WorldWideScience

Sample records for drug resistant mutations

  1. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  2. Fitness cost of chromosomal drug resistance-conferring mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Peter; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Sturmfels, Antje; Kappler, Martin; Pletschette, Michel; Böttger, Erik C

    2002-05-01

    To study the cost of chromosomal drug resistance mutations to bacteria, we investigated the fitness cost of mutations that confer resistance to different classes of antibiotics affecting bacterial protein synthesis (aminocyclitols, 2-deoxystreptamines, macrolides). We used a model system based on an in vitro competition assay with defined Mycobacterium smegmatis laboratory mutants; selected mutations were introduced by genetic techniques to address the possibility that compensatory mutations ameliorate the resistance cost. We found that the chromosomal drug resistance mutations studied often had only a small fitness cost; compensatory mutations were not involved in low-cost or no-cost resistance mutations. When drug resistance mutations found in clinical isolates were considered, selection of those mutations that have little or no fitness cost in the in vitro competition assay seems to occur. These results argue against expectations that link decreased levels of antibiotic consumption with the decline in the level of resistance.

  3. Differential Persistence of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutation Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vivek; Sucupira, Maria C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Hartogensis, Wendy; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Kallas, Esper G.; Janini, Luiz M.; Liegler, Teri; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deeks, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance (TDR) mutations can become replaced over time by emerging wild-type viral variants with improved fitness. The impact of class-specific mutations on this rate of mutation replacement is uncertain. Methods. We studied participants with acute and/or early HIV infection and TDR in 2 cohorts (San Francisco, California, and São Paulo, Brazil). We followed baseline mutations longitudinally and compared replacement rates between mutation classes with use of a parametric proportional hazards model. Results. Among 75 individuals with 195 TDR mutations, M184V/I became undetectable markedly faster than did nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations (hazard ratio, 77.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7–408.2; P < .0001), while protease inhibitor and NNRTI replacement rates were similar. Higher plasma HIV-1 RNA level predicted faster mutation replacement, but this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.71 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, .90–3.25 log10 copies/mL; P = .11). We found substantial person-to-person variability in mutation replacement rates not accounted for by viral load or mutation class (P < .0001). Conclusions. The rapid replacement of M184V/I mutations is consistent with known fitness costs. The long-term persistence of NNRTI and protease inhibitor mutations suggests a risk for person-to-person propagation. Host and/or viral factors not accounted for by viral load or mutation class are likely influencing mutation replacement and warrant further study. PMID:21451005

  4. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain.

  5. Effect of mutation and genetic background on drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Lukas; Egger, Matthias; Bodmer, Thomas; Altpeter, Ekkehardt; Zwahlen, Marcel; Jaton, Katia; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Borrell, Sonia; Dubuis, Olivier; Bruderer, Thomas; Siegrist, Hans H; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Fehr, Jan; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Ninet, Béatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial factors may contribute to the global emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). Only a few studies have reported on the interactions between different bacterial factors. We studied drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a nationwide study conducted from 2000 to 2008 in Switzerland. We determined quantitative drug resistance levels of first-line drugs by using Bactec MGIT-960 and drug resistance genotypes by sequencing the hot-spot regions of the relevant genes. We determined recent transmission by molecular methods and collected clinical data. Overall, we analyzed 158 isolates that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, or ethambutol, 48 (30.4%) of which were multidrug resistant. Among 154 isoniazid-resistant strains, katG mutations were associated with high-level and inhA promoter mutations with low-level drug resistance. Only katG(S315T) (65.6% of all isoniazid-resistant strains) and inhA promoter -15C/T (22.7%) were found in molecular clusters. M. tuberculosis lineage 2 (includes Beijing genotype) was associated with any drug resistance (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 5.6; P mutations (OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 20.7; P = 0.002). We found that the genetic strain background influences the level of isoniazid resistance conveyed by particular mutations (interaction tests of drug resistance mutations across all lineages; P tuberculosis drug resistance mutations were associated with various levels of drug resistance and transmission, and M. tuberculosis lineages were associated with particular drug resistance-conferring mutations and phenotypic drug resistance. Our study also supports a role for epistatic interactions between different drug resistance mutations and strain genetic backgrounds in M. tuberculosis drug resistance.

  6. Erythromycin resistance by L4/L22 mutations and resistance masking by drug efflux pump deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovmar, Martin; Nilsson, Karin; Lukk, Eliisa; Vimberg, Vladimir; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    We characterized the effects of classical erythromycin resistance mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 of the large ribosomal subunit on the kinetics of erythromycin binding. Our data are consistent with a mechanism in which the macrolide erythromycin enters and exits the ribosome through the nascent peptide exit tunnel, and suggest that these mutations both impair passive transport through the tunnel and distort the erythromycin-binding site. The growth-inhibitory action of erythromycin was characterized for bacterial populations with wild-type and L22-mutated ribosomes in drug efflux pump deficient and proficient backgrounds. The L22 mutation conferred reduced erythromycin susceptibility in the drug efflux pump proficient, but not deficient, background. This ‘masking' of drug resistance by pump deficiency was reproduced by modelling with input data from our biochemical experiments. We discuss the general principles behind the phenomenon of drug resistance ‘masking', and highlight its potential importance for slowing down the evolution of drug resistance among pathogens. PMID:19197244

  7. Drug resistance. K13-propeller mutations confer artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Duru, Valentine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Dacheux, Mélanie; Khim, Nimol; Zhang, Lei; Lam, Stephen; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Fairhurst, Rick M; Ménard, Didier; Fidock, David A

    2015-01-23

    The emergence of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia imperils efforts to reduce the global malaria burden. We genetically modified the Plasmodium falciparum K13 locus using zinc-finger nucleases and measured ring-stage survival rates after drug exposure in vitro; these rates correlate with parasite clearance half-lives in artemisinin-treated patients. With isolates from Cambodia, where resistance first emerged, survival rates decreased from 13 to 49% to 0.3 to 2.4% after the removal of K13 mutations. Conversely, survival rates in wild-type parasites increased from ≤0.6% to 2 to 29% after the insertion of K13 mutations. These mutations conferred elevated resistance to recent Cambodian isolates compared with that of reference lines, suggesting a contemporary contribution of additional genetic factors. Our data provide a conclusive rationale for worldwide K13-propeller sequencing to identify and eliminate artemisinin-resistant parasites.

  8. Reaching consensus on drug resistance conferring mutations (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Cirillo

    2016-01-01

    A user-friendly interface designed for nonexpert or expert operability.A standardized and validated analysis pipeline for variant analyses of M. tuberculosis next-generation sequencing (NGS data.Access to data beyond the published literature with dynamic and iterative updates of new data generated by global surveillance and clinical trials.A well-developed legal structure to ensure intellectual property rights and data ownership remain with contributors.A structured data-sharing architecture to restrict access to sensitive or unpublished data sets.Metadata standardization using CDISC: supports global, platform-independent data standards that enable information system interoperability.An emphasis on data quality and rigorous, expert curation with multiple quality control checks for whole-genome sequencing and other metadata.Validation of NGS analysis output by an expert committee with grading of resistance conferring mutations based on rigorous statistical standards.Regulatory-compliant analysis pipeline and database architecture. Successful execution of such an extensive database platform requires substantial collaboration from scientists investigating the genetic basis for drug resistance worldwide, and from developers with expertise in database design and implementation.

  9. The role of compensatory mutations in the emergence of drug resistance.

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    Andreas Handel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens that evolve resistance to drugs usually have reduced fitness. However, mutations that largely compensate for this reduction in fitness often arise. We investigate how these compensatory mutations affect population-wide resistance emergence as a function of drug treatment. Using a model of gonorrhea transmission dynamics, we obtain generally applicable, qualitative results that show how compensatory mutations lead to more likely and faster resistance emergence. We further show that resistance emergence depends on the level of drug use in a strongly nonlinear fashion. We also discuss what data need to be obtained to allow future quantitative predictions of resistance emergence.

  10. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Bennett (Diane); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); D. Otelea (Dan); D.R. Kuritzkes (Daniel); H. Fleury (Hervé); M. Kiuchi (Mark); W. Heneine (Walid); R. Kantor (Rami); M.R. Jordan (Michael); J.M. Schapiro (Jonathan); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); P. Sandstrom (Paul); C.A. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S.Y. Rhee (Soo Yoon); T.F. Liu (Tommy); D. Pillay (Deenan); R.W. Shafer (Robert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPrograms that monitor local, national, and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programs. To accurately compare transmitted drug resistance rates across geographic regions an

  11. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy.

  12. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  13. Personalized prediction of EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Debby D.; Weiqiang Zhou; Hong Yan; Maria Wong; Victor Lee

    2013-01-01

    EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has significantly impaired the potency of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer treatment. Computational approaches can provide powerful and efficient techniques in the investigation of drug resistance. In our work, the EGFR mutation feature is characterized by the energy components of binding free energy (concerning the mutant-inhibitor complex), and we combine it with specific personal features for 168 clinical subjects to construct a...

  14. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yon Rhee

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy.

  15. High prevalence of drug-resistance mutations in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in southern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Schunk, Mirjam; Kumma, Wondimagegn P.; Barreto Miranda, Isabel; Maha E. Osman; Roewer, Susanne; Alano, Abraham; Loescher, Thomas; Bienzle, Ulrich; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2006-01-01

    Background: In Ethiopia, malaria is caused by both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Drug resistance of P. falciparum to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) is frequent and intense in some areas. Methods: In 100 patients with uncomplicated malaria from Dilla, southern Ethiopia, P. falciparum dhfr and dhps mutations as well as P. vivax dhfr polymorphisms associated with resistance to SP and P. falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations conferring CQ resistance were assesse...

  16. Interplay between Mutations and Efflux in Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Miguel Viveiros

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies show efflux as a universal bacterial mechanism contributing to antibiotic resistance and also that the activity of the antibiotics subject to efflux can be enhanced by the combined use of efflux inhibitors. Nevertheless, the contribution of efflux to the overall drug resistance levels of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood and still is ignored by many. Here, we evaluated the contribution of drug efflux plus target-gene mutations to the drug resistance levels in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. A panel of 17 M. tuberculosis clinical strains were characterized for drug resistance associated mutations and antibiotic profiles in the presence and absence of efflux inhibitors. The correlation between the effect of the efflux inhibitors and the resistance levels was assessed by quantitative drug susceptibility testing. The bacterial growth/survival vs. growth inhibition was analyzed through the comparison between the time of growth in the presence and absence of an inhibitor. For the same mutation conferring antibiotic resistance, different MICs were observed and the different resistance levels found could be reduced by efflux inhibitors. Although susceptibility was not restored, the results demonstrate the existence of a broad-spectrum synergistic interaction between antibiotics and efflux inhibitors. The existence of efflux activity was confirmed by real-time fluorometry. Moreover, the efflux pump genes mmr, mmpL7, Rv1258c, p55, and efpA were shown to be overexpressed in the presence of antibiotics, demonstrating the contribution of these efflux pumps to the overall resistance phenotype of the M. tuberculosis clinical isolates studied, independently of the genotype of the strains. These results showed that the drug resistance levels of multi- and extensively-drug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical strains are a combination between drug efflux and the presence of target-gene mutations, a reality

  17. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  18. Viral fitness: relation to drug resistance mutations and mechanisms involved: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations.

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    Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth R; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2007-03-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors constitute the backbone of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. One of the major obstacles in achieving the long-term efficacy of anti-HIV-1 therapy is the development of resistance. The advent of resistance mutations is usually accompanied by a change in viral replicative fitness. This review focuses on the most common nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated mutations and their effects on HIV-1 replicative fitness. Recent studies have explained the two main mechanisms of resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their role in HIV-1 replicative fitness. The first involves mutations directly interfering with binding or incorporation and seems to impact replicative fitness more adversely than the second mechanism, which involves enhanced excision of the newly incorporated analogue. Further studies have helped explain the antagonistic effects between amino acid substitutions, K65R, L74V, M184V, and thymidine analogue mutations, showing how viral replicative fitness influences the evolution of thymidine analogue resistance pathways. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations impact HIV-1 replicative fitness to a lesser extent than protease resistance mutations. The monitoring of viral replicative fitness may help in the management of HIV-1 infection in highly antiretroviral-experienced individuals.

  19. Protease Inhibitors Drug Resistance Mutations in Turkish Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

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    Elif Sargin Altunok

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: We are of the opinion that drug resistance analyses can be beneficial and necessary in revealing which variants are responsible for pre-treatment natural resistance and which mutations are responsible for the viral breakthrough that may develop during the treatment.

  20. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

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    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  1. Gene Expression Noise Facilitates Adaptation and Drug Resistance Independently of Mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Charlebois, Daniel A; Kaern, Mads

    2011-01-01

    We show that the effect of stress on the reproductive fitness of noisy cell populations can be modelled as first-passage time problem, and demonstrate that even relatively short-lived fluctuations in gene expression can ensure long-term survival of a drug-resistant population. We examine how this effect contributes to the development of drug-resistant cancer cells, and demonstrate that permanent immunity can arise independently of mutations.

  2. Targeting oncoprotein stability overcomes drug resistance caused by FLT3 kinase domain mutations.

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    Chuanjiang Yu

    Full Text Available FLT3 is the most frequently mutated kinase in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Internal tandem duplications (ITDs in the juxta-membrane region constitute the majority of activating FLT3 mutations. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors were developed and tested in the clinic with significant success. However, recent studies have reported the development of secondary drug resistance in patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors. Since FLT3-ITD is an HSP90 client kinase, we here explored if targeting the stability of drug-resistant FLT3 mutant protein could be a potential therapeutic option. We observed that HSP90 inhibitor treatment resulted in the degradation of inhibitor-resistant FLT3-ITD mutants and selectively induced toxicity in cells expressing FLT3-ITD mutants. Thus, HSP90 inhibitors provide a potential therapeutic choice to overcome secondary drug resistance following TKI treatment in FLT3-ITD positive AML.

  3. Identification of drug resistance mutations in HIV from constraints on natural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas C.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evolves with extraordinary rapidity. However, its evolution is constrained by interactions between mutations in its fitness landscape. Here we show that an Ising model describing these interactions, inferred from sequence data obtained prior to the use of antiretroviral drugs, can be used to identify clinically significant sites of resistance mutations. Successful predictions of the resistance sites indicate progress in the development of successful models of real viral evolution at the single residue level and suggest that our approach may be applied to help design new therapies that are less prone to failure even where resistance data are not yet available.

  4. Analysis of hepatitis B virus genotyping and drug resistance gene mutations based on massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingxin; Zhang, Yinxin; Mei, Yanhua; Wang, Yuqi; Liu, Tao; Guan, Yanfang; Tan, Deming; Liang, Yu; Yang, Ling; Yi, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Drug resistance to nucleoside analogs is a serious problem worldwide. Both drug resistance gene mutation detection and HBV genotyping are helpful for guiding clinical treatment. Total HBV DNA from 395 patients who were treated with single or multiple drugs including Lamivudine, Adefovir, Entecavir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir and Emtricitabine were sequenced using the HiSeq 2000 sequencing system and validated using the 3730 sequencing system. In addition, a mixed sample of HBV plasmid DNA was used to determine the cutoff value for HiSeq-sequencing, and 52 of the 395 samples were sequenced three times to evaluate the repeatability and stability of this technology. Of the 395 samples sequenced using both HiSeq and 3730 sequencing, the results from 346 were consistent, and the results from 49 were inconsistent. Among the 49 inconsistent results, 13 samples were detected as drug-resistance-positive using HiSeq but negative using 3730, and the other 36 samples showed a higher number of drug-resistance-positive gene mutations using HiSeq 2000 than using 3730. Gene mutations had an apparent frequency of 1% as assessed by the plasmid testing. Therefore, a 1% cutoff value was adopted. Furthermore, the experiment was repeated three times, and the same results were obtained in 49/52 samples using the HiSeq sequencing system. HiSeq sequencing can be used to analyze HBV gene mutations with high sensitivity, high fidelity, high throughput and automation and is a potential method for hepatitis B virus gene mutation detection and genotyping.

  5. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sayan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out between 2009 and 2014 and antiretroviral naïve 774 HIV-1 infected patients from 19 Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Departments in Turkey were included; gender: 664 (86% male, median age: 37 (range; 1–77, median CD4+T-cell: 360 (range; 1–1320 count/mm3, median HIV-RNA load: 2.10+E6 (range; 4.2+E2–7.41+E8 IU/mL. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were detected by population based sequencing of the reverse transcriptase (codon 41–238 and protease (codon 1–99 domains of pol gene of HIV-1, and analyzed according to the criteria by the World Health Organization 2009 list of surveillance drug resistance mutations [1]. Results: The patients had TDRMs to NRTIs (K65R, M184V, NNRTIs (K101E, K103N/S, G190A/E/S, Y181I/C, Y188H/L and PIs (M46L, I54V, L76V, V82L/T, N83D, I84V, L90M. The prevalence of overall TDRMs was 6.7% (52/774. Resistance mutations were found to be 0.7% (6/774, 4.1% (32/774 and 2.1% (17/774 to NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs drug groups, respectively. Three patients had NRTIs+NNRTs resistance mutations (M184V+K103N as multi-class drug resistance. However, thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs determined two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and TAM2: D67N, K70R, K219E/Q, and T215F. The prevalence of TAM1 and TAM2 were 7.7% (60/774 and 4.3% (34/774, respectively. Conclusions: The TDRMs prevalence of antiretroviral naïve HIV-1 infected patients may be suggested current situation of Turkey. These long-term and large-scale results show that the resistance testing must be an integral part of the management of HIV infection in Turkey.

  6. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations Among Treatment-Naive Adult Patients in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoel Wahid, Firoz; Sno, Rachel; Darcissac, Edith; Lavergne, Anne; Adhin, Malti R; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    The molecular epidemiologic profile of HIV-1 in Suriname was determined through protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences obtained from HIV-1 strains collected from 100 drug-naive HIV-1-infected persons. Subtype determination revealed that most viruses were of subtype B (94.9%) in both PR and RT genomic regions, followed by B/D recombinants (5.1%). Analysis of drug resistance mutations showed only one transmitted dug resistance mutation (TDRM) (V75M) in a single strain. The genetic data obtained can serve as a baseline for Suriname to monitor emerging mutations. This study reveals that the HIV-1 epidemic in Suriname is still characterized by a low TDRM rate (1%) and a low level of subtype diversity. However, both genes display a high genetic polymorphism. This high polymorphism may ultimately lead to drug resistance. Continuous monitoring of the baseline resistance is therefore a prerequisite to safeguard effective long-term treatment for people living with HIV-1 in Suriname.

  7. Prevalence of drug resistance mutations and non-B subtypes in newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise B; Christensen, Marianne B; Gerstoft, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the prevalence of drug resistance mutations in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive individuals in Denmark. In addition we assessed the prevalence of non-B subtypes based on phylogenetic analysis of the pol gene. Plasma samples from 104 newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive...... patients were obtained in the year 2000. The entire protease gene and 320 amino acids of the reverse transcriptase gene were genotyped. Sequences were obtained from 97 patients. No subjects displayed primary resistance mutations in the protease gene, whereas all carried 1 or more secondary mutations....... Resistance mutations in the RT-gene associated with NRTI-resistance were found in 1 patient, who was infected with zidovudine resistant HIV-1 harbouring the M41L mutation in combination with T215S and L210S. The T215S mutation has been showed to be associated with reversion of zidovudine resistance. The T215...

  8. Persistence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance mutations associated with fitness costs and viral genetic backgrounds.

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    Wan-Lin Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of drug-resistant pathogens presents an almost-universal challenge for fighting infectious diseases. Transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM can persist in the absence of drugs for considerable time. It is generally believed that differential TDRM-persistence is caused, at least partially, by variations in TDRM-fitness-costs. However, in vivo epidemiological evidence for the impact of fitness costs on TDRM-persistence is rare. Here, we studied the persistence of TDRM in HIV-1 using longitudinally-sampled nucleotide sequences from the Swiss-HIV-Cohort-Study (SHCS. All treatment-naïve individuals with TDRM at baseline were included. Persistence of TDRM was quantified via reversion rates (RR determined with interval-censored survival models. Fitness costs of TDRM were estimated in the genetic background in which they occurred using a previously published and validated machine-learning algorithm (based on in vitro replicative capacities and were included in the survival models as explanatory variables. In 857 sequential samples from 168 treatment-naïve patients, 17 TDRM were analyzed. RR varied substantially and ranged from 174.0/100-person-years;CI=[51.4, 588.8] (for 184V to 2.7/100-person-years;[0.7, 10.9] (for 215D. RR increased significantly with fitness cost (increase by 1.6[1.3,2.0] per standard deviation of fitness costs. When subdividing fitness costs into the average fitness cost of a given mutation and the deviation from the average fitness cost of a mutation in a given genetic background, we found that both components were significantly associated with reversion-rates. Our results show that the substantial variations of TDRM persistence in the absence of drugs are associated with fitness-cost differences both among mutations and among different genetic backgrounds for the same mutation.

  9. HIV-1 diversity and drug-resistant mutations in infected individuals in Changchun, China.

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    Ming Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection has been detected in all provinces of China. Although epidemiological and phylogenetic studies have been conducted in many regions, such analyses are lacking from Jilin province in northeastern China. METHOD: Epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, as well as detection of drug-resistant mutations, were conducted on 57 HIV-1 infected patients from Changchun city identified and confirmed through annual surveillance by local Centers for Disease Control in Jilin province of northeastern China in 2012. RESULTS: Sexual contact was determined to be the major pathway for HIV-1 transmission in Jilin, where hetero- and homosexual activities contributed almost equally. Phylogenetic analyses detected multiple subtypes of HIV-1 including subtype G circulating in Jilin, with multiple origins for each of them. Both subtype B and CRF01_AE were dominant, and evidence of subtype B transmitting between different high-risk groups was observed. Mutations in the viral protease at position 71 indicated the presence of a selective pressure. Several drug-resistant mutations were detected, although they were predicted with low-level resistance to antiviral treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Information from this study fills the gap in knowledge of HIV-1 transmission in Changchun city, Jilin province, China. By revealing the origin and evolutionary status of local HIV-1 strains, this work contributes to ongoing efforts in the control and prevention of AIDS.

  10. Estimating the dynamics and dependencies of accumulating mutations with applications to HIV drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Hesam; Günthard, Huldrych F; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a new model called the observed time conjunctive Bayesian network (OT-CBN) that describes the accumulation of genetic events (mutations) under partial temporal ordering constraints. Unlike other CBN models, the OT-CBN model uses sampling time points of genotypes in addition to genotypes themselves to estimate model parameters. We developed an expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain approximate maximum likelihood estimates by accounting for this additional information. In a simulation study, we show that the OT-CBN model outperforms the continuous time CBN (CT-CBN) (Beerenwinkel and Sullivant, 2009. Markov models for accumulating mutations. Biometrika 96: (3), 645-661), which does not take into account individual sampling times for parameter estimation. We also show superiority of the OT-CBN model on several datasets of HIV drug resistance mutations extracted from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database.

  11. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  12. Competitive capacity of HIV-1 strains carrying M184I or Y181I drug-resistant mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jue; LI Lin; LI Han-ping; ZHUANG Dao-min; LIU Si-yang; LIU Yong-jian; BAO Zuo-yi; WANG Zheng; LI Jing-yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Virus with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcdptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) resistant mutations show different evolution tendencies when the anti-viral therapies are interrupted. Understanding the replication fitness of drug-resistant virus is important for the study of the prevalence of drug-resistance. For this purpose, we characterized the replication capacity of HIV-1 virus carrying lamivudine (3TC) or nevirapine (NVP) resistant mutations.Methods 3TC and NVP resistant variants were induced in vitro by selecting wild type virus in the presence of drugs. For the competitive replication assay, drug-resistant variants were cocultured with wild-type virus in the presence or absence of drugs. The ratios of the viral species were determined over time by using a real-time RT-PCR-based assay. Results 3TC-resistant (M184I mutation) and NVP-resistant (Y181I mutation) virus should be selected in vitro in two different ways. The competitive replication assay showed that the ratio of virus carrying a M184I mutation increased from 98.8%, while the wild type virus decreased to 1.2% after 4 passages in the presence of 3TC; the percentage of virus carrying the Y181I mutation increased to 90.5%, while wild type virus decreased to 9.5% in the presence of NVP. In the absence of drugs, the ratio of virus carrying the M184I mutation decreased to 5.3%, while wild type virus increased to 94.7%; the ratio of virus carrying Y181I increased to 75%, while wild type virus decreased to 25% after 4 passages.Conclusions The NVP-resistant virus is fitter than wild type virus even in the absence of NVP that may be the reason that NNRTIs-resistant virus is spreading quickly.

  13. Detection of HIV drug resistance mutations in pregnant women receiving single dose Nevirapine in south India

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    Mini S Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single dose of Nevirapine to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV is the commonest preventive regimen in resource-limited countries. Objectives: The objective of this study was to detect drug-resistant virus after single dose of Nevirapine (sdNVP provided to delivering HIV seropositive (HIV+ve women and to evaluate the time taken for its decay. Results: Of the 36 consenting HIV+ve pregnant women enrolled into the study, the mean hemoglobin and total lymphocyte counts were 10.8 g/dl and 1843 cells/mm 3 , respectively. Mean CD4 counts in 64% of women was 363 cells/mm 3 and mean viral load for 16/36 women was 28,143 copies/ml of plasma. Nevirapine-resistance mutations were detected in 28% of women at delivery; using OLA (Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay. K103N mutations were seen in 19.4% of women while the Y181C mutation was seen in 5%. Both the mutations were detected in 2.7% of women. Sequential blood samples collected at delivery, 7-10 days, 6 weeks, 4 months, 6 months and one year postpartum showed that 81% of K103N mutations and 66.7% of Y181C mutations were detected at 6 weeks postpartum . Wild-type virus had replaced the mutants by one year postpartum in all women except one. Conclusion : These observations are relevant for future treatment with antiretroviral therapy in these women for their HIV disease.

