratio [OR], 3.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46–8.68), QTc > 500 (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.33–7.07), and R/S ratio in aVR > 0.7 (OR, 16; 95% CI, 3.47–74). Excluding thioridazine overdoses

  14. Drug monitoring and individual dose optimization of antimicrobial drugs : oxazolidinones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattaneo, Dario; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem; Neely, Michael

    INTRODUCTION: Oxazolidinones are synthetic antibiotics with bacteriostatic activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Linezolid, the first marketed oxazolidinone, has shown also activity against Mycobaterium tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains. Recently,

  15. Drugs for rare disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Serge; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2017-08-01

    Estimates of the frequencies of rare disorders vary from country to country; the global average defined prevalence is 40 per 100 000 (0.04%). Some occur in only one or a few patients. However, collectively rare disorders are fairly common, affecting 6-8% of the US population, or about 30 million people, and a similar number in the European Union. Most of them affect children and most are genetically determined. Diagnosis can be difficult, partly because of variable presentations and partly because few clinicians have experience of individual rare disorders, although they may be assisted by searching databases. Relatively few rare disorders have specific pharmacological treatments (so-called orphan drugs), partly because of difficulties in designing trials large enough to determine benefits and harms alike. Incentives have been introduced to encourage the development of orphan drugs, including tax credits and research aids, simplification of marketing authorization procedures and exemption from fees, and extended market exclusivity. Consequently, the number of applications for orphan drugs has grown, as have the costs of using them, so much so that treatments may not be cost-effective. It has therefore been suggested that not-for-profit organizations that are socially motivated to reduce those costs should be tasked with producing them. A growing role for patient organizations, improved clinical and translational infrastructures, and developments in genetics have also contributed to successful drug development. The translational discipline of clinical pharmacology is an essential component in drug development, including orphan drugs. Clinical pharmacologists, skilled in basic pharmacology and its links to clinical medicine, can be involved at all stages. They can contribute to the delineation of genetic factors that determine clinical outcomes of pharmacological interventions, develop biomarkers, design and perform clinical trials, assist regulatory decision

  16. Psychotropic Drugs and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Lúcia Moreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS infection is frequently associated with psychiatric disor- ders like psychosis, depression and anxiety. Psychiatric comorbidities may interfere with adherence to antiretroviral treatment. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions are essential. However, the administration of a psychotropic drug to HAART therapy can result in drug interactions.Objectives: This review aims to analyze the various psychotropic drugs that can be used in these patients, as well as the interactions and adverse reactions that may occur. Methods: A MEDLINE search on anglo-saxonic literature was conducted, from 1993 until 2011, using the key-words: HIV, AIDS, psychosis, depression, anxiety, secondary mania, antidepressive agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, HAART. Results: We found 100 articles, of which 66 were included and 34 excluded. The articles that showed no specific data on the use of psychotropic drugs in HIV patients were excluded. Discussion: Pharmachologic interactions may occur by occupation of the same metabolic pathways. Further research is needed with indications for best practices. Psychotherapeutic interventions should be considered. Conclusion: The choice of the therapeutic intervention, namely when considering psychotropic drugs with the lowest number of interactions and adverse effects is crucial in order to achieve therapeutic success in the treatment of HIV infected patients.

  17. Drug Policy in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucek Psenkova, Maria; Visnansky, Martin; Mackovicova, Stanislava; Tomek, Dominik

    2017-09-01

    Slovak law sets clear rules and timelines in the process of approving the price and reimbursement of drugs. During the last decade, the Ministry of Health adopted several cost-containment measures in the price and reimbursement policy. The most effective measures were the implementation of the external referencing of drug prices in 2008 and the reimbursement law in 2011. The new act introduced several regulations such as making stricter rules for the referencing of prices, setting cost per quality-adjusted life-year threshold, and defining new rules for the setting of reimbursements. On one side, implementation of these measures helped to achieve visible cost savings, but, on the other side, cost-containment policies have had some unintended consequences. In recent years, Slovakia has been facing a decreased availability of drugs because of parallel exports. As a result of the government's effort, Slovakia is the only country in the European Union that implemented a legal ban on the re-export of medicines. During the decade before 2011, many innovative drugs were included in the reimbursement system. Because of stricter legal conditions introduced in 2011, there has been a gradual shift in reimbursing innovative drugs from the standard reimbursement system to reimbursement by way of exceptions of health insurance companies. Recently, there has been an ongoing discussion on possible changes to the reimbursement law. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Imipramine is an orally active drug against both antimony sensitive and resistant Leishmania donovani clinical isolates in experimental infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Mukherjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an endeavor to find an orally active and affordable antileishmanial drug, we tested the efficacy of a cationic amphiphilic drug, imipramine, commonly used for the treatment of depression in humans. The only available orally active antileishmanial drug is miltefosine with long half life and teratogenic potential limits patient compliance. Thus there is a genuine need for an orally active antileishmanial drug. Previously it was shown that imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant alters the protonmotive force in promastigotes, but its in vivo efficacy was not reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the drug is highly active against antimony sensitive and resistant Leishmania donovani in both promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes and in LD infected hamster model. The drug was found to decrease the mitochondrial transmembrane potential of Leishmania donovani (LD promastigotes and purified amastigotes after 8 h of treatment, whereas miltefosine effected only a marginal change even after 24 h. The drug restores defective antigen presenting ability of the parasitized macrophages. The status of the host protective factors TNF α, IFN γ and iNOS activity increased with the concomitant decrease in IL 10 and TGF β level in imipramine treated infected hamsters and evolution of matured sterile hepatic granuloma. The 10-day therapeutic window as a monotherapy, showing about 90% clearance of organ parasites in infected hamsters regardless of their SSG sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that imipramine possibly qualifies for a new use of an old drug and can be used as an effective orally active drug for the treatment of Kala-azar.

  19. Computational prediction of drug-drug interactions based on drugs functional similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdousi, Reza; Safdari, Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Therapeutic activities of drugs are often influenced by co-administration of drugs that may cause inevitable drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and inadvertent side effects. Prediction and identification of DDIs are extremely vital for the patient safety and success of treatment modalities. A number of computational methods have been employed for the prediction of DDIs based on drugs structures and/or functions. Here, we report on a computational method for DDIs prediction based on functional similarity of drugs. The model was set based on key biological elements including carriers, transporters, enzymes and targets (CTET). The model was applied for 2189 approved drugs. For each drug, all the associated CTETs were collected, and the corresponding binary vectors were constructed to determine the DDIs. Various similarity measures were conducted to detect DDIs. Of the examined similarity methods, the inner product-based similarity measures (IPSMs) were found to provide improved prediction values. Altogether, 2,394,766 potential drug pairs interactions were studied. The model was able to predict over 250,000 unknown potential DDIs. Upon our findings, we propose the current method as a robust, yet simple and fast, universal in silico approach for identification of DDIs. We envision that this proposed method can be used as a practical technique for the detection of possible DDIs based on the functional similarities of drugs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Drug product selection: legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, T P; Kirking, D M; Ascione, F J; Welage, L S; Gaither, C A

