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Sample records for drug-using women results

  1. Alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use amongst same-sex attracted women: results from the Western Australian Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Health and Well-Being Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Alexandra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use has been reported to be higher amongst lesbian and bisexual women (LBW than their heterosexual counterparts. However, few studies have been conducted with this population in Australia and rates that have been reported vary considerably. Methods A self-completed questionnaire exploring a range of health issues was administered to 917 women aged 15-65 years (median 34 years living in Western Australia, who identified as lesbian or bisexual, or reported having sex with another woman. Participants were recruited from a range of settings, including Perth Pride Festival events (67.0%, n = 615, online (13.2%, n = 121, at gay bars and nightclubs (12.9%, n = 118, and through community groups (6.9%, n = 63. Results were compared against available state and national surveillance data. Results LBW reported consuming alcohol more frequently and in greater quantities than women in the general population. A quarter of LBW (25.7%, n = 236 exceeded national alcohol guidelines by consuming more than four standard drinks on a single occasion, once a week or more. However, only 6.8% (n = 62 described themselves as a heavy drinker, suggesting that exceeding national alcohol guidelines may be a normalised behaviour amongst LBW. Of the 876 women who provided data on tobacco use, 28.1% (n = 246 were smokers, nearly double the rate in the female population as a whole. One third of the sample (33.6%, n = 308 reported use of an illicit drug in the previous six months. The illicit drugs most commonly reported were cannabis (26.4%, n = 242, meth/amphetamine (18.6%, n = 171, and ecstasy (17.9%, n = 164. Injecting drug use was reported by 3.5% (n = 32 of participants. Conclusion LBW appear to use alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs at higher rates than women generally, indicating that mainstream health promotion messages are not reaching this group or are not perceived as relevant. There is an urgent

  2. Drug use behaviour of pregnant women in rural India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, A.; Biswas, S.; Chattopadhyay, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the drug use habit of pregnant women in villages of central India. Methods: An observational, cross sectional study was conducted among six hundred fifty pregnant women from different randomly selected villages of Wardha district of central India through interviews on medicine use behaviour and evaluation of prescriptions. Results: Pregnant women of younger age group from lower socio economic status constituted the majority of the study population. Major portion (97.7) of this socio economically backward population followed the doctor's advice as far as dose, frequency and duration of the drug was concerned. The antenatal mothers were of the opinion that, if the instructions on the drug envelop or foil was in written in the local language, it could be more helpful for them. Conclusion: Majority of the study population used drugs or medicines regularly but some mothers were reluctant. This indicated that even in this age of advancement of scientific knowledge, all antenatal mothers were not conversant with the advantages of drug use. (author)

  3. Drug use in pregnancy among parous Scandinavian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nordeng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  SUMMARYThe aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of drug use in 1945 parous pregnant Scandinavianwomen, to determine the most common drug categories, and to describe changes in drug use throughoutpregnancy. The women were interviewed about drug use by a specially trained midwife at five different occasionsduring pregnancy: at gestational week 17, 25, 33, 37, and on admission for delivery at three Scandinavianstudy sites (Trondheim, Bergen and Uppsala. When excluding vitamins and iron supplementation, 1086(56% women reported at least one episode of drug use during pregnancy, with an average of 2.6 episodesamong the women reporting drug use. Four percent of the women accounted for 18% of the episodes of druguse. Systemic anti-infectives (15%, respiratory drugs (12%, gastrointestinal drugs (11% and analgesics(11% were the most widely used drugs among all the pregnant women. The number of women using drugsincreased throughout pregnancy. NORSK SAMMENDRAGHensikt med studien var å undersøke forekomsten av legemiddelbruk hos 1945 annen- eller tredjegangs fødendeskandinaviske kvinner, å beskrive hvilke legemiddelgrupper som ble hyppigst brukt, og å beskrive hvordanlegemiddelbruken forandrer seg i løpet av svangerskapet. Kvinnene ble intervjuet av en spesialopplært jordmorved fem tidspunkt under svangerskapet: ved gestasjonsuke 17, 25, 33, 37 og ved innleggelse før fødselenpå tre skandinaviske studiesteder (Trondheim, Bergen and Uppsala. Når jern- og vitamintilskudd ekskluderes,hadde 1086 (56% av de gravide minst en episode av legemiddelbruk under svangerskapet, med et gjennomsnittpå 2,6 episoder blant kvinnene som rapporterte legemiddelbruk. Fire prosent av de gravide stod for 18%av episodene med legemiddelbruk. Systemiske antiinfektiva (15%, legemidler med virkning på respirasjonssystemet(12%, gastrointestinale legemidler (11% og analgetika (11% var de hyppigst brukte legemiddelgruppene.Andel gravide som rapporterte

  4. The social context of homeless women's alcohol and drug use.

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    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Green, Harold D; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Ryan, Gery; Zhou, Annie

    2009-11-01

    Substance use poses a significant threat to the health of women, and homeless women are more likely to use alcohol and drugs than other women. Addressing risk factors in this population requires a focus on the social context of substance use among homeless women. Participants were 445 homeless women who were randomly sampled and interviewed in shelter settings about the characteristics of their personal networks. Binomial logistic regressions predicted days of binge drinking and of using marijuana, crack, cocaine, and methamphetamine or other amphetamines in the past 6 months. Homeless women with a greater proportion of heavy alcohol users in their personal networks had greater odds of engaging in binge drinking, and women with a greater proportion of drug users in their networks had greater odds of using marijuana, cocaine, crack, and methamphetamine or other amphetamines. Women with a greater proportion of individuals in their networks that they had met in school or through work had lower odds of marijuana, cocaine, and crack use. Findings suggest the importance of structural solutions in addressing homeless women's alcohol and drug use, including greater access to treatment and recovery support for alcohol and drug problems as well as depression, and enhancing employment and educational opportunities for homeless women.

  5. Gender, violence and being homeless: the experience of women and high risk drug use.

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    Souza, Márcia Rebeca Rocha de; Oliveira, Jeane Freitas de; Chagas, Mariana Cavalcante Guedes; Carvalho, Evanilda Souza de Santana

    2016-11-16

    To describe the experience of homeless women and their high risk drug use. Qualitative research whose data were produced by semi-structured interviews conducted with seven women enrolled in a CAPSad in Salvador, Bahia, in the period from October to December 2012. Theme content analysis was adopted to organize the data that resulted from processing two thematic categories: Gender, violence and drug use: What changes and what is perpetuated in the life of women users; No strings attached: life on the streets. The results show that many behaviors experienced in the family context and social constructions are reproduced by women and keep them vulnerable to social and health issues, among them the onset and maintenance of high risk drug use.

  6. Effects of Welfare Reform on Illicit Drug Use Of Adult Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Hope; Dave, Dhaval M.; Reichman, Nancy E.; Das, Dhiman

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting changes in welfare policy across states and over time and comparing relevant population subgroups within an econometric difference-in-differences framework, we estimate the effects of welfare reform on adult women's illicit drug use from 1992 to 2002, the period during which welfare reform unfolded in the U.S. The analyses are based on all available and appropriate national datasets, each offering unique strengths and measuring a different drug-related outcome. We investigate self-reported illicit drug use (from the National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse and National Surveys on Drug Use and Health), drug-related prison admissions (from the National Corrections Reporting Program), drug-related arrests (from Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Reports), and drug-related emergency department episodes (from the Drug Abuse Warning Network). We find robust evidence that welfare reform led to a 10-21% decline in illicit drug use among women at risk of relying on welfare, as well as associated declines in drug-related arrests (6-7%), drug-related hospital emergency department episodes (7-11%), and possibly drug-related prison admissions (11-19%). The findings indicate that an appropriately designed system with sufficient job opportunities for those are able to work can result in both increases in employment and decreases in drug use. PMID:25067860

  7. Maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes among illicit drug-using women in an urban setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitchaya Homsup

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: Compared to urban pregnant women without drug use, women who consumed drugs were younger, had lower level of education, poorer self-care and poorer pregnancy outcomes. ATS was the single most commonly used drug.

  8. Weight-related concerns related to drug use for women in substance abuse treatment: prevalence and relationships with eating pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Cortney S; Lindsay, Anne R; White, Emily K; Claudat, Kim; Velasquez, Sara C

    2013-01-01

    Women in substance abuse treatment increasingly report weight-related concerns as motivation for drug use. However, limited research has explored the nature of these concerns or examined whether women in substance abuse treatment with weight-related concerns related to drug use differ from those who do not on variables relevant to eating pathology. Using a sample of 297 women in substance abuse treatment, this study examined two intertwined issues: (1) the prevalence and nature of weight-related concerns related to drug use and (2) whether women who endorse weight-related concerns related to drug use differ from those without weight-related concerns on body dissatisfaction, eating pathology, perceived pressure and internalization of thin-ideal media, and appearance-related drug-use expectancies. Descriptive analyses indicated that the majority of participants were concerned about gaining weight during treatment and/or that weight gain could trigger drug relapse. Analyses of variance revealed that women who reported weight-based concerns (both with regards to weight gain during treatment and relapse potential) endorsed higher levels of body dissatisfaction, dieting, bulimic symptoms, and thin-ideal internalization than women who did not endorse weight-related concerns. Results suggest that substance abuse treatment programs should be aware of and address weight-related concerns around drug use for women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of drug use among pregnant women in the United States: Opioid and non-opioid illegal drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Verena E; Brown, Qiana L; Martins, Silvia S; Palamar, Joseph J

    2018-02-01

    The opioid epidemic in the US is affecting pregnant women and their offspring, with rising numbers of maternal and neonatal treatment episodes. The aim of this study was to characterize pregnant drug users in order to inform intervention strategies based on sociodemographic, mental health, and substance use characteristics. Data on pregnant women aged 18-44 reporting past-year, nonmedical opioid use or use of non-opioid illegal drugs (other than marijuana) were analyzed from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2005-2014). Women (N = 818) were categorized into 3 groups: 1) use of opioids only (n = 281), 2) opioid-polydrug users (n = 241), and 3) other (non-opioid) illegal drug users (n = 296). Characteristics between the 3 groups of women were compared using bivariable analyses. Most women were non-Hispanic White (67.6%), had a high school diploma or less education (61.0%), a household income illegal drug users (27.6%) (P drug/alcohol treatment was less prevalent among opioid-only users (6.3%) compared to opioid-polydrug users (20.3%) and other illegal drug users (8.3%) (P = 0.002). Opioid-only users also reported lower prevalence of past-year depression (P drug-using women were often of low socioeconomic status, with mental health and substance use patterns suggesting the need for targeted mental health/substance use screening and interventions before and during pregnancy, particularly for opioid-polydrug users. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Gender discrimination, educational attainment, and illicit drug use among U.S. women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carliner, Hannah; Sarvet, Aaron L; Gordon, Allegra R; Hasin, Deborah S

    2017-03-01

    While gender inequality has been a topic of concern for decades, little is known about the relationship between gender discrimination and illicit drug use. Further, whether this association varies by education level is unknown. Among 19,209 women participants in Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005), we used logistic regression to test the association between gender discrimination (measured with four items from the Experiences of Discrimination instrument) and three outcomes: past-year illicit drug use, frequent drug use, and drug use disorders. We then tested whether associations differed by education level. Gender discrimination was reported by 9% of women and was associated with past-year drug use [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.17-3.29], frequent drug use (aOR = 2.82; CI 1.99-4.00), and past-year drug use disorders (aOR = 3.15; CI 2.16-4.61). All specific domains of gender discrimination (on the job, in public, with institutions, being called a sexist name) were associated with all drug use outcomes. The association between gender discrimination and past-year drug use was stronger among women with less than a high school education (aOR = 6.33; CI 3.38-11.85) compared to those with more education (aOR = 2.45; CI 1.97-3.04; p interaction  Gender discrimination is consistently and strongly associated with illicit drug use and drug use disorders among U.S. women, with significantly higher odds for drug use among women with less than a high school education. Future research should examine whether explicitly addressing distress from discrimination could benefit women in drug treatment, especially among clients with lower educational attainment.

  11. The interaction of drug use, sex work, and HIV among transgender women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Beth R

    2014-06-01

    Transgender women have a higher prevalence of drug use, HIV, drug use, and sex work than the general population. This article explores the interaction of these variables and discusses how sex work and drug use behaviors contribute to the high rates of HIV. A model predicting HIV rates with sex work and drug use as well as these behaviors in the transgender woman's social network is presented. Challenges to intervening with transgender women, as well as suggestions and criteria for successful interventions, are discussed.

  12. 10 CFR 707.13 - Medical review of results of tests for illegal drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical review of results of tests for illegal drug use... Procedures § 707.13 Medical review of results of tests for illegal drug use. (a) All test results shall be... with legal and non-abusive drug use, the MRO will certify that the test results do not meet the...

  13. Representations of women and drug use in policy: A critical policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Natalie; Bull, Melissa

    2018-03-13

    Contemporary research in the drugs field has demonstrated a number of gender differences in patterns and experiences of substance use, and the design and provision of gender-responsive interventions has been identified as an important policy issue. Consequently, whether and how domestic drug policies attend to women and gender issues is an important question for investigation. This article presents a policy audit and critical analysis of Australian national and state and territory policy documents. It identifies and discusses two key styles of problematisation of women's drug use in policy: 1) drug use and its effect on women's reproductive role (including a focus on pregnant women and women who are mothers), and 2) drug use and its relationship to women's vulnerability to harm (including violent and sexual victimisation, trauma, and mental health issues). Whilst these are important areas for policy to address, we argue that such representations of women who use drugs tend to reinforce particular understandings of women and drug use, while at the same time contributing to areas of 'policy silence' or neglect. In particular, the policy documents analysed are largely silent about the harm reduction needs of all women, as well as the needs of women who are not mothers, young women, older women, transwomen or other women deemed to be outside of dominant normative reproductive discourse. This analysis is important because understanding how women's drug use is problematised and identifying areas of policy silence provides a foundation for redressing gaps in policy, and for assessing the likely effectiveness of current and future policy approaches. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Disparate rates of persistent smoking and drug use during pregnancy of women of Hawaiian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tricia E; Tam, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Significant disparity in smoking rates has been previously reported in pregnant and non-pregnant women of Native Hawaiian ancestry. Disparities in drug use rates have also been reported in non-pregnant women of Native Hawaiian ancestry. We undertook this study to compare rates of smoking and drug use during pregnancy among women in Hawaii to see if these differences are associated with disparities in pregnancy complications among Native Hawaiian women. Women were enrolled in the Pacific Research Center on Early Human Development study from July 2007 to January 2008, according to approved protocols. Persistent smoking was defined as self-reported smoking within 1 week of admission for labor. Drug use data was assessed by self-report, or if available, toxicology tests at the time of labor. There were 868 women enrolled in the study during this period. Women of Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian ancestry comprised 22% of the study population. Rates of persistent smoking and drug use among Hawaiian women were significantly higher than the remainder of the study population (21% and 8.3% vs. 7.8% and 2.1%, respectively, P Women of Hawaiian ancestry continue to smoke and use illicit drugs during pregnancy at significantly higher rates than women of other ethnic groups in Hawaii. In addition to the immediate effects on pregnancy, long-term adverse outcomes of in utero exposures of the offspring remain an important health disparity.

  15. Qualitative Study of a Background of Drug Use among Women in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Afrasiabi

    2017-05-01

    social relationships and job deviations are the consequences of addiction in women. Conclusion: woman drug use mostly affected by intimate relationships in family and friends. Social care systems should be developed for families with drug use persons to preventing family member’s involvement healthy lifestyle in Patients with type 2 diabetes. It was concluded that decrease in HbA1c level needs longer intervention period; more than three months.

  16. Validity of Self-Reported Drug Use Information Among Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mahek; Garrison, Laura; Leeman, Lawrence; Hamidovic, Ajna; Borrego, Matthew; Rayburn, William F; Bakhireva, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses validity of self-report for the use of major classes of illicit drugs and opioid-maintenance therapy among pregnant women at a substance abuse treatment program. Analyses used data collected from 83 pregnant women in a prospective cohort study at the University of New Mexico. Study participants with a history of substance abuse were screened and, if eligible, enrolled during an early prenatal care visit. A follow-up interview was conducted shortly after delivery. Self-reported information about drug use later in pregnancy was compared with urine drug screen (UDS) results collected during the third trimester. Simple kappa (k) and prevalence-and-bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) coefficients were calculated as the measures of agreement. Sensitivity and specificity of self-report for each drug class were estimated using UDS as the 'gold standard'. The sample included a large proportion of ethnic minority (80% Hispanic/Latina and 7% American Indian) and socially disadvantaged (50% less than high school education and 94% Medicaid-insured) pregnant women. On average, patients had 4.8 ± 3.0 urine drug screens during the third trimester. Sensitivity of self-report was low (abuse treatment program. Rates of underreporting are expected to be higher among the general population of pregnant women.

  17. Effects of gender discrimination and reported stress on drug use among racially/ethnically diverse women in Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Annie; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Gender discrimination has been associated with worse health outcomes for U.S. women. Using the stress and coping process framework, we examined whether lifetime gender discrimination was associated with maladaptive coping behaviors, namely, lifetime and recent hard drug use. We also considered whether reported stress from gender discrimination mediated this relationship and whether this process differed across racial/ethnic groups. We used data from a racially/ethnically diverse convenience sample of 754 women attending family planning clinics in Northern California (11% African American, 17% Latina, 10% Asian, and 62% Caucasian). To test our hypotheses, we conducted logistic regression models, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Gender discrimination was positively associated with both lifetime and recent hard drug use. We did not find support for the mediation hypothesis, because stress was not associated with either lifetime or recent hard drug use. There was evidence of some race moderation for the Latina sample. Among these respondents, gender discrimination was associated with higher odds of lifetime drug use, whereas stress was associated with lower odds. These results suggest that experiences of gender discrimination may still activate negative coping strategies involving drug use, regardless of the stress they cause. For Latina respondents, more research is needed to better understand the stress and coping process related to gender discrimination. Copyright 2010 Jacobs Institute of Women

  18. Prescription patterns and drug use among pregnant women with febrile illnesses in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Birungi, Josephine; Yanow, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    -pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in pregnancy, a sample of pregnant women presenting with fever in out-patient clinics was studied. The main objective was to assess prescription patterns and drug use in pregnancy especially SP; and draw implications on the efficacy of SP for intermittent preventive treatment...

  19. Workplace violence and drug use in women workers in a Peruvian Barrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musayón Oblitas, F Y; Caufield, C

    2007-12-01

    This exploratory and descriptive study explored the relationship between workplace violence and drug use in women. It also explored the perception of women workers on the relationship between workplace violence and drug use. The World Health Organization and the United Nations recognize violence against women and have adopted a definition of it. The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention reports that violence in the workplace has increased 300% over the last decade. Alcohol misuse, occupation and gender are associated with aggression in the workplace. Estimations of the incidence of non-fatal injuries sustained because of workplace violence and evaluations of the associated risk factors have rarely been documented. 125 women workers between the ages of 18 and 60 years were surveyed in four suburbs of Zapallal, Lima. Of the 125 women, 28.8% experienced violence in the workplace. Of the 36 women who had experienced violence in the workplace, 16 agreed to participate in interviews to explore their perceptions. The data were saturated with the 16 interviews. Of the 125 workers surveyed 17.6% experienced verbal violence, 9.6%% experienced physical violence, and 1.6% were sexually harassed in their workplace. Women who were verbally abused demonstrated eight times greater risk of drug use than those who did not experience this type of violence in their workplace. This paper contributes to an understanding of the relationships among drug abuse, gender and the incidence of violence in the workplace; it documents the perception women have of these relationships; and it supports the development of programmes and strategies related to the prevention of workplace violence and drug consumption by women workers.

  20. Predictors of drug use in prison among women convicted of violent crimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltieri, Danilo Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Worldwide, some prisoners consume illicit drugs while in prison. There is now some recognition of risk factors for this among male but not female prisoners. The aim was to identify variables associated with drug use by women in prison after conviction for violent crimes. Data were obtained from 315 women serving a sentence for robbery or homicide in the Penitentiary of Sant'Ana, São Paulo State, Brazil. Mainly self-report assessments of alcohol and drug misuse, sexual and general impulsiveness, depression, and psychosocial and criminological features were completed. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Thirty-five (11%) women reported illicit drug use in prison. Younger age, history of childhood sexual abuse, having committed robbery (rather than homicide), earlier onset of criminal activities, higher scores on sexual impulsiveness, drug-related problems prior to incarceration and having same-sex relationships inside prison were associated with a higher risk of using drugs in prison. In a multiple logistic regression, only prior drug history and having same-sex relationships in prison were independently associated with in-prison drug use. Illicit drug use in prison impairs rehabilitative goals. Identification of risk factors for this can help to recognise people with high treatment needs. We found that in-prison drug users seemed to be an exceptionally needy group, likely to have more wide ranging historical problems than their similar offending peers. It is essential to check for history of drug use outside prison. The strong association with active sexual behaviour in the prison highlighted another area of vulnerability, requiring sensitive in-prison attention to safeguard these women. Further research to understand the reasons for this relationship is recommended. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Does experiencing homelessness affect women's motivation to change alcohol or drug use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Carole C; Weinreb, Linda; Cheng, Debbie M; Kim, Theresa W; Samet, Jeffrey H; Saitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Homeless women are at high risk of drug and alcohol dependence and may receive less opportunity for treatment. Our objective was to examine the association between experiencing homelessness and motivation to change drug or alcohol use. Women (n = 154) participants in a study of substance dependence at an urban medical center (69 with some homeless days in the last 90 days; 85 continuously housed at baseline) completed six items rating motivation to change alcohol or drug use (ie, importance, readiness, and confidence) at baseline and in 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up interviews. Unadjusted and longitudinal analyses controlling for covariates (eg, demographics, insurance status, substance use consequences, mental health status, and participation in treatment) were conducted. There were no significant differences between women experiencing homeless days versus continuously housed women in the odds of reporting high motivation to change alcohol or drug use, either in unadjusted baseline analyses or longitudinal analyses adjusted for covariates. Covariates that were significantly associated with high importance, readiness or confidence to change behavior were higher life time consequences of substance use, and participation in 12-step programs. The findings suggest that clinicians should not make assumptions that homeless women have low motivation to change their substance use. The same opportunities for addiction treatment should be offered to homeless as to housed women. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  2. Drug use by pregnant women and comparable non-pregnant women in The Netherlands with reference to the Australian classification system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirm, Eric; Meijer, W.M.; Tobi, H; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe drug use in pregnancy, and compare drug use of pregnant women with non-pregnant women with respect to possible teratogenicity. Study design: A cross-sectional study based on pharmacy records from 1997 to 2001 was performed. Pregnant women and matched non-pregnant women (same

  3. Retrospective Analysis of Emerging Drugs Use in a Quebec Women's and Children's University Hospital and Perspectives for Safe and Optimal Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corny, Jennifer; Pelletier, Elaine; Lebel, Denis; Bussières, Jean-François

    2017-03-10

    Only few medicines are licensed for children. The use of emerging drugs (unmarketed drug, off-label drug with poorly documented use, and/or costly drugs) might represent an essential alternative for pediatric patients. The objective of the study was to assess emerging drug uses rate and profile in our women's and children's centre to support the implementation of an appropriate policy. We identified retrospectively emerging drugs used between 2013-01-01 and 2014-02-28, using computerized pharmacist software extraction of drugs used. Conventional oncologic drugs were excluded. Retrospective analysis of medical charts for patients who received an emerging drug and literature review for each drug were performed to determine efficacy and safety endpoints. Median delays between first intention and final decision to use the drug and between final decision and first administration were calculated. Proportion of patients who experienced a positive evolution under treatment or a side effect possibly related to the drug was calculated. A total of 26 emerging drugs were identified (89 patients, 99 uses). Median treatment duration was 66 days [1-1435]. Median delay between first evocation and final decision to use the drug was 2 days [0-333] and 0 day [0-404] between final decision and first administration. 52/99 (53%) of patients experienced a positive evolution under treatment and 26/99 (26%) experienced a side effect possibly related to emerging drug use. This study allowed us to describe emerging drug uses in a women and children tertiary hospital. It led to the implementation of a local emerging drug use policy ensuring optimal and safe use of these drugs. There is a significant number of emerging drugs used in pediatric which shows positive improvement in 56% of patients. © 2017 Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology. All rights reserved.

  4. Three city feasibility study of a body empowerment and HIV prevention intervention among women with drug use histories: Women FIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollub, Erica L; Morrow, Kathleen M; Mayer, Kenneth H; Koblin, Beryl A; Peterside, Pamela Brown; Husnik, Marla J; Metzger, David S

    2010-09-01

    New intervention models are needed for HIV prevention among drug-using women. The Women Fighting Infection Together (Women FIT) feasibility study enrolled 189 women in three U.S. cities (Providence, New York, Philadelphia) with drug-using histories, who also reported risky sexual behavior. Eligible women had participated previously in a yearlong study of HIV Counseling and Testing (HIV-CT) and limited case management. Two thirds of the sample were black, most were unemployed, and about two thirds reported prior or current crack use. Women were randomized into two groups. In one group, women participated in a manualized, four-session, peer-led, interactive group intervention that stressed body knowledge, woman-initiated HIV/sexually transmitted infection (HIV/STI) prevention, including a focus on women's health (reproductive health screening, sexual violence, self-breast examination, STI signs, symptoms), which aimed to increase comfort with and pride in their bodies. Control group women received HIV-CT enriched by female condom counseling. Outcomes included study retention, session attendance and ratings, changes in knowledge, and use of protection methods. The study successfully retained 95% of the participants for a 2-month follow-up. Positive assessments from participants and peer leaders exceeded preset thresholds for success. Pre-post changes in body knowledge (p empowerment model deserves further elaboration in interventions focusing on women at high risk of HIV/STI acquisition.

  5. Contraception use and unplanned pregnancies among injection drug using women in St Petersburg, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Nadia; Kershaw, Trace; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2013-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of contraceptive methods and investigated whether abortion rates influence contraceptive behaviour among injection drug-using (IDU) women in St Petersburg, Russia. Methodology A self-administered questionnaire of behaviour in the last 3 months was applied to a convenient sample of IDU women. Results Of 80 sexually active participants, 67% had had an abortion. No participant reported using hormonal contraceptives or intrauterine devices (IUDs). The only valid method of contraception used was condoms, which was reported by half of the participants. Consistent condom use was reported by 22% of participants and was no more likely among those who had an abortion. Condom use was significantly associated with having multiple or casual sex partners [prevalence ratio (PR) 1.75, 95% (confidence interval) CI 1.11–2.78, p = 0.01], having an IDU sex partner (PR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36–0.85, p = 0.029) and with a negative attitude toward condoms (PR 0.53, 95% CI 0.33–0.84, p = 0.01). Abortions were less likely among those who had multiple or casual sex partners (PR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49–0.97, p = 0.03). Conclusions Despite the high prevalence of abortions among IDU women, none reported the use of hormonal contraception or IUDs. Having had an abortion was not associated with greater likelihood of using condoms. Participants mostly used condoms with casual or multiple sex partners, suggesting that condoms were used mainly to prevent HIV/sexually transmitted infection transmission and not to prevent pregnancy. Programmes to prevent unwanted pregnancies and reduce abortion-related health risks among this understudied vulnerable group are needed. PMID:21493618

  6. An exploratory study of mental health and HIV risk behavior among drug-using rural women in jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton-Tindall, Michele; Harp, Kathi L H; Minieri, Alexandra; Oser, Carrie; Webster, J Matthew; Havens, Jennifer; Leukefeld, Carl

    2015-03-01

    Rural women, particularly those in the criminal justice system, are at risk for HIV related to the increasing prevalence of injection drug use as well as limited services. Research on HIV risk correlates, including drug use and mental health, has primarily focused on urban women incarcerated in prisons. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine dual HIV risk by 3 different mental health problems (depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) among drug-using women in rural jails. This study involved random selection, screening, and face-to-face interviews with 136 women in 1 Appalachian state. Analyses focused on the relationship between mental health and HIV risk. Nearly 80% of women self-reported symptoms of depression, and more than 60% endorsed symptoms consistent with anxiety and PTSD symptoms. Mental health significantly correlated with severity of certain types of drug use, as well as risky sexual activity. In addition, for women experiencing anxiety and PTSD, injection drug use moderated the relationship between mental health and risky sexual activity. Based on these rates of drug use, mental health problems, and the emergence of injection drug use in rural Appalachia, the need to explore the relationships between these issues among vulnerable and understudied populations, such as rural women, is critical. Because of service limitations in rural communities, criminal justice venues such as jails provide opportune settings for screening, assessment, and intervention for drug use, mental health, and HIV education and prevention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. A Neglected Population: Drug-Using Women and Women's Methods of HIV/STI Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollub, Erica L.

    2008-01-01

    Women drug users are at extremely high risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) from sexual transmission, but remain seriously neglected in intervention research promoting women-initiated methods of HIV/STI prevention. Sparse available data indicate a high interest and enthusiasm for women-initiated methods among these women.…

  8. Alcohol, smoking, and drug use among Inuit women of childbearing age during pregnancy and the risk to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckle, Gina; Laflamme, Dominique; Gagnon, Jocelyne; Boucher, Olivier; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2011-06-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy, a known teratogen often associated with drug use and smoking is a well-known public health concern. This study provides prevalence data for alcohol, smoking, and illicit drug use before, during, and after pregnancy among Inuit. Factors associated with alcohol use are also identified. Two hundred and eight Inuit women from Arctic Quebec were interviewed at mid-pregnancy, and at 1 and 11 months postpartum to provide descriptive data on smoking, alcohol, and drug use during pregnancy, and the year before and after pregnancy. Sociodemographic and family characteristics potentially associated with alcohol use were documented. Ninety-two percent of the women reported smoking and 61% reported drinking during pregnancy. Episodes of binging during pregnancy were reported by 62% of the alcohol users, which correspond to 38% of pregnant women. Thirty-six percent of the participants reported using marijuana during pregnancy. Alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy were more likely to be reported by women who lived in less crowded houses, had a better knowledge of a second language, drank alcohol more often and in larger amounts prior to pregnancy, and used illicit drugs. Binge drinkers were more likely to be single women and to have had fewer previous pregnancies. Postpartum distress and violence were more likely to be experienced by women who used alcohol during pregnancy. Binge drinking during pregnancy was best predicted by drinking habits before pregnancy, maternal symptoms of depression, the use of illicit drugs during pregnancy, and the number of young children living with the mother. These results confirm that alcohol is a major risk factor to maternal and child health in this population, underscoring the need for culturally relevant and effective prevention programs. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  9. Determinants of prescribed drug use among pregnant women in Bahir Dar city administration, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admasie, Chanie; Wasie, Belaynew; Abeje, Gedefaw

    2014-09-18

    Drug use during pregnancy may be dangerous to the fetus. There is high consumption of prescribed drugs among pregnant women. This condition may be much higher in developing countries. There is no sufficient evidence on prescribed drug use among pregnant women in Bahir Dar town. The aim of this study was to assess the level of prescribed drug use and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) service at government health centers in Bahir Dar city administration. Institution based cross sectional study was used. Data were collected from randomly selected 510 pregnant women. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Back ward stepwise logistic regression model was used and p-values pregnant women were included in the study of which 88.4% were prescribed at least one drug during pregnancy. Nearly 11% of the pregnant women were prescribed with drugs from category D or X of the US-FDA risk classification.Prescribed drug use among pregnant women was more likely when the pregnancy is wanted, (AOR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3 - 4.6), if the mother had maternal illness (AOR = 8.5, 95% CI: 5.4-13.4), when the educational level of ANC provider is diploma (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.7) and when number of pregnancies is more (AOR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.3). Prescribed drug use including those with potential harm to the fetus during pregnancy was very high in Bahir Dar city administration. Prescribed drug use is more when the woman had illness, when the woman was multi gravida and when the educational level of ANC provider was low (diploma). It is important to upgrade providers' educational level and institute prevention of diseases like malaria to reduce the level of prescribed drug use during pregnancy.

  10. Associations between Expectancies of Alcohol and Drug Use, Severity of Partner Violence, and Posttraumatic Stress among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erica N.; Khondkaryan, Enna; Sullivan, Tami P.

    2012-01-01

    Women who experience recurrent intimate partner violence (IPV) may use alcohol or drugs because they expect that these substances will help them cope with the negative physical and psychological sequelae of IPV. However, expectancies for alcohol and drug use have not been explored among this population of women. We used the Relaxation and…

  11. Extent and Influence of Recreational Drug Use on Men and Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The urban residents (5.4%) were more likely to report use of any illicit drug including cannabis than rural dwellers (2.5%). Illicit drug use has a high association with illnesses thus call for interventions to address this serious problem. Key Words: Recreational drug use, South Africa, illicit drug use, HIV prevalence survey ...

  12. Drug use patterns and predictors among homeless youth: results of an ecological momentary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Diane; Padhye, Nikhil; Yang, Yijiong; Gallardo, Kathryn; Santos, Glenn-Milo; Jung, Julie; Businelle, Michael

    2017-12-29

    Alcohol and drug use is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and is highly prevalent among homeless youth. Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMA) have been used to examine the effect of urges on drug use, though not among homeless youth. We assessed the patterns of drug use and the correlation between real-time contextual factors and drug use using EMA collected daily. We identified predictors of drug use among a sample of homeless youth 18-25 years old in Houston, Texas. Homeless youth (n = 66, 62% male) were recruited from a drop-in center between September 2015 and May 2016. We used generalized linear mixed models and cross-validation methods to determine the best predictive model of drug use. The overall drug use was high: 61% and 32% of participants reported using drugs or alcohol at least one day, respectively. Marijuana and synthetic marijuana use (i.e., Kush, K2, incense packs) were reported most frequently; 86% and 13% of the total drug use EMAs, respectfully. Drug use urge was reported on 26% of days and was the highest on drug use days. Drug use was predicted by discrimination, pornography use, alcohol use, and urges for drugs, alcohol, and to steal. EMA can be used to predict drug use among homeless youth. Drug use treatment among homeless youth should address the role of experiencing discrimination, pornography and alcohol use, and urge management strategies on drug use. Research is needed to determine if EMA informed just-in-time interventions targeting these predictors can reduce use.

  13. Contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes among opioid drug-using women: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles S Cornford

    Full Text Available The contraceptive needs of illicit opioid users differ from non-drug users but are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to describe contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes in opioid-using women, and to examine their association with a range of risk factors.This retrospective cohort study used UK general practice records, Treatment Outcomes Profile and National Drug Treatment Monitoring System data, and a nested data validation exercise. A cohort of 376 women aged 20-61 years were in active treatment for opioid addiction in October 2010 at two specialised primary care practices in North-East England. Outcomes were age-adjusted prevalence estimates for contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes in users of illicit opioids. The association between lifestyle-related risk factors and contraception was explored.Drug-using women made lower use of planned (non-condom contraception (24% vs 50%, p<0.001, had more frequent pregnancy terminations (0.46 vs. 0.025, p = 0.004 and higher annual incidence of chlamydia (1.1% vs. 0.33%, p<0.001, when compared with age-matched population data. Specifically, there was low use of oral contraceptives (4% vs. 25%, p<0.001, IUCD (1% vs. 6%, p<0.001, and sterilisation (7% vs. 6%, p = 0.053, but higher rates of injectable contraceptives (6% vs. 3%, p = 0.003. A total of 64% of children aged <16 years born to this group did not live with their mother. No individual risk factor (such as sex-working significantly explained the lower use or type of non-condom contraception.This is the first study to describe planned contraceptive use among drug-users, as well as the association with a range of risk factors and pregnancy outcomes. The low uptake of planned contraception, set against high rates of terminations and sexually transmitted disease demonstrates the urgent clinical need to improve contraceptive services, informed by qualitative work to explore the values and beliefs influencing low contraceptive uptake.

  14. 2013–2014 National Roadside Study of alcohol and drug use by drivers: drug results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This was a nationally representative study to estimate the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use among drivers. : Drugs studied included 98 over-the-counter, prescription, and illegal substances. Drivers were randomly selected at : 60 sites (300 l...

  15. The roles of spirituality in the relationship between traumatic life events, mental health, and drug use among African American women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton-Tindall, Michele; Duvall, Jamieson; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Oser, Carrie B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of spirituality as a moderator of the relationship between traumatic life experiences, mental health, and drug use in a sample of African American women. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship overall between spirituality and mental health and drug use among this sample of African American women. Secondly, was expected that spirituality would moderate the relationship between traumatic life events and mental health and drug use. African American women (n=206) were recruited from the community and from probation officers in three urban areas of a southern state, and face-to-face interviews were completed. Findings indicated that there was a main effect for spirituality (as measured by existential well-being on the Spiritual Well-Being Scale) and traumatic life events, mental health, and alcohol use. In addition, spirituality was a significant moderator of the relationship between traumatic life events and cocaine use. Discussion and implications for African American women are included. PMID:24041186

  16. Patterns of substance use and correlates of lifetime and active injection drug use among women in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Loeliger, Kelsey B; Marcus, Ruthanne; Pillai, Veena; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-01-01

    While drug use is associated with HIV risk in Southeast Asia, little is known about substance use behaviors among women, including drug injection. To describe patterns of substance use among women using alcohol and drugs in Malaysia and identify correlates of lifetime and active drug injection, a risk factor for HIV transmission. A survey of 103 women who used drugs in the last 12 months assessed drug use history and frequency, including drug injection and drug use during pregnancy, self-reported HIV-status, childhood and adulthood physical and sexual abuse, and access to and utilization of harm reduction services, including needle-syringe exchange programs (NSEP) and opioid agonist maintenance therapy (OAT). Principal component analyses (PCA) were conducted to assess drug use grouping. Amphetamine-type substances (ATS; 82.5%), alcohol (75.7%) and heroin (71.8%) were the most commonly used drugs across the lifetime. Drug injection was reported by 32.0% (n = 33) of participants with 21.4% (n = 22) having injected in the last 30 days. PCA identified two groups of drug users: opioids/benzodiazepines and club drugs. Lifetime drug injection was significantly associated with lower education, homelessness, prior criminal justice involvement, opioid use, polysubstance use, childhood physical and sexual abuse, and being HIV-infected, but not with prior OAT. Women who use drugs in Malaysia report high levels of polysubstance use and injection-related risk behaviors, including sharing of injection equipment and being injected by others. Low OAT utilization suggests the need for improved access to OAT services and other harm reduction measures that prioritize women.

  17. Uso de medicamentos por gestantes em seis cidades brasileiras Drug use by pregnant women in six Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotero S Mengue

    2001-10-01

    .956 medicamentos utilizados.OBJECTIVE: To describe drugs used during pregnancy by women attending prenatal clinics of the national public health system (SUS in Brazilian cities. METHODS: Using a structured questionnaire, 5,564 pregnant women between the week 21 to 28 who attended prenatal visits of the SUS in six Brazilian cities were interviewed. The interview questions were grouped in "guided use" to cover pain, cramps, nausea, cough, and others, and "guided medicine" to cover vitamins, iron, and fluoride. The Food and Drug Administration gestational risk classification (1991-1995 was applied. RESULTS: Of a total of 5,564 women, 4,614 (83.8% used at least one drug during pregnancy, with a total of 9,556 drugs used. The drugs most frequently used were vitamins associated with anti-anemics (33.5%, gastrointestinal drugs (31.3%, analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs (22.2%, anti-anemics (19.8%, and antibiotics (11.1%. Regarding gestational risk, 3,243 drugs used (34% belonged to category A risk, 1,923 (22.6% to category B, 3,798 (39.7% to category C, 289 (3.0% to category D, and 55 (0.6% to category X. CONCLUSIONS: A large variation in drug use across the cities was observed, especially for anti-anemics and vitamins associated with anti-anemics, revealing the lack of a national consensus regarding the use of these drugs during pregnancy. There was no literature data about safety during pregnancy for 12.9% of the drugs used. This percentage, plus the 26.9% of category C drugs, shows that 40% of the drugs used during pregnancy do not belong to the approved safety categories. However, only 3% of the 9,956 drugs used were clearly contraindicated during pregnancy.

  18. Prevention interventions for human immunodeficiency virus in drug-using women with a history of partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockman JK

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jamila K Stockman1, Natasha Ludwig-Barron1, Monica A Hoffman2, Monica D Ulibarri3, Typhanye V Penniman Dyer41Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine; 2Department of Communication and Science Studies; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA; 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD, USAAbstract: The intersecting epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and partner violence disproportionately affect women who use drugs. Despite accumulating evidence throughout the world linking these epidemics, HIV prevention efforts focused on these synergistic issues as well as underlying determinants that contribute to the HIV risk environment (eg, housing instability, incarceration, policing practices, survival sex are lacking. This article highlights selected behavior change theories and biomedical approaches that have been used or could be applied in HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women with histories of partner violence and in existing HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women that have been gender-focused while integrating histories of partner violence and/or relationship power dynamics. To date, there is a paucity of HIV prevention interventions designed for drug-using women (both in and outside of drug treatment programs with histories of partner violence. Of the few that exist, they have been theory-driven, culture-specific, and address certain aspects of gender-based inequalities (eg, gender-specific norms, relationship power and control, partner violence through assessment of personal risk and safety planning. However, no single intervention has addressed all of these issues. Moreover, HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women with histories of partner violence are not widespread and do not address multiple components of the risk environment. Efficacious interventions should target individuals

  19. Basic body knowledge in street-recruited, active drug-using women enrolled in a "body empowerment" intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollub, Erica L; Cyrus-Cameron, Elena; Armstrong, Kay; Boney, Tamara; Chhatre, Sumedha

    2013-01-01

    Drug-using women remain at high risk for HIV infection. Female condoms (FC) have proven potential and cervical barriers have promise to reduce HIV risk; their effective use may be boosted by familiarity and confidence about female anatomy. Women with high levels of crack cocaine use were assessed for their knowledge about reproductive anatomy, HIV/STI risk, as well as cancer screening behaviors. Women were recruited for a randomized trial of a behavioral intervention via mobile vans in Philadelphia known for high crack use and sex exchange. Knowledge and behavioral data on 198 women were collected via interviewer-administered questionnaire. Women were randomized into control (n=99) and intervention (n=99) arms. Five weekly, small-group, intervention sessions stressed "body empowerment" and teaching use of female-initiated barrier methods. Follow-up body knowledge data were collected at 12 months. Changes in and correlates of body knowledge were analyzed and compared. Most participants were African-American (66%); their mean age was 39.6 years. At baseline, 44% of the sample erroneously believed women have sex and urinate from the same place; 62% erroneously believed that tampons could get lost in the abdominal cavity. Only 27% knew douching increased STI transmission risk; only 10% knew condoms reduce cervical cancer risk. At follow-up, overall body knowledge improved substantially, across both arms. Race was associated with high body knowledge at baseline but not at follow-up. Knowledge favoring use of women-initiated methods and cervical cancer prevention was very low in this hard-to-reach sample. Body knowledge improved substantially with enhanced voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) as well as the women-focused intervention. Body knowledge education must be targeted and tailored to drug-using women.

  20. Prevalence of illicit drug use in pregnant women in a Wisconsin private practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauberger, Charles W; Newbury, Emily J; Colburn, Jean M; Al-Hamadani, Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    We sought to measure the prevalence of illicit drug use in our obstetric population, to identify the drugs being used, and to determine whether a modified version of the 4Ps Plus screening tool could serve as an initial screen. In this prospective study, urine samples of 200 unselected patients presenting for initiation of prenatal care in a Wisconsin private practice were analyzed for evidence of the use of illicit drugs. Of 200 patients, 26 (13%) had evidence of drugs of abuse in their urine samples. Marijuana (7%) and opioids (6.5%) were the most commonly identified drugs. Adding 5 questions about drug or alcohol use to the obstetric intake questionnaire proved sensitive in identifying patients with high risks of having a positive drug screen. The rate of drug use in our low-risk population was higher than expected and may reflect increasing rates of drug use across the United States. Enhanced screening should be performed to identify patients using illicit drugs in pregnancy to improve their care. Medical centers and communities may benefit from periodic testing of their community prevalence rates to aid in appropriate care planning. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reducing risky relationships: a multisite randomized trial of a prison-based intervention for reducing HIV sexual risk behaviors among women with a history of drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Oser, Carrie B; Havens, Jennifer R; Leukefeld, Carl G

    2014-01-01

    Women involved in the criminal justice system, particularly those with a history of drug use, are at elevated risk of HIV infection, yet few HIV prevention interventions have been tailored for delivery to incarcerated women. Drawing on the Relational Model, the Reducing Risky Relationships for HIV (RRR-HIV) intervention was developed and evaluated in a multisite randomized clinical trial. Women with weekly drug use prior to incarceration (n = 444) who were incarcerated within correctional institutions in four states were randomized to (1) the RRR-HIV intervention consisting of an HIV educational video, five group sessions, and one postrelease booster session or (2) a control condition consisting of the HIV educational video. The RRR-HIV intervention combined didactic and interactive content regarding seven "thinking myths" about intimate relationships that may result in decisions to engage in risky sexual behaviors. Data were collected while women were still incarcerated and approximately 90 days following release from prison by trained interviewers. A negative binomial regression (NBR) model of unprotected sexual behaviors at the 90-day follow-up indicated that RRR-HIV participants reported fewer unprotected sexual behaviors than women in the control condition once the analysis was adjusted for study site. Future studies should examine the sustainability of the RRR-HIV intervention's effect on risk reduction. Implementation research is needed to determine whether delivery of this intervention by correctional staff or peers, rather than research staff, yields similar reductions in unprotected sexual behaviors.

  2. Patterns of prescription drugs use among pregnant women at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital and Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Family and Community Medicine Clinic, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Z Al-Hamimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluates the patterns of prescription drugs use among women attending antenatal clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH and SQUH Family and Community Medicine clinic (FAMCO, Oman. Methods: The study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study on pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinic at SQUH and FAMCO from February to April 2014 and received a prescription containing at least one drug. Patients' information was extracted from SQUH electronic records. Results: A total of 105 pregnant women were included in the study. Among the recruited pregnant women, 35 (33.3% had at least one chronic disease. The average number of drugs prescribed per patient per prescription during the period of pregnancy was 2.33 ± 1.43. Vitamins and minerals were the most frequently prescribed class of drugs (30.60% followed by analgesics (11.19% and antidiabetic drugs (10.13%. According to the Food and Drug Administration risk classification, most of the prescribed drugs were from category B (30.0% and C (27.14%. No drug was prescribed from category X. There was a significant decrease in prescribing category A drugs over the three trimesters (20.7%, 12.7%, and 9.3%, respectively (P < 0.047. Conclusion: The study gives an overview of the extent of drug prescription during pregnancy and increases the awareness of health-care providers and women about the potential risks of drug use during pregnancy.

  3. Punishing pregnant drug-using women: defying law, medicine, and common sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Jeanne; Paltrow, Lynn M

    2010-04-01

    The arrests, detentions, prosecutions, and other legal actions taken against drug-dependent pregnant women distract attention from significant social problems, such as our lack of universal health care, the dearth of policies to support pregnant and parenting women, the absence of social supports for children, and the overall failure of the drug war. The attempts to "protect the fetus" undertaken through the criminal justice system (as well as in family and drug courts) actually undermine maternal and fetal health and discourage efforts to identify and implement effective strategies for addressing the needs of pregnant drug users and their families. In this article, the authors seek to expose some of the flawed premises on which the arrests, detentions, and prosecutions are based. The authors highlight the inherent unfairness of a system that expects low-income and drug-dependent pregnant women to provide their fetuses with the health care and safety that these women themselves are not provided and have not been guaranteed.

  4. Order of onset of drug use and criminal activities in a sample of drug-abusing women convicted of violent crimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltieri, Danilo Antonio

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to explore the temporal relationship between age of onset of substance use and criminal activity in women convicted of violent crimes as well as to subdivide them into clinically significant groups to which tailored treatment can be guided. Of the 353 female inmates randomised for this study, 38 (10.8%) refused to participate and 182 (51.6%) met inclusion criteria. Data were obtained only from substance-abusing female inmates serving a sentence for robbery or homicide in a female penitentiary in Brazil. Participant information was gathered through face-to-face interviews during which alcohol and drug abuse, impulsiveness levels, depressive symptoms, and criminological aspects were investigated. . Age of first alcohol and drug use significantly preceded the age of onset of criminal activities in the overall sample. Onset ages of alcohol and drug use problems significantly preceded the beginning of criminal activities in women convicted of homicide only. Latent Class Analysis resulted in two groups: cluster 1 (n = 122; 67%), early-onset alcohol and drug users; and cluster 2 (n = 60; 33%), late-onset alcohol and drug users. Higher depression levels, higher incidence of committing robbery and less official history of recidivism were associated with cluster 1 inmates. The temporal relationship between the onset age of alcohol/drug use problems and age of the beginning of criminal activities can set apart women convicted of robbery from those convicted of homicide. Further, a distinctive therapeutic approach to early- and late-onset offenders may be valuable. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  5. Parent-child conflict and drug use in college women: a moderated mediation model of self-control and mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Nicholas; Lamis, Dorian A; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Masuda, Akihiko; Dvorak, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the association between parent-child conflict and illicit drug use in a sample of female college students (N = 928). The mediating roles of self-control and mindfulness, as well as an interaction between self-control and mindfulness, were examined in a moderated mediation model for the purposes of expanding etiological theory and introducing targets for the prevention and treatment of drug abuse. Whereas deficits in self-control were found to facilitate the positive relation observed between parent-child conflict and the likelihood of experiencing drug-related problems, an interaction between mindfulness and self-control helped explain the association between parent-child conflict and intensity of drug-related problems. Parent-child conflict was related to low mindfulness when self-control was low, and low mindfulness in turn was related to a higher intensity of drug-related problems. This association did not exist for women with high self-control. Findings are consistent with developmental research on the etiology of drug use and the protective properties of mindfulness and self-control. Mindfulness as a potential target of intervention for drug users with low self-control to prevent drug-related problems is explored. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. [Changing the focus: an exploratory study of drug use and workplace violence among women of popular classes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Helena Maria Scherlowski Leal; Caufield, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study aimed to investigate factors related to the use of illicit and licit drugs and workplace violence in a group of women from popular classes in the city of Rio de Janeiro. We used a descriptive and analytic quantitative approach was used, as well as a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with women who suffered or were suffering workplace violence, using the collective subject discourse analysis methodology. The results showed sociodemographic and work situations that can be considered as possible risk factors for drug consumption and workplace violence. The qualitative analysis shows how this group perceives the phenomena of drug use and workplace violence, expanding the comprehension about these issues and providing conceptual and methodological elements for additional studies on this subject.

  7. The roles of spirituality in the relationship between traumatic life events, mental health, and drug use among African American women from one southern state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton-Tindall, Michele; Duvall, Jamieson; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Oser, Carrie B

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the role of spirituality as a moderator of the relationship between traumatic life experiences, mental health, and drug use in a sample of African American women. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship overall between spirituality and mental health and drug use among this sample of African American women. Secondly, was expected that spirituality would moderate the relationship between traumatic life events and mental health and drug use. African American women (n = 206) were recruited from the community and from probation officers in three urban areas of a southern state, and face-to-face interviews were completed. Findings indicated that there was a main effect for spirituality (as measured by existential well-being on the Spiritual Well-Being Scale) and traumatic life events, mental health, and alcohol use. In addition, spirituality was a significant moderator of the relationship between traumatic life events and cocaine use. Discussion and implications for African American women are included.

  8. Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2010. Volume I, Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The Monitoring the Future (MTF) study involves an ongoing series of national surveys of American adolescents and adults that has provided the nation with a vital window into the important, but largely hidden, problem behaviors of illegal drug use, alcohol use, tobacco use, anabolic steroid use, and psychotherapeutic drug use. For more than a third…

  9. Pattern of Illegal Drug Use in Women Referred to Substance Abuse Control Clinic in Fasa, Iran (2009-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad mehdi Naghizadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Women’s role as a consumer or as a person who is facing with risks is so important in studies of substance abuse. However, major studies on this field aimed at studying on male population. Therefore, the aim of this study described the pattern of using illegal drugs among women belong to substance abuse control clinic of  Fasa city (south of Iran.Materials & Methods: This cross sectional study as a census was done on all authorized substance abuse treatment centers in Fasa in summer 2011. Information about demographic data, types of drugs, method of using, duration of addiction and onset age was extracted from the files of self-referred women. Results: There were 88 women in Fasa substance abuse treatment centers who were 2.8% of all registered patients. The Mean age of drug onset was 30.8±11.8 years. 62 persons (70.5% used opium and 55 persons (62.5% used Opium sap which were indicated thatthese two drugs were the two common ones among addicted women. With the average of 9.4±7.1 years, Opium had the longest duration of use. There is only one woman who had used injection during the last month. Two of the women had sexual relationship out of the family in the last month in which one of them had the unsafe contact as well.Conclusion: Presently, the pattern of drug abuse among women in Fasa is traditional and is based on the opium derivatives. However, according to the increasing rate and changes in drugs type, monitoring the behavior of drug abuser can have an effective role on the improvement of health in a community.

  10. Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior among Adults: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Survey on Drug Use and Health Authors SAMHSA: Rachel Lipari and Kathryn Piscopo; RTI International: Larry A. ... may have made a suicide attempt. Author Affiliations Rachel Lipari and Kathryn Piscopo are with the Substance ...

  11. The impact of violence on sex risk and drug use behaviors among women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Jessica E. Draughon; Carrico, Adam W.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Stein, Ellen S.; Couture, Marie-Claude; Maher, Lisa; Page, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Background Violence, substance use, and HIV disproportionately impact female entertainment and sex workers (FESW), but causal pathways remain unclear. Methods We examined data from an observational cohort of FESW age 15-29 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia for associations between violence exposure and sexual risk and drug use. Validated measures of physical and sexual violence were assessed at baseline. Self-reported outcomes measured quarterly over the next 12-months included past month sexual partners, consistent condom use by partner type, sex while high, and amphetamine type stimulant (ATS) use. Biomarkers measured quarterly included prostate specific antigen (PSA) and urine toxicology. Generalized estimating equations were fit adjusting for age, education, marital status and sex work venue. Results Of 220 women, 48% reported physical or sexual violence in the preceding 12-months. Physical violence was associated with increased number of sex partners (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 1.33; 95% CI: 1.04-1.71), greater odds of sex while high (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.42; 95% CI: 1.10-5.33), increased days of ATS use (aIRR 2.74; 95% CI: 1.29-5.84) and increased odds of an ATS+ urine screen (aOR 2.80, 95%CI: 1.38-5.66). Sexual violence predicted decreased odds of consistent condom use with non-paying partners (aOR 0.24; 95% CI: 0.10-0.59) and greater odds of a PSA+ vaginal swabs (aOR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.13-2.93). Conclusions Physical and sexual violence are prevalent among Cambodian FESW and associated with subsequent sexual risk and drug use behaviors. Clinical research examining interventions targeting structural and interpersonal factors impacting violence is needed to optimize HIV/AIDS prevention among FESW. PMID:26883684

  12. Antiepileptic drug use among women from the Taiwanese Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy: Obstetric complications and fetal malformation outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ching Yeh

    Full Text Available To investigate antiepileptic drugs (AEDs prescription and pregnancy outcomes in pregnancies with epilepsy in Taiwan between 2004 and 2015. We retrospectively reviewed data from the Taiwanese Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy (TREP. The TREP registry is a voluntary prospective cohort registry, which tracks pregnant women with epilepsy and AED prescription throughout pregnancy, delivery, and early childhood development. All TREP pregnancies (n = 318 that had completed questionnaires up until delivery or had had an unsuccessful pregnancy were analyzed. Over 94.7% of women had been prescribed AEDs during pregnancy, with 69.0% and 25.7% having received monotherapy, or polytherapy, respectively. Among live births, 12 (3.9% reported malformation. Cesarean section rate was reported higher than usual (54.5%. In 2004, 73.3% of AEDs prescribed were 1st generation, with 1st generation prescription rates falling to only 8.3% of total prescribed in 2015. AED polytherapy also fell during the study period (40.0% to 20.0%. Cesarean sections were found to be higher for women over 35 years, who had generalized epilepsy, or had experienced an obstetric complication during pregnancy term. Binary logistic regression revealed that Cesarean section was associated with maternal complications (OR = 5.11, CI 95% = 1.11-23.51, p = 0.036, while malformations were associated with obstetric complication (OR = 20.46, CI 95% = 4.80-87.21, p<0.001. Both AED risk types were not associated with complications or malformations. Our sample provides a unique insight into the women with epilepsy with AED use during pregnancy. Cesarean section rate was observed to be higher than usual, but malformation rates remained low. Results indicate a decrease in both 1st generation AEDs and proportion of patients receiving polytherapy over the study period. Obstetric complications were associated with Cesarean section. Fetal malformations were significantly associated with obstetric

  13. Differences between men and women in self-reported body mass index and its relation to drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Villarroel, P.; Piqueras, J.A.; Kuhne, W.; Cuijpers, P.; van Straten, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a public health problem of alarming proportions, including among the university population in Latin America. The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between the self-reported body mass index and the associated drug use and health-risk behaviors.Methods: We

  14. Prevalence of drug use during sex amongst MSM in Europe: Results from a multi-site bio-behavioural survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Magdalena; Gios, Lorenzo; Nöstlinger, Christiana; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Marcus, Ulrich; Schink, Susanne; Sherriff, Nigel; Jones, Anna-Marie; Folch, Cinta; Dias, Sonia; Velicko, Inga; Mirandola, Massimo

    2018-02-02

    Substance use has been consistently reported to be more prevalent amongst Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) compared to the general population. Substance use, in particular polydrug use, has been found to be influenced by social and contextual factors and to increase the risk of unprotected intercourse among MSM. The objective of this analysis was to investigate the prevalence and predictors of drug use during a sexual encounter and to identify specific prevention needs. A multi-site bio-behavioural cross-sectional survey was implemented in 13 European cities, targeting MSM and using Time-Location Sampling and Respondent-Driven Sampling methods Multivariable multi-level logistic random-intercept model (random effect of study site) was estimated to identify factors associated with the use of alcohol, cannabis, party drugs, sexual performance enhancement drugs and chemsex drugs. Overall, 1261 (30.0%) participants reported drug use, and 436 of 3706 (11.8%) reported the use of two or more drugs during their last sexual encounter. By drug class, 966 (23.0%) reported using sexual performance enhancement drugs, 353 (8.4%) - party drugs, and 142 (3.4%) the use of chemsex drugs. Respondents who reported drug use were more frequently diagnosed with HIV (10.5% vs. 3.9%) before and with other STIs during the 12 months prior to the study (16.7% vs. 9.2%). The use of all the analysed substances was significantly associated with sexual encounter with more than one partner. Substance and polydrug use during sexual encounters occurred amongst sampled MSM across Europe although varying greatly between study sites. Different local social norms within MSM communities may be important contextual drivers of drug use, highlighting the need for innovative and multi-faceted prevention measures to reduce HIV/STI risk in the context of drug use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevention of illicit drug use through a school-based program: results of a longitudinal, cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jong-Long; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Liao, Jung-Yu; Huang, Chiu-Mieh

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the long-term effects of an illicit drug use prevention program for adolescents that integrates life skills into the theory of planned behavior. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial in which 24 participating schools were randomized to either an intervention group (12 schools, n = 1,176 students) or a control group (12 schools, n = 915 students). Participants were grade 7 students. The intervention comprised a main intervention of 10 sessions and two booster interventions. Booster 1 (four sessions) and booster 2 (two sessions) were performed at 6 months and 12 months, respectively, after completion of the main intervention. Assessments were made at baseline, after the main intervention, and after each booster session using specific questionnaires for measuring participants' attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and life skills. Retention rates were 71.9% (845/1,176) in the intervention group and 90.7% (830/915) in the control group after the 12-month follow-up. A significantly lower proportion of intervention group participants reported illicit drug use after the first and second booster sessions compared with control group participants (.1% vs. 1.7% and .2% vs. 1.7%, respectively; both p drug use. A drug use prevention program integrating life skills into the theory of planned behavior may be effective for reducing illicit drug use and improving planned behavior-related constructs in adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidemiology of illicit drug use disorders in Iran: prevalence, correlates, comorbidity and service utilization results from the Iranian Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Sharifi, Vandad; Hajebi, Ahmad; Radgoodarzi, Reza; Mojtabai, Ramin; Hefazi, Mitra; Motevalian, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    Drug abuse is a significant social and public health problem in Iran. The present study aimed to provide prevalence estimates and information on correlates of illicit drug use disorder and opioid dependence, as well as service use for these disorders in Iran. This report is based on the Iranian household Mental Health Survey (IranMHS) conducted in 2011. A three-stage probability sampling was employed. Face-to-face interviews by trained psychologists were carried out with a nationally representative sample of 7841 individuals (3366 men and 4475 women) aged 15-64 years. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview and questionnaires for socio-demographic correlates and service use. The prevalence of 12-month use disorders for any illicit drug according to DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria were 2.09% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.70-2.47%] and 2.44% (95% CI = 2.03-2.85%), respectively. Opioid use disorders, and opium in particular, were the most common use disorder. The odds of drug use disorders were greater in men than in women, in previously married participants than in currently or never married participants, and in participants with lower socio-economic status than in those with higher socio-economic status (all P-values drug use disorders and 40% with opioid dependence had a 12-month unmet need for treatment. Self-help groups were the most common type of service used, followed by obtaining medication from pharmacies directly and outpatient treatment services. Opioid use disorders are the most common type of drug use disorders in Iran, setting Iran apart from many other countries. Patterns of service use suggest a large unmet need for drug use disorder treatment in Iran. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Prevalence and correlates of recent injecting drug use among gay and bisexual men in Australia: Results from the FLUX study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, H; Zablotska-Manos, I; Hammoud, M; Jin, F; Lea, T; Bourne, A; Iversen, J; Bath, N; Grierson, J; Degenhardt, L; Prestage, G; Maher, L

    2018-02-08

    While illicit drug use is prevalent among gay and bisexual men (GBM) in Australia, little is known about the factors associated with injecting drug use among GBM. The Following Lives Undergoing Change (FLUX) study is a national, online prospective observational cohort investigating drug use among Australian GBM. Eligible participants were men living in Australia who were aged 16.5 years or older, identified as gay or bisexual or had sex with at least one man in the last year. We examined baseline data for associations between socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics and recent (last six months) injecting using log-binomial regression. Of 1995 eligible respondents, 206 (10.3%) reported ever injecting drugs and 93 (4.7%) had injected recently, most commonly crystal (91.4%) and speed (9.7%). Among recent injectors, only 16 (17.2%) reported injecting at least weekly; eight (8.6%) reported recent receptive syringe sharing. Self-reported HIV and HCV prevalence was higher among recent injectors than among other participants (HIV: 46.2% vs 5.0%, p drug classes (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) = 1.31, 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.21-1.41), longer time since initiating party drug use (APR = 1.02, 95%CI 1.01-1.04), greater numbers of sex partners (2-10 sex partners: APR = 3.44, 95%CI 1.45-8.20; >10 sex partners: APR = 3.21, 95%CI 1.30-7.92), group sex (APR = 1.42, 95%CI 1.05-1.91) and condomless anal intercourse with casual partners (APR = 1.81, 95%CI 1.34-2.43) in the last six months. Observed associations between injecting and sexual risk reflect a strong relationship between these practices among GBM. The intersectionality between injecting drug use and sex partying indicates a need to integrate harm reduction interventions for GBM who inject drugs into sexual health services and targeted sexual health interventions into Needle and Syringe Programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol and Other Drug Use during Pregnancy among Women Attending Midwife Obstetric Units in the Cape Metropole, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petal Petersen Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the nature and extent of alcohol and other drug (AOD use among pregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa, despite the very high levels of AOD use in this part of the country. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among pregnant women attending 11 Midwife Obstetric Units (MOUs in greater Cape Town. A two-stage cluster survey design was used. In total, 5231 pregnant women were screened to assess self-reported prevalence estimates. Of these, 684 (13.1% were intentionally subsampled and completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and provided a urine sample for biological screening. Urinalyses showed that 8.8% (95% CI: 6.7–10.9 of the subsample tested positive for at least one illicit drug. This is higher than the self-reported prevalence (3.6%. In addition, 19.6% (95% CI: 16.3–22.8 of the sub-sample tested positive for alcohol which is lower than the self-reported prevalence (36.9%. There are high levels of substance use among pregnant women attending public sector antenatal clinics. There is a need for routine screening for AOD use and appropriate responses depending on the women’s level of risk.