  14. Drug resistance mutations and genetic diversity in adults treated for HIV type 1 infection in Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-Malick, F-Zahra; Tchiakpé, Edmond; Ould Soufiane, Sid'Ahmed; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mouhamedoune Baye, Abderrahmane; Ould Horma Babana, Abdallah; Touré Kane, Coumba; Lo, Baidy; Mboup, Souleymane

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the drug resistance mutationprofile observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with virological failure and to document the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Mauritania. Eighty-six subjects were included and 65 samples were amplified successfully and sequenced. HIV-1 genotyping was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA AC11 resistance procedure. The median treatment duration was 32 months (range: 6-88) and the median viral load, 5 log10 copies/ml (range: 3.13-7). Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) were on first line regimens including 32.0% (19/59) on triomune fixed-dose and six on second-line therapy with NonNucleoside Reverse Transcriptase plus a protease inhibitor. Forty-seven patients (72.3%) had at least one drug resistance mutation including 73.0% (43/59) on first-line therapy. For the second-line, one out of six patients presented resistance mutations and only one presented PI DRM. Overall, the most common DRMs detected were M184V/I (n = 32; 49.2%), K103N (n = 28; 43%), and Y181C (n = 13; 20%). Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs) were found in 26.0% (n = 17) of strains and the most common was T215Y (n = 11, 16.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 17 HIV-1 variants with the predominance of CRF02_AG (n = 42; 64.6%). A high rate of DRM was found in this study and shows the potential need for a structured virological surveillance including viral load quantification and genotyping. Further studies may also be needed in regards to the great variability of HIV-1 strains in Mauritania. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Analysis of HBV genotype, drug resistant mutations, and pre-core/basal core promoter mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Hong, Sun Pyo; Jang, Eun Sun; Park, Sang Jong; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Kang, Sook-Kyoung; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2015-06-01

    Acute hepatitis B, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains with drug resistant mutations or pre-core/basal core promoter (PC/BCP) mutations, is a public health concern, because this infection is often associated with poor disease outcome or difficulty in therapeutic choice. The HBV genotype, the prevalence of drug resistant mutations, and PC/BCP mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B were studied. From 2006 to 2008, 36 patients with acute hepatitis B were enrolled prospectively in four general hospitals. Among them, 20 showed detectable HBV DNA (median value was 4.8 log copies/mL). HBV genotyping and analysis of HBV mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine, adefovir, or entecavir and of PC/BCP mutations were performed using highly sensitive restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) analysis. All 20 patients were infected with HBV genotype C, which causes almost all cases of chronic hepatitis B in Korea. No patient showed mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine (L180M, M204V/I), adefovir (A181T, N236S), or entecavir (I169M, A184T/V, S202I/G, M250V/I/L). However, four patients had BCP mutations, and two had PC mutations. Platelet counts were significantly lower in the four patients with PC/BCP mutations compared to those with wild type. In this study, all acute hepatitis B patients had genotype C HBV strains with no drug resistant mutations. However, 20% showed PC/BCP mutations. This highlights the need for further study on the significance of PC/BCP mutations.

  16. Characterization of drug resistance mutations in ART-naïve HIV-1 infected children in Northern Vietnam

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    Thuy Thi Bich Phung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the profile of drug resistance-associated mutations in pol gene of antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-1 infected children enrolled in National Hospital Pediatrics in Northern Vietnam. Methods: Genotyping was performed on 134 antiretroviral therapy-naïve plasma samples from HIV-1 infected children. HIV-1 pol gene was amplified using primers for protease and reverse transcriptase and sequenced using the BigDye chemistry. The mutations were analyzed based on the Stanford University HIV-1 Drug Resistance Database and ISA-USA list. Results: All the children were infected with HIV-1 CRF01_AE subtype. Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were found in 2 children (2.3% and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were found in 5 children (7.7%. The protease inhibitor mutations were observed M46L and L90M and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor mutations were M184I, K65R, Q151M, T69N, L210W, Y181C, M230L and K101E. Conclusions: This is the first study reporting the prevalence of drug resistance-associated mutation in naïve HIV-1 infected children in Northern Vietnam. These data also emphasize the importance of genotypic resistance testing of HIV-1 infected children before initiating treatment in order to achieve better clinical outcome.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism for the detection of multiple mutations leading to tuberculosis drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krothapalli, Sowmya; May, Michael K; Hestekin, Christa N

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem in both developed and developing countries. Mutations in the Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis bacterial genome, such as those to the rpoB gene and mabA-inhA promoter region, have been linked to TB drug resistance in against rifampicin and isoniazid, respectively. The rapid, accurate, and inexpensive identification of these and other mutations leading to TB drug resistance is an essential tool for improving human health. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can be a highly sensitive technique for the detection of genetic mutation that has not been previously explored for drug resistance mutations in M. tuberculosis. This work explores the potential of CE-SSCP through the optimization of variables such as polymer separation matrix concentration, capillary wall coating, electric field strength, and temperature on resolution of mutation detection. The successful detection of an rpoB gene mutation and two mabA-inhA promoter region mutations while simultaneously differentiating a TB-causing mycobacteria from a non-TB bacteria was accomplished using the optimum conditions of 4.5% (w/v) PDMA in a PDMA coated capillary at 20°C using a separation voltage of 278 V/cm. This multiplexed analysis that can be completed in a few hours demonstrates the potential of CE-SSCP to be an inexpensive and rapid analysis method.

  18. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick C K; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K C; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-04-15

    Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia.

  19. The dual role of pharmacogenetics in HIV treatment: mutations and polymorphisms regulating antiretroviral drug resistance and disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Veronique; Bar-Magen, Tamara; Turgeon, Jacques; Flockhart, David; Desta, Zeruesenay; Wainberg, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    Significant intra- and interindividual variability has been observed in response to use of pharmacological agents in treatment of HIV infection. Treatment of HIV infection is limited by high rates of adverse drug reactions and development of resistance in a significant proportion of patients as a result of suboptimal drug concentrations. The efficacy of antiretroviral therapy is challenged by the emergence of resistant HIV-1 mutants with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, pharmacotherapy of patients infected with HIV is challenging because a great number of comorbidities increase polypharmacy and the risk for drug-drug interactions. Drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters regulate drug access to the systemic circulation, target cells, and sanctuary sites. These factors, which determine drug exposure, along with the emergence of mutations conferring resistance to HIV medications, could explain variability in efficacy and adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs. In this review, the major factors affecting the disposition of antiretroviral drugs, including key drug-metabolizing enzymes and membrane drug transporters, are outlined. Genetic polymorphisms affecting the activity and/or the expression of cytochromes P450 or UGT isozymes and membrane drug transport proteins are highlighted and include such examples as the association of neurotoxicity with efavirenz, nephrotoxicity with tenofovir, hepatotoxicity with nevirapine, and hyperbilirubinemia with indinavir and atazanavir. Mechanisms of drug resistance conferred by specific viral mutations are also reviewed, with particular attention to replicative viral fitness and transmitted HIV drug resistance with the objectives of providing a better understanding of mechanisms involved in HIV drug resistance and helping health care providers to better manage interpatient variability in drug efficacy and toxicity.

  20. Identification of a Non-Gatekeeper Hot Spot for Drug-Resistant Mutations in mTOR Kinase

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    Tzung-Ju Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases are therapeutic targets for human cancer. However, “gatekeeper” mutations in tyrosine kinases cause acquired clinical resistance, limiting long-term treatment benefits. mTOR is a key cancer driver and drug target. Numerous small-molecule mTOR kinase inhibitors have been developed, with some already in human clinical trials. Given our clinical experience with targeted therapeutics, acquired drug resistance in mTOR is thought likely, but not yet documented. Herein, we describe identification of a hot spot (L2185 for drug-resistant mutations, which is distinct from the gatekeeper site, and a chemical scaffold refractory to drug-resistant mutations. We also provide new insights into mTOR kinase structure and function. The hot spot mutations are potentially useful as surrogate biomarkers for acquired drug resistance in ongoing clinical trials and future treatments and for the design of the next generation of mTOR-targeted drugs. Our study provides a foundation for further research into mTOR kinase function and targeting.

  1. Rapid detection of drug resistance and mutational patterns of extensively drug-resistant strains by a novel GenoType® MTBDRsl assay

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    A K Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB is a major concern in the India. The burden of XDR-TB is increasing due to inadequate monitoring, lack of proper diagnosis, and treatment. The GenoType ® Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance second line (MTBDRsl assay is a novel line probe assay used for the rapid detection of mutational patterns conferring resistance to XDR-TB. Aim: The aim of this study was to study the rapid detection of drug resistance and mutational patterns of the XDR-TB by a novel GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 98 multidrug-resistant (MDR M. tuberculosis isolates for second line drugs susceptibility testing by 1% proportion method (BacT/ALERT 3D system and GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay for rapid detection of conferring drug resistance to XDR-TB. Results: A total of seven (17.4% were identified as XDR-TB by using standard phenotypic method. The concordance between phenotypic and GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay was 91.7-100% for different antibiotics. The sensitivity and specificity of the MTBDRsl assay were 100% and 100% for aminoglycosides; 100% and 100% for fluoroquinolones; 91.7% and 100% for ethambutol. The most frequent mutations and patterns were gyrA MUT1 (A90V in seven (41.2% and gyrA + WT1-3 + MUT1 in four (23.5%; rrs MUT1 (A1401G in 11 (64.7%, and rrs WT1-2 + MUT1 in eight (47.1%; and embB MUT1B (M306V in 11 (64.7% strains. Conclusions: These data suggest that the GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay is rapid, novel test for detection of resistance to second line anti-tubercular drugs. This assay provides additional information about the frequency and mutational patterns responsible for XDR-TB resistance.

  2. Mutations in the rpoB and katG genes leading to drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracevska, T; Jansone, I; Broka, L; Marga, O; Baumanis, V

    2002-10-01

    To characterize the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Latvia, mutations involved in rifampin (rpoB gene) and isoniazid (katG gene) resistance in DNA from 19 drug-susceptible and 51 multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed. The most frequent rpoB gene mutations found by the Line Probe assay were the S531L (14 of 34 isolates), D516V (7 of 34), H526D (4 of 34), and D516Y plus P535S (4 of 34) mutations. Direct sequencing of seven isolates with unclear results from Line Probe assay showed the presence of the L533P mutation and the Q510H plus H526Y (1 of 34) and D516V plus P535S (4 of 34) double mutations, neither of which has been described previously. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis showed strand mobility differences between the rifampin-susceptible and -resistant samples for the D516V, H526D, and D516Y plus P535S mutations but not for the S531L mutation. Nucleotide substitution at codon 315 (AGC-->ACC) of the katG gene was found in 48 of 51 multidrug-resistant samples by sequencing. Furthermore, katG gene restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with endonuclease AciI confirmed the nucleotide change in codon 315.

  3. Pervasive sign epistasis between conjugative plasmids and drug-resistance chromosomal mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rui F; Mendonça, Sílvia C M; Carvalho, Luís M; Reis, Ana M; Gordo, Isabel; Trindade, Sandra; Dionisio, Francisco

    2011-07-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria arise mostly by the accumulation of plasmids and chromosomal mutations. Typically, these resistant determinants are costly to the bacterial cell. Yet, recently, it has been found that, in Escherichia coli bacterial cells, a mutation conferring resistance to an antibiotic can be advantageous to the bacterial cell if another antibiotic-resistance mutation is already present, a phenomenon called sign epistasis. Here we study the interaction between antibiotic-resistance chromosomal mutations and conjugative (i.e., self-transmissible) plasmids and find many cases of sign epistasis (40%)--including one of reciprocal sign epistasis where the strain carrying both resistance determinants is fitter than the two strains carrying only one of the determinants. This implies that the acquisition of an additional resistance plasmid or of a resistance mutation often increases the fitness of a bacterial strain already resistant to antibiotics. We further show that there is an overall antagonistic interaction between mutations and plasmids (52%). These results further complicate expectations of resistance reversal by interdiction of antibiotic use.

  4. Pervasive sign epistasis between conjugative plasmids and drug-resistance chromosomal mutations.

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    Rui F Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria arise mostly by the accumulation of plasmids and chromosomal mutations. Typically, these resistant determinants are costly to the bacterial cell. Yet, recently, it has been found that, in Escherichia coli bacterial cells, a mutation conferring resistance to an antibiotic can be advantageous to the bacterial cell if another antibiotic-resistance mutation is already present, a phenomenon called sign epistasis. Here we study the interaction between antibiotic-resistance chromosomal mutations and conjugative (i.e., self-transmissible plasmids and find many cases of sign epistasis (40%--including one of reciprocal sign epistasis where the strain carrying both resistance determinants is fitter than the two strains carrying only one of the determinants. This implies that the acquisition of an additional resistance plasmid or of a resistance mutation often increases the fitness of a bacterial strain already resistant to antibiotics. We further show that there is an overall antagonistic interaction between mutations and plasmids (52%. These results further complicate expectations of resistance reversal by interdiction of antibiotic use.

  5. Multiplex real-time PCR melting curve assay to detect drug-resistant mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Jiang, Lili; Sun, Weiming; Fu, G; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian

    2011-09-01

    Early diagnosis of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is urgently needed to optimize treatment regimens and to prevent the transmission of resistant strains. Real-time PCR assays have been developed to detect drug resistance rapidly, but none of them have been widely applied due to their complexity, high cost, or requirement for advanced instruments. In this study, we developed a real-time PCR method based on melting curve analysis of dually labeled probes. Six probes targeting the rpoB 81-bp core region, katG315, the inhA promoter, the ahpC promoter, and embB306 were designed and validated with clinical isolates. First, 10 multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains with a wide mutation spectrum were used to analyze the melting temperature (T(m)) deviations of different mutations by single real-time PCR. All mutations can be detected by significant T(m) reductions compared to the wild type. Then, three duplex real-time PCRs, with two probes in each, were developed to detect mutations in 158 MDR isolates. Comparison of the results with the sequencing data showed that all mutations covered by the six probes were detected with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Our method provided a new way to rapidly detect drug-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis. Compared to other real-time PCR methods, we use fewer probes, which are labeled with the same fluorophore, guaranteeing that this assay can be used for detection in a single fluorescent channel or can be run on single-channel instruments. In conclusion, we have developed a widely applicable real-time PCR assay to detect drug-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis.

  6. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

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    Luis E. Soto-Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study. Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2% ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent.

  7. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N Sarita; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C M; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-03-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  8. Allele-specific real-time PCR testing for minor HIV-1 drug resistance mutations: assay preparation and application to reveal dynamic of mutations in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Dong-xing; LI Jing-yun; LI Han-ping; LI Lin; ZHUANG Dao-min; JIAO Li-yan; WANG Zheng; BAO Zuo-yi; LIU Si-yang; LIU Yong-jian

    2010-01-01

    Background It is very important for the clinical management to test for minor HIV-1 resistance mutations accurately and sensitively. The conventional genotypic assays of HIV drug resistance detection based on sequencing can only discriminate the mutations which present in more than 20%-30%. The aim of this study was to evaluate allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) to detect the resistance-related mutations located at positions 103, 184 and 215.Methods We developed the allele-specific PCR assay, using the most common drug resistance mutations in Chinese AIDS patients, K103N, M184V/I, T215F/Y as a model system. The standards were constructed by cloning the wild-type and mutant DNA fragments into the T-vector. We designed specific primers to discriminate mutant templates in the real-time PCR using SYBR green as a fluorescence reporter. And then we evaluated the ASPCR assay and tested 140clinical samples using this method.Results The sensitivities of ASPCR assay were 0.04% for K103N, 0.30% for M1841, 0.40% for M184V, 0.03% for T215F and 0.02% for T215Y. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 0.42. One hundred and forty plasma samples were tested by ASPCR and dynamic resistance curves of ten patients were obtained.Conclusions Drug resistance emerged half a year after the start of antiretroviral therapy. The mutation of T215Yemerged 1 to 1.5 years after starting treatment and then increased rapidly. The ASPCR assay we developed was a sensitive, accurate and rapid method to detect the minor HIV-1 variants and it can provide earlier and more drug-resistance information for HIV research and AIDS antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and mutational profile for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis surveillance in Portugal: a 3-year period overview.

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    Silva, Carla; Perdigão, João; Jordão, Luísa; Portugal, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases constitute a serious health problem in Portugal, of which the majority of isolates belong to the Lisboa family and the Q1 cluster, highly related to the Lisboa family. Here we sought to investigate the molecular basis of resistant TB as well as to determine the prevalence of specific drug resistance mutations and their association with MDR-TB and/or XDR-TB. In total, 74 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Lisbon Health Region were genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), and the mutational profile associated with first- and second-line drug resistance was studied. Seven new mutations were found, whilst the remaining 28 mutations had been previously associated with drug resistance. None of the mutations was specifically associated with MDR-TB. The mutational patterns observed among isolates belonging to Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters were also observed in isolates with unique MIRU-VNTR patterns but closely related to these strains. Such data suggest that the genotyping technique employed discriminates isolates with the same mutational profile. To establish the most adequate genotyping technique, the discriminatory power of three different MIRU-VNTR sets was analysed. The 15-loci MIRU-VNTR set showed adequate discriminatory power, comparable with the 24-loci set, allowing clustering of 60% and 86% of the MDR-TB and XDR-TB isolates, respectively, the majority of which belonged to the Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters. From an epidemiological standpoint, this study suggests combined mutational and genotyping analysis as a valuable tool for drug resistance surveillance.

  10. The T790M mutation in EGFR kinase causes drug resistance by increasing the affinity for ATP

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    Yun, C.H.; Mengwasser, K.E.; Toms, A.V.; Woo, M.S.; Greulich, H.; Wong, K.K.; Meyerson, M.; Eck, M.J. (Harvard-Med); (DFCI)

    2008-07-15

    Lung cancers caused by activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are initially responsive to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but the efficacy of these agents is often limited because of the emergence of drug resistance conferred by a second mutation, T790M. Threonine 790 is the 'gatekeeper' residue, an important determinant of inhibitor specificity in the ATP binding pocket. The T790M mutation has been thought to cause resistance by sterically blocking binding of TKIs such as gefitinib and erlotinib, but this explanation is difficult to reconcile with the fact that it remains sensitive to structurally similar irreversible inhibitors. Here, we show by using a direct binding assay that T790M mutants retain low-nanomolar affinity for gefitinib. Furthermore, we show that the T790M mutation activates WT EGFR and that introduction of the T790M mutation increases the ATP affinity of the oncogenic L858R mutant by more than an order of magnitude. The increased ATP affinity is the primary mechanism by which the T790M mutation confers drug resistance. Crystallographic analysis of the T790M mutant shows how it can adapt to accommodate tight binding of diverse inhibitors, including the irreversible inhibitor HKI-272, and also suggests a structural mechanism for catalytic activation. We conclude that the T790M mutation is a 'generic' resistance mutation that will reduce the potency of any ATP-competitive kinase inhibitor and that irreversible inhibitors overcome this resistance simply through covalent binding, not as a result of an alternative binding mode.

  11. Role of Different Pfcrt and Pfmdr-1 Mutations in Conferring Resistance to Antimalaria Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum

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    Zaid O. Ibraheem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of drugs resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum has augmented the scourge of malaria in endemic areas. Antimalaria drugs act on different intracellular targets. The majority of them interfere with digestive vacuoles (DVs while others affect other organelles, namely, apicoplast and mitochondria. Prevention of drug accumulation or access into the target site is one of the mechanisms that plasmodium adopts to develop resistance. Plasmodia are endowed with series of transporters that shuffle drugs away from the target site, namely, pfmdr (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance transporter and pfcrt (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter which exist in DV membrane and are considered as putative markers of CQ resistance. They are homologues to human P-glycoproteins (P-gh or multidrug resistance system and members of drug metabolite transporter (DMT family, respectively. The former mediates drifting of xenobiotics towards the DV while the latter chucks them outside. Resistance to drugs whose target site of action is intravacuolar develops when the transporters expel them outside the DVs and vice versa for those whose target is extravacuolar. In this review, we are going to summarize the possible pfcrt and pfmdr mutation and their role in changing plasmodium sensitivity to different anti-Plasmodium drugs.

  12. Time trends in HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutation frequency in Poland

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    Milosz Parczewski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Poland, the HIV epidemic has shifted recently from being predominantly related to injection drug use (IDU to being driven by transmissions among men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM. The number of new HIV cases has increased in the recent years, while no current data on the transmitted drug resistance associated mutations (tDRM frequency trend over time are available from 2010. In this study, we analyze the temporal trends in the spread of tDRM from 2008 to 2013. Materials and Methods: Partial pol sequences from 833 antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals of European descent (Polish origin linked to care in 9 of 17 Polish HIV treatment centres were analyzed. Drug resistance interpretation was performed according to WHO surveillance recommendations, subtyping with REGA genotyping 2.0 tool. Time trends were examined for the frequency of t-DRM across subtypes and transmission groups using logistic regression (R statistical platform, v. 3.1.0. Results: Frequency of tDRM proved stable over time, with mutation frequency change from 11.3% in 2008 to 8.3% in 2013 [OR: 0.91 (95% CI 0.80–1,05, p=0.202] (Figure 1a. Also, no significant differences over time were noted for the subtype B (decrease from 8.4% 2008 to 6.2% in 2013 [OR: 0.94 (95% CI 0.79–1.11, p=0.45] and across non-B variants [change from 22.6% 2008 to 23.1% in 2013, OR: 0.94 (95% CI 0.75–1.19, p=0.62]. When patient groups were stratified according to transmission route, in MSM there was a trend for a NNRTI t-DRM decrease (from 6.8% 2008 to 1% in 2013, OR: 0.61 (95% CI 0.34–1.02, p=0.0655, slope −0.74%/year (Figure 1b, related to the subtype B infected MSM (decrease from 7% 2008 to 1% in 2013, OR: 0.61 (95% CI 0.34–1.03, p=0.0662, slope −0.75%/year. Overall tDRM frequency decrease was also noted for the heterosexually infected patients [from 17.6% 2008 to 10.3% in 2013, OR: 0.83 (95% CI 0.67–1.02, p=0.077, slope −2.041%/year] but did not associate with drug class

  13. Distinctive Drug-resistant Mutation Profiles and Interpretations of HIV-1 Proviral DNA Revealed by Deep Sequencing in Reverse Transcriptase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Qian Qian; SHAO Yi Ming; MA Li Ying; LI Zhen Peng; ZHAO Hai; PAN Dong; WANG Yan; XU Wei Si; XING Hui; FENGYi; JIANG Shi Bo

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate distinctive features in drug-resistant mutations(DRMs) and interpretations for reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) between proviral DNA and paired viral RNA in HIV-1-infected patients. MethodsForty-three HIV-1-infected individuals receiving first-line antiretroviral therapy were recruited to participate in a multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Anhui and Henan Provinces in China in 2004. Drug resistance genotyping was performed by bulk sequencing and deep sequencing on the plasma and whole blood of 77 samples, respectively. Drug-resistance interpretation was compared between viral RNA and paired proviral DNA. ResultsCompared with bulk sequencing, deep sequencing could detect more DRMs and samples with DRMs in both viral RNA and proviral DNA. The mutations M184I and M230I were more prevalent in proviral DNA than in viral RNA (Fisher’s exact test,P ConclusionCompared with viral RNA, the distinctive information of DRMsand drug resistance interpretations for proviral DNA could be obtained by deep sequencing, which could provide more detailed and precise information for drug resistance monitoring and the rational design of optimal antiretroviral therapy regimens.

  14. Characterizing the emergence and persistence of drug resistant mutations in HIV-1 subtype C infections using 454 ultra deep pyrosequencing

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    Bansode Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of HIV-1 RNA in the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral therapies (ARTs is well documented while less is known about the role of historical viruses stored in the proviral DNA. The primary focus of this work was to characterize the genetic diversity and evolution of HIV drug resistant variants in an individual’s provirus during antiretroviral therapy using next generation sequencing. Methods Blood samples were collected prior to antiretroviral therapy exposure and during the course of treatment from five patients in whom drug resistance mutations had previously been identified using consensus sequencing. The spectrum of viral variants present in the provirus at each sampling time-point were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing from multiple combined PCR products. The prevalence of viral variants containing drug resistant mutations (DRMs was characterized at each time-point. Results Low abundance drug resistant viruses were identified in 14 of 15 sampling time-points from the five patients. In all individuals DRMs against current therapy were identified at one or more of the sampling time-points. In two of the five individuals studied these DRMs were present prior to treatment exposure and were present at high prevalence within the amplified and sequenced viral population. DRMs to drugs other than those being currently used were identified in four of the five individuals. Conclusion The presence of DRMs in the provirus, regardless of their observed prevalence did not appear to have an effect on clinical outcomes in the short term suggesting that the drug resistant viral variants present in the proviral DNA do not appear to play a role in the short term in facilitating the emergence of drug resistance.