    2001-01-01

    To review the potential legal liability of the pharmacist in the drug product selection process. Published articles identified through MEDLINE, published law reviews identified through InfoTrac, and appellate court decisions. Search terms used included pharmacist liability, drug product selection, and generic substitution. Additional articles, books, and appellate court decisions were identified from the bibliographies of retrieved articles and citations in appellate court decisions. Pharmacists engaging in drug product selection are civilly liable under three legal theories: negligence, express or implied warranties, and strict product liability. Potential criminal liability includes prosecution for insurance fraud, deceptive business practices, and violation of state drug product selection laws and regulation. Pharmacists increase their liability when engaging in drug product selection, but the increase is small. Still, the law continues to evolve as pharmacists seek expanded roles and responsibilities. When courts give closer examination to pharmacists' expanded role, it is likely that pharmacists' liability will increase.

  1. Drug use and highway safety : a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-07-01

    This report reviews the research literature concerning several aspects of drug use as it relates to traffic safety. Some of the topics covered include the effects of drugs, types of drug users; research problems in assessing risk; laboratory findings...

  2. Drug: D03803 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03803 Drug Lidorestat (USAN) ... C18H11F3N2O2S. H2O D03803.gif ... Antidiabetic agent... ... DG01882 ... Aldose reductase inhibitor ... Treatment of diabetic complications, including neuropathy, retinopa

  3. Reality Television Programs Are Associated With Illegal Drug Use and Prescription Drug Misuse Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Shlivko, Alexander

    2016-01-02

    Reality television watching and social media use are popular activities. Reality television can include mention of illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. To determine if reality television and social media use of Twitter are associated with either illegal drug use or prescription drug misuse. Survey of 576 college students in 2011. Independent variables included watching reality television (social cognitive theory), parasocial interaction (parasocial interaction theory), television hours watched (cultivation theory), following a reality television character on Twitter, and demographics. Outcome variables were illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Watching reality television and also identifying with reality TV program characters were each associated with greater odds for illegal drug use. Also, following a reality TV character on Twitter had greater odds for illegal drug use and also in one analytical model for prescription drug misuse. No support was seen for cultivation theory. Those born in the United States had greater odds for illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Women and Asians had lower odds for illegal drug use. African Americans and Asians had lower odds for prescription drug misuse. Physicians, psychologists, and other healthcare practitioners may find it useful to include questions in their clinical interview about reality television watching and Twitter use. Physician and psychology groups, public health practitioners, and government health agencies should consider discussing with television broadcasting companies the potential negative impact of including content with illegal drugs and prescription drug misuse on reality television programs.

  4. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Image-guided drug delivery : Preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, G; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy.

  6. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy.

  7. Urine drug screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug screen - urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence may indicate that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  8. National Drug Code Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Listing Act of 1972 requires registered drug establishments to provide the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with a current list of all drugs manufactured,...

  9. Other Drugs of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Abuse » Other Drugs of Abuse Other Drugs of Abuse Listen There are many other drugs of abuse, ... and Rehab Resources About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | Contact ...

  10. Polypharmacy and the risk of drug-drug interactions among Danish elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, J U; Bjerrum, L; Hallas, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the use of all subsidized prescription drugs with special attention to the elderly (> or = 70 years of age), including their use of drug combination generally accepted as carrying a risk of severe interactions. DESIGN: Descriptive prevalence study. SETTING: Odense...... accepted as carrying a risk of severe interactions. RESULTS: Among persons less than 70 years, 67.9% used none, 16.5% used one drug and 15.6% used two or more prescription drugs. The corresponding prevalences for the elderly were 35.7%, 15.9% and 48.4%. The 26,337 elderly patients with at least two drugs...... used 21,293 different combinations. Of the elderly patients who had purchased > or = two drugs, 4.4% had combinations of drugs carrying a risk of severe interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Most elderly use drugs and usually several drugs concomitantly. The elderly form a heterogeneous group of drug users. Drug...

  11. Tratamento de idosos com depressão utilizando tricíclicos, IMAO, ISRS e outros antidepressivos Depression treatment of elderly patients using tricyclics, MAOI, SSRI, and other antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Z Scalco

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Antidepressivos são eficazes no tratamento da depressão em idosos. O sucesso do tratamento depende do tipo e da gravidade da depressão; das comorbidades com outras doenças psiquiátricas ou clínicas; da escolha adequada de antidepressivos, de sua eficácia e perfil de efeitos adversos; da orientação do paciente e de sua aderência ao tratamento. O manejo dos efeitos adversos em pacientes idosos, que usam muito mais medicações e apresentam mais doenças, é o ponto forte na escolha de antidepressivos. Em geral, os inibidores seletivos da recaptação de serotonina têm sido preferidos por apresentar menos riscos de complicações por efeitos adversos. Porém, diferentes antidepressivos podem ser preferíveis para diferentes pacientes. É indispensável que o médico conheça o paciente que irá tratar e o perfil de efeitos adversos e de possíveis interações medicamentosas dos antidepressivos para poder escolher o mais adequado para cada paciente. Neste artigo, são abordados os diferentes grupos de antidepressivos no tratamento agudo da depressão em idosos e o tratamento em populações especiais de idosos (idosos debilitados e idosos com demência.Antidepressants are effective in treating depression in the elderly. Treatment response depends on the type and severity of depression, comorbidities, efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants, patient education and treatment compliance. The aging process leads to physiological changes that, in association with concomitant diseases and use of several medications, render the elderly person more vulnerable to the adverse effects of antidepressants and an increased risk of drug interactions. It is very important that psychiatrists treating elderly patients be aware of possible adverse effects and drug interactions of different antidepressants. This paper reviews data on the efficacy and safety of antidepressant agents currently available for the treatment of the elderly, and includes

  12. CONCEPT OF DRUG INTERACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Drug interaction is an increasingly important cause of adverse reactions (ADR), and is the modification of the effect of one drug (object) by the prior or concomitant administration of another drug (precipitant drug). Drug interaction may either enhance or diminish the intended effect of one or both drugs. For example severe haemorrhage may occur if warfarin and salicylates (asprin) are combined. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or act...

  13. Understanding drugs and behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrott, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix xi Part I Drugs and Their Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychoactive drugs: introduction and overview . . . . . . . . 2 The brain...

  14. An overview of the relations between polymorphisms in drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and survival after cancer drug treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, Corine; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Smits, Paul H. M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.