  19. Student Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlis, Helen H.

    This paper discusses the nature and extent of student drug use, its meaning and significance, society's response to it, and some of the problems resulting from efforts to control it. Drugs are any substance which by its chemical nature affects the structure or function of the living organism. Abuse refers to any use of a non-medically approved…

  20. Antiepileptic drug use among women from the Taiwanese Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy: Obstetric complications and fetal malformation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chang Ching; Lussier, Eric C; Sun, Yi-Ting; Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Yu, Hsiang-Yu; Chang, Tung-Yao

    2017-01-01

    To investigate antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prescription and pregnancy outcomes in pregnancies with epilepsy in Taiwan between 2004 and 2015. We retrospectively reviewed data from the Taiwanese Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy (TREP). The TREP registry is a voluntary prospective cohort registry, which tracks pregnant women with epilepsy and AED prescription throughout pregnancy, delivery, and early childhood development. All TREP pregnancies (n = 318) that had completed questionnaires up until delivery or had had an unsuccessful pregnancy were analyzed. Over 94.7% of women had been prescribed AEDs during pregnancy, with 69.0% and 25.7% having received monotherapy, or polytherapy, respectively. Among live births, 12 (3.9%) reported malformation. Cesarean section rate was reported higher than usual (54.5%). In 2004, 73.3% of AEDs prescribed were 1st generation, with 1st generation prescription rates falling to only 8.3% of total prescribed in 2015. AED polytherapy also fell during the study period (40.0% to 20.0%). Cesarean sections were found to be higher for women over 35 years, who had generalized epilepsy, or had experienced an obstetric complication during pregnancy term. Binary logistic regression revealed that Cesarean section was associated with maternal complications (OR = 5.11, CI 95% = 1.11-23.51, p = 0.036), while malformations were associated with obstetric complication (OR = 20.46, CI 95% = 4.80-87.21, pObstetric complications were associated with Cesarean section. Fetal malformations were significantly associated with obstetric complications. AED risk factors were not significantly associated with either complications or malformations.

  1. Drug-using and nonusing women: potential for child abuse, child-rearing attitudes, social support, and affection for expected baby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Petersen, M G; Myers, B J; Degen, H M; Knisely, J S; Elswick, R K; Schnoll, S S

    1994-10-01

    Eighty pregnant women (25 substance using, 55 nonusing) from an American prenatal clinic serving lower-income to working-class women responded to questionnaire measures of child-rearing attitudes. The drug users' primary substance of misuse was cocaine (68%), alcohol (16%), amphetamines (12%), or sedatives (4%); polydrug use was documented for 80% of the women. The two (user and nonuser) groups were not different on demographic (age, race, marital status, education, SES, source of income) or obstetrical factors (number of pregnancies, number of children). Drug-using women scored significantly higher on a measure of child abuse potential; more than half scored in the range of clinical criterion for extreme risk. As their babies were not yet born, no actual physical abuse was documented, only a higher potential for abuse. The subgroup who were both drug users and had lower social support scored higher on child abuse potential than all other subgroups. The drug users also had lower self-esteem scores than the nonusers. The two groups did not differ on measures of overall social support, authoritarian/democratic child-rearing beliefs, or affection for the expected baby.

  2. "I need to hear from women who have 'been there'": Developing a woman-focused intervention for drug use and partner violence in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther; Guthrie, K Morrow; Mello, Michael; Wetle, Terrie F; Ranney, Megan; Tapé, Chantal; Zlotnick, Caron

    2016-04-01

    Addressing violence and linking women to community services in parallel with drug change goals is critical for women with coexisting intimate partner violence (IPV) and substance use disorders (SUD). Our objective was to develop a Web-based intervention to address violence and drug use among women patients in the ED. The intervention was developed in a five-step process: 1) Initial intervention development based on selected theoretical frameworks; 2) In-depth interviews with the target population; 3) Intervention adaptation, with iterative feedback from further interviews; 4) Beta testing and review by an advisory committee of domestic violence advocates; 5) Acceptability and feasibility testing in a small open trial. Themes supported the selection of MI and empowerment models but also guided major adaptations to the intervention, including the introduction of videos and a more robust booster phone call. Participants in the open trial reported high scores for satisfaction, usability, and consistency with essential elements of motivational interviewing. This qualitative work with our target population of women in the ED with SUD experiencing IPV underscored the importance of connection to peers and empathetic human contact. We developed an acceptable and feasible intervention distinct from prior ED-based brief interventions for substance-using populations.

  3. Epidemiology of DSM-5 Drug Use Disorder: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Bridget F; Saha, Tulshi D; Ruan, W June; Goldstein, Risë B; Chou, S Patricia; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Smith, Sharon M; Pickering, Roger P; Huang, Boji; Hasin, Deborah S

    2016-01-01

    Current information on the prevalence and sociodemographic and clinical profiles of individuals in the general population with DSM-5 drug use disorder (DUD) is limited. Given the present societal and economic context in the United States and the new diagnostic system, up-to-date national information is needed from a single uniform data source. To present nationally representative findings on the prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, and treatment of DSM-5 DUD diagnoses overall and by severity level. In-person interviews were conducted with 36,309 adults in the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, a cross-sectional representative survey of the United States. The household response rate was 72%; person-level response rate, 84%; and overall response rate, 60.1%. Data were collected April 2012 through June 2013 and analyzed from February through March 2015. Twelve-month and lifetime DUD, based on amphetamine, cannabis, club drug, cocaine, hallucinogen, heroin, nonheroin opioid, sedative/tranquilizer, and/or solvent/inhalant use disorders. Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime DUD were 3.9% and 9.9%, respectively. Drug use disorder was generally greater among men, white and Native American individuals, younger and previously or never married adults, those with lower education and income, and those residing in the West. Significant associations were found between 12-month and lifetime DUD and other substance use disorders. Significant associations were also found between any 12-month DUD and major depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% CI, 1.09-1.64), dysthymia (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09-2.02), bipolar I (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.06-2.05), posttraumatic stress disorder (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.27-2.10), and antisocial (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.11-1.75), borderline (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.41-2.24), and schizotypal (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.18-1.87) personality disorders. Similar associations were found for any lifetime DUD with the

  4. [Off-label and unlicensed drug use: Results from a pilot study in a pediatric intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Isabel; Fuentes-Ríos, Javier Ezequiel; Manrique-Rodríguez, Silvia; M Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the prevalence of use of off-label and unlicensed drugs in a pediatric intensive care unit of a University Hospital. An observational, descriptive, prospective six week pilot study in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Hospitalized patients aged between 0 and 18 years were included. Each prescribed drug was evaluated taking into account indication and condition of use, according to the information available on the Summary of Product Characteristics established by the European Medicines Agency. A sequential algorithm was defined allowing drug classification in unlicensed, off-label or approved. Forty-two patients were included. A total of 696 prescriptions, involving 102 different drugs, were analyzed. All patients had at least one off-label prescription, and a median of 8.9 off-label prescriptions was obtained. Of the total prescriptions, 8.6% were unlicensed and 53.9% corresponded to off-label use. The main reason for off-label use was by indication, followed by age and dose. A lineal tendency between off-label drug use and patient age was observed, where off-label use increased as patient age decreased. The drugs most commonly used off-label were: atropine, etomidate, dipyrone and ranitidine, and unlicensed drugs: spironolactone, sildenafil, acetazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide. Pediatric Intensive Care Units are characterized by a high ratio of off-label and unlicensed prescriptions. The scarce number of studies performed in this specific and complex sub-population added inconveniency to the current lack of data on safety and efficacy for drugs in paediatrics. Performing studies with these characteristics allows us to document practice on paediatric drug utilisation are required. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The results of the program to change the cognitive component of social representations about the consequences of drug use in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Ryabov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue the need of development and implementation of informational programs to focus drug prevention in adolescents due to the fact that the researchers neglected the distortion of knowledge and ideas about the consequences of drug use. The results of the program aimed at change the cognitive component of social representations of teenagers about taking drugs are presented. The program implemented in general education school is based on informational approach: a video is shown about the consequences of drug use on human health and life. The study involved 158 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years, students of 9th and 11th grades. As a result of the program, we recorded a significant reduction in the desire of teens to try drugs, their increased knowledge about the consequences of drug use, change in the hierarchy of consequences of initiation to drugs important for adolescents, and their life orientations. We identified and described age-and gender-specific impact of the program on the study parameters.

  6. Estimated occurrence of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use among 12- to 18-year-old students in Panama: results of Panama's 1996 National Youth Survey on Alcohol and Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo B. González

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This report provides the first epidemiological evidence on tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use among school students in Panama, using data from a student survey completed in 1996. Specifically, we examine sex, age, grade level, type of school, and urban-rural variations in the occurrence of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use. Estimates of lifetime prevalence and past-year use of these products were obtained using data from Panama's 1996 National Youth Survey on Alcohol and Drug Use (n = 6477. To account for the multistage sampling design of the survey, all estimates and respective standard errors are derived by the Taylor series approximation method using Epi Info 6.0 CSAMPLE software. In general, more males, more older students, and more students in higher grades have used licit and illicit drugs, even though male-female differences tend to be small. Public-private school differences and urban-rural trends vary depending on the drug. The findings of this study are discussed in relation to the epidemiology and prevention of drug use in Panama. Based on these data, we seek to provide information to be used by the Government of Panama in its planning for prevention programs directed toward students in Panamanian schools.

  7. Results of the 2013–2014 national roadside survey of alcohol and drug use by drivers : traffic safety facts : research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    In 20132014, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conducted the most recent National Roadside Survey of Alcohol and Drug Use by Drivers.1 This voluntary and anonymous study is the second to collect data on drug use, presenting our fi...

  8. The impact of violence on sex risk and drug use behaviors among women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draughon Moret, Jessica E; Carrico, Adam W; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen S; Couture, Marie-Claude; Maher, Lisa; Page, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Violence, substance use, and HIV disproportionately impact female entertainment and sex workers (FESW), but causal pathways remain unclear. We examined data from an observational cohort of FESW age 15-29 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia for associations between violence exposure and sexual risk and drug use. Validated measures of physical and sexual violence were assessed at baseline. Self-reported outcomes measured quarterly over the next 12-months included past month sexual partners, consistent condom use by partner type, sex while high, and amphetamine type stimulant (ATS) use. Biomarkers measured quarterly included prostate specific antigen (PSA) and urine toxicology. Generalized estimating equations were fit adjusting for age, education, marital status and sex work venue. Of 220 women, 48% reported physical or sexual violence in the preceding 12-months. Physical violence was associated with increased number of sex partners (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 1.33; 95% CI: 1.04-1.71), greater odds of sex while high (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.42; 95% CI: 1.10-5.33), increased days of ATS use (aIRR 2.74; 95% CI: 1.29-5.84) and increased odds of an ATS+ urine screen (aOR 2.80, 95%CI: 1.38-5.66). Sexual violence predicted decreased odds of consistent condom use with non-paying partners (aOR 0.24; 95% CI: 0.10-0.59) and greater odds of a PSA+ vaginal swab (aOR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.13-2.93). Physical and sexual violence are prevalent among Cambodian FESW and associated with subsequent sexual risk and drug use behaviors. Clinical research examining interventions targeting structural and interpersonal factors impacting violence is needed to optimize HIV/AIDS prevention among FESW. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sex differences in prevalence and comorbidity of alcohol and drug use disorders: results from wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Dawson, Deborah A; Chou, S Patricia; Grant, Bridget F

    2012-11-01

    The present study examined sex differences in lifetime Axis I and II psychiatric comorbidity of DSM-IV alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and drug use disorders (DUDs) among general population U.S. adults. Using data from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, Wave 2 lifetime prevalences of each disorder comorbid with alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and drug dependence were compared between men and women. Sex-specific associations of alcohol, any drug, and cannabis- and cocaine-specific abuse and dependence with each comorbid disorder were examined using logistic regression, first with adjustment for sociodemographic variables and then with additional adjustment for all other psychiatric disorders. Prevalences of most comorbid disorders differed significantly by sex among respondents with each AUD and DUD. However, after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and additional co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses, there were few sex differences in unique comorbid associations of specific AUDs and DUDs with specific psychiatric disorders. Rates of psychiatric disorders comorbid with AUDs and DUDs indicate large burdens of morbidity in both sexes, highlighting the need for careful assessment and appropriate treatment of both substance use and mental health disorders. The unique comorbid associations with AUDs and DUDs identified in this study further indicate the need for prospective etiological research to characterize these associations, their underlying mechanisms, and the possible sex specificity of those mechanisms.

  10. Monitoring the Future: National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2009. Volume I: Secondary School Students. NIH Publication No. 10-7584

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    The Monitoring the Future (MTF) study is an ongoing series of national surveys of American adolescents and adults that has provided the nation with a vital window into the important, but largely hidden, problem behaviors of illegal drug use, alcohol use, tobacco use, anabolic steroid use, and psychotherapeutic drug use. For more than a third of…

  11. Monitoring the Future. National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2009. Volume I, Secondary School Students. NIH Publication Number 10-7584

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    The Monitoring the Future (MTF) study is an ongoing series of national surveys of American adolescents and adults that has provided the nation with a vital window into the important, but largely hidden, problem behaviors of illegal drug use, alcohol use, tobacco use, anabolic steroid use, and psychotherapeutic drug use. For more than a third of a…

  12. The ultrasound research's results of the peri menopausal women's genitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodkhoeva, M.F.; Djonova, B.Yu.; Barieva, L.S.; Djonbekova, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    The results of ultrasound research of the peri menopausal women's genitals revealed that the sizes of the ovaries of women with the climacteric syndrome are smaller that the size of ovaries of the women with the physiologic menopause

  13. Drug Use in Gyms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2015-01-01

    Taking some of the most significant academic works into consideration this chapter describes how the scholarly interest in drug use in gyms rose from studies of competitive bodybuilding to studies of larger segments of the gym population. The challenge of establishing reliable figures for the fre......Taking some of the most significant academic works into consideration this chapter describes how the scholarly interest in drug use in gyms rose from studies of competitive bodybuilding to studies of larger segments of the gym population. The challenge of establishing reliable figures...... of the significant political campaigns and strategies to regulate and counter drug use in gyms....

  14. Consumo de drogas entre adolescentes: resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Adicciones, 1998 Drug used among adolescents: results from the National Survey on Addictions, 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Elena Medina-Mora

    2003-01-01

    probabilidad de desarrollar dependencia, quienes requieren de intervenciones preventivas más intensas.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe drug and associated factors use among adolescents (12 to 17 years of age. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data come from the recent Encuesta Nacional de Adicciones, 1998 (National Survey on Addictions undertaken in urban areas of Mexico. A probabilistic, multi-stage, stratified cluster sampling design was used to select the study population. The sampling unit was the individual in each household. Statistical analysis consisted of the estimation of prevalences of drug use, with 95% confidence intervals. Associations were analyzed using logistic regressions models. RESULTS: Excluding tobacco and alcohol, 3.57% of males and 0.6% of females have used one or more drugs; 2.14% and 0.45% used them in the 12 months previous to the survey, and 1.4% and 0.3% in the previous 30 days, respectively. Marihuana was the drug more often used by males (2.4% and females (0.45%, followed by inhaled solvents (1.08% and 0.20%, and cocaine (0.99% and 0.22%, respectively. The risk of using illicit drugs was associated to being male, having dropped out from school, perceiving availability, drug use by family and friends, social tolerance among friends, and symptoms of depression. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents between 12 to 17 years of age are exposed to increasing drug use. The rates of drug use have risen, especially in the northern region of Mexico and in the big urban areas (Tijuana, Mexico City and Guadalajara. These findings emphasize the need to develop campaigns to detect emotional problems. Preventive measures should provide appropriate care to prevent drug use as a mechanism to cope with such emotional conflicts. Also, more intense preventive interventions should be targeted to adolescents with a high probability of developing drug abuse.

  15. Computer-enhanced interventions for drug use and HIV risk in the emergency room: preliminary results on psychological precursors of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Erin E; Walton, Maureen A; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Chermack, Stephen T; Bohnert, Amy S B; Barry, Kristen L; Booth, Brenda M; Blow, Frederic C

    2014-01-01

    This article describes process data from a randomized controlled trial among 781 adults recruited in the emergency department who reported recent drug use and were randomized to: intervener-delivered brief intervention (IBI) assisted by computer, computerized BI (CBI), or enhanced usual care (EUC). Analyses examined differences between baseline and post-intervention on psychological constructs theoretically related to changes in drug use and HIV risk: importance, readiness, intention, help-seeking, and confidence. Compared to EUC, participants receiving the IBI significantly increased in confidence and intentions; CBI patients increased importance, readiness, confidence, and help-seeking. Both groups increased relative to the EUC in likelihood of condom use with regular partners. Examining BI components suggested that benefits of change and tools for change were associated with changes in psychological constructs. Delivering BIs targeting drug use and HIV risk using computers appears promising for implementation in healthcare settings. This trial is ongoing and future work will report behavioral outcomes. © 2013.

  16. Recent illicit drug use among psychiatric patients in Brazil: a national representative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Almeida Nahas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate factors associated to illicit drug use among patients with mental illness in Brazil according to gender. METHODS A cross-sectional representative sample of psychiatric patients (2,475 individuals was randomly selected from 11 hospitals and 15 public mental health outpatient clinics. Data on self-reported illicit drug use and sociodemographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics were obtained from face-to-face interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations with recent illicit drug use. RESULTS The prevalence of any recent illicit drug use was 11.4%. Men had higher prevalence than women for all substances (17.5% and 5.6%, respectively. Lower education, history of physical violence, and history of homelessness were associated with drug use among men only; not professing a religion was associated with drug use in women only. For both men and women, younger age, current hospitalization, alcohol and tobacco use, history of incarceration, younger age at sexual debut, and more than one sexual partner were statistically associated with illicit drug use. CONCLUSIONS Recent illicit drug use among psychiatric patients is higher than among the general Brazilian population and it is associated with multiple factors including markers of psychiatric severity. Our data indicate the need for the development of gender-based drug-use interventions among psychiatric patients in Brazil. Integration of substance use treatment strategies with mental health treatment should be a priority.

  17. Zambian Women\\'s Experiences of Urban Maternity Care: Results ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urban African maternity care systems face problems, as rapid population growth puts them under increasing pressure. In 1983 a decentralised system with midwife-run maternity units at health centres was initiated in Lusaka. A community-based survey of 1210 women conducted in 1999 examined access, coverage and ...

  18. Trends in Marijuana and Other Illicit Drug Use among College Students: Results from 4 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study Surveys--1993-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Lee, Jae Eun; Wechsler, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The authors examined changes in college students' illicit drug use, patterns of polydrug use, and the relationship between students' ages of initiation of substance use and later use of marijuana and other illicit drugs between 1993 and 2001. Data from 119 US colleges and universities in the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study…

  19. Dynamics of Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Joan H.; Holden, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper analyzes data from interviews with 167 drug users in the community, including age, sex, birth order, education, family constellation, and circumstances of first drug use. The majority of subjects had tried to stop using drugs, but most had been unsuccessful at the time of the interview. (Author)

  20. Drugs Used in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on drugs used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  1. Women's experiences of abnormal Pap smear results - A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Marie; Swahnberg, Katarina; Lindell, Gunnel; Oscarsson, Marie

    2017-06-01

    To describe women's experiences of abnormal Pap smear result. Ten women were recruited from a women's health clinic. Qualitative interviews based on six open-ended questions were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by content analysis. The women believed that their abnormal Pap smear result was indicative of having cancer. This created anxiety in the women, which resulted in the need for emotional support and information. Testing positive with human papillomavirus (HPV) also meant consequences for the relatives as well as concerns about the sexually transmitted nature of the virus. Finally, the women had a need to be treated with respect by the healthcare professionals in order to reduce feelings of being abused. In general, women have a low level of awareness of HPV and its relation to abnormal Pap smear results. Women who receive abnormal Pap smear results need oral information, based on the individual women's situation, and delivered at the time the women receive the test result. It is also essential that a good emotional contact be established between the women and the healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening and Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drug Use Among Pregnant Women Attending Midwife Obstetric Units in Cape Town, South Africa: A Qualitative Study of the Views of Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen Williams, Petal; Petersen, Zaino; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Mathews, Catherine; Everett-Murphy, Katherine; Parry, Charles D H

    2015-01-01

    Despite the negative consequences of alcohol and other drug use during pregnancy, few interventions for pregnant women are implemented, and little is known about their feasibility and acceptability in primary health care settings in South Africa. As part of the formative phase of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for substance use among women presenting for antenatal care, the present study explored health care workers' attitudes and perceptions about screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment among this population. Forty-three health care providers at 2 public sector midwife obstetric units in Cape Town, South Africa, were interviewed using an open-ended, semistructured interview schedule designed to identify factors that hinder or support the implementation of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for substance use in these settings. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using the framework approach. Health care providers agreed that there is a substantial need for screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for substance use among pregnant women and believe such services potentially could be integrated into routine care. Several women-, staff-, and clinic-level barriers were identified that could hinder the successful implementation in antenatal services. These barriers included the nondisclosure of alcohol and other drug use, the intervention being considered as an add-on service or additional work, negative staff attitudes toward implementation of an intervention, poor staff communication styles such as berating women for their behavior, lack of interest from staff, time constraints, staff shortages, overburdened workloads, and language barriers. The utility of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for addressing substance use among pregnant women in public health midwife obstetric units was supported, but consideration will need to be given to addressing a variety of

  3. Mental symptoms and drug use in maintenance treatment with slow-release oral morphine compared to methadone: results of a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verthein, Uwe; Beck, Thilo; Haasen, Christian; Reimer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance treatment is the option of choice to stabilize opioid-dependent patients. Whilst efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine has been studied extensively, fewer data on slow-release oral morphine are available. This study analyzes the effects of slow-release oral morphine compared to methadone with regard to self-reported mental symptoms, drug use and satisfaction with treatment. The study was carried out as an open-label randomized crossover trial in 14 treatment sites in Switzerland and Germany. It comprised 2 crossover periods of 11 weeks each. For measuring mental symptoms, the Symptom Checklist-27 (SCL-27) was used. Drug and alcohol use was assessed by the number of consumption days, and treatment satisfaction by a visual analogue scale. A total of 157 patients were included for the analyses (per-protocol sample). Statistically significantly better outcomes for morphine as compared to methadone treatment were found for overall severity of mental symptoms (SCL-27 Global Severity Index), as well as 5 of the 6 syndrome groups of the SCL-27, and for treatment satisfaction. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to drug or alcohol use between groups. This study supports positive effects of slow-release oral morphine compared to methadone on patient-reported outcomes such as mental symptoms and treatment satisfaction with comparable effects on concomitant drug use. Slow-release oral morphine represents a meaningful alternative to methadone for treatment of opioid dependence. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Marijuana and tobacco co-use among a nationally representative sample of US pregnant and non-pregnant women: 2005-2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman-Cowger, Victoria H; Schauer, Gillian L; Peters, Erica N

    2017-08-01

    Marijuana and tobacco are the most commonly used illicit and licit drugs during pregnancy. This study aimed to examine a nationally representative sample of US pregnant women and to: (1) determine the prevalence of past month marijuana and tobacco co-use, (2) identify characteristics that distinguish marijuana and tobacco co-users from users of marijuana only, tobacco only, or neither, and (3) compare characteristics that differ between pregnant and non-pregnant co-users of marijuana and tobacco. Data were obtained from 497,218 US women (8721 pregnant) ages 12-49 who participated in the 2005-2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Prevalence and demographic and substance use characteristics were compared across groups using weighted estimates and chi-squared tests. Multinomial logistic regression identified demographic and substance use correlates of co-use. Co-use among pregnant and non-pregnant women was significantly more prevalent than marijuana-only use but was less common than tobacco-only use. In unadjusted frequencies, pregnant co-users significantly differed from non-pregnant co-users across several domains. Among pregnant women, multivariate correlates of co-use of tobacco and marijuana vs. tobacco-only use were ages 12-17, non-Hispanic black race, Hispanic ethnicity, and past month polytobacco, any alcohol, and other drug use (all adjusted odds ratios≥2.0). In this first examination of the prevalence and correlates of co-use of marijuana and tobacco among a nationally representative group of pregnant women, pregnant co-users were more likely to report other high risk behaviors compared with non-pregnant co-users and users of a single substance, suggesting disparities worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Results from the 2012-2013 paediatric national survey on off-label drug use in children in Spain (OL-PED study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Pérez, R; Ruiz Antorán, M B; Avendaño Solá, C; Román Riechmann, E; Cabrera García, L; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Mellado Peña, M J

    2014-07-01

    Off-label drug use is a common practice in paediatrics. The aim of the present study was to estimate the knowledge of Spaniard paediatricians on off-label use. Cross-sectional, multicentre, descriptive and national study from July 2012 to March 2013 using an on-line questionnaire on off-label use in children. An e-mail was sent to paediatricians who were members of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (AEP) or its Regional or Paediatric Specialties Societies. Out of 673 responses were received, 75.1% of Spanish paediatricians knew the meaning of off-label use, 61% of them prescribed medicines outside the conditions authorised in their Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) and 47% knew of the importance of noting the off-label use in the medical record. However, just under half of paediatricians informed parents, and only 22% wrote it down in the medical record. Most Spanish paediatricians do not meet current regulations regarding off-label use. This regulation demands: justifying the decisions when off-label use is needed, and to write down in the medical record that, at least an oral consent from the parents has been obtained. This study reveals a fact that Spanish paediatricians must change. Meanwhile, it is a priority to continue with the implementation of consensus and clinical guidelines, to obtain more data on the efficacy and safety of off-label drug use in children, and to incorporate them into the SPC. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug use during breastfeeding. A survey from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirm, Eric; Schwagermann, M.P.; Tobi, H; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    Objective: To survey drug use by breastfeeding women, and to compare this with nonbreastfeeding women. In addition, we were interested whether drug use was of influence on the decision to give breastfeeding, and the other way around. Design and setting: During a 6-week period in 2002, a

  7. Understanding Drug Use and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... factors affect drug use trends, when young people view drug use as harmful, they tend to decrease ...

  8. Sex differences in drug use among polysubstance users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ben; Hoffman, Lauren A; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2014-12-01

    Available evidence indicates women with substance use disorders may experience more rapid progression through usage milestones (telescoping). The few investigations of sex differences in treatment-seeking populations often focus on single substances and typically do not account for significant polysubstance abuse. The current study examined sex differences in a heterogeneous sample of treatment seeking polysubstance users. We examined patterns of drug use, age at drug use milestones (e.g., initial use, regular use), and progression rates between milestones. Nicotine and alcohol use were also evaluated. Participants (n = 543; 288 women) completed personal histories of substance use, including chronicity, frequency, and regularity, as well as inventories assessing affect, and intellectual ability. Rates of drug use and milestone ages varied by sex and specific drug. Analyses suggested pronounced telescoping effects for pain medication and marijuana, with women progressing more rapidly through usage milestones. Our data were generally supportive of telescoping effects, although considerable variance in progression measures was noted. The contrast between the marked telescoping observed in pain medication use and the absence of telescoping in other opioids was of particular interest. The discrepancy in telescoping effects, despite shared pharmacologies, suggests the need for further work examining underlying psychosocial factors. These results highlight that the specific sample population, substance, and outcome measure should be carefully considered when interpreting sex differences in substance use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychotropic drug use among Icelandic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoëga, Helga; Baldursson, Gísli; Hrafnkelsson, Birgir

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate psychotropic drug use among children in Iceland between 2003 and 2007. METHODS: A nationwide population-based drug use study covering the total pediatric population (ages 0-17) in Iceland. Information was obtained from the National Medicines...... Registry to calculate prevalence of use by year and psychotropic drug group; incidence by year, psychotropic drug group, child's age and sex, and medical specialty of prescriber; the most commonly used psychotropic chemical substances, off-label and unlicensed use and concomitant psychotropic drug use....... RESULTS: The overall prevalence of psychotropic drug use was 48.7 per 1000 Icelandic children in 2007. Stimulants and antidepressants increased in prevalence from 2003 to 2007 and were the two most prevalent psychotropic drug groups, respectively, 28.4 and 23.4 per 1000 children in 2007. A statistically...

  10. Drug Use among Pregnant Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Lewayne D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Collected data from first 100 subjects in on-going longitudinal study of drug use before and during pregnancy in adolescence. Findings from unmarried pregnant adolescents revealed that, although lifetime prevalence of drug use was relatively high, substance use declined voluntarily and substantially during pregnancy. Prepregnancy drug use…

  11. Adolescent Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A.; Watkins, William C.

    2012-01-01

    For many adolescents today, the most common form of substance use is nonmedical prescription drug use. Fittingly, many researchers, policy makers, and people who work with youth are concerned about the serious problems associated with nonmedical prescription drug use (NMPDU). In this article, authors Jason Ford and William Watkins provide an…

  12. Measures for Prevention of Irrational Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursel Surmelioglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Irrational drug use is one of the main health problems all over the world, especially in developing countries. Limited studies about irrational drug use examples showed that main defects. These are polypharmacy, use of drug drug incompatible with diagnosis, inappropriate use of antibiotics, unnecessary use of expensive drug and people's self-treatment with over the counter and prescribing drugs. There are many reasons for irrational drug use. The main reasons are lack of education, socio-cultural, economic and resulting from regulatory mechanism factors. These reasons affect each other, so problems become more complicated. Reasons resulting from pharmacist and doctors occurs basic of irrational drug use. So attitude of doctors and pharmacist toward rational drug use should be evaluated for resolve defects, formal and non-formal education should be continually used and improved. Rational drug use policies should be developed involving drug companies, doctors, pharmacists and patients. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 452-462

  13. Nosologic Comparisons of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Saha, Tulshi D.; Pickering, Roger P.; June Ruan, W.; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine prevalences and concordances between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) in a newly completed U.S. epidemiologic survey. Method: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III surveyed 36,309 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults. SUDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule–5. Concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders were assessed using kappa statistics. Results: Prevalences of past-year substance-specific DSM-5 disorders (2+ criteria) were modestly higher than those of DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined for alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, opioids, and heroin, but lower for cannabis, cocaine, and stimulants. Lifetime prevalences were lower under DSM-5. Prevalences were similar between moderate to severe (4+ criteria) DSM-5 disorders and dependence, whereas prevalences of DSM-5 disorders at 3+ criteria (DSM-5 [3+]) were higher, particularly for cannabis. Past-year concordances were excellent for DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined versus any DSM-5 and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 moderate to severe disorders; lifetime concordances were fair to excellent. Past-year concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 (3+) were generally similar to or modestly higher than those with any DSM-5 disorder; lifetime concordances were mostly lower. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with those informing the development of DSM-5. Future research should examine differences in patterns between past-year and lifetime disorders, particularly for cannabis. Other questions warranting investigation include whether different combinations of the same numbers of criteria carry different clinical or nosologic implications, whether changes innosology yield changes in treatment demand, and whether changes in characteristics of individuals with DSM-5 SUDs

  14. Drug use among youth and adults in a population-based survey in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Peltzer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Illicit drug use is a growing public health problem. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of drug use and the sociodemographic and health characteristics that influence it among young and adult South Africans. Methods: Data based on the South African national population-based survey in 2012 for 26 453 individuals (52.0% women and 48.0% men aged 15 years and older were analysed. Past 3-month drug use was assessed with the ‘Alcohol, Smoking and Substance use Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST’. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was conducted to assess the association between sociodemographic factors, health variables and any past 3-month drug use. Results: Overall, any past 3-month drug use was 4.4%, 7.9% among men and 1.3% among women. The proportion of past 3-month cannabis use was 4.0%, followed by sedatives or sleeping pills 0.4%, amphetamine-type stimulants 0.3%, cocaine 0.3%, opiates 0.3%, inhalants 0.2% and hallucinogens 0.1%. Among the nine South African provinces, any past 3-month drug use was the highest in the Western Cape (7.1%, followed by the Free State (6.3% and Northern Cape (5.2%. In adjusted, multivariable, logistic regression analysis among both men and women, younger age, being mixed race and hazardous or harmful alcohol use were associated with any past 3-month drug use. In addition, having been a victim of violent crime and sexual risk behaviour among men and having psychological distress among women were associated with any past 3-month drug use. Conclusion: An increase of any past 3-month drug use from 3.7% in 2008 to 4.4% in 2012 was observed in South Africa. Prevention and intervention activities targeting drug use, in particular in identified risk groups, need to be strengthened in South Africa.

  15. Validation of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test in a Swedish sample of suspected offenders with signs of mental health problems: results from the Mental Disorder, Substance Abuse and Crime study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeej, Natalie; Berman, Anne H; Gumpert, Clara H; Palmstierna, Tom; Kristiansson, Marianne; Alm, Charlotte

    2010-12-01

    Substance abuse is common among offenders. One method widely used for the detection of substance abuse is screening. This study explored the concurrent validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) screening tools in relation to (a) substance abuse and dependency diagnoses and (b) three problem severity domains of the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index in a sample of 181 suspected offenders with signs of mental health problems. The screening tools showed moderate to high accuracy for identification of dependency diagnoses. The AUDIT was associated with alcohol problem severity, whereas the DUDIT was associated with drug and legal problem severity. Administering the screening tools in the current population yields valid results. However, the suggested cutoff scores should be applied with caution due to the discrepancy between present and previous findings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of grandparenting in postmenopausal women's cognitive health: results from the Women's Healthy Aging Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Katherine F; Henderson, Victor W; Ames, David; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Szoeke, Cassandra

    2014-10-01

    Preserving aging cognition improves quality of life and delays dementia onset. Previous studies have shown that social engagement can maintain cognition; however, none has examined the effects of grandparenting, an important role among postmenopausal women. This study aims to examine the role of grandparenting in cognition among postmenopausal women. Participants were 186 Australian women from the longitudinal prospective Women's Healthy Aging Project. Cognition was assessed using the Symbol-Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), California Verbal Learning Test, and Tower of London. Amount of time spent minding grandchildren predicted differences in SDMT performance (P cognitive scores for most tests were seen in participants who minded grandchildren for 1 day/week. Minding grandchildren for 1 day/week was also a significant positive predictor of California Verbal Learning Test immediate recall performance (P cognitive performance is demonstrated by postmenopausal women who spend 1 day/week minding grandchildren; however, minding grandchildren for 5 days or more per week predicts lower working memory performance and processing speed. These results indicate that highly frequent grandparenting predicts lower cognitive performance.

  17. Violence Against Women in Hong Kong: Results of the International Violence Against Women Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhours, Brigitte; Broadhurst, Roderic

    2015-11-01

    In Hong Kong, nearly 1,300 women participated by telephone in the International Violence Against Women Survey in 2006. One in five respondents had experienced violence since age 16. Sexual violence (13.4%) was more frequent than physical violence (11.7%). Women were more likely to be abused by men they knew (13.5%) than by strangers (8%). Compared with other surveyed countries, Hong Kong recorded among the lowest rates of violence by both intimate partners and non-partners. These results suggest that cultural influences linked to the interaction of modernization and some protective factors found in the adherence to traditional Chinese values are relevant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Employment Trajectories: Exploring Gender Differences and Impacts of Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David Y. C.; Evans, Elizabeth; Hara, Motoaki; Weiss, Robert E.; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of drug use on employment over 20 years among men and women, utilizing data on 7661 participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Growth mixture modeling was applied, and five distinct employment trajectory groups were identified for both men and women. The identified patterns were largely similar…

  19. Recreational Prescription Drug Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Ethan A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore recreational prescription drug use among undergraduate students. Although anecdotal accounts on this subject abound, empirical research is extremely limited. Data from a survey of a random sample of 734 students at a large public research university in the Northeast were examined. Results indicate that a…

  20. Reducing falls and resulting hip fractures among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J A; Olson, S

    2000-03-31

    Fall-related injuries are the leading cause of injury deaths and disabilities among older adults (i.e., persons aged > or = 65 years). The most serious fall injury is hip fracture; one half of all older adults hospitalized for hip fracture never regain their former level of function. In 1996, a total of 340,000 hospitalizations for hip fracture occurred among persons aged > or = 65 years, and 80% of these admissions occurred among women. From 1988 to 1996, hip fracture hospitalization rates for women aged > or = 65 years increased 23%. Risk factors for falls include increasing age, muscle weakness, functional limitations, environmental hazards, use of psychoactive medications, and a history of falls. Age is also a risk factor for hip fracture. Women aged > or = 85 years are nearly eight times more likely than women aged 65-74 years to be hospitalized for hip fracture. White women aged > or = 65 years are at higher risk for hip fracture than black women. Other riskfactors for hip fracture include lack of physical activity, osteoporosis, low body mass index, and a previous hip fracture. Because approximately 95% of hip fractures result from falls, minimizing fall risk is a practical approach to reducing these serious injuries. Research demonstrates that effective fall prevention strategies require a multifaceted approach with both behavioral and environmental components. Important elements include education and skill building to increase knowledge about fall risk factors, exercise to improve strength and balance, home modifications to reduce fall hazards, and medication assessment to minimize side effects (e.g., dizziness and grogginess). Coordination needs to be improved among the diverse Federal, state, and local organizations that conduct fall prevention activities. The effectiveness of existing fall prevention programs among specific groups of women (e.g., those aged > or = 85 years or living with functional limitations) needs careful evaluation. New primary fall

  1. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DrugFacts » Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Email Facebook Twitter Revised April 2018 What's the relationship between drug use and viral infections? People who engage in ...

  2. Conduct Disorder Symptoms and Illicit Drug Use in Juvenile Justice Involved Youth: The Reciprocal Relationship Between Positive Illicit Drug-Use Attitudes and Illicit Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolp, Haley M; Hershberger, Alexandra R; Sanders, Jasmyn; Um, Miji; Aalsma, Matthew; Cyders, Melissa A

    2017-11-29

    Conduct disorder (CD) symptoms cooccur at high rates with illicit drug use in juvenile justice involved youth, which results in poorer outcomes; however, research has not identified where best to intervene in this relationship, limiting the identification of modifiable risk factors to reduce negative effects of CD symptoms. Two mediation models were examined to investigate the potential for CD symptoms to influence a reciprocal relationship between illicit drug use and positive drug attitudes, controlling for age, gender, and race. Data were examined for 245 juvenile justice involved youth (mean age = 15.46, SD = 1.30, range 12-18, 64.9% Black, 80.4% male) who completed court-ordered psychological assessments. Findings indicate: (1) Positive attitudes toward illicit drug use significantly mediated the relationship between CD symptoms and illicit drug use (β = 0.16, CI 0.09-0.27; test for indirect effect z = 4.17, p drug use significantly mediated the relationship between CD symptoms and positive attitudes toward illicit drug use (β = 0.20, CI 0.12-0.32; test for indirect effect z = 4.87, p drug use both indirectly, through more positive attitudes toward illicit drug use, and directly, which further strengthens positive attitudes toward illicit drug use.

  3. Drug use as consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxall, Gordon Robert; Sigurdsson, Valdimar

    2011-12-01

    Seeking integration of drug consumption research by a theory of memory function and emphasizing drug consumption rather than addiction, Müller & Schumann (M&S) treat drug self-administration as part of a general pattern of consumption. This insight is located within a more comprehensive framework for understanding drug use as consumer behavior that explicates the reinforcement contingencies associated with modes of drug consumption.

  4. Illicit drug use in South Africa: Findings from a 2008 national population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Peltzer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this secondary analysis of the South African National HIV, Incidence, Behaviour and Communication (SABSSM 2008 survey is to provide current data on illicit drug use that could assist in the development and implementation of effective substance abuse policies and intervention programmes aimed at these populations in South Africa. Method. A multistage random population sample of 15 828 people age ≥15 (56.3% women was included in the survey. Illicit drug use was assessed by 2 sections of the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance use Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST. Frequency analyses for different age groups, geolocality, educational level, income, and population group were calculated, as were odds ratios for these variables regarding combined illicit drug use. Results. Current cannabis use was reported by 3.3% of the population sample – 6.1% of the men and 1.2% of the women – and the use of combined all-other illicit drugs (cocaine, amphetamines, inhalants, sedatives, hallucinogens, opiates was reported by 1.8% of the participants. Coloured men (14.3% were most likely, and Indian or Asian women (0.6% least likely, to be cannabis users. Illicit drug use (combined among men was associated with the 20 - 34 year age group and the coloured and white population groups, and among women in the younger age groups, the coloured and white population groups, and low and higher income. Conclusion. An increase of cannabis and other illicit drug prevalence rates was observed from 2005 (2.1% to 2008 (3.3% in the population sample. Multilevel interventions are required to target illicit drug users, in addition to creating awareness in the general population of the problems associated with illicit drug use. There is a need to address illicit drug use in national and provincial policy planning and intervention efforts and, in terms of treatment, a need to ensure that treatment practitioners are adequately trained to address illicit drug use

  5. Urethral carcinoma in women: results of treatment with primary radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.F.; Wards, P.R.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; McLean, M.; Catton, P.A.; Catton, C.N.; Banerjee, D.

    2000-01-01

    Urethral carcinoma in women is uncommon. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of these tumors. The hospital records of 34 women with primary urethral carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. There were 15 squamous cell carcinomas, 13 transitional cell carcinomas, and six adenocarcinomas. The primary tumor was >4 cm in size in eight patients, involved the proximal urethra in 19 and extended to adjacent organs in 22. Inguinal or iliac lymphadenopathy was present in nine patients. There were eight TNM stage I/II tumors, 11 stage III tumors and 15 stage IV tumors. Radiotherapy was administered only to the primary tumor in 15 patients, and to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes in the remaining 19 patients. Brachytherapy with or without external radiation was used to treat the primary tumor in 20 patients. Tumor recurred in 21 patients. The 7-year actuarial overall and cause-specific survivals were 41 and 45%, respectively. Large primary tumor bulk and treatment with external beam radiation alone (no brachytherapy) were independent adverse prognostic factors for local tumor recurrence. Brachytherapy reduced the risk of local recurrence by a factor of 4.2. The beneficial effect of brachytherapy was most prominently seen in patients with bulky primary disease. Large tumor size was the only independent adverse predictor of overall disease recurrence and death from cancer. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for carcinoma of the female urethra and preserves normal anatomy and function. Brachytherapy improves local tumor control, possibly as a result of the higher radiation dose that can safely be delivered. (author)

  6. The relationship of early-onset regular smoking to alcohol use, depression, illicit drug use, and other risky behaviors during early adolescence: results from the youth supplement to the third national health and nutrition examination survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, E Z; Yi, H Y; Dufour, M C; Whitmore, C C

    2001-01-01

    Recently we found that the early onset of regular tobacco use is as predictive of lifetime drug use and depressive disorders as it is of alcohol use disorders [Alcohol.: Clin. Exp. Res. 23 (1999) 513.]. This finding, which paralleled findings regarding early onset of alcohol use [J. Subst. Abuse 10 (1998) 59.], suggested that early regular use of any drug might simply be an indicator of risk for a constellation of problem behaviors. The purpose of the present study is to test this hypothesis as well as to study the strength and patterns of associations among these problem behaviors already present among youth. The results will permit description of more precise profiles to identify groups of children at risk. Using data for respondents aged 12-16 from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), descriptive statistics were calculated and logistic regression models were estimated. Descriptive analyses indicated that in comparison with those who never smoked, or who simply experimented, early-onset regular smokers, both those who began at age 13 or younger and those who did so between 14 and 16, were those most likely to use alcohol and other drugs as well as have school problems and early sexual experiences culminating in pregnancy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations among these high-risk behaviors. These results support the hypothesis that early onset of smoking is but an indicator of a syndrome of problem behaviors already in place during childhood. They also suggest that the significance of an age onset variable may differ depending on the age of the sample used. As follow-up data are collected, we expect to learn much about the natural course of the distinct risk groups identified in the analyses by studying longitudinally this nationally representative group of early adolescents.

  7. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use Among College Students With Trauma Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Lindsay S; Wiersma-Mosley, Jacquelyn D; Feldner, Matthew T; Melkonian, Alexander J; Milner, Lauren A; Lewis, Sarah F

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical prescription drug use, defined as using the drug without a prescription or in ways for which it is not prescribed, and traumatic event exposure are highly prevalent among college students. Despite evidence that posttraumatic stress symptoms could place college students at risk for nonmedical prescription drug problems, no studies have examined this relationship. This study was a preliminary examination of posttraumatic stress symptoms, lifetime nonmedical prescription drug use, hazardous use, and dependence symptoms among college students with trauma exposure. Participants were students attending a rural college in Virginia, recruited through psychology classes, flyers, LISTSERVs, and announcements at student events. All students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event were included (N = 119); participants' mean age was 19.7 years (SD = 1.90), about half were women (n = 63, 53%), and most were Caucasian (n = 103, 87%). Nearly 60% of participants (n = 71) reported using nonmedical prescription drugs at least once during their lifetime and were more likely than those with no use to report hazardous alcohol use (p college student is experiencing related to nonmedical prescription drug use may be more relevant to posttraumatic stress symptom frequency than dichotomous measures of nonmedical prescription drug use alone. Further, the association between the frequency of posttraumatic stress symptoms and both hazardous nonmedical prescription drug use and dependence symptoms among college students with a trauma history deserves further investigation due to the resulting vulnerability to increasingly negative outcomes.

  8. Family, Religiosity, and the Risk of Adolescent Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Stephen J.; Maughan, Suzanne L.; Marcos, Anastasios C.; Li, Bingdao

    1998-01-01

    Uses data from a random sample of 13,250 adolescents. Results show that mother/adolescent bonding and family drug problems have modest, indirect effects on the likelihood of adolescent drug use; father/adolescent bonding, parental monitoring, and family aggression have relatively weak effects on adolescent drug use; and religious students do not…

  9. Changes in Drug Use and Polypharmacy After the Age of 90

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastesson, Jonas W.; Oksuzyan, Anna; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    . Measurements: Self-reported use of regularly taken drugs. Mean and median number of drugs and growth curve models were used to identify the change in number of drugs as the cohort aged from 92 to 100. Results: The within-person use of drugs increased with age for women (0.19 per year; 95% confidence interval......) but thereafter remained stable at approximately 4 drugs. Women used more drugs than men at all waves. Conclusion: In this first longitudinal study of drug use in nonagenarians, individuals used an increasing number of drugs as they aged. This increase is difficult to detect in cross-sectional analyses......Objectives: To determine the longitudinal development of drug use in very old adults. Design: Longitudinal cohort study with waves in 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2005. Setting: Nationwide study in Denmark. Participants: All living Danes born in 1905 were approached in 1998; 2,262 responded at baseline...

  10. Adolescent Initiation of Drug Use: Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Gale A.; Larkby, Cynthia; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Day, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the direct effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on adolescent drug use, while controlling for other predictors of adolescent use. Method: Data are from a longitudinal study of PCE in which women and their offspring were assessed throughout childhood. Adolescents were interviewed at 15 years about their age at…

  11. Resilience characteristics mitigate tendency for harmful alcohol and illicit drug use in adults with a history of childhood abuse: a cross-sectional study of 2024 inner-city men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Aliza P; Ressler, Kerry J; Bradley, Bekh

    2014-04-01

    Resilience refers to abilities to cope adaptively with adversity or trauma. A common psychological sequella of childhood abuse or other traumatic experiences is substance use problems. There are, however, very limited data on relationships among resilience traits, childhood abuse, and alcohol or drug use problems. Hence, we aimed to examine associations between resilience characteristics and lifetime alcohol and illicit drug use in 2024 inner-city adults with high rates of childhood abuse and other trauma exposure. In this cross-sectional study, resilience was assessed with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, childhood abuse with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, lifetime alcohol and illicit drug use with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test and Drug Abuse Screening Test. Associations between resilience and substance use were examined with linear regression models, adjusting for trauma load, age, and sex. We found that resilience characteristics mitigated tendency for lifetime alcohol use problems both as a main effect (β = -0.11; p = 0.0014) and an interaction with severity of childhood abuse (β = -0.06; p = 0.0115) after trauma severity, age, and sex were controlled for. Similarly, resilience reduced lifetime illicit drug use both as a main effect (β = -0.03; p = 0.0008) and as an interaction with severity of childhood abuse (β = -0.01; p = 0.0256) after trauma load, age, and sex were adjusted for. Our findings add to a nascent body of literature suggesting that resilience characteristics mitigate risks not only for PTSD, major depression, and suicidality, but also for substance use problems in adults exposed to childhood abuse or other traumatic experiences. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Social patterning of overeating, binge eating, compensatory behaviours and symptoms of bulimia nervosa in young adult women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women?s Health

    OpenAIRE

    Koupil, Ilona; Tooth, Leigh; Heshmati, Amy; Mishra, Gita

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study social patterning of overeating and symptoms of disordered eating in a general population. Design A representative, population-based cohort study. Setting The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women?s Health (ALSWH), Survey 1 in 1996 and Survey 2 in 2000. Subjects Women (n 12 599) aged 18?23 years completed a questionnaire survey at baseline, of whom 6866 could be studied prospectively. Results Seventeen per cent of women reported episodes of overeating, 16 % reported binge ...

  13. Urinary organophosphate metabolite levels in Palestinian pregnant women: results of the Middle East Regional Cooperation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Ziad; Berman, Tamar; Azmi, Kifaya; Abu Seir, Rania; Agha, Hazem; Ein-Mor, Eliana; Göen, Thomas; Stein, Yael; Richter, Elihu; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure urinary organophosphate (OP) metabolites in Palestinian pregnant women, and to compare levels with those in pregnant women in Jerusalem and women from the general population in Israel. We measured six dialkyl phosphates in urine samples collected from 148 pregnant women from the West Bank area. Median total dimethyl phosphate (DM(total)) levels were significantly lower in Palestinian women compared to Jerusalem pregnant women and women in Israel (p = 0.041). In Palestinian women reporting that their place of residence was near an agricultural field, DM(total) levels were significantly higher (p = 0.037). Lower urinary excretion of dimethyl phosphate pesticide metabolites in Palestinian women compared to Israeli women may result from lower consumption of fruits and vegetables in the Palestinian population. Our findings highlight differences in OP pesticide exposure in populations with close geographical proximity but with differences in culture, diet, lifestyle, and regulatory oversight of pesticides.

  14. The Science of Drug Use: Discussion Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Science of Drug Use: Discussion Points The Science of Drug Use: Discussion Points Email Facebook Twitter ... was last updated February 2017 Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal ...

  15. Etiologies and consequences of adolescent drug use: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentler, P M

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results and work in progress from a longitudinal study of drug use etiologies and consequences. Early- and mid-adolescent drug use patterns, personality, and behavioral correlates were studied in a large sample of normal youth beginning in the mid-1970's. To determine the correlates and consequences of adolescent drug use, controlling for related tendencies such as lack of social conformity and deviant friendship networks, 654 youngsters were followed into young adulthood and their behaviors and lifestyles evaluated. Teenage drug use was found to disrupt many critical developmental tasks of adolescence and young adulthood. Tendencies to use many different drugs as an adolescent led in young adulthood to increased drug crime involvement, decreased college involvement, increased job instability, income, psychoticism, and stealing episodes. Intervention efforts should be directed not only towards decreasing drug use, but also towards improving personal maturity, social skills, and economic opportunities.

  16. Safety of artemether-lumefantrine in pregnant women with malaria: results of a prospective cohort study in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyando Christine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safety data regarding exposure to artemisinin-based combination therapy in pregnancy are limited. This prospective cohort study conducted in Zambia evaluated the safety of artemether-lumefantrine (AL in pregnant women with malaria. Methods Pregnant women attending antenatal clinics were assigned to groups based on the drug used to treat their most recent malaria episode (AL vs. sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, SP. Safety was assessed using standard and pregnancy-specific parameters. Post-delivery follow-up was six weeks for mothers and 12 months for live births. Primary outcome was perinatal mortality (stillbirth or neonatal death within seven days after birth. Results Data from 1,001 pregnant women (AL n = 495; SP n = 506 and 933 newborns (AL n = 466; SP n = 467 showed: perinatal mortality (AL 4.2%; SP 5.0%, comprised of early neonatal mortality (each group 2.3%, stillbirths (AL 1.9%; SP 2.7%; preterm deliveries (AL 14.1%; SP 17.4% of foetuses; and gestational age-adjusted low birth weight (AL 9.0%; SP 7.7%. Infant birth defect incidence was 1.8% AL and 1.6% SP, excluding umbilical hernia. Abortions prior to antenatal care could not be determined: abortion occurred in 4.5% of women treated with AL during their first trimester; none were reported in the 133 women exposed to SP and/or quinine during their first trimester. Overall development (including neurological assessment was similar in both groups. Conclusions These data suggest that exposure to AL in pregnancy, including first trimester, is not associated with particular safety risks in terms of perinatal mortality, malformations, or developmental impairment. However, more data are required on AL use during the first trimester.

  17. Drug use in first pregnancy and lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Steffensen, Flemming Hald; Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the drug prescription pattern in Danish women from 12 weeks prior to conception until 12 weeks post-partum. METHOD: A drug utilization study based on The North Jutland Prescription Database. The Danish pharmacies use a computerized accounting system for all subsidized drugs...... and this was linked to the Danish Medical Birth Registry concerning prescription patterns for all women who had given birth in the county of North Jutland from 1991 to 1996. RESULTS: The analysis included 16,001 primiparous women, who had redeemed 34,834 prescriptions prior to, during and after pregnancy. During...... pregnancy 44.2% of the women received prescriptions for at least one drug. Users received 2.6 prescriptions on average during pregnancy: 5% of the users redeemed 24.2% of all prescriptions. The proportion of women who redeemed prescriptions for more than three different drugs was 2.7%. The majority...

  18. Racial differences in adolescent drug use: the impact of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, C H; Albrecht, S L; Miller, M K

    1996-08-01

    Contrary to popular stereotypes, current studies of adolescent populations suggest that Black teens are less likely to use illicit drugs than are White teens. This study investigates the extent to which differences in religiosity are responsible for racial differences in drug use. Using data from a national survey of United States high school seniors, our results indicate that religion does provide some protection from drug use by adolescents. However, religiosity has less of an impact on the drug use of Black adolescents, perhaps as a result of the diverse roles of the Black church.

  19. Contraceptive use by women in Accra, Ghana: results from the 2003 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contraceptive use by women in Accra, Ghana: results from the 2003 Accra women's health survey. RMK Adanu, JD Seffah, AG Hill, R Darko, RB Duda, JK Anarfi. Abstract. The study was to determine the predictors of use of modern contraception among women in Accra, Ghana. Data were collected by trained interviewers ...