  15. Pairwise and higher-order correlations among drug-resistance mutations in HIV-1 subtype B protease

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    Morozov Alexandre V

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reaction of HIV protease to inhibitor therapy is characterized by the emergence of complex mutational patterns which confer drug resistance. The response of HIV protease to drugs often involves both primary mutations that directly inhibit the action of the drug, and a host of accessory resistance mutations that may occur far from the active site but may contribute to restoring the fitness or stability of the enzyme. Here we develop a probabilistic approach based on connected information that allows us to study residue, pair level and higher-order correlations within the same framework. Results We apply our methodology to a database of approximately 13,000 sequences which have been annotated by the treatment history of the patients from which the samples were obtained. We show that including pair interactions is essential for agreement with the mutational data, since neglect of these interactions results in order-of-magnitude errors in the probabilities of the simultaneous occurence of many mutations. The magnitude of these pair correlations changes dramatically between sequences obtained from patients that were or were not exposed to drugs. Higher-order effects make a contribution of as much as 10% for residues taken three at a time, but increase to more than twice that for 10 to 15-residue groups. The sequence data is insufficient to determine the higher-order effects for larger groups. We find that higher-order interactions have a significant effect on the predicted frequencies of sequences with large numbers of mutations. While relatively rare, such sequences are more prevalent after multi-drug therapy. The relative importance of these higher-order interactions increases with the number of drugs the patient had been exposed to. Conclusion Correlations are critical for the understanding of mutation patterns in HIV protease. Pair interactions have substantial qualitative effects, while higher-order interactions are

  16. Discordance in drug resistance-associated mutation patterns in marker genes of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium knowlesi during coinfections.

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    Tyagi, Rupesh K; Das, Manoj K; Singh, Shiv S; Sharma, Yagya D

    2013-05-01

    Human Plasmodium knowlesi infections have been reported from several South-East Asian countries, excluding India, but its drug susceptibility profile in mixed-infection cases remains unknown. The chloroquine resistance transporter (CRT) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes of P. knowlesi and other Plasmodium species were sequenced from clinical isolates obtained from malaria patients living in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. The merozoite surface protein-1 and 18S rRNA genes of P. knowlesi were also sequenced from these isolates. Among 445 samples analysed, only 53 of them had P. knowlesi-specific gene sequences. While 3 of the 53 cases (5.66%) had P. knowlesi monoinfection, the rest were coinfected with Plasmodium falciparum (86.79%, n = 46) or Plasmodium vivax (7.55%, n = 4), but none with Plasmodium malariae or Plasmodium ovale. There was discordance in the drug resistance-associated mutations among the coinfecting Plasmodium species. This is because the P. knowlesi isolates contained wild-type sequences, while P. falciparum isolates had mutations in the CRT and DHFR marker genes associated with a higher level of chloroquine and antifolate drug resistance, respectively. The mutation pattern indicates that the same patient, having a mixed infection, may be harbouring the drug-susceptible P. knowlesi parasite and a highly drug-resistant P. falciparum parasite. A larger human population in South-East Asia may be at risk of P. knowlesi infection than reported so far. The different drug susceptibility genotypes of P. knowlesi from its coinfecting Plasmodium species in mixed infections adds a new dimension to the malaria control programme, requiring formulation of an appropriate drug policy.

  17. The Impact of the Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase rtA181T Mutation on Replication and Drug Resistance Is Potentially Affected by Overlapping Changes in Surface Gene

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    Ahn, Sung Hyun; Park, Yong Kwang; Park, Eun-Sook; Kim, Jeong Han; Kim, Doo Hyun; Lim, Keo-Heun; Jang, Moon Sun; Choe, Won Hyeok; Ko, Soon Young; Sung, In-Kyung; Kwon, So Young

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major problem for antiviral treatment in chronic hepatitis B infection. In this study, we analyzed the evolution of drug-resistant mutations and characterized the effects of the rtA181T and rtI233V mutations on viral replication and drug resistance. We performed a clonal analysis of the HBV polymerase gene from serum samples during viral breakthrough treated with antiviral agents. A series of mutant clones containing rtA181T and/or rtI233V mutations were constructed and determined the effect of these mutations on the replication ability and drug resistance. An in vitro study revealed that the effect of the rtA181T mutation on viral replication and drug resistance is dependent on the mutations in the overlapping surface gene. Compared to the rtA181T surface missense mutation (rtA181T/sW172S), the introduction of rtA181T surface nonsense mutation (rtA181T/sW172*) resulted in decreased viral replication and increased drug resistance. Complementation assay revealed that the truncated PreS1 is responsible for reduced replication of rtA181T/sW172* mutant. Moreover, the rtA181T/sW172* mutant exhibited a defect in viral particle secretion. The rtI233V mutation that emerged during adefovir therapy reduced viral replication and conferred resistance to adefovir. Our data suggest that the impact of the rtA181T mutation on replication and drug resistance differs based on the mutation status of the corresponding surface gene. The rtI233V mutation also affects replication ability and drug resistance. This observation suggests the need for genotypic analysis of overlapping surface genes to manage antiviral drug resistance if clinical isolates harbor the rtA181T mutation. IMPORTANCE The emergence of drug-resistant HBV that are no longer susceptible to nucleos(t)ide analogues is a major problem for antiviral treatment in chronic hepatitis B infection. Among drug-resistant mutations, the single rtA181T mutation is

  18. Report of rpoB mutation in clinically suspected cases of drug resistant leprosy: A study from Eastern India

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    Abu Hena Hasanoor Reja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current strategy for leprosy control depends mainly on early case detection and providing the recommended multidrug therapy (MDT dosage. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance to each of these drugs is essential in providing effective treatment and preventing the spread of resistant strains in the community. The progress of molecular biology research provides a very efficient opportunity for the diagnosis of drug resistance by in vitro method. Aim: We aimed to investigate the point mutations within the rpoB gene region of the Mycobacterium leprae genome, which are responsible for resistance to rifampicin, in order to determine the emergence of drug resistance in leprosy in the Kolkata region of West Bengal. Methods: A total of 50 patients with a relapse of leprosy were enrolled in the study. Skin smears were obtained for estimation of bacillary index and biopsies were obtained in 70% alcohol for extraction of DNA. The extracted DNA was amplified by M. leprae-polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting rpoB gene region. Every single nucleotide base in the sequence is aligned to reference sequence and identity gaps were determined by NCBI - BLAST. Later in-silico analysis was done to identify the changes in the translated protein sequences. Results: A mutation at the base pair position 2275405 where G is replaced by C in the M. leprae genome, which corresponds to the coding region of rpoB gene (279 bp - 2275228 to2275506, was observed in two patients. This missense mutation in CAC codon brings about a glutamic acid to histidine change in the amino acid sequence of RNA polymerase beta subunit at the position 442 (Glu442His, a region specific for rifampicin interaction, which might be responsible for unresponsiveness to rifampicin by manifesting a stable bacteriological index in these 2 patients even after completion of 24 months of multibacillary multi-drug therapy (MB-MDT. Limitations: The major limitations of

  19. Likely role of APOBEC3G-mediated G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 evolution and drug resistance.

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    Patric Jern

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of APOBEC3 (A3 protein family members in inhibiting retrovirus infection and mobile element retrotransposition is well established. However, the evolutionary effects these restriction factors may have had on active retroviruses such as HIV-1 are less well understood. An HIV-1 variant that has been highly G-to-A mutated is unlikely to be transmitted due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. However, G-to-A mutated hA3G target sequences within which the mutations are the least deleterious are more likely to survive selection pressure. Thus, among hA3G targets in HIV-1, the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous changes will increase with virus generations, leaving a footprint of past activity. To study such footprints in HIV-1 evolution, we developed an in silico model based on calculated hA3G target probabilities derived from G-to-A mutation sequence contexts in the literature. We simulated G-to-A changes iteratively in independent sequential HIV-1 infections until a stop codon was introduced into any gene. In addition to our simulation results, we observed higher ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutation at hA3G targets in extant HIV-1 genomes than in their putative ancestral genomes, compared to random controls, implying that moderate levels of A3G-mediated G-to-A mutation have been a factor in HIV-1 evolution. Results from in vitro passaging experiments of HIV-1 modified to be highly susceptible to hA3G mutagenesis verified our simulation accuracy. We also used our simulation to examine the possible role of A3G-induced mutations in the origin of drug resistance. We found that hA3G activity could have been responsible for only a small increase in mutations at known drug resistance sites and propose that concerns for increased resistance to other antiviral drugs should not prevent Vif from being considered a suitable target for development of new drugs.

  20. Nucleic acid template and the risk of a PCR-Induced HIV-1 drug resistance mutation.

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    Vici Varghese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HIV-1 nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI-resistance mutation, K65R confers intermediate to high-level resistance to the NRTIs abacavir, didanosine, emtricitabine, lamivudine, and tenofovir; and low-level resistance to stavudine. Several lines of evidence suggest that K65R is more common in HIV-1 subtype C than subtype B viruses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS and clonal dideoxynucleotide sequencing of plasma virus samples to assess the prevalence of minority K65R variants in subtype B and C viruses from untreated individuals. Although UDPS of plasma samples from 18 subtype C and 27 subtype B viruses showed that a higher proportion of subtype C viruses contain K65R (1.04% vs. 0.25%; p1.5% of UDPS reads. We therefore performed UDPS on clones and site-directed mutants containing subtype B- and C-specific patterns of silent mutations in the conserved KKK motif encompassing RT codons 64 to 66 and found that subtype-specific nucleotide differences were responsible for increased PCR-induced K65R mutation in subtype C viruses. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the RT KKK nucleotide template in subtype C viruses can lead to the spurious detection of K65R by highly sensitive PCR-dependent sequencing techniques. However, the study is also consistent with the subtype C nucleotide template being inherently responsible for increased polymerization-induced K65R mutations in vivo.

  1. A study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypic diversity & drug resistance mutations in Varanasi, north India

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    Anamika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: One-fifth of the world′s new tuberculosis (TB cases and two-thirds of cases in the South East Asian region occur in India. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates has greatly facilitated to understand the transmission of TB. This study was aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology of M. tuberculosis genotypes in Varanasi, north India, and their association with clinical presentation among patients with pulmonary TB. Methods: M. tuberculosis isolates from 104 TB patients attending a tertiary referral hospital of north India were screened for susceptibility to isoniazid (INH, rifampicin (RIF, ethambutol (EMB and streptomycin (STR by proportion method and multiplex-allele-specific-polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR. These were genotyped by spoligotyping. The spoligotype patterns were compared with those in the international SITVIT2 spoligotyping database. Results: Eighty three of 104 isolates were distributed in 38 SITs, of which SIT3366 was newly created within the present study. The mass of ongoing transmission with MDR-TB isolates in Varanasi, northern India, was linked to Beijing genotype followed by the CAS1_Delhi lineage. HIV-seropositive patients had a significantly higher proportion of clustered isolates than HIV-seronegative patients and compared with the wild type(wt isolates, the isolates with katG315Thr mutation were considerably more likely to be clustered. Interpretation & conclusions: This study gives an insight into the M. tuberculosis genetic biodiversity in Varanasi, north India, the predominant spoligotypes and their impact on disease transmission. In this region of north India, TB is caused by a wide diversity of spoligotypes with predominance of four genotype lineages: Beijing, CAS, EAI and T. The Beijing genotype was the most frequent single spoligotype and strongly associated with multi drug resistant (MDR-TB isolates. These findings may have important implications for control

  2. Drug resistance mutations in HIV-2 patients failing raltegravir and influence on dolutegravir response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Silvia; Treviño, Ana; Cabezas, Teresa; Garcia-Delgado, Rosa; Amengual, María José; Lozano, Ana Belén; Peñaranda, María; Fernández, Juan Manuel; Soriano, Vicente; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    A broader extent of amino acid substitutions in the integrase of HIV-2 compared with HIV-1 might enable greater cross-resistance between raltegravir and dolutegravir in HIV-2 infection. Few studies have examined the virological response to dolutegravir in HIV-2 patients that failed raltegravir. All patients recorded in the HIV-2 Spanish cohort were examined. The integrase coding region was sequenced in viraemic patients. Changes associated with resistance to raltegravir and dolutegravir in HIV-1 were recorded. From 319 HIV-2-infected patients recorded in the HIV-2 Spanish cohort, 53 integrase sequences from 30 individuals were obtained (20 raltegravir naive and 10 raltegravir experienced). Only one secondary mutation (E138A) was found in one of the 20 raltegravir-naive HIV-2 patients. For raltegravir-experienced individuals, the resistance mutation profile in 9 of 10 viraemic patients was as follows: N155H + A153G/S (four); Y143G + A153S (two); Q148R + G140A/S (two); and Y143C + Q91R (one). Of note, all patients with Y143G and N155H developed a rare non-polymorphic mutation at codon 153. Rescue therapy with dolutegravir was given to 5 of these 10 patients. After >6 months on dolutegravir therapy, three patients with baseline N155H experienced viral rebound. In two of them N155H was replaced by Q148K/R and in another by G118R. A wide repertoire of resistance mutations in the integrase gene occur in HIV-2-infected patients failing on raltegravir. Although dolutegravir may allow successful rescue in most HIV-2 raltegravir failures, we report and characterize three cases of dolutegravir resistance in HIV-2 patients, emerging variants Q148K and Q148R and a novel change G118R.

  3. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

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    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs.

  4. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland.

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    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J; The Cascade Collaboration In EuroCoord, And

    2017-02-07

    BACKGROUND Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. MATERIAL AND METHODS Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. RESULTS Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa.

  5. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. Material/Methods Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. Results Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). Conclusions Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa. PMID:28167814

  6. Drug resistance and antiretroviral drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Robert W.; Jonathan M Schapiro

    2005-01-01

    As more drugs for treating HIV have become available, drug resistance profiles within antiretroviral drug classes have become increasingly important for researchers developing new drugs and for clinicians integrating new drugs into their clinical practice. In vitro passage experiments and comprehensive phenotypic susceptibility testing are used for the pre-clinical evaluation of drug resistance. Clinical studies are required, however, to delineate the full spectrum of mutations responsible fo...

  7. Differential in vitro kinetics of drug resistance mutation acquisition in HIV-1 RT of subtypes B and C.

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    Rodrigo D Cunha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 subtype B is the most prevalent in developed countries and, consequently, it has been extensively studied. On the other hand, subtype C is the most prevalent worldwide and therefore is a reasonable target for future studies. Here we evaluate the acquisition of resistance and the viability of HIV-1 subtype B and C RT clones from different isolates that were subjected to in vitro selection pressure with zidovudine (ZDV and lamivudine (3TC. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MT4 cells were infected with chimeric virus pseudotyped with RT from subtype B and C clones, which were previously subjected to serial passage with increasing concentrations of ZDV and 3TC. The samples collected after each passage were analyzed for the presence of resistance mutations and VL. No differences were found between subtypes B and C in viral load and resistance mutations when these viruses were selected with 3TC. However, the route of mutations and the time to rebound of subtype B and C virus were different when subjected to ZDV treatment. In order to confirm the role of the mutations detected, other clones were generated and subjected to in vitro selection. RT subtype B virus isolates tended to acquire different ZDV resistance mutations (Q151M and D67N or T215Y, D67D/N and F214L compared to subtype C (D67N, K70R, T215I or T215F. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that different subtypes have a tendency to react differently to antiretroviral drug selection in vitro. Consequently, the acquisition of resistance in patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy can be dependent on the subtypes composing the viral population.

  8. Use of GenoType® MTBDRplus assay to assess drug resistance and mutation patterns of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis isolates in northern India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health problem. The diagnosis of MDR-TB is of paramount importance in establishing appropriate clinical management and infection control measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate drug resistance and mutational patterns in clinical isolates MDR-TB by GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Material and Methods: A total of 350 non-repeated sputum specimens were collected from highly suspected drug-resistan...

  9. Detecting drug resistant genetic mutation among pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms application of PCR-SSCP technique in Huainan mining district

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Shan Jiang; Song Ye; Chaopin Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between drug resistant genetic mutation and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-form, discuss the internal relationship between drug resistances and drug-resistant related genes and explore the value of PCRSSCP to clinical application. Methods: A total of 52 clinically isolated strains of tuberculosis L-form were collected among 97pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis. The gene mutations of katG, rpoB and rpsL were detected by PCR-SSCP,and the results were compared with those analyzed by traditional antimicrobial susceptibility test(AST). Results: The gene mutation rates of katG, rpoB and rpsL by PCR-SSCP were respectively 57.70% (30/52), 65.38% (32/52) and 40.38% (21/52). The rate of reversion was 78.85%(41/52) and the result of drug-resistant genes was invariable. The results of AST showed that there were 40 (76.92%) multi-drug resistant strains in 52 clinically isolated strains. The number for three-drug resistant strain was 21(40.38%) and that of two-drug resistant was 19(36.54%), but only 12 (23.08%) strains were one drug resistant. The rate of total drug-resistance was 100%, but there were 15 strains of allied mutation of three genes, 16 of two mutations and 6 of only one by PCR-SSCP. The coincidences were respectively 71.43%, 84.12% and 50.00%. Then there was no significant difference between the allied mutations of multi-drug resistant gene and the mutations of only one drug resistant gene (P > 0.05). Conclusion: PCRSSCP technique has a higher sensibility and specificity to detect the genes of katG, rpoB and rpsL in tuberculosis L-form among pneumoconiosis complicated with tuberculosis,and the detecting rate of two drug resistant strains and three drug resistant strains was higher. The combined application of PCR-SSCP and AST has advantages at earlier diagnosis and guidance of clinical medications.

  10. Reverse Transcriptase drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 Subtype C infected patients on ART in Karonga District, Malawi

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bansode, Vijay B

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Drug resistance testing before initiation of, or during, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not routinely performed in resource-limited settings. High levels of viral resistance circulating within the population will have impact on treatment programs by increasing the chances of transmission of resistant strains and treatment failure. Here, we investigate Drug Resistance Mutations (DRMs) from blood samples obtained at regular intervals from patients on ART (Baseline-22 months) in Karonga District, Malawi. One hundred and forty nine reverse transcriptase (RT) consensus sequences were obtained via nested PCR and automated sequencing from blood samples collected at three-month intervals from 75 HIV-1 subtype C infected individuals in the ART programme. Results Fifteen individuals showed DRMs, and in ten individuals DRMs were seen from baseline samples (reported to be ART naïve). Three individuals in whom no DRMs were observed at baseline showed the emergence of DRMs during ART exposure. Four individuals who did show DRMs at baseline showed additional DRMs at subsequent time points, while two individuals showed evidence of DRMs at baseline and either no DRMs, or different DRMs, at later timepoints. Three individuals had immune failure but none appeared to be failing clinically. Conclusion Despite the presence of DRMs to drugs included in the current regimen in some individuals, and immune failure in three, no signs of clinical failure were seen during this study. This cohort will continue to be monitored as part of the Karonga Prevention Study so that the long-term impact of these mutations can be assessed. Documenting proviral population is also important in monitoring the emergence of drug resistance as selective pressure provided by ART compromises the current plasma population, archived viruses can re-emerge

  11. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure f

  12. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Vega

    Full Text Available Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI and protease inhibitors (PI were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs, 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs, and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01]. Sixty eight (42.2% of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions.

  13. Detecting mutation pattern of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Himachal Pradesh using GenoType® MTBDRplus assay

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    C Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tuberculosis (TB is a major public health problem in India and a principal cause of death in adults, especially among the economically productive age group. India accounts for one-fifth of the global burden of TB. It is estimated that about 40% of Indian population is infected with TB bacillus. The GenoType® MTBDRplus molecular method allows rapid diagnosis of the clinical samples and detection of the most common mutations in the genes associated with rifampicin (R and isoniazid (H resistance. Aims: To study the drug resistance and mutational patterns in multidrug-resistant (MDR suspects clinical strains using GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Subjects and Methods: A total of 770 sputum samples of the MDR-TB suspects were included in this study, which were received at Intermediate Reference Laboratory, Government TB Sanatorium, Dharampur, Solan, Himachal Pradesh from the Designated Microscopy Centres of Himachal Pradesh for the culture and susceptibility testing. All the 521 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC strains were subjected to GenoType® MTBDRplus (HAIN Lifescience assay to detect molecular resistance pattern to first line anti-tubercular drugs (isoniazid and rifampicin. Results: Of 770 samples, 556 (72.20% were from male and 214 (27.80% were from female. Among the 521 MTBC strains, 19.76% were found to be MDR and mono-resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin was detected in 8.63% and 6.14% strains respectively. About 74.81%, 76.35% and 5.40% strains harboured known mutation in rpoB, katG and inhA genes respectively. Conclusions: In rpoB gene, the most common mutation is associated with S531 L region. The GenoType® MTBDRplus assay is a rapid test for the detection of the most common mutations in MDR-TB strains. In our study, unknown rpoB gene mutations were found in 25.18% strains that may further be detected by gene sequencing.

  14. Use of GenoType® MTBDRplus assay to assess drug resistance and mutation patterns of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis isolates in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Maurya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is a major public health problem. The diagnosis of MDR-TB is of paramount importance in establishing appropriate clinical management and infection control measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate drug resistance and mutational patterns in clinical isolates MDR-TB by GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Material and Methods: A total of 350 non-repeated sputum specimens were collected from highly suspected drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB cases; which were processed by microscopy, culture, differentiation and first line drug susceptibility testing (DST using BacT/ALERT 3D system. Results: Among a total of 125 mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC strains, readable results were obtained from 120 (96% strains by GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Only 45 MDR-TB isolates were analysed for the performance, frequency and mutational patterns by GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. The sensitivity of the GenoType® MDRTBplus assay for detecting individual resistance to rifampicin (RIF, isoniazid (INH and multidrug resistance was found to be 95.8%, 96.3% and 97.7%, respectively. Mutation in codon S531L of the rpoB gene and codon S315T1 of katG genes were dominated in MDR-TB strains, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: The GenoType® MTBDRplus assay is highly sensitive with short turnaround times and a rapid test for the detection of the most common mutations conferring resistance in MDR-TB strains that can readily be included in a routine laboratory workflow.

  15. Point mutations associated with HIV-1 drug resistance, evasion of the immune response and AIDS pathogenesis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khati, M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available , the presence of K65R or L74V (J. Eron, Jr. et al., 2006; Gallant et al., 2006; Moyle et al., 2005) point mutations (Figure 2 and Table 2) in addition to the M184V is sufficient for high level resistance to ddI and ABC (Rhee et al., 2004), particularly... in patients with non-subtype B clades (Harrigan et al., 2000; Lanier et al., 2004a; Svarovskaia et al., 2007; M. A. Winters et al., 1997). K65R has emerged more rapidly during the in vitro passage of subtype C compared with subtype B isolates in the presence...

  16. Structural basis for drug resistance conferred by β-tubulin mutations: a molecular modeling study on native and mutated tubulin complexes with epothilone B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Karen R; Alderete, Joel B; Jiménez, Verónica A

    2015-01-01

    Using molecular modeling, we have investigated the structure and dynamic properties of epothilone B-tubulin complexes with wild-type and mutated tubulin, aimed at identifying the molecular factors involved in the emergence of drug resistance induced by four protein mutations at Phe270Val, Thr274Ile, Arg282Gln, and Gln292Glu. Our results revealed that tubulin mutations render significant changes in the protein conformation in regions involved either in the binding of the ligand or in interdimer contacts that are relevant to the assembly of stable microtubules. In addition, point mutations induce drastic changes in the binding pose of the ligand and in the interaction networks responsible for the epothilone-tubulin association. Large ligand displacements inside the binding pocket and an overall decrease in the strength of drug-receptor polar contacts suggest a looser binding of the ligand in tubulin mutants. These results explain the loss of activity for epothilone B against cancer cells that contain tubulin mutants and provide valuable information to enhance the understanding of the atomic source of epothilones' activity, which can be helpful to conduct further research on the rational design of more potent therapeutic tubulin-binding agents.

  17. Assessing subtypes and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 infected children who failed antiretroviral therapy in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Suharni; Deris, Zakuan Zainy; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin; Ariffin, Tg Ahmad Akram Tg Mohd; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infected children. However, development of ARV resistance in these children is a major public health problem due to lack of availability of and access to new drugs. This study was conducted in order to identify circulating HIV subtypes and recombinant forms and evaluate the drug resistance mutation patterns in 18 HIV-1 infected children failing ARV treatment in Kelantan, Malaysia. Genotyping for codon 1-99 of protease (PR) and 1-250 of reverse transcriptase (RT) were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Subsequently, these were phylogenetically analyzed to determine the subtypes. CRF33_01B (44.4%) was found to be the predominant HIV subtype, followed by B (27.8%), CRF15_01B (16.7%) and CRF01_AE (11.1%) subtypes. The most prevalent RT mutations were T215F/V/Y (66.7%), D67G/N (55.6%), K219Q/E/R (44.4%), M184V/I (38.9%), K70R/E (27.8%) and M41L (27.8%), associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) resistance; and K103N (55.6%), G190A (33.3%), and K101P/E/H (27.8%) associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) resistance. The results showed a possible emergence of CRF33_01B as current predominant subtypes/circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), and a high frequency of primary mutations among HIV-1 infected children after failure of ARV therapy in Kelantan, Malaysia.