    2009-01-01

    A wide interindividual variability in survival after cancer treatment is observed. This is attributable to many factors, including tumour and patient related factors. Genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters may be one of these factors. Drug metabolising enzymes are

  15. Digital Drug Dosing: Dosing in Drug Assays by Light-Defined Volumes of Hydrogels with Embedded Drug-Loaded Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faralli, Adele; Melander, Fredrik; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogels are widely used for biomedical applications, including matrices for controlled drug release. We present a method for defining drug dosing in screening assays by light-activated cross-linking of PEG-diacrylate hydrogels with embedded drug-loaded liposome...

  16. Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%–30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST; however, the high turn around time of 2–6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  17. Drug-resistant Spinal Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anil K; Jaggi, Karan Raj; Bhayana, Himanshu; Saha, Rumpa

    2018-01-01

    Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB) is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%-30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT) for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST); however, the high turn around time of 2-6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  18. Drug abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, T.R.; Seastrunk, J.W.; Malone, G.; Knesevich, M.A.; Hickey, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that this study used SPECT to examine patients who have abused drugs to determine whether SPECT could identify abnormalities and whether these findings have clinical importance. Fifteen patients with a history of substance abuse (eight with cocaine, six with amphetamine, and one with organic solvent) underwent SPECT performed with a triple-headed camera and Tc-99m HMPAO both early for blood flow and later for functional information. These images were then processed into a 3D videotaped display used in group therapy. All 15 patients had multiple areas of decreased tracer uptake peppered throughout the cortex but mainly affecting the parietal lobes, expect for the organic solvent abuser who had a large parietal defect. The videotapes were subjectively described by a therapist as an exceptional tool that countered patient denial of physical damage from substance abuse. Statistical studies of recidivism between groups is under way

  19. Using Potentiometric Free Drug Sensors to Determine the Free Concentration of Ionizable Drugs in Colloidal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy; Chakraborty, Anjan; Xi, Xi

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigates the use of free drug sensors (FDS) to measure free ionized drug concentrations in colloidal systems, including micellar solutions, emulsions, and lipid formulations during in vitro lipolysis. Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DPH) and loperamide hydrochloride (LOP) were...... selected as model drugs. Self-diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance studies were performed and confirmed the entrapment of drugs in micelles in Brij 35 and sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDC)/phosphatidylcholine (PC) micellar solutions. The FDS measurements indicated that with a constant level of drug...

  20. Drugs and the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  1. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe (n=64 and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent (n=117. Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5% and 124 women (68.5% with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1% patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81% were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%, clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%, and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%. Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  2. Identifying novel drug indications through automated reasoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Tari

    Full Text Available With the large amount of pharmacological and biological knowledge available in literature, finding novel drug indications for existing drugs using in silico approaches has become increasingly feasible. Typical literature-based approaches generate new hypotheses in the form of protein-protein interactions networks by means of linking concepts based on their cooccurrences within abstracts. However, this kind of approaches tends to generate too many hypotheses, and identifying new drug indications from large networks can be a time-consuming process.In this work, we developed a method that acquires the necessary facts from literature and knowledge bases, and identifies new drug indications through automated reasoning. This is achieved by encoding the molecular effects caused by drug-target interactions and links to various diseases and drug mechanism as domain knowledge in AnsProlog, a declarative language that is useful for automated reasoning, including reasoning with incomplete information. Unlike other literature-based approaches, our approach is more fine-grained, especially in identifying indirect relationships for drug indications.To evaluate the capability of our approach in inferring novel drug indications, we applied our method to 943 drugs from DrugBank and asked if any of these drugs have potential anti-cancer activities based on information on their targets and molecular interaction types alone. A total of 507 drugs were found to have the potential to be used for cancer treatments. Among the potential anti-cancer drugs, 67 out of 81 drugs (a recall of 82.7% are indeed known cancer drugs. In addition, 144 out of 289 drugs (a recall of 49.8% are non-cancer drugs that are currently tested in clinical trials for cancer treatments. These results suggest that our method is able to infer drug indications (original or alternative based on their molecular targets and interactions alone and has the potential to discover novel drug indications for

  3. Annual Report on the State of the Drugs Problem in the European Union, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, Lisbon (Portugal).

    This report presents an overview of the drug phenomenon in Europe at the start of the new millennium. The first chapter begins with a discussion of overall drug trends. Specifically, it examines trends in drug use and the consequences including multiple drug use; problem drug use and demand for treatment; drug-related deaths; drug-related…

  4. Pharmacodynamics and common drug-drug interactions of the third-generation antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Srđan; Janković, Slobodan M; Novaković, Milan; Milosavljević, Marko; Folić, Marko

    2018-02-01

    Anticonvulsants that belong to the third generation are considered as 'newer' antiepileptic drugs, including: eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide, perampanel, brivaracetam, rufinamide and stiripentol. Areas covered: This article reviews pharmacodynamics (i.e. mechanisms of action) and clinically relevant drug-drug interactions of the third-generation antiepileptic drugs. Expert opinion: Newer antiepileptic drugs have mechanisms of action which are not shared with the first and the second generation anticonvulsants, like inhibition of neurotransmitters release, blocking receptors for excitatory amino acids and new ways of sodium channel inactivation. New mechanisms of action increase chances of controlling forms of epilepsy resistant to older anticonvulsants. Important advantage of the third-generation anticonvulsants could be their little propensity for interactions with both antiepileptic and other drugs observed until now, making prescribing much easier and safer. However, this may change with new studies specifically designed to discover drug-drug interactions. Although the third-generation antiepileptic drugs enlarged therapeutic palette against epilepsy, 20-30% of patients with epilepsy is still treatment-resistant and need new pharmacological approach. There is great need to explore all molecular targets that may directly or indirectly be involved in generation of seizures, so a number of candidate compounds for even newer anticonvulsants could be generated.

  5. Intranasal Oxytocin for the Treatment of Pain Associated with Interstitial Cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    GRA score, which will be collected at 6 and 24 hours post drug or placebo administration. This is a seven-point symmetric scale previously validated...at relieving symptoms. These include bladder distention, bladder instillation with DMSO, oral drugs (Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium (Elmiron), aspirin...ibuprofen, tricyclic antidepressants, antihistamines , narcotic analgesics such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) with codeine or longer- acting narcotics

  6. 2013–2014 National Roadside Study of alcohol and drug use by drivers: drug results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This was a nationally representative study to estimate the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use among drivers. : Drugs studied included 98 over-the-counter, prescription, and illegal substances. Drivers were randomly selected at : 60 sites (300 l...