  20. Women's perceptions and treatment patterns related to contraception: results of a survey of US women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Anita L; Cohen, Stephen; Galitsky, Alex; Hathaway, Mark; Kappus, Dale; Kerolous, Majid; Patel, Kiren; Dominguez, Linda

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this survey was to understand US women's contraception journey from her first prescribed method to her current one including reasons for choosing and stopping/switching methods, healthcare provider relationships, and bleeding preferences. We administered a nationally-representative, web-based survey of US women aged 16 to 50 years currently using (N=1656) or had previously used (N=1448) prescription contraception, or who had never used it but would consider using it in the future (N=103). Statistical analyses were based on overlap formulae with sample weights adjusted to 2010 US census demographic benchmarks. The survey was sent to 11,906 women, and 5957 responded (50% response rate). Among qualified respondents, 3104 had experience with prescription contraception. Oral contraceptives (OC) remain the most frequently prescribed method as first or subsequent contraception. However, as women switch to their current prescription method, more chose IUD contraception. As reported by respondents, only 48% of current users received counseling on how to use specific methods, and 58% were counseled on bleeding patterns to expect, while 67% were offered counseling on potential side effects. Many of the side effects reported in this study for first and current prescription contraception were nonspecific and may be related to a nocebo effect, lack of understanding about normal bodily fluctuations, or poor compliance. Many women (34%) reported 'making their periods lighter' as a reason for using their current prescription method, and 53% would prefer to skip their monthly period altogether. Misperceptions about contraception are common, and prescription contraception choice can be quite complex. Clinicians can enhance patient satisfaction by providing adequate information and matching methods to women's lifestyles, reproductive choices, and pregnancy risk. This study provides insight into modern women's attitudes and views toward prescription contraception that may be

  1. A prospective examination of the path from child abuse and neglect to illicit drug use in middle adulthood: the potential mediating role of four risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen W; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2009-03-01

    This study examines prostitution, homelessness, delinquency and crime, and school problems as potential mediators of the relationship between childhood abuse and neglect (CAN) and illicit drug use in middle adulthood. Children with documented cases of physical and sexual abuse and neglect (ages 0-11) during 1967-1971 were matched with non-maltreated children and followed into middle adulthood (approximate age 39). Mediators were assessed in young adulthood (approximate age 29) through in-person interviews between 1989 and 1995 and official arrest records through 1994 (N = 1,196). Drug use was assessed via self-reports of past year use of marijuana, psychedelics, cocaine, and/or heroin during 2000-2002 (N = 896). Latent variable structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test: (1) a four-factor model with separate pathways from CAN to illicit drug use through each of the mediating risk factors and (2) a second-order model with a single mediating risk factor comprised of prostitution, homelessness, delinquency and crime, and poor school performance. Analyses were performed separately for women and men, controlling for race/ethnicity and early drug use. In the four-factor model for both men and women, CAN was significantly related to each of the mediators, but no paths from the mediators to drug use were significant. For women, the second-order risk factor mediated the relationship between CAN and illicit drug use in middle adulthood. For men, neither child abuse and neglect nor the second-order risk factor predicted drug use in middle adulthood. These results suggest that for women, the path from CAN to middle adulthood drug use is part of a general "problem behavior syndrome" evident earlier in life.

  2. Rural attitudes, opinions, and drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T K; Schenck, J E; Leukefeld, C G; Meyers, J; Allen, S

    1999-01-01

    There are two primary purposes of this paper. The first is to summarize the results of a survey conducted in a rural area of Kentucky on attitudes and behaviors regarding substance use. The second purpose is to examine differences in drug attitudes and behaviors for higher and lower density rural areas. Participants for this study were contacted by telephone in March 1996. The sample was generated by random digit dialing for eight county telephone exchanges. The sample included 334 respondents from the eight counties who were grouped into respondents from higher density areas (n = 132) and lower density areas (n = 202). Results indicated that respondents from both higher density and lower density areas were similar on drug use and attitudes. However, lower density areas reported their county as a worse place to live and less safe than respondents from higher density areas. Respondents from lower density areas were also more likely to report there was more alcohol/drug use and more alcohol bootlegging in the past year, and that bootlegging alcohol is a serious problem in their county. Future research could include the examination of heterogeneity of rural areas using different indices.

  3. Effects of baseline problematic alcohol and drug use on internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Gajecki

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients' problematic substance use prevalence and effects were explored in relation to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder. METHODS: At baseline and treatment conclusion, 1601 ICBT patients were assessed with self-rated measures for alcohol and drug use (AUDIT/DUDIT, depressive symptoms (MADRS-S, panic disorder symptoms (PDSS-SR and social anxiety symptoms (LSAS-SR. RESULTS: Problematic substance use (AUDIT ≥ 8 for men, ≥ 6 for women; DUDIT ≥ 1 occurred among 32.4% of the patients; 24.1% only alcohol, 4.6% only drugs, and 3.7% combined alcohol and drug use. Hazardous alcohol use and probable alcohol dependence negatively affected panic disorder outcomes, and hazardous drug use led to worse social anxiety outcomes. Depression outcomes were not affected by substance use. Treatment adherence was negatively affected by problematic drug use among men and 25-34 year olds; combined substance use negatively affected adherence for women and 35-64 year olds. CONCLUSION: Problematic substance use does not preclude ICBT treatment but can worsen outcomes, particularly problematic alcohol use for panic disorder patients and hazardous drug use for social anxiety patients. ICBT clinicians should exercise particular caution when treating men and younger patients with problematic drug use, and women or older patients with combined substance use.

  4. Loneliness and suicidal ideation in drug-using college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamis, Dorian A; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Patel, Amee B

    2014-12-01

    The college years are marked by social changes and behavioral experimentation which may increase risk of suicidal ideation. We propose a novel pathway for the development of suicidal thoughts between two established suicide risk factors, loneliness and drug use, which have not been examined in a nonclinical sample. Data were collected from 207 undergraduate drug-using students at a large southeastern university. As hypothesized, suicidal ideation was positively correlated with both loneliness (r = .40) and drug use (r = .29). After controlling for several demographic variables, social desirability, and anxiety sensitivity, drug use was tested as a potential mediator in the loneliness-suicidal ideation link using a single-mediator model. Results indicated a significant indirect (mediated) effect of loneliness on suicidal ideation via drug use (ab = 0.09, 95% CI: 0.02-0.18), suggesting that loneliness may contribute to suicidal ideation through increased drug use among college students. Identification of and intervention with students reporting loneliness and drug use may be a promising suicide prevention strategy on college campuses. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  5. Drug use and risk of bloodborne infections: a survey of female prisoners in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ruth Elwood; Gold, Fiona; Murphy, Wendy; Remple, Valencia; Berkowitz, Jonathan; Money, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians working in a women's prison in British Columbia observed hepatitis C sero-conversion among inmates, prompting this study to determine: the characteristics of women who do and do not report illicit drug use in prison; patterns of drug use inside prison; factors associated with illicit drug use that might contribute to bloodborne transmission inside prison. A cross-sectional observational data set was created using an anonymous 61-item self-administered survey. Eighty-three percent (104/126) of eligible inmates participated. Seventy-four percent (77/104) reported their current prison sentence was related to illicit drug use and 25% (26/104) reported their ethnicity as Aboriginal. Ninety-three percent (97/104) reported a prior history of illicit drug use, of whom 70% (68/97) reported a history of injection drug use. Thirty-six percent (37/104) reported illicit drug use in prison, and 21% (22/104) reported injection drug use in prison. Fifty-two percent (54/104) reported hepatitis C sero-positivity, and 8% (8/104) reported HIV sero-positivity. Of the 22 women who reported prison injection drug use, 91% (20/22) reported hepatitis C infection and 86% (19/22) reported injecting with shared needles inside prison, with or without bleach cleaning. Women were more likely to report illicit drug use in prison if they had had illegal sources of income prior to incarceration (p=0.0081, OR 3.19), had previously injected drugs (p=0.036, OR 2.97), and had first injected drugs at a friend's house (p=0.066, OR 2.70). The majority of women reporting prison injection drug use also reported hepatitis C sero-positivity and shared needle use. Canadian prisons are risk situations for transmission of bloodborne pathogens, and provide opportunities for harm reduction strategies.

  6. Low prosocial attachment, involvement with drug-using peers, and adolescent drug use: a longitudinal examination of mediational mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L

    2008-06-01

    The process of disengagement from prosocial entities (e.g., family and school) and either simultaneous or subsequent engagement with antisocial entities (e.g., friends who use drugs) is a critical contributor to adolescent drug use and delinquency. This study provides a series of formal mediation tests to demonstrate the relationship between poor family attachment, poor school attachment, involvement with friends who use drugs, and a student's own use of drugs. Results indicate that poor family attachment exerts its effect on drug use through poor school attachment and involvement with friends who use drugs. In addition, poor school attachment exerts its effect on drug use through involvement with friends who use drugs. The results of this study corroborate theories that suggest disengagement from prosocial entities is associated with involvement with antisocial entities and eventual involvement in drug use. Implications for prevention strategies are discussed. 2008 APA

  7. Off-Label Drug Use in Pediatric Practice: Unsolved Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Titova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread «off-label» drug use and the prescribing of unlicensed medicines in pediatric practice is a major health problem. The authors discuss actual regulatory and legal issues of «off-label» drug use in children in the US, Europe and Russia. The results of different population-based studies from many countries, showing the structure and frequency of «off-label» drug use in children, are summarized in this article. It is shown that such practice increases the risk of adverse drug reactions. The authors offer practical recommendations for a safer use of drugs in pediatric practice. The priority issue is conducting high quality clinical trials with the participation of children, improving national pharmacovigilance and the monitoring of off-label drug use, developing pediatric formularies, improving doctors’ knowledge and awareness of safety and efficacy of medicines in pediatric population.

  8. 12-step programs to reduce illicit drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Nielsen, Sine Kirkegaard; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2014-01-01

    programs in reducing illicit drug use. A systematic literature search was conducted based on 17 international and Nordic Bibliographic databases. A total of 15993 references were screened, and eleven unique studies were finally included in this mapping. The included studies demonstrated conflicting results......Many treatments are not rigorously evaluated as to their effectiveness, and it is uncertain which types of interventions are more effective than others in reducing illicit drug use. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic mapping of the research literature of the effectiveness of 12-step...... regarding the effectiveness of the 12-step treatment and TSF in reducing individuals’ drug use. Two studies reported a positive effect of the TSF treatment compared to the comparison conditions in reducing drug use. Six studies reported no differences between 12-step program and the comparison condition...

  9. Alcohol, tobacco and drug use as reasons for abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah C M; Avalos, Lyndsay Ammon; Sinkford, Danielle; Foster, Diana Greene

    2012-01-01

    Concern about the effects of alcohol and drug use during pregnancy is intertwined with debates about abortion. There is concern that alcohol abstinence recommendations lead women using low levels of alcohol to terminate otherwise wanted pregnancies. This study examines how women describe alcohol, tobacco and/or drug use (ATOD) as reasons for deciding to have abortions and assesses the differences between women reporting and not reporting ATOD as reasons for deciding to have an abortion. Data come from the UCSF Turnaway Study which recruited 956 women seeking an abortion at one of 30 US clinics between 2008 and 2010. Mixed methods were used and data were analyzed through thematic coding and logistic regression. Nearly 5% reported ATOD as a reason for abortion. Women worried that their ATOD had affected their baby's health and that their or their partner's ATOD would influence parenting. Most women (84%) who reported alcohol as a reason binge drank or had an alcohol-problem symptom in the month before discovering their pregnancy. Sixty-one percent who reported drugs as a reason used drugs, with 88% using more than once/week. Although two-thirds smoked tobacco, no woman reported tobacco alone as a reason. Ninety-eight percent of women reporting ATOD as a reason had unintended pregnancies. Women reporting ATOD as a reason drink at levels exceeding a low threshold and do not appear to be terminating otherwise wanted pregnancies. Thus, findings are inconsistent with hypotheses that abstinence recommendations and punitive policies lead women using low levels of alcohol or using drugs to terminate otherwise wanted pregnancies.

  10. Surveillance of drug use among young people attending a music festival in Australia, 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Megan S C; Hellard, Margaret E; Hocking, Jane S; Spelman, Tim D; Aitken, Campbell K

    2010-03-01

    In order to monitor trends in illicit drug use among youth, surveillance of drug use behaviours among a variety of populations in different settings is required. We monitored drug use among music festival attendees. Cross-sectional studies of young people's reported drug use were performed at a music festival in Melbourne from 2005 to 2008. Self-administered questionnaires collected information on drug use, demographics and other risk behaviour. From 2005 to 2008, over 5000 questionnaires were completed by people aged 16-29; 2273 men and 3011 women. Overall, use of any illicit drug in the past month was reported by 44%. After adjusting for demographic and behavioural characteristics, the prevalence of recent illicit drug use decreased significantly from 46% in 2005 to 43% in 2008 (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.97). After adjusting for age and sex the downwards trend was repeated for amphetamines and cannabis, but a significant increase in prevalence was observed in hallucinogen, ecstasy and inhalant use. Drug use was more common among men, older participants and those engaging in high-risk sexual behaviour. Illicit drug use was much more common in this sample than in the National Drug Strategy Household survey, but the direction of trends in drug use were similar; drug use prevalences were much lower than in the Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System, the Illicit Drug Reporting System or National Needle and Syringe Program Survey. Music festival attendees are a potentially useful group for monitoring trends in illicit drug use.

  11. Structural stigma and sexual orientation disparities in adolescent drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Jun, Hee-Jin; Corliss, Heather L; Bryn Austin, S

    2015-07-01

    Although epidemiologic studies have established the existence of large sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use among adolescents and young adults, the determinants of these disparities remain understudied. This study sought to determine whether sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use are potentiated in states that are characterized by high levels of stigma surrounding sexual minorities. State-level structural stigma was coded using a previously established measure based on a 4-item composite index: (1) density of same-sex couples; (2) proportion of Gay-Straight Alliances per public high school; (3) 5 policies related to sexual orientation discrimination (e.g., same-sex marriage, employment non-discrimination); and (4) public opinion toward homosexuality (aggregated responses from 41 national polls). The index was linked to individual-level data from the Growing Up Today Study, a prospective community-based study of adolescents (2001-2010). Sexual minorities report greater illicit drug use than their heterosexual peers. However, for both men and women, there were statistically significant interactions between sexual orientation status and structural stigma, such that sexual orientation disparities in marijuana and illicit drug use were more pronounced in high-structural stigma states than in low-structural stigma states, controlling for individual- and state-level confounders. For instance, among men, the risk ratio indicating the association between sexual orientation and marijuana use was 24% greater in high- versus low-structural stigma states, and for women it was 28% greater in high- versus low-structural stigma states. Stigma in the form of social policies and attitudes may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Sexual Assault and Sexual Dysfunction in Alcohol and Other Drug Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjuan, Pilar M.; Langenbucher, James W.; Labouvie, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Many women with sexual assault histories receive care in alcohol and other drug treatment programs. Affected women frequently suffer from sexual dysfunction, leading investigators to suggest self-medication may be one path to alcohol and other drug use disorders and relapse. This preliminary study examined sexual dysfunction and sexual assault in 71 women receiving treatment for addiction. Women with prior sexual assault scored higher than non-assaulted women on sexual dysfunction overall, a ...

  13. Injection Drug Use Trajectories Among Migrant Populations: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Jason S; Mittal, Maria Luisa; Horyniak, Danielle; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Werb, Dan

    2018-01-24

    Dual epidemics of injection drug use and blood-borne disease, characterized as "syndemics," are present in a range of settings. Behaviors that drive such syndemics are particularly prevalent among mobile drug-using populations, for whom cross-border migration may pose additional risks. This narrative review aims to characterize the risk factors for injection drug use initiation associated with migration, employing a risk environment framework and focusing on the San Diego-Tijuana border region as the most dynamic example of these phenomena. Based on previous literature, we divide migration streams into three classes: intra-urban, internal, and international. We synthesized existing literature on migration and drug use to characterize how mobility and migration drive the initiation of injection drug use, as well as the transmission of hepatitis and HIV, and to delineate how these might be addressed through public health intervention. Population mixing between migrants and receiving communities and the consequent transmission of social norms about injection drug use create risk environments for injection drug use initiation. These risk environments have been characterized as a result of local policy environments, injection drug use norms in receiving communities, migration-related stressors, social dislocation, and infringement on the rights of undocumented migrants. Policies that exacerbate risk environments for migrants may inadvertently contribute to the expansion of epidemics of injection-driven blood-borne disease. Successful interventions that address emerging syndemics in border regions may therefore need to be tailored to migrant populations and distinguish between the vulnerabilities experienced by different migration classes and border settings.

  14. The role of serotonin in drug use and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian P; Homberg, Judith R

    2015-01-15

    The use of psychoactive drugs is a wide spread behaviour in human societies. The systematic use of a drug requires the establishment of different drug use-associated behaviours which need to be learned and controlled. However, controlled drug use may develop into compulsive drug use and addiction, a major psychiatric disorder with severe consequences for the individual and society. Here we review the role of the serotonergic (5-HT) system in the establishment of drug use-associated behaviours on the one hand and the transition and maintenance of addiction on the other hand for the drugs: cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA (ecstasy), morphine/heroin, cannabis, alcohol, and nicotine. Results show a crucial, but distinct involvement of the 5-HT system in both processes with considerable overlap between psychostimulant and opioidergic drugs and alcohol. A new functional model suggests specific adaptations in the 5-HT system, which coincide with the establishment of controlled drug use-associated behaviours. These serotonergic adaptations render the nervous system susceptible to the transition to compulsive drug use behaviours and often overlap with genetic risk factors for addiction. Altogether we suggest a new trajectory by which serotonergic neuroadaptations induced by first drug exposure pave the way for the establishment of addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Drug Use in Soldiers: Family and Peer Contextual Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mojtaba; Darharaj, Mohammad; Kelly, Adrian B; Shahmiri, Hasan; Malekianjabali, Mona; Kheirolomoom, Seyedeh Leili

    2017-08-24

    Given the stressful nature of military life, people in the armed forces are vulnerable to substance use. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between family and peers with drug use among military forces in Iran. Convenience sampling was used to recruit a total of 422 draftees doing military service in army units in Tehran, Iran. Measures of family and peers' risk and protective factors, alcohol use, and other drug use were administered. Findings indicated significant relationships between family (i.e., family models for risk behavior, parent sanctions, and family controls) and peers (i.e., peer modeling for risk behavior, peer controls, support from friends) with drug use. A multiple regression analysis revealed that peer modeling for risk behavior, family models for risk behavior, and parent sanctions were significant predictors of drug use in soldiers. These results were consistent with the influence of family and peer on drug use amongst soldiers. Programs designed to reduce alcohol and other drug use may benefit from tailoring to fit risk and protective files amongst peer and family networks.

  16. Drug-use pattern, comorbid psychosis and mortality in people with a history of opioid addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H J; Jepsen, P W; Haastrup, S

    2005-01-01

    . METHOD: In 1984, 188 persons (122 men and 66 women) with a history of intravenous narcotics addiction were interviewed about their drug-use pattern. A registry-based follow-up continued through 1999 and mortality was assessed. Three 1984-drug-use categories were formed. In category 1, cohort members had...... at lower risk of premature death than people with continued drug use. A residual observed excess mortality in people who had apparently achieved stable abstinence from drug use is consistent with the view of drug addiction as a chronic disease....

  17. Persistence of antimuscarinic drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence suggests antimuscarinic drugs for the overactive-bladder syndrome only confer modest improvements in quality of life. We wanted to describe the persistence of therapy, including an extended analysis beyond the 1-year follow-up employed in other studies. METHODS: All prescriptions...... for drugs in ATC category G04BD were retrieved for the period 1999-2006 from a regional database with complete capture of all reimbursed prescriptions. Kaplan-Meyer curves were generated for duration of treatment for each substance and analyzed for determinants of termination. RESULTS: With the exception...... of trospium chloride, all drugs had continuation rates of less than 50% at 6 months, less than 25% at 1 year, and less than 10% at 2 years and longer. Trospium chloride, however, exhibited continuation rates of 46% at 6 months, 36% at 1 year, 22% at 2 years, and 16% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: In a setting...

  18. The cosmetic results after oncoplastic breast surgery in Iranian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviani A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The oncoplastic surgery has been revolutionized breast conservative surgery. The aim of our study was to represent the cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic breast surgery in Iran and to evaluate its determinants. "n"nMethods: Fifty eight patients with unilateral breast neoplasm operated with single surgeon in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Three view photographs were obtained pre and post operatively and were put in separate PowerPoint slides. The photographs were evaluated by six health related professionals. They scored the cosmetic outcome with modified questionnaire containing general and specific questions. Weighted kappa used for intra and inters rater reliability and ANOVA was used for analyzing cosmetic outcome determinants. "n"nResults: Generally, 72.2% of the photographs got the excellent or good score in a single breast evaluation part. Its items breast size, nipple deviation and scar quality scored 94.2, 67.9 and 88.8 respectively. "In comparison with contra-lateral breast" part shape asymmetry, need for surgery of contra lateral breast and size asymmetry scored 68.9, 75.8 and 69% respectively. Tumor size greater than two cm had poorer outcome (p=0.039 upper outer quadrant tumor had the worst and upper inner quadrant tumors had the best outcomes (p<0.0001. Patient with 50 to 60 years of age had the poorest outcomes (p<0.0001. Weighted kappa for inter and intra rater kappa was 0.12 and 0.58 respectively. "n"nConclusions: Acceptable cosmetic outcome is obtained in the first experience of oncoplastic breast surgery in Iran. Long term monitoring of oncologic and cosmetic outcomes in greater numbers of patients is recommended.

  19. What do women think about abnormal smear test results? A qualitative interview study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Schijf, C.P.T.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study is a report of Dutch women's views on abnormal cervical smear test results and the consequences thereof. Twenty-seven women with recent PAP III in their history were interviewed in the context of this qualitative study. GPs often do not inform patients beforehand about the ways

  20. Screening and Brief Intervention for Drug Use in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitz, Richard; Palfai, Tibor P. A.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Alford, Daniel P.; Bernstein, Judith A.; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine A.; Meli, Seville M.; Chaisson, Christine E.; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The United States has invested substantially in screening and brief intervention for illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse, based in part on evidence of efficacy for unhealthy alcohol use. However, it is not a recommended universal preventive service in primary care because of lack of evidence of efficacy. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 2 brief counseling interventions for unhealthy drug use (any illicit drug use or prescription drug misuse)—a brief negotiated interview (BNI) and an adaptation of motivational interviewing (MOTIV)—compared with no brief intervention. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This 3-group randomized trial took place at an urban hospital-based primary care internal medicine practice; 528 adult primary care patients with drug use (Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test [ASSIST] substance-specific scores of $4) were identified by screening between June 2009 and January 2012 in Boston, Massachusetts. INTERVENTIONS Two interventions were tested: the BNI is a 10- to 15-minute structured interview conducted by health educators; the MOTIV is a 30- to 45-minute intervention based on motivational interviewing with a 20- to 30-minute booster conducted by master’s-level counselors. All study participants received a written list of substance use disorder treatment and mutual help resources. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was number of days of use in the past 30 days of the self-identified main drug as determined by a validated calendar method at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included other self-reported measures of drug use, drug use according to hair testing, ASSIST scores (severity), drug use consequences, unsafe sex, mutual help meeting attendance, and health care utilization. RESULTS At baseline, 63% of participants reported their main drug was marijuana, 19% cocaine, and 17% opioids. At 6 months, 98% completed follow-up. Mean adjusted number of days using the main drug at 6 months was 12 for

  1. [Self-concept and drug use in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María C; García, Fernando; Gracia, Enrique; Lila, Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between a multidimensional measure of self-concept, the Self-concept Form-5 Questionnaire (AF5), and drug use among adolescents. From the responses of 632 participants (47.5% females) aged 12 to 17 years (M = 14.88 years, SD = 1.71 years), results showed negative relationships between family, academic and physical self-concept, and drug use. Although a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use was found, this significant relationship disappeared once the age and sex of adolescents was controlled statistically. Moreover, the study includes other adjustment indicators in adolescence (psychological adjustment, personal competence, antisocial behavior and parenting). Results support the idea of self-concept as an important correlate of psychological well-being and a basic theoretical construct for explaining adjusted and adaptive behaviors in adolescence. Likewise, our results underline the need for statistical control of the effect of a third variable (sex), which could explain some contradictory results reported in the literature (a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use), so as to avoid reaching conclusions based on spurious relationships. self-concept, multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, adolescence, psychosocial adjustment, drug use.

  2. Parent, Teacher, and School Factors Associated with Over-the-Counter Drug Use among Multiracial Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Over-the-counter (OTC) drug use is an increasing health issue among adolescents. Purpose: This study investigated OTC drug use among 7th through 12th grade multiracial students in one metropolitan area. Methods: A total of 2134 students completed the PRIDE Questionnaire, which examines alcohol and other drug use. Results: A total of…

  3. Do African American women require fewer calories to maintain weight?: Results from a controlled feeding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Laprincess C; Miller, Edgar R; Appel, Lawrence J; Anderson, Cheryl A M

    2012-08-01

    The high prevalence of obesity in African American (AA) women may result, in part, from a lower resting metabolic rate (RMR) than non-AA women. If true, AA women should require fewer calories than non-AA women to maintain weight. Our objective was to determine in the setting of a controlled feeding study, if AA women required fewer calories than non-AA women to maintain weight. This analysis includes 206 women (73% AA), aged 22-75 years, who participated in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) trial-a multicenter, randomized, controlled, feeding study comparing the effects of 3 dietary patterns on blood pressure in individuals with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension. After a 3-week run-in, participants were randomized to 1 of 3 dietary patterns for 8 weeks. Calorie intake was adjusted during feeding to maintain stable weight. The primary outcome of this analysis was average daily calorie (kcal) intake during feeding. AA women had higher baseline weight and body mass index than non-AA women (78.4 vs 72.4 kg, P calories to maintain weight.

  4. From recreational to regular drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2011-01-01

    of parties, intoxication becoming a goal in itself, easier access to drugs, learning to recognise alternative effects of drugs and experiences of loss of control. The analysis shows that these dimensions are at play not only when young people develop a regular drug use pattern but also when they attempt......This article analyses the process of going from recreational use to regular and problematic use of illegal drugs. We present a model containing six career contingencies relevant for young people’s progress from recreational to regular drug use: the closing of social networks, changes in forms...... to extricate themselves from this pattern. Hence, when regular drug users talk about their future, it is not a future characterised by total abstinence from illegal drugs but a future where they have rolled back their drug use career to the recreational drug use pattern they started out with. Empirically...

  5. Illicit Drug Use and Marital Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Kenneth E.; Cornelius, Jack R.

    2008-01-01

    With the acquisition of adult social roles such as marriage, more deviant or socially disapproved behaviors such as drug use often decrease. The objective of this work was to examine patterns of illicit drug use in a community sample of adults during the transition and early years of marriage. Additionally, this work examined if couples who were discrepant in their drug use (i.e., one individual reported past year drug use and the partner reported no use) experience sharper declines in marital satisfaction compared to other couples. Multilevel regression models explored these issues over the first four years of marriage (N= 634 couples). Although rates of illicit drug use decline over the first four years of marriage, a significant number of husbands and wives continued to use illicit drugs (21% and 16%, respectively). At the transition to marriage, both husbands and wives who had discrepant drug use behaviors experienced lower levels of marital satisfaction compared to other couples. Over the first four years of marriage, couples in each group experienced significant declines in marital satisfaction. PMID:17945436

  6. Antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Paul S; Apley, Michael D; Besser, Thomas E; Burney, Derek P; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Papich, Mark G; Traub-Dargatz, Josie L; Weese, J Scott

    2005-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of antimicrobial resistance and the need for veterinarians to aid in efforts for maintaining the usefulness of antimicrobial drugs in animals and humans, the Board of Regents of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine charged a special committee with responsibility for drafting this position statement regarding antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine. The Committee believes that veterinarians are obligated to balance the well-being of animals under their care with the protection of other animals and public health. Therefore, if an animal's medical condition can be reasonably expected to improve as a result of treatment with antimicrobial drugs, and the animal is under a veterinarian's care with an appropriate veterinarian-client-patient relationship, veterinarians have an obligation to offer antimicrobial treatment as a therapeutic option. Veterinarians also have an obligation to actively promote disease prevention efforts, to treat as conservatively as possible, and to explain the potential consequences associated with antimicrobial treatment to animal owners and managers, including the possibility of promoting selection of resistant bacteria. However, the consequences of losing usefulness of an antimicrobial drug that is used as a last resort in humans or animals with resistant bacterial infections might be unacceptable from a public or population health perspective. Veterinarians could therefore face the difficult choice of treating animals with a drug that is less likely to be successful, possibly resulting in prolonged or exacerbated morbidity, to protect the good of society. The Committee recommends that voluntary actions be taken by the veterinary profession to promote conservative use of antimicrobial drugs to minimize the potential adverse effects on animal or human health. The veterinary profession must work to educate all veterinarians about issues related to conservative antimicrobial drug use and

  7. SURPRISING RESULTS: HIV TESTING AND CHANGES IN CONTRACEPTIVE PRACTICES AMONG YOUNG WOMEN IN MALAWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennott, Christie; Yeatman, Sara

    2016-03-01

    This study uses eight waves of data from the population-based Tsogolo la Thanzi study (2009-2011) in rural Malawi to examine changes in young women's contraceptive practices, including the use of condoms, non-barrier contraceptive methods and abstinence, following positive and negative HIV tests. The analysis factors in women's prior perceptions of their HIV status that may already be shaping their behaviour and separates surprise HIV test results from those that merely confirm what was already believed. Fixed-effects logistic regression models show that HIV testing frequently affects the contraceptive practices of young Malawian women, particularly when the test yields an unexpected result. Specifically, women who are surprised to test HIV positive increase their condom use and are more likely to use condoms consistently. Following an HIV-negative test (whether a surprise or expected), women increase their use of condoms and decrease their use of non-barrier contraceptives; the latter may be due to an increase in abstinence following a surprise negative result. Changes in condom use following HIV testing are robust to the inclusion of potential explanatory mechanisms, including fertility preferences, relationship status and the perception that a partner is HIV positive. The results demonstrate that both positive and negative tests can influence women's sexual and reproductive behaviours, and emphasize the importance of conceptualizing of HIV testing as offering new information only insofar as results deviate from prior perceptions of HIV status.

  8. Time Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Ane; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Gasse, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    : To investigate time trends in use of antipsychotics and other psychotropic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: The study included longitudinal data on all Danish residents ≥65 years. The study population was defined on January 1 of each year from 2000-2012. Data included prescriptions, discharge diagnoses......, and somatic and psychiatric comorbidities. Multivariate time trend analyses of psychotropic drug use in patients with dementia within 4-year age bands were performed. RESULTS: Overall, among patients with dementia the prevalence of antipsychotic drug use decreased from 31.3% in 2000 to 20.4% in 2012...... increased as the annual median number of defined daily doses (DDD) increased from 33.3 to 42.0 DDD. CONCLUSIONS: The changing patterns of psychotropic drug use may be caused by warnings against use of antipsychotics. Further research is needed to explore the implications for patient safety....

  9. Public acceptance of drug use for non-disease conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Claus; Hansen, Rikke Rie

    2006-01-01

    emerges. People who did not vote or voted for one of the left-wing parties are less likely to accept this type of drug use. The extent to which people work with drugs professionally does not seem to influence the extent to which they are positive or negative about this type of drug use. CONCLUSION......OBJECTIVE: This article deals with the issue of ordinary healthy people using drugs to improve or enhance non-disease conditions. The objective is to illuminate the extent of public acceptance of this practice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The results are based on two studies: a classically...... of drugs for non-disease conditions. Men in particular look favourably on the use of drugs by healthy individuals. People with less education find this type of drug use unacceptable to a greater extent than those with more education, who are more positive. If we look at political affiliation, a pattern...

  10. Cardiovascular disease among people with drug use disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Clausen, Thomas; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a national cohort of patients seeking treatment for drug use disorders (DUD). Methods This is a longitudinal record linkage study of consecutive DUD treatment admissions between 2000 and 2006 from Denmark. Results...... treatment (SHR = 1.15, p = 0.022). The use of amphetamines was negatively associated with the risk of CVD within this cohort (SHR = 0.75, p = 0.001). Conclusions Patients injecting drugs using prescribed methadone were at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and should be monitored for CVD. Opioid...... medications should be evaluated in terms of their cardiovascular sequelae....

  11. Mammography use among women with and without diabetes: Results from the Southern Community Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Sanderson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer associated with diabetes which may be due to differences in mammography use among women who have diabetes compared with women who do not have diabetes. Baseline data was used from the Southern Community Cohort Study – a prospective cohort study conducted primarily among low-income persons in the southeastern United States – to examine the association between diabetes and mammography use. In-person interviews collected information on diabetes and mammography use from 14,665 white and 30,846 black women aged 40–79 years between 2002 and 2009. After adjustment for potential confounding, white women with diabetes were no more likely (odds ratio [OR] 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85–1.06 to undergo mammography within the past 12 months than white women without diabetes. Nor was there an association between diabetes and mammography use among black women (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.93–1.07. An increase in mammography use was seen within one year following diabetes diagnosis, more so among white than black women, but this was offset by decreases thereafter. Although there was some evidence of an increase in mammography use within one year of diabetes diagnosis, these results suggest that mammography use is not related to diabetes.

  12. Drug use and harm reduction in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine S; Safi, Naqibullah; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2005-09-07

    Opium has been cultivated in Afghanistan since 1100 A.D., although production has steadily increased since 1979. Currently, Afghanistan produces three-quarters of the global opium supply, with injection drug use and HIV currently following the opium trade route through Central Asia. Although systematic studies are lacking, heroin use appears to be on the rise in Afghanistan. The purpose of this paper is to briefly provide historical background and current statistics for drug production and use in Afghanistan, to discuss the new government's policies towards problem drug use and available rehabilitation programs, and to assess Afghan harm reduction needs with consideration of regional trends.

  13. Drug use and harm reduction in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strathdee Steffanie A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Opium has been cultivated in Afghanistan since 1100 A.D., although production has steadily increased since 1979. Currently, Afghanistan produces three-quarters of the global opium supply, with injection drug use and HIV currently following the opium trade route through Central Asia. Although systematic studies are lacking, heroin use appears to be on the rise in Afghanistan. The purpose of this paper is to briefly provide historical background and current statistics for drug production and use in Afghanistan, to discuss the new government's policies towards problem drug use and available rehabilitation programs, and to assess Afghan harm reduction needs with consideration of regional trends.

  14. Definition and outcome of a curriculum to prevent disordered eating and body-shaping drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L; Moe, Esther L; Goldberg, Linn; DeFrancesco, Carol A; Durham, Melissa B; Hix-Small, Hollie

    2006-02-01

    Almost one half of male and female students participate in high school-sponsored athletics, and high school also is a time when classroom health promotion curricula are less effective. The Athletes Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids is a sport team-centered drug-use prevention program for male high school athletes, which has been shown to reduce alcohol and illicit drug use. Just as anabolic steroid use is associated with male athletes, female sport participants may be at a greater risk for disordered eating and body-shaping drug use. Extending sport team-centered programs to young women athletes required defining and ranking factors related to developing those harmful behaviors. Survey results from a cross-sectional cohort of female middle and high school student athletes were used to identify and prioritize potential curriculum components, including mood and self-esteem, norms of behavior, perceptions of healthy body weight, effects of media depictions of women, and societal pressures to be thin. The derived sport team-centered program was prospectively assessed among a second group of female student athletes from 18 high schools, randomized to receive the intervention or the usual care control condition. The Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Alternatives (ATHENA) intervention is a scripted, coach-facilitated, peer-led 8-session program, which was incorporated into a team's usual training activities. The ATHENA program significantly altered the targeted risk factors and reduced ongoing and new use of diet pills and body-shaping substances (amphetamines, anabolic steroids, and sport supplements). These findings illustrate the utility of a structured process to define curriculum content, and the program's positive results also confirm the sport team's potential as a vehicle to effectively deter health-harming behaviors.

  15. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Fred

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. Methods We interviewed six patients (four men and two women with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. Results There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. Conclusion The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area.

  16. Illegal drug use among female university students in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejovičová, Barbora; Trandžík, Jozef; Schlarmannová, Janka; Boledovičová, Mária; Velemínský, Miloš

    2015-01-20

    This study is focused on the issue of illegal drug use among female university students preparing to become teachers. The main aim was to determine the frequency of drug abuse in a group of young women (n=215, mean age 20.44 years). Using survey methods, we determined that 33.48% of female university students in Slovakia use illegal drugs and 66.51% of students have never used illegal drugs. Differences between these groups were determined using statistical analysis, mostly in 4 areas of survey questions. We determined that education of parents has a statistically significant influence on use of illegal drugs by their children (χ2=10.14; Pillegal drug use, χ2=8.698, Pillegal drugs were interested in how their children spend their free time (68.53%). We confirmed the relationship between consumption of alcohol and illegal drug use (χ2=16.645; Pdrugs occurs most frequently at high school age. The most consumed "soft" drug in our group of female university students is marijuana. Our findings are relevant for comparison and generalization regarding causes of the steady increase in number of young people using illegal drugs.

  17. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  18. A case-control study of maternal periconceptual and pregnancy recreational drug use and fetal malformation using hair analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L David

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Maternal recreational drug use may be associated with the development of fetal malformations such as gastroschisis, brain and limb defects, the aetiology due to vascular disruption during organogenesis. Using forensic hair analysis we reported evidence of recreational drug use in 18% of women with a fetal gastroschisis. Here we investigate this association in a variety of fetal malformations using the same method. METHODS: In a multi-centre study, women with normal pregnancies (controls and those with fetal abnormalities (cases gave informed consent for hair analysis for recreational drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. Hair samples cut at the root were tested in sections corresponding to 3 month time periods (pre and periconceptual period. RESULTS: Women whose fetus had gastroschisis, compared to women with a normal control fetus, were younger (mean age 23.78 ± SD4.79 years, 18-37 vs 29.79 ± SD6 years, 18-42, p = 0.00001, were more likely to have evidence of recreational drug use (15, 25.4% vs 21, 13%, OR2.27, 95thCI 1.08-4.78, p = 0.028, and were less likely to report periconceptual folic acid use (31, 53.4% vs 124, 77.5%, OR0.33, 95thCI 0.18-0.63, p = 0.001. Age-matched normal control women were no less likely to test positive for recreational drugs than women whose fetus had gastroschisis. After accounting for all significant factors, only young maternal age remained significantly associated with gastroschisis. Women with a fetus affected by a non-neural tube central nervous system (CNS anomaly were more likely to test positive for recreational drugs when compared to women whose fetus was normal (7, 35% vs 21, 13%, OR3.59, 95th CI1.20-10.02, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate a significant association between non neural tube CNS anomalies and recreational drug use in the periconceptual period, first or second trimesters, but we cannot confirm this association with gastroschisis. We confirm the association of

  19. Women Entrepreneurship in the Western Romania. Research Results and Policy Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca DODESCU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the results of the empirical, quantitative, and qualitative research performed in the AntrES project, between 5.01.2009 - 4.01.2011, in the Western Romania, referring to the existence of obvious gender gaps regarding the start up of new businesses and the ownership of the businesses; the characteristics, the motivations, and the difficulties of the women entrepreneurs and potentially enterprising women; the successful women entrepreneurs' perceptions on the sex equality in the field of entrepreneurship - this paper presents arguments and recommendations of specific policies meant to support the potential women entrepreneurship in Romania, as an engine to overcome the economic crisis and to reconnect to the regional development mechanism facilitated by the European Union's regional policy.

  20. Correlação entre fratura por queda em idosos e uso prévio de medicamentos Correlation between fractures resulting from falls and previous drug use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Hamra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O uso de medicamentos por idosos é freqüente e tem crescido a cada dia em virtude do aumento da expectativa de vida no Brasil. Algumas destas drogas quando administradas, podem provocar efeitos colaterais como tontura e diminuição dos reflexos podendo ocasionar quedas e conseqüentes fraturas. Este trabalho verificou se o uso de medicamentos pode ser considerado como fator de risco para fratura por queda no idoso. Para isso fez-se um estudo no ano de 2004 com 205 pacientes a partir de 60 anos de idade internados com fratura por queda e comparou-se estatisticamente com grupo-controle de 205 pacientes do mesmo grupo etário sem fratura. Verificou-se que o uso de medicamentos pode ser considerado como fator de risco para fratura por queda. Os resultados também podem servir como orientação para equipe médica, pacientes e seus familiares, no sentido de se tentar evitar quedas, principalmente quando o uso de medicamentos é necessário.The use of medication by elderly individuals is frequently and is constantly growing due to the increase of life expectance rates in Brazil. When some of these drugs are administered, they can cause collateral effects like dizziness and decreased reflex, potentially causing the occurrence of falls resulting in fractures. This study examined whether the use of medications by the elderly could be regarded as a risk factor to fractures resulting from falls. The study, conducted in 2004, assessed 205 hospitalized patients > 60 years old, with fractures resulting from falls. These patients were statistically compared to a control group (205 patients in the same age group and without fractures. We’ve found that the use of medication can be regarded as a risk factor to fractures resulting from falls. Our results could be useful to raise the awareness of doctors, patients and their families so that to avoid accidents when any drug therapy is required.

  1. Drug-use pattern, comorbid psychosis and mortality in people with a history of opioid addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H J; Jepsen, P W; Haastrup, S

    2005-01-01

    . METHOD: In 1984, 188 persons (122 men and 66 women) with a history of intravenous narcotics addiction were interviewed about their drug-use pattern. A registry-based follow-up continued through 1999 and mortality was assessed. Three 1984-drug-use categories were formed. In category 1, cohort members had...... at lower risk of premature death than people with continued drug use. A residual observed excess mortality in people who had apparently achieved stable abstinence from drug use is consistent with the view of drug addiction as a chronic disease.......OBJECTIVE: To compare the 15-year mortality of people with a history of opioid dependence that had achieved stable abstinence, with the mortality associated with continued drug use. Another objective was to study the influence of hospitalization with comorbid psychosis on the 15-year mortality...

  2. Personality, Motivation, and Adolescent Drug Use Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Samuel E.; Henry, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    Interrelationships between patterns of drug abuse and personality and motivation were determined for male and female subjects. Significant sex differences were found with respect to drug behavior. Females used amphetamines more frequently than males and also showed greater multiple drug use. (Author)

  3. [Drug use and addictive practices in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, François

    2017-06-01

    In terms of drug use, legal substances, namely tobacco and alcohol, are the most commonly consumed. Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal substance, followed by cocaine with ten times fewer users, far ahead of other products. This broad overview conceals numerous nuances explored by the French drug and drug addiction watch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug use, family support and related factors in university students. A cross-sectional study based on the uniHcos Project data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-De la Torre, Jorge; Fernández-Villa, Tania; Molina, Antonio José; Amezcua-Prieto, Carmen; Mateos, Ramona; Cancela, José María; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Ortíz-Moncada, Rocío; Alguacil, Juan; Almaraz, Ana; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Suárez-Varela, María Morales; Blázquez-Abellán, Gemma; Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Valero, Luis Félix; Ayán, Carlos; Vilorio-Marqués, Laura; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Martín, Vicente

    2018-01-09

    To assess the prevalence of illegal drug use in college students on any previous occasion, during the previous year and the previous month, and to analyze the relationship between illegal drug use and family support and other factors. A cross-sectional study using data from students participating in the uniHcos project (n = 3767) was conducted. The prevalence and age of onset of consumption of cannabis, non-prescription sedatives, stimulants and depressants was evaluated. Polyconsumption was also assessed. The independent variables were: family support, age, residence, and employment status. To determine the factors related to drug use multivariate logistic regression models stratified by gender were fitted. Differences between men and women in prevalence of illegal drug use except non-prescription sedatives were observed. In both genders, less family support was associated with higher consumption of all drugs, except depressants, and with polyconsumption. To be studying and looking for work was related to cannabis and stimulant use and to polyconsumption among women, but only to cannabis use among men. These results support the notion that the start of university studies is a particularly relevant stage in the onset of illegal drug use and its prevention, and that consumption may be especially associated with family support. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Prescription drug use in pregnancy and variations according to prior psychiatric history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingstrup, Katja G; Liu, Xiaoqin; Gasse, Christiane; Debost, Jean-Christophe P; Munk-Olsen, Trine

    2018-01-01

    Prescription drug use during pregnancy has increased during the past decades. However, little is known about prescription drug use for high-risk pregnancies. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of redeemed prescriptions in Danish pregnant women with and without previous psychiatric history. A Danish population-based descriptive study of 981 392 pregnancies ending in live-born singletons by 586 988 women aged 15 to 55 years between 1997 and 2012, of which 113 449 (11.6%) pregnancies were by women with a psychiatric history prior to the index pregnancy. All prescription drugs redeemed during pregnancy were identified, and dispensing patterns among the women were reported by therapeutic classes of drugs, calendar year of childbirth, and trimester. Overall, women with psychiatric history prior to pregnancy were more likely to fill a prescription (75.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 75.5-76.0%), compared with women with no psychiatric history (64.5%; 95% CI, 64.4-64.6%). The difference was observed even when psychotropic drug use was excluded and in all therapeutic classes except for antineoplastic and immunomodulating drugs. The most commonly prescribed drugs were anti-infectives. Approximately 44.7% (95% CI, 44.5-45.0%) of women with psychiatric history and 31.3% (95% CI, 31.2-31.4%) of women with no psychiatric history redeemed more than one therapeutic class of drugs. Women with a psychiatric history were more likely to redeem prescriptions during pregnancy across almost all drug classes, especially anti-infectives. Two thirds of all women redeemed at least one prescription drug during pregnancy and one third more than one drug class. KEY POINTS We mapped prescription drug use of almost 600 000 women during almost one million pregnancies with focus on women with a history of psychiatric disorder before conception compared with women with no such history. Pregnant women with a previous psychiatric disorder were more likely to redeem prescription drugs compared

  6. Drug Use before and during Pregnancy in Japan: The Japan Environment and Children’s Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Nishigori

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To elucidate drug use before and during pregnancy in Japan. Methods: The Japan Environment and Children’s Study (JECS is an ongoing nationwide birth cohort study. We analyzed data from JECS involving cases where drugs were used for 12 months before pregnancy was diagnosed, between the time of diagnosis of pregnancy until week 12 of pregnancy, and after week 12 of pregnancy. Results: We analyzed data from 97,464 pregnant women. The percentages of pregnant women who had taken one or more drugs and supplements before diagnosis of pregnancy, between the time of diagnosis of pregnancy until week 12 of pregnancy, and after week 12 of pregnancy, were 78.4%, 57.1%, and 68.8% respectively. Excluding iron supplements, folic acid, and other vitamins and minerals, the percentages of women taking supplements were 75.3%, 36.0%, and 51.7% at each respective time point. The following drugs and supplements were frequently used for 12 months before pregnancy diagnosis: Commercially available antipyretics, analgesics, and/or medicine for treating common cold (34.7%, antipyretics, analgesics, and/or medicine for treating common colds, which were prescribed in hospitals (29.8%, antimicrobial drugs (14.0%, and anti-allergy drugs (12.5%. The following drugs and supplements were frequently used from the time of pregnancy diagnosis until week 12 of pregnancy, and after week 12 of pregnancy: folic acid (28.9% and 26.2%, antipyretics, analgesics and/or medicines for treating common cold, that were prescribed in hospitals (7.8% and 13.3%, Chinese herbal medicines (6.0% and 9.4%, and uterine relaxants (5.1% and 15.2%. Conclusions: The analysis of a nationwide cohort study showed that a high percentage of Japanese pregnant women were taking medicinal drugs. Further research is required to elucidate the relationship between drug use during pregnancy and birth defects in Japan.

  7. Residential proximity to major roadways and prevalent hypertension among postmenopausal women: results from the Women's Health Initiative San Diego Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwa, Kipruto; Eliot, Melissa N; Wang, Yi; Adams, Marc A; Morgan, Cindy G; Kerr, Jacqueline; Norman, Gregory J; Eaton, Charles B; Allison, Matthew A; Wellenius, Gregory A

    2014-10-01

    Living near major roadways has been linked with increased risk of cardiovascular events and worse prognosis. Residential proximity to major roadways may also be associated with increased risk of hypertension, but few studies have evaluated this hypothesis. We examined the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roadways and prevalent hypertension among 5401 postmenopausal women enrolled into the San Diego cohort of the Women's Health Initiative. We used modified Poisson regression with robust error variance to estimate the association between prevalence of hypertension and residential distance to nearest major roadway, adjusting for participant demographics, medical history, indicators of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status, and for local supermarket/grocery and fast food/convenience store density. The adjusted prevalence ratios for hypertension were 1.22 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.39), 1.13 (1.00, 1.27), and 1.05 (0.99, 1.12) for women living ≤100, >100 to 200, and >200 to 1000 versus >1000 m from a major roadway (P for trend=0.006). In a model treating the natural log of distance to major roadway as a continuous variable, a shift in distance from 1000 to 100 m from a major roadway was associated with a 9% (3%, 16%) higher prevalence of hypertension. In this cohort of postmenopausal women, residential proximity to major roadways was positively associated with the prevalence of hypertension. If causal, these results suggest that living close to major roadways may be an important novel risk factor for hypertension. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Epidemiology of DSM-5 Drug Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Bridget F.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Ruan, W. June; Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Smith, Sharon M.; Pickering, Roger P.; Huang, Boji; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current information on the prevalence and sociodemographic and clinical profiles of individuals in the general population with DSM-5 drug use disorder (DUD) is limited. Given the present societal and economic context in the United States and the new diagnostic system, up-to-date national information is needed from a single uniform data source. OBJECTIVE To present nationally representative findings on the prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, and treatment of DSM-5 DUD diagnoses overall and by severity level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In-person interviews were conducted with 36 309 adults in the 2012–2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III, a cross-sectional representative survey of the United States. The household response rate was 72%; person-level response rate, 84%; and overall response rate, 60.1%. Data were collected April 2012 through June 2013 and analyzed from February through March 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Twelve-month and lifetime DUD, based on amphetamine, cannabis, club drug, cocaine, hallucinogen, heroin, nonheroin opioid, sedative/tranquilizer, and/or solvent/inhalant use disorders. RESULTS Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime DUD were 3.9% and 9.9%, respectively. Drug use disorder was generally greater among men, white and Native American individuals, younger and previously or never married adults, those with lower education and income, and those residing in the West. Significant associations were found between 12-month and lifetime DUD and other substance use disorders. Significant associations were also found between any 12-month DUD and major depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% CI, 1.09–1.64), dysthymia (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.02), bipolar I (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.06–2.05), posttraumatic stress disorder (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.27–2.10), and antisocial (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.11–1.75), borderline (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.41–2.24), and schizotypal (OR, 1

  9. Route of Delivery in Women With Stillbirth: Results From the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Annelee; Preslar, Jessica P; Hogue, Carol J R; Silver, Robert M; Reddy, Uma M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Stoll, Barbara J; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Saade, George R; Bukowski, Radek; Dudley, Donald J

    2017-04-01

    To describe delivery management of singleton stillbirths in a population-based, multicenter case series. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 611 women with singleton stillbirths at 20 weeks of gestation or greater from March 2006 to September 2008. Medical and delivery information was abstracted from medical records. Both antepartum and intrapartum stillbirths were included; these were analyzed both together and separately. The primary outcome was mode of delivery. Secondary outcomes included induction of labor and indications for cesarean delivery. Indications for cesarean delivery were classified as obstetric (abnormal fetal heart tracing before intrapartum demise, abruption, coagulopathy, uterine rupture, placenta previa, or labor dystocia) or nonobstetric (patient request, repeat cesarean delivery, or not documented). Of the 611 total cases of stillbirth, 93 (15.2%) underwent cesarean delivery, including 43.0% (46/107) of women with prior cesarean delivery and 9.3% (47/504) of women without prior cesarean delivery. No documented obstetric indication was evident for 38.3% (18/47) of primary and 78.3% (36/46) of repeat cesarean deliveries. Labor induction resulted in vaginal delivery for 98.5% (321/326) of women without prior cesarean delivery and 91.1% (41/45) of women with a history of prior cesarean delivery, including two women who had uterine rupture. Among women with a history of prior cesarean delivery who had spontaneous labor, 74.1% (20/27) delivered vaginally, with no cases of uterine rupture. Women with stillbirth usually delivered vaginally regardless of whether labor was spontaneous or induced or whether they had a prior cesarean delivery. However, 15% underwent cesarean delivery, often without a documented obstetric indication.

  10. Drug-use pattern, comorbid psychosis and mortality in people with a history of opioid addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H J; Jepsen, P W; Haastrup, S

    2005-01-01

    . METHOD: In 1984, 188 persons (122 men and 66 women) with a history of intravenous narcotics addiction were interviewed about their drug-use pattern. A registry-based follow-up continued through 1999 and mortality was assessed. Three 1984-drug-use categories were formed. In category 1, cohort members had......OBJECTIVE: To compare the 15-year mortality of people with a history of opioid dependence that had achieved stable abstinence, with the mortality associated with continued drug use. Another objective was to study the influence of hospitalization with comorbid psychosis on the 15-year mortality...

  11. [Drug use and involvement in risky driving styles in a sample of university students. The uniHcos project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Medina-García, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Virginia; Pulido-Manzanero, José; Fernández-Villa, Tania

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol use are known to increase the risk of traffic accidents, especially among youth. However, the association between habitual drug use and the adoption of risky driving behavior is not well known. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the association between habitual drug use and involvement in risky driving practices overall and by gender among university students. A cross sectional study was conducted. The study population was composed of 559 car drivers younger than 31 years who completed an online questionnaire during the 2011-2012 academic year. Among other factors, the questionnaire assessed the following items: habitual drug consumption (20 or more days) during the last year and involvement in other risky driving practices during the last month. A total of 27.7% of students reported they had used drugs regularly during the last year. Drug use was associated with a higher frequency of involvement in risky driving practices. In men, the factors most strongly associated with drug consumption were speeding, driving under influence of alcohol, and feeling drowsy while driving. In women, drug consumption was mainly associated with smoking while driving, drunk driving, and driving without rest. The results of our study support the hypothesis that habitual drug use is associated with an increased frequency of risky driving behavior. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Periodontal Disease and Incident Cancer Risk among Postmenopausal Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwizu, Ngozi N; Marshall, James R; Moysich, Kirsten; Genco, Robert J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Mai, Xiaodan; LaMonte, Michael J; Freudenheim, Jo L; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2017-08-01

    Background: Periodontal pathogens have been isolated from precancerous and cancerous lesions and also shown to promote a procarcinogenic microenvironment. Few studies have examined periodontal disease as a risk factor for total cancer, and none have focused on older women. We examined whether periodontal disease is associated with incident cancer among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Methods: Our prospective cohort study comprised 65,869 women, ages 54 to 86 years. Periodontal disease information was obtained via self-report questionnaires administered between 1999 and 2003, whereas ascertainment of cancer outcomes occurred through September 2013, with a maximum follow-up period of 15 years. Physician-adjudicated incident total cancers were the main outcomes and site-specific cancers were secondary outcomes. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. All analyses were conducted two-sided. Results: During a mean follow-up of 8.32 years, 7,149 cancers were identified. Periodontal disease history was associated with increased total cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.08-1.20); findings were similar in analyses limited to 34,097 never-smokers (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.04-1.22). Associations were observed for breast (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23), lung (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.14-1.51), esophagus (HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.64-6.53), gallbladder (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.01-2.95), and melanoma skin (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.48) cancers. Stomach cancer was borderline (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.94-2.67). Conclusions: Periodontal disease increases risk of total cancer among older women, irrespective of smoking, and certain anatomic sites appear to be vulnerable. Impact: Our findings support the need for further understanding of the effect of periodontal disease on cancer outcomes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1255-65. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer

  13. Drug use and harm reduction in Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, Catherine S; Safi, Naqibullah; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Opium has been cultivated in Afghanistan since 1100 A.D., although production has steadily increased since 1979. Currently, Afghanistan produces three-quarters of the global opium supply, with injection drug use and HIV currently following the opium trade route through Central Asia. Although systematic studies are lacking, heroin use appears to be on the rise in Afghanistan. The purpose of this paper is to briefly provide historical background and current statistics for drug producti...

  14. Treatment results in women with clinical stage I and pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J.J.; Schutter, E.M.J.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; van der Sijde, R.; Naudin ten Cate, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report survival and results of therapy and possible prognostic factors in women with pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma. Forty-two patients with pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma were treated at the department of Radiation Oncology of the Medisch Spectrum

  15. Targeted breast cancer screening in women younger than 40: results from a statewide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarff, MaryClare; Schmidt, Katherine; Vetto, John T

    2008-05-01

    Our state Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) has previously reported a paucity of data supporting breast screening for asymptomatic women younger than 40 (cancer detection rate of .25% per screening-year). In partnership with the local Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, we began a targeted "screening" program to evaluate women younger than 40 referred for symptoms or other concerns. Retrospective data review of program results, including demographics, symptoms, evaluations performed, and outcomes. A total of 176 women, ages 16 to 39 years, were referred to the BCCP/Komen program. Of the women with documented presenting symptoms, the most common was breast lump (81%). Evaluation triggered 75 surgical referrals and 69 biopsies, yielding 16 cancers (a biopsy positive rate of 23% and overall cancer detection rate from the program of 9%). For women younger than age 40, targeted breast cancer screening is a more efficient utilization of screening resources, with a higher cancer detection rate than asymptomatic screening.

  16. Geographical variation in cardiovascular incidence: results from the British Women's Heart and Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Shah

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD in women shows regional variations not explained by common risk factors. Analysis of CVD incidence will provide insight into whether there is further divergence between regions with increasing age. Methods Seven-year follow-up data on 2685 women aged 59-80 (mean 69 at baseline from 23 towns in the UK were available from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. Time to fatal or non-fatal CVD was analyzed using Cox regression with adjustment for risk factors, using multiple imputation for missing values. Results Compared to South England, CVD incidence is similar in North England (HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.84, 1.31 and Scotland (0.93 (0.68, 1.27, but lower in Midlands/Wales (0.85 (0.64, 1.12. Event severity influenced regional variation, with South England showing lower fatal incident CVD than other regions, but higher non-fatal incident CVD. Kaplan-Meier plots suggested that regional divergence in CVD occurred before baseline (before mean baseline age of 69. Conclusions In women, regional differences in CVD early in adult life do not further diverge in later life. This may be due to regional differences in early detection, survivorship of women entering the study, or event severity. Targeting health care resources for CVD by geographic variation may not be appropriate for older age-groups.