  18. Pyrosequencing for detection of drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus and its clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈占国

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the accuracy and clinical application of pyrosequencing for detection of drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus(HBV).Methods Compared with Sanger sequencing,the accuracy and sensitivity of pyrosequencing were assessed.Pyrosequencing was used to determine the serum of 1 164 patients with chronic Hepatitis B and its re-sults were analyzed.Results The sensitivity of pyrosequencing was 1×103KIU/L,the same as Sanger sequencing.But

  19. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging on darunavir therapy in PI-naive and -experienced patients in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouzidi, Kate; White, Ellen; Mbisa, Jean L; Sabin, Caroline A; Phillips, Andrew N; Mackie, Nicola; Pozniak, Anton L; Tostevin, Anna; Pillay, Deenan; Dunn, David T

    2016-12-01

    Darunavir is considered to have a high genetic barrier to resistance. Most darunavir-associated drug resistance mutations (DRMs) have been identified through correlation of baseline genotype with virological response in clinical trials. However, there is little information on DRMs that are directly selected by darunavir in clinical settings. We examined darunavir DRMs emerging in clinical practice in the UK. Baseline and post-exposure protease genotypes were compared for individuals in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort Study who had received darunavir; analyses were stratified for PI history. A selection analysis was used to compare the evolution of subtype B proteases in darunavir recipients and matched PI-naive controls. Of 6918 people who had received darunavir, 386 had resistance tests pre- and post-exposure. Overall, 2.8% (11/386) of these participants developed emergent darunavir DRMs. The prevalence of baseline DRMs was 1.0% (2/198) among PI-naive participants and 13.8% (26/188) among PI-experienced participants. Emergent DRMs developed in 2.0% of the PI-naive group (4 mutations) and 3.7% of the PI-experienced group (12 mutations). Codon 77 was positively selected in the PI-naive darunavir cases, but not in the control group. Our findings suggest that although emergent darunavir resistance is rare, it may be more common among PI-experienced patients than those who are PI-naive. Further investigation is required to explore whether codon 77 is a novel site involved in darunavir susceptibility. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  20. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  1. Synthetic long oligonucleotides to generate artificial templates for use as positive controls in molecular assays: drug resistance mutations in influenza virus as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive controls are an integral component of any sensitive molecular diagnostic tool, but this can be affected, if several mutations are being screened in a scenario of a pandemic or newly emerging disease where it can be difficult to acquire all the necessary positive controls from the host. This work describes the development of a synthetic oligo-cassette for positive controls for accurate and highly sensitive diagnosis of several mutations relevant to influenza virus drug resistance. Results Using influenza antiviral drug resistance mutations as an example by employing the utility of synthetic paired long oligonucleotides containing complementary sequences at their 3' ends and utilizing the formation of oligonucleotide dimers and DNA polymerization, we generated ~170bp dsDNA containing several known specific neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI resistance mutations. These templates were further cloned and successfully applied as positive controls in downstream assays. Conclusion This approach significantly improved the development of diagnosis of resistance mutations in terms of time, accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity, which are paramount to monitoring the emergence and spread of antiviral drug resistant influenza strains. Thus, this may have a significantly broader application in molecular diagnostics along with its application in rapid molecular testing of all relevant mutations in an event of pandemic.

  2. High Prevalence of inhA Promoter Mutations among Patients with Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

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    Abraham J Niehaus

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB remains extremely difficult to treat because there are often few remaining active medications and limited diagnostic options to detect resistance. Resistance to isoniazid is typically caused by mutations in either katG or the inhA promoter. inhA mutations confer low-level resistance to isoniazid and cross-resistance to ethionamide while katG mutations confer high-level isoniazid resistance and no cross-resistance. Line Probe Assays (LPAs that detect mutations in katG and inhA are currently performed on all positive TB cultures in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa, but the frequency of inhA mutations in drug-resistant TB patients has not been examined.We sought to determine the proportion of patients who could potentially benefit from high-dose isoniazid and who may be resistant to ethionamide. We reviewed 994 LPA (Hain MTBDRplus results at the TB reference laboratory in KwaZulu-Natal to determine the frequency of mutations in either katG or the inhA promoter. We stratified these results by drug-resistance category (i.e., MDR-TB, pre-XDR-TB, and XDR-TB as determined by phenotypic drug-susceptibility testing.Among MDR- and XDR-TB isolates, the prevalence of inhA mutations without a concurrent katG mutation was 14.8% and 10.3% respectively. The prevalence of inhA mutations with OR without a katG mutation was 30.3% and 82.8%, respectively.More than 10% of patients with MDR- and XDR-TB may benefit from high-dose isoniazid. Although ethionamide is empirically included in all MDR- and XDR-TB regimens, nearly a third of MDR-TB patients and a majority of XDR-TB patients likely have resistance to ethionamide. Laboratories performing line probe assays should report specific band patterns so that clinicians may adjust treatment regimens accordingly.

  3. High Prevalence of inhA Promoter Mutations among Patients with Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Abraham J.; Mlisana, Koleka; Gandhi, Neel R.; Mathema, Barun; Brust, James C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) remains extremely difficult to treat because there are often few remaining active medications and limited diagnostic options to detect resistance. Resistance to isoniazid is typically caused by mutations in either katG or the inhA promoter. inhA mutations confer low-level resistance to isoniazid and cross-resistance to ethionamide while katG mutations confer high-level isoniazid resistance and no cross-resistance. Line Probe Assays (LPAs) that detect mutations in katG and inhA are currently performed on all positive TB cultures in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa, but the frequency of inhA mutations in drug-resistant TB patients has not been examined. Methods We sought to determine the proportion of patients who could potentially benefit from high-dose isoniazid and who may be resistant to ethionamide. We reviewed 994 LPA (Hain MTBDRplus) results at the TB reference laboratory in KwaZulu-Natal to determine the frequency of mutations in either katG or the inhA promoter. We stratified these results by drug-resistance category (i.e., MDR-TB, pre-XDR-TB, and XDR-TB) as determined by phenotypic drug-susceptibility testing. Results Among MDR- and XDR-TB isolates, the prevalence of inhA mutations without a concurrent katG mutation was 14.8% and 10.3% respectively. The prevalence of inhA mutations with OR without a katG mutation was 30.3% and 82.8%, respectively. Conclusion More than 10% of patients with MDR- and XDR-TB may benefit from high-dose isoniazid. Although ethionamide is empirically included in all MDR- and XDR-TB regimens, nearly a third of MDR-TB patients and a majority of XDR-TB patients likely have resistance to ethionamide. Laboratories performing line probe assays should report specific band patterns so that clinicians may adjust treatment regimens accordingly. PMID:26332235

  4. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Among Antiretroviral-Naïve HIV-1–Infected Patients in Asia: Results From the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K. C.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G.; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-01-01

    (See editorial commentary by Jordan on pages 1058–1060.) Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia. PMID:21460324

  5. Early detection of multi-drug resistance and common mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Delhi using GenoType MTBDRplus assay

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is scarcity of prevalence data of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) data and common mutations responsible in North India. This study aimed to detect MDR-TB among MDR-TB suspects from Delhi and mutation patterns using GenoType MTBDRplus assay. Materials and Methods: All MDR suspects in five districts of New Delhi were referred to the laboratory from 1 st October 2011 to 31 st December 2012 as per criterion defined by Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant Tuberculosi...

  6. Oxazolidinone resistance mutations in 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli reveal the central region of domain V as the primary site of drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, L; Kloss, P; Douthwaite, S

    2000-01-01

    Oxazolidinone antibiotics inhibit bacterial protein synthesis by interacting with the large ribosomal subunit. The structure and exact location of the oxazolidinone binding site remain obscure, as does the manner in which these drugs inhibit translation. To investigate the drug-ribosome interaction...... in the wild-type rRNA operon produced an oxazolidinone resistance phenotype, establishing that the G2032A substitution was the determinant of resistance. Engineered U and C substitutions at G2032, as well as a G2447-to-U mutation, also conferred resistance to oxazolidinone. All the characterized resistance...

  7. Mutation in katG315 is, possibly, a good prognostic marker for treatment with second-line drugs in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohanad M; Mohammed, Suhad H; Nasurallah, Hassan A A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore baseline data, laboratory and molecular analyses to determine if any could serve as potential prognostic marker(s) for treatment response to second line tuberculosis regimens. Of a total number of 50 multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients starting second-line drug MDR-TB treatment in Iraq, only 21 showed treatment adherence and thus, included in this study. Response to treatment was monitored for 11 months by sputum microscopy and culture. We explored baseline data, laboratory and molecular analyses to determine if any could serve as potential prognostic marker(s) for treatment response. Highly significant association (P = 0.019) was detected between mutations in katG315 codon and good response to second-line anti-TB drugs. Spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeat confirmed that katG315-mutatnt isolates were genotypically unrelated. The katG315 mutation is a potential prognostic marker for treatment response to second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. One possible explanation of our results is that the katG315-mutants are sensitive to bacterial killing by "oxidative killing.".

  8. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in Candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca2+ did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport. PMID:26220356

  9. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca(2+) did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

  10. HIV type 1 pol gene diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, N; Mulanga, C; Bazepeo, S Edidi; Mwamba, J Kasali; Tshimpaka, J; Kashi, M; Mama, N; Valéa, D; Delaporte, E; Lepira, F; Peeters, M

    2006-02-01

    To study recombination and the natural polymorphism in pol of HIV-1 strains in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) we sequenced the protease and RT genes for 70 HIV-1 strains previously characterized in the env V3-V5 region from a sentinel surveillance study in 2002. For 41 of the 70 (58.6%) strains, the same subtype/ CRF designations were observed in pol and env. Twenty-three (32.9%) of 70 pol sequences were complex recombinants involving two to five subtypes as well as fragments that could not be classified into any of the known subtypes. All subtypes were involved in recombination events. Unclassified (U) and env subtype H strains were very likely to be recombinant strains. Overall, many minor mutations were identified in the protease sequences. Although at the time of our study ARV use was not yet widespread in DRC, three strains were identified with one major mutation associated with drug resistance: L90M and M46L in protease and K103N in RT.

  11. Distinguishing HIV-1 drug resistance, accessory, and viral fitness mutations using conditional selection pressure analysis of treated versus untreated patient samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV can evolve drug resistance rapidly in response to new drug treatments, often through a combination of multiple mutations 123. It would be useful to develop automated analyses of HIV sequence polymorphism that are able to predict drug resistance mutations, and to distinguish different types of functional roles among such mutations, for example, those that directly cause drug resistance, versus those that play an accessory role. Detecting functional interactions between mutations is essential for this classification. We have adapted a well-known measure of evolutionary selection pressure (Ka/Ks and developed a conditional Ka/Ks approach to detect important interactions. Results We have applied this analysis to four independent HIV protease sequencing datasets: 50,000 clinical samples sequenced by Specialty Laboratories, Inc.; 1800 samples from patients treated with protease inhibitors; 2600 samples from untreated patients; 400 samples from untreated African patients. We have identified 428 mutation interactions in Specialty dataset with statistical significance and we were able to distinguish primary vs. accessory mutations for many well-studied examples. Amino acid interactions identified by conditional Ka/Ks matched 80 of 92 pair wise interactions found by a completely independent study of HIV protease (p-value for this match is significant: 10-70. Furthermore, Ka/Ks selection pressure results were highly reproducible among these independent datasets, both qualitatively and quantitatively, suggesting that they are detecting real drug-resistance and viral fitness mutations in the wild HIV-1 population. Conclusion Conditional Ka/Ks analysis can detect mutation interactions and distinguish primary vs. accessory mutations in HIV-1. Ka/Ks analysis of treated vs. untreated patient data can distinguish drug-resistance vs. viral fitness mutations. Verification of these results would require longitudinal studies. The result

  12. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra K; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep S; Agrawal, Avinash; Garg, Rajiv

    2013-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis, is an emerging health problem in many countries. An association with Beijing strains and drug resistance-related mutations, such as mutations in katG and rpoB genes, has been found. The pathology, clinical features and neuroimaging characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis are similar to drug-responsive tuberculous meningitis. Detection of mycobacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by conventional methods (smear examination or culture) is often difficult. Nucleic acid amplification assays are better methods owing to their rapidity and high sensitivity. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, CA, USA) is a fully-automated test that has also been found to be effective for CSF samples. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis depends on the drug susceptibility pattern of the isolate and/or the previous treatment history of the patient. Second-line drugs with good penetration of the CSF should be preferred. Isoniazid monoresistant disease requires addition of another drug with better CSF penetration. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis is associated with a high mortality. HIV infected patients with drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have severe clinical manifestations with exceptionally high mortality. Prevention of tuberculosis is the key to reduce drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

  13. The association between detected drug resistance mutations and CD4(+) T-cell decline in HIV-positive individuals maintained on a failing treatment regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Paredes, Roger; Sabin, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the effect of drug resistance mutations (DRM) on CD4 cell trends in HIV-positive people maintained on virologically failing antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: Individuals from two large cohorts experiencing virological failure (VF) while maintained on ART with >1 CD4 co...

  14. Detection of katG and inhA mutations to guide isoniazid and ethionamide use for drug-resistant tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollela, V. R.; Namburete, E. I.; Feliciano, C. S.; Macheque, D.; Harrison, L. H.; Caminero, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Depending on the presence of mutations that determine isoniazid (INH) susceptibility (katG and inhA), Mycobacterium tuberculosis may be susceptible to high doses of INH or ethionamide (ETH). OBJECTIVE To describe the INH resistance profile and association of katG mutation with previous INH treatment and level of drug resistance based on rapid molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) in southern Brazil and central Mozambique. DESIGN Descriptive study of 311 isolates from Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil (2011–2014) and 155 isolates from Beira, Mozambique (2014–2015). Drug resistance patterns and specific gene mutations were determined using GenoType® MTBDRplus. RESULTS katG gene mutations were detected in 12/22 (54.5%) Brazilian and 32/38 (84.2%) Mozambican isolates. inhA mutations were observed in 9/22 (40.9%) isolates in Brazil and in 4/38 (10.5%) in Mozambique. Both katG and inhA mutations were detected in respectively 1/22 (5%) and 2/38 (5.2%). The difference in the frequency of katG mutations in Brazil and Mozambique was statistically significant (P = 0.04). katG mutations were present in 68.8% (33/48) of patients previously treated with INH and 31.2% (15/48) of patients without previous INH. This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.223). CONCLUSION INH mutations varied geographically; molecular DST can be used to guide and accelerate decision making in the use of ETH or high doses of INH. PMID:27393546

  15. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T.; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007–2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5–10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  16. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  17. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naive and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxelis Mendoza

    Full Text Available The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73% to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10% to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  18. Temperature-mediated heteroduplex analysis for the detection of drug-resistant gene mutations in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by denaturing HPLC, SURVEYOR nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruiru; Otomo, Koji; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Taiga; Sugawara, Isamu

    2006-01-01

    Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) is a relatively new technique, which utilizes heteroduplex formation between wild-type and mutated DNA strands to identify point mutations. Heteroduplex molecules are separated from homoduplex molecules by ion-pair, reverse-phase liquid chromatography on a special column matrix with partial heat denaturation of the DNA strands. In order to investigate the application of this method for point mutation detection in drug-resistant genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, katG, rpoB, embB, gyrA, pncA and rpsL genes, which are responsible for isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, fluoroquinolone, pyrazinamide and streptomycin resistance, respectively, were detected by temperature-mediated DHPLC in 10 multidrug-resistant and 10 drug-susceptible clinical isolates. The DHPLC data were compared with those from a conventional MIC test. The results show that DHPLC is cost-effective with high capacity and accuracy, and is potentially useful for genotypic screening for mutations associated with anti-tuberculosis drug resistance.

  19. Drug-Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Genotype Does Not Develop Mutation-Conferred Resistance to Rifampin at an Elevated Rate

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype has drawn attention because it is often strongly associated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). A possible reason is that the Beijing strains may have an enhanced capacity to develop drug resistance. In this study, we used the Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test to investigate whether strains of Beijing and non-Beijing genotypes exhibit differences in the acquisition of drug resistance. The M. tuberculosis reference strain H37Rv and 12 f...

  20. Detecting Mutations in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase Gene pncA to Improve Infection Control and Decrease Drug Resistance Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Matthew Z.; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Ticona, Eduardo; Friedland, Jon S.; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Caviedes, Luz; Rodriguez, Richard; Cabrera, Lilia Z.; Coronel, Jorge; Grandjean, Louis; Moore, David A. J.; Evans, Carlton A.; Huaroto, Luz; Chávez-Pérez, Víctor; Zimic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Hospital infection control measures are crucial to tuberculosis (TB) control strategies within settings caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients, as these patients are at heightened risk of developing TB. Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a potent drug that effectively sterilizes persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. However, PZA resistance associated with mutations in the nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase coding gene, pncA, is increasing. A total of 794 patient isolates obtained from four sites in Lima, Peru, underwent spoligotyping and drug resistance testing. In one of these sites, the HIV unit of Hospital Dos de Mayo (HDM), an isolation ward for HIV/TB coinfected patients opened during the study as an infection control intervention: circulating genotypes and drug resistance pre- and postintervention were compared. All other sites cared for HIV-negative outpatients: genotypes and drug resistance rates from these sites were compared with those from HDM. HDM patients showed high concordance between multidrug resistance, PZA resistance according to the Wayne method, the two most common genotypes (spoligotype international type [SIT] 42 of the Latino American-Mediterranean (LAM)-9 clade and SIT 53 of the T1 clade), and the two most common pncA mutations (G145A and A403C). These associations were absent among community isolates. The infection control intervention was associated with 58–92% reductions in TB caused by SIT 42 or SIT 53 genotypes (odds ratio [OR] = 0.420, P = 0.003); multidrug-resistant TB (OR = 0.349, P < 0.001); and PZA-resistant TB (OR = 0.076, P < 0.001). In conclusion, pncA mutation typing, with resistance testing and spoligotyping, was useful in identifying a nosocomial TB outbreak and demonstrating its resolution after implementation of infection control measures. PMID:27928075

  1. Early detection of multi-drug resistance and common mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Delhi using GenoType MTBDRplus assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is scarcity of prevalence data of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB data and common mutations responsible in North India. This study aimed to detect MDR-TB among MDR-TB suspects from Delhi and mutation patterns using GenoType MTBDRplus assay. Materials and Methods: All MDR suspects in five districts of New Delhi were referred to the laboratory from 1 st October 2011 to 31 st December 2012 as per criterion defined by Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT. GenoType MTBDRplus assay was performed on 2182 samples or cultures and mutations in the rpoB gene for rifampicin (RIF and katG and inhA genes for isoniazid (INH were analyzed. Results: A total of 366 (16.8% MDR-TB cases were diagnosed. MDR rate was found to be 32%, 16.6% and 10.2% during criterion A, B and C respectively. The most common mutation detected for RIF was S531L (59.0% and for INH was S315T1 (88.3%. Mutations S531L and S315T1 occurred significantly higher in MDR strains as compared to RIF mono-resistant and INH mono-resistant strains, respectively. Average laboratory turn-around time (TAT for dispatch of result to districts for test conducted on samples was 4.4 days. Conclusion: GenoType MTBDRplus is a useful assay for rapid detection of MDR-TB. The common mutations for RIF and INH were similar to those seen in other regions. However, mutations determining MDR strains and mono-resistant strains differed significantly for both RIF and INH.

  2. In vitro resistance selections for Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors give mutants with multiple point mutations in the drug-binding site and altered growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leila S; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M P; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-06-27

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity.

  3. Structural Studies of a Rationally Selected Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease Reveal Synergistic Effect of Distal Mutations on Flap Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Louis, John M.; Roche, Julien; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (NIH); (Iowa State)

    2016-12-16

    We report structural analysis of HIV protease variant PRS17 which was rationally selected by machine learning to represent wide classes of highly drug-resistant variants. Crystal structures were solved of PRS17 in the inhibitor-free form and in complex with antiviral inhibitor, darunavir. Despite its 17 mutations, PRS17 has only one mutation (V82S) in the inhibitor/substrate binding cavity, yet exhibits high resistance to all clinical inhibitors. PRS17 has none of the major mutations (I47V, I50V, I54ML, L76V and I84V) associated with darunavir resistance, but has 10,000-fold weaker binding affinity relative to the wild type PR. Comparable binding affinity of 8000-fold weaker than PR is seen for drug resistant mutant PR20, which bears 3 mutations associated with major resistance to darunavir (I47V, I54L and I84V). Inhibitor-free PRS17 shows an open flap conformation with a curled tip correlating with G48V flap mutation. NMR studies on inactive PRS17 D25N unambiguously confirm that the flaps adopt mainly an open conformation in solution very similar to that in the inhibitor-free crystal structure. In PRS17, the hinge loop cluster of mutations, E35D, M36I and S37D, contributes to the altered flap dynamics by a mechanism similar to that of PR20. An additional K20R mutation anchors an altered conformation of the hinge loop. Flap mutations M46L and G48V in PRS17/DRV complex alter the Phe53 conformation by steric hindrance between the side chains. Unlike the L10F mutation in PR20, L10I in PRS17 does not break the inter-subunit ion pair or diminish the dimer stability, consistent with a very low dimer dissociation constant comparable to that of wild type PR. Distal mutations A71V, L90M and I93L propagate alterations to the catalytic site of PRS17. PRS17 exhibits a molecular mechanism whereby mutations act synergistically to alter the flap dynamics resulting in significantly weaker binding yet maintaining active site contacts with darunavir.

  4. Detection of multi-drug resistance & characterization of mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from North- Eastern States of India using GenoType MTBDRplus assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Information on drug resistance tuberculosis is sparse from North-East (N-E States of India. We undertook this study to detect multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB among MDR-TB suspects, and common mutations among MDR-TB cases using GenoType MTBDRplus. Methods: All MDR suspect patients deposited sputum samples to peripheral designated microscopy centres (DMC in North-East States. The district TB officers (DTOs facilitated the transport of samples collected during January 2012 to August 2012 to our laboratory. The line probe assay to detect common mutations in the rpoB gene for rifampicin (RIF and katG and inhA genes for isoniazid (INH, respectively was performed on 339 samples or cultures. Results: A total of 553 sputum samples from MDR suspects were received of which, 181 (32.7% isolates were found to be multi-drug resistant. Missing WT8 along with mutation in codon S531L was commonest pattern for rifampicin resistant isolates (65.1% and missing WT along with mutations in codon S315T1 of katG gene was commonest pattern for isoniazid resistant isolates (86.2%. Average turn-around time for dispatch of LPA result to these States from cultures and samples was 23.4 and 5.2 days, respectively. Interpretations & conclusions: The MDR-TB among MDR-TB suspects in North-Eastern States of India was found to be 32.7 per cent. The common mutations obtained for RIF and INH in the region were mostly similar to those reported earlier.

  5. Diminished representation of HIV-1 variants containing select drug resistance-conferring mutations in primary HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dan; Brenner, Bluma; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Moisi, Daniela; Rosberger, Zeev; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark A

    2004-12-15

    This study compared the incidence of HIV-1 variants harboring mutations conferring resistance to thymidine analogues, ie, thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNMs), lamivudine (3TC) (ie, M184V), and protease inhibitors (PIs) acquired in primary HIV infection (PHI) (n = 59) to their observed prevalence in a corresponding potential transmitter (PT) population of persons harboring resistant infections (n = 380). Both of these populations in the context of this cohort analysis possessed similar demographics. Whereas the frequencies of observed TAMs, NNMs, M184V, and protease-associated mutations (PRAMs) were similar in the PT groups, the prevalence of M184V and major PI mutations were significantly lower in the PHI group (PHI/PT ratios of 0.14 and 0.39, respectively). There was a decreased prevalence in the PHI population of resistant viruses co-expressing NNMs or TAMs with M184V compared with viruses that harbored NNMs or TAMs in the absence of M184V (P < 0.0001). It was also observed that individuals in the PT subgroups who harbored RT mutations or PRAMs with M184V had lower levels of plasma viremia than individuals who lacked M184V (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that both decreased viremia and viral fitness in the case of M184V-containing HIV-1 variants may impact on viral transmissibility.

  6. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  7. Computational simulations of structural role of the active-site W374C mutation of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: multi-drug resistance mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yu, Ning-Xi; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Herbicides targeting grass plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) are selectively effective against graminicides. The intensive worldwide use of this herbicide family has selected for resistance genes in a number of grass weed species. Recently, the active-site W374C mutation was found to confer multi-drug resistance toward haloxyfop (HF), fenoxaprop (FR), Diclofop (DF), and clodinafop (CF) in A. myosuroides. In order to uncover the resistance mechanism due to W374C mutation, the binding of above-mentioned four herbicides to both wild-type and the mutant-type ACCase was investigated in the current work by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding free energies were calculated by molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energy values for four herbicides were qualitatively consistent with the experimental order of IC(50) values. All the computational model and energetic results indicated that the W374C mutation has great effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket and the ligand-protein interactions. The most significant conformational change was found to be associated with the aromatic amino acid residues, such as Phe377, Tyr161' and Trp346. As a result, the π-π interaction between the ligand and the residue of Phe377 and Tyr161', which make important contributions to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation and the binding affinity for the inhibitors to the mutant-type ACCase was less than that to the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural role and mechanistic insights obtained from computational simulations will provide a new starting point for the rational design of novel inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with W374C mutation.

  8. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of HIV-1 isolates from Northern Indian patients: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Choudhury, Shubhasree; Chaudhury, Alok K; Kalra, Rajesh; Andrabi, Raiees; Wig, Naveet; Biswas, Ashutosh; Bala, Manju; Luthra, Kalpana

    2010-04-01

    The viral reverse transcriptase gene was amplified from the plasma of 27 drug-naïve and five drug-experienced HIV patients in Northern India. Follow-up samples of naïve patients after antiretroviral therapy initiation were collected in six patients at 3 months and three patients at 6 months. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two new recombinant forms, CRF_CH and CRF_CK, and an accessory non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation E138A, not previously reported from India. The major DRMs found in two 6-month follow-up samples were absent in their baseline blood samples. This is the first follow-up study to determine anti-retroviral drug resistance mutations in Indian HIV patients.