  7. Observational study of drug-drug interactions in oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sacramento Díaz-Carrasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of potential clinically relevant drug- drug interactions in adult oncological inpatients, as well as to describe the most frequent interactions. A standard database was used. Method: An observational, transversal, and descriptive study including patients admitted to the Oncology Service of a reference hospital. All prescriptions were collected twice a week during a month. They were analysed using Lexicomp® database, recording all interactions classified with a level of risk: C, D or X. Results: A total of 1 850 drug-drug interactions were detected in 218 treatments. The prevalence of treatments with at least one clinically relevant interaction was 95%, being 94.5% for those at level C and 26.1% for levels D and X. The drugs most commonly involved in the interactions detected were opioid analgesics, antipsychotics (butyrophenones, benzodiazepines, pyrazolones, glucocorticoids and heparins, whereas interactions with antineoplastics were minimal, highlighting those related to paclitaxel and between metamizole and various antineoplastics. Conclusions: The prevalence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions rate was very high, highlighting the high risk percentage of them related to level of risk X. Due to the frequency of onset and potential severity, highlighted the concomitant use of central nervous system depressants drugs with risk of respiratory depression, the risk of onset of anticholinergic symptoms when combining morphine or haloperidol with butylscopolamine, ipratropium bromide or dexchlorpheniramine and the multiple interactions involving metamizole.

  8. Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2015-04-01

    Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs are a growing global problem. The most common substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials include beta-lactams (among antibiotics) and chloroquine and artemisin derivatives (among antimalarials). The most common type of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs have a reduced amount of the active drug, and the majority of them are manufactured in Southeast Asia and Africa. Counterfeit antimicrobial drugs may cause increased mortality and morbidity and pose a danger to patients. Here we review the literature with regard to the issue of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials and describe the prevalence of this problem, the different types of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs, and the consequences for the individuals and global public health. Local, national, and international initiatives are required to combat this very important public health issue. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Bioinformatics in translational drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooller, Sarah K; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Chen, Xiangrong; Ali, Yusuf; Pearl, Frances M G

    2017-08-31

    Bioinformatics approaches are becoming ever more essential in translational drug discovery both in academia and within the pharmaceutical industry. Computational exploitation of the increasing volumes of data generated during all phases of drug discovery is enabling key challenges of the process to be addressed. Here, we highlight some of the areas in which bioinformatics resources and methods are being developed to support the drug discovery pipeline. These include the creation of large data warehouses, bioinformatics algorithms to analyse 'big data' that identify novel drug targets and/or biomarkers, programs to assess the tractability of targets, and prediction of repositioning opportunities that use licensed drugs to treat additional indications. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Hidden wholesale: The drug diffusing capacity of online drug cryptomarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Judith; Décary-Hétu, David

    2016-09-01

    customers themselves. Cryptomarkets provide researchers and policy makers with a rich source of drug monitoring information. Further research should ascertain whether their virtual location may reduce the violence associated with middle market drug activity. We caution that conflict may instead manifest in other ways, including threats, fraud, and blackmail. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  12. [Drug interactions in pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syhr, K M J; Oertel, B G; Geisslinger, G

    2015-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common reasons for consulting a physician. Chronic pain patients often suffer from a variety of comorbidities, such as depression and anxiety and they are therefore often simultaneously treated with more than one drug. The probability of drug interactions increases with every additional drug. A systematic internet and literature search up to February 2015 was carried out. Systematic lists were included. In addition, the drug prescription information sheets were used and an internet search via Pubmed and google.com was carried out for drugs alone and in combination in order to find substance-specific interactions. A differentiation is made between pharmaceutical, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Pharmaceutical interactions are caused by chemical, physical or physicochemical incompatibility of drugs or adjuvants used. These can even occur outside the body and during concomitant administration via the same route. A pharmacodynamic interaction in pain management is for example the additive sedative effect of opioids and benzodiazepines when taken together. Pharmacokinetic interactions occur during the absorption, distribution, metabolism and in the elimination phases. Many drug interactions can be avoided by careful and continuous evaluation of pharmacotherapy and if necessary its adaptation; however, a sound knowledge of the underlying pharmacological mechanisms and the properties of currently used analgesics is necessary.

  13. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  14. How Many Drugs Are Catecholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Peng Yang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available By examination of the 8659 drugs recorded in the Comprehensive Medicinal Chemistry (CMC database, 78 catecholics (including five pyrogallolics were identified, of which 17 are currently prescribed by FDA. Through analyzing the substitutent patterns, ClogPs and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies(BDEs of the catecholic drugs, some molecular features that may benefit circumventing the toxicity of catecholics were revealed: i strong electron-donating substituents are excluded; ii ClogP 3; iii an energy penalty exists for quinone formation. Besides, the present analyses also suggest that the clinical usage and dosage of currently prescribed catecholic drugs are of importance in designing or screening catecholic antioxidants.

  15. Optogenetics enlightens neuroscience drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Optogenetics - the use of light and genetics to manipulate and monitor the activities of defined cell populations - has already had a transformative impact on basic neuroscience research. Now, the conceptual and methodological advances associated with optogenetic approaches are providing fresh momentum to neuroscience drug discovery, particularly in areas that are stalled on the concept of 'fixing the brain chemistry'. Optogenetics is beginning to translate and transit into drug discovery in several key domains, including target discovery, high-throughput screening and novel therapeutic approaches to disease states. Here, we discuss the exciting potential of optogenetic technologies to transform neuroscience drug discovery.

  16. Drug induced rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenegger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical condition of potential life threatening destruction of skeletal muscle caused by diverse mechanisms including drugs and toxins. Given the fact that structurally not related compounds cause an identical phenotype pinpoints to common targets or pathways, responsible for executing rhabdomyolysis. A drop in myoplasmic ATP paralleled with sustained elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration represents a common signature of rhabdomyolysis. Interestingly, cardiac tissue is hardly affected or only secondary, as a consequence of imbalance in electrolytes or acid–base equilibrium. This dogma is now impaired by compounds, which show up with combined toxicity in heart and skeletal muscle. In this review, cases of rhabdomyolysis with novel recently approved drugs will be explored for new target mechanisms in the light of previously described pathomechanisms. PMID:22560920

  17. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-05-10

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lorcaserin: A novel antiobesity drug

    OpenAIRE

    Brashier, Dick B. S.; Sharma, A. K.; Dahiya, Navdeep; Singh, S. K.; Khadka, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major co-morbidity with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. There are few drugs for treatment of obesity like orlistat and recentlty approved drug lorcaserin. Lorcaserin has serotonergic properties and acts as an anorectic. It may cause serious side effects, including serotonin syndrome, particularly when taken with certain medicines that increase serotonin levels or activate serotonin receptors. Although, mainstay and first line of approach of treatment will always remain in hav...