  17. Estimated occurrence of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use among 12- to 18-year-old students in Panama: results of Panama's 1996 National Youth Survey on Alcohol and Drug Use Uso estimado de tabaco, alcohol y otras drogas en estudiantes panameños de12 a 18 años: resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Panamá sobre el Uso de Alcohol y Drogas en la Juventud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo B. González

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This report provides the first epidemiological evidence on tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use among school students in Panama, using data from a student survey completed in 1996. Specifically, we examine sex, age, grade level, type of school, and urban-rural variations in the occurrence of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use. Estimates of lifetime prevalence and past-year use of these products were obtained using data from Panama's 1996 National Youth Survey on Alcohol and Drug Use (n = 6477. To account for the multistage sampling design of the survey, all estimates and respective standard errors are derived by the Taylor series approximation method using Epi Info 6.0 CSAMPLE software. In general, more males, more older students, and more students in higher grades have used licit and illicit drugs, even though male-female differences tend to be small. Public-private school differences and urban-rural trends vary depending on the drug. The findings of this study are discussed in relation to the epidemiology and prevention of drug use in Panama. Based on these data, we seek to provide information to be used by the Government of Panama in its planning for prevention programs directed toward students in Panamanian schools.Este informe presenta las primeras pruebas epidemiológicas del consumo de tabaco, alcohol y otras drogas en alumnos de escuelas panameñas, usando datos obtenidos mediante una encuesta estudiantil completada en 1996. En particular hemos examinado las diferencias por sexo, edad, grado escolar, tipo de escuela y residencia urbana o rural en el uso de tabaco, alcohol y otras drogas. Se estimaron la prevalencia vitalicia y el consumo previo de estos productos a partir de una encuesta nacional de la juventud efectuada en 1996 (n = 6 477. Debido al diseño muestral multietápico aplicado en la encuesta, todas las estimaciones y sus respectivos errores estándar se derivaron por el método de Taylor de series aproximadas aplicando el

  18. Abnormal Vaginal Pap Test Results After Hysterectomy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Stephanie; Yu, Xiaoying; Schmeler, Kathleen; Levison, Judy

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of abnormal vaginal cytology and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) and vaginal cancer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women with no history of abnormal cytologic screening who had a hysterectomy for conditions other than cervical dysplasia and cancer and to explore the risk factors associated with VAIN and vaginal cancer. A retrospective cohort study was performed identifying 238 women between January 2000 and January 2015 with a history of HIV, previous hysterectomy, and no previous abnormal Pap test results. Medical records from patients with both HIV and a history of hysterectomy were reviewed from Thomas Street Health Center and Northwest Community Health Center. Among 238 women, 164 (69%) had normal Pap test results, 12 (5%) had results showing atypical cells of undermined significance and human papillomavirus-positive, 55 (23.1%) had results showing low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and seven (2.9%) had results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. No demographic risk factor was associated with abnormal Pap test results after hysterectomy. Median follow-up time for the Pap test was 16 years. Of those who underwent vaginal biopsies for abnormal Pap test results, 15 (28%) had normal results, 23 (43%) had VAIN 1, nine (16%) had VAIN 2, and seven (13%) had VAIN 3. No patients had invasive vaginal cancer. More than 30% of HIV-infected women who had no prehysterectomy history of abnormal Pap test results had abnormal vaginal Pap test results. Among those who had vaginal biopsies, 29% had VAIN 2 or 3, suggesting that Pap testing posthysterectomy in the HIV population may be indicated.

  19. Does Drug Use Inhibit Crime Deceleration or Does Crime Inhibit Drug Use Deceleration? A Test of the Reciprocal Risk Postulate of the Worst of Both Worlds Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D

    2018-01-16

    Prior research has shown that ongoing drug use inhibits the commonly reported maturing out of crime process and that ongoing crime inhibits the commonly reported maturing out of drug use process. To test the predictive efficacy of drug use for crime deceleration and of crime for drug deceleration using a prospective analysis of data on a group of 524 male California Youth Authority parolees to see if both effects exist simultaneously. A two-equation regression analysis of Year 3 arrests and illicit drug use was performed, controlling for age, race, marital status, employment status, and number of months free in the community. It was determined that illicit drug use at Year 2 predicted an increase in arrests between the first and third years of the analysis and arrests at Year 2 predicted an increase in illicit drug use over this same time period. Alcohol use, on the other hand, failed to predict a change in arrests and arrests failed to predict a change in alcohol use. The results of this study suggest that illicit drug use may inhibit the natural maturing out of crime process observed in emerging adults whereas involvement in crime may inhibit the natural maturing out of illicit drug use process. These findings not only support the reciprocal risk postulate from the Worst of Both Worlds hypothesis but also have implications for risk prediction, risk management, and treatment.

  20. Abnormal ovarian cancer screening test result: women's informational, psychological and practical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patricia Y; Graves, Kristi D; Pavlik, Edward J; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the identification of cost-effective approaches to screening for ovarian cancer (OC). Transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) is one such screening approach. Approximately 5-7% of routine TVS screening tests yield abnormal results. Some women experience significant distress after receipt of an abnormal TVS screening test. Four focus groups provided in-depth, qualitative data regarding the informational, psychological, and practical needs of women after the receipt of an abnormal TVS result. Through question and content analytic procedures, we identified four themes: anticipation, emotional response, role of the screening technician, and impact of prior cancer experiences. Results provide initial guidance toward development of interventions to promote adaptive responses after receipt of an abnormal cancer screening test result.

  1. Risk Profiles for Endometriosis in Japanese Women: Results From a Repeated Survey of Self-Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Nagai, Kazue; Mizunuma, Hideki; Kubota, Toshiro; Lee, Jung-Su; Suzuki, Shosuke

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and risk factors for endometriosis may differ according to diagnosis methodologies, such as study populations and diagnostic accuracy. We examined risk profiles in imaging-diagnosed endometriosis with and without surgical confirmation in a large population of Japanese women, as well as the differences in risk profiles of endometriosis based on history of infertility. Methods Questionnaires that included items on sites of endometriosis determined by imaging techniques and surgical procedure were mailed to 1025 women who self-reported endometriosis in a baseline survey of the Japan Nurses’ Health Study (n = 15 019). Results Two hundred and ten women had surgically confirmed endometriosis (Group A), 120 had imaging-diagnosed endometriosis without a surgical procedure (Group B), and 264 had adenomyosis (Group C). A short menstrual cycle at 18–22 years of age and cigarette smoking at 30 years of age were associated with significantly increased risk of endometriosis (Group A plus Group B), while older age was associated with risk of adenomyosis (Group C). In women with a history of infertility, a short menstrual cycle was associated with a significantly increased risk of endometriosis in both Group A and Group B, but risk profiles of endometriosis were different between Group A and Group B in women without a history of infertility. Conclusions Women with surgically confirmed endometriosis and those with imaging-diagnosed endometriosis without surgery have basically common risk profiles, but these risk profiles are different from those with adenomyosis. The presence of a history of infertility should be taken into consideration for evaluation of risk profiles. PMID:25716280

  2. Women's Experience with Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing and Emotional Well-being and Satisfaction after Test-Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schendel, R.V. van; Page-Christiaens, G.; Beulen, L.; Bilardo, C.M.; Boer, M.A. de; Coumans, A.B.C.; Faas, B.H.W.; Langen, I.M. van; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Maarle, M.C. van; Macville, M.V.E.; Oepkes, D.; Pajkrt, E.; Henneman, L.

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, high-risk pregnant women opt for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) instead of invasive diagnostic testing. Since NIPT is less accurate than invasive testing, a normal NIPT result might leave women less reassured. A questionnaire study was performed among pregnant women with elevated

  3. [Drug using risks screening in primary care patients using the ASSIST test: Cross sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Rigabert, Alina; Gómez Llano, M Nieves; Rubio, Gabriel

    2018-03-15

    The aim of this study is to estimate risky-drug use patterns of consumption of primary care patients. Multicentric descriptive cross-sectional study. five primary health care centers of the South of Madrid. all patients between 16-100 year-old consulting with their family physician. Spanish-validated World Health Organization ASSIST test was use to screen risky drug use in primary care. Total points scored at the test were obtained. A sum of 441 screening test were collected. Mean age was 51,3 years and 51.6% of patients presented a moderate-severe risky drug use out of the nine drugs tested. The more frequent drug use screened were tobacco (41.7%) followed by alcohol (15.4%), hypnotics (13.7%) and cannabis (5.7%). Differences were found between genders in the patterns: men had higher risky drug uses compared to women regarding alcohol and cannabis. Women had higher sedatives/hypnotics consumption prevalence. A 16% of patients presented with polyconsumption drug use patterns. There is risk derived from drug misuse in primary care for tobacco, alcohol, hypnotics and cannabis as detected by the ASSIST test. There is a higher rate of hypnotics than expected. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Energy drinks and escalation in drug use severity: An emergent hazard to adolescent health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Wanda E; Jackson, Dylan B

    2017-11-29

    The aim of the current study is to determine whether energy drink consumption contributes to drug use and, more specifically, an escalation in the severity of drug use. We first examine the association between energy drink use and hard drug use, and subsequently investigate whether soft drug use mediates this relationship. Potential moderating influences are also investigated by testing whether the degree of mediation varies by age, gender, and race. The current study uses a nationally representative sample of 8th (ages 13-14), 10th (ages 15-16), and 12th (ages 17-18) grade adolescents from the 2015 Monitoring the Future survey. Negative binomial regression is employed to examine associations between energy drink consumption and soft and hard drug use. Mediation results indicate that energy drink consumption is significantly associated with increased soft drug use, which is, in turn, associated with significant increases in hard drug use. This cascading effect of energy drink consumption on drug use appears to be stronger among younger females and older males. Results for the moderating effect of race are mixed. Energy drinks appear to pose an important threat to adolescent health in the form of soft and hard drug use. The United States may want to consider adopting energy drink policies similar to European countries and Canada, which require warning labels on beverages with high caffeine content. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Reality Television Programs Are Associated With Illegal Drug Use and Prescription Drug Misuse Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Shlivko, Alexander

    2016-01-02

    Reality television watching and social media use are popular activities. Reality television can include mention of illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. To determine if reality television and social media use of Twitter are associated with either illegal drug use or prescription drug misuse. Survey of 576 college students in 2011. Independent variables included watching reality television (social cognitive theory), parasocial interaction (parasocial interaction theory), television hours watched (cultivation theory), following a reality television character on Twitter, and demographics. Outcome variables were illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Watching reality television and also identifying with reality TV program characters were each associated with greater odds for illegal drug use. Also, following a reality TV character on Twitter had greater odds for illegal drug use and also in one analytical model for prescription drug misuse. No support was seen for cultivation theory. Those born in the United States had greater odds for illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Women and Asians had lower odds for illegal drug use. African Americans and Asians had lower odds for prescription drug misuse. Physicians, psychologists, and other healthcare practitioners may find it useful to include questions in their clinical interview about reality television watching and Twitter use. Physician and psychology groups, public health practitioners, and government health agencies should consider discussing with television broadcasting companies the potential negative impact of including content with illegal drugs and prescription drug misuse on reality television programs.

  6. Violent injuries and regional correlates among women in China: results from 21 cities study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingzhong; Yang, Xiaozhao Y; Cottrell, Randall R; Wu, Dan; Jiang, Shuhan; Anderson, James G

    2016-06-01

    Ecological models depict violent injuries against women being influenced by both individual and environmental characteristics. However, only few studies examined the association between regional variables and the likelihood of violent injuries. Our study is a preliminary assessment of the impact of regional variables on the likelihood that a woman has experienced violent injuries. Participants were 16 866 urban residents, who were identified through a multi-stage sampling process conducted in 21 Chinese cities. Out of the sampled population, 8071 respondents were female. Subsequent analyses focused solely on the female sample. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to examine regional variation in violent injuries. Prevalence of violent injuries against women is 10.7% (95% CI: 7.8%, 15.5%). After controlling for individual-level characteristics, higher regional male-female ratio (OR: 1.97, P population growth rate (OR: 4.12, P unemployment rate (OR: 2.45, P < 0.01) were all associated with an elevated risk of violent injuries among Chinese women caused by physical attack. The results suggest violent injuries among Chinese women caused by physical attack have become an important social and public health problem. The findings point to the importance of developing effective health policies, laws and interventions that focuses on the unequal economic development between different regions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  7. The Shanghai Women's Asthma and Allergy Study: objectives, design, and recruitment results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartert, Tina V; Deng, Xinqing; Hartman, Terryl J; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jin, Meiling; Bai, Chunxue; Gross, Myron; Roberts, L Jackson; Sheller, James R; Christman, John; Dupont, William; Griffin, Marie; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2008-06-01

    The Shanghai Women's Asthma and Allergy Study is the first population-based incidence study designed to assess the associations of dietary antioxidant intake and measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity with development of adult-onset asthma and allergic rhinitis. A total of 65,732 participants in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, an ongoing cohort study in seven districts of Shanghai, People's Republic of China, were recruited to the Shanghai Women's Asthma and Allergy Study from 2003 to 2007. Dietary intake was assessed in the parent study by using a validated and quantitative food frequency questionnaire at baseline recruitment and at the first biennial follow-up survey. Blood and urine samples were collected to measure baseline oxidative stress, antioxidant enzyme activity, and nutrient levels at the baseline survey. Incident asthma and allergic rhinitis were assessed by using a modification of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire during the biennial in-person survey of the Shanghai Women's Health Study. Diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by either methacholine challenge testing or test of reversibility to beta-agonists. Dietary antioxidant intake, plasma antioxidants, antioxidant enzymes, and urinary isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress, were measured prior to disease onset. This paper describes the study objectives, design, population demographics, and recruitment results.

  8. Hepatitis C in hemodialysis: the contribution of injection drug use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galperim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is the most common cause of acute or chronic hepatitis in patients on hemodialysis (HD. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of positive HCV RNA and investigate injection drug use as an emerging risk factor in patients with chronic renal disease on HD. METHODS: This was a multicenter cross-sectional study with 325 patients with chronic renal disease on HD in the period between August 1, 2005 to August 30, 2006, receiving care at four institutions in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Epidemiological data were collected by means of a structured questionnaire. The following laboratory tests were performed: alanine aminotransferase (ALT, anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV, and qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: Of 325 patients, 68 had positive HCV RNA results. The comparison between patients with positive and negative PCR results revealed significant differences in duration of HD (mean = 71 versus 52.4 months; p = 0.02; previous blood transfusion (92% versus 72%; p < 0.01; injection drug use (13% versus 0.7%; p < 0.01; anti-HCV positivity at start of HD therapy (60% versus 4%; p < 0.01; and mean ALT value (39 versus 26.5; p < 0.01. Logistic regression analysis showed a positive HCV RNA independently associated to being on HD for more than five years [OR: 2.1 (95% CI 1.2 -3.8]; previous blood transfusion [OR: 3.7 (95% CI 1.4 - 9.5]; and injection drug use [OR: 22.6 (95% CI 4.2 - 119.6]. CONCLUSION: Injection drug use was an independent risk factor for HCV infection among chronic renal disease patients on HD.

  9. Illicit drug use and HIV risk in the Dominican Republic: tourism areas create drug use opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Lee, Jane J; Ruiz, Yumary; Hagan, Holly; Delva, Marlyn; Quiñones, Zahira; Kamler, Alexandra; Robles, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    While the Caribbean has the second highest global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence, insufficient attention has been paid to contributing factors of the region's elevated risk. Largely neglected is the potential role of drugs in shaping the Caribbean HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic. Caribbean studies have almost exclusively focused on drug transportation and seldom acknowledged local user economies and drug-related health and social welfare consequences. While tourism is consistently implicated within the Caribbean HIV epidemic, less is known about the intersection of drugs and tourism. Tourism areas represent distinct ecologies of risk often characterised by sex work, alcohol consumption and population mixing between lower and higher risk groups. Limited understanding of availability and usage of drugs in countries such as the Dominican Republic (DR), the Caribbean country with the greatest tourist rates, presents barriers to HIV prevention. This study addresses this gap by conducting in-depth interviews with 30 drug users in Sosúa, a major sex tourism destination of the DR. A two-step qualitative data analysis process was utilised and interview transcripts were systematically coded using a well-defined thematic codebook. Results suggest three themes: (1) local demand shifts drug routes to tourism areas, (2) drugs shape local economies and (3) drug use facilitates HIV risk behaviours in tourism areas.

  10. Modeling Illicit Drug Use Dynamics and Its Optimal Control Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steady Mushayabasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of death and disability attributable to illicit drug use, remains a significant threat to public health for both developed and developing nations. This paper presents a new mathematical modeling framework to investigate the effects of illicit drug use in the community. In our model the transmission process is captured as a social “contact” process between the susceptible individuals and illicit drug users. We conduct both epidemic and endemic analysis, with a focus on the threshold dynamics characterized by the basic reproduction number. Using our model, we present illustrative numerical results with a case study in Cape Town, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Durban communities of South Africa. In addition, the basic model is extended to incorporate time dependent intervention strategies.

  11. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, C M; Dixon, S C; Jensen, A; Kjaer, S K; Modugno, F; deFazio, A; Fereday, S; Hung, J; Johnatty, S E; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Lambrechts, D; Vergote, I; Van Nieuwenhuysen, E; Lambrechts, S; Risch, H A; Rossing, M A; Doherty, J A; Wicklund, K G; Chang-Claude, J; Goodman, M T; Ness, R B; Moysich, K; Heitz, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Schwaab, I; Matsuo, K; Hosono, S; Goode, E L; Vierkant, R A; Larson, M C; Fridley, B L; Høgdall, C; Schildkraut, J M; Weber, R P; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Bandera, E V; Paddock, L; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L; Wentzensen, N; Yang, H P; Brinton, L A; Lissowska, J; Høgdall, E; Lundvall, L; Whittemore, A; McGuire, V; Sieh, W; Rothstein, J; Sutphen, R; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Pearce, C L; Wu, A H; Webb, P M

    2015-09-01

    Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390 women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage was observed for women who were obese (BMI: 30-34.9, pHR: 1.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.99-1.23); BMI: ⩾35, pHR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01-1.25)). Results were similar for PFS and ovarian cancer-specific survival. In analyses stratified by histologic subtype, associations were strongest for women with low-grade serous (pHR: 1.12 per 5 kg m(-2)) and endometrioid subtypes (pHR: 1.08 per 5 kg m(-2)), and more modest for the high-grade serous (pHR: 1.04 per 5 kg m(-2)) subtype, but only the association with high-grade serous cancers was significant. Higher BMI is associated with adverse survival among the majority of women with ovarian cancer.

  12. IDENTIDAD FEMENINA Y CONSUMO DE DROGAS: UN ESTUDIO CUALITATIVO / FEMININE IDENTITY AND DRUG USE: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Pérez Gómez* y Marcela Correa Muñoz**

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEste estudio examina la relación entre identidad femenina (IF y consumo de drogas. Setenta y seis mujeres de tresgrupos de edades (jóvenes, adultas jóvenes y adultas mayores, de tres niveles socioeconómicos (alto, medio y bajo y trescircunstancias de consumo (consumidoras, no consumidoras y ex consumidoras fueron entrevistadas sobre seis aspectos:la definición de ser mujer y las diferencias con ser hombre; la autovaloración femenina; los factores que influyen en laconstrucción de la IF; la evolución de la IF; IF y consumo de drogas; factores protectores y de riesgo.Las entrevistadas consideraron que la mayor parte de los cambios recientes dentro de la sociedad occidental hanmejorado sustancialmente la condición de la mujer, aun cuando algunos de esos cambios también han incrementado suvulnerabilidad y están asociados al notable aumento del consumo de drogas entre las mujeres. Varios de los factoresmencionados no suelen aparecer en los estudios sobre este tema ("mal uso de la libertad", "abandono de responsabilidades","conducta sexual inadecuada" probablemente porque sus autores temen que se les acuse de estar censurando a las mujerescontemporáneas; en este estudio se presentan las percepciones de las mujeres, no las interpretaciones de los autores.ABSTRACTThis study examines the relationship between feminine identity and drug use. Seventy-six women in three ages groups(young, young adults, and mature adults, in three socio-economic levels (upper, medium, low and three drug use conditions(non users, users and ex users were interviewed on six aspects: definition of being a woman; and difference with being amale, women’s self-evaluation, factors influencing the development of FI; FI and drug use; and risk and protective factors.The results showed that the interviewees think that most of the changes that occurred in West society have substantiallyimproved women’s condition; nevertheless, some of those changes have also

  13. Space, Place and Desistance from Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hunter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As centres of human existence, places and spaces are vital for individuals’ understanding of themselves and who they might become. We explore these aspects of existence through a longitudinal study of 43 current and former drug users. First, we identify the differences between those who have desisted from drug use and those who continued. These differences manifested themselves in the routines that frequently governed desisters’ lives. Persisters had very little in the way of routines that served to structure their time and where they did these were more likely to be seen as a burden. Further, the places our respondents occupied served as indications of their own understandings of their self and their efforts to desist. Second, we investigate in detail one individual’s desistance from drug use and the accompanying change in his existential geography. As Peter desisted his goals and aspirations changed, becoming less focused on avoiding drug use and directed to more positive desires. We discuss the implications of this work for desistance research. Como centros de la existencia humana, los lugares y los espacios son vitales para que los individuos se conozcan a sí mismos, y sepan en quién podrían convertirse. Estos aspectos de la existencia se analizan a través de un estudio longitudinal de 43 personas que consumen o han consumido drogas. En primer lugar, se identifican las diferencias entre los que han abandonado el consumo de drogas, y los que siguen consumiéndolas. Estas diferencias se manifestaron en las rutinas que a menudo regían en las vidas de los que habían abandonado el consumo. Los que seguían consumiendo tenían pocas rutinas que sirvieran para estructurar su tiempo, y si las tenían, se percibían como una carga. Además, los lugares que los encuestados ocupaban servían como indicaciones de su propia autocomprensión y sus esfuerzos para dejar el consumo. En segundo lugar, se investigó en detalle el abandono del

  14. Self-image bias in drug use attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Rebecca L; Heim, Derek

    2011-12-01

    The aim was to examine the degree to which people's personal drug use affects how they perceive other drug users, with a view to investigating the possibility that drug use attributions are a function of self-image bias. University students (n = 60), categorized post hoc as drug users or nonusers, completed questionnaires assessing locus, control, and stability attributions about their own personal drug use or imagined drug use. Attributions pertaining to presented vignettes of light and heavy drug use by others were also assessed. Heavy drug use elicited the most "addicted" attributions (dispositional locus, low control, and high stability) and drug-using participants made more addicted attributions about their own personal drug use than did nonusing participants about their imagined use. Additionally, attributions made by non-drug users regarding their imagined personal drug use were similar to those they made for the light drug use described in presented vignettes. Conversely, drug users made attributions which were similar for their personal drug use and for the heavy drug-use vignette. These data lend support to conceptualizing addiction as a product of the functional attribution process-"addict" attributions being applied mainly where drug use is more problematic (heavy) and thus in need of explanation. The data also lend support to the notion that a self-image bias is operating in drug use attributions when people can identify with the behavior of others.

  15. Impact of online counseling on drug use: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Farrokh; Haack, Mary; Nemes, Susie; Harge, Angela; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effect of online counseling abuse counseling on drug use among underserved patients. Subjects were recruited from an Indian Reservation in Eagle Butte, South Dakota; a family court in Newark, New Jersey; a probation office in Alexandria, Virginia; and a co-occurring disorders treatment clinic in Washington, District of Columbia. Subjects were predominantly poor, undereducated, unemployed, court involved, or diagnosed with co-occurring psychiatric disorders. A total of 79 subjects volunteered to participate in the project. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The control and experimental groups were both issued an Internet-ready computer and 1 year of Internet service. Only the experimental group had access to online counseling intervention. Drug use was measured using a combination of self-usage reporting and supervised urine tests. Urine tests were available for 37% of subjects. Exit surveys containing self-reported usage were obtained from 54% of the subjects. Self-usage reports or urine test results were available from 70% of subjects. The difference of the rates of drug use in the control and experimental groups (as calculated from urine tests or through self-report) was not significantly different from zero, suggesting that online counseling had not led to a reduction in substance use. It is possible that the study lacked sufficient power to detect small differences in the rate of drug use in the experimental and control groups. Additional research is needed to establish the efficacy of online counseling in hard-to-reach populations.

  16. Factors Associated with Drug Use among Youth Living in Homeless Shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Tracy; Dusenbury, Linda; Botvin, Gilbert J.; Farmer-Huselid, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Examined predictors of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use with homeless adolescents and preadolescents (N=234). Results reveal that social influences (friends and family drug use) are strong predictors of experimental drug use and intentions to use drugs, as are several psychological factors (psychological well-being, assertiveness, and social…

  17. Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

    2009-01-01

    Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

  18. Drug Use and Attitudes among College Students in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pela, Ona A.

    1989-01-01

    Examined pattern of drug use among Nigerian college students, their attitudes toward drug use, and their perception of drug harmfulness to the body and to society. Results from 400 undergraduate students revealed that most frequently used social drugs were caffeine and alcohol. Respondents considered heroin and cocaine to pose greatest dangers to…

  19. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis and interpretation. Results: The results…

  20. Encouraging results despite complexity of multidisciplinary care of HIV-infected women using assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Jeanine; Partisani, Marialuisa; Wittemer, Christiane; Lang, Jean-Marie; Viville, Stéphane; Favre, Romain

    2005-11-01

    Assisted reproduction technologies can treat infertility for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive women. We assessed the efficacy of these techniques in the results and difficulties encountered while conducting our assisted reproduction programme for 49 couples in which at least the woman had HIV infection that was currently under control. Treatments included intrauterine insemination (IUI), IVF and ICSI, with ovarian stimulation. Embryos were transferred on day 3 after oocyte retrieval. An elective single transfer was performed, except for patients aged > or = 40 years. The median age of the women was 36 years. Ten IUI, nine IVF, 53 ICSI and 10 frozen-thawed embryo transfers have been performed. No pregnancy occurred following the IUI trials but for the couples with IVF and ICSI attempts the clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 23.9%. Eight babies have been born leading to a 22.2% take home baby rate per treated couple. Contamination was not observed in any newborn. Assisted reproduction technologies and particularly ICSI can provide HIV seropositive women with a safe means of mothering children. Results are encouraging when considering the age of the patients and a preferential single embryo transfer.

  1. The determinants of induced abortion among women in Ukraine, results of 2007 survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranovska, Anastasia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. In Ukraine, an estimated 8.5 million induced abortions have been performed during the years of independence. To examine the reproductive health of Ukrainians, the National Health Survey was conducted in 2007 as a nationally representative cross-sectional survey involving 6841 women and 3178 men aged 15-49. Based on the survey data we aimed to identify the determinants of induced abortion. METHODS. The sample for analysis included 4953 women that have ever been pregnant. As an outcome measure we took induced abortion as the result of the last pregnancy versus all other pregnancy outcomes (live births, miscarriages, and stillbirths. Independent variables included age at the time of pregnancy, region, type of place of residence, religion, time since the end of pregnancy, age at first intercourse, whether first intercourse was at first marriage, and number of previous pregnancies. The first step of the analysis was conducted using the bivariate analysis (crosstabulation and chi-square test. The multivariate analysis was done using the binary logistic regression (backward conditional methods. RESULTS. In multivariate analysis, only five variables were associated at the 0.05 level: region, type of place of residence, religion, age at the time of pregnancy, and number of previous pregnancies. Women from the Western regions and those who live in large cities were less likely to have an induced abortion at the last pregnancy. With the increasing of age and number of previous pregnancies the risk of having an induced abortion at the last pregnancy increases as well. CONCLUSIONS. Women of older age groups, who already have children, those living in smaller settlements and in non-Western regions, are at increased risk of induced abortion. These groups are to be considered while developing programs to facilitate access to effective contraception.

  2. Prevalence of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Herbal Remedy Use in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women: Results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robin R; Santoro, Nanette; Allshouse, Amanda A; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Derby, Carol

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, including botanical/herbal remedies, among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), New Jersey site. We also examined whether attitudes toward CAM and communication of its use to providers differed for Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. SWAN is a community-based, multiethnic cohort study of midlife women. At the 13th SWAN follow-up, women at the New Jersey site completed both a general CAM questionnaire and a culturally sensitive CAM questionnaire designed to capture herbal products commonly used in Hispanic/Latina communities. Prevalence of and attitudes toward CAM use were compared by race/ethnicity and demographic characteristics. Among 171 women (average age 61.8 years), the overall prevalence of herbal remedy use was high in both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women (88.8% Hispanic and 81.3% non-Hispanic white), and prayer and herbal teas were the most common modalities used. Women reported the use of multiple herbal modalities (mean 6.6 for Hispanic and 4.0 for non-Hispanic white women; p = 0.001). Hispanic women were less likely to consider herbal treatment drugs (16% vs. 37.5%; p = 0.005) and were less likely to report sharing the use of herbal remedies with their doctors (14.4% Hispanic vs. 34% non-Hispanic white; p = 0.001). The number of modalities used was similar regardless of the number of prescription medications used. High prevalence of herbal CAM use was observed for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Results highlight the need for healthcare providers to query women regarding CAM use to identify potential interactions with traditional treatments and to determine whether CAM is used in lieu of traditional medications.

  3. Illicit drug use in South Africa: Findings from a 2008 national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa. Method. A multistage random population sample of 15 828 people age .15 (56.3% women) was included in the survey. Illicit drug use was assessed by 2 sections of the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance use Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Frequency analyses for different age groups, geolocality, educational ...

  4. Abnormal urinalysis results are common, regardless of specimen collection technique, in women without urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazee, Bradley W; Enriquez, Kayla; Ng, Valerie; Alter, Harrison

    2015-06-01

    Voided urinalysis to test for urinary tract infection (UTI) is prone to false-positive results for a number of reasons. Specimens are often collected at triage from women with any abdominal complaint, creating a low UTI prevalence population. Improper collection technique by the patient may affect the result. At least four indices, if positive, can indicate UTI. We examine the impact of voided specimen collection technique on urinalysis indicators of UTI and on urine culture contamination in disease-free women. In this crossover design, 40 menstrual-age female emergency department staff without UTI symptoms collected urine two ways: directly in a cup ("non-clean") and midstream clean catch ("ideal"). Samples underwent standard automated urinalysis and culture. Urinalysis indices and culture contamination were compared. The proportion of abnormal results from samples collected by "non-clean" vs. "ideal" technique, respectively, were: leukocyte esterase (>trace) 50%, 35% (95% confidence interval for difference -6% to 36%); nitrites (any) 2.5%, 2.5% (difference -2.5 to 2.5%); white blood cells (>5/high-powered field [HPF]) 50%, 27.5% (difference 4 to 41%); bacteria (any/HPF) 77.5%, 62.5%, (difference -7 to 37%); epithelial cells (>few) 65%, 30% (difference 13 to 56%); culture contamination (>1000 colony-forming units of commensal or >2 species) 77%, 63% (difference -5 to 35%). No urinalysis index was positively correlated with culture contamination. Contemporary automated urinalysis indices were often abnormal in a disease-free population of women, even using ideal collection technique. In clinical practice, such false-positive results could lead to false-positive UTI diagnosis. Only urine nitrite showed a high specificity. Culture contamination was common regardless of collection technique and was not predicted by urinalysis results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Safety of artemether-lumefantrine in pregnant women with malaria: results of a prospective cohort study in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyando, Christine; Mkandawire, Rhoda; Puma, Lwipa; Sinkala, Moses; Mpabalwani, Evans; Njunju, Eric; Gomes, Melba; Ribeiro, Isabela; Walter, Verena; Virtanen, Mailis; Schlienger, Raymond; Cousin, Marc; Chipimo, Miriam; Sullivan, Frank M

    2010-09-01

    Safety data regarding exposure to artemisinin-based combination therapy in pregnancy are limited. This prospective cohort study conducted in Zambia evaluated the safety of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in pregnant women with malaria. Pregnant women attending antenatal clinics were assigned to groups based on the drug used to treat their most recent malaria episode (AL vs. sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, SP). Safety was assessed using standard and pregnancy-specific parameters. Post-delivery follow-up was six weeks for mothers and 12 months for live births. Primary outcome was perinatal mortality (stillbirth or neonatal death within seven days after birth). Data from 1,001 pregnant women (AL n = 495; SP n = 506) and 933 newborns (AL n = 466; SP n = 467) showed: perinatal mortality (AL 4.2%; SP 5.0%), comprised of early neonatal mortality (each group 2.3%), stillbirths (AL 1.9%; SP 2.7%); preterm deliveries (AL 14.1%; SP 17.4% of foetuses); and gestational age-adjusted low birth weight (AL 9.0%; SP 7.7%). Infant birth defect incidence was 1.8% AL and 1.6% SP, excluding umbilical hernia. Abortions prior to antenatal care could not be determined: abortion occurred in 4.5% of women treated with AL during their first trimester; none were reported in the 133 women exposed to SP and/or quinine during their first trimester. Overall development (including neurological assessment) was similar in both groups. These data suggest that exposure to AL in pregnancy, including first trimester, is not associated with particular safety risks in terms of perinatal mortality, malformations, or developmental impairment. However, more data are required on AL use during the first trimester.

  6. Disentangling the correlates of drug use: A regression analysis of the associations between frequency of drug use, years-of-school, impulsivity, working memory, and psychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene M Heyman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Years-of-school is negatively correlated with illicit drug use. However, educational attainment is positively correlated with IQ and negatively correlated with impulsivity, two traits that are also correlated with drug use. Thus, the negative correlation between education and drug use may reflect the correlates of schooling, not schooling itself. To help disentangle these relations we obtained measures of working memory, simple memory, IQ, disposition (impulsivity and psychiatric status, years-of-school and frequency of illicit and licit drug use in methadone clinic and community drug users. We found strong zero-order correlations between all measures, including IQ, impulsivity, years-of- school, psychiatric symptoms and drug use. However, multiple regression analyses revealed a different picture. The significant predictors of illicit drug use were gender, involvement in a methadone clinic, and years-of-school. That is, psychiatric symptoms, impulsivity, cognition, and IQ no longer predicted illicit drug use in the multiple regression analyses. Moreover, high risk subjects ( low IQ and/or high impulsivity who spent 14 or more years in school used stimulants and opiates less than did low risk subjects who had spent less than 14 years in school. Smoking and drinking had a different correlational structure. IQ and years-of-school predicted whether someone ever became a smoker, whereas impulsivity predicted the frequency of drinking bouts, but years-of-school did not. Many subjects reported no use of one or more drugs, resulting in a large number of zeroes in the data sets. Cragg’s Double-Hurdle regression method proved the best approach for dealing with this problem. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that years-of-school predicts lower levels of illicit drug use after controlling for IQ and impulsivity. This paper also highlights the advantages of Double-Hurdle regression methods for analyzing the correlates of drug use in

  7. Intimate Partner Violence Against Pregnant Women: Study About The Repercussions On The Obstetric And Neonatal Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driéli Pacheco Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This observational, descriptive and analytic study aimed to identify the prevalence of IPV cases among pregnant women and classify them according to the type and frequency; identify the obstetric and neonatal results and their associations with the intimate partner violence (IPV occurrence in the current pregnancy. It was developed with 232 pregnant women who had prenatal care at a public maternity hospital. Data were collected via structured interview and in the patients’ charts and analyzed through the statistic software SAS® 9.0. Among the participants, 15.5% suffered IPV during pregnancy, among that 14.7% suffered psychological violence, 5.2% physical violence and 0.4% sexual violence. Women who did not desire the pregnancy had more chances of suffering IPV (p<0.00; OR=4.32 and 95% CI [1.77 – 10.54]. With regards to the obstetric and neonatal repercussions, there was no statistical association between the variables investigated. Thus, for the study participants there were no negative obstetric and neonatal repercussions related to IPV during pregnancy.

  8. A weight-loss intervention program designed for Mexican-American women: Cultural adaptations and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Nangel M.; Stevens, Victor J.; Vega-López, Sonia; Kauffman, Tia; Calderón, Mariana Rosales; Cervantes, María Antonieta

    2013-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility of a culturally-appropriate weight-loss intervention targeting obese Spanish-speaking Mexican women. Methods This 12-month weight-loss program was based on behavioral interventions previously used successfully with English-speaking participants. Cultural adaptations included: female interventionists, minimal written materials, emphasis on group activities, focus on Mexican traditions and beliefs, and skill-building approach to food measurement. All sessions were conducted in Spanish. The study had few exclusionary criteria, which allowed participation of women with a wide range of literacy levels. Results Recruitment exceeded expectations, with 47 participants enrolling in the program. Not counting participants who became pregnant during the study, attendance at 6 and 12 months was 62% and 50% respectively. Mean weight loss at 6 and 12 months was 5.3 kg and 7.2 kg, respectively, with a mean reduction in BMI of 4.0 kg/m2 and 5.5 kg/m2 from baseline to 6 and 12 months, respectively. Discussion This pilot study shows that it is feasible to develop and implement culturally-appropriate behavioral lifestyle interventions for obesity treatment in Mexican-American women. PMID:22460538

  9. CDC Vital Signs: HIV and Injection Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips HIV and Injection Drug Use Syringe Services Programs for HIV Prevention Language: English ( ... Pages Vital Signs Issue details: HIV and Injection Drug Use, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Vital Signs – ...

  10. Antiretroviral Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV/AIDS Treatment Antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV infection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Pin it Email Print Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection All FDA-approved medicines used in the ...

  11. Patterns of Drug Use Among College Students. A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizner, George L.; And Others

    Initial data from a survey of drug usage among college students was presented. A large-scale effort was made to produce reliable figures on: (1) drug use patterns; (2) attitudes toward drug use; and (3) incidence of drug use among college students. Questionnaires were answered by 26,000 college students from the Denver-Boulder area, who were…

  12. The role of serotonin in drug use and addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, C.P.; Homberg, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of psychoactive drugs is a wide spread behaviour in human societies. The systematic use of a drug requires the establishment of different drug use-associated behaviours which need to be learned and controlled. However, controlled drug use may develop into compulsive drug use and addiction, a

  13. 42 CFR 456.709 - Retrospective drug use review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retrospective drug use review. 456.709 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.709 Retrospective drug use review. (a) General...

  14. 49 CFR 219.101 - Alcohol and drug use prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alcohol and drug use prohibited. 219.101 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Prohibitions § 219.101 Alcohol and drug use prohibited. (a) Prohibitions. Except as provided in § 219.103— (1) No employee may use or...

  15. [Drugs used to treat nicotine addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieleń, Iwona; Sliwińska-Mossoń, Mariola; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking in Poland is fairly widespread on a large scale. Research suggests that the early twenty-first century, the percentage of female daily smokers aged 20 and above was 26%, and men the same age 43%. In addition, epidemiological studies have shown that smoking was the cause of approximately sixty-nine thousand deaths in Poland (including fifty-seven thousand men and twelve thousand women). It is common ground that cigarette smoking has a negative effect on our body. It represents one of the main and most commonly defined risk factors for many diseases that can be eliminated. Smoking often leads to addiction, and nicotine is an addictive drug. Nicotine addiction is characterized by symptoms such as: "hunger" smoking, difficulty in controlling behavior on smoking or the number of cigarettes smoked, nicotine withdrawal, the occurrence of tolerance, neglect of interests, as well as devoting more time on activities related to smoking, follow-up smoking despite knowledge of its dangers. The most commonly used in Poland, a questionnaire to identify nicotine dependence is a test Fagerstöma. Currently assigned some importance, "the doctor a conversation the patient" and motivating him to stop smoking and maintain abstinence as long as possible. But beyond the "conversation" is also used as an aid to medical treatment for the patient to stop smoking, especially to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. The first attempts of pharmacological help in the effort to weaning from smoking began in the thirties. Were conducted fairly successful, although uncontrolled trials with lobeline, an alkaloid of action similar to nicotine. In Poland, the drugs of first choice in the treatment of nicotine dependence are nicotine replacement therapies (nicotine gum and patches that contain nicotine) and bupropion SR. Quite a popular drugs to help in the fight against addiction are also cytisine and varenicline. The choice of the drug is usually the result of medical experience in the use

  16. [Contraception's choice: women's opinion, satisfaction and profile. Results of a French national survey of a representative sample of 5963 women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, S; Le Tohic, A; Chis, C; This, P; Grosdemouge, I; Panel, P

    2014-06-01

    To describe French women's use of contraceptive methods and study their satisfaction and expectations about contraception. A survey carried out by mail questionnaire filled in by a representative sample group of French women aged 15 to 45 years (Panel Postal Metascope TNS Sofres) in June 2007. Of 10,000 questionnaires sent out, 6044 questionnaires were returned, of which 5963 were usable. Seventy-three percent of women surveyed used some method of contraception, of which 46% was an oral contraceptive, 15% an IUD and 7% used condoms. A minority used new contraceptive methods (implant, patch, vaginal ring). The average age at first sexual relationship was 17.8 years. It was 18.5 among 40-45-year-olds and gradually reduced to 16.7 in the under 25-year-olds. Twenty-three percent of pregnancies remain unwanted and unplanned. For 96% of patients, the choice of contraception was considered to be important. Thirty-six percent thought that contraception could be harmful to health. Only 63% of women believed themselves to be well informed the first time they used contraception. Satisfaction for contraception method was evaluated from 7.3/10 (condom) to 9.7/10 (sterilization). Twenty-seven percent of women do not use any contraception and 23% of pregnancies are unwanted despite a large offering of contraceptives. Our study enables the drawing of 'patient-profiles' for the main methods of contraception in order to better determine women's expectations and to pass the findings on to health professionals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnesium intake, bone mineral density, and fractures: results from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Tonya S; Larson, Joseph C; Alghothani, Nora; Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Cauley, Jane A; Chen, Zhao; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Jackson, Rebecca D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnesium is a necessary component of bone, but its relation to osteoporotic fractures is unclear. Objective: We examined magnesium intake as a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures and altered bone mineral density (BMD). Design: This prospective cohort study included 73,684 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Total daily magnesium intake was estimated from baseline food-frequency questionnaires plus supplements. Hip fractures were confirmed by a medical record review; other fractures were identified by self-report. A baseline BMD analysis was performed in 4778 participants. Results: Baseline hip BMD was 3% higher (P 422.5 compared with magnesium. In contrast, risk of lower-arm or wrist fractures increased with higher magnesium intake [multivariate-adjusted HRs of 1.15 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.32) and 1.23 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.42) for quintiles 4 and 5, respectively, compared with quintile 1; P-trend = 0.002]. In addition, women with the highest magnesium intakes were more physically active and at increased risk of falls [HR for quintile 4: 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.16); HR for quintile 5: 1.15 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.20); P-trend magnesium intake is associated with lower BMD of the hip and whole body, but this result does not translate into increased risk of fractures. A magnesium consumption slightly greater than the Recommended Dietary Allowance is associated with increased lower-arm and wrist fractures that are possibly related to more physical activity and falls. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611. PMID:24500155

  18. Urethral obstruction after anti-incontinence surgery in women: evaluation, methodology, and surgical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, P; Spyropoulos, E; Lotenfoe, R; Helal, M; Hoffman, M; Lockhart, J L

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate a group of women with voiding dysfunction and a low maximum flow rate (MFR) (less than or equal to 12 mL/s) after surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI); to establish diagnostic parameters indicating obstruction in an attempt to determine treatment selection; and to evaluate preliminary surgical results. Eighteen women who underwent anti-incontinence surgery for SUI were diagnosed as having infravesical obstruction (IO). Thirteen women (group A [72%]) presented with clinically predominant symptoms of urgency, frequency, intermittency, and a variable vesical residual volume (RV), and five (group B [28%]) had as their most significant symptoms a high vesical RV and urinary tract infection that had been managed with intermittent catheterization (IC). The diagnosis of IO, suspected after clinical history, was established after physical examination and cystoscopic, cystographic and urodynamic investigations. Bladder instability was demonstrated in 6 group A patients (46%) and 1 group B patient (20%) (P = NS). Mean MFRs were 8.07 and 7.2 mL/s, respectively, in both groups (P = NS). Mean maximal voiding pressures (MVPs) were 20.23 and 5 cm H20, and mean RVs were 57.46 and 174 mL, respectively; both differences were statistically very significant (P <0.01 and P <0.001, respectively). High to normal MVPs occurred in 2 patients overall (11%). Bladder neck overcorrection, midurethral distortion, and postsurgical cystocele were demonstrated in both groups in 11 (85%), 0, and 2 (15%) patients in group A and 3 (60%), 2 (40%), and 3 (60%) patients in group B, respectively (P = NS). Patients in group A were treated surgically with cystourethrolysis and a repeated, less obstructive anti-incontinence operation. In group B 2 women (40%) had a similar surgical procedure; 1 (20%) underwent isolated urethrolysis; and 2 (40%) are currently maintained with IC. Among these 18 patients with voiding dysfunction after anti-incontinence surgery, a primary diagnosis of IO was

  19. Modelling analysis and prediction of women javelin throw results in the years I946 — 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Grycmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goals of our study of the women's javelin throw were twofold; first, to analyse the dynamics of female javelin throw results variability as a function of time (time period 1946-2014, second, to create a predictive model of the results during the upcoming 4 years. The study material consisted of databases covering the female track and field events obtained from the International Association of Athletics Federations. Prior to predicting the magnitude of results change dynamics in the time to follow, the adjustment of trend function to empirical data was tested using the coefficients of convergence. Phase ll of the investigation consisted of the construction of predictive models. The greatest decreases in result indexes were noted in 2000 (9.4%, 2005-2006 (8.7% and Z009 (7.4%. The trend increase was only noted in the years 2006-2008. In general, until 1998 the mean result improved by 54.6% (100% - results of 1946 whereas from 1999 through 2011 the result only increased by 1.3%. Based on data and results variability analysis it might be presumed that, in the nearest future (2015-2018, results variability will increase by approximately 9.7%. Percent improvement of javelin throw distance calculated on the basis of the 1999 raw input data is 1.4% (end of 2014.

  20. Comparison of Pap smear screening results between Akha hill tribe and urban women in Chiang Rai province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritpetcharat, Onanong; Wutichouy, Wiwat; Sirijaichingkul, Suchat; Kritpetcharat, Panutas

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an important woman's health problems worldwide, especially in low socio-economic countries. The aim of this study was to compare the Pap smear screening results between Akha hill tribe and urban women who live in Chiang Rai province, Thailand. Screening was conducted for 1,100 Akha women and 1,100 urban women who came to have the Pap smear at Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital and 1 private cytology laboratory from January to June 2008. The demographic characteristics and factors related to abnormal Pap smears of these women were gathered using closed model questionnaires. Abnormal Rap smears were defined according to the Bethesda 2001 system. The results showed that the prevalence of abnormal Pap smears was 12.2% in Akha women and 4.5% in urban women. The highest prevalence of Pap abnormalities was found in the 41-50 years age group in both populations (4.5% in Akha and 1.7% in urban women). In both populations, abnormal Pap smears were found in education level. In conclusion, cervical cancer control by education and early detection by Pap smear screening is necessary for hill tribe women. More Pap smear screening service units should be set to improve the coverage for the risk group women who got married in young age, especial in ethnic groups.

  1. Medication adherence, cascade screening, and lifestyle patterns among women with hypercholesterolemia: Results from the WomenHeart survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Gretchen; Witt, Dawn R; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Campbell, Susan M; Sillah, Arthur; Hayes, Sharonne N; Lui, Matt; Gulati, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Women with hypercholesterolemia and familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are a high-risk group often underdiagnosed, undertreated, and unaware of the need for cascade screening. The objectives were to identify the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and FH in 2 national databases, explore lifestyle/medication adherence, and examine rates of cascade screening (lipid testing in all first-degree relatives) among those with FH. This was a cross-sectional study of women who completed an online survey in 2014. Outcomes were examined for 3 groups: diagnosed, probable, and no FH. For FH, multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between family member screening for FH and sociodemographic and/or clinical characteristics. There were 761 respondents with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 59 ± 10.1 years; 26% reported FH, 22% probable FH, and 51% no FH. Eighty-three percent of the total sample and 95% with FH take a statin. In those with hypercholesterolemia and FH, 65% and 58% reported high medication adherence, respectively. Women with probable FH consumed significantly fewer fruits/vegetables and were less active. FH cascade screening was: siblings 54%, parents 37%, and children 34%. Marital status, annual household income, and diabetes were significantly associated with cascade screening. In a survey of informed women with hypercholesterolemia and FH, cascade screening is underused. Our findings warrant increased efforts to identify cascade screening barriers. Early detection and treatment of hypercholesterolemia/FH is a priority for women, and their first-degree relatives, as this may dramatically reduce cardiovascular disease impact. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug use in college students: a 13-year trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Arantes Wagner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze drug use trends among college students in 1996, 2001 and 2009. METHODS: A cross-sectional epidemiological study with a multistage stratified cluster sample with 9,974 college students was conducted in the city of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on drug use assessed in lifetime, the preceding 12 months and the preceding 30 days. The Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons of drug use rates between surveys. RESULTS: There were changes in the lifetime use of tobacco and some other drugs (hallucinogens [6.1% to 8.8%], amphetamines [4.6% to 8.7%], and tranquilizers [5.7% to 8.2%] from 1996 to 2009. Differences in the use of other drugs over the 12 months preceding the survey were also seen: reduced use of inhalants [9.0% to 4.8%] and increased use of amphetamines [2.4% to 4.8%]. There was a reduction in alcohol [72.9% to 62.1%], tobacco [21.3% to 17.2%] and marijuana [15.0% to 11.5%] use and an increase in amphetamine use [1.9% to 3.3%] in the preceeding 30 days. CONCLUSIONS: Over the 13-year study period, there was an increase in lifetime use of tobacco, hallucinogens, amphetamines, and tranquilizers. There was an increase in amphetamine use and a reduction in alcohol use during the preceding 12 months. There was an increase in amphetamine use during the preceding 30 days.

  3. Mid-term Clinical Results and Patient Satisfaction After Uterine Artery Embolization in Women with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeets, Albert J.; Lohle, Paul N. M.; Vervest, Harry A. M.; Boekkooi, P. Focco; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the mid-term clinical results and patient satisfaction following uterine artery embolization (UAE) in women with symptomatic fibroids. Methods. Between August 1998 and December 2002, 135 patients had UAE for symptomatic uterine fibroids. All patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Questions were aimed at changes in bleeding, pain, and bulk-related symptoms. Symptoms after UAE were scored as disappeared, improved, unchanged or worsened. Adverse events were noted, such as vaginal dryness and discharge, menopausal complaints or fibroid expulsion. Patient satisfaction after UAE was assessed. Patient satisfaction of women embolized with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles was compared with satisfaction of women embolized with calibrated microspheres. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 110 of 135 women (81%) at a median time interval of 14 months following UAE. In 10 women additional embolization or hysterectomy had been performed. Of the 110 responders, 86 (78%) were satisfied with the result of UAE. The proportion of satisfied women was higher in the group embolized with calibrated microspheres than in women embolized with PVA, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.053). Conclusion. UAE in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids leads to improvement of symptoms and patient satisfaction is good in the vast majority after a median follow-up period of 14 months

  4. Association of Baseline Depressive Symptoms with Prevalent and Incident Pre-Hypertension and Hypertension in Postmenopausal Hispanic Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Zambrana

    Full Text Available Depression and depressive symptoms are risk factors for hypertension (HTN and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Hispanic women have higher rates of depressive symptoms compared to other racial/ethnic groups yet few studies have investigated its association with incident prehypertension and hypertension among postmenopausal Hispanic women. This study aims to assess if an association exists between baseline depression and incident hypertension at 3 years follow-up among postmenopausal Hispanic women.Prospective cohort study, Women's Health Initiative (WHI, included 4,680 Hispanic women who participated in the observational and clinical trial studies at baseline and at third-year follow-up. Baseline current depressive symptoms and past depression history were measured as well as important correlates of depression-social support, optimism, life events and caregiving. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate prevalent and incident prehypertension and hypertension in relation to depressive symptoms.Prevalence of current baseline depression ranged from 26% to 28% by hypertension category and education moderated these rates. In age-adjusted models, women with depression were more likely to be hypertensive (OR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.04-1.51, although results were attenuated when adjusting for covariates. Depression at baseline in normotensive Hispanic women was associated with incident hypertension at year 3 follow-up (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.10-2.74 after adjustment for insurance and behavioral factors. However, further adjustment for clinical covariates attenuated the association. Analyses of psychosocial variables correlated with depression but did not alter findings. Low rates of antidepressant medication usage were also reported.In the largest longitudinal study to date of older Hispanic women which included physiologic, behavioral and psychosocial moderators of depression, there was no association between baseline depressive symptoms and prevalent nor

  5. Longitudinal changes in sexual functioning as women transition through menopause: results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Nancy E; Brockwell, Sarah; Randolph, John F; Shen, Shunhua; Cain, Virginia S; Ory, Marcia; Greendale, Gail A

    2009-01-01

    Sexual functioning is an important component of women's lives. The extent to which the menopausal transition is associated with decreased sexual functioning remains inconclusive. This study seeks to determine if advancing through the menopausal transition is associated with changes in sexual functioning. This was a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of women aged 42 to 52 years at baseline recruited at seven US sites (N = 3,302) in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Cohort-eligible women had an intact uterus, had at least one ovary, were not currently using exogenous hormones, were either premenopausal or early perimenopausal, and self-identified as one of the study's designated racial/ethnic groups. Data from the baseline interview and six annual follow-up visits are reported. Outcomes are self-reported ratings of importance of sex; frequency of sexual desire, arousal, masturbation, sexual intercourse, and pain during intercourse; and degree of emotional satisfaction and physical pleasure. With adjustment for baseline age, chronological aging, and relevant social, health, and psychological parameters, the odds of reporting vaginal or pelvic pain increased and desire decreased by late perimenopause. Masturbation increased at early perimenopause but declined during postmenopause. The menopausal transition was unrelated to other outcomes. Health, psychological functioning, and importance of sex were related to all sexual function outcomes. Age, race/ethnicity, marital status, change in relationship, and vaginal dryness were also associated with sexual functioning. Pain during sexual intercourse increases and sexual desire decreases over the menopausal transition. Masturbation increases during the early transition, but then declines in postmenopause. With adjustment for other factors, the menopausal transition was not independently associated with reports of the importance of sex, sexual arousal, frequency of sexual intercourse, emotional

  6. Drug use and nightlife: more than just dance music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broekaert Eric

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research over the last decade has focused almost exclusively on the association between electronic music and MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine or "ecstasy" or other stimulant drug use in clubs. Less attention has been given to other nightlife venues and music preferences, such as rock music or southern/funky music. This study aims to examine a broader spectrum of nightlife, beyond dance music. It looks at whether certain factors influence the frequency of illegal drug and alcohol use: the frequency of going to certain nightlife venues in the previous month (such as, pubs, clubs or goa parties; listening to rock music, dance music or southern and funky music; or sampling venues (such as, clubs, dance events or rock festivals. The question of how these nightlife variables influence the use of popular drugs like alcohol, MDMA, cannabis, cocaine and amphetamines is addressed. Methods The study sample consisted of 775 visitors of dance events, clubs and rock festivals in Belgium. Study participants answered a survey on patterns of going out, music preferences and drug use. Odds ratios were used to determine whether the odds of being an illegal substance user are higher for certain nightlife-related variables. Furthermore, five separate ordinal regression analyses were used to investigate drug use in relation to music preference, venues visited during the last month and sampling venue. Results Respondents who used illegal drugs were 2.5 times more likely to report that they prefer dance music. Goa party visitors were nearly 5 times more likely to use illegal drugs. For those who reported visiting clubs, the odds of using illegal drugs were nearly 2 times higher. Having gone to a pub in the last month was associated with both more frequent alcohol use and more frequent illegal substance use. People who reported liking rock music and attendees of rock festivals used drugs less frequently. Conclusions It was concluded that a

  7. Alcohol and Drug Use of Faculty in an Urban University Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Results of a survey of academic faculty in a large urban university indicate that drug use does not appear to differ compared with the general population. Faculty use slightly more alcohol and marijuana. (Author)

  8. Concurrent sexual partnerships among African American women in Philadelphia: results from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Amy; Dickman, Samuel; Cornwall, Alexandra; Kwakwa, Helena; Mayer, Kenneth H; Rana, Aadia; Rosengard, Cynthia

    2012-07-01

    African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Concurrent sexual partnerships may contribute to racial disparities in HIV infection. Little is known about attitudes and practices related to concurrency among African American women, or the social, structural and behavioural factors influencing concurrency. We recruited 19 heterosexual African American women engaging in concurrent sexual partnerships from a public clinic in Philadelphia in 2009. We conducted interviews exploring social norms, attitudes and practices about concurrency, and the structural, social and behavioural factors influencing concurrent sexual partnerships, guided by grounded theory. Seventeen women reported one main and one or more non-main partners; two reported no main partners. Many women used condoms more frequently with non-main than main partners, noting they trust main partners more than non-main partners. Social factors included social normalisation of concurrency, inability to negotiate partners' concurrent partnerships, being unmarried, and not trusting partners. Lack of trust was the most commonly cited reason that women engaged in concurrent partnerships. Structural factors included economic dependence on partners, partners' dependence on women for economic support and incarceration that interrupted partnerships. Behavioural factors included alcohol and cocaine use. Social, structural and behavioural factors strongly influenced these African American women's concurrent sexual partnerships. Many HIV interventions disseminated by the CDC focus largely on behavioural factors and may fail to address the social and structural factors influencing African American women's sexual networks. Novel HIV prevention interventions that address the social determinants of African American women's HIV risks are urgently needed.