  9. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Blanco-Heredia

    Full Text Available Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies.We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations.Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64% corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual or DR (median 6 pairs/individual were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001. While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient's virus (mean 68% of cases, responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002.Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides.

  10. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

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    Guodong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A and inhibitor (GRL-0519 complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors.

  11. Detecting katG Drug Resistant Genetic Mutation among pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms by PCR-SSCP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Zhao Zheng; Song Ye; Chaopin Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between mutation in the katG gene and drug resistance of INH in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms among patients of pneumoconiosis complicated with pulmonary tuberculosis, and to explore the clinical application of PCR-SSCP. Methods:A total of 52 clinical isolated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms were collected. Mutation in the katG genes was detected by PCR-SSCP and traditional antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST). Results:The results by AST showed that there were 40 persisters in 52 clinical isolated strains. The drug resistant rate was 76.92%(40/52),and the gene mutation rate of katG was 57.70% (30/52)by.PCR-SSCP, the difference was no quite significance (χ2 = 2.8507, P >0.05). The coincidence rate of two methods was 75.00% (30/40). Conclusion: The detectionrate of katG resistant strains in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms was high by PCR-SSCP. The combined application of PCR-SSCP and traditional antimicrobial susceptibility test can improve the detecting rate.

  12. Moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, José H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G; Velasque, Luciane S; Friedman, Ruth K; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Rodrigues-Pedro, Adriana; Oliveira, Sandra M; Currier, Judith S; Morgado, Mariza G

    2013-04-01

    Transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains has been gaining attention and is becoming a growing problem throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) among antiretroviral (ARV)-naive HIV-infected pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ARV-naive pregnant women were recruited at Hospital Geral de Nova Iguacu (HGNI), Rio de Janeiro, from 2005 to 2008. HIV genotyping was carried out using ViroSeq (Abbott v. 2.0). TDRM were detected using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool-CPR v. 6.0.The prevalence of mutations associated with resistance in the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the HIV genome were assessed in samples collected prior to initiation of ARV prophylaxis or treatment. Among 238 eligible specimens that were collected, 197 samples were successfully amplified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Eighty-one percent of women were infected with HIV subtype B, 10% with subtype F1 viruses, 1.0% with subtype C virus, and 8.0% with recombinant forms of the virus. The prevalence of HIV TDRM was 5.6% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 2.0% for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 3.0% for protease inhibitors. The overall prevalence of any drug resistance was 10.7%. There were no multiclass resistant strains identified in the analyzed samples. The prevalence of HIV TDRM among the pregnant women in our cohort was moderate. Resistance testing should be encouraged in Rio de Janeiro, among other locations, for all HIV-infected pregnant women prior to prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  13. Computational Studies of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, João Miguel

    Drug resistance has been an increasing problem in patient treatment and drug development. Starting in the last century and becoming a major worry in the medical and scienti c communities in the early part of the current millennium, major research must be performed to address the issues of viral...... and bacterial resistance to common-use inhibitors, in such cases as multiple targeted proteins in the human immunode ciency virus infection and penicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, understanding the evolutionary pressures by which these arise and predicting future possible resistance mutations...... is of the utmost importance in developing better and less resistance-inducing drugs. A drug's in uence can be characterized in many diff erent ways, however, and the approaches I take in this work re ect those same different in uences. This is what I try to achieve in this work, through seemingly unrelated...

  14. Genetic variation and drug resistance mutation of influenza virus during 2013-2014 in Beijing, China: a report of 37 cases

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    Hao LIAO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the evolutionary characteristics of H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A and B viruses, and investigate the drug-resistant mutation of influenza viruses to amantadine and neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs during 2013-2014 episode in Beijing. Methods  RNA was extracted from pharyngeal or nasal swab samples from 37 influenza virus-infected patients and viral genotype/subgenotype were analyzed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. All influenza A viruses were further directly sequenced for NA and M2 matrix protein (M2 genes, and all influenza B viruses were further sequenced for NA and hemagglutinin (HA genes. The drug-resistant mutations and genetic evolution were analyzed by Vector NTI software and phylogenetic trees were plotted using Mega software. Results  Influenza A viruses were identified in 29 patients, including 23 with H1N1 and 6 with H3N2 viruses. Influenza B viruses were identified in 8 patients. M2 gene of all 29 patients with influenza A virus infection were detected with S31N amantadine-resistant mutation. NAIs-resistant mutations were not detected in all 37 patients with influenza A and B virus infection. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HA genes from 5 influenza B virus strains were identified as the B-Yamagata lineage, while NA genes from the corresponding strains were identified as B-Victoria lineage. Conclusions  Among Beijing Influenza B virus strains reassortants derived from B-Yamagata lineage and B-Victoria lineage were found. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.02.05

  15. Drug resistant ADLTE and recurrent partial status epilepticus with dysphasic features in a family with a novel LGI1mutation: electroclinical, genetic, and EEG/fMRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Carni, Marco; Diani, Erica; Fattouch, Jinane; Vaudano, Elisabetta A; Egeo, Gabriella; Pantano, Patrizia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Bozzao, Luigi; Manfredi, Mario; Prencipe, Massimiliano; Giallonardo, Teresa A; Nobile, Carlo

    2009-11-01

    We characterized a family with autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) whose proband presented uncommon electroclinical findings such as drug-resistant seizures and recurrent episodes of status epilepticus with dysphasic features. The electroclinical characteristics and LGI1 genotype were defined in the family. In the proband, the ictal pattern was documented during video-EEG monitoring and epileptic activity was mapped by EEG/fMRI. The affected members who were studied had drug-resistant seizures. In the proband, seizures with predominant dysphasic features often occurred as partial status epilepticus. The video-EEG-documented ictal activity and fMRI activation clearly indicated the elective involvement of the left posterior lateral temporal cortex. Sequencing of LGI1 exons revealed a heterozygous c.367G>A mutation in exon 4, resulting in a Glu123Lys substitution in the protein sequence. The uncommon clinical pattern (high seizure frequency, drug-resistance) highlights the variability of the ADLTE phenotype and extends our knowledge of the clinical spectrum associated with LGI1 mutations.

  16. Role of Mutations in Dihydrofolate Reductase DfrA (Rv2763c) and Thymidylate Synthase ThyA (Rv2764c) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Koser, C. U.

    2010-09-17

    We would like to comment on a number of recent reports in this journal (6, 8, 12, 18) concerning Mycobacterium tuberculosis dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), encoded by dfrA (Rv2763c). Around 36% of phenotypically para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS)-resistant M. tuberculosis strains harbor mutations in thyA (Rv2764c), which encodes a thymidylate synthase (20). In their effort to elucidate the remaining unknown resistance mechanism(s), Mathys et al. extended their sequence analysis to a number of additional genes, including dfrA (12). It was unclear whether the three dfrA mutations they identified in the PAS-resistant strains P-693 and P-3158 could contribute to PAS resistance on their own. Nonetheless, these findings are notable for two reasons. First, isoniazid (INH) has been shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis DHFR in vitro (1). Whether the same holds true for ethionamide, which shares a number of common resistance mechanisms with INH, was not tested (J. Blanchard, personal communication). In any case, the clinical relevance of DHFR-mediated INH resistance remains enigmatic. To date, only Ho et al. have addressed this question, but they did not identify any dfrA mutations in a screen of 127 INH-resistant clinical isolates (8). Consequently, Mathys et al. remain the first to describe mutations in this target (12). However, given that isolates with mutated DHFR are members of a cluster with baseline INH resistance, the importance of these mutations with respect to INH resistance remains unclear. Irrespective of their relevance in INH resistance, these dfrA mutations are noteworthy for a second reason. Contrary to previous wisdom, Forgacs et al. recently showed that M. tuberculosis is sensitive to the drug combination trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) (6, 18). DHFR is competitively inhibited by TMP, and consequently, mutations therein lead to resistance in a variety of organisms (9, 16, 19). The crystal structures of the wild-type M. tuberculosis DHFR in complex with

  17. HIV-1 diversity, drug-resistant mutations, and viral evolution among high-risk individuals in phase II HIV vaccine trial sites in southern China.

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    Haiyan Qi

    Full Text Available HIV-1 prevalence in Guangxi, China, has been growing since 1996, when the first case was reported. Over half of HIV-1 positive patients in Guangxi Province were injecting drug users (IDUs, possibly because of the province's location near drug-trafficking routes. Since a phase II HIV vaccine trial is ongoing there, a current characterization of the subtypes of HIV-1 among IDUs in Guangxi would provide critical information for future HIV vaccine trials, as well as further control and prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Thus, we conducted a molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 samples from 2008-2010 among IDUs in multiple cities in Guangxi Province. Our results, based on the gag/pol fragment, indicated a very high proportion (78.47% of HIV-1 CRF08_BC recombinants, some CRF01_AE (15.38% recombinants, and a low proportion of CRF07_BC (6.15% recombinants among the IDUs. The high proportion of CRF08 HIV-1 strains among recent IDUs matches the vaccine candidate constructs. However, future vaccine development should also incorporate CRF01-targeted vaccine candidates. Distinct Env sequence evolution patterns were observed for CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE, indicating that different local selection pressures have been exerted on these two HIV-1 subtypes. Unique drug-resistant mutations were also detected, and our data indicate that HIV treatment programs should consider pre-existing drug-resistant mutations.

  18. Fluconazole and Echinocandin Resistance of Candida glabrata Correlates Better with Antifungal Drug Exposure Rather than with MSH2 Mutator Genotype in a French Cohort of Patients Harboring Low Rates of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellière, Sarah; Healey, Kelley; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Carrara, Bastien; Barbaro, Alessandro; Guigue, Nicolas; Lecefel, Christophe; Touratier, Sophie; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Perlin, David S.; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a major pathogenic yeast in humans that is known to rapidly acquire resistance to triazole and echinocandin antifungal drugs. A mutator genotype (MSH2 polymorphism) inducing a mismatch repair defect has been recently proposed to be responsible for resistance acquisition in C. glabrata clinical isolates. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of antifungal resistance in a large cohort of patients in Saint-Louis hospital, Paris, France, some of whom were pre-exposed to antifungal drugs, as well as to determine whether MSH2 polymorphisms are associated with an increased rate of fluconazole or echinocandin resistance. We collected 268 isolates from 147 patients along with clinical data and previous antifungal exposure. Fluconazole and micafungin minimal inhibition concentrations (MICs) were tested, short tandem repeat genotyping was performed, and the MSH2 gene was sequenced. According to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility breakpoints, 15.7% of isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC > 32 mg/L) and 0.7% were resistant to micafungin (MIC > 0.03 mg/L). A non-synonymous mutation within MSH2 occurred in 44% of the isolates, and 17% were fluconazole resistant. In comparison, fluconazole resistant isolates with no MSH2 mutation represented 15% (P = 0.65). MSH2 polymorphisms were associated with the short tandem repeat genotype. The rate of echinocandin resistance is low and correlates with prior exposure to echinocandin. The mutator genotype was not associated with enrichment in fluconazole resistance but instead corresponded to rare and specific genotypes. PMID:28066361

  19. The impact of intermittent versus continuous exposure to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on selection of EGFR T790M-mutant drug-resistant clones in a lung cancer cell line carrying activating EGFR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Choi, Yu-Ra; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-07-12

    Drug-resistant cell lines are essential tools for investigating the mechanisms of resistance to molecular-targeted anti-cancer drugs. However, little is known about how to establish clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. Our study examined the impact of a drug-free period on the establishment of a cell line with clinically relevant resistance to molecular-targeted drugs. We used PC9 cells, a lung cancer cell line carrying EGFR mutation, because this is a validated target for EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). PC9 cells were intermittently or continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of gefitinib (0.01 μM to 1.0 μM) and the emergence of the most common acquired resistance mutation in EGFR, T790M, was determined. T790M was detected at a 25-fold lower drug concentration in cells continuously exposed to gefitinib (PC9/GRc) than in cells intermittently exposed to gefitinib (PC9/GRi) (0.04 μM vs 1.0 μM, respectively). The mutation frequencies at those drug concentrations were 19.8% and 8.0% in PC9/GRc and PC9/GRi cells, respectively. After drug-free culture for 8 weeks, resistance to gefitinib decreased in the PC9/GRi cells but not in the PC9/GRc cells. In the PC9/GRc cells, the frequency of the T790M mutation was consistently about 20% from 0.04 μM to 1.0 μM of gefitinib. In the PC9/GRc cells, the T790M mutation was detected in all single-cell clones, at frequencies ranging from 7.0% to 37.0%, with a median of 19.5% (95% confidence interval, 17.3%-20.9%). In conclusion, compared with intermittent drug exposure, continuous exposure might select better minor drug-resistant clones when creating cell lines resistant to molecular-targeted drugs.

  20. A new high-throughput method for simultaneous detection of drug resistance associated mutations in Plasmodium vivax dhfr, dhps and mdr1 genes

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    Siba Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of severe cases and increasing levels of drug resistance highlight the importance of improved Plasmodium vivax case management. Whereas monitoring P. vivax resistance to anti-malarial drug by in vivo and in vitro tests remain challenging, molecular markers of resistance represent a valuable tool for high-scale analysis and surveillance studies. A new high-throughput assay for detecting the most relevant markers related to P. vivax drug resistance was developed and assessed on Papua New Guinea (PNG patient isolates. Methods Pvdhfr, pvdhps and pvmdr1 fragments were amplified by multiplex nested PCR. Then, PCR products were processed through an LDR-FMA (ligase detection reaction - fluorescent microsphere assay. 23 SNPs, including pvdhfr 57-58-61 and 173, pvdhps 382-383, 553, 647 and pvmdr1 976, were simultaneously screened in 366 PNG P. vivax samples. Results Genotyping was successful in 95.4% of the samples for at least one gene. The coexistence of multiple distinct haplotypes in the parasite population necessitated the introduction of a computer-assisted approach to data analysis. Whereas 73.1% of patients were infected with at least one wild-type genotype at codons 57, 58 and 61 of pvdhfr, a triple mutant genotype was detected in 65.6% of the patients, often associated with the 117T mutation. Only one patient carried the 173L mutation. The mutant 647P pvdhps genotype allele was approaching genetic fixation (99.3%, whereas 35.1% of patients were infected with parasites carrying the pvmdr1 976F mutant allele. Conclusions The LDR-FMA described here allows a discriminant genotyping of resistance alleles in the pvdhfr, pvdhps, and pvmdr1 genes and can be used in large-scale surveillance studies.

  1. ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS OF TUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA DEFINING DRUG RESISTANCE IN HIV POSITIVE AND HIV NEGATIVE TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS WITHOUT PRIOR HISTORY OF TREATMENT IN SVERDLOVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Panov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study: to identify profile of mutations of tuberculous mycobacteria responsible for resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis patients without prior history of treatment.Materials and methods. 165 strains of tuberculous mycobacteria from HIV positive patients and 166 strains of tuberculous mycobacteria from HIV negative patients were studied in Sverdlovsk Region (TB Dispensary, Yekaterinburg. Mutations in genes were identified using microchips of TB-BIOCHIP® and TB-BIOCHIP®-2 in compliance with the manufacturer's guidelines (OOO Biochip-IMB, Moscow.Results. It was observed that 85/165 (51.52% strains isolated from HIV positive tuberculosis patients and 58/166 (34.94% strains isolated from tuberculosis patients not associated with HIV possessed MDR genotype (p < 0.01. The majority of MDR strains had mutations in the 531th codon of rpoB (Ser→Leu and 315th codon of katG (Ser→Thr (64/85, 75.29% and 38/58, 65.52% respective the groups, resulting in the high level of resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid. Each group also had approximately equal ratio (11/165, 6.67% and 12/166, 7.23% respective the groups of strains with genomic mutations defining the resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin and fluoruquinolones. No confident difference was found in mutation patterns of genome of tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis patients. 

  2. Presence of key drug resistance mutations in isolates from untreated patients of Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire: ANRS 1257 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Thomas D'Aquin; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Minga, Albert; Ekouevi, Didier; Bonard, Dominique; Bequet, Laurence; Huet, Charlotte; Chenal, Henri; Rouet, François; Dabis, François; Lafon, Marie-Edith; Salamon, Roger; Masquelier, Bernard; Fleury, Herve J

    2003-08-01

    A total of 107 HIV-1 isolates from untreated adult patients recruited in Abidjan, CMte d'Ivoire, in 2001 and 2002 were sequenced in the env, reverse transcriptase (RT), and protease genes. The results show that CRF02_AG is still predominant in this west African population; key mutations of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (NRTI, NNRTI, and PIs) were detected in 5.6% of the patients. We hypothesize that these resistant mutants have been acquired through horizontal transmission. Compared to a previous study carried out by our group in 1997-2000 in a similar population of Abidjan, it seems that there is a dynamic process of resistance and that a survey will be necessary.

  3. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the past 70 years, antimicrobial drugs, such as antibiotics, have been successfully used to treat patients with bacterial and infectious diseases. Why Is the Study of Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance a Priority for NIAID? Over time, many infectious ...

  4. Virological failure and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among naive and antiretroviral pre-treated patients entering the ESTHER program of Calmette Hospital in Cambodia.

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    Hubert Barennes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In resource limited settings, patients entering an antiretroviral therapy (ART program comprise ART naive and ART pre-treated patients who may show differential virological outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective study, conducted in 2010-2012 in the HIV clinic of Calmette Hospital located in Phnom Penh (Cambodia assessed virological failure (VF rates and patterns of drug resistance of naive and pre-treated patients. Naive and ART pre-treated patients were included when a Viral Load (VL was performed during the first year of ART for naive subjects or at the first consultation for pre-treated individuals. Patients showing Virological failure (VF (>1,000 copies/ml underwent HIV DR genotyping testing. Interpretation of drug resistance mutations was done according to 2013 version 23 ANRS algorithms. RESULTS: On a total of 209 patients, 164 (78.4% were naive and 45 (21.5% were ART pre-treated. Their median initial CD4 counts were 74 cells/mm3 (IQR: 30-194 and 279 cells/mm3 (IQR: 103-455 (p<0.001, respectively. Twenty seven patients (12.9% exhibited VF (95% CI: 8.6-18.2%, including 10 naive (10/164, 6.0% and 17 pre-treated (17/45, 37.8% patients (p<0.001. Among these viremic patients, twenty-two (81.4% were sequenced in reverse transcriptase and protease coding regions. Overall, 19 (86.3% harbored ≥1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs whereas 3 (all belonging to pre-treated patients harbored wild-types viruses. The most frequent DRMs were M184V (86.3%, K103N (45.5% and thymidine analog mutations (TAMs (40.9%. Two (13.3% pre-treated patients harbored viruses that showed a multi-nucleos(tide resistance including Q151M, K65R, E33A/D, E44A/D mutations. CONCLUSION: In Cambodia, VF rates were low for naive patients but the emergence of DRMs to NNRTI and 3TC occurred relatively quickly in this subgroup. In pre-treated patients, VF rates were much higher and TAMs were relatively common. HIV genotypic assays before ART initiation and for ART pre

  5. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen: An urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy

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    Al-Mekhlafi Hesham M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. Results The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates. Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8% (p = 0.031. The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045. Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001, low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027, no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025 and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01. Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. Conclusions The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.

  6. Detection of Rare Drug Resistance Mutations by Digital PCR in a Human Influenza A Virus Model System and Clinical Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whale, Alexandra S; Bushell, Claire A; Grant, Paul R; Cowen, Simon; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; O'Sullivan, Denise M; Žel, Jana; Milavec, Mojca; Foy, Carole A; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Huggett, Jim F

    2016-02-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is being increasingly used for the quantification of sequence variations, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), due to its high accuracy and precision in comparison with techniques such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and melt curve analysis. To develop and evaluate dPCR for SNP detection using DNA, RNA, and clinical samples, an influenza virus model of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) was used. First, this study was able to recognize and reduce off-target amplification in dPCR quantification, thereby enabling technical sensitivities down to 0.1% SNP abundance at a range of template concentrations, a 50-fold improvement on the qPCR assay used routinely in the clinic. Second, a method was developed for determining the false-positive rate (background) signal. Finally, comparison of dPCR with qPCR results on clinical samples demonstrated the potential impact dPCR could have on clinical research and patient management by earlier (trace) detection of rare drug-resistant sequence variants. Ultimately this could reduce the quantity of ineffective drugs taken and facilitate early switching to alternative medication when available. In the short term such methods could advance our understanding of microbial dynamics and therapeutic responses in a range of infectious diseases such as HIV, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis. Furthermore, the findings presented here are directly relevant to other diagnostic areas, such as the detection of rare SNPs in malignancy, monitoring of graft rejection, and fetal screening. Copyright © 2016 Whale et al.

  7. TKI Resistance for T790M Mutation

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    Hong WANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR the development of orally activesmall molecule inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC provides anew treatment plan. EGFR gene mutation in patients with activation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs therapy for the treatment of sensitive, so that a large number of clinical benefit. The first generation of reversible ATP-competitive EGFR-TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib as first-line, second-line or has the effect of maintenance therapy. Although the initial effect of these drugs have, but most patients will produce drug resistance. Within a year, 50%-60% patients had T790M housekeeping gene mutation associated with. Irreversible EGFR-TKIs recent background: afatinib and dac-omitinib covalent binding and inhibition of multiple ErbB family receptors (EGFR, HER2 and HER4. People evaluate these drugs as first-line treatment of significance, and acquired drug resistance situation significance on the first generation EGFR-TKIs. Afatinib is the first ErbB family approved blocking agent, used to treat with EGFR activatingmutations in patients with non small cell lung cancer; dacomitinib are in the later stages of clinicaldevelopment. EGFR inhibitors specifically targeting T790M resistance mutations (AZD9291, CO-1686, HM61713 are in the early stages of development. As discussed in this paper, the scope of the EGFR-TKIs kinase to target different, EGFR receptor binding was reversible and drug interaction potential is also different. For clinicians, these differences of the multi drug treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with meaning, from the innovative anticancer drug combination therapy strategy point of view, these differences are also of great significance.

  8. Using dried blood spots collected under field condition to determine HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations in resource limited Tanzania

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    James Kimaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dried blood spot (DBS on filter paper has been used for different tests globally and has gained popularities in resource limited settings especially during HIV/AIDS epidemic. We assessed the efficiency of molecular characterization of HIV-1 subtypes using DBS collected under field conditions in northern Tanzania. Materials and Methods: In 2011 and 2012, 60 DBS samples were collected under field conditions from exposed and newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected children from Kilimanjaro (n=20, Arusha (n=20, Tanga (n=10 and Manyara (n=10. Results and discussion: Of 60 DBS analyzed at both Protease (PR and Reverse Transcriptase (RT regions, 45 (75% were analyzed, including 17 (85% from Kilimanjaro, 15 (75% from Arusha, 8 (80% from Tanga, and 5 (50% from Manyara region. All 45 DBS characterized had viral load above 1000 copies/mL with mean log10 viral loads of 3.87 copies/mL (SD 0.995. The phylogenetic results indicated presence of subtype and circulating recombinant form (CRF. In which, 24 were subtype A1 (53.33%, 16 were subtype C (35.55%, 3 were subtype D (6.67% and 2 were CRF10_CD (4.35%. All major mutations were detected in the RT region, none from protease (PR region. The mutations detected were Y181C (n=8, K103 (n=4 and G190A (n=1, conferring resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, and M184V (n=1, conferring resistance to lamivudine and emtricitabine. Conclusions: Our results indicate that DBS collected from field conditions in resource scarcity areas can be used to determine the phylogeny of the virus and drug resistance mutations in areas with diverse HIV-1 group M subtypes.