  19. Predicting drug-drug interactions through drug structural similarities and interaction networks incorporating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takako; Hao, Ming; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may lead to adverse effects and potentially result in drug withdrawal from the market. Predicting DDIs during drug development would help reduce development costs and time by rigorous evaluation of drug candidates. The primary mechanisms of DDIs are based on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This study examines the effects of 2D structural similarities of drugs on DDI prediction through interaction networks including both PD and PK knowledge. Our assumption was that a query drug (Dq) and a drug to be examined (De) likely have DDI if the drugs in the interaction network of De are structurally similar to Dq. A network of De describes the associations between the drugs and the proteins relating to PK and PD for De. These include target proteins, proteins interacting with target proteins, enzymes, and transporters for De. We constructed logistic regression models for DDI prediction using only 2D structural similarities between each Dq and the drugs in the network of De. The results indicated that our models could effectively predict DDIs. It was found that integrating structural similarity scores of the drugs relating to both PK and PD of De was crucial for model performance. In particular, the combination of the target- and enzyme-related scores provided the largest increase of the predictive power.Graphical abstract.

  20. Drugs and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelssering, G.; Aguiar, L.F.; Ribeiro, R.M.; Souza, A.Z. de

    1988-01-01

    Different kinds of drugs who can be transferred through the mother's milk to the lactant and its effects are showed in this work. A list of them as below: cardiotonics, diuretics, anti-hypertensives, beta-blockings, anti-arrythmics, drugs with gastrintestinal tract action, hormones, antibiotics and chemotherapeutics, citostatic drugs, central nervous system action drugs and anticoagulants drugs. (L.M.J.) [pt

  1. 99 Films on Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  2. Handling a tricycle: Orthogonal versus random oxidation of the tricyclic inhibitor cystine knotted peptide gurmarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Rasmus; Andresen, Thomas L.; Conde-Frieboes, Kilian W.

    2012-01-01

    Gurmarin is a 35 amino acid peptide with three disulfide bridges in an inhibitor cystine knot. It is found in the plant Gymnema sylvestre, and has been identified as a sweet taste inhibitor in rodents. In this article we provide an efficient route for the synthesis of gurmarin by a controlled...... random oxidation strategy. We compared two oxidation procedures to form the three disulfide bridges. In the first, based on random oxidation, reduced gurmarin was synthesized using trityl for cysteine protection, and oxidized for 48h in a Tris–HCl buffer containing cystamine and reduced glutathione...... to facilitate disulfide scrambling. The second was based on step-wise deprotection followed by oxidation in which the cysteine pairs are orthogonally protected with tert-Butylthio, trityl and acetamidomethyl. To verify that the native gurmarin oxidation product was obtained, thermolysin cleavage was used...

  3. Terapia medicamentosa na depressão pós-acidente vascular encefálico Drug treatment of poststroke depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Silva Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo visa realizar uma revisão de literatura sobre a terapia farmacológica na depressão pós-AVE. MÉTODO: Foi feita uma revisão nos bancos de dados MedLine e SciELO, utilizando-se como descritores primários "stroke", "depression" e "treatment", incluindo artigos publicados entre 1996 e 2008. RESULTADOS: Treze artigos foram selecionados. Foram encontrados dez artigos que apresentaram terapias farmacológicas eficazes no tratamento da depressão pós-AVE e três em que as terapias farmacológicas utilizadas não trouxeram benefício para a depressão dos grupos em estudo. CONCLUSÃO: O manejo farmacológico da DPAVE pode ser realizado de maneira profilática ou terapêutica. Em ambas as modalidades, os inibidores de recaptação seletiva são as medicações mais adequadas, destacando-se a fluoxetina e, em pacientes adequadamente selecionados, a reboxetina e o citalopram. A nortriptilina, antidepressivo tricíclico, é uma alternativa com relativa eficácia na conduta da DPAVE.INTRODUCTION: Poststroke depression (PSD is one of the most frequent psychiatric sequelae in populations affected by stroke. Effective drug therapy is essential in the proper management of patients. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to conduct a review of the literature on pharmacological therapy in PSD. METHOD: A review was made in databases MedLine and SciELO using as primary descriptors "stroke", "depression" and "treatment", including articles published between 1996 to 2006. RESULTS: Thirteen articles were selected. Ten trials were found that described effective pharmacological therapies in the treatment of the PSD. CONCLUSION: The pharmacological management of PSD can be done prophylactic or therapeutically. In both methods, selective reuptake inhibitors, particularly fluoxetine, and in some instances, citalopram and reboxetine, seem to be the most appropriate medications to be used in PSD. Alternatively, nortriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, may be

  4. The anti-hepatitis drug use effect and inventory management optimization from the perspective of hospital drug supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanyu

    2017-09-01

    By analyzing the current hospital anti hepatitis drug use, dosage, indications and drug resistance, this article studied the drug inventory management and cost optimization. The author used drug utilization evaluation method, analyzed the amount and kind distribution of anti hepatitis drugs and made dynamic monitoring of inventory. At the same time, the author puts forward an effective scheme of drug classification management, uses the ABC classification method to classify the drugs according to the average daily dose of drugs, and implements the automatic replenishment plan. The design of pharmaceutical services supply chain includes drug procurement platform, warehouse management system and connect to the hospital system through data exchange. Through the statistical analysis of drug inventory, we put forward the countermeasures of drug logistics optimization. The results showed that drug replenishment plan can effectively improve drugs inventory efficiency.

  5. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  6. Potential prescription drug misuse in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Handler, Steven M; Wagner, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse among older adults includes inappropriate and harmful use of these drugs. In this study, prescription drug misuse in assisted living settings as reported by direct care workers (DCWs) was examined. Data came from DCWs in 45 assisted living settings located in Pennsylvania. A total of 944 DCWs completed a questionnaire on their opinions of prescription drug misuse. DCWs believed most assisted living residents take prescription medications. In addition, 10% of DCWs observed or had evidence that residents used unnecessarily high doses, 30% were preoccupied with the cost of prescription drugs, and 26% had problems understanding the complexity of their drug treatment regimen. Prescription drug misuse may be a problem of importance in assisted living settings. Assisted living has experienced rapid growth in capacity, yet the ability of these settings and their residents to manage prescription drugs may not have kept pace with this growth. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Microspheres and Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannesson, Gauti; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye can be accomplished by invasive drug injections into different tissues of the eye and noninvasive topical treatment. Invasive treatment involves the risks of surgical trauma and infection, and conventional topical treatments are ineffective in delivering drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. In recent years, nanotechnology has become an ever-increasing part of ocular drug delivery. In the following, we briefly review microspheres and nanotechnology for drug delivery to the eye, including different forms of nanotechnology such as nanoparticles, microparticles, liposomes, microemulsions and micromachines. The permeation barriers and anatomical considerations linked to ocular drug delivery are discussed and a theoretical overview on drug delivery through biological membranes is given. Finally, in vitro, in vivo and human studies of x03B3;-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eyedrop suspensions are discussed as an example of nanotechnology used for drug delivery to the eye. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Quorum sensing and microbial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-fan; Liu, Shi-yin; Liang, Zhi-bin; Lv, Ming-fa; Zhou, Jia-nuan; Zhang, Lian-hui

    2016-10-20

    Microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem of global concern, and the evolution and regulatory mechanisms of microbial drug resistance has become a hotspot of research in recent years. Recent studies showed that certain microbial resistance mechanisms are regulated by quorum sensing system. Quorum sensing is a ubiquitous cell-cell communication system in the microbial world, which associates with cell density. High-density microbial cells produce sufficient amount of small signal molecules, activating a range of downstream cellular processes including virulence and drug resistance mechanisms, which increases bacterial drug tolerance and causes infections on host organisms. In this review, the general mechanisms of microbial drug resistance and quorum-sensing systems are summarized with a focus on the association of quorum sensing and chemical signaling systems with microbial drug resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation and drug efflux pump. The potential use of quorum quenching as a new strategy to control microbial resistance is also discussed.