  9. Prevalent and Incident Vertebral Deformities in Midlife Women: Results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A Greendale

    Full Text Available Vertebral fractures are the most common type of osteoporotic fracture among women, but estimates of their prevalence and incidence during middle-age are limited. The development of vertebral morphometry (VM using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA makes it more feasible to measure VM in large, longitudinal, observational studies. We conducted this study to: 1 contribute to the scant knowledge of the prevalence, incidence and risk factors for vertebral deformities in middle-aged women; and 2 to evaluate the performance of DXA-based VM measurement in a large, community based sample.The sample is derived from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN, a multi-site, community-based, longitudinal cohort study of the MT. Using Hologic QDR 4500A instruments, we acquired initial VM measurements in 1446 women during calendar years 2004-2007; in 2012-2013, a follow-up VM was obtained in 1108. Annually, lumbar spine (LS and femoral neck (FN bone mineral density (BMD were measured and participant characteristics were assessed with standardized instruments. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the relations between prevalent deformity and relevant characteristics. Analyses of characteristics associated with prevalent deformity were restricted to 824 women who had not taken bone active medications since SWAN baseline. We calculated incident deformity per person year (PY of observation, standardized to 1000 person-years.The cranial portion of the VM image yielded the lowest proportions of readable vertebrae: from T4 through T6, between 43% and 63% of vertebral bodies were evaluable. Greater BMI was associated with fewer readable levels (B = -0.088, p<0.0001. In the baseline sample of 1446 women, the prevalence of vertebral deformity was 3.2% (95% CI: 2.3, 4.1. The relative odds of deformity increased by 61% per SD decrement in baseline LS BMD (p = 0.02 and were 67% greater per SD decrement in baseline FN BMD (p = 0.04. Odds of

  10. Is the practice of yoga or meditation associated with a healthy lifestyle? Results of a national cross-sectional survey of 28,695 Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Sibbritt, David; Park, Crystal L; Adams, Jon; Lauche, Romy

    2017-10-01

    To examine the relationship between yoga/meditation practice and health behavior in Australian women. Women aged 19-25years, 31-36years, and 62-67years from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) were surveyed regarding smoking, alcohol or drug use, physical activity and dietary behavior; and whether they practiced yoga/meditation on a regular basis. Associations of health behaviors with yoga/meditation practice were analyzed using multiple logistic regression modelling. 11,344, 8200, and 9151 women aged 19-25years, 31-36years, and 62-67years, respectively, were included of which 29.0%, 21.7%, and 20.7%, respectively, practiced yoga/meditation. Women practicing yoga/meditation were significantly more likely to report at least moderate physical activity levels (OR=1.50-2.79), to follow a vegetarian (OR=1.67-3.22) or vegan (OR=2.26-3.68) diet, and to report the use of marijuana (OR=1.28-1.89) and illicit drugs in the last 12 months (OR=1.23-1.98). Yoga/meditation practice was associated with higher physical activity levels, a higher likelihood of vegetarian or vegan diet use, and a higher likelihood of drug use. While health professionals should keep the potential vulnerability of yoga/meditation practitioners to drug use in mind, the positive associations of yoga/meditation with a variety of positive health behaviors warrant its consideration in preventive medicine and healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rubella susceptibility in pregnant women and results of a postpartum immunization strategy in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilajeliu, Alba; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Valencia, Salomé; Barreales, Saul; Oliveras, Laura; Calvente, Valentín; Goncé, Anna; Bayas, José M

    2015-04-08

    Elimination of congenital rubella syndrome depends not only on effective childhood immunization but also on the identification and immunization of rubella susceptible women. We assessed rubella susceptibility among pregnant women and evaluated the adherence and response to postpartum immunization with measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Cross-sectional study of women who gave birth at the Hospital Clinic de Barcelona (Spain) between January 2008 and December 2013. Antenatal serological screening for rubella was performed in all women during pregnancy. In rubella-susceptible women, two doses of MMR vaccine were recommended following birth. We evaluated rubella serological response to MMR vaccination in mothers who complied with the recommendations. A total of 22,681 pregnant women were included in the study. The mean age was 32.3 years (SD 5.6), and 73.6% were primipara. The proportion of immigrants ranged from 43.4% in 2010 to 38.5% in 2012. The proportion of women susceptible to rubella was 5.9% (1328). Susceptibility to rubella declined with increasing maternal age. Immigrant pregnant women were more susceptible to rubella (7.6%) than women born in Spain (4.6%). Multivariate analyses showed that younger age (≤19 years) aOR 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.5), primiparas aOR 1.3 (95% CI 1.1-1.5) and immigrant women aOR 1.6 (95% CI 1.4-1.8) were more likely to be susceptible. The second dose of MMR vaccine was received by 57.2% (718/1256) of rubella-susceptible women, with the highest proportion being immigrant women compared with women born in Spain. After vaccination, all women showed rubella immunity. The higher rubella susceptibility found in the three youngest age groups and in immigrant women highlights the relevance of antenatal screening, in order to ensure identification and postpartum immunization. The postpartum immunization strategy is an opportunity to protect women of childbearing age and consequently prevent occurrence of CRS, and to increase vaccination

  12. Obstacles in Advancement of Young Female Geoscientists: Research Results from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M.; Laursen, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    While the number of women receiving advanced degrees in the geosciences has been rising, the faces of scientific leaders in academia remain dominantly male. Women are currently underrepresented in tenure-track positions in Earth science departments at research universities. Additionally, women are less likely to have more senior positions within their academic institutions. ESWN is a peer-mentoring network of early career women in the Earth sciences. We conducted a survey of ESWN members as part of an evaluation-with-research study that aims to determine the career needs of young female geoscientists. We also conducted a survey of the co-ed Earth Science Jobs list also run by ESWN and used its male and female members as comparison samples. The survey data provide insight into critical career junctures for women in geosciences and identify salient issues that institutions will need to address to successfully recruit, retain and promote women scientists. Prior research has shown that women are subjected to unintended and unrecognized biases that can have an ultimate impact on their productivity, advancement, and success. Our data corroborate these findings: women consistently rated the professional atmosphere in their departments and their interactions with colleagues less favorably than men. Moreover, women indicated lower rates of collaboration with colleagues in their unit compared to their male peers. Possibly due to this discrepancy in collaboration, women also reported lower research productivity than men in our study. Attaining work/life balance is a particular concern to early-career scientists, especially since tenure clock and the biological clock can coincide and reduce the opportunity for women to achieve tenure and have children. Family issues may impact the success of women in academic careers, such as travel to meetings and field work. Our research shows that women's partners more often worked in STEM fields, potentially complicating women's careers by

  13. Predictors of drug use in prison among incarcerated Black men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Tawandra L; Wu, Elwin; Hart, Carl L; Haile, Rahwa; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2012-11-01

    Black men currently comprise a substantial percentage of prisoners in the United States. Drug dependence is common among prison populations, and US prisons are high-risk environments for drug use. Prison drug use exacerbates health problems disproportionately prevalent among Black men and prisoners. The goal of this research was to examine predictors of prison drug use among incarcerated Black men. This study examined drug use within the prison environment in a random sample of 134 Black men incarcerated in maximum-security correctional institution. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) was used to measure illicit drug use history and the extent to which drug use occurred within the prison environment. Seventy-five percent of the participants reported a history of illicit drug use. Overall, 20% (n 25) of the participants, or 25% of those with a history of drug use, reported using drugs during a time frame consistent with incarceration. Participants with lengthier histories of drug use (OR: 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2) and those who were incarcerated longer (OR: 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2) were more likely to use drugs in prison. Drug use in prison was associated with history of injection drug use and with probation/parole status when arrested. Prisoners are engaging in illicit drug use while incarcerated, suggesting that they could benefit from harm reduction and drug treatment services offered during incarceration. Drug treatment programs that address long-standing addictions and coping mechanisms for lengthy prison stays, specifically, would be especially useful for this population.

  14. Type-specific HPV and Pap test results among low-income, underserved women: providing insights into management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiya, Mona; Benard, Vicki B; Greek, April A; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Massad, L Stewart; Sawaya, George F; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-10-01

    The primary cervical cancer screening strategy for women over age 30 is high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing combined with Papanicolaou (Pap) testing (cotesting) every 5 years. This combination strategy is a preventive service that is required by the Affordable Care Act to be covered with no cost-sharing by most health insurance plans. The cotesting recommendation was made based entirely on prospective data from an insured population that may have a lower proportion of women with HPV positive and Pap negative results (ie, discordant results). The discordant group represents a very difficult group to manage. If the frequency of discordant results among underserved women is higher, health care providers may perceive the cotesting strategy to be a less favorable screening strategy than traditional Pap testing every 3 years. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Cervical Cancer Study was conducted at 15 clinics in 6 federally qualified health centers across Illinois. Providers at these clinics were given the option of cotesting for routine cervical cancer screening. Type-specific HPV detection was performed on residual extracts using linear array. Pap test results were abnormal in 6.0% and HPV was positive in 7.2% of the underserved women screened in this study (mean age, 45.1 years). HPV prevalence decreased with age, from 10.3% among 30- to 39-year-olds to 4.5% among 50- to 60-year-olds. About 5% of the women had a combination of a positive HPV test and normal Pap test results; HPV 16/18 was identified in 14% of discordant women. The rate of discordant results among underserved women was similar to those reported throughout the US in a variety of populations. Typing for HPV 16/18 appears to assist in the management in a small proportion of women with discordant results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Homeless women and hazardous drinking: screening results in a primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Carole C; Weinreb, Linda; Bharel, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Screening for alcohol use in primary care is underutilized, especially for women. The current study implemented systematic women's alcohol use screening in a health care for the homeless primary care program. All women (n=541) seeking care over 12 months were screened. Of the 541 screening forms returned, 80 women refused to answer the alcohol use questions. Of 461 completed screens, over 40% reported no alcohol use, while 43.8% reported hazardous drinking. Hazardous drinking was significantly associated with younger age, African American race, and living on the street or in a shelter. High rates of drinking were identified among women in different housing situations and use of systematic screening was beneficial to providers. Health care settings are important sites to identify hazardous drinking as well as alcohol disorders among women with unstable housing histories. The growing integration of behavioral health care into primary care, and the medical home concept, both provide opportunities for brief interventions for at-risk drinkers, as well as treatment options for those with alcohol use disorders that may be particularly appealing to women. Findings support further investigation of the relationship of housing stability to drinking, and suggest African American women may need special attention. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  16. Prerequsite result of routine human immunodeficiency virus serology among infertile women before assisted reproduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osemwenkha, Abieyuwa Patricia; Ibadin, Kennedy Osegua; Akotha, Egodi Eugenia; Ibeh, Isaiah Ndubuisi

    2011-04-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which causes or induces incurable fatal infections have been transmitted through Assisted Reproduction Technology and from infected mothers to the fetus or new born. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of this chronic viral agent among infertile women recruited for Assisted Reproduction Technique programme in Benin City, Nigeria. Sera (serum) from Five hundred and Ninety infertile women attending Human Reproduction Research Programme/In-vitro fertilization Center at University of Benin Teaching Hospital were screened for the presence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus antibody using three algorithm or techniques of Determine, Unigold and Stat Pack kits. The age range of the infertile women was 20-49 years. 28 (4.7%) out of Five Hundred and fifty infertile women recruited for Assisted Reproduction Technique and screened for Human Immunodeficiency Virus antibody were seropositive with increase in prevalence of 10. 0%, 8.5% and 7.5% among infertile women in age groups of (20 - 24), (25 - 29)yrs and (30 - 34)yrs. Chi-square statistical analysis of data shows insignificance in seroprevalence rate in relation to the number of infertile women screened (P > 0.0001) but the screening of these infertile women for the presence Human Immunodeficiency Virus should continue due to the attendant effects. Infertile women who are Human Immunodeficiency Virus carriers give a new dimension to assisted reproductive techniques. This will no doubt help to prevent further spread and adverse pregnancy outcome.

  17. Women's Sport Leadership Styles as the Result of Interaction between Feminine and Masculine Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sue; Light, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing body of research focusing on women in the business sector using a transformational model of leadership that identifies the ways in which they lead yet little is known about the style of leadership women practise in sport. In attempting to redress this oversight in the literature, this article draws on data from a larger study to…

  18. Violence against women in Yemen: official statistics and results from an exploratory victim survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ba-Obeid, M.; Bijleveld, C.C.J.H.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents official statistics on violence against women in Yemen, as a threshold indicator of victimization incidence. Next, we present the findings from an exploratory survey into the prevalence of violent victimisation among a stratified sample of 120 women in Sana' a. We distinguish

  19. The association between dietary inflammatory index and risk of colorectal cancer among postmenopausal women: results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabung, Fred K; Steck, Susan E; Ma, Yunsheng; Liese, Angela D; Zhang, Jiajia; Caan, Bette; Hou, Lifang; Johnson, Karen C; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Shivappa, Nitin; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ockene, Judith K; Hebert, James R

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a process central to carcinogenesis and in particular to colorectal cancer (CRC). Previously, we developed a dietary inflammatory index (DII) from extensive literature review to assess the inflammatory potential of diet. In the current study, we utilized this novel index in the Women's Health Initiative to prospectively evaluate its association with risk of CRC in postmenopausal women. The DII was calculated from baseline food frequency questionnaires administered to 152,536 women aged 50-79 years without CRC at baseline between 1993 and 1998 and followed through 30 September 2010. Incident CRC cases were ascertained through a central physician adjudication process. Multiple covariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) for colorectal, colon (proximal/distal locations), and rectal cancer risk, by DII quintiles (Q). During an average 11.3 years of follow-up, a total of 1,920 cases of CRC (1,559 colon and 361 rectal) were identified. Higher DII scores (representing a more pro-inflammatory diet) were associated with an increased incidence of CRC (HRQ5-Q1 1.22; 95 % CI 1.05, 1.43; p trend = 0.02) and colon cancer, specifically proximal colon cancer (HRQ5-Q1 1.35; 95 % CI 1.05, 1.67; p trend = 0.01) but not distal colon cancer (HRQ5-Q1 0.84; 95 % CI 0.61, 1.18; p trend = 0.63) or rectal cancer (HRQ5-Q1 1.20; 95 % CI 0.84, 1.72; p trend = 0.65). Consumption of pro-inflammatory diets is associated with an increased risk of CRC, especially cancers located in the proximal colon. The absence of a significant association for distal colon cancer and rectal cancer may be due to the small number of incident cases for these sites. Interventions that may reduce the inflammatory potential of the diet are warranted to test our findings, thus providing more information for colon cancer prevention.

  20. Alcohol Use and Transactional Sex among Women in South Africa: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Sarah; Christofides, Nicola; Johnson, Saul; Weiner, Renay

    2015-01-01

    Transactional sex is a risk factor for HIV infection. Alcohol use may increase the risk of transactional sex. No nationally-representative studies have examined the relationship between multiple dimensions of alcohol use and transactional sex in women in South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between alcohol dependence, binge drinking and frequency of drinking in the past month and transactional sex in adult women in South Africa. A cross-sectional study using multi-stage, cluster sampling collected data from a nationally representative sample of 5,969 women aged 16-55 years in 2012. The analysis conducted for this paper was restricted to women reporting sexual activity in the past 12 months (n = 3,594). Transactional sex was defined as having received money/gifts in exchange for sex with any sex partner in the past year. Alcohol use measures included: alcohol dependence (≥2 positive responses to the CAGE questionnaire); binge drinking (≥4 drinks for women on one occasion); and drinking frequency in the previous month. Logistic regression models were built to test the hypotheses that each dimension of alcohol use was associated with transactional sex. About 6.3% (n = 225) of sexually active women reported transactional sex. Almost a third (30.6%) of sexually active women had ever drunk alcohol, and 19.2% were current (past month) drinkers. Among lifetime drinkers, 28.0% were alcohol dependent and 56.6% were binge drinkers. Alcohol dependent women were twice as likely to report transactional sex (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-4.3, ptransactional sex (95% CI 1.5-6.6, ptransactional sex. Alcohol dependency and binge drinking are significantly associated with transactional sex in South African women. HIV prevention programmes need to target these women, and address both their alcohol use, as well as the HIV risks associated with transactional sex.

  1. Qigong improves quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhiqiang; Milbury, Kathrin; Bei, Wenying; Zhang, Ying; Thornton, Bob; Liao, Zhongxing; Wei, Qi; Chen, Jiayi; Guo, Xiaoma; Liu, Luming; McQuade, Jennifer; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2013-05-01

    Radiotherapy may lead to side effects that undermine patients' quality of life (QOL). Although mind-body practices like qigong appear to improve QOL in cancer survivors, little is known about their benefits for patients who are receiving radiotherapy. Thus, in the current randomized controlled trial, the authors examined the efficacy of a qigong intervention on QOL in women with breast cancer during and after treatment. Ninety-six women with breast cancer were recruited from a cancer center in Shanghai, China, and were randomized to a qigong group (N = 49) or a waitlist control group (N = 47). Women in the qigong group attended 5 weekly classes over 5 or 6 weeks of radiotherapy. QOL outcomes (ie, depressive symptoms, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and overall QOL) and cortisol slopes were assessed at baseline, during treatment, at the end of treatment, 1 month later, and 3 months later. The mean age of the women was 46 years (range, 25-64 years). Seven percent of women had stage 0 disease, 25% had stage I disease, 40% had stage II disease, and 28% had stage III disease. Fifty-four percent of women underwent mastectomy. Multilevel analyses revealed that women in the qigong group reported less depressive symptoms over time than women in the control group (P = .05). Women who had elevated depressive symptoms at the start of radiotherapy reported less fatigue (P qigong group compared with the control group, and these findings were clinically significant. No significant differences were observed for sleep disturbance or cortisol slopes. The current results indicated that qigong may have therapeutic effects in the management of QOL among women who are receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer. Benefits were particularly evident for patients who had preintervention elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  2. Do the Drugs Used to Treat Rheumatic Disorders Induce Bone Fragility? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Súsanna við Streym; Vestergaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic disorders are linked to immuno-logical processes in the body; therefore, drugs used to treat these disorders may interfere with the immune system. The immune system shares several signaling mechanisms with bone cells, both directly via cytokines and prostaglandins, and indirectly via...... vitamin D, which is also an active immunological substance. As a result, drugs used to modulate the immune response may interfere with bone mineral density (BMD), bone biomechanical competence, and the risk of fractures [1–3]....

  3. Pesticide exposure among pregnant women in Jerusalem, Israel: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Tamar; Hochner-Celnikier, Drorit; Barr, Dana Boyd; Needham, Larry L; Amitai, Yona; Wormser, Uri; Richter, Elihu

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides have been shown to disrupt neurodevelopment in laboratory animals and in human populations. To date, there have been no studies on exposure to pesticides in pregnant women in Israel, despite reports of widespread exposure in other populations of pregnant women and the importance of evaluating exposure in this susceptible sub-population. We measured urinary concentrations of organophosphorus (OP) insecticide metabolites and plasma concentrations of OP and other pesticides in 20 pregnant women, recruited in Jerusalem, Israel in 2006, and collected questionnaire data on demographic factors and consumer habits from these women. We compared geometric mean concentrations in subgroups using the Mann-Whitney U-test for independent samples. We compared creatinine-adjusted OP pesticide metabolite concentrations, as well as plasma pesticide concentrations, with other populations of pregnant women. Creatinine-adjusted total dimethyl (DM) metabolite concentrations were between 4 and 6 times higher in this population compared to other populations of pregnant women in the United States while total diethyl (DE) metabolite concentrations were lower. Dimethylphosphate (DMP) was detected in 74% of the urine samples whereas dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP) was detected in 90% of the urine samples. The carbamate bendiocarb was detected in 89% of the plasma samples, while the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos was detected in 42% of the samples. Mean plasma concentrations of bendiocarb and chlorpyrifos in our sample were 4.4 and 3.9 times higher, respectively, than that of an urban minority cohort from New York City. Twelve women (63%) reported using some form of household pest control during their pregnancy and five (26%) reported using household pest control during the past month. Women with a graduate degree had significantly higher geometric mean concentrations of total urinary DM metabolite concentrations compared to other women (P=0.006). Finally, one woman in the study had

  4. Enrolling Underserved Women in mHealth Programs: Results From Text4baby Outreach Campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushar, Jessica A; Fishman, Jodie; Garfinkel, Danielle; Pirretti, Amy

    2018-03-01

    Public health practitioners have increasingly leveraged technology-based communication to get health information into the hands of hard-to-reach populations; however, best practices for outreach and enrollment into mobile health (mHealth) programs are lacking. This article describes enrollment results from campaigns focused on enrolling underserved pregnant women and mothers in Text4baby-a free, mHealth service-to inform outreach strategies for mHealth programs. Text4baby participants receive health and safety information, interactive surveys, alerts, and appointment reminders through at least three weekly texts and a free app-timed to users' due date or babies' birth date. Text4baby worked with partners to implement national, state, and community-based enrollment campaigns. Descriptive statistics were used to compare baseline enrollment prior to a campaign with enrollment during a campaign to generate enrollment estimates. Enrollment rates were calculated for campaigns for which the number targeted/reached was available. National television campaigns resulted in more than 10,000 estimated enrollments. Campaigns that were integrated with an existing program and text-based recruitment had the highest enrollment rates, ranging from 7% to 24%. Facebook advertisements and traditional media targeting providers and consumers were least effective. mHealth programs should consider text-based recruitment and outreach via existing programs; additional research is needed on return on investment for different outreach strategies and on the effectiveness of different outreach strategies at reaching and enrolling specific target populations.

  5. Schistosomiasis: Drugs used and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Lidiany da Paixão; Fontes, Danilo Augusto Ferreira; Aguilera, Cindy Siqueira Britto; Timóteo, Taysa Renata Ribeiro; Ângelos, Matheus Alves; Silva, Laysa Creusa Paes Barreto Barros; de Melo, Camila Gomes; Rolim, Larissa Araújo; da Silva, Rosali Maria Ferreira; Neto, Pedro José Rolim

    2017-12-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) affect millions of people in different geographic regions, especially the poorest and most vulnerable. Currently NTDs are prevalent in 149 countries, seventeen of these neglected tropical parasitic diseases are classified as endemic. One of the most important of these diseases is schistosomiasis, also known as bilharzia, a disease caused by the genus Schistosoma. It presents several species, such as Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mansoni, the latter being responsible for parasitosis in Brazil. Contamination occurs through exposure to contaminated water in the endemic region. This parasitosis is characterized by being initially asymptomatic, but it is able to evolve into more severe clinical forms, potentially causing death. Globally, more than 200 million people are infected with one of three Schistosome species, including an estimated 40 million women of reproductive age. In Brazil, about 12 million children require preventive chemotherapy with anthelmintic. However, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), only about 15% of the at-risk children receive regular treatment. The lack of investment by the pharmaceutical industry for the development and/or improvement of new pharmaceutical forms, mainly aimed at the pediatric public, is a great challenge. Currently, the main forms of treatment used for schistosomiasis are praziquantel (PZQ) and oxaminiquine (OXA). PZQ is the drug of choice because it presents as a high-spectrum anthelmintic, used in the treatment of all known species of schistosomiasis and some species of cestodes and trematodes. OXA, however, is not active against the three Schistosome species. This work presents a literature review regarding schistosomiasis. It addresses points such as available treatments, the role of the pharmaceutical industry against neglected diseases, and perspectives for treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Illicit drug use in late pregnancy associated with stillbirth and eclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Katherine; Fagermo, Narelle; Callaway, Leonie; Lust, Karin

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 20-year-old student with an undiagnosed pregnancy who had taken ecstasy and LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide). Twenty-four hours later she delivered a stillborn term infant, and subsequently developed eclampsia with seizures, hypertension and proteinuria. Illicit drug use is relatively common in women of child-bearing age in Australia, and is a risk factor for adverse obstetric outcomes. Ecstasy (MDMA [3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine]) is a sympathomimetic amine, sim...

  7. Mudando o foco: um estudo exploratório sobre uso de drogas e violência no trabalho entre mulheres das classes populares da cidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Cambiando el foco: un estudio exploratorio acerca del uso de drogas y violência en el trabalho de mujeres de las classes populares de Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Changing the focus: an exploratory study of drug use and worplace violence among women of popular classes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Maria Scherlowski Leal David

    2005-12-01

    .This exploratory study aimed to investigate factors related to the use of illicit and licit drugs and workplace violence in a group of women from popular classes in the city of Rio de Janeiro. We used a descriptive and analytic quantitative approach was used, as well as a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with women who suffered or were suffering workplace violence, using the collective subject discourse analysis methodology. The results showed sociodemographic and work situations that can be considered as possible risk factors for drug consumption and workplace violence. The qualitative analysis shows how this group perceives the phenomena of drug use and workplace violence, expanding the comprehension about these issues and providing conceptual and methodological elements for additional studies on this subject.

  8. The Association between Non-Medical Prescription Drug Use and Suicidal Behavior among United States Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Divin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence represents a vulnerable time for the development of both drug use/abuse and mental illness. Although previous research has substantiated a relationship between drug use and suicidal behavior, little research has examined this relationship with non-medical prescription drug use. Given the growing prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use (NMPDU among adolescents, this study explored the association between NMPDU and suicidal behavior. Nationally representative data were derived from 16, 410 adolescents who completed the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Approximately 19.8% of participants reported lifetime NMPDU. NMPDU was associated with significantly increased odds of suicidal behavior (P < 0.01, with seriously considering attempting suicide and making a plan about attempting suicide representing the strongest correlates for males and females. Results suggest the importance of 1 continued reinforcement of drug education programs in high school begun at earlier ages and 2 mental health care and screenings among adolescents.

  9. [Perceived norms among university students about their peers and drug use at a Chilean university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Castillo, Julia; Cunningham, John; Brands, Bruna; Strike, Carol; Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between perceived norms about drug use among peers and actual use among university students. This is a qualitative, multicenter study involving sophomore and junior students of the health courses of a Chilean university. Participants were 286 (75.2%) of the total 380 university students. more than 50% of the students notice that their peers smoke cigarettes on a daily basis, drink alcohol three times a week, and use marijuana once a week and cocaine at least once a year. The university campus it place of highest drug use; cocaine is used at a friend's house. Among students, 68% have smoked once in their life, 57% smoke on a daily basis; 88% have had alcohol once in their life; 26% used marijuana once in their life, 16% used marijuana over the last 12 months. Students do not know about any university policies for drug use. Some results confirm that drug use is underestimated.

  10. Relationship between student illicit drug use and school drug-testing policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryoko; Johnston, Lloyd D; O'Malley, Patrick M

    2003-04-01

    This report provides information about drug testing by American secondary schools, based on results from national surveys. The study provides descriptive information on drug-testing practices by schools from 1998 to 2001, and examines the association between drug testing by schools and reported drug use by students. School-level data on drug testing were obtained through the Youth, Education, and Society study, and student-level survey data were obtained from the same schools participating in the Monitoring the Future study. A relatively small percentage of schools (about 18%) reported testing students for drug use, with more high schools than middle schools reporting drug testing. Drug testing was not associated with students' reported illicit drug use, or with rate of use among experienced marijuana users. Drug testing of athletes was not associated with illicit drug use among male high school athletes. Policy implications are discussed.

  11. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Age at Initiation of Injection Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ompad, Danielle C.; Ikeda, Robin M.; Shah, Nina; Fuller, Crystal M.; Bailey, Susan; Morse, Edward; Kerndt, Peter; Maslow, Carey; Wu, Yingfeng; Vlahov, David; Garfein, Richard; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the relation between childhood sexual abuse and injection drug use initiation among young adult injection drug users. Methods. We used mixed effect linear models to compare age at first injection among 2143 young injection drug users by first sexual abuse age categories. Results. The participants were predominantly male (63.3%) and White (52.8%). Mean age and age at first injection were 23.7 and 19.6 years, respectively; 307 participants (14.3%) reported childhood sexual abuse. After adjustment for gender, race/ethnicity, noninjection drug use before first injection drug use, and recruitment site, childhood sexual abuse was independently associated with younger age at first injection. Conclusions. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with earlier initiation of injection drug use. These data emphasize the need to integrate substance abuse prevention with postvictimization services for children and adolescents. PMID:15798133

  12. Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2013: Overview, Key Findings on Adolescent Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Miech, Richard A.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the Future (MTF) is a long-term study of American adolescents, college students, and adults through age 55. It has been conducted annually by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research since its inception in 1975 and is supported under a series of investigator-initiated, competing research grants from the National…

  13. Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2014: Overview, Key Findings on Adolescent Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Miech, Richard A.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the Future (MTF) is a long-term study of American adolescents, college students, and adult high school graduates through age 55. It has been conducted annually by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research since its inception in 1975 and is supported under a series of investigator-initiated, competing research grants…

  14. IMPRISONMENT AS A RESULT OF WOMEN SUBORDINATION 194 REFLECTED IN MAYA ANGELOU‘S POEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatikha Amalina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to describe the imprisonment of African American people, especially women, in the case of patriarchy and women subordination through Maya Angelou‘s selected poems entitled ―Caged Bird‖, ―Still I Rise‖ and ―Woman Work‖. This research discusses the meaning behind the poems that reflected Maya Angelou‘s life experience relating to women subordination and freedom. Feminism approach is applied to analyze the concept of freedom in women subordination and patriarchy in this research. The paper points to how the concept of gender intertwines with labor, ethnics, kinship and gender domination. Without aiming to paint a detailed picture of feminism, the paper explores how ideas developed in these inquiries question the taken-for-granted assumption about the universality of women‘s subordination and challenge the emancipation prerequisite of feminist agenda.

  15. Informal Care and Inter-vivos Transfers: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Edward C; Nicholas, Lauren H; Huang, Sean Sheng-Hsiu

    2013-05-01

    Informal care is the largest source of long-term care for elderly, surpassing home health care and nursing home care. By definition, informal care is unpaid. It remains a puzzle why so many adult children give freely of their time. Transfers of time to the older generation may be balanced by financial transfers going to the younger generation. This leads to the question of whether informal care and inter-vivos transfers are causally related. We analyze data from the 1999 and 2003 waves of National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. We examine whether the elderly parents give more inter-vivos monetary transfers to adult children who provide informal care, by examining both the extensive and intensive margins of financial transfers and of informal care. We find statistically significant results that a child who provides informal care is more likely to receive inter-vivos transfers than a sibling who does not. If a child does provide care, there is no statistically significant effect on the amount of the transfer.

  16. 20 CFR 638.511 - Drug use and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug use and abuse. 638.511 Section 638.511... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.511 Drug use and abuse. The Job... and education programs related to drug and alcohol use and abuse. ...

  17. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  18. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use in Rural Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Ted L.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the extent of illegal drug use among 2,060 junior and senior high school students in rural Georgia, and found extensive illegal drug use, especially among older White male students. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists, Orlando, Florida, February 1982. (JAC)

  19. Patterns of antiepileptic drug use and seizure control among people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method We assessed the patterns of antiepileptic drug use and seizure control among persons living with epilepsy in a suburban community in Southeast Nigeria found in a two phase cross-sectional study. Detailed information on epilepsy treatment, seizure control and patterns of antiepileptic drug use (AED) by those ...

  20. Alcohol Use and Transactional Sex among Women in South Africa: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Magni, Sarah; Christofides, Nicola; Johnson, Saul; Weiner, Renay

    2015-01-01

    Background Transactional sex is a risk factor for HIV infection. Alcohol use may increase the risk of transactional sex. No nationally-representative studies have examined the relationship between multiple dimensions of alcohol use and transactional sex in women in South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between alcohol dependence, binge drinking and frequency of drinking in the past month and transactional sex in adult women in South Africa. Methods A cross-section...

  1. Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration among Women in Kuwait: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dashti, Manal; Scott, Jane A.; Edwards, Christine A.; Al-Sughayer, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% o...

  2. Women's Experience with Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing and Emotional Well-being and Satisfaction after Test-Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schendel, Rachèl V; Page-Christiaens, G C M Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Caterina M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H W; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2017-12-01

    Increasingly, high-risk pregnant women opt for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) instead of invasive diagnostic testing. Since NIPT is less accurate than invasive testing, a normal NIPT result might leave women less reassured. A questionnaire study was performed among pregnant women with elevated risk for fetal aneuploidy based on first-trimester combined test (risk ≥1:200) or medical history, who were offered NIPT in the nationwide Dutch TRIDENT study. Pre- and post-test questionnaires (n = 682) included measures on: experiences with NIPT procedure, feelings of reassurance, anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI), child-related anxiety (PRAQ-R), and satisfaction. The majority (96.1%) were glad to have been offered NIPT. Most (68.5%) perceived the waiting time for NIPT results (mean: 15 days, range 5-32) as (much) too long. Most women with a normal NIPT result felt reassured (80.9%) or somewhat reassured (15.7%). Levels of anxiety and child-related anxiety were significantly lower after receiving a normal NIPT result as compared to the moment of intake (p < 0.001). Women with inadequate health literacy or a medical history (e.g. previous child with trisomy) experienced significantly higher post-test-result anxiety (Mean (M) STAI = 31.6 and 30.0, respectively) compared to those with adequate health literacy (M = 28.6) and no medical history (M = 28.6), indicating these women might benefit from extra information and/or guidance when communicating NIPT test-results. Introducing NIPT as an alternative to invasive testing, led to an offer that satisfied and largely reassured high-risk pregnant women.

  3. Prevalence of drug and alcohol use in urban Afghanistan: epidemiological data from the Afghanistan National Urban Drug Use Study (ANUDUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottler, Linda B; Ajinkya, Shaun; Goldberger, Bruce A; Ghani, Mohammad Asrar; Martin, David M; Hu, Hui; Gold, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Previous attempts to assess the prevalence of drug use in Afghanistan have focused on subgroups that are not generalisable. In the Afghanistan National Urban Drug Use Study, we assessed risk factors and drug use in Afghanistan through self-report questionnaires that we validated with laboratory test confirmation using analysis of hair, urine, and saliva. The study took place between July 13, 2010, to April 25, 2012, in 11 Afghan provinces. 2187 randomly selected households completed a survey, representing 19 025 household members. We completed surveys with the female head of the household about past and current drug use among members of their household. We also obtained hair, urine, and saliva samples from 5236 people in these households and tested them for metabolites of 13 drugs. Of 2170 households with biological samples tested, 247 (11·4%) tested positive for any drug. Overall, opioids were the most prevalent drug in the biological samples (5·6%), although prescription drugs (prescription pain pills, sedatives, and tranquilliser) were the most commonly reported in the past 30 days in the questionnaires (7·6%). Of individuals testing positive for at least one substance, opioids accounted for more than 50% of substance use in women and children, but only a third of substances in men, who predominantly tested positive for cannabinoids. After controlling for age with direct standardisation, individual prevalence of substance use (from laboratory tests) was 7·2% (95% CI 6·1-8·3) in men and 3·1% (2·5-3·7) in women-with a national prevalence of 5·1% (4·4-5·8) and a prevalence of 5·0% (4·1-5·8) in Kabul. Concordance between laboratory test results and self-reports was high. These data suggest the female head of household to be a knowledgeable informant for household substance use. They also might provide insight into new avenues for targeted behavioural interventions and prevention messages. Copyright © 2014 Cottler et al. Open Access article

  4. Permissive Attitude Towards Drug Use, Life Satisfaction, and Continuous Drug Use Among Psychoactive Drug Users in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, N Wt; Cheung, Y W; Chen, X

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects of a permissive attitude towards regular and occasional drug use, life satisfaction, self-esteem, depression, and other psychosocial variables in the drug use of psychoactive drug users. Psychosocial factors that might affect a permissive attitude towards regular / occasional drug use and life satisfaction were further explored. We analysed data of a sample of psychoactive drug users from a longitudinal survey of psychoactive drug abusers in Hong Kong who were interviewed at 6 time points at 6-month intervals between January 2009 and December 2011. Data of the second to the sixth time points were stacked into an individual time point structure. Random-effects probit regression analysis was performed to estimate the relative contribution of the independent variables to the binary dependent variable of drug use in the last 30 days. A permissive attitude towards drug use, life satisfaction, and depression at the concurrent time point, and self-esteem at the previous time point had direct effects on drug use in the last 30 days. Interestingly, permissiveness to occasional drug use was a stronger predictor of drug use than permissiveness to regular drug use. These 2 permissive attitude variables were affected by the belief that doing extreme things shows the vitality of young people (at concurrent time point), life satisfaction (at concurrent time point), and self-esteem (at concurrent and previous time points). Life satisfaction was affected by sense of uncertainty about the future (at concurrent time point), self-esteem (at concurrent time point), depression (at both concurrent and previous time points), and being stricken by stressful events (at previous time point). A number of psychosocial factors could affect the continuation or discontinuation of drug use, as well as the permissive attitude towards regular and occasional drug use, and life satisfaction. Implications of the findings for prevention and intervention work targeted at

  5. Alcohol Use and Transactional Sex among Women in South Africa: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Magni

    Full Text Available Transactional sex is a risk factor for HIV infection. Alcohol use may increase the risk of transactional sex. No nationally-representative studies have examined the relationship between multiple dimensions of alcohol use and transactional sex in women in South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between alcohol dependence, binge drinking and frequency of drinking in the past month and transactional sex in adult women in South Africa.A cross-sectional study using multi-stage, cluster sampling collected data from a nationally representative sample of 5,969 women aged 16-55 years in 2012. The analysis conducted for this paper was restricted to women reporting sexual activity in the past 12 months (n = 3,594. Transactional sex was defined as having received money/gifts in exchange for sex with any sex partner in the past year. Alcohol use measures included: alcohol dependence (≥2 positive responses to the CAGE questionnaire; binge drinking (≥4 drinks for women on one occasion; and drinking frequency in the previous month. Logistic regression models were built to test the hypotheses that each dimension of alcohol use was associated with transactional sex.About 6.3% (n = 225 of sexually active women reported transactional sex. Almost a third (30.6% of sexually active women had ever drunk alcohol, and 19.2% were current (past month drinkers. Among lifetime drinkers, 28.0% were alcohol dependent and 56.6% were binge drinkers. Alcohol dependent women were twice as likely to report transactional sex (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-4.3, p<0.05 than those not alcohol dependent. Binge drinkers were 3.1 times more likely to have had transactional sex (95% CI 1.5-6.6, p<0.01 than non-binge drinkers. There was no significant relationship between frequency of drinking in the past month and transactional sex.Alcohol dependency and binge drinking are significantly associated with transactional sex in South African women. HIV prevention programmes

  6. Assessment of club patrons' alcohol and drug use: the use of biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brenda A; Byrnes, Hilary F; Branner, Amy C; Voas, Robert; Johnson, Mark B

    2013-11-01

    Young adulthood (ages 18-25 years) represents a time when high-risk behaviors, including alcohol and drug use, peak. Electronic music dance events (EMDEs) featured at clubs provide an ecologic niche for these high-risk behaviors. This paper examines the prevalence of alcohol and drug use among EMDE patrons. Examination of personal characteristics associated with exit levels of alcohol and drug use identifies important indicators of risk taking for prevention strategies. Data were collected anonymously during 2010-2012 from 2028 patrons as they entered and exited clubs in the San Francisco Bay area featuring EMDEs. Nearly half were aged ≤25 years. Biological measures of drug and alcohol and self-reported personal characteristics were attained. Analyses were completed in 2012. At entrance, more than one fifth of patrons were positive for drug use and one fourth arrived either impaired (blood alcohol concentration [BAC]: 0.05%-0.079%) or intoxicated (BAC: >0.08%) by alcohol. At exit, one fourth tested positive for drugs, and nearly half were impaired or intoxicated by alcohol. Individual characteristics that were important for levels of risk included prior alcohol use behaviors, sexual identity, ethnic/racial identity, and transportation to the event. Gender did not differentiate for alcohol use but fewer women used drugs. Findings confirm the importance of targeting EMDEs for prevention efforts. EMDEs attract young working adults who are engaged in heavy alcohol and/or drug use. Targeting these social settings for delivering public health prevention strategies regarding alcohol and drug use and related harm is indicated by the findings. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  7. Womens' opinions on antenatal care in developing countries: results of a study in Cuba, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigenda, Gustavo; Langer, Ana; Kuchaisit, Chusri; Romero, Mariana; Rojas, Georgina; Al-Osimy, Muneera; Villar, José; Garcia, Jo; Al-Mazrou, Yagob; Ba'aqeel, Hassan; Carroli, Guillermo; Farnot, Ubaldo; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Belizán, José; Bergsjo, Per; Bakketeig, Leiv; Lindmark, Gunilla

    2003-01-01

    Background The results of a qualitative study carried out in four developing countries (Cuba, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and Argentina) are presented. The study was conducted in the context of a randomised controlled trial to test the benefits of a new antenatal care protocol that reduced the number of visits to the doctor, rationalised the application of technology, and improved the provision of information to women in relation to the traditional protocol applied in each country. Methods Through focus groups discussions we were able to assess the concepts and expectations underlying women's evaluation of concepts and experiences of the care received in antenatal care clinics. 164 women participated in 24 focus groups discussion in all countries. Results Three areas are particularly addressed in this paper: a) concepts about pregnancy and health care, b) experience with health services and health providers, and c) opinions about the modified Antenatal Care (ANC) programme. In all three topics similarities were identified as well as particular opinions related to country specific social and cultural values. In general women have a positive view of the new ANC protocol, particularly regarding the information they receive. However, controversial issues emerged such as the reduction in the number of visits, particularly in Cuba where women are used to have 18 ANC visits in one pregnancy period. Conclusion Recommendations to improve ANC services performance are being proposed. Any country interested in the application of a new ANC protocol should regard the opinion and acceptability of women towards changes. PMID:12756055

  8. Womens' opinions on antenatal care in developing countries: results of a study in Cuba, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnot Ubaldo

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The results of a qualitative study carried out in four developing countries (Cuba, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and Argentina are presented. The study was conducted in the context of a randomised controlled trial to test the benefits of a new antenatal care protocol that reduced the number of visits to the doctor, rationalised the application of technology, and improved the provision of information to women in relation to the traditional protocol applied in each country. Methods Through focus groups discussions we were able to assess the concepts and expectations underlying women's evaluation of concepts and experiences of the care received in antenatal care clinics. 164 women participated in 24 focus groups discussion in all countries. Results Three areas are particularly addressed in this paper: a concepts about pregnancy and health care, b experience with health services and health providers, and c opinions about the modified Antenatal Care (ANC programme. In all three topics similarities were identified as well as particular opinions related to country specific social and cultural values. In general women have a positive view of the new ANC protocol, particularly regarding the information they receive. However, controversial issues emerged such as the reduction in the number of visits, particularly in Cuba where women are used to have 18 ANC visits in one pregnancy period. Conclusion Recommendations to improve ANC services performance are being proposed. Any country interested in the application of a new ANC protocol should regard the opinion and acceptability of women towards changes.

  9. Substance use among women receiving post-rape medical care, associated post-assault concerns and current substance abuse: results from a national telephone household probability sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Jenna L; Kilpatrick, Dean G; Walsh, Kate; Resnick, Heidi S

    2013-04-01

    To examine post-rape substance use, associated post rape medical and social concern variables, and past year substance abuse among women reporting having received medical care following a most recent or only lifetime incident of rape. Using a subsample of women who received post-rape medical care following a most recent or only rape incident (n=104) drawn from a national household probability sample of U.S. women, the current study described the extent of peritraumatic substance use, past year substance misuse behaviors, post-rape HIV and pregnancy concerns, and lifetime mental health service utilization as a function of substance use at time of incident. One-third (33%) of women seeking post-rape medical attention reported consuming alcohol or drugs at the time of their rape incident. Nearly one in four (24.7%) and one in seven (15%) women seeking medical attention following their most recent rape incident endorsed drug (marijuana, illicit, non-medical use of prescription drugs, or club drug) use or met substance abuse criteria, respectively, in the past year. One in twelve (8.4%) women reported at least monthly binge drinking in the past year. Approximately two-thirds of women reported seeking services for mental health needs in their lifetime. Post-rape concerns among women reporting peritraumatic substance use were not significantly different from those of women not reporting such use. Substance use was reported by approximately one-third of women and past year substance abuse was common among those seeking post-rape medical care. Implications for service delivery, intervention implementation, and future research are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Results of percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy in pregnant women about 12 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairi, I; Mzoughi, K; Mroua, F; Ben Moussa, F; Amri, I; Kammoun, S; Fennira, S; Kraiem, S

    2018-02-01

    Mitral stenosis (MS) is the most common valvular heart disease revealed or exacerbated by pregnancy. Percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy (PMC) is currently the treatment of choice when mitral valve morphology is favorable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immediate, medium and long term results of percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy in pregnant women with a severe symptomatic mitral stenosis despite medical treatment. It is a retrospective study including 12 pregnant patients diagnosed with severe mitral stenosis and hospitalized in the cardiology department of Habib Thameur hospital between 1994 and 2014. A clinical and ultrasonographic monitoring was performed for over 15 years. Mean patients age was 31.5±4.4 years. All patients were in NYHA class III or IV despite medical treatment. Mitral regurgitation was rated as moderate in four cases. Functional improvement was observed in all cases immediately after the procedure. Mitral valve area increased from 1.02±0.5cm 2  averaged to 2±0.35cm 2 . Mitral regurgitation increased in three cases and appeared in two cases. All patients delivered at term. Newborns were all healthy. Two of them had a low birth weight. On the long term follow-up (95.58±64.1 months), five patients had mitral restenosis: two had a surgical valve replacement and three underwent a second percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy. The effectiveness of the percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy is clearly documented by clinical and echocardiographic evaluation. In the case of pregnancy, the goal is not so much to obtain an optimal result but to cause hemodynamic improvement authorizing the continuation of pregnancy and childbirth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Sex Differences in College Student Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimbu, Jerry L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Determines patterns of drug usage and related behavior of college, university, and junior college students on a state-wide basis. This article focuses on sex as it relates to the total pattern of drug abuse of nine specific substances among a large group of college students and examines results in terms of both practical and statistical…

  12. Recreational drug use during sex and sexually transmitted infections among clients of a city sexually transmitted infections clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenberg, Marlies; Wermeling, Paulien R; van Rooijen, Martijn S; Urbanus, Anouk T; Speksnijder, Arjen G C L; Heijman, Titia; Prins, Maria; Coutinho, Roel A; van der Loeff, Maarten F Schim

    2012-07-01

    Recreational drug use is associated with high-risk sexual behavior and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We assessed the prevalence of drug use during sex and the associations between such use and STI (chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis). During 3 periods in 2008 and 2009, attendees of an STI clinic in Amsterdam were interviewed about sexual behavior and drug use during sex and tested for STI. Associations between sex-related drug use and STI were assessed separately for heterosexual men, men who have sex with men (MSM), and women. We examined whether drug use was associated with STI after adjusting for high-risk sexual behavior. Nine hundred sixty-one heterosexual men, 673 MSM, and 1188 women participated in this study. Of these, 11.9% had chlamydia, 3.4% gonorrhea, and 1.2% syphilis. Sex-related drug use in the previous 6 months was reported by 22.6% of heterosexual men, 51.6% of MSM, and 16.0% of women. In multivariable analyses, adjusting for demographics (and high-risk sexual behavior in MSM), sex-related drug use was associated with STI in MSM (any drugs and poppers) and women (GHB and XTC) but not in heterosexual men. Stratified analysis in MSM showed that sex-related use of poppers was associated with STI in HIV-negative MSM but not in HIV-infected MSM. Clients reported frequent sex-related drug use, which was associated with STI in MSM and women. In MSM, sex-related drug use was associated with STI after adjusting for high-risk sexual behavior but only in HIV-negative MSM. Prevention measures targeted at decreasing sex-related drug use could reduce the incidence of STI.

  13. Problematic drug use and drug use disorders in EU countries and Norway: An overview of the epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehm, Jürgen; Room, Robin; van den Brink, Wim; Kraus, Ludwig

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of drug use disorders in the European Union and Norway. Method: Based on a systematic literature search and an expert survey, publications after 1990 on prevalence of drug use disorders (DUD, defined as drug dependence and drug abuse or harmful use) in EU

  14. Older women's health priorities and perceptions of care delivery: results of the WOW health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Mayo, Nancy; Ducharme, Francine

    2005-07-19

    As women get older, their health priorities change. We surveyed a sample of older Canadian women to investigate what health priorities are of concern to them, their perceptions about the care delivered to address these priorities and the extent to which priorities and perceptions of care differ across age groups and provinces. The WOW (What Older women Want) cross-sectional health survey was mailed in October 2003 to 5000 community-dwelling women aged 55-95 years from 10 Canadian provinces. Women were asked questions on 26 health priorities according to the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and their perceptions of whether these priorities were being addressed by health care providers through screening or counselling. Differences in priorities and perceptions of care delivery were examined across age groups and provinces. The response rate was 52%. The mean age of the respondents was 71 (standard deviation 7) years. The health priorities identified most frequently by the respondents were preventing memory loss (88% of the respondents), learning about the side effects of medications (88%) and correcting vision impairment (86%). Items least frequently selected were counselling about community programs (28%), counselling about exercise (33%) and pneumonia vaccination (33%). Up to 97% of the women recalled being adequately screened for heart disease and stroke risk factors, but as little as 11% reported receiving counselling regarding concerns about memory loss or end-of-life issues. Women who stated that specific priorities were of great concern or importance to them were more than twice as likely as those who stated that they were not of great concern or importance to perceive that these priorities were being addressed: osteoporosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1- 3.2), end-of-life care (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.0-3.4), anxiety reduction (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.8-2.6), fall prevention (OR 2.1, 95

  15. Physical and relational aggression as predictors of drug use: gender differences among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skara, Silvana; Pokhrel, Pallav; Weiner, Michelle D; Sun, Ping; Dent, Clyde W; Sussman, Steve

    2008-12-01

    The present study investigated the longitudinal relationships between physical and relational aggression and later drug use, as moderated by gender. Self-reported data were gathered from 2064 high school students at pretest and 1-year post-test to test the hypotheses that (1) males would engage in more physical aggression than females, whereas females would engage in more relational aggression than males; and (2) physical aggression would be a stronger drug use predictor for males and relational aggression a stronger predictor for females. Results indicated that males reported engaging in more physical aggression than females at baseline; however, females and males reported engaging in similar rates of relational aggression. After controlling for relational aggression, baseline drug use, and demographic variables, physical aggression at baseline was found to predict alcohol use 1-year later for males but not for females. After controlling for physical aggression, baseline drug use, and demographic variables, relational aggression was found to predict cigarette use and marijuana use for females but not for males. However, relational aggression was found to predict later alcohol and hard drug equally across gender. These findings suggest that both physical and relational aggression are predictive of subsequent drug use and have important implications for violence and drug use prevention intervention efforts.

  16. Using technology to assess and intervene with illicit drug-using persons at risk for HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Keith J; Lammert, Sara; LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn E; Bauermeister, José A

    2017-09-01

    This review describes recent literature on novel ways technology is used for assessment of illicit drug use and HIV risk behaviours, suggestions for optimizing intervention acceptability, and recently completed and ongoing technology-based interventions for drug-using persons at risk for HIV and others with high rates of drug use and HIV risk behaviour. Among studies (n = 5) comparing technology-based to traditional assessment methods, those using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) had high rates of reported drug use and high concordance with traditional assessment methods. The two recent studies assessing the acceptability of mHealth approaches overall demonstrate high interest in these approaches. Current or in-progress technology-based interventions (n = 8) are delivered using mobile apps (n = 5), text messaging (n = 2) and computers (n = 1). Most intervention studies are in progress or do not report intervention outcomes; the results from one efficacy trial showed significantly higher HIV testing rates among persons in need of drug treatment. Studies are needed to continually assess technology adoption and intervention preferences among drug-using populations to ensure that interventions are appropriately matched to users. Large-scale technology-based intervention trials to assess the efficacy of these approaches, as well as the impact of individual intervention components, on drug use and other high-risk behaviours are recommended.

  17. Improving self-esteem in women diagnosed with Turner syndrome: results of a pilot intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Paul M; Smyth, Arlene; Liao, Lih-Mei

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate a brief intervention to improve the self esteem of women diagnosed with Turner syndrome (TS). Prospective observational study. Turner Syndrome Support Society, UK. 30 women aged 18-60 years. A 1-day psychology workshop targeting problems of self-esteem in women diagnosed with TS. The workshop drew on cognitive-behavioral therapy and narrative therapy skills and emphasized increased self-awareness of interpersonal difficulties and improved capacity for self-management. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSS); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); bespoke user experiences questionnaire. All 30 women provided baseline data, 27/30 provided immediate post-intervention data and 22/30 provided follow-up data at 3 months. The intervention improved RSS and HADS scores at 3 months. Generic skills-based psychological interventions have the potential to be adapted to provide brief and low-cost interventions to improve self-esteem and reduce psychological distress in women diagnosed with TS. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility and acceptability of shared decision-making to promote alcohol behavior change among women Veterans: Results from focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Traci H; Wright, Patricia; White, Penny; Booth, Brenda M; Cucciare, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Although rates of unhealthy drinking are high among women Veterans with mental health comorbidities, most women Veterans with mental comorbidities who present to primary care with unhealthy drinking do not receive alcohol-related care. Barriers to alcohol-related treatment could be reduced through patient-centered approaches to care, such as shared decision-making. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a telephone-delivered shared decision-making intervention for promoting alcohol behavior change in women Veterans with unhealthy drinking and co-morbid depression and/or probable post-traumatic stress disorder. We used 3, 2-hour focus group discussions with 19 women Veterans to identify barriers and solicit recommendations for using the intervention with women Veterans who present to primary care with unhealthy drinking and mental health comorbidities. Transcripts from the focus groups were qualitatively analyzed using template analysis. Although participants perceived that the intervention was feasible and acceptable for the targeted patient population, they identified the treatment delivery modality, length of telephone sessions, and some of the option grid content as potential barriers. Facilitators included strategies for enhancing the telephone-delivered shared decision-making sessions and diversifying the treatment options contained in the option grids. Focus group feedback resulted in preliminary adaptations to the intervention that are mindful of women Veterans' individual preferences for care and realistic in the everyday context of their busy lives.

  19. Psychosocial Correlates of Ever Having a Pap Test and Abnormal Pap Results in a Sample of Rural Appalachian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Kristen P; Crosby, Richard A; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2018-03-01

    Despite known prevention and screening efforts, there are higher invasive cervical cancer rates in Appalachia than in other areas of the United States and higher mortality rates in the Appalachian region of Kentucky compared to Appalachian regions of other states. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the association of psychosocial factors relevant to cervical cancer and the outcome of ever having a Pap test in a rural sample of women. The secondary purpose was to determine whether any of the same psychosocial factors were also associated with ever having an abnormal Pap test result among women with a self-reported history of having one or more Pap tests in their lifetime. Data were collected in fall of 2013 from 393 women in 8 economically distressed counties of rural Appalachian Kentucky. Women completed an interviewer-administered survey assessing sociodemographic and health information as well as beliefs about cervical cancer. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that low income and greater perceived local fatalism were significant predictors of never having a Pap test. Lack of personal control over prevention, and peer and family influences were significant predictors of ever having an abnormal Pap test result. Educational efforts targeted in rural Appalachia would be supported by encouraging the benefits of early and consistent screening, altering the established norms of community fatalism and lack of personal control over prevention, and creating targeted messages through public campaigns that convince rural Appalachian women that cervical cancer is highly preventable and screenable. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  20. Injection drug use among homeless adults in the Southeast with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, J Gary; Brown, Michael; Kendrick, Lorna

    2005-11-01

    This study examined injection drug use and HIV risk behaviors in a predominantly African American sample of homeless men with mental illness. Personal interviews focusing on injection drug use and sexual risk behaviors were completed with 240 homeless mentally ill men in two shelters in a southeastern city. Sixty-two (26%) of the 240 men injected drugs. Among the injection drug users (IDUs), most reported high-risk behaviors, including needle sharing (70%) and participation in shooting galleries (71%). Very few performed risk reduction activities (e.g., cleaning needles with bleach [19%] or using a needle exchange program [0%]). Within the preceding 6 months, most of the IDUs had had sex with women (51%) or men (8%) without a condom. This investigation reported a high lifetime occurrence of injection drug use in a sample of predominantly African American homeless men with mental illness. The IDUs reported intravenous drug use and sexual activities with great risk of HIV transmission and provided little evidence of risk-reduction efforts. These men are outside of most social service and health care systems but must be included in special programs to decrease the transmission of HIV.

  1. Risk of the Metabolic Syndrome in Sexual Minority Women: Results from the ESTHER Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsky, Suzanne; Stall, Ron; Hawk, Mary; Markovic, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Compared to heterosexuals, sexual minority women (SMW) have higher rates of the metabolic syndrome risk factors (e.g., obesity, smoking, heavy drinking, and depression). Yet, no published research has examined whether SMW have higher rates of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its individual factors in a sample of heterosexuals and SMW, and identify whether SMW are at greater risk of having the metabolic syndrome. Data are from the Epidemiologic STudy of HEalth Risk in Women (ESTHER), a cross-sectional convenience sample of 479 SMW and 400 heterosexual women from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Participants provided self-report questionnaire data, clinical data, and blood work. Compared to heterosexuals, SMW had higher mean waist circumference, fasting glucose, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Nearly one-quarter (24.3%) of SMW had the metabolic syndrome compared to 15.6% of heterosexual women (p = 0.002). After controlling for demographic and risk factors, SMW had a 44% higher risk of having the metabolic syndrome than heterosexuals (p = 0.031). To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify this health disparity in SMW. Future studies should explore differential risk of mortality and metabolic health between SMW and heterosexuals.

  2. Exercise Effects on Fitness and Bone Mineral Density in Early Postmenopausal Women: 1-Year EFOPS Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Engelke, Klaus; Lauber, Dirk; Weineck, Juergen; Hensen, Johannes; Kalender, Willi A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effect of intense exercise training on physical fitness, coronary heart disease, bone mineral density (BMD), and parameters related to quality of life in early postmenopausal women with osteopenia. Data on woman in control and exercise training groups indicated that the intense exercise training program was effective in improving…

  3. [The results of open and laparoscopic appendectomy in pregnant women with acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, A V; Dubrovsky, A V; Petrov, D Yu; Smirnov, A V

    To compare conventional and laparoscopic appendectomy in pregnant women. The study included 86 patients with acute appendicitis who were surgically treated. In group 1 (42 women) laparoscopic approach was used, in group 2 (44 patients) - laparotomy. Postoperative complications were observed in 2 (4.8%) and 3 (6.8%) patients in groups 1 and 2 respectively. All complications related to Clavien-Dindo class I-II. There were no premature births and abortions in laparoscopy group. In case of conventional surgery premature births and abortions were observed in 2 (4.5%) and 1 (2.27%) observations respectively. Other women had timely childbirth in terms of 36-41 weeks. Risk of delay exceeds risk of vain appendectomy. All pregnant women with acute appendicitis should be examined by obstetrician-gynaecologist, surgeon, urologist, anesthesiologist. If acute appendicitis can not be excluded based on clinical data the patient should be operated. Diagnostic laparoscopy and laparoscopic appendectomy are advisable in case of pregnancy up to 24 weeks. Woman should be under observation of obstetrician-gynaecologist in perioperative period to prevent premature birth and abortion.

  4. Women, brokerage and transnational organized crime. Empirical results from the Dutch Organized Crime Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemans, E.R.; Kruisbergen, E.W.; Kouwenberg, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the role of women in various types of transnational organized crime and tests the ‘gendered markets’ hypothesis by Zhang et al. (Criminology 45(3):699–733 2007) for a wide cross-section of 150 cases from the Dutch Organized Crime Monitor. The main information sources for the

  5. Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration among Women in Kuwait: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Dashti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% of all infants were receiving some breast milk and only 2% of infants had been fully breastfed to 26 weeks. Women born in other Arab countries were less likely to discontinue breastfeeding than women born in Kuwait. Other factors positively associated with breastfeeding duration were level of maternal education, higher parity, infant being demand fed in hospital and a preference for breastfeeding on the part of the infant’s father and maternal grandmother. The introduction of a pacifier before four weeks of age and the mother intending to return to work by six months were negatively associated with duration. These findings present a number of opportunities for prolonging breastfeeding duration in Kuwait.

  6. Predictors of breastfeeding duration among women in Kuwait: results of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Manal; Scott, Jane A; Edwards, Christine A; Al-Sughayer, Mona

    2014-02-20

    The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox's proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% of all infants were receiving some breast milk and only 2% of infants had been fully breastfed to 26 weeks. Women born in other Arab countries were less likely to discontinue breastfeeding than women born in Kuwait. Other factors positively associated with breastfeeding duration were level of maternal education, higher parity, infant being demand fed in hospital and a preference for breastfeeding on the part of the infant's father and maternal grandmother. The introduction of a pacifier before four weeks of age and the mother intending to return to work by six months were negatively associated with duration. These findings present a number of opportunities for prolonging breastfeeding duration in Kuwait.

  7. Drug Use among Street Children in Tehran, Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh eDejman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Globally, children who work and live on the streets are at higher risk of undesired behavioral health outcomes, including increased drug use and abuse. Considering the rapid growth of this population in Iran and the lack of program planning that is partly due to a scarcity of research-based information, this study was conducted in 2013 to investigate drug use among street children in Tehran. Method: With a qualitative design, we conducted a Rapid Assessment and Response (RAS Survey of street children in Tehran, 2012-2013. Data were also obtained from ten focus group discussions with street children using semi-structured questionnaires and 27 in-depth interviews with key informants in governmental, non-governmental, and international organizations. Results: The variation in age at first use, type of drugs, and pattern of drug use were found based on ethnicity. Gypsy boys and girls reported consuming more alcohol than other groups. Drug use problems were commonly described among families of street children. Children whose parents had drug-use problems described using drugs earlier than other children. Informants reported that families with drug-related problems used children for procurement of drugs. Children themselves described using drugs to cope with stress, reduce physical and psychological stressors and problems such as fatigue, sadness, and pressure resulting from frequent failures in life. Conclusion: These results suggest that intervention and prevention programs dealing with drug use of street children in Iran should include family and peers when addressing drug use by street children.

  8. Duration of residence and psychotropic drug use in recently settled refugees in Sweden - a register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendler-Lindqvist, Maria; Nørredam, Marie Louise; Hjern, Anders

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recently settled refugee populations have consistently been reported to have high rates of mental health problems, particularly Post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate psychotropic drug use among young adult refugees......-born residents. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between duration of residence in Sweden and the dispensing of at least one psychotropic medication during 2009 in four categories (any drug, neuroleptics, antidepressants and anxiolytics/hypnotics), adjusting for age, gender and domicile....... RESULTS: Rates of dispensed psychotropic drugs among recently settled refugees were low, compared to the Swedish-born, with an increase with duration of residence. For refugee men and women from Iraq/Iran who had resided for 0-3 years the adjusted ORs compared to Swedish natives, were 0.83 (95% CI 0...