  9. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  10. Comparative assessment on the prevalence of mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum drug-resistant genes in two different ecotypes of Odisha state, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Narayani Prasad; Chauhan, Kshipra; Nanda, Nutan; Kumar, Ashwani; Carlton, Jane M; Das, Aparup

    2016-07-01

    Considering malaria as a local and focal disease, epidemiological understanding of different ecotypes of malaria can help in devising novel control measures. One of the major hurdles in malaria control lies on the evolution and dispersal of the drug-resistant malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. We herewith present data on genetic variation at the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) level in four different genes of P. falciparum (Pfcrt, Pfmdr1, Pfdhfr, and Pfdhps) that confer resistance to different antimalarials in two different eco-epidemiological settings, i.e. Hilly-Forest (HF) and Riverine-Plain (RP), in a high malaria endemic district of Odisha state, India. Greater frequency of antimalarial resistance conferring SNPs and haplotypes was observed in all four genes in P. falciparum, and Pfdhps was the most variable gene among the four. No significant genetic differentiation could be observed in isolates from HF and RP ecotypes. Twelve novel, hitherto unreported nucleotide mutations could be observed in the Pfmdr1 and Pfdhps genes. While the Pfdhps gene presented highest haplotype diversity, the Pfcrt gene displayed the highest nucleotide diversity. When the data on all the four genes were complied, the isolates from HF ecotype were found to harbour higher average nucleotide diversity than those coming from RP ecotype. High and positive Tajima's D values were obtained for the Pfcrt and Pfdhfr genes in isolates from both the HF and RP ecotypes, with statistically significant deviation from neutrality in the RP ecotype. Different patterns of Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) among SNPs located in different drug-resistant genes were found in the isolates collected from HF and RP ecotypes. Whereas in the HF ecotype, SNPs in the Pfmdr1 and Pfdhfr were significantly associated, in the RP ecotype, SNPs located in Pfcrt were associated with Pfmdr1, Pfdhfr and Pfdhps. These findings provide a baseline understanding on how different micro eco-epidemiological settings

  11. Towards Better Precision Medicine: PacBio Single-Molecule Long Reads Resolve the Interpretation of HIV Drug Resistant Mutation Profiles at Explicit Quasispecies (Haplotype) Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da Wei; Raley, Castle; Jiang, Min Kang; Zheng, Xin; Liang, Dun; Rehman, M Tauseef; Highbarger, Helene C; Jiao, Xiaoli; Sherman, Brad; Ma, Liang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Skelly, Thomas; Troyer, Jennifer; Stephens, Robert; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Pau, Alice; Lempicki, Richard A; Tran, Bao; Nissley, Dwight; Lane, H Clifford; Dewar, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    Development of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations (HDRMs) is one of the major reasons for the clinical failure of antiretroviral therapy. Treatment success rates can be improved by applying personalized anti-HIV regimens based on a patient's HDRM profile. However, the sensitivity and specificity of the HDRM profile is limited by the methods used for detection. Sanger-based sequencing technology has traditionally been used for determining HDRM profiles at the single nucleotide variant (SNV) level, but with a sensitivity of only ≥ 20% in the HIV population of a patient. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies offer greater detection sensitivity (~ 1%) and larger scope (hundreds of samples per run). However, NGS technologies produce reads that are too short to enable the detection of the physical linkages of individual SNVs across the haplotype of each HIV strain present. In this article, we demonstrate that the single-molecule long reads generated using the Third Generation Sequencer (TGS), PacBio RS II, along with the appropriate bioinformatics analysis method, can resolve the HDRM profile at a more advanced quasispecies level. The case studies on patients' HIV samples showed that the quasispecies view produced using the PacBio method offered greater detection sensitivity and was more comprehensive for understanding HDRM situations, which is complement to both Sanger and NGS technologies. In conclusion, the PacBio method, providing a promising new quasispecies level of HDRM profiling, may effect an important change in the field of HIV drug resistance research.

  12. Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, V N

    1966-12-01

    Iyer, V. N. (Microbiology Research Institute, Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada). Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1663-1669. 1966.-The pattern of development of genetic resistance in Bacillus subtilis to mitomycin C was studied, and spontaneous single and multistep mutants were obtained. The transmission and expression of these mutations in sensitive strains proved possible by means of genetic transformation. The mutations were genetically studied in relation to a chromosomal mutation, mac-1, which confers resistance to the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and which has been previously localized in the early-replicating segment of the B. subtilis chromosome. The results indicate that all of three primary mutations studied in this manner, as well as a secondary and tertiary mutation derived from one of the primary mutations, are clustered in this early-replicating segment. It appears that the secondary and tertiary mutations enhance the resistance conferred by the primary mutation, apparently without themselves conferring any resistance.

  13. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors (PI results from mutations in the viral protease (PR that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC. Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6 with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  14. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations associated to antiretroviral drug resistance in human isolates from Central Brazil Subtipos e mutações associadas à resistência aos anti-retrovirais em isolados de HIV-1 do Distrito Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marreco Cerqueira

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of polymorphisms associated to HIV-1 drug-resistance and genetic subtypes is important for the control and treatment of HIV-1 disease. Drug pressure selects resistant variants that carry mutations in the viral reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes. For a contribution to the public health authorities in planning the availability of therapeutic treatment, we therefore described the genetic variability, the prevalence of mutations associated to drug resistance and the antiretroviral resistance profile in HIV-1 isolates from infected individuals in Central Brazil. Nineteen HIV-1 RNA samples from a Public Health Laboratory of the Federal District were reversely transcribed and cDNAs were amplified by nested PCR. One fragment of 297 bp coding the entire protease gene, and another of 647 bp, corresponding to the partial RT gene (codons 19-234, were obtained. Automated sequencing and BLAST analysis revealed the presence of 17 B and 2 F1 HIV-1 subtypes. The amino acid sequences were analyzed for the presence of resistance-associated mutations. A total of 6 PR mutations, 2 major and 4 accessory, and 8 RT mutations related to drug resistance were found. Our data suggest a high prevalence of HIV-1 B subtype in the studied population of Federal District as well as the presence of genetically-resistant strains in individuals failing treatment.A detecção de polimorfismos do HIV-1 que estejam associados à resistência às drogas anti-retrovirais e aos subtipos genéticos é importante para o controle e tratamento da infecção pelo HIV-1. A pressão exercida pela terapia anti-retroviral seleciona variantes resistentes com mutações nos genes virais da transcriptase reversa (RT e da protease (PR. Assim, visando contribuir com as autoridades de saúde pública na perspectiva de planejar a disponibilidade de um tratamento terapêutico, nós descrevemos a variabilidade genética e a prevalência de mutações associadas à resist

  15. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  16. Adaptation of cancer cells from different entities to the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin-3 results in the emergence of p53-mutated multi-drug-resistant cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Barth, S.; Cinatl, J.; van Rikxoort, M.; Loeschmann, N.; Voges, Y.; Breitling, R.; von Deimling, A.; Roedel, F.; Weber, K.; Fehse, B.; Mack, E.; Stiewe, T.; Doerr, H. W.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    2011-01-01

    Six p53 wild-type cancer cell lines from infrequently p53-mutated entities (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and melanoma) were continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3, resulting in the emergence of nutlin-3-resistant, p53-mutated sublines d

  17. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle P. Porter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33, as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118. Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20% were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study.

  18. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  19. HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations among people seeking HIV diagnosis in voluntary counseling and testing sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Velasco-de-Castro

    Full Text Available The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005-2007. Recent (RS and long-term (LTS HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005-2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6% or age (25yo 16.6% along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF/URF emergence and

  20. HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations among people seeking HIV diagnosis in voluntary counseling and testing sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-de-Castro, Carlos A; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Bastos, Francisco I; Pilotto, José H; Fernandes, Nilo; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs) sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005-2007. Recent (RS) and long-term (LTS) HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005-2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR) Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6%) or age (25yo 16.6%) along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF/URF emergence and putative

  1. HIV-1 Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations among People Seeking HIV Diagnosis in Voluntary Counseling and Testing Sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-de-Castro, Carlos A.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Bastos, Francisco I.; Pilotto, José H.; Fernandes, Nilo; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs) sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005–2007. Recent (RS) and long-term (LTS) HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005–2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR) Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6%) or age (25yo 16.6%) along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF/URF emergence and putative

  2. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  3. Drug resistance in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Parija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimalarial chemotherapy is an important component of all malaria control programmes throughout the world. This is especially so in light of the fact that there are no antimalarial vaccines which are available for clinical use at present. Emergence and spread of malaria parasites which are resistant to many of the available antimalarials today is, therefore, a major cause for concern. Till date, resistance to all groups of antimalarials excluding artemisinin has been reported. In recent years, in vitro resistance to even artemisinin has been described. While resistance to antibacterial agents has come to prominence as a clinical problem in recent years, antiparasitic resistance in general and antimalarial resistance in particular has not received much attention, especially in the Indian scenario. The present review deals with commonly used antimalarial drugs and the mechanisms of resistance to them. Various methods of detecting antimalarial resistance and avoiding the same have also been dealt with. Newer parasite targets which can be used in developing newer antimalarial agents and antimalarials obtained from plants have also been mentioned.

  4. Analysis of HBV drug-resistant mutation in 1 121 patients with chronic hepatitis B%1121例慢性乙型肝炎患者HBV反转录酶区的耐药突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘妍; 徐东平; 王春梅; 纪冬; 徐辰; 韩萍; 任晓强; 许智慧; 戴久增; 张玲霞

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutation associated with nucleos(t)ide analogue resistance in multiple sites in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene in a large sample of patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods Serum HBV DNA was extracted individually from 1 121 patients. A nested PCR assay with high sensitivity and specifidty developed by our laboratory was employed for the RT gene amplification. Direct aequencing of PCRproduct was performed and the mutations associated with drug resistance at 12 sites were analyzed. The significance of detected mutations was analyzed in collaboration with clinical data of the patients. Results Drug-resistant mutations were detected in 228 patients for lamivudine (LAM), 32 for addfovir (ADV), 13 for entecavir (ETV), and 4 for telbivudine (L-dT). Five mutations were multi-drug resistant. M204V and M204I were dominant LAM-resistant mutations. The former was usually accompanied with L180M mutation, while the latter often emerged alone. N236T±A181 substitution was dominant in ADV-resistant mutation pattern. ETV-resistant mutations occurred on top of LAM-resistant mutations, and T184 exchange was the most common pattern. L-dT resistance was found be M204L Conclusions Detection of HBV drug-resistant mutations at multiple sites of the viral RT gene by direct sequencing is valuable for discovering genotypie drug resistance, thus it is helpful for physicians to adopt anti-HBV therapy more reasonably.%目的 分析大样本慢性乙型肝炎患者HBV反转录酶基因上的多位点核苷(酸)类似物的耐药相关突变情况及其临床意义.方法 提取1 121例患者血清HBV DNA,采用巢式PCR方法 扩增HBV反转录酶(RT)基因,对PCR产物进行DNA双向测序,对12个位点上的耐药相关突变进行检测,并结合临床资料进行分析.结果 检出拉米夫定(LAM)耐药突变228例,阿德福韦(ADV)耐药突变32例,恩替卡韦(ETV)耐药突变13例,替比夫定(L-dT)耐药突变4例.多药耐药5

  5. 乙肝治疗耐药基因突变的焦磷酸测序技术诊断%Pyrosequencing Diagnosis to Hepatitis B Gene Mutation Caused by Drug Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪钦; 颜真; 郭晏海; 李勇年; 刘永兰; 包晗; 赵锦荣; 梁平; 雷小英; 张菊

    2011-01-01

    目的:建立焦磷酸测序技术检测拉米夫定和阿德福韦酯治疗乙肝所致乙肝病毒基因耐药突变的定量检测方法,为临床乙肝耐药诊断和治疗提供依据.方法:针对乙肝病毒DNA聚合酶基因序列上4个常见基因突变位点的6种突变形式,分别克隆构建野生型和突变型质粒作为标准品,应用生物信息学手段设计目标基因通用PCR引物和各突变点的焦磷酸测序引物,建立焦磷酸测序的突变检测方法.对接受拉米夫定、阿德福韦酯治疗的慢性乙型肝炎患者血清标本进行检测.结果:构建了乙肝病毒四种常见耐药性突变的标准株和变异株克隆,建立了分别或同时检测拉米夫定、阿德福韦酯耐药突变的焦磷酸测序方法,对68例临床耐药或疑似耐药的患者血清标本进行检测,双脱氧测序验证,检出拉米夫定耐药突变32例,阿德福韦酯耐药突变5例,其中焦磷酸测序检出20例为混合突变,而双脱氧测序显示为6例.结论:成功建立了焦磷酸测序定量检测拉米夫定、阿德福韦酯耐药基因突变的方法,构建了乙肝病毒耐药基因突变的标准质粒,为临床动态监测乙肝病毒变异病毒株、指导合理用药奠定了基础.%Objective: Establish the pyrosequencing detection method of Lamivudine and Adefovir dipivoxil treatment of hepatitis B virus resistance mutations, and to provide the basis for clinical diagnosis of hepatitis B drug resistance and treatment. Methods: For gene mutation of DNA polymerase of hepatitis B virus, wild-type and mutant plasmid were constructed as a standard. The gene universal PCR primers and the point mutation pyrosequencing primer were designed by bioinformatics tools, and pyrosequencing method was established for mutation detection. The serum samples of patients were detected, who received lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil treatment for chronic hepatitis. Results: Four common drug resistance mutations of hepatitis B virus

  6. Fitness-compensatory mutations facilitate the spread of drug-resistant F15/LAM4/KZN and F28 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHARISSA C. NAIDOO; MANORMONEY PILLAY

    2017-09-01

    While the acquisition of drug resistance is often accompanied by fitness costs, Mycobacterium tuberculosis has developed mechanisms to overcome these costs in the form of compensatory mutations. In an attempt to dissect strain-specific differences in biological fitness, 10 M. tuberculosis genomes, representing F15/LAM4/KZN, Beijing, F11 and F28 genotypes were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Drug-susceptible F15/LAM4/KZN strains differed by 43 SNPs, demonstrating that heterogeneity exists even among closely-related strains. We found unique, nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the sigA and grcC1 genes of multidrug resistant (MDR) and XDR F15/LAM4/KZN strains, respectively. The F28 MDR strain harboured a novel ubiA mutation in combination with its embB M306I mutation, which may be related to ethambutol resistance. In addition, it possessed a low-frequency rpoC mutation, suggesting that this strain was in the process of developing compensation. In contrast, nocompensatory mutations were identified in Beijing and F11 MDR strains, corroborating its low in vitro fitness. Clinical strains also harboured unique SNPs in a number of important genes associated with virulence, highlighting the need for future studies which examine the correlation of genetic variations with phenotypic diversity. In summary, whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of fitness-compensatory mutations in F15/LAM4/KZN and F28 genotypes which predominate in MDR and/or extensively drug resistant (XDR) forms in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

  7. Prevalence and evolution of low frequency HIV drug resistance mutations detected by ultra deep sequencing in patients experiencing first line antiretroviral therapy failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Anne Vandenhende

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Clinical relevance of low-frequency HIV-1 variants carrying drug resistance associated mutations (DRMs is still unclear. We aimed to study the prevalence of low-frequency DRMs, detected by Ultra-Deep Sequencing (UDS before antiretroviral therapy (ART and at virological failure (VF, in HIV-1 infected patients experiencing VF on first-line ART. METHODS: Twenty-nine ART-naive patients followed up in the ANRS-CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, having initiated ART between 2000 and 2009 and experiencing VF (2 plasma viral loads (VL >500 copies/ml or one VL >1000 copies/ml were included. Reverse transcriptase and protease DRMs were identified using Sanger sequencing (SS and UDS at baseline (before ART initiation and VF. RESULTS: Additional low-frequency variants with PI-, NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs were found by UDS at baseline and VF, significantly increasing the number of detected DRMs by 1.35 fold (p<0.0001 compared to SS. These low-frequency DRMs modified ARV susceptibility predictions to the prescribed treatment for 1 patient at baseline, in whom low-frequency DRM was found at high frequency at VF, and 6 patients at VF. DRMs found at VF were rarely detected as low-frequency DRMs prior to treatment. The rare low-frequency NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs detected at baseline that correlated with the prescribed treatment were most often found at high-frequency at VF. CONCLUSION: Low frequency DRMs detected before ART initiation and at VF in patients experiencing VF on first-line ART can increase the overall burden of resistance to PI, NRTI and NNRTI.

  8. Mechanisms of Anticancer Drugs Resistance: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Chorawala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of cancer involves surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Development of chemoresistance is a persistent problem during the chemotherapy treatment. Cytotoxic drugs that selectively, but not exclusively, target actively proliferating cells include such diverse groups as DNA-alkylating agents, anti-metabolites, intercalating agents and mitotic inhibitors. Resistance constitutes a lack of response to drug-induced tumour growth inhibition; it may be inherent in a subpopulation of heterogeneous cancer cells or be acquired as a cellular response to drug exposure. Principle mechanisms may include altered membrane transport involving the p-glycoprotein product of the multidrug resistance (MDR gene as well as other associated proteins, altered target enzyme, decreased drug activation, increased drug degradation due to altered expression of drug metabolising enzymes, drug inactivation due to conjugation with increased glutathione, subcellular redistribution, drug interaction, enhanced DNA repair and failure to apoptosis as a result of mutated cell cycle proteins such as p53. Attempts to overcome resistance involves the use of combination drug therapy using different classes of drugs with minimally overlapping toxicities to allow maximal dosages, necessary for bone marrow recovery. Adjuvant therapy with p-glycoprotein inhibitors and in specific instances, the use of growth factor and protein kinase C inhibitors are newer experimental approaches that may also prove effective in delaying onset of resistance. Gene knockout using antisense molecules may be effective way of blocking drug resistance.

  9. An Efficient Microarray-Based Genotyping Platform for the Identification of Drug-Resistance Mutations in Majority and Minority Subpopulations of HIV-1 Quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Verónica; Perales, Celia; Fernández-Algar, María; Dos Santos, Helena G; Garrido, Patricia; Pernas, María; Parro, Víctor; Moreno, Miguel; García-Pérez, Javier; Alcamí, José; Torán, José Luis; Abia, David; Domingo, Esteban; Briones, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The response of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies to antiretroviral therapy is influenced by the ensemble of mutants that composes the evolving population. Low-abundance subpopulations within HIV-1 quasispecies may determine the viral response to the administered drug combinations. However, routine sequencing assays available to clinical laboratories do not recognize HIV-1 minority variants representing less than 25% of the population. Although several alternative and more sensitive genotyping techniques have been developed, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, they are usually very time consuming, expensive and require highly trained personnel, thus becoming unrealistic approaches in daily clinical practice. Here we describe the development and testing of a HIV-1 genotyping DNA microarray that detects and quantifies, in majority and minority viral subpopulations, relevant mutations and amino acid insertions in 42 codons of the pol gene associated with drug- and multidrug-resistance to protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. A customized bioinformatics protocol has been implemented to analyze the microarray hybridization data by including a new normalization procedure and a stepwise filtering algorithm, which resulted in the highly accurate (96.33%) detection of positive/negative signals. This microarray has been tested with 57 subtype B HIV-1 clinical samples extracted from multi-treated patients, showing an overall identification of 95.53% and 89.24% of the queried PR and RT codons, respectively, and enough sensitivity to detect minority subpopulations representing as low as 5-10% of the total quasispecies. The developed genotyping platform represents an efficient diagnostic and prognostic tool useful to personalize antiviral treatments in clinical practice.

  10. An Efficient Microarray-Based Genotyping Platform for the Identification of Drug-Resistance Mutations in Majority and Minority Subpopulations of HIV-1 Quasispecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Verónica; Perales, Celia; Fernández-Algar, María; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Garrido, Patricia; Pernas, María; Parro, Víctor; Moreno, Miguel; García-Pérez, Javier; Alcamí, José; Torán, José Luis; Abia, David; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The response of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies to antiretroviral therapy is influenced by the ensemble of mutants that composes the evolving population. Low-abundance subpopulations within HIV-1 quasispecies may determine the viral response to the administered drug combinations. However, routine sequencing assays available to clinical laboratories do not recognize HIV-1 minority variants representing less than 25% of the population. Although several alternative and more sensitive genotyping techniques have been developed, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, they are usually very time consuming, expensive and require highly trained personnel, thus becoming unrealistic approaches in daily clinical practice. Here we describe the development and testing of a HIV-1 genotyping DNA microarray that detects and quantifies, in majority and minority viral subpopulations, relevant mutations and amino acid insertions in 42 codons of the pol gene associated with drug- and multidrug-resistance to protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. A customized bioinformatics protocol has been implemented to analyze the microarray hybridization data by including a new normalization procedure and a stepwise filtering algorithm, which resulted in the highly accurate (96.33%) detection of positive/negative signals. This microarray has been tested with 57 subtype B HIV-1 clinical samples extracted from multi-treated patients, showing an overall identification of 95.53% and 89.24% of the queried PR and RT codons, respectively, and enough sensitivity to detect minority subpopulations representing as low as 5–10% of the total quasispecies. The developed genotyping platform represents an efficient diagnostic and prognostic tool useful to personalize antiviral treatments in clinical practice. PMID:27959928

  11. Inhibition of mutation and combating the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T Cirz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria poses a serious threat to human health. In the case of several antibiotics, including those of the quinolone and rifamycin classes, bacteria rapidly acquire resistance through mutation of chromosomal genes during therapy. In this work, we show that preventing induction of the SOS response by interfering with the activity of the protease LexA renders pathogenic Escherichia coli unable to evolve resistance in vivo to ciprofloxacin or rifampicin, important quinolone and rifamycin antibiotics. We show in vitro that LexA cleavage is induced during RecBC-mediated repair of ciprofloxacin-mediated DNA damage and that this results in the derepression of the SOS-regulated polymerases Pol II, Pol IV and Pol V, which collaborate to induce resistance-conferring mutations. Our findings indicate that the inhibition of mutation could serve as a novel therapeutic strategy to combat the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  12. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about...... in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim...... for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone....

  13. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Göhring

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV, foscarnet (PFA and cidofovir (CDV are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97 and the polymerase-gene (UL54. Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood.

  14. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naïve HIV-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Lecanda, Aarón; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Brander, Christian; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART) efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies. Methods We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR) positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations. Results Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64%) corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual) or DR (median 6 pairs/individual) were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001). While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient’s virus (mean 68% of cases), responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002). Conclusions Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides. PMID:26808823

  15. High prevalence of pfdhfr-pfdhps triple mutations associated with anti-malarial drugs resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolates seven years after the adoption of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in combination with artesunate as first-line treatment in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Maryam; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Pirahmadi, Sakineh; Raeisi, Ahmad; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2015-04-01

    The spread of anti-malarial drug resistance will challenge any malaria control and elimination strategies, and routine monitoring of resistance-associated molecular markers of commonly used anti-malarial drugs is very important. Therefore, in the present investigation, the extent of mutations/haplotypes in dhfr and dhps genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates (n=72) was analyzed seven years after the introduction of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus artesunate (AS) as first-line anti-malarial treatment in Iran using PCR-RFLP methods. The results showed that the majority of the patients (97.2%) carried both 59R and 108N mutations in pure form with wild-type genotype at positions N51 and I164. Additionally, a significant increase (Pdrug for treatment of falciparum patients in these malaria-endemic areas of Iran. However, no quintuple mutations associated with treatment failure were detected. In conclusion, the present results along with in vivo assays suggest that seven years after the adoption of SP-AS as the first-line treatment in Iran, this drug remains efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, as a partner drug with AS in these malaria-endemic areas.

  16. Transporter protein and drug resistance of Trypanosoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Noraine P; Mingala, Claro N

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma infection is one of the most important infections in livestock and humans. One of the main problems of its therapeutic control and treatment is the resurgence of drug resistance. One of the most studied causes of such resistance is the function of its adenosine transporter gene. A trypanosomal gene TbAT1 from Trypanosoma brucei has been cloned in yeast to demonstrate its function in the transport of adenosine and trypanocidal agents. Drug resistant trypanosomes showed a defective TbAT1 variant; furthermore, deletion of the gene and set point mutations in the transporter gene has been demonstrated from isolates from relapse patients. The molecular understanding of the mechanism of action trypanocidal agents and function of transporter gene can lead to control of drug resistance of Trypanosomes.

  17. A proportion of mutations fixed in the genomes of in vitro selected isogenic drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants can be detected as minority variants in the parent culture

    KAUST Repository

    Bergval, Indra

    2015-01-09

    We studied genomic variation in a previously selected collection of isogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis laboratory strains subjected to one or two rounds of antibiotic selection. Whole genome sequencing analysis identified eleven single, unique mutations (four synonymous, six non-synonymous, one intergenic), in addition to drug resistance-conferring mutations, that were fixed in the genomes of six monoresistant strains. Eight loci, present as minority variants (five non-synonymous, three synonymous) in the genome of the susceptible parent strain, became fixed in the genomes of multiple daughter strains. None of these mutations are known to be involved with drug resistance. Our results confirm previously observed genomic stability for M. tuberculosis, although the parent strain had accumulated allelic variants at multiple locations in an antibiotic-free in vitro environment. It is therefore likely to assume that these so-called hitchhiking mutations were co-selected and fixed in multiple daughter strains during antibiotic selection. The presence of multiple allelic variations, accumulated under non-selective conditions, which become fixed during subsequent selective steps, deserves attention. The wider availability of \\'deep\\' sequencing methods could help to detect multiple bacterial (sub)populations within patients with high resolution and would therefore be useful in assisting in the detailed investigation of transmission chains.

  18. Gyrase Mutations Are Associated with Variable Levels of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha R; Jacobson, Karen R; Franke, Molly F; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alex; Mitnick, Carole D; Murray, Megan

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostics that rapidly and accurately predict resistance to fluoroquinolone drugs and especially later-generation agents promise to improve treatment outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and prevent the spread of disease. Mutations in the gyr genes are known to confer most fluoroquinolone resistance, but knowledge about the effects of gyr mutations on susceptibility to early- versus later-generation fluoroquinolones and about the role of mutation-mutation interactions is limited. Here, we sequenced the full gyrA and gyrB open reading frames in 240 multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains and quantified their ofloxacin and moxifloxacin MIC by testing growth at six concentrations for each drug. We constructed a multivariate regression model to assess both the individual mutation effects and interactions on the drug MICs. We found that gyrB mutations contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance both individually and through interactions with gyrA mutations. These effects were statistically significant. In these clinical isolates, several gyrA and gyrB mutations conferred different levels of resistance to ofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Consideration of gyr mutation combinations during the interpretation of molecular test results may improve the accuracy of predicting the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Further, the differential effects of gyr mutations on the activity of early- and later-generation fluoroquinolones requires further investigation and could inform the selection of a fluoroquinolone for treatment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. A novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon-based two-phase hybridization assay for accurate and high-throughput detection of multiple drug resistance-conferring point mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinghai; Wu, Nan; Xie, Meng; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianjun; Zhuo, Lisha; Kuang, Hong; Fu, Weiling

    2012-04-01

    The accurate and high-throughput detection of drug resistance-related multiple point mutations remains a challenge. Although the combination of molecular beacons with bio-immobilization technology, such as microarray, is promising, its application is difficult due to the ineffective immobilization of molecular beacons on the chip surface. Here, we propose a novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon in which the loop consists of 2 parts. One is complementary to a target, while the other is complementary to an oligonucleotide probe immobilized on the chip surface. With this novel probe, a two-phase hybridization assay can be used for simultaneously detecting multiple point mutations. This assay will have advantages, such as easy probe availability, multiplex detection, low background, and high-efficiency hybridization, and may provide a new avenue for the immobilization of molecular beacons and high-throughput detection of point mutations.