  9. Drugs and the media: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mass media accounts of drugs and drug use are a daily occurrence and the focus of much inquiry and debate. In this special issue, nine articles consider the role and impact of a specific type of mass medium in the depiction of drugs, drug use, and drug users. Media include television programs, newspapers, films, public service advertising and product-specific marketing campaigns, and the world of the Internet, including YouTube and message boards. Media accounts of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and prescription drugs such as antidepressants, and more broadly, drug abuse and addictions are examined through a variety of methods from the humanities and social sciences. Copyright © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  10. Smart drugs: green shuttle or real drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornara, L; Borghesi, B; Canali, C; Andrenacci, M; Basso, M; Federici, S; Labra, M

    2013-11-01

    We have combined morphological, molecular, and chemical techniques in order to identify the plant and chemical composition of some last-generation smart drugs, present on the market under the following names: Jungle Mistic Incense, B-52, Blendz, and Kratom 10x. Micromorphological analyses of botanical fragments allowed identification of epidermal cells, stomata, trichomes, starch, crystals, and pollen. DNA barcoding was carried out by the plastidial gene rbcL and the spacer trnH-psbA as universal markers. The combination of morphological and molecular data revealed a mixture of plants from different families, including aromatic species, viz., Lamiaceae and Turneraceae. GC-MS and LC-MS analyses on ethanol or methanol extracts showed the presence of synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-250 in Jungle, JWH-122 in B-52, and JWH-073 and JWH-018 in Blendz. In Kratom 10x, only the indole alkaloid mitragynine was detected. All the identified synthetic cannabinoids, apart from mitragynine, are under the restriction of law in Italy (TU 309/90). Synthetic cannabinoid crystals were also identified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which also detected other foreign organic chemicals, probably preservatives or antimycotics. In Kratom only leaf fragments from Mitragyna speciosa, containing the alkaloid mitragynine, were found. In the remaining products, aromatic plant species have mainly the role of hiding synthetic cannabinoids, thus acting as a "green shuttle" rather than as real drugs. Such a multidisciplinary approach is proposed as a method for the identification of herbal blends of uncertain composition, which are widely marketed in "headshops" and on the Internet, and represent a serious hazard to public health.

  11. Drug Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs ... used in leukemia that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  13. Drug Retention Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  14. Teenagers and drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teenagers and drugs; Symptoms of drug use in teenagers; Drug abuse - teenagers; Substance abuse - teenagers ... for a specialist who has experience working with teenagers. Do not hesitate, get help right away. The ...

  15. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  16. Frequency of different anti-depressants associated with suicides and drug deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasch, Gustav; Dahlmann, Felicitas; von Meyer, Ludwig; Roider, Gabriele; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    From each case of suicide and drug-related death autopsied in the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Munich during the years 2001--2005, a toxicological investigation on anti-depressants (AD) was performed. In 180 suicides and 72 narcotic drug death cases, ADs were detected: 4 different classic tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs), 6 other non-selective monoamine re-uptake inhibitors (NSMRIs), 5 selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and 3 other ADs. The suicides were grouped further according to the type of suicide (violent or non-violent). The prescription frequency of the ADs in Germany, expressed as the defined daily dosages (DDDs), during the investigated years served for comparison. There were serious differences in the frequency of different ADs regarding to the manner of suicide. In cases associated with doxepin and trimipramine, non-violent suicides were distinctly over-represented, as in cases in which the drug itself was responsible for the death as in cases of non-violent suicides in other manners. In contrast, in cases with citalopram or opipramol, violent forms of suicides were significantly over-represented. For amitriptyline, the ratio was approximately balanced. For the remainder of the ADs, the case numbers were too low for a valid evaluation. The different frequency distributions of the ADs, associated with violent and non-violent suicides may be explained by their different pharmacological active profiles and the different lethality of overdoses of the different ADs. There was no indication at all for a special suicidal problem of SSRIs in juveniles. Amongst 1,127 suicides within 5 years, in an area with approximately 5 million people, the youngest suicide victim with SSRIs was 28 years old. In drug death cases, citalopram was obviously over-represented.

  17. International variation in drug utilization: Antidepressant utilization in North America, Greece, and Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mamdani

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional time series analysis of antidepressant utilization in Canada, the United States, Greece, and Ireland from January 2007 to September 2011 using data from IMS Healthcare Inc., which tracks over 80% of global prescription sales of over 1.3 million products. We studied 23 antidepressants from five drug classes, namely, 1 serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, 2 serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs, 3 tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs, 4 monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs, and 5 ′other′ antidepressants. We used time series analysis to examine trends in utilization patterns. Results: Overall antidepressant utilization increased steadily over time for all study regions, although regions differed considerably in the magnitude of antidepressant utilization and the rates of increase. While overall antidepressant utilization rates were similar between Canada (2,876 units per 1,000 population per month and the United States (2,815 units per 1,000 population per month, these rates were approximately 83% higher than in Greece (1,558 units per 1,000 population per month and approximately 50% higher than in Ireland (1,898 units per 1,000 population per month. Although the use of SSRIs, SNRIs, and other antidepressants generally increased over time, the use of TCAs and MAOIs generally decreased over time. Utilization of specific drug classes varied widely between regions, ranging from an 80% relative difference in SSRI utilization between the United States and Greece to a nearly 700% difference in the utilization of MAOIs between Canada and the United States. Conclusions: The findings of our study, using antidepressants as the case example, are consistent with previous studies demonstrating significant variation in drug utilization levels internationally. Future studies are needed to document regional variation in light of appropriateness of drug therapies to determine optimal