  9. A Nationwide Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Drug Use among Adults in Iceland 2003-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geirs, D. P.; Pottegård, Anton; Halldorsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    and duration of use of stimulants and atomoxetine, among adults (19years) in Iceland, with regard to sex, age, type of drug and specialty of the prescribing physician. Our results indicate that the 1-year period prevalence of ADHD drug use rose, from 2.9 to 12.2 per 1000 adults between 2003 and 2012......, with the most pronounced increases among young adults (19-24years). The annual incidence increased 3 times, similarly among men and women. Extended-release methylphenidate formulations were the most commonly used ADHD drugs. Specialists in psychiatry initiated treatment in 79% of new adult ADHD drug users......In this study, we leveraged on complete nationwide prescription data for the total adult population in Iceland (N=227,000) to examine how attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drugs have been used over the past decade. In particular, we aimed to describe the prevalence, incidence...

  10. Transitions among Health States Using 12 Measures of Successful Aging in Men and Women: Results from the Cardiovascular Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thielke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Successful aging has many dimensions, which may manifest differently in men and women at different ages. Methods. We characterized one-year transitions among health states in 12 measures of successful aging among adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. The measures included self-rated health, ADLs, IADLs, depression, cognition, timed walk, number of days spent in bed, number of blocks walked, extremity strength, recent hospitalizations, feelings about life as a whole, and life satisfaction. We dichotomized variables into “healthy” or “sick,” states, and estimated the prevalence of the healthy state and the probability of transitioning from one state to another, or dying, during yearly intervals. We compared men and women and three age groups (65–74, 75–84, and 85–94. Findings. Measures of successful aging showed similar results by gender. Most participants remained healthy even into advanced ages, although health declined for all measures. Recuperation, although less common with age, still occurred frequently. Men had a higher death rate than women regardless of health status, and were also more likely to remain in the healthy state. Discussion. The results suggest a qualitatively different experience of successful aging between men and women. Men did not simply “age faster” than women.

  11. Visible and invisible marks: facial injuries suffered by women as the result of acts of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Suzana de Magalhães; Noronha, Ceci Vilar

    2015-09-01

    This article focuses on female facial injuries caused by domestic partners in the light of the cultural assumption that the face is the most valued area of the human body. Through a quantitative/qualitative approach, the study aimed to estimate the prevalence of lesions on the face, head and neck of women abused by their partners. The intention is to comprehend the significance, from the victim's standpoint, of the marks originated in the violent episode and investigate issues concerning healthcare in the treatment of injuries. Statistical data were obtained from reports of the Special Police Department for Women in Salvador, Bahia, and the qualitative phase of research consisted of interviews with women who filed such reports. The results showed that, in 63.2% of studied cases, there were injuries to the face and/or head and/or neck of battered women. Speech analysis revealed that facial injuries, especially permanent ones, tend to result in feelings of low self-esteem, shame and humiliation in the victim, causing severe psychological distress. It was revealed that healthcare was limited to the physical aspects of victimization, without the perception of domestic violence as a health problem and the consequent lack of referral of patients to the centers for women in situations of violence.

  12. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug...

  13. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug...

  14. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  15. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  16. Prevalence and correlates of atypical patterns of drug use progression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1-4 However the mechanisms underpinning this gateway effect remain contentious, with ongoing debate focused on the meaning of the predictive associations between the stages of drug use and the extent to which these observed ...

  17. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  18. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  19. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  20. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  1. Interventions by students in friends' alcohol, tobacco, and drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, R G; Stoduto, G

    1997-01-01

    This article investigates self-reported interventions by students in the alcohol, tobacco, illicit drug use, and drinking-driving of their friends. The data came from a study of 1184 students in Ontario schools in grades 7, 9, 11, and 13. We found that about a third of students intervened in friends' illegal drug use and drinking-driving but about half intervened about smoking. Students who intervened were more likely to be older and spend fewer nights at home. They were less likely to use cannabis, but had more friends using cannabis and illegal drugs. Also, they had more exposure to drug education and were more disapproving of drug use. Drug education may give students the knowledge and confidence to intervene in friends' drug use.

  2. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  3. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  4. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  5. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  6. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  7. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  8. Drug use and highway safety : a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-07-01

    This report reviews the research literature concerning several aspects of drug use as it relates to traffic safety. Some of the topics covered include the effects of drugs, types of drug users; research problems in assessing risk; laboratory findings...

  9. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug...

  10. Young women's perceived health and lifetime sexual experience: results from the national survey of family growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kelli S; Moreau, Caroline; Trussell, James

    2012-05-01

    Sexuality is a component of health and well-being for all women, including adolescents. Yet relationships between young women's health perceptions and sexual behavior are unclear. We examined associations between perceived health and lifetime sexual experiences among young U.S. women. We used data from 4,413 young women ages 15-24 years in the National Survey of Family Growth, 2002-2008. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistics estimated relationships between categories of perceived health and types of lifetime sexual experience. A self-rated health Likert item and sexual history questions were administered with a computer-assisted survey instrument. Young women reported excellent (30%), very good (41%), good (23%), and fair-poor (6%) health. Sexual experiences included vaginal (64%), oral (64%), and anal (20%) sex. Negative experiences included involuntary sex (11%) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) history (8%). In multivariate logistic regression models, lower perceived health ("good" rather than "excellent") was positively associated with vaginal (odds ratio [OR] 1.5, confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.1, P = 0.02), oral (OR 1.5, CI 1.1-2.1, P = 0.005), and anal (OR 1.4, CI 1.0-2.0, P = 0.03) sex. In models stratified by age, point estimates for vaginal (OR 1.8, CI 1.2-2.6, P = 0.002) and oral (OR 1.9, CI 1.4-2.6, P sexual experiences, point estimates were stable in models including STI history but statistically insignificant when including involuntary sexual experience. Other characteristics associated with sexual experiences varied by type of experience and included age, race/ethnicity, employment situation, poverty level, insurance status, childhood family situation, religious service participation, cohabitation/marital experience, and body mass index.   Further investigation is warranted to disentangle potentially negative relationships between perceived health (as well as response bias and more objective health outcomes), sociodemographic

  11. Screening and brief intervention for drug use in primary care: the ASPIRE randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitz, Richard; Palfai, Tibor P A; Cheng, Debbie M; Alford, Daniel P; Bernstein, Judith A; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine A; Meli, Seville M; Chaisson, Christine E; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2014-08-06

    for the MOTIV group (IRR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.84-1.32; P = .81 for both comparisons vs no brief intervention). There were also no significant effects of BNI or MOTIV on any other outcome or in analyses stratified by main drug or drug use severity. Brief intervention did not have efficacy for decreasing unhealthy drug use in primary care patients identified by screening. These results do not support widespread implementation of illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse screening and brief intervention. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00876941.

  12. The Effect of Illicit Drug Use on Outcomes Following Burn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgman, Erica I; Subramanian, Madhu; Wolf, Steven E; Arnoldo, Brett D; Phelan, Herb A; Cripps, Michael W; Abdel Fattah, Kareem R

    Illicit drug use is common among patients admitted following burn injury. The authors sought to evaluate whether drug abuse results in worse outcomes. The National Burn Repository (NBR) was queried for data on all patients with drug testing results available. Outcomes included mortality, hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) LOS, and duration of ventilator support. Propensity score weighting was performed to control for age, alcohol use, burn size, gender, and etiology of burn. A total of 20,989 patients had drug screen data available; 11,642 (55.5%) tested positive for at least one drug of abuse. Illicit drug use was associated with a higher proportion of patients with flame burn (53.2 vs 48.4%) and larger average burn size (11.2 vs 9.5% TBSA, P drugs (2.8 vs 1.7%, P Drug use resulted in longer hospital and ICU LOS (14.2 vs 11.4 and 8.5 vs 5.6 days, P drug use did not affect mortality, hospital LOS, or duration of ventilator support, but did increase the average ICU LOS by 1.2 days (P = .001). Drug use does not affect mortality, hospital LOS, or duration of ventilator support among burned patients. After controlling for burn size, age, mechanism of injury, and gender, patients with a positive drug screen had an average increase in ICU LOS by 1 day.

  13. Young people, drug use and family conflict: pathways into homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen; Keys, Deborah

    2005-04-01

    Young people who experience homelessness, in Australia and in other western contexts (US, Canada, England), are widely perceived to use and abuse alcohol and drugs. The available research indicates that homeless young people use all drug types, whether injected or otherwise, more frequently than their home-based peers. Debate exists in the research and policy literature about whether drug use is a cause or consequence of homelessness. In a study exploring homeless young peoples reasons for leaving home, we examined the relationship between young people's drug use and their pathways into homelessness. Brief qualitative interviews were conducted with 302 homeless young people (12-20 years). Following a thematic analysis of interview transcripts, four pathways into homelessness involving personal or familial drug use were identified. One-third of the participants indicated that personal or familial drug use was a critical factor in them leaving home. Of these, just over half indicated that personal drug use was a direct or indirect cause of their homelessness and one-quarter indicated that familial drug and alcohol use was the critical factor that led them to leaving home. One-quarter indicated that their drug use only began after they became homeless. Family conflict, if not family breakdown, was implicated in all four pathways out of home.

  14. Low bone mineral density is associated with reduced hip joint space width in women: results from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Jensen, Trine W; Bach-Mortensen, Pernille

    2007-01-01

    inconclusive. The present cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between reduced bone mineral density (BMD), as a surrogate parameter of endogenous estrogen status assessed by digital x-ray radiogrammetry, and reduced minimum hip joint space width (JSW). DESIGN: Standardized hand radiographs...... was calculated. Minimum hip JSW was assessed on standardized pelvic radiographs. RESULTS: Digital x-ray radiogrammetry BMD decreased in both men and women after the age of 45 years, progressively more so in women. Although minimum hip JSW in men remained relatively unaltered throughout life, a marked decline...

  15. Women's Decisions to Stay in or Leave an Abusive Relationship: Results From a Longitudinal Study in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Eva; Ajzen, Icek; Schmidt, Peter; Seddig, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    This study examined Bolivian women's decisions to stay with or leave their violent partners. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was used as the theoretical framework. One hundred thirty-four women were assessed 3 times over 6 months. The TPB constructs were measured at T1 and T2; relationship status was assessed at T3. At T2, attitudes about staying and leaving predicted the intention to leave. Intention to leave at T2 but not at T1 predicted relationship status at T3. These results suggest that the decision to leave was consolidated between T1 and T2, and attitudes toward staying were most relevant to this decision.

  16. Caregiving associated with selected cancer risk behaviors and screening utilization among women: cross-sectional results of the 2009 BRFSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeves Katherine W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informal caregiving is increasingly common as the U.S. population ages, and there is concern that caregivers are less likely than non-caregivers to practice health-promoting behaviors, including cancer screening. We examined caregiving effects on cancer risk behaviors and breast and cervical cancer screening in the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Methods Women age ≥41 with data on breast and cervical cancer screening were included (weighted frequency 3,478,000 women. Cancer screening was classified according to American Cancer Society guidelines. We evaluated the association of caregiving with cancer risk behaviors (obesity, physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking status, and fruit/vegetable consumption and cancer screening (mammography, clinical breast exam [CBE], and Pap test using logistic regression overall and with stratification on age ( Results Caregivers had greater odds of being obese, physically active, and current smokers. Subgroup analyses revealed that caregiving was associated with obesity in younger women and whites, and with less obesity in older women. Also, caregiving was associated with smoking only among younger women and non-whites. Caregivers had greater odds of ever having had a mammogram or CBE, yet there was no association with mammogram, CBE, or Pap test within guidelines. Conclusions Caregiving was associated with some health behaviors that increase cancer risk, yet not with cancer screening within guidelines. Effects of caregiving by age and race require confirmation by additional studies.

  17. Testing the Question-Behavior Effect of Self-Administered Surveys Measuring Youth Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briney, John S; Brown, Eric C; Kuklinski, Margaret R; Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J David

    2017-12-01

    Concern that asking about a specific behavior could elicit that behavior is often cited as a reason that communities and schools should not administer surveys about youth drug use. In this study, we investigated if this question-behavior effect exists related to substance use. We examined if simply asking a student about their current drug use leads to an increase in drug use 1 year later. This study tests the validity of the question-behavior effect on youth drug use in a longitudinal panel of 2,002 elementary school students. The sample of students was drawn from the Community Youth Development Study, a community-randomized test of the Communities That Care prevention system. If the prevalence of self-reported drug use in sixth grade in a sample surveyed in fifth and sixth grades was higher than in an accretion sample surveyed only in sixth grade, the difference could indicate a question-behavior effect. Results from logistic regression analyses did not provide any evidence of a question-behavior effect on 30-day or lifetime prevalence of alcohol, tobacco, inhalant, or marijuana use reported in sixth grade. Asking youth about drug use in a survey did not increase the rates of self-reported drug use measured 1 year later. The absence of evidence of a question-behavior effect should ease concerns of communities and schools when administering surveys asking youth about their drug use. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prospective cohort study of tea consumption and risk of digestive system cancers: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechuta, Sarah; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Hui; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Data from in vitro and animal studies support a protective role for tea in the etiology of digestive system cancers; however, results from prospective cohort studies have been inconsistent. In addition, to our knowledge, no study has investigated the association of tea consumption with the incidence of all digestive system cancers in Chinese women. Objective: We investigated the association of regular tea intake (≥3 times/wk for >6 mo) with risk of digestive system cancers. Design: We used the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort study of middle-aged and older Chinese women who were recruited in 1996–2000. Adjusted HRs and associated 95% CIs were derived from Cox regression models. Results: After a mean follow-up of 11 y, 1255 digestive system cancers occurred (stomach, esophagus, colorectal, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder/bile duct cancers) in 69,310 nonsmoking and non–alcohol-drinking women. In comparison with women who never drank tea, regular tea intake (mostly green tea) was associated with reduced risk of all digestive system cancers combined (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.98), and the reduction in risk increased as the amount and years of tea consumption increased (P-trend = 0.01 and P-trend tea/mo (∼2–3 cups/d) had a 21% reduced risk of digestive system cancers combined (HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.99). The inverse association was found primarily for colorectal and stomach/esophageal cancers. Conclusion: In this large prospective cohort study, tea consumption was associated with reduced risk of colorectal and stomach/esophageal cancers in Chinese women. PMID:23053557

  19. Privacy effects on self-reported drug use: interactions with survey mode and respondent characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, W S

    1997-01-01

    This chapter examines the impact of interview privacy on self-reported illicit drug use. In 1991, interviews were completed with an urban-suburban sample of 2,417 adults aged 18 to 45. Results show that the presence of third parties during the interview significantly influences respondents' willingness to reveal illicit drug use. Among married respondents, presence of a spouse resulted in higher reporting of illicit drug use, while the presence of adults other than the spouse had a consistent negative effect on drug use reports. A parent's presence during the interview significantly reduced respondents' willingness to report illicit drug use. The pattern of findings suggests that the direction of effects due to third party presence is linked to two factors: the extent of the third party's knowledge of the information requested, and the degree of personal stake the third party may have in the respondent's answers. The differential impact of privacy by interview mode was also examined. Tests of interactions between privacy and interview mode failed to support the hypothesis that the use of self-administered answer sheets reduces privacy effects compared with interviewer-administered interviews.

  20. Prevalence of psychotropic drug use in military police units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sérgio Henrique Nascente; Yonamine, Maurício; Ramos, Andrea Luciana Martins; Oliveira, Fernando Gomes Ferreira; Rodrigues, Caroline Rego; da Cunha, Luiz Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to verify the prevalence of psychoactive drug use (amphetamines, methamphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opioids and benzodiazepines) among military police officers in the state of Goiás. Data were obtained from urine samples voluntarily provided by the officers participating in the study, who were informed of the study methods and signed a free and informed consent form. The samples were subject to screening analysis by immunochromatography (Multi-DrugOneStep Test®), with positive tests confirmed by gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and data analyzed by descriptive statistics. The results indicated the presence of the following drugs: amphetamines (0.33%), cannabinoids (0.67%) and benzodiazepines (1.34%); 97.66% showed negative results. The positive cases were distributed as follows: benzodiazepines (57.1%); cannabinoids (28.6%) and amphetamines (14.3%). In conclusion, the detection of psychoactive substances in voluntary sampling of military police officers indicates the need to implement drug testing among active military officers and preventive public policies aimed at eliminating the abusive consumption of psychotropic drugs.

  1. Parent-adolescent problem-solving interactions and drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hops, H; Tildesley, E; Lichtenstein, E; Ary, D; Sherman, L

    1990-01-01

    This study reports on the social problem-solving interactions of young adolescents in single-parent and intact families on substance-specific and nonsubstance-related issues. Although research has shown the impact of families on adolescent substance use, all of the previous results have been based on questionnaire or interview data. A sample of 128 families was selected from a larger sample of 763 within a longitudinal study of adolescent substance use. Parent(s) and one adolescent, aged 11-15, participated in interactions which were videotaped for later coding. In three standard scenarios, the families discussed fictional assignments from a health class teacher about the use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. In addition, they discussed an issue salient to them that was the source of recent conflict. Results showed that aversive affective behavior was more likely to be displayed by substance-using adolescents, whether or not the issue was drug-related. Mothers' and fathers' alcohol use was also shown to contribute to alcohol and cigarette use among their children, while fathers' smoking contributed to marijuana and hard drug use. These data suggest that such families may not be skilled at resolving issues and coping with life's difficulties whether or not they are drug-related.

  2. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized...... and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two studies that met inclusion criteria. Only one study provided numerical results on the effect of FFT on drug use reduction. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to allow any conclusion to be drawn on the effect of FFT for young people in treatment...... for nonopioid drug use. There is a need for more research and particularly for more methodologically rigorous studies in the field of treatment for young drug users....

  3. Prescription headache medication in OEF/OIF veterans: results from the Women Veterans Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Driscoll, Mary A; Brandt, Cynthia A; Bathulapalli, Harini; Goulet, Joseph; Silliker, Norman; Kerns, Robert D; Haskell, Sally G

    2013-09-01

    To examine differences in male and female veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) period of service in taking prescription headache medication, and associations between taking prescription headache medication and mental health status, psychiatric symptoms, and rates of traumatic events. Headaches are common among active service members and are associated with impairment in quality of life. Little is known about headaches in OEF/OIF veterans. Veterans participating in the Women Veterans Cohort Study responded to a cross-sectional survey to assess taking prescription headache medication, mental health status (Post Deployment Health Assessment), psychiatric symptoms (portions of the Brief Patient Health Questionnaire and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist), and traumatic events (the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire and queries regarding military trauma). Gender differences among taking prescription headache medication, health status, psychiatric symptoms, and traumatic events were examined. Regression analyses were used to examine the influence of gender on the associations between taking prescription headache medication and health status, psychiatric symptoms, and traumatic events. 139/551 (25.2%) participants reported taking prescription headache medication in the past year. A higher proportion of women veterans (29.1%) reported taking prescription medication for headache in the last year compared with men (19.7%). Taking prescription headache medication was associated with poorer perceived mental health status, higher anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and higher rates of traumatic events. The association between prescription headache medication use and perceived mental health status, and with the association between prescription headache medication use and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, was stronger for men than for women. Among OEF/OIF veterans, the prevalence of clinically relevant headache is high

  4. Associations Between Family History of Substance Use, Childhood Trauma, and Age of First Drug Use in Persons With Methamphetamine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, Leah; Dykstra, Rita E; Simpson, Jamie L; Jaffe, Anna E; Bevins, Rick A; Carlo, Gustavo; DiLillo, David; Grant, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the association among family history of substance use problems, childhood maltreatment, and age of first drug use in a sample of men and women seeking treatment for methamphetamine dependence. Various forms of childhood maltreatment were considered as mediators of the association between family history of substance use problems and age of first drug use. Participants (N = 99, 40% women, mean age 33) who were under treatment for methamphetamine dependence completed a baseline interview that obtained demographic information, past substance use by participants, history of drug/alcohol problems in their family of origin, and age at first use of any drug (excluding alcohol and tobacco). The Early Trauma Inventory Self-Report-Short Form was used to assess child maltreatment experiences before the age of 18. Family history of substance use problems and childhood physical (but not emotional or sexual) trauma significantly predicted age of first drug use. Further, childhood physical trauma mediated the association between family history of substance use problems and age of first drug use. These findings suggest that the experience of childhood physical abuse may be an important mechanism through which family history of substance use is associated with an earlier age of first drug use.

  5. Prospective cohort study of tea consumption and risk of digestive system cancers: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechuta, Sarah; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Hui; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Data from in vitro and animal studies support a protective role for tea in the etiology of digestive system cancers; however, results from prospective cohort studies have been inconsistent. In addition, to our knowledge, no study has investigated the association of tea consumption with the incidence of all digestive system cancers in Chinese women. We investigated the association of regular tea intake (≥3 times/wk for >6 mo) with risk of digestive system cancers. We used the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort study of middle-aged and older Chinese women who were recruited in 1996-2000. Adjusted HRs and associated 95% CIs were derived from Cox regression models. After a mean follow-up of 11 y, 1255 digestive system cancers occurred (stomach, esophagus, colorectal, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder/bile duct cancers) in 69,310 nonsmoking and non-alcohol-drinking women. In comparison with women who never drank tea, regular tea intake (mostly green tea) was associated with reduced risk of all digestive system cancers combined (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.98), and the reduction in risk increased as the amount and years of tea consumption increased (P-trend = 0.01 and P-trend digestive system cancers combined (HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.99). The inverse association was found primarily for colorectal and stomach/esophageal cancers. In this large prospective cohort study, tea consumption was associated with reduced risk of colorectal and stomach/esophageal cancers in Chinese women.

  6. Cigarette smoking is associated with adverse survival among women with ovarian cancer: Results from a pooled analysis of 19 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praestegaard, Camilla; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Signe M; Nielsen, Thor S S; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; DeFazio, Anna; Høgdall, Estrid; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten; Ness, Roberta B; Edwards, Robert; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Fridley, Brooke L; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Massuger, Leon F; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pharoah, Paul; Song, Honglin; Whittemore, Alice; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Alexandra; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm; Lee, Alice W; Sutphen, Rebecca; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Risch, Harvey A; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2017-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing mucinous ovarian tumors but whether it is associated with ovarian cancer survival overall or for the different histotypes is unestablished. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the association between cigarette smoking and survival differs according to strata of ovarian cancer stage at diagnosis. In a large pooled analysis, we evaluated the association between various measures of cigarette smoking and survival among women with epithelial ovarian cancer. We obtained data from 19 case-control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), including 9,114 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted study-specific hazard ratios (HRs), which were combined into pooled hazard ratios (pHR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) under random effects models. Overall, 5,149 (57%) women died during a median follow-up period of 7.0 years. Among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, both current (pHR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.08-1.28) and former smokers (pHR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.18) had worse survival compared with never smoking women. In histotype-stratified analyses, associations were observed for mucinous (current smoking: pHR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.01-3.65) and serous histotypes (current smoking: pHR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.00-1.23; former smoking: pHR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.04-1.20). Further, our results suggested that current smoking has a greater impact on survival among women with localized than disseminated disease. The identification of cigarette smoking as a modifiable factor associated with survival has potential clinical importance as a focus area to improve ovarian cancer prognosis. © 2017 UICC.

  7. Brief strategic family therapy for young people in treatment for drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    and interpretation. Results: The results are mixed: BSFT does not seem to have better or worse effects on drug use frequency and family functioning than other treatments but has positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions. Longer retention in treatment has been identified as a consistent...

  8. School Bullying and Drug Use Later in Life: A Meta-Analytic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ttofi, Maria M.; Farrington, David P.; Lösel, Friedrich; Crago, Rebecca V.; Theodorakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to investigate whether there is a significant long-term association between bullying at school and drug use later in life. A meta-analysis is presented based on results from major prospective longitudinal studies with available unadjusted and adjusted effect sizes. Results are based on thorough systematic searches…

  9. Pathways linking drug use and labour market trajectories: the role of catastrophic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lindsey; Small, Will; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    People affected by substance use disorders often experience sub-optimal employment outcomes. The role of drug use in processes that produce and entrench labour market precarity among people who inject drugs (PWID) have not, however, been fully described. We recruited 22 PWID from ongoing prospective cohort studies in Vancouver, Canada, with whom we conducted semi-structured retrospective interviews and then employed a thematic analysis that drew on concepts from life course theory to explore the mechanisms and pathways linking drug use and labour market trajectories. The participants' narratives identified processes corresponding to causation, whereby suboptimal employment outcomes led to harmful drug use; direct selection, where impairment, health complications or drug-seeking activities selected individuals out of employment; and indirect selection, where external factors, such as catastrophic events, marked the initiation or intensification of substance use concurrent with sudden changes in capacities for employment. Catastrophic events linking negative transitions in both drug use and labour market trajectories were of primary importance, demarcating critical initiation and transitional events in individual risk trajectories. These results challenge conventional assumptions about the primacy of drug use in determining employment outcomes among PWID and suggest the importance of multidimensional support to mitigate the initiation, accumulation and entrenchment of labour market and drug-related disadvantage. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  10. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Al-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs.

  11. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, Ahmed A; Al-Rashoudi, Abdualltef H; Al-Eisa, Abdulrhman A; Addar, Abdullah M; Al-Hargan, Abdullah H; Al-Jerian, Albaraa A; Al-Omair, Abdullah A; Al-Sheddi, Ahmed I; Al-Nowaiser, Hussam I; Al-Kathiri, Omar A; Al-Hassan, Abdullah H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs.

  12. CONCURRENT PREDICTORS OF DRUG USE CONSEQUENCES AMONG U.S. AND RUSSIAN ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Gunning, Melissa; Lisha, Nadra E; Rohrbach, Louise A; Kniazev, Vadim; Masagutov, Radik

    2009-01-01

    We describe correlates of drug use-consequences related variables (addiction concern, problem consequences, and drinking alcohol/using drugs while driving) among two samples of high school students, one in the Russian Federation (n = 365), and one in the United States (n = 965). The correlates used in the analyses are based on the Theory of Triadic Influence, which organizes predictors of adolescent substance misuse into intrapersonal (e.g., depression), cultural/attitudinal (e.g., perceived harmfulness of drug use), and interpersonal (friend and family drug use) types of influence. We examined measures from each type of influence, along with drug use (cigarette and alcohol use) as correlates. Overall, correlates from each of the types of influence were significant predictors of substance use consequences variables in both samples. The most consistent predictors of consequences across countries were depression, perceived harmfulness of drug use, family substance abuser, friends' substance use, and last 30-day cigarette use. These results suggest that the Theory of Triadic Influence is relevant to both countries. We speculate that drug prevention efforts may share common features among some U.S. and Russian youth populations.

  13. Religion as a protective factor against drug use among brazilian university students: a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carolina Gomes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between religiosity and drug use among Brazilian university students. METHODS: This manuscript is part of the "First Nationwide Survey on the Use of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs among College Students in the 27 Brazilian State Capitals". In this study, 12,595 university students were divided into two groups according to their attendance at religious services: frequent attenders (FR; 39.1% and non-frequent attenders (NFR; 60.8%. Subsequently, we analyzed their responses to a structured, anonymous questionnaire on drug use and other behaviors. Individual multivariate logistic regression models tested the association between religiosity and drug use (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and at least one illicit drug. RESULTS: Drug use over the last 30 days was higher among NFR students even after controlling for demographic variables. NFR students were more likely to use alcohol OR = 2.52; 95% CI: 2.08-3.06, tobacco (2.83; 2.09-3.83, marijuana (2.09; 1.39-3.11 and at least one illicit drug (1.42; 1.12-1.79 compared to FR students. CONCLUSION: Religiosity was found to be a strongly protective factor against drug use among Brazilian university students. However, more studies are needed to identify the mechanisms by which religiosity exerts this protective influence.

  14. Injection and Non-Injection Drug Use and Infectious Disease in Baltimore City: Differences by Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Larry; Khan, Maria; Clifford, Lisa; Harrell, Paul T.; Latimer, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The current study examines differences in the prevalence of biologically-confirmed hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV, and coinfection between Black and White adult cocaine/heroin users across three drug use subgroups identified in previous research (Harrell et al, 2012): non-injection smoking crack/nasal heroin users, heroin injectors, and polydrug injectors. Results 59% of the 482 participants in the study were male. Significant race differences emerged between drug use subgroup memberships. Non-injection smoking crack/nasal heroin users were predominantly Black (75%), while heroin injectors and polydrug injectors were predominantly White (69% and 72%, respectively). Polydrug injectors accounted for nearly three quarters of the HCV positive diagnoses in Whites. Though HIV disease status, stratified by race, did not differ significantly between drug use subgroups, the non-injection smoking crack/nasal heroin subgroup contained over half of the HIV positive diagnoses in the sample and was predominantly Black. Despite much lower rates of injection, Blacks (8%) had a higher prevalence of coinfection than Whites (3%; X2 (2) = 6.18, p = .015). Conclusions The current findings are consistent with trends in recent HIV transmission statistics where sexual activity has overtaken injection drug use as a HIV risk factor. The current findings also provide further support to the notion of injection drug use as an exceedingly high-risk behavior for HCV and coinfection, specifically those who are polysubstance injectors. PMID:24837755

  15. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q 25 , 75 ) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men ( P stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Patient-provider communication with HIV-positive women about abnormal Pap test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigfall, Lisa T; Bynum, Shalanda A; Friedman, Daniela B; Brandt, Heather M; Richter, Donna L; Glover, Saundra H; Hébert, James R

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine communication between women living with human immunodeficiency virus (WLH) and health care providers (HCPs) regarding abnormal Pap tests. During the period of March 2011 through April 2012, 145 WLH were recruited from Ryan White funded clinics and community-based AIDS service organizations located in the southeastern United States. WLH who had an abnormal Pap test (69%, n = 100/145) were asked if their HCP shared and explained information about abnormal Pap tests. The authors performed chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression analyses using Stata I/C 13. HCPs shared information about abnormal Pap tests with 60% of participants, and explained the information they shared to 78% of those. Health literate participants were more than three times as likely to have read the information received about abnormal Pap tests (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-10.23), and almost five times as likely to have understood the cancer information they read (aOR = 4.70, 95% CI 1.55-14.24). Knowing other women who had had an abnormal Pap test was not significantly associated with cancer information seeking or processing after controlling for confounding factors. The present findings underscore the need to increase WLH's health literacy as an intermediate step to improving patient-provider communication among WLH. Lay sources of cancer information for WLH warrant further study.

  17. The Life Journeys Of Young Women Project: objectives, design, and recruitment results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Emily J; Giles, Lynne C; Davies, Michael J; Moore, Vivienne M

    2011-07-01

    The Life Journeys of Young Women Project is the first population-based study to examine the role of economic uncertainty throughout early adulthood on age at first childbirth. A retrospective cross-sectional component was added to an existing cohort study that is based on a birth cohort of women born during 1973-1975 in Adelaide, South Australia (n ∼ 1,000). An event history calendar instrument was used to obtain data regarding a range of life domains including partnering, educational attainment, home ownership, higher education debt, employment, and pregnancies over a 20-year period (sometimes as detailed as at monthly intervals). Interviews were conducted between 2007 and 2009. An analysis framework applying time-varying and time-constant survival analysis techniques within a life-course framework was developed that will guide analyses to examine the role of duration and life-course timing of economic uncertainty on age at first childbirth. This paper discusses study objectives and design, fieldwork procedures, planned statistical analyses, and recruitment outcomes, focusing on novel features that would facilitate analogous epidemiologic research.

  18. Earning, Spending, and Drug Use in a Therapeutic Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shrinidhi; DeFulio, Anthony; Jarvis, Brantley P; Holtyn, August F; Silverman, Kenneth

    2017-06-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic, relapsing health problem that is associated with the degree to which individuals choose small, immediate monetary outcomes over larger, delayed outcomes. This study was a secondary analysis exploring the relation between financial choices and drug use in opioid-dependent adults in a therapeutic workplace intervention. Sixty-seven participants were randomly assigned to a condition in which access to paid job training was contingent upon naltrexone adherence (N = 35) or independent of naltrexone adherence (N = 32). Participants could earn approximately $10 per hour for 4 hours every weekday and could exchange earnings for gift cards or bill payments each weekday. Urine was collected and tested for opiates and cocaine thrice weekly. Participants' earning, spending, and drug use were not related to measures of delay discounting obtained prior to the intervention. When financial choices were categorized based on drug use during the intervention, however, those with less frequent drug use or frequent use of one drug spent a smaller proportion of their daily earnings and maintained a higher daily balance than those who frequently tested positive for both drugs (i.e., opiates and cocaine). Several patterns described the relation between cumulative earning and spending including no saving, periods of saving, and sustained saving. One destructive effect of drug use may be that it creates a perpetual zero-balance situation in the lives of users, which in turn prevents them from gaining materials that could help to break the cycle of addiction.

  19. Musical preference as an indicator of adolescent drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, A J; Barnard, M; McKeganey, N P

    1997-10-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate whether a relationship exists between adolescent drug use and identification with styles of music linked to specific youth culture. Survey data were collected by researchers, under exam conditions, from two contrasting samples of Scottish secondary schoolchildren. Fieldwork was conducted in five comprehensive schools in the city of Dundee in 1994 and five comprehensive schools in the rural area of Perth and Kinross District in 1996. Questionnaires were administered to two randomly selected mixed ability classes in each of the four compulsory school years (S1 to S4), at each participating school. The eventual sample (n = 1523) was approximately 10% of all children in these school years from the geographical areas surveyed. Comparisons were made between life-time measures of legal and illegal drug use and current favourite style of music. Although few children in this study had ever taken the drug ecstasy (MDMA), 'fans' of rave music were more likely to have used drugs than those who preferred other styles of music. This relationship held true across a range of drugs used, across two geographical areas, over time and controlling for age, gender and parental social class. The paper is one of the first to quantify a possible relationship between drug use and music style. On the basis of the evidence presented, a significant relationship was found between identification with rave music and life-time drug use.

  20. Gender moderates the influence of psychosocial factors and drug use on HAART adherence in the context of HIV and childhood sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah M; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Ranby, Krista W

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine gender moderation within a stress and coping model of HIV medication adherence in adults with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Sequelae of CSA, including negative coping, psychological distress, and drug use, interfere with adherence to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). These obstacles to adherence are likely moderated by gender. Gender may particularly influence the mediational effect of drug use on adherence. Participants included 206 adults living with HIV/AIDS and CSA. Categorical/continuous variable methodology in a structural equation modeling framework was used to test a multigroup model with women and men. Gender significantly moderated several effects in the model. For women, the effect of psychological distress on HAART adherence was mediated by drug use and the effect of drug use on viral load was mediated by HAART adherence. Among men, drug use did not significantly impact adherence. Since gender appears to moderate the effect of drug use on medication adherence, it is particularly important to address drug use within the context of HIV disease management in women with a history of CSA. Further, interventions to increase HAART adherence should take trauma history, gender, and drug abuse into account when assessing efficacy.

  1. Compulsive buying: Earlier illicit drug use, impulse buying, depression, and adult ADHD symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Judith S; Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, David W; Leukefeld, Carl G

    2015-08-30

    This longitudinal study examined the association between psychosocial antecedents, including illicit drug use, and adult compulsive buying (CB) across a 29-year time period from mean age 14 to mean age 43. Participants originally came from a community-based random sample of residents in two upstate New York counties. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to study the relationship between the participant's earlier psychosocial antecedents and adult CB in the fifth decade of life. The results of the multivariate linear regression analyses showed that gender (female), earlier adult impulse buying (IB), depressive mood, illicit drug use, and concurrent ADHD symptoms were all significantly associated with adult CB at mean age 43. It is important that clinicians treating CB in adults should consider the role of drug use, symptoms of ADHD, IB, depression, and family factors in CB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Compulsive Buying: Earlier Illicit Drug Use, Impulse Buying, Depression, and Adult ADHD Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Judith S.; Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, David W.; Leukefeld, Carl G.

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the association between psychosocial antecedents, including illicit drug use, and adult compulsive buying (CB) across a 29-year time period from mean age 14 to mean age 43. Participants originally came from a community-based random sample of residents in two upstate New York counties. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to study the relationship between the participant’s earlier psychosocial antecedents and adult CB in the fifth decade of life. The results of the multivariate linear regression analyses showed that gender (female), earlier adult impulse buying (IB), depressive mood, illicit drug use, and concurrent ADHD symptoms were all significantly associated with adult CB at mean age 43. It is important that clinicians treating CB in adults should consider the role of drug use, symptoms of ADHD, IB, depression, and family factors in CB. PMID:26165963

  3. Is the quality of brief motivational interventions for drug use in primary care associated with subsequent drug use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfai, Tibor P; Cheng, Debbie M; Bernstein, Judith A; Palmisano, Joseph; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine A; Goodness, Tracie; Saitz, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although a number of brief intervention approaches for drug use are based on motivational interviewing (MI), relatively little is known about whether the quality of motivational interviewing skills is associated with intervention outcomes. The current study examined whether indices of motivational interviewing skill were associated with subsequent drug use outcomes following two different MI-based brief interventions delivered in primary care; a 15 min Brief Negotiated Interview (BNI) and a 45 min adaptation of motivational interviewing (MOTIV). Audio recordings from 351 participants in a randomized controlled trial for drug use in primary care were coded using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Scale, (MITI Version 3.1.1). Separate negative binomial regression analyses, stratified by intervention condition, were used to examine the associations between six MITI skill variables and the number of days that the participant used his/her main drug 6 weeks after study entry. Only one of the MITI variables (% reflections to questions) was significantly associated with the frequency of drug use in the MOTIV condition and this was opposite to the hypothesized direction (global p=0.01, adjusted IRR 1.50, 95%CI: 1.03-2.20 for middle vs. lowest tertile [higher skill, more drug use]. None were significantly associated with drug use in the BNI condition. Secondary analyses similarly failed to find consistent predictors of better drug outcomes. Overall, this study provides little evidence to suggest that the level of MI intervention skills are linked with better drug use outcomes among people who use drugs and receive brief interventions in primary care. Findings should be considered in light of the fact that data from the study are from negative trial of SBI and was limited to primary care patients. Future work should consider alternative ways of examining these process variables (i.e., comparing thresholds of proficient versus non-proficient skills) or

  4. Geographical Variation in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Elderly Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakarias, Johanne Købstrup; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Nørgaard, Ane

    2016-01-01

    of behavioral symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential geographical variances in use of antipsychotic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: A registry-based cross-sectional study in the entire elderly population of Denmark (≥65 years) conducted in 2012. Data included place of residence, prescriptions filled......, and hospital discharge diagnoses. Antipsychotic drug use among elderly with (n = 34,536) and without (n = 931,203) a dementia diagnosis was compared across the five regions and 98 municipalities in Denmark, adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: In 2012, the national prevalence of antipsychotic drug use was 20...

  5. Labeling disorder: the relationship between conduct problems and drug use in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Morihisa,Rogerio Shigueo; Barroso,Lúcia Pereira; Scivoletto,Sandra

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify how conduct disorder and conduct problems are associated with gender, age at onset of drug use and categories of drugs used. METHOD: A test of association was conducted between the presence of comorbidity and gender. Mean age of first use of each drug was compared to mean age of first arrest, of first robbery/theft, and of first drug dealing. RESULTS: In this sample, approximately 59% of adolescents had already robbed and/or stolen, 38.6% had already been arrested, 32.3% ...

  6. Disparities in bone density measurement history and osteoporosis medication utilisation in Swiss women: results from the Swiss Health Survey 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Born Rita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although factors associated with the utilisation of bone density measurement (BDM and osteoporosis treatment have been regularly assessed in the US and Canada, they have not been effectively analysed in European countries. This study assessed factors associated with the utilisation of BDM and osteoporosis medication (OM in Switzerland. Methods The Swiss Health Survey 2007 data included self-reported information on BDM and OM for women aged 40 years and older who were living in private households. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify sociodemographic, socioeconomic, healthcare-related and osteoporosis risk factors associated with BDM and OM utilisation. Results The lifetime prevalence of BDM was 25.6% (95% CI: 24.3-26.9% for women aged 40 years and older. BDM utilisation was associated with most sociodemographic factors, all the socioeconomic and healthcare-related factors, and with major osteoporosis risk factors analysed. The prevalence of current OM was 7.8% (95% CI: 7.0-8.6% and it was associated with some sociodemographic and most healthcare-related factors but only with one socioeconomic factor. Conclusions In Swiss women, ever having had a BDM and current OM were low and utilisation disparities exist according to sociodemographic, socioeconomic and healthcare-related factors. This might foster further health inequalities. The reasons for these findings should be addressed in further studies of the elderly women, including those living in institutions.

  7. Analysis of chromosome lesions in women with gynecological disorders, residing in territories contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T. I.; Kondrashova, T. V.; Krikunova, L. I.; Shenterva, N. I.; Song, Jie Young; Han, Young Soo; Yun, Yeon Sook

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous levels of chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of 95 women were analyzed in the course of medical examination of residents of Bryansk region territories (Klintsy district, and the town of Klintsy) contaminated after the Chernobyl NPP accident. All recognizable chromosome lesion types were scored in the first in vitro division metaphases stained with azure-eosin. The mean total aberration frequency in the sample studied was 5.1±0.4 per 100 metaphases, the main contribution being made by chromatid deletions, which is typical for a normal spontaneous aberration pattern. Abnormal patterns, including significantly elevated aberration frequencies and/or presence of chromosome type exchange aberrations, were found in 13 women. The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible correlation between cytogenetic anomalies and reproductive system disorders and/or the level of radiation contamination of the territory. As a result of our estimation, it was shown that cytogenetic anomalies were in fact higher in subjects residing in territories with a higher radiation contamination; however, the difference was statistically insignificant. The frequency of cytogenetic anomalies was higher in women with gynecological disorders including hormone-dependent and inflammatory (17%) than in healthy women (7%). This difference was statistically significant for subjects with hormone-dependent diseases of the female reproductive system, but not in patients with inflammatory disorders

  8. Low-fat dietary pattern and cardiovascular disease: results from the Women's Health Initiative randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Ross L; Aragaki, Aaron K; Van Horn, Linda; Thomson, Cynthia A; Beresford, Shirley Aa; Robinson, Jennifer; Snetselaar, Linda; Anderson, Garnet L; Manson, JoAnn E; Allison, Matthew A; Rossouw, Jacques E; Howard, Barbara V

    2017-07-01

    Background: The influence of a low-fat dietary pattern on the cardiovascular health of postmenopausal women continues to be of public health interest. Objective: This report evaluates low-fat dietary pattern influences on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and mortality during the intervention and postintervention phases of the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. Design: Participants comprised 48,835 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 y; 40% were randomly assigned to a low-fat dietary pattern intervention (target of 20% of energy from fat), and 60% were randomly assigned to a usual diet comparison group. The 8.3-y intervention period ended in March 2005, after which >80% of surviving participants consented to additional active follow-up through September 2010; all participants were followed for mortality through 2013. Breast and colorectal cancer were the primary trial outcomes, and coronary heart disease (CHD) and overall CVD were additional designated outcomes. Results: Incidence rates for CHD and total CVD did not differ between the intervention and comparison groups in either the intervention or postintervention period. However, CHD HRs comparing these groups varied strongly with baseline CVD and hypertension status. Participants without prior CVD had an intervention period CHD HR of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.87) or 1.04 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.19) if they were normotensive or hypertensive, respectively ( P -interaction = 0.003). The CHD benefit among healthy normotensive women was partially offset by an increase in ischemic stroke risk. Corresponding HRs in the postintervention period were close to null. Participants with CVD at baseline (3.4%) had CHD HRs of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.93) and 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.55) in the intervention and postintervention periods, respectively. However, various lines of evidence suggest that results in women with CVD or hypertension at baseline are confounded by postrandomization use of cholesterol-lowering medications

  9. Aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa: survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BJ Erasmus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a survey done among nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council. The survey was carried out in the last quarter of 2003. The purpose of the survey was to investigate aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa and to make recommendations on how their working environment could be improved. The important findings were that pay-related issues dominate as the main problem at work. Improving pay scales and being paid according to extra experience, responsibilities and qualifications could improve the nurses’ working environment. Furthermore, training opportunities, medical insurance and equal opportunities should be addressed as a matter of urgency. In general, respondents had a positive attitude towards their job, which leaves the impression that nurses still regard their jobs as something they do for the sake of a service to the community and not only for the money they earn.

  10. Illicit drug use and neonatal outcomes: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempf, Ashley H

    2007-11-01

    Although the neonatal consequences of tobacco and alcohol exposure are well established, the evidence related to prenatal illicit drug use is less consistent despite prevalent views to the contrary. The many social, psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical risk factors for adverse birth outcomes associated with illicit drug use complicate the evaluation of neonatal effects. Placing emphasis on recent research, this review summarizes the epidemiologic literature on the neonatal impact of marijuana, opiate, and cocaine use. Of these drugs, cocaine use is most consistently related to fetal growth decrements and dose-response effects have been observed. However, studies to date have largely failed to control for associated social, psychosocial, and contextual factors. Additional recommendations for future research are provided. It is likely that interventions will need to address the factors surrounding drug use to greatly improve neonatal outcomes (e.g., social circumstances, poor nutrition, stress, infections).

  11. Teacher drug use: a response to occupational stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, W D; Short, A P

    1990-01-01

    Work-related stress is predicted to be correlated with wanting to leave the teaching profession and drug use. A stratified random sample of 500 Texas teachers was surveyed (56.5% responded), regarding working conditions, collegial and supervisory relationships, job satisfaction, rigidity of attitudes and drug use. Two-thirds of teachers may want to quit the profession, while 36.4 percent are likely to quit. Teachers report higher rates than a national sample of lifetime alcohol, amphetamine, and tranquilizer use and higher rates of alcohol use in the last year and last month. Selected measures of stress are correlated with drug use, particularly amphetamine use, over the lifetime, last year, and last month.

  12. Gendered contexts: psychopathy and drug use in relation to sex work and exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bethany G.; Verona, Edelyn

    2016-01-01

    Few scholars have examined psychopathology correlates of sex work. It has been suggested that sex work may reflect manifestations of impulsive-antisocial psychopathic traits (e.g., reckless disregard, delinquency) in women more than men. The current work examined relative contributions of drug dependence and distinct psychopathic features in relation to traditional forms of sex work (i.e., prostitution) in women, along with gender differences in psychopathy relationships with casual forms of sex exchange (i.e., trading sex for necessities). Study 1 included 171 community-dwelling women offenders, and Study 2 included 319 participants (42.3% women) with histories of drug use and/or violence. Participants completed the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version, prostitution was measured as self-report and/or public record data across studies, and sex exchange in Study 2 was assessed using a questionnaire based on prior research on sexual risk-taking. Findings across both studies demonstrated that while psychopathic traits, particularly impulsive-antisocial features, were associated with prostitution in women above the use of drugs, drug dependence did not moderate the relationship between psychopathic traits and prostitution in women. Analyses of Study 2 data revealed that impulsive-antisocial traits were associated with sex exchange at low, but not high, levels of interpersonal-affective traits across participants. As well, interpersonal-affective traits were significantly positively related to sex exchange in men and not significantly (and negatively) related in women. In sum, impulsive-antisocial traits related to prostitution among women, suggesting that women may manifest these traits within intimate contexts. Moreover, findings indicated gender differences in the manifestation of interpersonal-affective traits within sexual exchange contexts. PMID:27030996

  13. The association between childhood maltreatment, psychopathology, and adult sexual victimization in men and women: results from three independent samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, K. B.; McCutcheon, V. V.; Challa, M.; Agrawal, A.; Lynskey, M. T.; Conroy, E.; Statham, D. J.; Madden, P. A. F.; Henders, A. K.; Todorov, A. A.; Heath, A. C.; Degenhardt, L.; Martin, N. G.; Bucholz, K. K.; Nelson, E. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood maltreatment (CM) has consistently been linked with adverse outcomes including substance use disorders and adult sexual revictimization. Adult sexual victimization itself has been linked with psychopathology but has predominately been studied in women. The current investigation examines the impact of CM and co-occurring psychopathology on adult sexual victimization in men and women, replicating findings in three distinct samples. Method We investigated the association between continuous CM factor scores and adult sexual victimization in the Childhood Trauma Study (CTS) sample (N = 2564). We also examined the unique relationship between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adult sexual victimization while adjusting for co-occurring substance dependence and psychopathology. We replicated these analyses in two additional samples: the Comorbidity and Trauma Study (CATS; N = 1981) and the Australian Twin-Family Study of Alcohol Use Disorders (OZ-ALC; N = 1537). Results Analyses revealed a significant association with CM factor scores and adult sexual victimization for both men and women across all three samples. The CSA factor score was strongly associated with adult sexual victimization after adjusting for substance dependence and psychopathology; higher odds ratios were observed in men (than women) consistently across the three samples. Conclusions A continuous measure of CSA is independently associated with adult sexual trauma risk across samples in models that included commonly associated substance dependence and psychopathology as covariates. The strength of the association between this CSA measure and adult sexual victimization is higher in magnitude for men than women, pointing to the need for further investigation of sexual victimization in male community samples. PMID:26688007

  14. Messages that increase women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy: results from quantitative testing of advertising concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kathryn E; Donovan, Robert J; Bower, Carol; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Payne, Janet M; D'Antoine, Heather; Bartu, Anne E

    2014-01-13

    Public awareness-raising campaigns targeting alcohol use during pregnancy are an important part of preventing prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Despite this, there is little evidence on what specific elements contribute to campaign message effectiveness. This research evaluated three different advertising concepts addressing alcohol and pregnancy: a threat appeal, a positive appeal promoting a self-efficacy message, and a concept that combined the two appeals. The primary aim was to determine the effectiveness of these concepts in increasing women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy. Women of childbearing age and pregnant women residing in Perth, Western Australia participated in a computer-based questionnaire where they viewed either a control or one of the three experimental concepts. Following exposure, participants' intentions to abstain from and reduce alcohol intake during pregnancy were measured. Other measures assessed included perceived main message, message diagnostics, and potential to promote defensive responses or unintended consequences. The concepts containing a threat appeal were significantly more effective at increasing women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy than the self-efficacy message and the control. The concept that combined threat and self-efficacy is recommended for development as part of a mass-media campaign as it has good persuasive potential, provides a balance of positive and negative emotional responses, and is unlikely to result in defensive or unintended consequences. This study provides important insights into the components that enhance the persuasiveness and effectiveness of messages aimed at preventing prenatal alcohol exposure. The recommended concept has good potential for use in a future campaign aimed at promoting women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy.

  15. SisterTalk: final results of a culturally tailored cable television delivered weight control program for Black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risica, Patricia Markham; Gans, Kim M; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Kirtania, Usree; Lasater, Thomas M

    2013-12-27

    Obesity among Black women continues to exceed that of other women. Most weight loss programs created without reference to specific cultural contexts are less effective for Black than White women. Weight control approaches accessible to Black women and adapted to relevant cultural contexts are important for addressing this problem. This paper reports the final results of SisterTalk, the randomized controlled trial of a cable TV weight control program oriented toward Black women. A five group design included a comparison group and a 2 × 2 factorial comparison of a) interactive vs. passive programming and b) telephone social support vs no telephone support, with 12 weekly initial cable TV programs followed by 4 monthly booster videos. At baseline, 3, 8, and 12 months post randomization, telephone and in person surveys were administered on diet, physical activity, and physical measurements of height and weight were taken to calculate body mass index (BMI). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine differences over time, and between treatment and comparison groups. Dose variables reflecting use of the TV/video and written materials were also assessed. At 3 months, BMI, weight, and dietary fat were significantly lower and physical activity significantly higher among women exposed to the Cable TV intervention compared to the wait-list comparison group. Significant dietary fat differences were still observed at 8 and 12 month evaluations, but not BMI or physical activity differences. Main effects were not observed for interactive programming or enhanced social support at any time point. Within the intervention group, higher watching of the TV series and higher reading of educational materials were both (separately) associated with significantly lower dietary fat. Cable TV was an effective delivery channel to assist Black women with weight control, increasing physical activity and decreasing dietary fat during an initial intervention period, but only dietary

  16. Opioid addicted buprenorphine injectors: drug use during and after 12-weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or methadone in the Republic of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralishvili, Gvantsa; Otiashvili, David; Sikharulidze, Zura; Kamkamidze, George; Poole, Sabrina; Woody, George E

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of non-opioid drug use among opioid-addicted, buprenorphine injecting individuals in Georgia, during and after a 12-week course of buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) or methadone. Randomized controlled trial with daily observed Suboxone® or methadone and weekly counseling, urine tests and timeline followback (TLFB) in weeks 0-12 and 20, and the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, 20. Of the 80 patients (40/group, 4 women), 68 (85%) completed the 12-weeks of study treatment and 66 (82.5%) completed the 20-week follow-up. At baseline, injecting more than one drug in the last 30 days was reported by 68.4% of patients in the methadone and 72.5% in the Suboxone® groups. Drug use was markedly reduced in both treatment conditions but there were significant differences in the prevalence of specific drugs with more opioid (1.5 vs. 0.2%; p=0.03), less amphetamine (0.2 vs. 2.8%; pmethadone vs. Suboxone® groups. At the 20-week follow-up, TLFB results on the 34 that continued methadone or the 3 on Suboxone® showed less opioid (5.6 vs. 27.6%; p<0.001), illicit buprenorphine (2.7 vs. 13.8%; p=0.005), benzodiazepine (13.5 vs. 34.5%; p<0.001), and marijuana (2.8 vs. 20.7%; p<0.001) use than the 29 who did not continue opioid substitution therapy. Despite small but significant differences in opioid and other drug use, both treatments were highly effective in reducing opioid and non-opioid drug use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between concomitant psychiatric drug use, and patients' beliefs about and persistence with chronic cardiovascular medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hromadkova, L.; Heerdink, E. R.; Philbert, D.; Bouvy, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric disorders are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and may result in additional risk of non-adherence. No data on the influence of concomitant psychiatric drug use on patients' beliefs and persistence related to cardiovascular medication are available.

  18. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two…

  19. The Relationship between Student Illicit Drug Use and School Drug-Testing Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryoko; Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.

    This report provides information about drug testing by American secondary schools, based on results from national surveys. The purposes of this study are (1) to provide descriptive information on drug testing practices by schools from 1998 to 2001, and (2) to examine the association between drug testing by schools and reported drug use by…

  20. Drug use indicators at a secondary health care facility in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Drug-use indicators were measured in a secondary health care facility in Lagos, Nigeria. Method: Retrospective prescribing data was used and patient records were selected using a systematic sampling method. Results:The average number of drugs per patient was 3.5=1= 1.4, 14% of patients received at least ...

  1. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Alcohol- or Other Drug-Use Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports the results of the study in the area of alcohol- or other drug-use prevention, covering the following topics: (1) Health Education;…

  2. Participation in School Sports: Risk or Protective Factor for Drug Use among Black and White Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Marvin P.; Williams, Mary M.; Guilbault, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between participation in school-based sports and drug use among Black and White high school students, using data from participants in the National Educational Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS, NCES, 1988) and follow-up surveys in 1990 and 1992. While previous research produced inconsistent results, the present…

  3. Life Experiences, Identity and Adolescent Soft Drug Use in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Ed; De Goede, Marijn; Iedema, Jurijen; Maas, Cora; Duindam, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    Study examines the effects of adolescents' vocational and relationship experiences, adherence to non-traditional values, and parental divorce and involvement on adolescent soft drug use. Results reveal that vocational and relationship experiences in adolescence correlate with the use of soft drugs and adherence to non-conventional norms and values…

  4. College Drinking and Drug Use. The Duke Series in Child Development and Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Helene Raskin, Ed.; Rabiner, David L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Substance use among college students can result in serious academic and safety problems and have long-term negative repercussions. This state-of-the-art volume draws on the latest research on students' alcohol and drug use to provide useful suggestions for how to address this critical issue on college campuses. Leading researchers from multiple…

  5. Epidemiology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use among American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2002-01-01

    Presents information on the extent of alcohol use and other drug use among college students. Alcohol rates are very high among college students, with use higher among males than females. White students are highest in heavy drinking, black students are lowest and Hispanics are intermediate. Results indicate colleges should do more to reduce heavy…

  6. Relationship between Drugs Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors among Senior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yola Yuniaarti Herijanto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drugs use and risky sexual behavior among teenager are some of crucial problems arising in Indonesia. Statistic showed that there is an increasing prevalence in drugs use and risky sexual behavior among teenagers. This study was conducted to analyze the relationship between drugs use and risky sexual behaviors among high school students. Methods: An analytic study involving 432 students in 5 state high schools located in Kerees region Bandung, West Java, Indonesia, was carried out in 2013. The region was chosen due the high prevalence of substance abuse. The inclusion criteria were every high school students in the Karees region. The exclusion criteria were the students who refused to participate in the study, did not come when the sample was taken, and did not fill the questionnaire completely. The instruments used for the study were questionnaires with cross-sectional technique. Furthermore, the questionnaire used for analyzing drugs use was Addiction Severity Index-Lite Version (ASI-lite questionnaire; with additional questionnaire to analyze risky sexual behaviors. Results: Out of 432 students, 23.8% students already engaged to one or more risky sexual behavior. Among all respondents, the prevalence of students who had already done kissing was 22.7%, necking 9.3%, petting 7.2% and sexual intercourse 1.2%. Illegal drugs had been used at least once by 21.8% students. According to Chi-square test, drugs use and risky sexual behavior were related. Conclusions:The prevalence of both drugs use and risky sexual behaviors are high and students who use drugs are more prone to do risky sexual behavior.

  7. Effects of backpacking holidays in Australia on alcohol, tobacco and drug use of UK residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Copeland Jan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst alcohol and drug use among young people is known to escalate during short holidays and working breaks in international nightlife resorts, little empirical data are available on the impact of longer backpacking holidays on substance use. Here we examine changes in alcohol, tobacco and drug use when UK residents go backpacking in Australia. Methods Matched information on alcohol and drug use in Australia and the UK was collected through a cross sectional cohort study of 1008 UK nationals aged 18–35 years, holidaying in Sydney or Cairns, Australia, during 2005. Results The use of alcohol and other drugs by UK backpackers visiting Australia was common with use of illicit drugs being substantially higher than in peers of the same age in their home country. Individuals showed a significant increase in frequency of alcohol consumption in Australia compared to their behaviour in the UK with the proportion drinking five or more times per week rising from 20.7% (UK to 40.3% (Australia. Relatively few individuals were recruited into drug use in Australia (3.0%, cannabis; 2.7% ecstasy; 0.7%, methamphetamine. However, over half of the sample (55.0% used at least one illicit drug when backpacking. Risk factors for illicit drug use while backpacking were being regular club goers, being male, Sydney based, travelling without a partner or spouse, having been in Australia more than four weeks, Australia being the only destination on their vacation and drinking or smoking five or more days a week. Conclusion As countries actively seek to attract more international backpacker tourists, interventions must be developed that target this population's risk behaviours. Developing messages on drunkenness and other drug use specifically for backpackers could help minimise their health risks directly (e.g. adverse drug reactions and indirectly (e.g. accidents and violence as well as negative impacts on the host country.