  20. Impaired fitness of drug-resistant malaria parasites: evidence and implication on drug-deployment policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Hamza A; Hastings, Ian M; Swedberg, Göte

    2009-06-01

    Malaria, a leading parasitic disease, inflicts an enormous toll on human lives and is caused by protozoal parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium. Antimalarial drugs targeting essential biochemical processes in the parasite are the primary resources for management and control. However, the parasite has established mutations, substantially reducing the efficacy of these drugs. First-line therapy is faced the with the consistent evolution of drug-resistant genotypes carrying these mutations. However, drug-resistant genotypes are likely to be less fit than the wild-type, suggesting that they might disappear by reducing the volume of drug pressure. A substantial body of epidemiological evidence confirmed that the frequency of resistant genotypes wanes when active drug selection declines. Drug selection on the parasite genome that removes genetic variation in the vicinity of drug-resistant genes (hitch-hiking) is common among resistant parasites in the field. This can further disadvantage drug-resistant strains and limit their variability in the face of a mounting immune response. Attempts to provide unequivocal evidence for the fitness cost of drug resistance have monitored the outcomes of laboratory competition experiments of deliberate mixtures of sensitive and resistant strains, in the absence of drug pressure, using isogenic clones produced either by drug selection or gene manipulation. Some of these experiments provided inconclusive results, but they all suggested reduced fitness of drug-resistant clones in the absence of drug pressure. In addition, biochemical analyses provided clearer information demonstrating that the mutation of some antimalarial-targeted enzymes lowers their activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Here, we review current evidences for the disadvantage of drug-resistance mutations, and discuss some strategies of drug deployment to maximize the cost of resistance and limit its spread.

  1. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented.

  2. Effects of the K65R and K65R/M184V reverse transcriptase mutations in subtype C HIV on enzyme function and drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutsinos Dimitrios

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of mutations K65R and K65R plus M184V on enzymatic function and mechanisms of drug resistance in subtype C reverse transcriptase (RT. Methods Recombinant subtype C HIV-1 RTs containing K65R or K65R+M184V were purified from Escherichia coli. Enzyme activities and tenofovir (TFV incorporation efficiency by wild-type (WT and mutant RTs of both subtypes were determined in cell-free assays. Efficiency of (- ssDNA synthesis and initiation by subtype C RTs was measured using gel-based assays with HIV-1 PBS RNA template and tRNA3Lys as primer. Single-cycle processivity was assayed under variable dNTP concentrations. Steady-state analysis was performed to measure the relative inhibitory capacity (ki/km of TFV-disphosphate (TFV-DP. ATP-dependent excision and rescue of TFV-or ZDV-terminated DNA synthesis was monitored in time-course experiments. Results The efficiency of tRNA-primed (-ssDNA synthesis by subtype C RTs was: WT > K65R > K65R+M184V RT. At low dNTP concentration, K65R RT exhibited lower activity in single-cycle processivity assays while the K65R+M184V mutant showed diminished processivity independent of dNTP concentration. ATP-mediated excision of TFV-or ZDV-terminated primer was decreased for K65R and for K65R+M184V RT compared to WT RT. K65R and K65R+M184V displayed 9.8-and 5-fold increases in IC50 for TFV-DP compared to WT RT. The Ki/Km of TFV was increased by 4.1-and 7.2-fold, respectively, for K65R and K65R+M184V compared to WT RT. Conclusion The diminished initiation efficiency of K65R-containing RTs at low dNTP concentrations have been confirmed for subtype C as well as subtype B. Despite decreased excision, this decreased binding/incorporation results in diminished susceptibility of K65R and K65R+M184 RT to TFV-DP.

  3. HIV-1 drug resistance and resistance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutter, Dana S; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (ART) has led to dramatic reductions in HIV-1 mortality and incidence. However, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) poses a potential threat to the long-term success of ART and is emerging as a threat to the elimination of AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. In this review we describe the genetic mechanisms, epidemiology, and management of HIVDR at both individual and population levels across diverse economic and geographic settings. To describe the genetic mechanisms of HIVDR, we review the genetic barriers to resistance for the most commonly used ARVs and describe the extent of cross-resistance between them. To describe the epidemiology of HIVDR, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We also review to two categories of HIVDR with important public health relevance: (i) pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR), a World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR surveillance metric and (ii) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-related drug resistance, a type of ADR that can impact clinical outcomes if present at the time of treatment initiation. To summarize the implications of HIVDR for patient management, we review the role of genotypic resistance testing and treatment practices in both high-income and LMIC settings. In high-income countries where drug resistance testing is part of routine care, such an understanding can help clinicians prevent virological failure and accumulation of further HIVDR on an individual level by selecting the most efficacious regimens for their patients. Although there is reduced access to diagnostic testing and to many ARVs in LMIC, understanding the scientific basis and clinical implications of HIVDR is useful in all regions in order to shape appropriate surveillance, inform treatment algorithms, and manage difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  4. Strategies for Overcoming Resistance in Tumours Harboring BRAF Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourah Mohammad Obaid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of resistance to previously effective treatments has been a challenge for health care providers and a fear for patients undergoing cancer therapy. This is an unfortunately frequent occurrence for patients undergoing targeted therapy for tumours harboring the activating V600E mutation of the BRAF gene. Since the initial identification of the BRAF mutation in 2002, a series of small molecular inhibitors that target the BRAFV600E have been developed, but intrinsic and acquired resistance to these drugs has presented an ongoing challenge. More recently, improvements in therapy have been achieved by combining the use of BRAF inhibitors with other drugs, such as inhibitors of the downstream effector mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK. Despite improved success in response rates and in delaying resistance using combination therapy, ultimately, the acquisition of resistance remains a concern. Recent research articles have shed light on some of the underlying mechanisms of this resistance and have proposed numerous strategies that might be employed to overcome or avoid resistance to targeted therapies. This review will explore some of the resistance mechanisms, compare what is known in melanoma cancer to colorectal cancer, and discuss strategies under development to manage the development of resistance.

  5. Detection of resistance mutations and CD4 slopes in individuals experiencing sustained virological failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Paredes, Roger; Sabin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Several resistance mutations have been shown to affect viral fitness, and the presence of certain mutations might result in clinical benefit for patients kept on a virologically failing regimen due to an exhaustion of drug options. We sought to quantify the effect of resistance muta...

  6. Managing Drug Resistance in Cancer: Role of Cancer Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing cancer drug resistance is the main goal of the modern oncology programs worldwide. One of the major factors contributing to drug resistance in cancer cells is the acquired mutations in drug targets. Advances in sequencing technologies and high-throughput screening assays have generated huge information related to pharmaco-profiling of anticancer drugs and revealed the mutational spectrum of different cancers. Systematic meta-analysis of this complex data is very essential to make useful conclusions in order to manage cancer drug resistance. Bioinformatics can play a significant role to interpret this complex data into useful conclusions. In this chapter, the use of bioinformatics platforms, particularly CancerDR, in understanding the cancer drug resistance is described.

  7. Putative compensatory mutations in the rpoC gene of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are associated with ongoing transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, M; Müller, B; Borrell, S; Black, P A; van Helden, P D; Warren, R M; Gagneux, S; Victor, T C

    2013-02-01

    Rifampin resistance in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis arises primarily through the selection of bacterial variants harboring mutations in the 81-bp rifampin resistance-determining region of the rpoB gene. While these mutations were shown to infer a fitness cost in the absence of antibiotic pressure, compensatory mutations in rpoA and rpoC were identified which restore the fitness of rifampin-resistant bacteria carrying mutations in rpoB. To investigate the epidemiological relevance of these compensatory mutations, we analyzed 286 drug-resistant and 54 drug-susceptible clinical M. tuberculosis isolates from the Western Cape, South Africa, a high-incidence setting of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Sequencing of a portion of the RpoA-RpoC interaction region of the rpoC gene revealed that 23.5% of all rifampin-resistant isolates tested carried a nonsynonymous mutation in this region. These putative compensatory mutations in rpoC were associated with transmission, as 30.8% of all rifampin-resistant isolates with an IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern belonging to a recognized RFLP cluster harbored putative rpoC mutations. Such mutations were present in only 9.4% of rifampin-resistant isolates with unique RFLP patterns (P mutations were associated with specific strain genotypes and the rpoB S531L rifampin resistance mutation. Among isolates harboring this rpoB mutation, 44.1% also harbored rpoC mutations, while only 4.1% of the isolates with other rpoB mutations exhibited mutations in rpoC (P mutations in the transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and illustrates how epistatic interactions between drug resistance-conferring mutations, compensatory mutations, and different strain genetic backgrounds might influence compensatory evolution in drug-resistant M. tuberculosis.

  8. Resistance mutations against dolutegravir in HIV integrase impair the emergence of resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Moïsi, Daniela; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-03-27

    Among 1222 antiretroviral-naive patients who received dolutegravir (DTG) as part of first-line therapy, none has developed resistance against this compound after 48-96 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, only four occurrences of virological failure with resistance mutations have been documented in previously drug-experienced patients who received DTG as a first time integrase inhibitor as a component of a second-line regimen. The R263K integrase resistance mutation was observed in two of these individuals who received suboptimal background regimens. We have previously selected mutations at position R263K, G118R, H51Y, and E138K as being associated with low-level resistance to DTG. Now, we sought to investigate the facility with which resistance on the part of R263K-containing viruses might develop. We tested the ability of DTG-resistant viruses containing either the R263K or G118R and/or H51Y mutations to develop further resistance against several reverse transcriptase inhibitors during in-vitro selection experiments. Our results show that DTG-resistant viruses are impaired in their ability to acquire further resistance to each of nevirapine and lamivudine as a consequence of their relative inability to develop resistance mutations associated with these two compounds. Our findings provide an explanation for the fact that no individual has yet progressed to virological failure with resistance mutations associated with dolutegravir in clinical trials in which patients received dolutegravir together with an optimized background regimen.

  9. Correlation between mtrR gene mutation and multi-drug resistant of Neisseria gonorrhoeae%mtrR基因突变与淋病奈瑟菌多重耐药的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志萍; 吴爱武

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is to study the drug resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae for common antibacterial agents, and to explore the correlation between mtrR system, mtrR gene mutation and multi-drug resistant of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.Methods Agar dilution method was used to detect the minimum bacteriostatic concentration ( MIC) of 30 strains of Neisseria gonorrhea clinical strains to 6 kinds of antimicrobial agents commonly used in clinic including ciprofloxacin, penicillin, tetracycline, az-ithromycin, spectinomycin and ceftriaxone, at the same time penicillin enzyme production was determined by paper iodine vol-ume method.The clinical strains with antimicrobial resistance for one kind of antimicrobial agents, the ones for two kinds and the ones with multi-drug resistance were selected and their DNA was extracted to detect mtrR gene by PCR method, and its differences with Neisseria gonorrhea standard sensitive strains were compared.Results There were 3 clinical strains (10%) with antimicrobial resistance for one kind of antimicrobial agents, 16 ones (53%) for two kinds and 9 ones (30%) for three kinds, 2 ones (7%) for 4 four kinds.The mulit-drug resistance rate was 37%.There were 7 strains whose penicillin enzyme was positive.Gene mutation of mtrR gene was not found in the strains with antimicrobial resistance for one and two kinds of antimicrobial agents, but all the strains with multi-drug resistance had gene mutation, in which 7 strains with Gly( GGC-GAC) Asp mutation on the 45th position, 7 strains with Phe( TTC-GTC) Val mutation on the 51th position.Conclusion Neisseria gonorrhoeae separated in clinic has a high multi-drug resistance rate, and their resistance should be continuously monitored.Gly(GGC-GAC) Asp mutation on the 45th position, Phe(TTC-GTC)Val mutation on the 51th position of mtrR gene are closely related with multi-drug resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.%目的:了解临床分离的淋病奈瑟菌对常用抗菌药物的耐药性,

  10. Progress in antiandrogen design targeting hormone binding pocket to circumvent mutation based resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong eTian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR plays a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa. Current clinically used antiandrogens such as flutamide, bicalutamide, and newly approved enzalutamide mainly target the hormone binding pocket (HBP of AR. However, over time, drug resistance invariably develops and switches these antiandrogens from antagonist to agonist of the AR. Accumulated evidence indicates that AR mutation is an important cause for the drug resistance. This review will give an overview of the mutation based resistance of the current clinically used antiandrogens and the rational drug design to overcome the resistance, provides a promising strategy for the development of the new generation of antiandrogens targeting HBP.

  11. Amodiaquine-Artesunate versus Artemether-Lumefantrine against Uncomplicated Malaria in Children Less Than 14 Years in Ngaoundere, North Cameroon: Efficacy, Safety, and Baseline Drug Resistant Mutations in pfcrt, pfmdr1, and pfdhfr Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Innocent M; Netongo, Palmer M; Atogho-Tiedeu, Barbara; Ngongang, Eric-Olivier; Ajua, Anthony; Achidi, Eric A; Mbacham, Wilfred F

    2013-01-01

    Background. In Cameroon, both Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are used as first-line treatment against uncomplicated malaria in line with the WHO recommendations. We compared the efficacy and safety of both therapeutic combinations and determined the prevalence of drug resistance conferring mutations in three parasite genes. Methods. One hundred and fifty acute malaria patients between six months and 14 years of age were randomized to receive standard doses of either AS/AQ (73) or AL (77) and followedup for 28 days. Outcome of treatment was according to the standard WHO classification. DNA samples from pretreatment parasite isolates were used to determine the prevalence of resistant mutations in the pfcrt, pfmdr1, and dhfr genes. Results. Both drug combinations induced rapid clearance of parasites and malaria symptoms. PCR-corrected cure rates were 100% and 96.4% for AL. The combinations were well tolerated. Major haplotypes included CVIET (71%), CVMNT (25%) for the pfcrt; SND (100%) for the pfmdr1; IRN (79, 8%), NCS (8.8%), and mixed haplotype (11, 8%) for the dhfr. Conclusion. Both AS/AQ and AL were highly effective and well tolerated for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Ngaoundere, Cameroon. High prevalence of mutant pfcrt alleles confirms earlier observations. Long-term monitoring of safety and efficacy and molecular markers is highly solicited.

  12. Amodiaquine-Artesunate versus Artemether-Lumefantrine against Uncomplicated Malaria in Children Less Than 14 Years in Ngaoundere, North Cameroon: Efficacy, Safety, and Baseline Drug Resistant Mutations in pfcrt, pfmdr1, and pfdhfr Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent M. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Cameroon, both Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ and artemether-lumefantrine (AL are used as first-line treatment against uncomplicated malaria in line with the WHO recommendations. We compared the efficacy and safety of both therapeutic combinations and determined the prevalence of drug resistance conferring mutations in three parasite genes. Methods. One hundred and fifty acute malaria patients between six months and 14 years of age were randomized to receive standard doses of either AS/AQ (73 or AL (77 and followedup for 28 days. Outcome of treatment was according to the standard WHO classification. DNA samples from pretreatment parasite isolates were used to determine the prevalence of resistant mutations in the pfcrt, pfmdr1, and dhfr genes. Results. Both drug combinations induced rapid clearance of parasites and malaria symptoms. PCR-corrected cure rates were 100% and 96.4% for AL. The combinations were well tolerated. Major haplotypes included CVIET (71%, CVMNT (25% for the pfcrt; SND (100% for the pfmdr1; IRN (79, 8%, NCS (8.8%, and mixed haplotype (11, 8% for the dhfr. Conclusion. Both AS/AQ and AL were highly effective and well tolerated for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Ngaoundere, Cameroon. High prevalence of mutant pfcrt alleles confirms earlier observations. Long-term monitoring of safety and efficacy and molecular markers is highly solicited.

  13. Detection of Mutations Resistant to Lamivudine or Adefovir in HBV and Its Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) na?ve chronic hepatitis B(CHB) patients were given rescue combination therapy after drug resistance to lamivudine or adefovir. Evolution of HBV mutation patterns and its impact on antiviral effects were studied. Methods Total of 142 na?ve CHB patients treated with lamivudine were randomly divided into two groups when lamivudine resistance occurred. One group was added with adefovir, the other was switched to entecavir and adefovir. Seventy-two na?ve CHB patients treated with adefovir were randomly divided into two groups when adefovir resistance occurred. One group was added with lamivudine, the other was added with entecavir. HBV polymerase reverse transcriptase mutations associated with resistance were analyed before and after 48 weeks of rescue therapy, respectively. Results The mutation patterns of M204V/I, M204V+L180M were predominantly found in CHB patients after lamivudine resistance. Meanwhile, the entecavir resistance mutation patterns were also detected. Therefore, patients with lamivudine resistance could develop more diverse drug resistance mutations if they were switched to entecavir and adefovir. The mutation patterns of rtA181 were predominantly found in CHB patients after adefovir resistance and rescure therapy with add-on entecavir was more effective than with add-on lamivudine Conclusions Resistance mutation analysis chould help to choose NAs, reduce resistance and ehance antiviral effects.

  14. Update on Antifungal Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Erika; Zhao, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a major source of global morbidity and mortality, especially among patients with underlying immune suppression. Successful patient management requires antifungal therapy. Yet, treatment choices are restricted due to limited classes of antifungal agents and the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. In some settings, the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains insensitive to several classes of antifungal agents is a major concern. The resistance mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance are well characterized and include changes in drug target affinity and abundance, and reduction in the intracellular level of drug by biofilms and efflux pumps. The development of high-level and multidrug resistance occurs through a stepwise evolution of diverse mechanisms. The genetic factors that influence these mechanisms are emerging and they form a complex symphony of cellular interactions that enable the cell to adapt and/or overcome drug-induced stress. Drivers of resistance involve a complex blend of host and microbial factors. Understanding these mechanisms will facilitate development of better diagnostics and therapeutic strategies to overcome and prevent antifungal resistance. PMID:26120512

  15. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Harbor Hospital Baltimore, MD (United States); Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Wang, Yong [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Dewdney, Tamaria G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Reiter, Samuel J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brunzelle, Joseph S. [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Kovari, Iulia A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  16. Drug Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsu, Osamu; Hangauer, Matthew J.; Phuchareon, Janyaporn; Eisele, David W.; McCormick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has dramatically changed the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)—the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. EGFR-targeted therapies show considerable promise, but drug resistance has become a substantial issue. Methods We reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the drug resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC. Results The mechanisms causing primary, acquired, and persistent drug resistance to TKIs vary. Researchers and clinicians, who have used study findings to develop more effective therapeutic approaches, have found that the sequential use of single agents presents a formidable challenge, suggesting that multi-drug combinations must be considered. Conclusions In the era of precision medicine, oncologists should promptly obtain an accurate diagnosis of drug resistance in each patient to design the most relevant combination therapy to overcome patient-specific drug resistance. PMID:26910730

  17. Drug resistance in Leishmania: similarities and differences to other organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, B; Kündig, C; Singh, A; Ouellette, M

    1998-01-01

    The main line of defense available against parasitic protozoa is chemotherapy. Drug resistance has emerged however, as a primary obstacle to the successful treatment and control of parasitic diseases. Leishmania spp., the causative agents of leishmaniasis, have served as a useful model for studying mechanisms of drug resistance in vitro. Antimonials and amphotericin B are the first line drugs to treat Leishmania followed by pentamidine and a number of other drugs. Parasites resistant against all these classes of drugs have been selected under laboratory conditions. A multiplicity of resistance mechanisms has been detected, the most prevalent being gene amplification and transport mutations. With the tools now available, it should be possible to elucidate the mechanisms that govern drug resistance in field isolates and develop more effective chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Analysis on Mycoplasma pneumonia 23SrRNA gene mutation site and drug resistance phenotype%肺炎支原体23SrRNA基因突变位点与耐药表型的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶芸; 李苏亮; 姜萍; 王瑶; 杨超

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the infection situation of Mycoplasma pneumonia ( Mp ) in patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infection and the molecular drug resistance mechanisms of macrolide,and to analyze the relationship between 23SrRNA gene mutation site of isolates resistant to Mp and drug resistance phenotype. Methods A total of 400 throat swab specimens of community-acquired respiratory tract infection were cultured to isolate Mp,the clinical isolates were identified by nested polymerase chain reaction, and the in vitro antibiotic sensitivity test was performed for identifying macrolide-resistant isolates through the minimal inhibitory concentration( MIC).The sequences of macrolide-resistant 23SrRNA gene were detected. The sequences were compared to the corresponding sequences of Ml29. The relationship between mutation site and drug resistance phenotype was analyzed. Results A total of 50 Mp were isolated from 400 throat swab specimens. Of the 50 isolates, 32 isolates were susceptible to macrolide, and 18 isolates were resistant to macrolide. The 18 clinical isolates appeared mutation A2063G, A2064G and A2067G, separately. A2063G showed 14 ring macrolide resistance. A2064G showed 14 and 16 ring macrolide resistances. A2067G showed josamycin resistance. Conclusions Mp to macrolide resistance is serious, and the mutation of 23SrRNA gene is a predominant mechanism that contributes to the macrolide resistance. Through the analysis of 23SrRNA gene mutation site and drug resistance phenotype, the clinical Mp drug resistance situation is obtained. The theoretical guidance for reasonable selection and application of antibiotics is provided.%目的 了解本地区社区呼吸道感染肺炎支原体(Mycoplasma pneumoniae,Mp)感染状况,探讨肺炎支原体对大环内酯类抗菌药物的耐药分子机制,并分析肺炎支原体耐药菌株23SrRNA基因突变位点与耐药表型之间的关系.方法 对400例社区获得性呼吸道感染患儿咽拭

  19. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  20. New Topoisomerase I mutations are associated with resistance to camptothecin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourquier Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topoisomerase I (TOP1 is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during DNA replication and transcription. TOP1 is the molecular target of camptothecin and related drugs such as irinotecan and SN38 (irinotecan's active metabolite. Irinotecan is widely used as an anti-cancer agent in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, its efficacy is often limited by the development of resistance. Methods We previously established several SN38 resistant HCT116-derived clones to study the mechanisms underlying resistance to SN38. Here, we investigated whether resistance to SN38 in these cell lines could be linked to the presence of TOP1 mutations and changes in its expression and activity. Functional analyses were performed on these cell lines challenged with SN38 and we specifically monitored the double strands breaks with γH2AX staining and replication activity with molecular combing. Results In SN38 resistant HCT116 clones we identified three new TOP1 mutations, which are located in the core subdomain III (p.R621H and p.L617I and in the linker domain (p.E710G and are packed together at the interface between these two domains. The presence of these TOP1 mutations in SN38 resistant HCT116 cells did not modify TOP1 expression or intrinsic activity. Conversely, following challenge with SN38, we observed a decrease of TOP1-DNA cleavage complexes and a reduction in double-stranded break formation. In addition, we showed that SN38 resistant HCT116 cells present a strong decrease in the SN38-dependent asymmetry of replication forks that is characteristic of SN38 sensitive HCT116 cells. Conclusions These results indicate that the TOP1 mutations are involved in the development of SN38 resistance. We hypothesize that p.L617, p.R621 and p.E710 TOP1 residues are important for the functionality of the linker and that mutation of one of these residues is sufficient to alter or modulate its flexibility

  1. Analysis of embCAB mutations associated with ethambutol resistance in multidrug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Sun, Qing; Liu, Hai-Can; Wu, Xiao-Cui; Xiao, Tong-Yang; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Gui-Lian; Jiang, Yi; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Wan, Kang-Lin

    2015-04-01

    Ethambutol (EMB) plays a pivotal role in the chemotherapy of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Resistance to EMB is considered to be caused by mutations in the embCAB operon (embC, embA, and embB). In this study, we analyzed the embCAB mutations among 139 MDR-TB isolates from China and found a possible association between embCAB operon mutation and EMB resistance. Our data indicate that 56.8% of MDR-TB isolates are resistant to EMB, and 82.2% of EMB-resistant isolates belong to the Beijing family. Overall, 110 (79.1%) MDR-TB isolates had at least one mutation in the embCAB operon. The majority of mutations were present in the embB gene and the embA upstream region, which also displayed significant correlations with EMB resistance. The most common mutations occurred at codon 306 in embB (embB306), followed by embB406, embA(-16), and embB497. Mutations at embB306 were associated with EMB resistance. DNA sequencing of embB306-497 was the best strategy for detecting EMB resistance, with 89.9% sensitivity, 58.3% specificity, and 76.3% accuracy. Additionally, embB306 had limited value as a candidate predictor for EMB resistance among MDR-TB infections in China.