  18. Study on the interaction between amphiphilic drug and bovine serum albumin: A thermodynamic and spectroscopic description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rub, Malik Abdul, E-mail: malikrub@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah-21589 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Javed Masood [Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah-21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah-21589 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Rizwan Hasan, E-mail: rizwanhkhan1@gmail.com [Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Kabir-ud-Din [Department of Applied Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Herein we report the interaction of amphiphilic drug clomipramine hydrochloride (CLP—a tricyclic antidepressant) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) studied by fluorescence, UV–vis, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Clomipramine hydrochloride is used to treat a variety of mental health problems. The quenching rate constant (k{sub q}) values, calculated according to the fluorescence data, decrease with increase in temperature indicating the static quenching procedure for the CLP–BSA interaction. The association binding constants (K{sub A}), evaluated at different conditions, and the thermodynamic parameters (free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes) indicate that the hydrophobic forces play a major role in the binding interaction of drug. The interaction of BSA with CLP was further confirmed by UV absorption spectra. Blue shift of position was detected due to the complex formation between the BSA–CLP. The molecular distance, r{sub 0}, between donor (BSA) and acceptor (CLP) was estimated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) whose value (4.47 nm) suggests high probability of static quenching interaction. The CD results prove the conformational changes in the BSA on binding with the drug. Thus, the results supply qualitative and quantitative understanding of the binding of BSA to CLP, which is important in understanding their effect as therapeutic agents. - Highlights: • BSA can be considered as a good carrier for transportation of CLP in vivo. • The fluorescence results indicated the presence of static quenching mechanism in the binding process. • CD spectra showed the change in molecular conformation of BSA in the presence of CLP. • The results have applicability in model drug delivery.

  19. Drug Repurposing: Far Beyond New Targets for Old Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Mestres, J.

    2012-01-01

    Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach...... is of interest primarily because we continue to face significant gaps in the drug–target interactions matrix and to accumulate safety and efficacy data during clinical studies. Collecting and making publicly available as much data as possible on the target profile of drugs offer opportunities for drug...... repurposing, but may limit the commercial applications by patent applications. Certain clinical applications may be more feasible for repurposing than others because of marked differences in side effect tolerance. Other factors that ought to be considered when assessing drug repurposing opportunities include...

  20. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH DIAZEPAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with anxyolitic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, antitremor, and amnestic activity. It is metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P (CYP 450 enzyme system. Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyl-diazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isozymes involved in the biotransformation of diazepam may alter plasma concentrations of this drug, although this effect is unlikely to be associated with clinically relevant interactions.The goal of this article was to review the current literature on clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions with diazepam.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for original research and review articles published in English between January 1971. and May 2011. Among the search terms were drug interactions, diazepam, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, and cytochrome P450. Only articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, and meeting abstracts were excluded. The reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional publications.Diazepam is substantially sorbed by the plastics in flexible containers, volume control set chambers, and tubings of intravenous administration sets. Manufacturers recommend not mixing with any other drug or solution in syringe or solution, although diazepam is compatible in syringe with cimetidine and ranitidine, and in Y-site with cisatracurium, dobutamine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, nafcillin, quinidine gluconate, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Diazepam is compatible with: dextrose 5% in water, Ringers injection, Ringers injection lactated and sodium chloride 0.9%. Emulsified diazepam is compatible with Intralipid and Nutralipid.Diazepam has low potential

  1. CHEMOMETRICS IN BIOANALYTICAL SAMPLE PREPARATION - A FRACTIONATED COMBINED MIXTURE AND FACTORIAL DESIGN FOR THE MODELING OF THE RECOVERY OF 5 TRICYCLIC AMINES FROM PLASMA AFTER LIQUID-LIQUID-EXTRACTION PRIOR TO HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIELING, J; MENSINK, CK; JONKMAN, JHG; COENEGRACHT, PMJ; DUINEVELD, CAA; DOORNBOS, DA

    1993-01-01

    A general systematic approach is described for the chemometric modelling of liquid-liquid extraction data of drugs from biological fluids. Extraction solvents were selected from Snyder's solvent selectivity triangle: methyl tert.-butyl ether, methylene chloride and chloroform. The composition of a

  2. Psychotropic drugs and bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falisi, Giovanni; Rastelli, Claudio; Panti, Fabrizio; Maglione, Horacio; Quezada Arcega, Raul

    2014-10-01

    Sleep and awake bruxism is defined as 'a parafunctional activity including clenching, bracing, gnashing, and grinding of the teeth'. Some evidence suggests that bruxism may be caused by, or associated with, alterations in the CNS neurotransmission. Several classes of psychotropic drugs interfering with CNS activity may potentially contribute to bruxism. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine relevant peer-reviewed papers to identify and describe the various classes of psychotropic substances that may cause, exacerbate or reduce bruxism as the result of their pharmacological action in CNS neurons. A literature search from 1980 to the present was performed using PubMed database. The term 'bruxism' was used in association with 'psychotropic', 'dopamine (DA)', 'serotonin', 'histamine', 'antipsychotics', 'antidepressants', 'antihistaminergics' and 'stimulants'. Studies on the effects of DA agonists (Levo-DOPA, psychostimulants) and antagonists (antipsychotics) identified a central role of DA in the pathogenesis of pharmacologically induced bruxism. Important information from studies on drugs acting on serotonin neurotransmission (antidepressants) was recognized. Other mechanisms involving different neurotransmitters are emerging. This is the case of antihistaminergic drugs which may induce bruxism as a consequence of their disinhibitory effect on the serotonergic system.

  3. Drug abuse in Prishtina region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashi, Sanije; Ramadani, Naser; Berisha, Merita; Gashi, Musli; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Hoxha, Rina

    2009-01-01

    Currently the drug abuse has become one of the most serious problems in many countries. The drugs abuse is also widespread in less developed societies. This problem is present in Kosova too with the tendency of rising. The of this research was to show the number of drug abusers in Prishtina region, the type of drugs used, the way of drug administration, then survey of the age, sex, marital status, residence of the drug abusers including their social status (employment, profession and economical status). During the surveyed period the number of hospitalized drug abusers in Neuropsychiatry clinic was 39. 25.5% of them were hospitalized more than ones, with 367 stay days with average treatment period of 7.5 days. Average age of those hospitalized for the first time was 27.9 years of age. 64.1% of them were 25-34 years old. 97.4% of the hospitalized were male. 32 (82.1%) patient were from Prishtina, 5 from Ferizaj and 1 from F. Kosova and Kacanik. During the surveyed period there was no patient hospitalized from other cities of Prishtina Region (Besiana, Drenas, Kastriot, Lipjan, Shtime and Shterpc).

  4. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially improved safety profile compared to other aminoglycosides. This study assessed plazomicin MICs and MBCs in four Brucella spp. reference strains. Like other aminoglycosides and aminocyclitols, plazomicin MBC values equaled MIC values ...

  5. Kidney–targeted drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kidney-targeted drug delivery systems represent a promising technology to improve drug efficacy and safety in the treatment of renal diseases. In this review, we summarize the strategies that have been employed to develop kidney-targeted drug delivery systems. We also describe how macromolecular carriers and prodrugs play crucial roles in targeting drugs to particular target cells in the kidney. New technologies render it possible to create renal targeting conjugates and other delivery systems including nanoparticles and liposomes present promising strategies to achieve the goal of targeting drugs to the kidney.