  8. Immunohistochemical features of progesterone receptors expression of placental barrier in women with multiple pregnancies resulting from assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Zadorozhna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal disorders are one of the main known causes of miscarriage and preterm birth in multiple pregnancies resulting from assisted reproductive technology (ART. Progesterone and the number of its receptors play an important role in the preservation and prolongation of pregnancy and it is the pressing issue of our time. The study of placentas, as the main site of synthesis of progesterone, has high informative potential and it is the most important diagnostic object, and information received by its research is essential for the full conclusion on the causes, mechanisms, close and long-term effects of multiple pregnancy pathology. Aim. The aim of our study was to investigate immunohistochemical features of placentas from women with dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies in spontaneous fertilization and after use of assisted reproductive technology (ART. Methods and results. According to this goal we examined 94 women, 44 of whom had multiple pregnancies due to ART, 42 with separate multiple pregnancy and 38 women with a singleton pregnancy. We carried out clinical and statistical analysis of the course of pregnancy and childbirth in the studied groups. During the study it was found that multiple pregnancies due to assisted reproduction belong to the high risk of gestation, at which premature births occur much more frequently than in singleton pregnancies. We were the first to carry out the immunohistochemical study of placentas in which the highest expression of progesterone receptors in the nuclei of cells of decidua (45% related to the parent structure of the placenta from women with multiple pregnancies caused by ART is found. It is also found that with increasing gestational age, there has been a significant decrease in the expression of the activity of progesterone receptors (from 45 to 2.5%, regardless of the method of conception and the number of fetuses. Conclusions. The results of the study point to the definitive link of structures of

  9. Drug Use and Military Plans of High School Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Patrick M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Contrary to previous findings, drug use rates were not very different for various categories of prospective military servicemen. Findings suggest that there is currently no selection effect operating such that those who enter all-volunteer military service are more prone to drug abuse than their comparably educated age/sex mates. (Author/WI)

  10. What You Can Do about Drug Use in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This guide, part of the Drug-Free Communities Series, is a comprehensive overview of drug use and what can be done about it. It is directed toward individuals, specifically toward parents, asserting that change in the community needs to be reinforced by change at home. Information about alcohol and other drugs, their physiological effects, and how…

  11. An Empirical Examination of the Anomie Theory of Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dull, R. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between anomie theory, as measured by Srole's Anomie Scale, and self-admitted drug use in an adult population (N=1,449). Bivariate cross-comparison correlations indicated anomie was significantly correlated with several drug variables, but these associations were extremely weak and of little explanatory value.…

  12. Drug use among people who patronize beer parlours: The function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates big five personality factors and self-monitoring as predictors of drug use among people who patronize beer parlours within Ibadan metropolis. The study adopted expost facto design. Two hundred and twenty eight (228) people who patronize beer parlours were sampled using purposive sampling ...

  13. Drug Use Patterns and Socio-Demographic Profiles of Substance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Substance abuse is a critical problem in Botswana, yet empirical evidence on substance users is limited. The current study sought to examine patterns of drug use and sociodemographic profiles of clients who sought treatment at a substance abuse treatment centre in Gaborone, Botswana. Findings showed clients' age ...

  14. Prevalence of Psychoactive Drug Use by Taxi Drivers in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To ascertain the prevalence and nature of psychoactive drug use amongst taxi drivers in Nigeria. Materials and Method: A total of 192 taxi drivers in Enugu, South East Nigeria was studied using a questionnaire. Information obtained from the questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics of the drivers, ...

  15. Antipsychotic drug use and risk of pneumonia in elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, Wilma; Van Marum, Rob J.; Jansen, Paul A. F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between antipsychotic drug use and risk of pneumonia in elderly people. DESIGN: A nested case-control analysis. SETTING: Data were used from the PHARMO database, which collates information from community pharmacies and hospital discharge records.

  16. 5. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH IRRATIONAL DRUG USE AT A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    prevalence of irrational drug use and factors associated with it were investigated at Kapiri Mposhi District. Hospital ... markets and open areas by unqualified people. The misuse of medicines continues to be widespread and ... several key dimensions related to the rational use of drugs, such as average number of drugs per ...

  17. Prevalence and correlates of atypical patterns of drug use progression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and correlates of atypical patterns of drug use progression: findings from the South African Stress and Health Study. ... This paper attempts to address this gap by examining the prevalence and correlates of atypical patterns of drug progression among South Africans. Method: Data on substance use and other ...

  18. 12-step programs for reducing illicit drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Martin; Filges, Trine; Brännström, Lars

    2017-01-01

    12-step programs for reducing illicit drug use are neither better nor worse than other interventions Illicit drug abuse has serious and far-reaching implications for the abuser, their family members, friends, and society as a whole. Preferred intervention programs are those that effectively reduc...

  19. Educational Variables and Drug Use Among Puerto Rican Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Raul A.; And Others

    A longitudinal study of educational variables and drug use was conducted by interview with 635 young Puerto Rican adults. Half had been selected as representing a "high risk" population, half a "normal risk" population. Correlational analyses revealed that the use of all drugs was associated with a negative attitude toward…

  20. Antimalarial drug use among caregivers in Ghana | Abuaku | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Household surveys, using multi-stage sampling, were conducted in 2 sentinel districts, Wassa West and Kassena Nankana, established to monitor chloroquine resistance in the country. Five hundred caregivers were interviewed in each district to determine patterns of antimalarial drug use among caregivers of ...

  1. Sex work, drug use and sexual health risks: Occupational norms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that alcohol and drugs use among sex workers is shaped by the social organization of sex work, including normative expectations, social pressures, negative societal attitudes towards sex work and threats arising from the socio-cultural context of their lives and work. Drugs occupy an ambiguous position in the ...

  2. Stage of Alcohol and Drug Use among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werch, Chudley E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study examined stages of drug habit acquisition and change among college students, basing the proposed stages of drug use on the Multi-Component Motivational Stages prevention model. Surveys indicated the model helped explain the stages of substance use. The proportion of youths at each stage differed by type of drug. (SM)

  3. Drug use disorders among long distance commercial vehicle drivers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Substance use disorder occur among long distance commercial vehicle drivers, and there is a need to develop a system that identifies substance use disorders and provides treatment for drug users as part of a holistic approach against drugged-driving. Keywords: Drug-use disorders, long-distance commercial drivers, ...

  4. Illicit intravenous drug use in Johannesburg medical complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Illicit intravenous drug use in Johannesburg medical complications and prevalence of HIV infection. P.G. Williams, S.M. Ansell, F.J. Milne. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics ...

  5. Side effects of drugs used in directly observed treatment short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The study assessed the side effects of drugs used in directly observed treatment short course in a newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients at the chest unit of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital in Enugu State, Nigeria. Methods: A retrospective study, involving a 3-year review of case files of TB patients ...

  6. 42 CFR 456.703 - Drug use review program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic..., appropriate to this population, across providers and patients to determine the provider outliers whose... predetermined standards and of how they can obtain copies of them. (h) Confidentiality of patient related data...

  7. Student Drug Use and Driving: A University Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valois, Robert F.

    A survey of 857 students at a large midwestern university provided information regarding the frequency and type of drugs used by students at any time and shortly before driving. The drugs most frequently used at least once in the prior year were alcohol, marijauna, caffeine, and nicotine. Significant association was found between alcohol use…

  8. Empathy and Drug Use Behaviors among African-American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh B.; Clark, Trenette T.; Belgrave, Faye Z.

    2011-01-01

    The current study proposed that empathy may indirectly play a protective role for adolescents in drug use behaviors and that this relationship will be mediated by self-regulatory strategies found in drug refusal efficacy. We predict that empathy will be linked to prosocial behavior and aggression, though we do not believe that they will mediate…

  9. Selective Prevention: Addressing Vulnerability to Problem Drug Use in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Gregor; Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Bo, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Following the 2003 publication of the European Union (EU) Council Recommendations and the 2005-2008 and 2009-2012 EU Drugs Action Plans, increasing attention has been given in EU member states' drug policies to populations that are vulnerable to problem drug use (PDU). Monitoring data reported to the EMCDDA by designated agencies from 30 countries…

  10. Cracking down on Youth Tobacco May Influence Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Adams, Monica; Nihls, Annie; Kim, Hyo Yeon; Hunt, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of tobacco possession-use-purchase (PUP) law enforcement and illicit drug use and offers. Twenty-four towns were randomly assigned into two conditions. Both conditions focused on reducing minors' access to commercial sources of tobacco. The communities assigned to the experimental condition also increased their…

  11. Illicit drug use among adolescent students. A peer phenomenon?

    OpenAIRE

    Cousineau, D.; Savard, M.; Allard, D.

    1993-01-01

    Illicit drug use was studied in 2071 students 11 to 18 years of age. Almost all drug users had friends who consumed drugs, compared with only one third of those who did not use drugs. This suggests a bond between adolescent drug users, who form a distinct group of which most students are unaware.

  12. Fracture risk in women with type II diabetes. Results from a historical cohort with fracture follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob Præst; Jensen, Thomas; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2018-01-01

    with type II diabetes in a cohort of 6285 women followed on average (until major osteoporotic fracture (MOF), death or end of study) for 5.8 years. Information of fracture risk factors was obtained from a clinical database and from national registries. RESULTS: An elevated fracture risk was present......PURPOSE: To examine the independent association between type II diabetes and fracture risk in a population of predominantly postmenopausal women referred to a specialist clinic for osteoporosis evaluation. METHODS: Type II diabetes associated fracture risk were evaluated among to 229 patients....... Prevalent fractures (43.7 vs. 33.2%, p = 0.0010) and prevalent MOF (26.2 vs. 20.5% p = 0.038) were more common among patients with type II diabetes. The unadjusted incident fracture risk was increased with a higher relative risk of 42%. An elevated MOF hazard ratio was present (HR = 1.726, p = 0...

  13. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skårberg, Kurt; Nyberg, Fred; Engström, Ingemar

    2008-11-28

    The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. We interviewed six patients (four men and two women) with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area.

  14. Arthritis increases the risk for fractures--results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicole C; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Walitt, Brian T; Eaton, Charles B; Chen, Zhao

    2011-08-01

    To examine the relationship between arthritis and fracture. Women were classified into 3 self-reported groups at baseline: no arthritis (n = 83,295), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 63,402), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 960). Incident fractures were self-reported throughout followup. Age-adjusted fracture rates by arthritis category were generated, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to test the association between arthritis and fracture. After an average of 7.80 years, 24,137 total fractures were reported including 2559 self-reported clinical spinal fractures and 1698 adjudicated hip fractures. For each fracture type, age-adjusted fracture rates were highest in the RA group and lowest in the nonarthritic group. After adjustment for several covariates, report of arthritis was associated with increased risk for spine, hip, and any clinical fractures. Compared to the nonarthritis group, the risk of sustaining any clinical fracture in the OA group was HR 1.09 (95% CI 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) and HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.26, 1.75; p < 0.001) in the RA group. The risk of sustaining a hip fracture was not statistically increased in the OA group (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.98, 1.25; p = 0.122) compared to the nonarthritis group; however, the risk of hip fracture increased significantly (HR 3.03; 95% CI 2.03, 4.51; p < 0.001) in the RA group compared to the nonarthritis group. The increase in fracture risk confirms the importance of fracture prevention in patients with RA and OA.

  15. Sex as a biological variable: Drug use and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Anthony L; Hempel, Briana J; Clasen, Matthew M

    2018-04-01

    The study of sex as a biological variable is a necessary emphasis across a wide array of endpoints, including basic neuroscience, medicine, mental health, physiology and behavior. The present review summarizes work from clinical and preclinical populations on sex differences in drug use and abuse, ranging from initiation to escalation/dysregulation and from drug cessation/abstinence to relapse. These differences are analyzed in the context of the addiction cycle conceptualization of Koob and his colleagues and address patterns of drug use (binge/intoxication), motivation underlying its use (withdrawal/negative affect) and likelihood and causes of craving and relapse of drug taking (preoccupation/anticipation). Following this overview, an assessment of the basis for the reported sex differences is discussed in the context of the affective (rewarding and aversive) properties of drugs of abuse and how such properties and their balance vary with sex and contribute to drug intake. Finally, the interaction of sex with several experiential (drug history) and subject (age) factors and how these interactions affect reward and aversion are discussed to highlight the importance of understanding such interactions in predicting drug use and abuse. We note that sex as a biological variable remains one of critical evaluation and that such investigations of sex differences in drug use and abuse continue and be expanded to assess all facets of their mediation, including these affective properties, how their balance may be impacted by the multiple conditions under which drugs are taken and how this overall balance affects drug use and addiction vulnerability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Vecchioli Scaldazza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. Materials and Methods 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. Results A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups. Quality of life improved in both groups, whereas patient perception of urgency improved only in women treated with PTNS. Global impression of improvement revealed a greater satisfaction in patients treated with PTNS. Conclusion This study demonstrates the effectiveness of PTNS and ES with PFMT in women with OAB, but greater improvements were found with PTNS.

  17. A nationwide study of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug use among adults in Iceland 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirs, Drifa Palin; Pottegård, Anton; Halldórsson, Matthías; Zoëga, Helga

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we leveraged on complete nationwide prescription data for the total adult population in Iceland (N = 227,000) to examine how attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drugs have been used over the past decade. In particular, we aimed to describe the prevalence, incidence and duration of use of stimulants and atomoxetine, among adults (≥19 years) in Iceland, with regard to sex, age, type of drug and specialty of the prescribing physician. Our results indicate that the 1-year period prevalence of ADHD drug use rose, from 2.9 to 12.2 per 1000 adults between 2003 and 2012, with the most pronounced increases among young adults (19-24 years). The annual incidence increased 3 times, similarly among men and women. Extended-release methylphenidate formulations were the most commonly used ADHD drugs. Specialists in psychiatry initiated treatment in 79% of new adult ADHD drug users. The proportion of users still receiving treatment after 1 year varied from 43.0% (19-24 years), 57.2% (25-49 years) to 47.5% (50+ years). After 3 years, the corresponding proportions still on treatment were 12.4%, 24.5% and 24.3%, and after 5 years 7.9%, 15.9% and 16.8%. These results of increasing ADHD drug use and short treatment durations call for further investigation of the quality of treatment regimens for adults with ADHD and better follow-up of patients treated with ADHD drugs. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. The women made it work: fuzzy transitive closure of the results chain in a dengue prevention trial in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Andersson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified theory of planned behaviour (acronym CASCADA proposes that Conscious knowledge precedes a change in Attitude, which in turn precedes positive deviations from negative Subjective norms, intention to Change, perception of Agency to change, Discussion of possible action, and Action itself. We used this as a results chain to investigate gender-specific behaviour dynamics in chemical-free dengue prevention. Methods Secondary analysis of the Mexican arm of a cluster randomised controlled trial used household survey data on intermediate outcomes of dengue prevention behaviour. We used a matrix of odds ratios between outcomes, transformed to a symmetrical range (−1, 1, to compute fuzzy transitive closure of the results chain for control and intervention clusters, then for male and female respondents separately in each group. Transitive closure of a map computes the influence of each factor on each other factor, taking account of all influences in the system. Cumulative net influence was the sum of influences across the results chain. Results Responses of 5042 women and 1143 men in 45 intervention clusters contrasted with those of 5025 women and 1179 men in 45 control clusters. Control clusters showed a distal block (negative influence in the results chain with a cumulative net influence of 0.88; intervention clusters showed no such block and a cumulative net influence of 1.92. Female control respondents, like the overall control picture, showed a distal block, whereas female intervention responses showed no such blocks (cumulative net influence 0.78 and 1.73 respectively. Male control respondents showed weak distal blocks. Male intervention responses showed several new negative influences and a reduction of cumulative net influence (1.38 in control and 1.11 in intervention clusters. Conclusions The overall influence of the intervention across the results chain fits with the trial findings, but is different for women and

  19. Smoking, alcohol and drug use in youth and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Sydney; Hirsch, Lauren; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2017-05-01

    Previous research suggests a relationship between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use, however most studies have focused on adolescents or young adults, or clinically ascertained samples. To analyse population-based data on the relationship between ADHD and at-risk health behaviours in adolescents and adults. Data were derived from a Statistics Canada population-based health survey. The association between the diagnosis of ADHD and smoking, alcohol use, and illicit drug use was examined. Individuals with ADHD started smoking at a younger age. They consumed more alcoholic drinks on drinking days, and women with ADHD were more likely to engage in binge drinking. Women over the age of 25 and men with ADHD were more likely to meet alcohol-dependence lifetime criteria. People with ADHD were at a greater risk of drug misuse and dependence. People with ADHD are more likely to partake in at-risk behaviours. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

  20. Disentangling the Correlates of Drug Use in a Clinic and Community Sample: A Regression Analysis of the Associations between Drug Use, Years-of-School, Impulsivity, IQ, Working Memory, and Psychiatric Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Gene M; Dunn, Brian J; Mignone, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Years-of-school is negatively correlated with illicit drug use. However, educational attainment is positively correlated with IQ and negatively correlated with impulsivity, two traits that are also correlated with drug use. Thus, the negative correlation between education and drug use may reflect the correlates of schooling, not schooling itself. To help disentangle these relations we obtained measures of working memory, simple memory, IQ, disposition (impulsivity and psychiatric status), years-of-school and frequency of illicit and licit drug use in methadone clinic and community drug users. We found strong zero-order correlations between all measures, including IQ, impulsivity, years-of-school, psychiatric symptoms, and drug use. However, multiple regression analyses revealed a different picture. The significant predictors of illicit drug use were gender, involvement in a methadone clinic, and years-of-school. That is, psychiatric symptoms, impulsivity, cognition, and IQ no longer predicted illicit drug use in the multiple regression analyses. Moreover, high risk subjects (low IQ and/or high impulsivity) who spent 14 or more years in school used stimulants and opiates less than did low risk subjects who had spent IQ and years-of-school predicted whether someone ever became a smoker, whereas impulsivity predicted the frequency of drinking bouts, but years-of-school did not. Many subjects reported no use of one or more drugs, resulting in a large number of "zeroes" in the data sets. Cragg's Double-Hurdle regression method proved the best approach for dealing with this problem. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that years-of-school predicts lower levels of illicit drug use after controlling for IQ and impulsivity. This paper also highlights the advantages of Double-Hurdle regression methods for analyzing the correlates of drug use in community samples.

  1. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cross-Sectional Population Survey in Africa: NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M; Clarke, William; Kulich, Michal; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Breaud, Autumn; Olson, Matthew T; Marzinke, Mark A; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Fiamma, Agnès; Donnell, Deborah; Mbwambo, Jessie K K; Richter, Linda; Gray, Glenda; Sweat, Michael; Coates, Thomas J; Eshleman, Susan H

    2017-02-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug treatment benefits the treated individual and can prevent HIV transmission. We assessed ARV drug use in a community-randomized trial that evaluated the impact of behavioral interventions on HIV incidence. Samples were collected in a cross-sectional survey after a 3-year intervention period. ARV drug testing was performed using samples from HIV-infected adults at 4 study sites (Zimbabwe; Tanzania; KwaZulu-Natal and Soweto, South Africa; survey period 2009-2011) using an assay that detects 20 ARV drugs (6 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 3 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 9 protease inhibitors; maraviroc; raltegravir). ARV drugs were detected in 2011 (27.4%) of 7347 samples; 88.1% had 1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors ± 1-2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors. ARV drug detection was associated with sex (women>men), pregnancy, older age (>24 years), and study site (P < 0.0001 for all 4 variables). ARV drugs were also more frequently detected in adults who were widowed (P = 0.006) or unemployed (P = 0.02). ARV drug use was more frequent in intervention versus control communities early in the survey (P = 0.01), with a significant increase in control (P = 0.004) but not in intervention communities during the survey period. In KwaZulu-Natal, a 1% increase in ARV drug use was associated with a 0.14% absolute decrease in HIV incidence (P = 0.018). This study used an objective, biomedical approach to assess ARV drug use on a population level. This analysis identified factors associated with ARV drug use and provided information on ARV drug use over time. ARV drug use was associated with lower HIV incidence at 1 study site.

  2. Qualitative research: contributions to the study of drug use, drug abuse, and drug use(r)-related interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichter, Mark; Quintero, Gilbert; Nichter, Mimi; Mock, Jeremiah; Shakib, Sohaila

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how qualitative social science research has and can contribute to the emerging field of drug and alcohol studies. An eight-stage model of formative-reformative research is presented as a heuristic to outline the different ways in which qualitative research may be used to better understand micro and macro dimensions of drug use and distribution; more effectively design, monitor and evaluate drug use(r)-related interventions; and address the politics of drug/drug program representation. Tobacco is used as an exemplar to introduce the reader to the range of research issues that a qualitative researcher may focus upon during the initial stage of formative research. Ethnographic research on alcohol use among Native Americans is highlighted to illustrate the importance of closely examining ethnicity as well as class when investigating patterns of drug use. To familiarize the reader with qualitative research, we describe the range of methods commonly employed and the ways in which qualitative research may complement as well as contribute to quantitative research. In describing the later stages of the formative-reformative process, we consider both the use of qualitative research in the evaluation and critical assessment of drug use(r)-intervention programs, and the role of qualitative research in critically assessing the politics of prevention programs. Finally, we discuss the challenges faced by qualitative researchers when engaging in transdisciplinary research.

  3. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and mental health in young Australian women: Results from the Safe-D study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Emma T; Reavley, Nicola; Gorelik, Alexandra; Garland, Suzanne M; Wark, John D

    2017-12-15

    While there is evidence linking vitamin D status with mood, this association and its clinical significance remain uncertain. Moreover, few studies have focused on young, community-dwelling females. The Safe-D study examined the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels and mental health in young women. Participants completed an online questionnaire, wore a UV dosimeter to measure personal sun exposure and underwent a comprehensive health assessment. Serum 25OHD was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 353 healthy women aged 16-25 years, living in Victoria, Australia. Mental health measures included: Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), Kessler psychological distress scale (K10) and 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12), plus any self-reported mental disorder diagnoses or medication use. The prevalence of self-reported mental disorder was 26% and of vitamin D deficiency 27%. The median (Q1, Q3) scores for the PHQ-9, GAD-7, K10 and SF-12 MCS were 6 (3, 9), 5 (2, 8), 19 (15, 25) and 43 (34, 49), respectively. Serum 25OHD levels were not associated with mental health scores. Vitamin D status was not associated with a reported diagnosis of depression or anxiety. There was a low prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency and mental health symptoms, which may reduce study power. Our findings do not support an association between serum 25OHD levels and mental health status in young women. Longitudinal studies and randomized clinical trials investigating vitamin D and mood in young women are needed to confirm and extend these results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Attitudes and experiences of women on abortion (results from the qualitative research from the territory of Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoman Marija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents different views and experiences of women on abortion and contraception, on the basis of data obtained through in-depth interviews, within the project 'Policies of parenting'. The aim of the analysis is to obtain a deeper insight into the meaning that respondents have on abortion and discourse used when talking about this topic. The methodology is qualitative and includes an analysis of in-depth interviews with a sample of 30 respondents from the territory of Belgrade. The results show that respondents generally have, at least nominally, a positive attitude toward abortion and usually argue their positions through the discourse of 'individual decisions', but also 'feminist' discourse and 'anti-nationalist' discourse. Negative views are in the minority and the one that is the most prevalent are religious and discourse of 'naturalization' which includes the belief that motherhood, birth and practices associated with parenting are natural women functions and natural role of women in society. However, the deeper meaning behind the persons' declarative statement is often a mixing of positive and negative discourses, which indicates that respondents have not quite clear and precise views. This, however, should not be surprising, because in addition to the dominant public discourses on abortion which generally are not positive and still pronounced conservatism towards women's sexuality in our society (and the silence on this subject it is logical that such contextual factors refract on a personal level respondents. In addition to these, the paper discusses the nationalist and anti-nationalist discourses and 'denaturalization'.

  5. Whole Body Vibration Treatments in Postmenopausal Women Can Improve Bone Mineral Density: Results of a Stimulus Focussed Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, Antonio; Bonci, Tecla; Bull, Anthony M J

    2016-01-01

    Whole body vibration treatment is a non-pharmacological intervention intended to stimulate muscular response and increase bone mineral density, particularly for postmenopausal women. The literature related to this topic is controversial, heterogeneous, and unclear despite the prospect of a major clinical effect.The aim of this study was to identify and systematically review the literature to assess the effect of whole body vibration treatments on bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with a specific focus on the experimental factors that influence the stimulus. Nine studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 527 postmenopausal women and different vibration delivery designs. Cumulative dose, amplitudes and frequency of treatments as well as subject posture during treatment vary widely among studies. Some of the studies included an associated exercise training regime. Both randomized and controlled clinical trials were included. Whole body vibration was shown to produce significant BMD improvements on the hip and spine when compared to no intervention. Conversely, treatment associated with exercise training resulted in negligible outcomes when compared to exercise training or to placebo. Moreover, side-alternating platforms were more effective in improving BMD values than synchronous platforms and mechanical oscillations of magnitude higher than 3 g and/or frequency lower than 25 Hz were also found to be effective. Treatments with a cumulative dose over 1000 minutes in the follow-up period were correlated to positive outcomes.Our conclusion is that whole body vibration treatments in elderly women can reduce BMD decline.However, many factors (e.g., amplitude, frequency and subject posture) affect the capacity of the vibrations to propagate to the target site; the adequate level of stimulation required to produce these effects has not yet been defined. Further biomechanical analyses to predict the propagation of the vibration waves along the body

  6. COMPARISON OF THE RESULTS OF BLOOD GLUCOSE SELFMONITORING AND CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH PREVIOUS DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Dreval'

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy is one of the indications for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. The data on its efficiency in pregnant women are contradictory.Aim: To compare the results of blood glucose self-monitoring (SMBG and CGM in pregnant women with previous diabetes mellitus.Materials and methods: We performed a cross-sectional comparative study of glycemia in 18 pregnant women with previous type 1 (87.8% of patients and type 2 diabetes (22.2% of patients with various degrees of glycemic control. Their age was 27.7 ± 4.9 year. At study entry, the patients were at 17.2 ± 6.1 weeks of gestation. CGM and SMBG were performed in and by all patients for the duration of 5.4 ± 1.5 days. Depending on their HbA1c levels, all patients were divided into two groups: group 1 – 12 women with the HbA1c above the target (8.5 ± 1%, and group 2 – 6 women with the HbA1c levels within the target (5.6 ± 0.3%.Results: According to SMBG results, women from group 2 had above-the-target glycemia levels before breakfast, at 1 hour after breakfast and at bedtime: 6.2 ± 1.6, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 5.7 ± 1.9 mmol/L, respectively. According to CGM, patients from group 1 had higher postprandial glycemia than those from group 2 (8.0 ± 2.1 and 6.9 ± 1.8 mmol/L, respectively, p = 0.03. The analysis of glycemia during the day time revealed significant difference between the groups only at 1 hour after dinner (7.1 ± 1.4 mmol/L in group 1 and 5.8 ± 0.9 mmol/L in group 2, р = 0.041 and the difference was close to significant before lunch (6.0 ± 2.2 mmol/L in group 1 and 4.8 ± 1.0 mmol/L in group 2, р = 0.053. Comparison of SMBG and CGM results demonstrated significant difference only at one timepoint (at 1 hour after lunch and only in group 1: median glycemia was 7.4 [6.9; 8.1] mmol/L by SMBG and 6 [5.4; 6.6] mmol/L by CGM measurement (р = 0.001. Lower median values by CGM measurement could be explained by averaging of three successive measurements carried out in the

  7. Biological markers of drug use in the club setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brenda A; Furr-Holden, Debra; Johnson, Mark B; Holder, Harold; Voas, Robert; Keagy, Carolyn

    2009-03-01

    The prevalence of drug and alcohol use among patrons of clubs featuring electronic music dance events was determined by using biological assays at entrance and exit. Using a portal methodology that randomly selects groups of patrons on arrival at clubs, oral assays for determining level and type of drug use and level of alcohol use were obtained anonymously. Patrons provided self-reported data on their personal characteristics. A total of 362 patrons were interviewed at entrance and provided oral assay data, and 277 provided data at both entrance and exit. Overall, one quarter of all patrons surveyed at entrance were positive for some type of drug use. Based on our exit sample, one quarter of the sample was positive at exit. Individual drugs most prevalent at entrance or exit included cocaine, marijuana, and amphetamines/stimulants. Only the amphetamine/stimulant category increased significantly from entrance to exit. Drug-using patrons arrive at the club already using drugs; few patrons arrive with no drug use and leave with detectable levels of drug use. Clubs vary widely in drug-user prevalence at entrance and exit, suggesting that both events and club policies and practices may attract different types of patrons. Approximately one half of the total entrance sample arrived with detectable alcohol use, and nearly one fifth arrived with an estimated blood alcohol concentration of .08 or greater. Based on our exit sample data, one third of patrons were intoxicated, and slightly less than one fifth were using both drugs and alcohol at exit. Clubs attract a wide array of emerging adults, with both genders and all ethnicities well represented. Clubs also attract emerging adults who are not in college and who are working full time. At clubs featuring electronic music dance events, drug use and/or high levels of alcohol use were detected using biological assays from patrons at entrance and exit from the clubs. Thus, these clubs present a potentially important location

  8. Opioid analgesic administration in patients with suspected drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreling, Maria Clara Giorio Dutra; Mattos-Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de

    2017-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of patients suspected of drug use according to the nursing professionals' judgement, and compare the behavior of these professionals in opioid administration when there is or there is no suspicion that patient is a drug user. A cross-sectional study with 507 patients and 199 nursing professionals responsible for administering drugs to these patients. The Chi-Square test, Fisher's Exact and a significance level of 5% were used for the analyzes. The prevalence of suspected patients was 6.7%. The prevalence ratio of administration of opioid analgesics 'if necessary' is twice higher among patients suspected of drug use compared to patients not suspected of drug use (p = 0.037). The prevalence of patients suspected of drug use was similar to that of studies performed in emergency departments. Patients suspected of drug use receive more opioids than patients not suspected of drug use. Identificar a prevalência de pacientes com suspeita de uso de drogas conforme opinião de profissionais de enfermagem e comparar a conduta desses profissionais na administração de opioides quando há ou não suspeita de que o paciente seja usuário de drogas. Estudo transversal com 507 pacientes e 199 profissionais de enfermagem responsáveis pela administração de medicamentos a esses pacientes. Para as análises foram utilizados os testes de Qui-Quadrado, Exato de Fisher e um nível de significância de 5%. A prevalência de pacientes suspeitos foi 6,7%. A razão de prevalência de administração de analgésicos opioides "se necessário" é duas vezes maior entre os pacientes suspeitos em relação aos não suspeitos (p=0,037). A prevalência de suspeitos foi semelhante à de estudos realizados em departamentos de emergência. Os suspeitos de serem usuários de drogas recebem mais opioides do que os não suspeitos.

  9. Effects of baseline problematic alcohol and drug use on internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajecki, Mikael; Berman, Anne H; Sinadinovic, Kristina; Andersson, Claes; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Hedman, Erik; Rück, Christian; Lindefors, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Patients' problematic substance use prevalence and effects were explored in relation to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder. At baseline and treatment conclusion, 1601 ICBT patients were assessed with self-rated measures for alcohol and drug use (AUDIT/DUDIT), depressive symptoms (MADRS-S), panic disorder symptoms (PDSS-SR) and social anxiety symptoms (LSAS-SR). Problematic substance use (AUDIT ≥ 8 for men, ≥ 6 for women; DUDIT ≥ 1) occurred among 32.4% of the patients; 24.1% only alcohol, 4.6% only drugs, and 3.7% combined alcohol and drug use. Hazardous alcohol use and probable alcohol dependence negatively affected panic disorder outcomes, and hazardous drug use led to worse social anxiety outcomes. Depression outcomes were not affected by substance use. Treatment adherence was negatively affected by problematic drug use among men and 25-34 year olds; combined substance use negatively affected adherence for women and 35-64 year olds. Problematic substance use does not preclude ICBT treatment but can worsen outcomes, particularly problematic alcohol use for panic disorder patients and hazardous drug use for social anxiety patients. ICBT clinicians should exercise particular caution when treating men and younger patients with problematic drug use, and women or older patients with combined substance use.

  10. Differences in the Access to Sterilization between Women Living and Not Living with HIV: Results from the GENIH Study, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Regina Maria; Cabral, Cristiane da Silva; do Lago, Tania di Giacomo; Pinho, Adriana de Araujo

    2016-01-01

    sterilization are observed depending on the timing and the type of sterilization procedure. The probability of obtaining an interval sterilization is significantly lower for WLHIV compared to those not living with HIV. The reverse occurs regarding postpartum sterilization. Although sterilization is mainly performed in conjunction with caesarean section in Brazil, it is evident that caesarean sections are not the sole factor increasing the risk of sterilization among WLHIV. The results indicate barriers in the access to services offering interval sterilization for WLHIV and certain facilitation in obtaining the procedure in conjunction with caesarean section. Health policy makers at local and national levels should promote institutional changes in order to facilitate access to interval sterilization and to confront the sensitive discussion of WLHIV's eligibility for postpartum sterilization. It is also urgent to increase access to a wider range of contraceptive methods for WLHIV and promote dual method protection strategies. Moreover, since condom use may decrease in the future in the context of the preventive effect of antiretroviral therapy, promoting dual methods will expand the choices regarding the reproductive rights of women living with HIV.

  11. Differences in the Access to Sterilization between Women Living and Not Living with HIV: Results from the GENIH Study, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria Barbosa

    infection at sterilization are observed depending on the timing and the type of sterilization procedure. The probability of obtaining an interval sterilization is significantly lower for WLHIV compared to those not living with HIV. The reverse occurs regarding postpartum sterilization. Although sterilization is mainly performed in conjunction with caesarean section in Brazil, it is evident that caesarean sections are not the sole factor increasing the risk of sterilization among WLHIV.The results indicate barriers in the access to services offering interval sterilization for WLHIV and certain facilitation in obtaining the procedure in conjunction with caesarean section. Health policy makers at local and national levels should promote institutional changes in order to facilitate access to interval sterilization and to confront the sensitive discussion of WLHIV's eligibility for postpartum sterilization. It is also urgent to increase access to a wider range of contraceptive methods for WLHIV and promote dual method protection strategies. Moreover, since condom use may decrease in the future in the context of the preventive effect of antiretroviral therapy, promoting dual methods will expand the choices regarding the reproductive rights of women living with HIV.

  12. Social patterning of overeating, binge eating, compensatory behaviours and symptoms of bulimia nervosa in young adult women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupil, Ilona; Tooth, Leigh; Heshmati, Amy; Mishra, Gita

    2016-12-01

    To study social patterning of overeating and symptoms of disordered eating in a general population. A representative, population-based cohort study. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), Survey 1 in 1996 and Survey 2 in 2000. Women (n 12 599) aged 18-23 years completed a questionnaire survey at baseline, of whom 6866 could be studied prospectively. Seventeen per cent of women reported episodes of overeating, 16 % reported binge eating and 10 % reported compensatory behaviours. Almost 4 % of women reported symptoms consistent with bulimia nervosa. Low education, not living with family, perceived financial difficulty (OR=1·8 and 1·3 for women with severe and some financial difficulty, respectively, compared with none) and European language other than English spoken at home (OR=1·5 for European compared with Australian/English) were associated with higher prevalence of binge eating. Furthermore, longitudinal analyses indicated increased risk of persistent binge eating among women with a history of being overweight in childhood, those residing in metropolitan Australia, women with higher BMI, smokers and binge drinkers. Overeating, binge eating and symptoms of bulimia nervosa are common among young Australian women and cluster with binge drinking. Perceived financial stress appears to increase the risk of binge eating and bulimia nervosa. It is unclear whether women of European origin and those with a history of childhood overweight carry higher risk of binge eating because of genetic or cultural reasons.

  13. Employment and risk of injection drug use initiation among street involved youth in Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lindsey; DeBeck, Kora; Feng, Cindy; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan

    2014-09-01

    Youth unemployment has been associated with labour market and health disparities. However, employment as a determinant of high-risk health behaviour among marginalized young people has not been well described. We sought to assess a potential relationship between employment status and initiation of intravenous drug use among a prospective cohort of street-involved youth. We followed injecting naïve youth in the At-Risk Youth Study, a cohort of street-involved youth aged 14-26 in Vancouver, Canada, and employed Cox regression analyses to examine whether employment was associated with injection initiation. Among 422 injecting naïve youth recruited between September 2005 and November 2011, 77 participants transitioned from non-injection to injection drug use, for an incidence density of 10.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0-12.6) per 100 person years. Results demonstrating that employment was inversely associated with injection initiation (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.33-0.85) were robust to adjustment for a range of potential confounders. A lack of employment among street-involved youth was associated with the initiation of injection drug use, a practice that predisposes individuals to serious long-term health consequences. Future research should examine if reducing barriers to labour market involvement among street-involved youth prevents transitions into high-risk drug use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The relationship between drugs use and risk behaviors in Brazilian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Sandra Cristina; O'Brien, Beverley; Piedra Chavez, Ketty Aracely

    2005-01-01

    The aim was to describe relationships between gender and drug use as well as risk behaviors that may be associated with drug use among first-year students at the University of São Paulo-Ribeirão Preto. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is an anonymous survey that was used for this descriptive correlational study. It was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. The sample (n=200) included (50%) males and (50%) females. Their ages ranged from 18 to 26 years. Results showed that more female than male students use alcohol and tobacco, but that the probability of heavy consumption is higher among men. There was a low incidence of illicit drug use for both groups. Male students were more likely to drive under the influence of alcohol than female students and more men were involved in violent behaviors such as fights with friends and police. In relation to sexual behavior, male students were likely to have more partners and less protection while under influence of alcohol. It was concluded that gender is associated with recreational drug use, specifically tobacco and alcohol, as well as other risk behaviors in university students.

  15. Off-Label and Unlicensed Drug Use in Neonatology: Reality in a Portuguese University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joana; Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Soares, Henrique; Guimarães, Hercília

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the drugs used in a Portuguese Neonatal Intensive Unit Care, assess the rate of off-label or unlicensed drugs use according to the information available in the Summary of Product Characteristics and compare results between preterm and full-term neonates. A 6-month period retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in our Neonatal Intensive Unit Care in 2013. Prescribed drugs data were recorded and compared with the paediatric information contained in drugs Summary of Product Characteristics. We analyzed 1011 prescriptions of 84 active substances, made in 218 admissions. In 42.9% of the cases, medicines were used according to Summary of Product Characteristics information; 27.9% of drugs were approved for neonatal period but used in an off-label manner; off-label drugs for neonates were used in 10.1%, whereas those with undetermined approval state and contraindicated were used 6.0% and 8.7% of the cases, respectively. Unlicensed prescriptions accounted for 4.4% of total. Preterm received a higher rate of drugs used according to Summary of Product Characteristics (p Manipulation of medicines is one of the causes for unlicensed drugs use, emphasizing the lack of appropriate formulations for neonatal age. Progresses have been made to reduce the risks of off-label/unlicensed prescriptions, but competent authorities must continue their efforts to develop safer and more effective drugs for neonatal period.

  16. Telephone versus face-to-face interviewing for household drug use surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, W S

    1992-01-01

    This research investigated the use of telephone versus face-to-face interviewing to gather data on the use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs. Telephone and personal drug use surveys of the 18-34 year-old household population were conducted in the state of New Jersey in 1986-1987. Survey modes were compared in terms of unit and item nonresponse rates, sample coverage, and levels of self-reported drug use. Results showed that the telephone survey achieved response rates lower than the personal survey, but comparable to telephone surveys of less threatening topics. Item nonresponse to sensitive drug questions was lower by phone than with the self-administered answer sheets in the personal mode. The exclusion of households without telephones in the telephone survey is a potential source of bias, and may lead to underestimation of alcohol and drug use for minority populations. After controlling for telephone status, the telephone survey furnished significantly lower drug use estimates on several indicators than the personal survey, with the largest mode differences found for Blacks.

  17. Results of a preliminary analysis of the pattern of hereditary breast cancer in the women of a Kyrgyz population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Makieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic and morphological features of hereditary breast cancer in relation to abnormal BRCA genotype among Kyrgyz women remain virtually unelucidated now. This paper presents the results of the first medical genetic study conducted in the Kyrgyz Republic, which has yielded preliminary data on the spectrum of mutations associated with hereditary breast cancer in the Kyrgyz female popu- lation. The findings suggest that it is possible and expedient to further study the problem of hereditary breast cancer for substantiation of screening for a genetic predisposition to this disease in order to form risk groups and to timely undertake primary prevention.

  18. Managing Drug Use in Danish Club Settings: A normalized enterprise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Signe

    2012-01-01

    this perceived acceptability—or rather lack of acceptability—affects their practices around drug-taking. The analysis points towards two distinct strategies which the clubbers make use of when taking drugs in clubs: an assimilative strategy and an opportunistic strategy, and it is shown how these strategies......The article analyzes Danish clubbers’ strategies for taking drugs in night clubs. This exploration is framed within the discussion of a possible normalization of youth drug use. Thus, the article investigates how young drug-users experience the level of acceptability of drug use in clubs and how...... are indicative of the level of acceptability of drugs in club settings. Through this focus on the micro-level, the article adds to the limited amount of literature on this dimension of the normalization thesis. Empirically, the article is based on a Danish mixed methods club study....

  19. Patterns of drug use among nonmetropolitan and rural adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, E; Donnermeyer, J F

    1998-08-01

    This article examines illegal drug use among adults living in nonmetropolitan and rural areas of the United States using data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. Subjects were classified into three categories by residence: nonmetropolitan-urban, metropolitan-rural, and nonmetropolitan-rural. Respondents indicate about 10% of adults were current users of marijuana or other illegal drugs. Discriminant analysis was used to examine differences among groups of individuals classified as current users, past users, and nonusers. For both marijuana and other illegal drugs, the variables that accounted most for group differences were age, marital, status, employment status, occupation, and income. Only minor differences in drug use were exhibited across the three residential categories. It is recommended that future research on the rural and nonmetropolitan adult population incorporate both structural level measures of socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of localities, and individual level measures of peer influence, work stress, family factors, and psychosocial characteristics.

  20. Association of Antithrombotic Drug Use With Subdural Hematoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Incidence of subdural hematoma has been reported to be increasing. To what extent this is related to increasing use of antithrombotic drugs is unknown. Objectives: To estimate the association between use of antithrombotic drugs and subdural hematoma risk and determine trends in subdural...... hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use in the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control study of 10 010 patients aged 20 to 89 years with a first-ever subdural hematoma principal discharge diagnosis from 2000 to 2015 matched by age, sex, and calendar year to 400...... 380 individuals from the general population (controls). Subdural hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use was identified using population-based regional data (population: 484 346) and national data (population: 5.2 million) from Denmark. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds...

  1. Cannabis and other illicit drug use in epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerle, M; Ghaeni, L; Kowski, A; Weissinger, F; Holtkamp, M

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of illicit drug use among epilepsy patients and its effects on the disease. We systematically interviewed epilepsy outpatients at a tertiary epilepsy clinic. Predictors for active cannabis use were analysed with a logistic regression model. Overall, 310 subjects were enrolled; 63 (20.3%) reported consuming cannabis after epilepsy was diagnosed, and 16 (5.2%) used other illicit drugs. Active cannabis use was predicted by sex (male) [odds ratio (OR) 5.342, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.416-20.153] and age (OR 0.956, 95% CI 0.919-0.994). Cannabis consumption mostly did not affect epilepsy (84.1%). Seizure worsening was observed with frequent illicit (non-cannabis) drug use in 80% of cases. Cannabis use does not seem to affect epilepsy; however, frequent use of other drugs increases seizure risk. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  2. Peculiarities of pregnancy results and parturitions of women with iron deficiency anemia in the Semipalatinsk region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajlyubaeva, G.Zh.; Al'seitova, M.Zh.; Ibragimova, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of research is study of factor influence on the frequency and the heaviness of iron deficiency anemia during natal, possibilities of woman rehabilitation with anemia in the post-natal period, peculiarities of pregnancy course, parturition results for both a mother and foetus by iron deficiency anemia

  3. Pattern of prescription drug use in Nigerian army hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do you use EDL or NDF routinely in prescription Y/N. 7. My definition of rational drug use is……………………………………..………………………………………….. 8. My preferred prescription drug is often (a) Generic (b) Branded (c) Mixture of both (mark only one). 9. The following are the steps taken in issuing a prescription.

  4. Small geographic area variations in prescription drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Shelsey J; House, Samantha A; Chang, Chiang-Hua; Wasserman, Jared R; Goodman, David C; Morden, Nancy E

    2014-09-01

    Despite the frequency of pediatric prescribing little is known about practice differences across small geographic regions and payer type (Medicaid and commercial). The goal of this research was to quantify variation in prescription drug use among northern New England children. Northern New England, all-payer administrative data (2007-2010) permitted study of prescriptions for 949 821 children ages 0 to 17 years (1.75 million person-years [PYs]; 54% Medicaid, 46% commercial). Age- and gender adjusted overall and drug group-specific prescription use was quantified according to payer type (Medicaid or commercial) and within payer type across 69 hospital service areas (HSAs). We measured prescription fills per PY (rate) and annual, mean percentage of the population with any drug group-specific fills (prevalence). Overall mean annual prescriptions per PY were 3.4 (commercial) and 5.5 (Medicaid). Generally, these payer type differences were smaller than HSA-level variation within payer type. HSA-level rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug use (5th-95th percentile) varied twofold in Medicaid and more than twofold in commercially insured children; HSA-level antidepressant use varied more than twofold within each payer type. Antacid use varied threefold across HSAs and was highest in infants where commercial use paradoxically exceeded Medicaid. Prevalence of drug use varied as much as rates across HSAs. Prescription use was higher among Medicaid-insured than commercially insured children. Regional variation generally exceeded payer type differences, especially for drugs used in situations of diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainty. Efforts should advance best pediatric prescribing discussions and shared decision-making. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Irrational drug use in neuropathic pain treatment: a twoyear data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irrational drug use in neuropathic pain treatment: a twoyear data analysis. E Tan, A Akıncı, G Ayvaz, T Erbaş, M Ertaş, O Güç, S Hepgüler, S Kiraz, SZ Oşar, S Öztürk, NS Özyalçın, S Palaoğlu, M Uyar, S Ünal, S Yalçın ...

  6. Illicit drug use and its association with key sexual risk behaviours and outcomes: Findings from Britain’s third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Fiona; Prah, Philip; Shahmanesh, Maryam; Field, Nigel; Macdowall, Wendy; Gravningen, Kirsten; Sonnenberg, Pam; Mercer, Catherine H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We explore the hypothesis that using illicit drugs other than, or in addition to, cannabis is associated with sexual risk behaviour and sexual health outcomes in the British population. Methods We analysed data, separately by gender, reported by sexually-active participants (those reporting > = 1 partners/past year) aged 16–44 years (3,395 men, 4,980 women) in Britain’s third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3), a probability survey undertaken 2010–12 involving computer-assisted personal-interview and computer-assisted self-interview. Analyses accounted for the stratification, clustering and weighting of the data. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios. Results Use of illicit drugs other than, or in addition to, cannabis in the past year was reported by 11.5% (95%CI:10.4%-12.8%) of men and 5.5% (4.8%-6.3%) of women. Use of these types of drugs was more common among those health behaviours, e.g. binge drinking > = weekly (age-adjusted ORs, aAORs, 10.91 (6.27–18.97) men; 9.95 (6.11–16.19) women); having > = 2 condomless partners in the past year (aAOR:5.50 (3.61–8.39) men; 5.24 (3.07–8.94) women). Participants reporting illicit drug use were more likely (than those who did not) to report sexual health clinic attendance (ORs after adjusting for age, sexual identity and partner numbers: 1.79 (1.28–2.51) men; 1.99 (1.34–2.95) women), chlamydia testing (1.42 (1.06–1.92) men; 1.94 (1.40–2.70) women), unplanned pregnancy (2.93 (1.39–6.17) women), and among men only, sexually transmitted infection diagnoses (3.10 (1.63–5.89)). Conclusions In Britain, those reporting recent illicit drug use were more likely to report other markers of poor general and sexual health. They were also more likely to attend sexual health clinics so these should be considered appropriate settings to implement holistic interventions to maximise health gain. PMID:28542366

  7. Why do Asian-American women have lower rates of breast conserving surgery: results of a survey regarding physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Laura J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background US Asian women with early-stage breast cancer are more likely to receive a modified radical mastectomy (MRM than White women, contrary to clinical recommendations regarding breast conserving treatment (BCT. Methods We surveyed physicians regarding treatment decision-making for early-stage breast cancer, particularly as it applies to Asian patients. Physicians were identified through the population-based Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry. Eighty (of 147 physicians completed a questionnaire on sociodemographics, professional training, clinical practices, and perspectives on the treatment decision-making processes. Results The most important factors identified by physicians in the BCT/MRM decision were clinical in nature, including presence of multifocal disease (86% identified this as being an important factor for selecting MRM, tumor size (71% for MRM, 78% for BCT, cosmetic result (74% for BCT, and breast size (50% for MRM, 55% for BCT. The most important reasons cited for the Asian treatment patterns were patient attitudes toward not needing to preserve the breast (53%, smaller breast sizes (25%, and fear and cultural beliefs (12%. Conclusion These survey results suggest that physicians perceive major roles of both clinical and cultural factors in the BCT/MRM decision, but cultural factors may be more relevant in explaining surgical treatment patterns among Asians.

  8. Drug use among street children and adolescents: what helps?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone Gonçalves de Moura

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated to frequent and heavy drug use among street children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years. A sample of 2,807 street children and adolescents from the 27 Brazilian state capital cities was analyzed. A World Health Organization questionnaire for non-students was adapted for use in Brazil. Data analysis was performed using logistic regression and decision tree models. Factors inversely associated with frequent and heavy drug use were: being age nine to 11 years (OR = 0.1; school attendance (OR = 0.3; daily time (one to five hours spent on the streets (OR = 0.3 and 0.4; not sleeping on the streets (OR = 0.4; being on the streets for less than one year (OR = 0.4; maintenance of some family bonds (OR = 0.5; presence on the streets of a family member (OR = 0.6; not suffering domestic violence (OR = 0.6; being female (OR = 0.8. All of these variables were significant at the p < 0.05 level. The findings suggest that being younger, having family bonds and engagement in school are important protective factors that affect drug use among this population and should be considered in the formulation of public policies.

  9. Illicit drug use and treatment in South Africa: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Ramlagan, Shandir; Johnson, Bruce D; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy

    2010-11-01

    This review synthesizes available epidemiological data on current drug use and substance user treatment admissions in South Africa since 1994, and how changes in the political, economic, and social structures within South Africa, both before and after Apartheid, has made the country more vulnerable to drug use. Based on national surveys, current use of cannabis ranged among adolescents from 2% to 9% and among adults it was 2%, cocaine/crack (0.3%), mandrax/sedatives (0.3%), club drugs/amphetamine-type stimulants (0.2%), opiates (0.1%), and hallucinogens (0.1%). The use of primary illicit substance at admission to South African drug user treatment centers was cannabis 16.9%, methamphetamine (tik) 12.8%, crack/cocaine 9.6%, cannabis and mandrax 3.4%, heroin/opiates 9.2%, and prescription and OTC drugs 2.6%. An increase in substance user treatment admissions has increased. While the prevalence of illicit drug use in South Africa is relatively low compared to the United States and Australia, prevention and intervention policies need to be designed to reduce these levels by targeting the more risky subpopulations identified from this review.

  10. Illicit drug use among school-going adolescents in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Fadhli; Sahril, Norhafizah; Rasidi, Naim M; Zaki, Nor Azian M; Muhamad, Norazlina; Ahmad, NoorAni

    2014-09-01

    Illicit drug use among adolescents has become a public health issue in Malaysia. This study was from the Global School-Based Student Health Survey (GSHS) and aimed to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with illicit drug use among school-going adolescents in Malaysia. A 2-stage stratified cluster sampling method was used and data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 25 507 students participated in the study. The prevalence of adolescents who ever used illicit drugs was 1.7%. Adolescents who ever used illicit drugs were associated with current smoking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 6.99; 95% CI = 5.19, 9.40), current alcohol use (aOR = 4.63; 95% CI = 3.43, 6.26), ever having sex (aOR = 4.76; 95% CI = 3.54, 6.41), truancy (aOR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.07, 1.90), lack of peer support (aOR = 1.47; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.03), and lack of parental monitoring (aOR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.22, 2.39). Public health intervention should be addressed to prevent illicit drug used among adolescents. © 2014 APJPH.

  11. Follow-up of Women With Negative Pap Test Results and Abnormal Clinical Signs or Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocque, Rebecca; Austin, R Marshall

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal signs or symptoms recorded on Papanicolaou (Pap) test requisitions may reflect disease not detected with Pap testing. Since 2009, these cases have been reviewed in our laboratory by a second cytotechnologist and a cytopathologist. The objective of this study was to document follow-up findings on these patients. A search for Pap test results of "Negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, abnormal clinical signs or symptoms" was performed for cases from January 1, 2009, to October 10, 2013. Clinical information and follow-up findings were documented. 1,104 cases were identified. Signs and symptoms were abnormal bleeding 897 (81%), polyps 83 (8%), pelvic mass 54 (5%), visible cervical lesions 48 (4%), vaginal lesions 17 (2%) and endometrial masses 6 (0.5%). Six hundred sixty-seven (60%) had follow-up results, including 517 with histopathologic diagnoses. Two-hundred thirty-three (45%) had nonspecific benign diagnoses, 216 (42%) had benign tumor-like conditions, 28 (4%) had insufficient specimens, 16 (3%) had precancerous diagnoses and 23 (4%) had malignancies. Endometrial malignancy was identified in 14 (61%), ovarian in 6 (26%), and miscellaneous in 3 (13%). No cervical cancers were identified. We report follow-up findings from patients with abnormal clinical signs or symptoms, negative Pap test results, and follow-up recommendations highlighting reported abnormal signs or symptoms. Abnormal clinical signs and symptoms should routinely be considered in assessment and management of patients with negative cervical screening test results. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Health status, health conditions, and health behaviors among Amish women. Results from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kirk; Yost, Berwood; Flaherty, Sean; Hillemeier, Marianne M; Chase, Gary A; Weisman, Carol S; Dyer, Anne-Marie

    2007-01-01

    We performed one of the first systematic, population-based surveys of women in Amish culture. We used these data to examine health status and health risks in a representative sample of 288 Amish women ages 18-45 living in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in particular for risks associated with preterm and low birthweight infants, compared with a general population sample of 2,002 women in Central Pennsylvania. Compared with women in the general population, Amish women rated their physical health approximately at the same level, but reported less stress, fewer symptoms of depression, and had higher aggregate scores for mental health. Amish women reported low levels of intimate partner violence, high levels of social support, and they perceived low levels of unfair treatment owing to gender compared with the general population. Amish women also reported higher fertility, fewer low birthweight babies, but the same number of preterm births as the general population. The findings suggest that these outcomes may be due to higher levels of social support and better preconceptional behavior among Amish women.

  13. Initial results of population based cervical cancer screening program using HPV testing in one million Turkish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Murat; Zayifoglu Karaca, Mujdegul; Kucukyildiz, Irem; Dundar, Selin; Boztas, Guledal; Semra Turan, Hatice; Hacikamiloglu, Ezgi; Murtuza, Kamil; Keskinkilic, Bekir; Sencan, Irfan

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the Turkey's nationwide HPV DNA screening program on the basis of first 1 million screened women. Women over age 30 were invited for population based screening via HPV DNA and conventional cytology. Samples were collected by family physicians and the evaluations and reports had been performed in the National Central HPV laboratories. The acceptance rate for HPV based cervical cancer screening after first invitation was nearly 36.5%. Since HPV DNA tests have been implemented, cervical cancer screening rates have shown 4-5-fold increase in primary level. Through the evaluation of all, HPV positivity was seen in 3.5%. The commonest HPV genotypes were 16, followed by 51, 31, 52 and 18. Among the 37.515 HPV positive cases, cytological abnormality rate was 19.1%. Among HPV positive cases, 16.962 cases had HPV 16 or 18 or other oncogenic HPV types with abnormal cytology (>ASC-US). These patients were referred to colposcopy. The colposcopy referral rate was 1.6%. Among these, final clinico-pathological data of 3.499 patients were normal in 1.985 patients, CIN1 in 708, CIN2 in 285, CIN3 in 436 and cancer in 85 patients and only pap-smear program could miss 45.9% of ≥CIN3 cases. The results of 1 million women including the evaluation of 13 HPV genotypes with respect to prevalence, geographic distribution and abnormal cytology results shows that HPV DNA can be used in primary level settings to have a high coverage rated screening program and is very effective compared to conventional pap-smear. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  14. Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Reproductive Outcomes among Women Undergoing in Vitro Fertilization: Results from the EARTH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Russ; Gaskins, Audrey J; Souter, Irene; Smith, Kristen W; Dodge, Laura E; Ehrlich, Shelley; Meeker, John D; Calafat, Antonia M; Williams, Paige L

    2016-06-01

    Evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that exposure to phthalates may be associated with adverse female reproductive outcomes. We evaluated the associations between urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites and outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). This analysis included 256 women enrolled in the Environment and Reproductive Health (EARTH) prospective cohort study (2004-2012) who provided one to two urine samples per cycle before oocyte retrieval. We measured 11 urinary phthalate metabolites [mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), monoethyl phthalate (MEP), monocarboxyisooctyl phthalate (MCOP), monocarboxyisononyl phthalate (MCNP), and mono(3-carboxypropyl) phthalate (MCPP)]. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the association of urinary phthalate metabolites with in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes, accounting for multiple IVF cycles per woman. In multivariate models, women in the highest as compared with lowest quartile of MEHP, MEHHP, MEOHP, MECPP, ΣDEHP (MEHP + MEHHP + MEOHP + MECPP), and MCNP had lower oocyte yield. Similarly, the number of mature (MII) oocytes retrieved was lower in the highest versus lowest quartile for these same phthalate metabolites. The adjusted differences (95% CI) in proportion of cycles resulting in clinical pregnancy and live birth between women in the fourth versus first quartile of ΣDEHP were -0.19 (-0.29, -0.08) and -0.19 (-0.28, -0.08), respectively, and there was also a lower proportion of cycles resulting in clinical pregnancy and live birth for individual DEHP metabolites. Urinary concentrations of DEHP metabolites were inversely associated with oocyte yield, clinical pregnancy, and live birth following ART. Hauser R, Gaskins AJ, Souter I, Smith

  15. Exploring differences in Canadian adult men and women with diabetes management: results from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Margaret; de Sa, Eric; Gucciardi, Enza

    2013-11-22

    .8-3.1), and more likely to be physically inactive (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-1.8). Our findings underscore the importance of addressing sex differences which may interfere with diabetes self-care. In women, addressing socioeconomic and psychological barriers, as well as limitations to active living are important; in men, the benefit of more effective nutrition therapy and smoking cessation interventions are suggested. The results for this study highlight the need to further investigate and eliminate disparities between the sexes in order to optimize health outcomes among Canadians with diabetes.

  16. Illicit Drug Use Among Gym-Goers: a Cross-sectional Study of Gym-Goers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Yasmina; Bakshi, Ann-Sofie; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2017-08-29

    The use of anabolic-androgenic steroids has increased among gym-goers, and it has been proposed that this may be part of a polysubstance use pattern that includes the use of illicit drugs. Still, epidemiological data on illicit drug use among gym-goers of both genders are meager. The aim of the present study was thus to examine the use of illicit drugs and its correlates in a large sample of men and women who engaged in weight training at gyms across Sweden. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1969 gym-goers who engaged in weight training in 54 gyms across Sweden were invited to fill in a questionnaire. The questionnaire included 25 items on background variables, weight training frequency, use of illicit drugs and doping substances, and non-medical use of benzodiazepines. Of the gym-goers, 19.6% reported having ever used illicit drugs, 6.5% reported use during the past 12 months, and 2.1% during the past 30 days. The most commonly used drug was cannabis, followed by cocaine, amphetamine, and ecstasy. Almost 40% of those who reported drug use had used more than one drug. Male participants and participants between 20 and 39 years of age made up the majority of users. Furthermore, 5.1% of the reported drug users had ever used a doping substance. There was an almost threefold higher odds (OR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.16-7.66, p gyms is typically considered a health-promoting behavior. However, our results revealed a slightly higher prevalence of illicit drug use among gym attendees as compared to the general population. Our findings may have captured an underrecognized group of young adult males who engage in weightlifting and use illicit drugs recreationally and/or as training aids. Developing knowledge is imperative in orientating preventive efforts among at-risk gym-goers. ISRCTN11655041.

  17. Sex Partner Type, Drug Use and Condom Use Self-Efficacy Among African Americans from Disadvantaged Neighborhoods: Are Associations with Consistent Condom Use Moderated by Gender?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehl, Eric J; Elifson, Kirk; DePadilla, Lara; Sterk, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Gender inequalities in sexual behavior are explored from the perspective of the theory of gender and power. This study focused on the effect of sex partner type (steady versus casual), drug use, and condom use self-efficacy regarding consistent condom use (CCU) among a community-based sample of adults. The sample included 1,357 African American men and women (M age 37.0, SD 13.1 years; 44% women, 66% men) from 61 disadvantaged census block groups in Atlanta, GA as part of a study of individual and neighborhood characteristics and HIV risk-taking. Having a steady partner decreased the odds of CCU, while higher condom use self-efficacy increased the odds of CCU. Among non-drug users, having a drug-using partner was associated with decreased odds of condom use for women only. Women with drug-using partners, especially a steady partner, were least likely to report CCU. Therefore, interventions intended to empower CCU among women need to expand beyond acknowledging the reduced control that women who use drugs demonstrate to also consider those who have drug-using sexual partners.

  18. Treatment of Giant Fibroadenoma in Young Women: Results after Tumor Excision without Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille-Betz, U.; Klapdor, R.; Henseler, H.; Soergel, P.; Länger, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant fibroadenoma (GFA) of the breast is defined as fibroadenoma larger than 5 cm, usually presenting unilaterally and manifesting as breast asymmetry or deformity of the breast. Material and Methods: A retrospective database search was done of all patients with giant fibroadenoma who underwent surgery for GFA in the breast center of Hanover Medical School between 2007 and 2014; all patients with GFA were followed up. Data were analyzed with regard to tumor and patient characteristics and esthetic outcome. Results: A total of 13 patients with symptomatic GFA underwent surgery between 2007 and 2014. Mean patient age was 21.2 years (range 14–31 years). In 8 of 13 patients the tumor had resulted in breast deformity and/or breast asymmetry. Average size of the mass was 10.2 cm (range 8.5–12 cm) and average weight was 203.6 g (range 151.2–323.5 g). Initial clinical suspicion of GFA was confirmed by ultrasound examination. Preoperative core biopsy revealed fibroadenoma in 8/13 cases, cellular fibroepithelial lesions with a differential diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor in 3 cases and unspecific histological findings in the remaining 2 cases. Conclusion: Excision was done using an inframammary or periareolar approach without reconstructive plasty. The cosmetic results were good, as were the outcomes on follow-up. We therefore favor this surgical technique to treat giant fibroadenoma of similar size to those described above. PMID:26500369

  19. Antimalarial drug use in general populations of tropical Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardella Florence

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of Plasmodium falciparum malaria has worsened because of the emergence of chloroquine resistance. Antimalarial drug use and drug pressure are critical factors contributing to the selection and spread of resistance. The present study explores the geographical, socio-economic and behavioural factors associated with the use of antimalarial drugs in Africa. Methods The presence of chloroquine (CQ, pyrimethamine (PYR and other antimalarial drugs has been evaluated by immuno-capture and high-performance liquid chromatography in the urine samples of 3,052 children (2–9 y, randomly drawn in 2003 from the general populations at 30 sites in Senegal (10, Burkina-Faso (10 and Cameroon (10. Questionnaires have been administered to the parents of sampled children and to a random sample of households in each site. The presence of CQ in urine was analysed as dependent variable according to individual and site characteristics using a random – effect logistic regression model to take into account the interdependency of observations made within the same site. Results According to the sites, the prevalence rates of CQ and PYR ranged from 9% to 91% and from 0% to 21%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of CQ in urine was significantly associated with a history of fever during the three days preceding urine sampling (OR = 1.22, p = 0.043, socio-economic level of the population of the sites (OR = 2.74, p = 0.029, age (2–5 y = reference level; 6–9 y OR = 0.76, p = 0.002, prevalence of anti-circumsporozoite protein (CSP antibodies (low prevalence: reference level; intermediate level OR = 2.47, p = 0.023, proportion of inhabitants who lived in another site one year before (OR = 2.53, p = 0.003, and duration to reach the nearest tarmacked road (duration less than one hour = reference level, duration equal to or more than one hour OR = 0.49, p = 0.019. Conclusion Antimalarial drug pressure varied considerably from

  20. Drug use in Australian nightlife settings: estimation of prevalence and validity of self-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter; Curtis, Ashlee; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Droste, Nicolas; Bowe, Steven J; Pennay, Amy

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to (1) estimate the prevalence of illicit drug use in night-time entertainment districts across five major cities in Australia; and (2) validate self-reported drug use using biochemical marker oral swabs. Street intercept surveys and oral drug swabs conducted over a 7-month period during 2011-12. The night-time entertainment districts of three metropolitan cities (Sydney, Melbourne and Perth) and two regional cities (Wollongong and Geelong) in Australia, between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. A total of 7581 individuals agreed to participate in the survey (93% response rate). More than half (62%) the sample was male, with a median age of 22 years (range 18-73). Patrons were approached in thoroughfares and while entering and leaving licensed venues. Data collected included demographics and current session alcohol and other substance use. Drug swabs (n = 401) were performed with a subsample of participants. Approximately 9% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 7-12%] of participants self-reported consumption of illicit or non-prescribed pharmaceutical drugs prior to interview; of those, 81% identified psychostimulants as the drug used. One in five drug swabs returned a positive result, with psychostimulants the most commonly detected drugs (15%; 95% CI = 12-19%). Kappa statistics indicate agreement between self-report of any illicit drug and a positive drug swab is in the slight range [κ = 0.12 (95% CI = 0.05-0.20) P = 0.000]. Self-report findings suggest drug use in Australian nightlife is common, although still very much a minority past-time. Drug swabs indicate a higher prevalence of use (20%) than self-report (9%), which suggests that self-reported drug use may not be reliable in this context. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Correlates of drug use and driving among undergraduate college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Christine; Saleheen, Hassan; Borrup, Kevin; Rogers, Steve; Lapidus, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Drug use by drivers is a significant and growing highway safety problem. College students are an important population to understand drugged driving. The objective of this study was to examine correlates of drugged driving among undergraduate college students. We conducted an anonymous, confidential, 24-question survey at a large New England public university during the 2010-2011 academic year among undergraduates in courses that met a graduation requirement. Data include demographics; academics; housing status; lifestyle; personal values; high school/college drug use; and driving following alcohol use, drug use, or both; and as a passenger with a driver who used alcohol, drugs, or both. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Chi-square tests compared driver alcohol use, drug use, or both with demographic, academic, and lifestyle variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed with drugged driving as the dependent variable. Odds ratios and corresponding 95 percent confidence intervals were calculated for each of the potential explanatory variables in relation to the outcome. Four hundred forty-four of 675 students completed surveys (66% participation rate). Participants were representative of the student body with a mean age of 19.4 (±1.3 years), 51 percent male, 75 percent white, and 10 percent Hispanic. Seventy-eight percent lived on campus, 93 percent had a driver's license, and 37 percent had access to a car. Students disagreed that cannabinoids impair driving (18%) compared to other drugs (17%), stimulants (13%), depressants (11%), hallucinogens (8%), and alcohol (7%). Twenty-three percent drove after alcohol use and 22 percent drove after drug use. Forty-one percent reported having been a passenger with a driver who had been drinking and 37 percent with a driver using drugs. Drugged driving was more likely among males vs. females (30% vs. 14%, P college (50% vs. 8%, P confidence interval [CI]: 4.6-19.6) and best friends in college used drugs regularly

  2. Are Negative Peer Influences Domain Specific? Examining the Influence of Peers and Parents on Externalizing and Drug Use Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ronald B; Criss, Michael M; Harrist, Amanda W; Zapata-Roblyer, Martha

    2017-10-01

    Most studies tend to characterize peer influences as either positive or negative. In a sample of 1815 youth from 14 different schools in Caracas, Venezuela, we explored how two types of peer affiliations (i.e., deviant and drug-using peers) differentially mediated the paths from positive parenting to youth's externalizing behavior and licit and illicit drug use. We used Zero Inflated Poisson models to test the probability of use and the extent of use during the past 12 months. Results suggested that peer influences are domain specific among Venezuelan youth. That is, deviant peer affiliations mediated the path from positive parenting to youth externalizing behaviors, and peer drug-using affiliations mediated the paths to the drug use outcomes. Mediation effects were partial, suggesting that parenting explained unique variance in the outcomes after accounting for both peer variables, gender, and age. We discuss implications for the development of screening tools and for prevention interventions targeting adolescents from different cultures.

  3. Young Women's Knowledge and Beliefs about Osteoporosis: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey of College Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Mark J.; Garber, Michele; Walsdorf, Kristie

    2007-01-01

    Background: About 40% of White American women over age 50 experience osteoporosis-related fracture of the hip, spine, or wrist during their lives. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of osteoporosis knowledge and beliefs among young women. Methods: University women (n=302) completed a self-administered osteoporosis risk…

  4. Melatonin increases anagen hair rate in women with androgenetic alopecia or diffuse alopecia: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T W; Burmeister, G; Schmidt, H W; Elsner, P

    2004-02-01

    In addition to the well-known hormonal influences of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone on the hair cycle, melatonin has been reported to have a beneficial effect on hair growth in animals. The effect of melatonin on hair growth in humans has not been investigated so far. To examine whether topically applied melatonin influences anagen and telogen hair rate in women with androgenetic or diffuse hair loss. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 40 women suffering from diffuse alopecia or androgenetic alopecia. A 0.1% melatonin or a placebo solution was applied on the scalp once daily for 6 months and trichograms were performed to assess anagen and telogen hair rate. To monitor effects of treatment on physiological melatonin levels, blood samples were taken over the whole study period. Melatonin led to a significantly increased anagen hair rate in occipital hair in women with androgenetic hair loss compared with placebo (n=12; P=0.012). For frontal hair, melatonin gave a significant increase in the group with diffuse alopecia (n=28; P=0.046). The occipital hair samples of patients with diffuse alopecia and the frontal hair counts of those with androgenetic alopecia also showed an increase of anagen hair, but differences were not significant. Plasma melatonin levels increased under treatment with melatonin, but did not exceed the physiological night peak. To the authors' knowledge, this pilot study is the first to show that topically applied melatonin might influence hair growth in humans in vivo. The mode of action is not known, but the effect might result from an induction of anagen phase.

  5. Comparative study of the results of heel ultrasound screening and DXA findings (lumbar spine and left hip of postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amila Jaganjac

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoporosis is a silent and invisible disease of bone, great presence and is considered to suffer from osteoporosis at least 200 million women worldwide. The goal of this paper is to show average ageof postmenopausal respondents, values of anthropometric parameters (weight, height, BMI, anamnestic data on clinical symptoms, fractures of women in menopause, analysis of heel ultrasound screening results,analysis of lumbar spine DXA results, analysis of left hip DXA results.Methods: In retrospective study 61 respondents were involved, 33 to 79 years old, treated in u Center for Physical Medicine and Acupuncture “AD” in Sarajevo during the period from 01.01.2008 till 31.12.2009. Alldate are shown numerically and percentage account with calculation of mean value, expressed in the form of tables and charts.Results: Finding of heel ultrosound screening compared to T values of postmenopausal respondents indicates on osteoporosis in case of 17 (27,87%, in case of 44 (72,13% respondents osteopenia, while normalvalues were not found. T value with lumbar spine DXA method in postmenopausal female respondents correspond to 43 (70,5% respondents, in 15 respondents (24,6% finding corresponded to osteopenia, while 3 respondents (4,9% had physiological finding. Left hip DXA finding shows 36 (59% respondents corresponded osteoporosis, 19 (31,2% respondents corresponded osteopenia, while physiological finding was found in 6 respondents (9,8%. T value of lumbar spine DXA finding was - 2,71 ± 1,16; DXA finding of left hip -2,35 ±1,36; heel ultrasound screening -2,19 ± 0,54.Conclusion: Research results indicate that DXA finding in relation to the heel ultrasound screening confirms gold standard in diagnosing osteoporosis.

  6. The Education-Drug Use Connection: How Successes and Failures in School Relate to Adolescent Smoking, Drinking, Drug Use, and Delinquency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John E.; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Freedman-Doan, Peter; Messersmith, Emily E.

    2007-01-01

    Does success in school protect teenagers from drug use? Does drug use impair scholastic success? This book tackles a key issue in adolescent development and health--the education-drug use connection. The authors examine the links and likely causal connections between educational experiences, delinquent behavior, and adolescent use of tobacco,…

  7. Impact of BRCA1/2 testing and disclosure of a positive test result on women affected and unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roosmalen, MS; Stalmeier, PFM; Verhoef, LCG; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Oosterwijk, JC; Hoogerbrugge, N; Moog, U; van Daal, WAJ

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of BRCA1/2 testing and disclosure of a positive test result on women affected and unaffected with cancer. Longitudinal cohort study including women affected and unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer testing for a BRCA1/2 mutation. Data on well-being (anxiety, depression,

  8. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  9. Malformation risk of antiepileptic drug exposure during pregnancy in women with epilepsy: Results from a pregnancy registry in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sanjeev V; Jose, Manna; Divakaran, Srividya; Sankara Sarma, Prabhakaran

    2017-02-01

    Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy had been prospectively evaluating the reproductive issues of women with epilepsy since April 1998. This analysis aimed to estimate the relative risk of major congenital malformations (MCM) to the registrants. All pregnancies with known outcome in this register until December 2013 were included. Malformation status was evaluated by antenatal ultrasonography, physical examination at birth, echocardiography, and abdomen ultrasonography at 3 months of age and a final review at 1 year of age. There were 1,688 fetuses (singlets 1,643, twins 21, and triplet 1) resulting in 1,622 live births. All were born to women of Asian origin living in South India. The MCM rate for all live births was 6.84% (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.71-8.18) and for all pregnancy outcomes including fetal loss was 7.11% (95% CI 5.98-8.44). The MCM rates (mean with 95% CI) for exposed group were 6.4% (5.03-8.03) for monotherapy and 9.9% (7.37-13.13) for polytherapy; internal control group (women with epilepsy [WWE] not on antiepileptic drugs [AEDs] in first trimester) 5.6% (3.34-9.11), external control group (women without epilepsy or AED exposure in first trimester) 3.45% (1.94-6.07). Valproate monotherapy group had a dose-dependent relative risk for MCM of 2.6 (95% CI 1.30-5.20) compared to the external control group. The preliminary data on MCM rate for the nine total clobazam monotherapy (22.2%; 95% CI 6.2-54.7) signals increased risk that needs further validation on larger sample size. There was no association between MCM rate and maternal socioeconomic status, epilepsy syndrome, or use of folic acid in first trimester. This dataset from South India confirms the increased risk of MCM with exposure to AEDs, particularly polytherapy. A dose-dependent increased risk was observed with valproate. The increased risk associated with clobazam monotherapy is an important signal that needs to be confirmed in a larger sample. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017

  10. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by women transitioning through menopause in Germany : Results of a survey of women aged 45-60 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhling, K. J.; v Daniels, B.; v Studnitz, F. S. G.; Eulenburg, C.; Mueck, A. O.

    Objectives: To describe prevalence rates of complementary and alternative medicine therapies (CAM) for the relief of menopausal complaints among German women. Furthermore, to investigate the perceived effectiveness of these therapies. Design: A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 9785

  11. Women's empowerment and experiences of mistreatment during childbirth in facilities in Lucknow, India: results from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond-Smith, Nadia; Treleaven, Emily; Murthy, Nirmala; Sudhinaraset, May

    2017-11-08

    Recent evidence has found widespread reports of women experiencing abuse, neglect, discrimination, and poor interpersonal care during childbirth around the globe. Empowerment may be a protective mechanism for women against facility mistreatment during childbirth. The majority of previous research on mistreatment during childbirth has been qualitative in nature. In this analysis, we use quantitative data from 392 women who recently gave birth in a facility in the slums of Lucknow, India, to explore whether measures of women's empowerment are associated with their experiences of mistreatment at their last childbirth. We use the Gender Equitable Men (GEM) scale to measure women's views of gender equality. We find that women who had more equitable views about the role of women were less likely to report experiencing mistreatment during childbirth. These findings suggest that dimensions of women's empowerment related to social norms about women's value and role are associated with experiences of mistreatment during childbirth. This expands our understanding of empowerment and women's health, and also suggests that the GEM scale can be used to measure certain domains of empowerment from a women's perspective in this setting.

  12. [Assessments of long-term results of different types of sling procedures for stress urinary incontinence in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, O B; Seregin, A V; Dovlatov, Z A

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate long-term results of surgery for stress urinary incontinence in women using different types of sling procedures. The study included 698 patients aged 42 to 68 years (median 54 years) with stress urinary incontinence. TVT was used in 167 (23.9%) cases, TVT-O Gynecare system in 359 (51.4%), TVT-O Monarch system in 105 (15.0%), and TVT Secur mini-sling system - in 67 (9.6%). Follow-up ranged from 12 to 108 months (median 55 months). Patients' status was assessed using UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires, an improvised treatment satisfaction questionnaire, voiding diary, cough test and 1-hour Pad-test. The effectiveness of the treatment, according to objective criteria was 92.2%, 93.3%, 91.4% and 92.5% after surgery with TVT, TVT-O Gynecare, TVT-O Monarch and TVT Secur, respectively, and according to subjective criteria - 90.4%, 91.1%, 89.5% and 91.0%. No differences in the effectiveness of techniques were found. The data obtained in long-term observations of a large sample of patients treated with a variety of techniques in a single center showed the effectiveness and safety of modern sling procedures for correcting urinary incontinence in women.

  13. Short- and long-term eating habit modification predicts weight change in overweight, postmenopausal women: results from the WOMAN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone Gibbs, Bethany; Kinzel, Laura S; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Kuller, Lewis H

    2012-09-01

    Standard behavioral obesity treatment produces poor long-term results. Focusing on healthy eating behaviors rather than energy intake may be an alternative strategy. In addition, important behaviors might differ for short- vs long-term weight control. Our aim was to describe and compare associations between changes in eating behaviors and weight after 6 and 48 months. We performed secondary analysis of data collected during a randomized weight-loss intervention trial with 48-month follow-up. We studied 481 overweight and obese postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women on the Move through Activity and Nutrition (WOMAN) Study. We measured changes in weight from baseline to 6 and 48 months. Linear regression models were used to examine the associations between 6- and 48-month changes in eating habits assessed by the Conner Diet Habit Survey and changes in weight. Analyses were conducted in the combined study population and stratified by randomization group. At 6 months in the combined population, weight loss was independently associated with decreased desserts (Peating (P=0.042), sugar-sweetened beverages (P=0.009), and fried foods (Peating behaviors were associated with weight change, although important behaviors differed for short- and long-term weight change and by randomization group. Future studies should determine whether interventions targeting these behaviors could improve long-term obesity treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impacts of stigma on HIV risk for women who inject drugs in Java: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Catherine; Saktiawati, Antonia Morita Iswari; Lazuardi, Elan; Worth, Heather; Subronto, Yanri Wijayanti; Padmawati, Retna Siwi

    2015-12-01

    People who inject drugs have experienced stigma around the world. Stigma has been found to have negative consequences for individuals in relation to health-service use, psychological wellbeing and physical health; and for populations in terms of health inequalities. Indonesia has experienced a rapid growth in injecting drug use and HIV and little is known about drivers of HIV risk among Indonesian women who inject drugs. The purpose of this paper is to describe and consider the multiple impacts of stigmatization of injecting drug use on injecting behaviors among women who inject drugs in Java. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 women who inject drugs in Java. Mean age was 25 years, all but one was employed or at college. The interviewers were Indonesian women. Significant stigma around women's drug use was reported from multiple sources in Java including family, friends and health services, resulting in feelings of shame. To avoid this stigma, most of the study participants hid their drug use. They lived away from family and had few friends outside their drug-injecting circle, resulting in isolation from mainstream society and harm-reduction services. Sharing of injecting equipment was restricted to a small, closed circle of trusted friends, thus limiting possible HIV transmission to a small number of injectors. The stigmatization of drug use, particularly of drug use by women, in Indonesia appears to have contributed to significant shame, isolation from mainstream society and high rates of sharing injecting equipment with a small group of trusted friends (particularly the partner). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Provision of smoking cessation support for pregnant women in England:results from an online survey of NHS Stop Smoking Services for Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Fahy, Samantha J; Cooper, Sue; Coleman, Tim; Naughton, Felix; Bauld, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background\\ud Smoking during pregnancy is a major public health concern and an NHS priority. In 2010, 26% of UK women smoked immediately before or during their pregnancy and 12% smoked continuously. Smoking cessation support is provided through free at the point of use Stop Smoking Services for Pregnant women (SSSP). However, to date, little is known of how these services provide support across England. The aim of this study was to describe the key elements of support provided through English...

  16. Self-reported osteoarthritis, ethnicity, body mass index, and other associated risk factors in postmenopausal women-results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicole C; Riggs, Gail Kershner; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Chen, Zhao

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this analysis was to assess risk factors for self-reported osteoarthritis (OA) in an ethnically diverse cohort of women. The participants were postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 (n=146,494) participating in the clinical trial and observational study of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Baseline OA and risk factors were collected from WHI questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to find the association between the risk factors and OA. Risk factor distribution and ethnicity interaction terms were used to assess ethnic differences in OA risk. Forty-four percent of the participants reported OA. Older age (odds ratio (OR)(70-79 vs 50-59)=2.69, 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.60-2.78) and higher body mass index (BMI) (OR(BMI>or=40.0 vs or=30.0) was 57.9% in African Americans, 51.0% in American Indians, 41.9% in Hispanic whites, and 32.9% in non-Hispanic whites. The prevalence of other major OA risk factors was higher in African-American, American-Indian, and Hispanic white women than in non-Hispanic white women. Non-Hispanic white women who were in the extreme obese category (BMI>or=40.0 kg/m(2)) had a 2.80 times (95% CI=2.63, 2.99) greater odds of self-reported OA. The odds were even higher in American-Indian (OR=4.22, 95% CI=1.82, 9.77) and African-American (OR=3.31, 95% CI=2.79, 3.91) women, indicating a significant interactive effect of BMI and ethnicity on odds of OA. In conclusion, OA is a highly prevalent condition in postmenopausal women, and there are differential effects according to ethnicity.

  17. [Characteristics and health status of homeless women born in France and abroad: Results of Insee-Ined 2012 survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes do Espirito Santo, M-E; Perrine, A-L; Bonaldi, C; Guseva-Canu, I

    2018-02-08

    French national surveys among the homeless population in 2001 and 2012 provided a general description of the homeless beneficiaries of medical and social aids. However, given the increasing number of women in this population, mostly born abroad and accompanied by their children, a descriptive study of homeless women according to the fact of being born in France or abroad was conducted. A probability sample of 1470 French-speaking homeless women was recruited for the Insee-Ined 2012 survey. Socio-demographic characteristics, life trajectories, work and employment over the last 12 months, perceived health, reported morbidity, use of care and medical coverage have been described, comparing homeless women born abroad with those born in France. Homeless women are young (median age=34 y.), often single (55%), without a partner (71%) and often accompanied by children (52%). The vast majority (60%) reported no salary during the previous 12 months. Housing conditions were less precarious in women born in France, but these women had a more difficult life history, a more unfavorable perception of their health status, and a higher frequency of chronic health problems. Homeless women born abroad seemed to have more precarious conditions of life and more difficulties to access aids and medical coverage. Overall, despite a relatively good availability of medical insurance, homeless women, regardless of the place of birth, often reported health problems, which were not treated. This study suggests that homeless women often have to deal with chronic health problems that are not treated. Homeless women born abroad are characterized by more precarious living conditions that women born in France. Although younger, with an overall favorable perception of their health and declaring less often an addiction, their general state of health appears to be as fragile as for women born in France. Actions towards homeless women should be implemented to promote their access to care. Copyright

  18. Contraceptive practices and fertility desires among HIV-infected and uninfected women in Kenya: results from a nationally representative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngugi, Evelyn W; Kim, Andrea A; Nyoka, Raymond; Ng'ang'a, Lucy; Mukui, Irene; Ng'eno, Bernadette; Rutherford, George W

    2014-05-01

    Prevention of unplanned pregnancies is a critical element in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection, but its potential has not been fully realized. We assessed the utilization of family planning (FP) and fertility desires among women of reproductive age by HIV status. We selected a nationally representative sample of households using a stratified 2-stage cluster design and surveyed women aged 15-49 years. We administered questionnaires and examined predictors of current use of FP and desire for children among sexually active women with known HIV infection and women who were HIV uninfected. Of 3583 respondents, 68.2% were currently using FP, and 57.7% did not desire children in the future. Among women who did not desire children in the future, 70.9% reported that they were using FP, including 68.7% of women with known HIV infection and 71.0% of women who were HIV uninfected. Women with known HIV infection had similar odds of using FP as women with no HIV infection (odds ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval: 0.81 to 1.54). Women with no HIV infection had significantly higher adjusted odds of desiring future children (adjusted OR, 2.27; 95% confidence interval: 1.31 to 3.93) than women with known HIV infection. There is unmet need for FP for HIV-infected women, underscoring a gap in the national prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV strategy. Efforts to empower HIV-infected women to prevent unintended pregnancies should lead to expanded access to contraceptive methods and take into account women's reproductive intentions.

  19. Screening women for cervical cancer carcinoma with a HPV mRNA test: first results from the Venice pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggino, Tiziano; Sciarrone, Rocco; Murer, Bruno; Dei Rossi, Maria Rosa; Fedato, Chiara; Maran, Michela; Lorio, Melania; Soldà, Marika; Zago, Fiorella; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Zorzi, Manuel

    2016-08-23

    HPV DNA-based screening is more effective than a Pap test in preventing cervical cancer, but the test is less specific. New HPV tests have been proposed for primary screening. The HPV mRNA test showed a similar or slightly lower sensitivity than the HPV DNA tests but with a higher specificity. We report the results of an organised HPV mRNA-based screening pilot program in Venice, Italy. From October 2011 to May 2014, women aged 25-64 years were invited to undergo a HPV mRNA test (Aptima). Those testing positive underwent cytological triage. Women with positive cytology were referred to colposcopy, whereas those with negative cytology were referred to repeat the HPV mRNA test 1 year later. The results of the HPV mRNA test program were compared with both the local historical cytology-based program and with four neighbouring DNA HPV-based pilot projects. Overall, 23 211 women underwent a HPV mRNA test. The age-standardised positivity rate was 7.0%, higher than in HPV DNA programs (6.8%; relative rate (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.17). The total colposcopy referral was 5.1%, double than with cytology (2.6%; RR 2.02, 95% CI 1.82-2.25) but similar to the HPV DNA programs (4.8%; RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.96-1.08). The cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ detection rate with HPV mRNA was greater than in the HPV DNA programs at baseline (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.19-1.88) and not significantly lower at the 1-year repeat (RR 0.70; 95% CI 0.40-1.16). The overall RR was 1.29 (95% CI 1.05-1.59), which was much higher than with cytology (detection rate 5.5‰ vs 2.1‰; RR 2.50, 95% CI 1.76-3.62). A screening programme based on the HPV mRNA obtained results similar to those observed with the HPV DNA test. In routine screening programmes, even a limited increase in HPV prevalence may conceal the advantage represented by the higher specificity of HPV mRNA.

  20. Drug use and nightlife: more than just dance music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Havere, Tina; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Lammertyn, Jan; Broekaert, Eric; Bellis, Mark

    2011-07-27

    Research over the last decade has focused almost exclusively on the association between electronic music and MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine or "ecstasy") or other stimulant drug use in clubs. Less attention has been given to other nightlife venues and music preferences, such as rock music or southern/funky music. This study aims to examine a broader spectrum of nightlife, beyond dance music. It looks at whether certain factors influence the frequency of illegal drug and alcohol use: the frequency of going to certain nightlife venues in the previous month (such as, pubs, clubs or goa parties); listening to rock music, dance music or southern and funky music; or sampling venues (such as, clubs, dance events or rock festivals). The question of how these nightlife variables influence the use of popular drugs like alcohol, MDMA, cannabis, cocaine and amphetamines is addressed. The study sample consisted of 775 visitors of dance events, clubs and rock festivals in Belgium. Study participants answered a survey on patterns of going out, music preferences and drug use. Odds ratios were used to determine whether the odds of being an illegal substance user are higher for certain nightlife-related variables. Furthermore, five separate ordinal regression analyses were used to investigate drug use in relation to music preference, venues visited during the last month and sampling venue. Respondents who used illegal drugs were 2.5 times more likely to report that they prefer dance music. Goa party visitors were nearly 5 times more likely to use illegal drugs. For those who reported visiting clubs, the odds of using illegal drugs were nearly 2 times higher. Having gone to a pub in the last month was associated with both more frequent alcohol use and more frequent illegal substance use. People who reported liking rock music and attendees of rock festivals used drugs less frequently. It was concluded that a more extended recreational environment, beyond dance clubs, is

  1. Migration, urbanization, and drug use and casual sex in China: a multilevel analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiushi Yang; Huasong Luo

    2009-01-01

    Using data from a survey conducted in 2003 and employing multilevel modeling, this paper examines the impact of migration and urbanization on drug abuse and casual sex in China. The results suggest that being a migrant predicts significantly higher odds of having casual sex but lower odds of drug abuse. Living in an urban place is a significant risk factor for both illicit drug use and casual sex. There are significant cross-community (primary sampling unit) variances in the random intercept ...

  2. Infant outcomes among women with Zika virus infection during pregnancy: results of a large prenatal Zika screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Emily H; Nelson, David B; Johnson, Kathryn A; Jacobs, Sara; Rogers, Vanessa L; Roberts, Scott W; Sexton, Taylor; McIntire, Donald D; Casey, Brian M

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a known cause of congenital microcephaly and other neurologic morbidities. We present the results of a large-scale prenatal screening program in place at a single-center health care system since March 14, 2016. Our aims were to report the baseline prevalence of travel-associated Zika infection in our pregnant population, determine travel characteristics of women with evidence of Zika infection, and evaluate maternal and neonatal outcomes compared to women without evidence of Zika infection. This is a prospective, observational study of prenatal Zika virus screening in our health care system. We screened all pregnant women for recent travel to a Zika-affected area, and the serum was tested for those considered at risk for infection. We compared maternal demographic and travel characteristics and perinatal outcomes among women with positive and negative Zika virus tests during pregnancy. Comprehensive neurologic evaluation was performed on all infants delivered of women with evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Head circumference percentiles by gestational age were compared for infants delivered of women with positive and negative Zika virus test results. From March 14 through Oct. 1, 2016, a total of 14,161 pregnant women were screened for travel to a Zika-affected country. A total of 610 (4.3%) women reported travel, and test results were available in 547. Of these, evidence of possible Zika virus infection was found in 29 (5.3%). In our population, the prevalence of asymptomatic or symptomatic Zika virus infection among pregnant women was 2/1000. Women with evidence of Zika virus infection were more likely to have traveled from Central or South America (97% vs 12%, P Zika virus infection. Additionally, there was no difference in mean head circumference of infants born to women with positive vs negative Zika virus testing. No microcephalic infants born to women with Zika infection were identified

  3. Comparison of illegal drug use pattern in Taiwan and Korea from 2006 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ling-Yi; Yu, Wen-Jing; Chang, Wei-Ting; Han, Eunyoung; Chung, Heesun; Li, Jih-Heng

    2016-09-23

    Illegal drug use has long been a global concern. Taiwan and Korea are geographically adjacent and both countries have experienced the illegal use problems of methamphetamine, a predominant prototype of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS). NPS, a term coined by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in recent years, have not been scrutinized for their safety and may become a new threat to public health and security worldwide. To conduct evidence-based drug policy, it is imperative to estimate the trend and pattern of illegal drug use. Therefore, this study aims to analyze and compare the current status of drug-related seizures, arrests and illegal drug use, with a focus on methamphetamine and NPS, between Taiwan and Korea. Data of illegal drug (including NPS)-related seizures and arrests were collected via anti-drug related agencies of both countries from 2006 through 2014.Since listing of NPS as controlled substances was a result of NPS abuse liability through official evaluation, the items of controlled NPS were used as an indicator of emerging use. These data obtained from Taiwan and Korea was then compared. The results showed that while methamphetamine remained as a predominant drug in both Taiwan and Korea for decades, different illegal drug use patterns have been observed in these two countries. In Taiwan, the major illegal drugs were methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine, whereas in Korea those were methamphetamine and cannabis. By comparison of per capita illicit drug seizures, the illegal drug use situation in Taiwan was at a higher stake than that in Korea. In terms of NPS use, ketamine has been a major drug in Taiwan, but it was seldom found in Korea. Besides ketamine, the major type of NPS was synthetic cathinones in Taiwan whereas it was synthetic cannabinoids and phenethylamines in Korea. The difference in the numbers of controlled NPS items between Taiwan (23) and Korea (93) may be due to the implementation of temporary control on NPS in

  4. Just Say “I Don’t”: Lack of Concordance Between Teen Report and Biological Measures of Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prevalence estimates of illicit drug use by teens are typically generated from confidential or anonymous self-report. While data comparing teen self-report with biological measures are limited, adult studies identify varying degrees of under-reporting. METHODS Hair analyses for cocaine, opiates and marijuana were compared to confidential teen self- and parent-reported teen drug use in a longitudinal cohort of >400 high-risk urban teens and parents. RESULTS Both teens and parents substantially underreported recent teen cocaine and opiate use. However, compared with parents, teens were more likely to deny biomarker-verified cocaine use. Teen specimens (hair) were 52 times more likely to identify cocaine use compared with self-report. Parent hair analyses for cocaine and opiate use were 6.5 times and 5.5 times, respectively, more likely to indicate drug use than were parental self-report. The lack of concordance between self-report and bioassay occurred despite participant’s knowledge that a “certificate of confidentiality” protected both teen and adult participants, and that the biological specimens would be tested for drugs. CONCLUSIONS These findings confirm prior reports of adult under-reporting of their own drug use while extending our understanding of teen’s self-admitted drug use. The lack of concordance between teen self- or parent-reported teen drug use and biomarkers confirm our concerns that both teen- and parent-reported teen drug use is limited, at least for youth in high-risk urban settings. Methods of ascertainment other than self- or parent-report must be considered when health care providers, researchers and public health agencies attempt to estimate teen drug-use prevalence. PMID:20974792

  5. Evaluation of Drug Use Attitudes of Patient and Its Relatives Attending to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Karatas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Irrational drug usage is one of the important public health problems in all countries. Also in our country irrational drug usage patterns is a serious problem and it increases the drug’s share of public health care costs. The aim of our study was evaluate the drug use patterns of patients and relatives of patients in Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital. Material and Methods: Face-to-face interviews (using a questionnaire about Rational Drug Use Survey with 209 patients and patients relatives, admitted to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital clinics. Results: 209 people participated in this study and 58 % (124 of these are women. The mean age of women was 41,39±13,76 and the mean age of the man was 44,67±13,55. If we decompose the participants to their educational attainment; primary school (34,4 %, secondary school (18,7 %, high school (26,3 % and university (20,6 %. 11,0 % of the participants have no social security. 5,7 % of the participants have acute disease, 54,5 % of them have chronic disease and 39,7 % of them have no medical problems. 53,1 % of the participants said that they do not use drugs without consulting a medical doctor, 11,0 % of the participants said that they sometimes use drugs, 30,6 % of the participants said that they rarely use drugs and 5,3 % of the participants said that they often use drugs without consulting a medical doctor. 14,8 % of the participants said that they use drugs with advise of their relatives, friends and neighbors, 17,2 % of the participants said that they advise the drugs to their relatives, friends and neighbors when they were sick. 16,7 % of the participants said that they often use antibiotics and 77,5 % of the participants said that they sometimes use antibiotics without consulting a doctor when they had common cold or flu. 40,2 % of the participants said that they do not use herbal medicine in treatment. Patients with canser 2,4 %, patients with

  6. Dual Epidemics of Club Drug Use and Sexually Transmitted Infections among Chinese Female Sex Workers: New Challenges to STI Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate club drug use and its potential association with STI among female sex workers (FSWs in China. Methods. From November 2008 to January 2009, participants were recruited at sex work venues in five cities for a questionnaire survey. Free testing for syphilis, Chlamydia trachomatis (CT, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG was provided. Logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with club drug use and its association with STI. Results. A total of 1604 eligible FSWs were included. The overall prevalence of any STI infection and club drug use in the past 12 months was 22.6% and 7.4%, respectively. STI prevalence was significantly higher among club drug users (33.1% than among nonusers (21.7%, P<0.05. Multivariable logistic regression found that club drug use was associated with younger age (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.0, 6.0, higher education, having injected drugs (AOR 24.4, 95% CI 6.2, 96.8, and having had STI symptoms (AOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4, 3.4. Conclusions. Club drug use and STI were highly prevalent among FSWs in China, especially among young FSWs. Club drug users had more risk behaviors and higher STI rates. A coordinated risk reduction framework is urgently needed to address the dual epidemic of drug use and STI.

  7. Factors that Can Promote or Impede the Advancement of Women as Leaders in Surgery: Results from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Carpelan-Holmström, Monika; Kwong, Ava; Sanfey, Hilary

    2016-02-01

    Compared with male surgeons, women have less success advancing their careers and are underrepresented in leadership positions in surgery. The purpose of this study is to identify the qualifications necessary to become leaders in surgery and the career barriers faced by women surgeons in various cultural environments. A survey was performed with women surgeons in Japan, USA, Finland, and Hong Kong, China, to assess various barriers faced by women surgeons in the respective countries. To develop appropriate survey tool, a preliminary questionnaire was distributed to leaders in surgery and also in various organizations worldwide. The response rate was 23 % with 225 of 964 survey returned. Japanese women surgeons identify lacked family support as impeding a successful surgical career. US women surgeons feel more latent gender discrimination. Finnish women surgeons are less likely to need to sacrifice work-life balance, when holding leadership positions. Women surgeons worldwide are highly motivated to develop their career and agree the percentage of women surgeons in leadership positions should be increased. Women surgeons in different countries perceive different challenges. We must develop strategies and should not hesitate to negotiate to overcome these issues to reach leadership positions in surgery. This may be accomplished through networking worldwide to improve current conditions and obstacles.

  8. Provision of smoking cessation support for pregnant women in England: results from an online survey of NHS Stop Smoking Services for Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Samantha J; Cooper, Sue; Coleman, Tim; Naughton, Felix; Bauld, Linda

    2014-03-04

    Smoking during pregnancy is a major public health concern and an NHS priority. In 2010, 26% of UK women smoked immediately before or during their pregnancy and 12% smoked continuously. Smoking cessation support is provided through free at the point of use Stop Smoking Services for Pregnant women (SSSP). However, to date, little is known of how these services provide support across England. The aim of this study was to describe the key elements of support provided through English SSSP. SSSP managers were invited to participate in this survey by email. Data were then collected via an online questionnaire; one survey was completed for each SSSP. Up to four reminder emails were sent over a two month period. 86% (121 of 141) of services completed the survey. Responding services were, on average, larger than non-responding services in terms of the number of pregnant women setting quit dates and successfully quitting (p therapy (NRT) to pregnant women and 87% of services also offered dual therapy NRT, i.e. combination of a patch and short acting NRT product.. The 2010 NICE guidelines note that services should be flexible and client-centred. Consistent with this, SSSP offer pregnant women a range of support types (median 4) including couple/family, group (open or closed) or one-to-one. These are available in a number of locations (median 5), including in community venues, clinics and women's homes. English Stop Smoking Services offer behavioural support and pharmacotherapy to pregnant women motivated to quit smoking. Interventions provided are generally evidence-based and delivered in a variety of both social and health care settings.

  9. Ante Natal Care (ANC seeking behavior among women living in an urban squatter settlement: results from an ethnographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabeena Jalal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Pakistan’s population is estimated to be 160,943,000. It ranks third among the ten high burden
    countries and accounts for up to 7% of worldwide neonatal deaths. According to the Pakistan’s World Health Oganization (WHO 2010 health profile, only 28% of Pakistani women have used ante natal care services (4 plus visits, whilst 39% of reported births in Pakistan had used skilled birth attendant services, whereas 59% fell within the WHO’s regional average. There is also a significant disparity, reported by the WHO, in terms of inequity between the poor and the rich in the use of skilled birth attendant services: 16% and 77 % respectively.

    Objective: This ethnographic study explores the perceptions about the need for antenatal care (ANC in a disadvantaged population in Pakistan.

    Method: This is an Ethnographic study which makes use of standard methods such as non-participant observation, semi structured interviews, and documentary review. Data was collected over 14 months and was analyzed thematically. Key informants assisted in understanding the community norms. Open ended answer options were used in the questionnaire.

    Setting: The community in this case was an urban squatter settlement by the name of Ghazi Goth, which is the neighborhood of the poor people.

    Results: We found that 41% of the women did not receive ANC because of lack of financial support. 33% said that family did not support the decision. In 43% of the cases, the husband was the decision maker regarding where the delivery of the baby should take place. 31% of the respondents also reported that their mother-inlaws were the decision makers for the baby’s delivery. Only 3% reported a self decision.

    Conclusions: This a qualitative study which helps explore perceptions and attitudes of women towards ANC, through contextual data. The

  10. The effects of radiation therapy on quality of life in women with breast cancer: Results of a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, T.; Levine, M.; Julian, J.; Skingley, P.; Kirkbride, P.; Clark, R.; Lipa, M.; Wilkinson, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The effects of radiation therapy on quality of life of women with breast cancer are not well known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of breast irradiation on quality of life including cosmetic outcome in the context of a randomized controlled trial. Methods: Between 1984 and 1989 a randomized trial was conducted in Ontario in which women with node-negative breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and axillary section were randomized either to postoperative radiation (4000 cGy in 16 fractions to the whole breast, followed by a boost of 1250 cGy in five fractions to the primary site) or no further treatment (J Natl Cancer Inst 1996; 88:1659). A modified version of the breast cancer chemotherapy questionnaire (J Clin Oncol 1988; 6:1798) containing 17 items was administered to women at baseline, one month and two months postrandomization. Each item was scored on a Likert scale from ''1'' All of the Time to ''7'' None of the Time. Patient assessments of breast pain and cosmetic outcome were also evaluated every three months for the first two years of the study. Results: Of 837 patients, 416 were randomly allocated to radiation therapy and 421 to no further treatment. The groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Factor analysis identified three different domains of the quality of life instrument: emotional/social, fatigue, and physical/inconvenience. There was a significant difference in the physical/inconvenience and fatigue domain scores between the radiation and control groups over time. The differences in scores between groups at two months post randomization were 0.97, p = 0.0001; 0.33, p=0.0001; and 0.03, p=0.62 for the physical/inconvenience, fatigue and emotional/social domains respectively. The percentage of patients who were troubled by breast pain differed between radiation and control groups up to one year (33.3% vs 19.9%, p = 0.001 at 6 months). Beyond one year, no difference was detected. The

  11. Epidemiological analysis of alcohol and drug use as risk factors for psychotic experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, A Y; Anthony, J C

    1990-08-01

    Clinical and laboratory studies link alcohol and other drug use to the occurrence of psychotic experiences, but epidemiologic evidence has been lacking. In this study, the quantitative relationships between alcohol or other drug use and psychotic experiences were examined by analysis of prospective data from 4994 adult household residents sampled in a multisite survey of mental disorders in the population, the NIMH Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program. After control for sociodemographic factors and preexisting psychiatric conditions, the risk for onset of self-reported delusions or hallucinations was observed to be greater for daily users of marijuana or cocaine and for users of anxiolytics or sympathomimetics compared with nonusers. After control for daily cocaine use and alcohol disorder, the risk of onset of psychotic experiences for daily users of marijuana was double that for nonusers. Alcohol disorder in men was associated with eightfold risk and in women with threefold risk. Baseline depressive episodes, manic episodes, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder also were associated with increased risk of onset of psychotic experiences.

  12. Long-term results of a clinical trial comparing isolated vaginal stimulation with combined treatment for women with stress incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Maria Cláudia Bicudo; Mendonça, Rafaela Rosalba de; Rodrigues, Alexandre Oliveira; Matos, Leandro Luongo de; Pompeo, Antônio Carlos Lima; Bezerra, Carlos Alberto

    2014-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of stress urinary incontinence treatments adding pelvic floor muscle training to vaginal electrical stimulation. Forty-eight women with stress urinary incontinence were randomized into 2 groups: 24 underwent isolated vaginal electrical stimulation, and 24 vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training. History, physical examination, voiding diary, perineum strength test, and urodynamic study were assessed. Comparisons were made for adherence to treatment, muscle strength improvement, urinary symptoms, and degree of satisfaction immediately, 12 and 96 months after treatment. Patients' degree of satisfaction on vaginal electrical stimulation, and on vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training immediately, 12 and 96 months post treatment, were, respectively: 88.2% versus 88.9% 64.7% versus 61.1% and 42.9% versus 28.6% (p>0.05). Vaginal electrical stimulation associated to pelvic floor muscle training did not show better results than vaginal electrical stimulation alone.

  13. The mental health consequences of nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mir M; Dean, David; Lipari, Rachel; Dowd, William N; Aldridge, Arnie P; Novak, Scott P

    2015-03-01

    Nonmedical prescription drug use is estimated to be the second most abused category of drugs after marijuana among adolescents. Prescription drugs can be highly addictive and prolonged use can produce neurological changes and physiological dependence and could result in adverse mental health outcomes. This topic is largely unexplored, as current knowledge of possible mechanisms of the linkage between adverse mental health consequences and prescription drug misuse is limited. This study explores the relationship between nonmedical use of prescription drugs and depression outcomes among adolescents. Given their complex and confounded relationship, our purpose is to better understand the extent to which nonmedical use of prescription drugs is an antecedent of depressive episodes. Using data from the 2008-2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the study employs a propensity score matching methodology to ascertain whether nonmedical use of prescription drugs is linked to major depressive episodes among adolescents. The results document a positive relationship between nonmedical prescription drug use and major depressive episodes among adolescents. Specifically, the results indicate that adolescents who used prescription drugs non-medically are 33% to 35% more likely to experience major depressive episodes compared to their non-abusing counterparts. This provides additional evidence about the potential public health consequences of misuse of prescription drugs on adverse mental health outcomes. Given the significant increased risk of major depressive episode among adolescents who use prescription drugs nonmedically, it seems that the prevention of nonmedical prescription drug use warrants the utilization of both educational and public health resources. An important area for future research is to understand how any policy initiatives in this area must strike a balance between the need to minimize the misuse of prescription drugs and the need to ensure access for

  14. Developing a scale to measure stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs about women who have abortions: results from Ghana and Zambia.

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    Shellenberg, Kristen M; Hessini, Leila; Levandowski, Brooke A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore the context of abortion stigma in Ghana and Zambia through qualitative research, and develop a quantitative instrument to measure stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs about abortion. Ultimately, we aimed to develop a scale to measure abortion stigma at the individual and community level that can also be used in the evaluation of stigma reduction interventions. Focus group discussions were conducted in both countries to provide information around attitudes and beliefs about abortion. A 57-item instrument was created from these data, pre-tested, and then administered to 531 individuals (n = 250 in Ghana and n = 281 in Zambia). Exploratory factor analyses were conducted on 33 of the original 57 items to identify a statistically and conceptually relevant scale. Items with factor loadings > 0.39 were retained. All analyses were completed using Stata IC/11.2. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in a three-factor solution that explained 53% of the variance in an 18-item instrument. The three identified subscales are: (i) negative stereotypes (eight items), (ii) discrimination and exclusion (seven items), and (iii) potential contagion (three items). Coefficient alphas of 0.85, 0.80, and 0.80 for the three subscales, and 0.90 for the full 18-item instrument provide evidence of internal consistency reliability. Our Stigmatizing Attitudes, Beliefs, and Actions scale captures three important dimensions of abortion stigma: negative stereotypes about men and women who are associated with abortion, discrimination/exclusion of women who have abortions, and fear of contagion as a result of coming in contact with a woman who has had an abortion. The development of this scale provides a validated tool for measuring stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs about abortion in Ghana and Zambia. Additionally, the scale has the potential to be applicable in other country settings. It represents an important contribution to the fields of reproductive

  15. Prevalence of indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus western blot results in pregnant women attended at a public hospital in Presidente Prudente, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezi

    Full Text Available The AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly among women worldwide, offering increasing opportunities for vertical transmission of HIV. In Brazil, the prevalence of HIV infection among pregnant women is less than 1%. Therefore, the positive predictive value of an HIV EIA test tends to be lower than the more frequent indeterminate Western blot result. Pregnant women receiving antenatal care, from 2000 to 2004, at a public secondary hospital in the city of Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil, were systematically screened for HIV by means of two distinct EIA tests, in order to determine the prevalence of indeterminate Western blot results among pregnant women showing discordance in both HIV EIA tests and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Confirmatory indirect immunofluorescence was performed on material for all women with positive results in both EIA tests. Whenever there were positive results in EIA and IIA, the applicant was retested by the initial screening assay. Only those not showing concordance in results in EIA and IAA had a Western blot performed. The viral load was measured in pregnant women with positive or indeterminate Western blot results. Out of 9,786 sera, 105 (1.0% were positive in the two HIV EIA screening tests, confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Among these women, Western blot was interpreted as indeterminate in 11 (0.1% cases and their viral load was <50 copies/mL. We found a prevalence of 0.1% HIV indeterminate Western blots in pregnant women from Presidente Prudente and the surrounding region; none of these pregnant women had positive HIV viral loads.

  16. Drugs Used in Sexual Assaults: Features and Toxicological Investigations

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    Pinar Efeoglu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Drugs used in sexual assault, which are also called as date rape drugs, are common phenomenon of crime in many countries. In a typical scenario, a perpetrator adds a date-rape drug which has sedative effect into alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage of an unsuspecting person. After drug administration, mostly amnesia and symptoms such as confussion, loss of memory, lack of muscle control, dizziness occur. The main drugs in sexual assaults are benzodiazepines such as γ-hydroxy butyrate and its analogs, clonazepam, alprazolam, flunitrazepam, oxazepam, ketamine, barbiturates, antidepressants, cocaine and stimulants. Most of these drugs are colorless, odorless and highly soluble in alcohol or other beverages quickly. They are rapidly absorbed and eliminated after oral administration. A victim may complain to police or other legal forces after several days due to emotional trauma as shame, fear, doubt and disbelief. For this reason, It is important to know what time the sample is taken from the victim to confirm the presence of the drug. In this study, we will present a general approach to date-rape drugs used in sexual assault. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 418-425

  17. Preparing community educational presentations on ergogenic drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isetts, B J

    1989-10-01

    Advice on how to prepare educational presentations on the use of ergogenic drugs is provided. One way that pharmacists can contribute to the effort to curb the use of performance-enhancing drugs is by giving educational presentations in schools and other public forums and before groups of athletes, parents, teachers, healthcare professionals, and others. Public demand for information on the pharmacology and risks of ergogenic drug use, especially anabolic steroid use, has increased in the wake of the widely publicized disqualification of sprinter Ben Johnson at the 1988 Summer Olympics. When addressing adolescents, speakers must choose their words particularly carefully because these listeners tend to focus only on the possible benefits of the drugs in question, which may appeal not only to athletes but also to those seeking to improve their physical appearance. In addition, speakers must overcome a credibility gap created by early claims by medical experts that anabolic steroids are not effective in increasing muscle size and strength. Thorough preparation is the key to effective presentations. Reading of relevant materials is important, but speakers should also familiarize themselves with the practical details by talking with athletes, gym owners, and sports medicine personnel. The speaker must be prepared to answer pointed questions from sometimes skeptical audiences. By preparing effective, factual community presentations on ergogenic drug use, pharmacists can help to dispel the misinformation that leads many high school students to begin using these agents.

  18. Drug use and social control: The negotiation of moral ambivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Michael; Winstock, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Illicit drugs occupy an ambivalent position in late modern society; one that revolves around the twin themes of pleasure and disapproval. Drawing on Freudian psychoanalysis and Eliasian sociology this article considers how people, particularly those who use drugs, negotiate such ambivalence. Patterns of drug use and associated attitudes are examined on the basis of the Crime Survey for England and Wales and a specialist survey of largely recreational drug users in the United Kingdom. Although illicit drugs have become increasingly familiar, their use is still widely thought to be harmful and morally dubious, creating a series of challenges for those who engage in such behaviour. Ambivalence among drug users is evident in an awareness of potential costs as well as benefits; a tendency to avoid more harmful substances; a general emphasis on moderation; and a desire to use less. Building on previous work, which highlights the role of neutralisations in sustaining drug using behaviour, particular attention is paid to users' judgements about how their levels of consumption compare with other users. The analysis identifies a tendency among users to downplay their relative levels of use, which, it is argued, serves to shield them from some of the imperatives that may lead to decisions to cut down. As such, normalisation is said to be an intra-personal as well inter-personal process. The article concludes by discussing the potential of web-based personalised feedback as a harm reduction approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. My first time: initiation into injecting drug use in Manipur and Nagaland, north-east India

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    Langkham Biangtung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The north-east Indian states of Manipur and Nagaland are two of the six high HIV prevalence states in the country, and the main route of HIV transmission is injecting drug use. Understanding the pathways to injecting drug use can facilitate early intervention with HIV prevention programs. While several studies of initiation into injecting drug use have been conducted in developed countries, little is known about the situation in developing country settings. The aim of this study was to increase understanding of the contextual factors associated with initiation into injecting drug use in north-east India, and the influence of these factors on subsequent initiation of others. Method In mid 2006 a cross-sectional survey among 200 injecting drug users (IDUs was undertaken in partnership with local NGOs that provide HIV prevention and care services and advocacy for IDUs in Imphal, Manipur and Dimapur, Nagaland. The questionnaire elicited detailed information about the circumstances of the first injection and the contexts of participants' lives. Demographic information, self-reported HIV status, and details about initiation of others were also recorded. Results Initiation into injecting drug use occurred at 20 years of age. The drugs most commonly injected were Spasmo-proxyvon (65.5% and heroin (30.5%. In 53.5% cases, a needle belonging to someone else was used. Two-thirds (66.7% had used the drug previously, and 91.0% had known other IDUs prior to initiation (mean = 7.5 others. The first injection was usually administered by another person (94.5%, mostly a friend (84.1%. Initiation is a social event; 98% had others present (mean = 2.7 others. Almost 70% of participants had initiated at least one other (mean = 5 others. Initiation of others was independently associated with being male and unemployed; having IDU friends and using alcohol around the time of initiation; and having been taught to inject and not paid for the drug at the

  20. Comparison of prescription drug use between community-dwelling and institutionalized elderly in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnell, Kristina; Fastbom, Johan

    2012-09-01

    Most previous studies about drug use in the elderly population have either investigated drug use in institutions or in the community-dwelling setting. Hence, very few studies have compared drug use in institutionalized and community-dwelling elderly, maybe because of a lack of sufficiently large databases. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in drug use patterns between community-dwelling and institutionalized elderly, after adjustment for age, gender and number of other drugs (used as a proxy for overall co-morbidity). We analysed data from individuals aged ≥65 years who filled at least one drug prescription between July and September 2008 and were consequently registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register (n = 1,347,564; 1,260,843 community-dwelling and 86,721 institutionalized elderly). A list of current prescriptions was constructed for every individual on the arbitrarily chosen date 30 September 2008. Outcome measures were the 20 most common drug classes and the 20 most common individual drugs. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate whether institutionalization was associated with use of these drugs, after adjustment for age, gender and number of other drugs. Institutionalized elderly were more likely than community-dwelling elderly to use antidepressants, laxatives, minor analgesics, opioids and hypnotics/sedatives, after adjustment for age, gender and number of other drugs. On the contrary, institutionalization was negatively associated with use of lipid modifying agents, angiotensin II antagonists, selective calcium channel blockers, β-blocking agents and ACE inhibitors, after adjustment for age, gender and number of other drugs. Our results indicate that institutionalized elderly are more likely than community-dwelling elderly to use psychotropics, analgesics and laxatives, but less likely to receive recommended cardiovascular drug therapy, which may indicate a need for implementation of evidence-based guidelines for

  1. Women's responses to changes in U.S. Preventive Task Force's mammography screening guidelines: results of focus groups with ethnically diverse women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D; Bluethmann, Shirley Morrison; Sheets, Margaret; Opdyke, Kelly Morrison; Gates-Ferris, Kathryn; Hurlbert, Marc; Harden, Elizabeth

    2013-12-12

    The 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) changed mammography guidelines to recommend routine biennial screening starting at age 50. This study describes women's awareness of, attitudes toward, and intention to comply with these new guidelines. Women ages 40-50 years old were recruited from the Boston area to participate in focus groups (k = 8; n = 77). Groups were segmented by race/ethnicity (Caucasian = 39%; African American = 35%; Latina = 26%), audio-taped, and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used. Participants were largely unaware of the revised guidelines and suspicious that it was a cost-savings measure by insurers and/or providers. Most did not intend to comply with the change, viewing screening as obligatory. Few felt prepared to participate in shared decision-making or advocate for their preferences with respect to screening. Communication about the rationale for mammography guideline changes has left many women unconvinced about potential disadvantages or limitations of screening. Since further guideline changes are likely to occur with advances in technology and science, it is important to help women become informed consumers of health information and active participants in shared decision-making with providers. Additional research is needed to determine the impact of the USPSTF change on women's screening behaviors and on breast cancer outcomes.

  2. Reduced acquisition and reactivation of human papillomavirus infections among older women treated with cryotherapy: results from a randomized trial in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Lynette

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of women for high-grade cervical cancer precursors frequently results in clearance of the associated high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV infection but the role of treatment among women without hrHPV is unknown. We investigated whether cervical cryotherapy reduces newly detected hrHPV infections among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women who were hrHPV negative when treated. Methods The impact of cryotherapy on newly detected hrHPV infections was examined among 612 women of known HIV serostatus, aged 35 to 65 years, who were negative for hrHPV DNA, and randomized to either undergo cryotherapy (n = 309 or not (n = 303. All women underwent repeat hrHPV DNA testing 6, 12, 24, and 36 months later. Results Among 540 HIV-negative women, cryotherapy was associated with a significant reduction in newly detected hrHPV infections. Women in the cryotherapy group were 55% less likely to have newly detected hrHPV than women in the control group (95% CI 0.28 to 0.71. This association was independent of the influence of changes in sexual behaviors following therapy (adjusted hazards ratio (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.81. Among 72 HIV-positive women, similar reductions were not observed (HR = 1.10, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.29. Conclusions Cervical cryotherapy significantly reduced newly detected hrHPV infections among HIV-negative, but not HIV-positive women. These results raise intriguing questions about immunological responses and biological mechanisms underlying the apparent prophylactic benefits of cryotherapy.

  3. Geographical variation in antipsychotic drug use in elderly patients with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakarias, Johanne Købstrup; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Nørgaard, Ane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of antipsychotics in elderly patients with dementia has decreased in the past decade due to safety regulations; however use is still high. Geographical variation may indicate discrepancies in clinical practice and lack of adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the management...... of behavioral symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential geographical variances in use of antipsychotic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: A registry-based cross-sectional study in the entire elderly population of Denmark (≥65 years) conducted in 2012. Data included place of residence, prescriptions filled......, and hospital discharge diagnoses. Antipsychotic drug use among elderly with (n = 34,536) and without (n = 931,203) a dementia diagnosis was compared across the five regions and 98 municipalities in Denmark, adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: In 2012, the national prevalence of antipsychotic drug use was 20...