  6. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  7. Comparative trials in registration files of cardiovascular drugs : Comparator drugs and dosing schemes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, NF; Vos, R; de Graeff, PA

    Registration files of 13 cardiovascular drugs were analysed with respect to the number of double-blind phase-III clinical trials, the use of placebo and active comparator drugs and their dosing schemes. Half of the 146 double-blind trials used active comparator drugs. The majority of files included

  8. Drugs and Crime: The Relationship of Drug Use and Concomitant Criminal Behavior. Research Issues 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Gregory A., Ed.; Lettieri, Dan J., Ed.

    This volume of abstracts of major research and theoretical studies dealing with the relationship between drug use, criminal behavior and the law is concerned with criminal acts other than the possession of, or trafficking in, illicit drugs. Included are 107 selected studies categorized into seven major topic areas: Reviews and Theories, Drug Use…

  9. A review on development of analytical methods to determine monitorable drugs in serum and urine by micellar liquid chromatography using direct injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Romero, Josep; Albiol-Chiva, Jaume; Peris-Vicente, Juan

    2016-07-05

    Therapeutic drug monitoring is a common practice in clinical studies. It requires the quantification of drugs in biological fluids. Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC), a well-established branch of Reverse Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC), has been proven by many researchers as a useful tool for the analysis of these matrices. This review presents several analytical methods, taken from the literature, devoted to the determination of several monitorable drugs in serum and urine by micellar liquid chromatography. The studied groups are: anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, analgesics and bronchodilators. We detail the optimization strategy of the sample preparation and the main chromatographic conditions, such as the type of column, mobile phase composition (surfactant, organic solvent and pH), and detection. The finally selected experimental parameters, the validation, and some applications have also been described. In addition, their performances and advantages have been discussed. The main ones were the possibility of direct injection, and the efficient chromatographic elution, in spite of the complexity of the biological fluids. For each substance, the measured concentrations were accurate and precise at their respective therapeutic range. It was found that the MLC-procedures are fast, simple, inexpensive, ecofriendly, safe, selective, enough sensitive and reliable. Therefore, they represent an excellent alternative for the determination of drugs in serum and urine for monitoring purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 21 CFR 1.233 - What optional items are included in the registration form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... extracts) and 11b (e.g., grain products, amino acids); (i) Type of storage, if the facility is primarily a... registration form? 1.233 Section 1.233 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Registration of Food Facilities § 1.233 What optional items are included in the registration form? FDA...

  11. Mathematical modeling of drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2008-12-08

    Due to the significant advances in information technology mathematical modeling of drug delivery is a field of steadily increasing academic and industrial importance with an enormous future potential. The in silico optimization of novel drug delivery systems can be expected to significantly increase in accuracy and easiness of application. Analogous to other scientific disciplines, computer simulations are likely to become an integral part of future research and development in pharmaceutical technology. Mathematical programs can be expected to be routinely used to help optimizing the design of novel dosage forms. Good estimates for the required composition, geometry, dimensions and preparation procedure of various types of delivery systems will be available, taking into account the desired administration route, drug dose and release profile. Thus, the number of required experimental studies during product development can be significantly reduced, saving time and reducing costs. In addition, the quantitative analysis of the physical, chemical and potentially biological phenomena, which are involved in the control of drug release, offers another fundamental advantage: The underlying drug release mechanisms can be elucidated, which is not only of academic interest, but a pre-requisite for an efficient improvement of the safety of the pharmaco-treatments and for effective trouble-shooting during production. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of mathematical modeling of drug delivery, including empirical/semi-empirical and mechanistic realistic models. Analytical as well as numerical solutions are described and various practical examples are given. One of the major challenges to be addressed in the future is the combination of mechanistic theories describing drug release out of the delivery systems with mathematical models quantifying the subsequent drug transport within the human body in a realistic way. Ideally, the effects of the design

  12. Mathematical modeling of drug dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2013-08-30

    The dissolution of a drug administered in the solid state is a pre-requisite for efficient subsequent transport within the human body. This is because only dissolved drug molecules/ions/atoms are able to diffuse, e.g. through living tissue. Thus, generally major barriers, including the mucosa of the gastro intestinal tract, can only be crossed after dissolution. Consequently, the process of dissolution is of fundamental importance for the bioavailability and, hence, therapeutic efficacy of various pharmaco-treatments. Poor aqueous solubility and/or very low dissolution rates potentially lead to insufficient availability at the site of action and, hence, failure of the treatment in vivo, despite a potentially ideal chemical structure of the drug to interact with its target site. Different physical phenomena are involved in the process of drug dissolution in an aqueous body fluid, namely the wetting of the particle's surface, breakdown of solid state bonds, solvation, diffusion through the liquid unstirred boundary layer surrounding the particle as well as convection in the surrounding bulk fluid. Appropriate mathematical equations can be used to quantify these mass transport steps, and more or less complex theories can be developed to describe the resulting drug dissolution kinetics. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of modeling drug dissolution and points out the assumptions the different theories are based on. Various practical examples are given in order to illustrate the benefits of such models. This review is not restricted to mathematical theories considering drugs exhibiting poor aqueous solubility and/or low dissolution rates, but also addresses models quantifying drug release from controlled release dosage forms, in which the process of drug dissolution plays a major role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antitheilerial Chemical Drugs: A Review | Hayat | Bulletin of Animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthetic or semi synthetic chemical drugs were used for treatment of Theileria species. These drugs include antimalarial, trypanocides and antibiotics, antiviral, etc. The aim of this study was to over-view chemical drugs tested for treatment of theileriosis. Keywords: Theileria, treatment, chemical drug ...

  14. Methods used to assess drug prescribing and dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In assessing drug sellers performance, various methods have been used to collect data from drug sellers and other non professional providers. Some of these methods include exit interviews for patients after purchase of drugs, observations to assess drug sellers/dispensers roles and consumers behaviour, interviews with ...

  15. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  16. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  17. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  18. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  19. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  20. Dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Daniel; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-07-01

    Dapsone is a sulfone drug used to treat infectious conditions and also numerous dermatologic diseases. Fixed drug eruption is a distinctive adverse cutaneous reaction associated with the initial administration and subsequent delivery of a specific agent. Areas covered: The authors preformed a literature search using the following keywords: dapsone, fixed drug eruption, and adverse cutaneous drug reaction. Bibliographies were also reviewed for pertinent articles. The results were combed for relevant papers and reviewed. Articles pertaining to dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption were included. Expert commentary: The majority of cases of dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption in the literature come from Africa or India where there is a high prevalence of patients treated for leprosy. Characteristics of these cases are similar to fixed drug eruption described in the western literature, with differences in frequency of multiple versus solitary lesions. Dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption should be considered when reviewing the drug history of a patient with fixed drug eruption. In the case of darker pigmented individuals, multiple fixed drug eruption lesions may be more common. Multiple lesions may mimic Kaposi's sarcoma in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients. Dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple hyperpigmented lesions.