  2. Ciprofloxacin selects for RNA polymerase mutations with pleiotropic antibiotic resistance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Franziska; Bergman, Jessica M; Brandis, Gerrit; Marcusson, Linda L; Zorzet, Anna; Huseby, Douglas L; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to the fluoroquinolone drug ciprofloxacin is commonly linked to mutations that alter the drug target or increase drug efflux via the major AcrAB-TolC transporter. Very little is known about other mutations that might also reduce susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. We discovered that an Escherichia coli strain experimentally evolved for resistance to ciprofloxacin had acquired a mutation in rpoB, the gene coding for the β-subunit of RNA polymerase. The aim of this work was to determine whether this mutation, and other mutations in rpoB, contribute to ciprofloxacin resistance and, if so, by which mechanism. Independent lineages of E. coli were evolved in the presence of ciprofloxacin and clones from endpoint cultures were screened for mutations in rpoB. Ciprofloxacin-selected rpoB mutations were identified and characterized in terms of effects on susceptibility and mode of action. Mutations in rpoB were selected at a high frequency in 3 out of 10 evolved lineages, in each case arising after the occurrence of mutations affecting topoisomerases and drug efflux. All ciprofloxacin-selected rpoB mutations had a high fitness cost in the absence of drug, but conferred a competitive advantage in the presence of ciprofloxacin. RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that expression of mdtK, encoding a multidrug efflux transporter, was significantly increased by the ciprofloxacin-selected rpoB mutations. The susceptibility phenotype was shown to depend on the presence of an active mdtK and a mutant rpoB allele. These data identify mutations in RNA polymerase as novel contributors to the evolution of resistance to ciprofloxacin and show that the phenotype is mediated by increased MdtK-dependent drug efflux. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Computational analysis of ABL kinase mutations allows predicting drug sensitivity against selective kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamasani, Swapna; Akula, Sravani; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha; Duyster, Justus; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Kancha, Rama Krishna

    2017-05-01

    The ABL kinase inhibitor imatinib has been used as front-line therapy for Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia. However, a significant proportion of imatinib-treated patients relapse due to occurrence of mutations in the ABL kinase domain. Although inhibitor sensitivity for a set of mutations was reported, the role of less frequent ABL kinase mutations in drug sensitivity/resistance is not known. Moreover, recent reports indicate distinct resistance profiles for second-generation ABL inhibitors. We thus employed a computational approach to predict drug sensitivity of 234 point mutations that were reported in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Initial validation analysis of our approach using a panel of previously studied frequent mutations indicated that the computational data generated in this study correlated well with the published experimental/clinical data. In addition, we present drug sensitivity profiles for remaining point mutations by computational docking analysis using imatinib as well as next generation ABL inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, axitinib, and ponatinib. Our results indicate distinct drug sensitivity profiles for ABL mutants toward kinase inhibitors. In addition, drug sensitivity profiles of a set of compound mutations in ABL kinase were also presented in this study. Thus, our large scale computational study provides comprehensive sensitivity/resistance profiles of ABL mutations toward specific kinase inhibitors.

  4. Frequency and Distribution of Tuberculosis Resistance-Associated Mutations between Mumbai, Moldova, and Eastern Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, S B; Seifert, M; Catanzaro, D; Garfein, R S; Valafar, F; Crudu, V; Rodrigues, C; Victor, T C; Catanzaro, A; Rodwell, T C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays, with their ability to rapidly detect resistance-associated mutations in bacterial genes, are promising technologies to control the spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Sequencing assays provide detailed information for specific gene regions and can help diagnostic assay developers prioritize mutations for inclusion in their assays. We performed pyrosequencing of seven Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene regions (katG, inhA, ahpC, rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and eis) for 1,128 clinical specimens from India, Moldova, and South Africa. We determined the frequencies of each mutation among drug-resistant and -susceptible specimens based on phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results and examined mutation distributions by country. The most common mutation among isoniazid-resistant (INH(r)) specimens was the katG 315ACC mutation (87%). However, in the Eastern Cape, INH(r) specimens had a lower frequency of katG mutations (44%) and higher frequencies of inhA (47%) and ahpC (10%) promoter mutations. The most common mutation among rifampin-resistant (RIF(r)) specimens was the rpoB 531TTG mutation (80%). The mutation was common in RIF(r) specimens in Mumbai (83%) and Moldova (84%) but not the Eastern Cape (17%), where the 516GTC mutation appeared more frequently (57%). The most common mutation among fluoroquinolone-resistant specimens was the gyrA 94GGC mutation (44%). The rrs 1401G mutation was found in 84%, 84%, and 50% of amikacin-resistant, capreomycin-resistant, and kanamycin (KAN)-resistant (KAN(r)) specimens, respectively. The eis promoter mutation -12T was found in 26% of KAN(r) and 4% of KAN-susceptible (KAN(s)) specimens. Inclusion of the ahpC and eis promoter gene regions was critical for optimal test sensitivity for the detection of INH resistance in the Eastern Cape and KAN resistance in Moldova. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02170441.).

  5. Detection of low frequency multi-drug resistance and novel putative maribavir resistance in immunocompromised paediatric patients with cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed paediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analysed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54 and C480F (UL97. In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of eleven subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  6. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Margetts, Ben K.; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J.; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J. J.; Marks, Stephen D.; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1–27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27667983

  7. Extensively Drug-Resistant TB

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-16

    Dr. Charlotte Kvasnovsky, a surgery resident and Ph.D. candidate in biostatistics, discusses various types of drug resistance in TB patients in South Africa.  Created: 12/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/16/2016.

  8. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  9. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  10. Rifampin Drug Resistance Tests for Tuberculosis: Challenging the Gold Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Kya J. M.; Bola, Valentin; Lebeke, Rossin; Hossain, Mohamed Anwar; de Rijk, Willem Bram; Rigouts, Leen; Gumusboga, Aysel; Torrea, Gabriela; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of rifampin resistance is hampered by a reported insufficient specificity of molecular techniques for detection of rpoB mutations. Our objective for this study was to document the prevalence and prognostic value of rpoB mutations with unclear phenotypic resistance. The study design entailed sequencing directly from sputum of first failure or relapse patients without phenotypic selection and comparison of the standard retreatment regimen outcome, according to the mutation present. We found that among all rpoB mutations, the best-documented “disputed” rifampin resistance mutations (511Pro, 516Tyr, 526Asn, 526Leu, 533Pro, and 572Phe) made up 13.1% and 10.6% of all mutations in strains from Bangladesh and Kinshasa, respectively. Except for the 511Pro and 526Asn mutations, most of these strains with disputed mutations tested rifampin resistant in routine Löwenstein-Jensen medium proportion method drug susceptibility testing (DST; 78.7%), but significantly less than those with common, undisputed mutations (96.3%). With 63% of patients experiencing failure or relapse in both groups, there was no difference in outcome of first-line retreatment between patients carrying a strain with disputed versus common mutations. We conclude that rifampin resistance that is difficult to detect by the gold standard, phenotypic DST, is clinically and epidemiologically highly relevant. Sensitivity rather than specificity is imperfect with any rifampin DST method. Even at a low prevalence of rifampin resistance, a rifampin-resistant result issued by a competent laboratory may not warrant confirmation, although the absence of a necessity for confirmation needs to be confirmed for molecular results among new cases. However, a result of rifampin susceptibility should be questioned when suspicion is very high, and further DST using a different system (i.e., genotypic after phenotypic testing) would be fully justified. PMID:23761144

  11. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance mutations to rifampin and isoniazid by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristea A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of our study was to evaluate the use of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based technique for the prediction of phenotypic resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: We tested 67 M tuberculosis strains (26 drug resistant and 41 drug susceptible using a method recommended for the LightCycler platform. The susceptibility testing was performed by the absolute concentration method. For rifampin resistance, two regions of the rpoB gene were targeted, while for identification of isoniazid resistance, we searched for mutations in katG and inhA genes. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of this method for rapid detection of mutations for isoniazid resistance were 96% (95% CI: 88% to 100% and 95% (95% CI: 89% to 100%, respectively. For detection of rifampin resistance, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% (95% CI: 81% to 100% and 74% (95% CI: 61% to 87%, respectively. The main isoniazid resistance mechanism identified in our isolates is related to changes in the katG gene that encodes catalase. We found that for rifampin resistance the concordance between the predicted and observed phenotype was less than satisfactory. Conclusions: Using this method, the best accuracy for genotyping compared with phenotypic resistance testing was obtained for detecting isoniazid resistance mutations. Although real-time PCR assay may be a valuable diagnostic tool, it is not yet completely satisfactory for detection of drug resistance mutations in M tuberculosis.

  13. HIV-1 drug resistance among antiretroviral treatment-naïve Ethiopian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mulu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many African countries, access to antiretroviral treatment (ART has been significantly scaled up over the last five years. Nevertheless, data on drug resistance mutation are scarce. The objective of the current study was to determine the predominant subtypes of HIV-1 as well as to identify baseline mutations with potential drug resistance among ART-naïve patients from Ethiopia. Methods: Genotypic drug resistance on the entire protease and partial reverse transcriptase (codons 1–335 regions of the pol gene was determined by an in-house protocol in 160 ART-naïve patients. Genotypic drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more resistance-related mutations, as specified by the consensus of the Stanford University HIV drug resistance database (HIVDB available at http://hivdb.stanford.edu/ and the 2011 International AIDS Society (IAS mutation list (http://www.iasusa.org/resistance-mutations/. Results: A predominance of HIV-1 subtype C (98.7% was observed. According to the IAS mutation list, antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in 20 patients (13%. However, the level of drug resistance is 5.2% (8/155 when the most conservative method, HIVDB algorithms were applied. In both algorithms, none had major PI mutation and mutation-conferring resistance to NRTI and NNRTI were not overlapping. Conclusions: There is strong evidence for clade homogeneity in Ethiopia and low influx of other subtypes to the country. The level of transmitted drug resistance exceeds that of WHO estimates and indicates that many HIV-infected individuals on ART are practicing risk-related behaviours. The results also show that HIV drug resistance testing should be installed in resource limited settings.

  14. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  15. FabH Mutations Confer Resistance to FabF-Directed Antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Joshua B.; Yao, Jiangwei; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2014-01-01

    Delineating the mechanisms for genetically acquired antibiotic resistance is a robust approach to target validation and anticipates the evolution of clinical drug resistance. This study defines a spectrum of mutations in fabH that render Staphylococcus aureus resistant to multiple natural products known to inhibit the elongation condensing enzyme (FabF) of bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis. Twenty independently isolated clones resistant to platensimycin, platencin, or thiolactomycin were...

  16. High-throughput Detection of Drug-resistance Gene mutations in HBV Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry%应用MALDI-TOF-MS技术高通量检测乙肝病毒耐药基因变异

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周伯平; 张红梅; 李晓鹤; 袁静; 李巍; 徐六妹; 王火生; 陈心春; 丁春明

    2008-01-01

    目的 建立基于MALDI-TOF-MS技术的高通量检测乙型肝炎病毒耐药基因变异的临床检测方法 .方法 应用MassARRAY Assay Design软件设计iPLEX引物,按iPLEX反应的操作说明进行PCR扩增、SAP反应、引物延伸、脱盐、点样,MALDI-TOF-MS采集、分析iPLEX反应物的数据,判读基因变异位点.批量检测、分析138例HBV耐药包括拉米夫定、阿德福韦、恩替卡韦单药耐药及多重耐药的慢性乙型肝炎患者血清标本.并对MALDI-TOF-MS所检测的HBV基因变异位点所在区域进行DNA测序,与MALDI-TOF-MS检测结果 对比、分析.结果 建立了基于MALDI-TOF-MS技术的HBV基因突变检测平台,实现了临床血清标本的高通量检测.能一次获得138份标本的HBV基因突变临床检测结果 .MALDI-TOF-MS技术和DNA测序同时检测的33份标本中,有10份检测结果 不一致,其中有2份MALDI-TOF-MS技术未检测到,有1例出现2个检测位点不一致.结论 MALDI-TOF-MS技术灵敏度高、准确度高,可高通量、快速检测HBV基因变异,适用于HBV临床诊治及监测.%Objective To develop a high-throughput clinical method on drag-resistance gene mutations of HBV using MALDI-TOF-MS. Method Using MassArray Assay Design software designed the iPLEX primers and followed the iPLEX instruction for amplification, SAP reaction, primer extenction, desalination, dispensing, MALDI-TOF-MS screening and data analysis of the gene mutation locus. 138 serum samples of chronic HBV patients with single drug-resistance or multiple drug-resistance on Lamivudin, adefovi, Entecavir were detected. Result The HBV gene mutation platform was successfully developed and applied on the high-throughput dectection of clinical serum samples. It was also a high throughput assay which could be used to detect for more than 138 samples once. The MALDI-TOF-MS technology and the DNA sequencing simultaneously examine 33 samples, in which result of 10 sample is inconsistent, the including 2

  17. Quinolone resistance and gyr gene mutations in multi-drug resistant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis%耐多药结核分枝杆菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药性与gyr基因突变的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽丽; 夏强; 赵秀芹; 刘志广; 万康林

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析耐多药结核分枝杆菌(Multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis,MDR-TB)临床分离株的gyr基因突变特点,探讨MDR-TB对喹诺酮类药物耐药产生与gyr基因突变的关系.方法 采用比例法对耐多药结核临床分离菌株进行氧氟沙星的药物敏感性检测,应用DNA直接测序法检测MDR-TB的gyr基因突变情况.结果 125株MDR-TB临床分离株中,50株对喹诺酮类耐药,耐药率为40%.50株耐药菌株中,40株gyr基因发生突变:其中39株gyrA基因突变,突变率为78%,突变位点包括90,91和94位氨基酸;5株gyrB基因突变,其中4株合并gyrA基因突变,gyrB基因突变位点为500,506,534和539位氨基酸.结论 MDR-TB中的喹诺酮类药物耐药态势比较严峻,其对喹诺酮类药物耐药机制主要与gyrA基因突变有关.%In order ot analyze the characteristics of gyr gene mutations in clinical isolates from the patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and the relation between MDR-TB with quinolone resistance and gyr gene mutations,the susceptibility of the MDR-TB clinical isolates to quinolones was tested by the proportion method.Gyr gene mutations of MDR-TB strains were detected by direct DNA sequencing.The results showed that there were 50 strains with quinolone resistance in 125 MDR-TB clinical isolates.The quinolone resistance rate was 40%.There were 40 with gyr mutations in 50 MDRTB with quinolone resistance.Of 40 quinolone resistant MDR-TB with gyr mutations, 39 mutated at condon 90, 91 and 94 of gyrA gene with a mutation rate of 78%.For 5 gyrB mutatans, 4 were associated with gyrA gene mutations.The mutation sites of gyrB were at condon 500, 506, 534 and 539 of gyrB gene.This study shows that the situation of MDR-TB with quinolone resistance is very serious.The mechanism of quinolone resistance in MDR-TB is mainly in connection with the mutation of gyrA gene.

  18. De Novo Assembly of Human Herpes Virus Type 1 (HHV-1) Genome, Mining of Non-Canonical Structures and Detection of Novel Drug-Resistance Mutations Using Short- and Long-Read Next Generation Sequencing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitros, Timokratis; Harrison, Ian; Piorkowska, Renata; Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Mbisa, Jean Lutamyo

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus type 1 (HHV-1) has a large double-stranded DNA genome of approximately 152 kbp that is structurally complex and GC-rich. This makes the assembly of HHV-1 whole genomes from short-read sequencing data technically challenging. To improve the assembly of HHV-1 genomes we have employed a hybrid genome assembly protocol using data from two sequencing technologies: the short-read Roche 454 and the long-read Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencers. We sequenced 18 HHV-1 cell culture-isolated clinical specimens collected from immunocompromised patients undergoing antiviral therapy. The susceptibility of the samples to several antivirals was determined by plaque reduction assay. Hybrid genome assembly resulted in a decrease in the number of contigs in 6 out of 7 samples and an increase in N(G)50 and N(G)75 of all 7 samples sequenced by both technologies. The approach also enhanced the detection of non-canonical contigs including a rearrangement between the unique (UL) and repeat (T/IRL) sequence regions of one sample that was not detectable by assembly of 454 reads alone. We detected several known and novel resistance-associated mutations in UL23 and UL30 genes. Genome-wide genetic variability ranged from assembly of accurate, full-length HHV-1 genomes will be useful in determining genetic determinants of drug resistance, virulence, pathogenesis and viral evolution. The numerous, complex repeat regions of the HHV-1 genome currently remain a barrier towards this goal.

  19. Role of embCAB gene mutations in ethambutol resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadaun, G P S; Das, Ram; Upadhyay, Prashant; Chauhan, D S; Sharma, V D; Katoch, V M

    2009-05-01

    In the present study, ethambutol (EMB) resistance-associated mutations were characterised in the embCAB genes of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) collected in India. Thirty MTB isolates were tested for their susceptibility to first-line antitubercular drugs using the Löwenstein-Jensen proportion method, and EMB minimum inhibitory concentrations of MTB isolates were determined by the resazurin microtitre assay. Sequencing of various regions of the embCAB genes was performed to identify EMB resistance-associated mutations. Mutations of embB306 were detected in 15 of 23 EMB-resistant MTB isolates. Three EMB-resistant isolates had mutations at codon 270 of the embC gene, two of which also harboured embB306 mutations. No mutation was identified in the embA gene. All seven EMB-sensitive MTB isolates had the wild-type embCAB sequence. In summary, embB306 mutations were associated with EMB resistance, and mutation at codon 270 of the embC gene may contribute to high-level EMB resistance in some MTB isolates.

  20. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbuba Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Hasan, Mohammad Rubayet

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26437434

  2. Temporal interplay between efflux pumps and target mutations in development of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Swick, Michelle C; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Tam, Vincent H

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of resistance presents a debilitating change in the management of infectious diseases. Currently, the temporal relationship and interplay between various mechanisms of drug resistance are not well understood. A thorough understanding of the resistance development process is needed to facilitate rational design of countermeasure strategies. Using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model that simulates human drug treatment, we examined the appearance of efflux pump (acrAB) overexpression and target topoisomerase gene (gyrA and parC) mutations over time in the emergence of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. Drug-resistant isolates recovered early (24 h) had 2- to 8-fold elevation in the MIC due to acrAB overexpression, but no point mutations were noted. In contrast, high-level (≥ 64× MIC) resistant isolates with target site mutations (gyrA S83L with or without parC E84K) were selected more readily after 120 h, and regression of acrAB overexpression was observed at 240 h. Using a similar dosing selection pressure, the emergence of levofloxacin resistance was delayed in a strain with acrAB deleted compared to the isogenic parent. The role of efflux pumps in bacterial resistance development may have been underappreciated. Our data revealed the interplay between two mechanisms of quinolone resistance and provided a new mechanistic framework in the development of high-level resistance. Early low-level levofloxacin resistance conferred by acrAB overexpression preceded and facilitated high-level resistance development mediated by target site mutation(s). If this interpretation is correct, then these findings represent a paradigm shift in the way quinolone resistance is thought to develop.

  3. Temporal Interplay between Efflux Pumps and Target Mutations in Development of Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Swick, Michelle C.; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of resistance presents a debilitating change in the management of infectious diseases. Currently, the temporal relationship and interplay between various mechanisms of drug resistance are not well understood. A thorough understanding of the resistance development process is needed to facilitate rational design of countermeasure strategies. Using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model that simulates human drug treatment, we examined the appearance of efflux pump (acrAB) overexpression and target topoisomerase gene (gyrA and parC) mutations over time in the emergence of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. Drug-resistant isolates recovered early (24 h) had 2- to 8-fold elevation in the MIC due to acrAB overexpression, but no point mutations were noted. In contrast, high-level (≥64× MIC) resistant isolates with target site mutations (gyrA S83L with or without parC E84K) were selected more readily after 120 h, and regression of acrAB overexpression was observed at 240 h. Using a similar dosing selection pressure, the emergence of levofloxacin resistance was delayed in a strain with acrAB deleted compared to the isogenic parent. The role of efflux pumps in bacterial resistance development may have been underappreciated. Our data revealed the interplay between two mechanisms of quinolone resistance and provided a new mechanistic framework in the development of high-level resistance. Early low-level levofloxacin resistance conferred by acrAB overexpression preceded and facilitated high-level resistance development mediated by target site mutation(s). If this interpretation is correct, then these findings represent a paradigm shift in the way quinolone resistance is thought to develop. PMID:22232279

  4. Integration of published information into a resistance-associated mutation database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Hugh; Yamaguchi, Ken D; Cirillo, Daniela M; Miotto, Paolo; Schito, Marco; Posey, James; Starks, Angela M; Niemann, Stefan; Alland, David; Hanna, Debra; Aviles, Enrique; Perkins, Mark D; Dolinger, David L

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global public health challenge. Although incidence is decreasing, the proportion of drug-resistant cases is increasing. Technical and operational complexities prevent Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility phenotyping in the vast majority of new and retreatment cases. The advent of molecular technologies provides an opportunity to obtain results rapidly as compared to phenotypic culture. However, correlations between genetic mutations and resistance to multiple drugs have not been systematically evaluated. Molecular testing of M. tuberculosis sampled from a typical patient continues to provide a partial picture of drug resistance. A database of phenotypic and genotypic testing results, especially where prospectively collected, could document statistically significant associations and may reveal new, predictive molecular patterns. We examine the feasibility of integrating existing molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility data to identify associations observed across multiple studies and demonstrate potential for well-integrated M. tuberculosis mutation data to reveal actionable findings.

  5. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  6. Resensitization to Crizotinib by the Lorlatinib ALK Resistance Mutation L1198F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alice T; Friboulet, Luc; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Gainor, Justin F; Bergqvist, Simon; Brooun, Alexei; Burke, Benjamin J; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Dardaei, Leila; Frias, Rosa L; Schultz, Kate R; Logan, Jennifer; James, Leonard P; Smeal, Tod; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Iafrate, A John; Le, Long; McTigue, Michele; Getz, Gad; Johnson, Ted W; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-07

    In a patient who had metastatic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer, resistance to crizotinib developed because of a mutation in the ALK kinase domain. This mutation is predicted to result in a substitution of cysteine by tyrosine at amino acid residue 1156 (C1156Y). Her tumor did not respond to a second-generation ALK inhibitor, but it did respond to lorlatinib (PF-06463922), a third-generation inhibitor. When her tumor relapsed, sequencing of the resistant tumor revealed an ALK L1198F mutation in addition to the C1156Y mutation. The L1198F substitution confers resistance to lorlatinib through steric interference with drug binding. However, L1198F paradoxically enhances binding to crizotinib, negating the effect of C1156Y and resensitizing resistant cancers to crizotinib. The patient received crizotinib again, and her cancer-related symptoms and liver failure resolved. (Funded by Pfizer and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01970865.).

  7. Biophysical principles predict fitness landscapes of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João V; Bershtein, Shimon; Li, Anna; Lozovsky, Elena R; Hartl, Daniel L; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-03-15

    Fitness landscapes of drug resistance constitute powerful tools to elucidate mutational pathways of antibiotic escape. Here, we developed a predictive biophysics-based fitness landscape of trimethoprim (TMP) resistance for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We investigated the activity, binding, folding stability, and intracellular abundance for a complete set of combinatorial DHFR mutants made out of three key resistance mutations and extended this analysis to DHFR originated from Chlamydia muridarum and Listeria grayi We found that the acquisition of TMP resistance via decreased drug affinity is limited by a trade-off in catalytic efficiency. Protein stability is concurrently affected by the resistant mutants, which precludes a precise description of fitness from a single molecular trait. Application of the kinetic flux theory provided an accurate model to predict resistance phenotypes (IC50) quantitatively from a unique combination of the in vitro protein molecular properties. Further, we found that a controlled modulation of the GroEL/ES chaperonins and Lon protease levels affects the intracellular steady-state concentration of DHFR in a mutation-specific manner, whereas IC50 is changed proportionally, as indeed predicted by the model. This unveils a molecular rationale for the pleiotropic role of the protein quality control machinery on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, which, as we illustrate here, may drastically confound the evolutionary outcome. These results provide a comprehensive quantitative genotype-phenotype map for the essential enzyme that serves as an important target of antibiotic and anticancer therapies.

  8. Epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Mark E; Takhsha, Farnaz Sedigheh; Chirumamilla, Chandra Sekhar; Perez-Novo, Claudina; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Cuendet, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy, which remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Due to heterogeneity within the cancer cell microenvironment, cancer cell populations employ a dynamic survival strategy to chemotherapeutic treatments, which frequently results in a rapid acquisition of therapy resistance. Besides resistance-conferring genetic alterations within a tumor cell population selected during drug treatment, recent findings also reveal non-mutational mechanisms of drug resistance, involving a small population of "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) which are intrinsically more refractory to the effects of a variety of anticancer drugs. Other studies have implicated epigenetic mechanisms in reversible drug tolerance to protect the population from eradication by potentially lethal exposures, suggesting that acquired drug resistance does not necessarily require a stable heritable genetic alteration. Clonal evolution of MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. MM-CSCs may not be a static population and survive as phenotypically and functionally different cell types via the transition between stem-like and non-stem-like states in local microenvironments, as observed in other types of cancers. Targeting MM-CSCs is clinically relevant, and different approaches have been suggested to target molecular, metabolic and epigenetic signatures, and the self-renewal signaling characteristic of MM CSC-like cells. Here, we summarize epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

  9. Clinical implications of molecular drug resistance testing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a TBNET/RESIST-TB consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, J; Boettger, E C; Cirillo, D; Cobelens, F; Eisenach, K D; Gagneux, S; Hillemann, D; Horsburgh, R; Molina-Moya, B; Niemann, S; Tortoli, E; Whitelaw, A; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control. Although culture-based methods have been regarded as the gold standard for drug susceptibility testing (DST), molecular methods provide rapid information on mutations in the M. tuberculosis genome associated with resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. We ascertained consensus on the use of the results of molecular DST for clinical treatment decisions in TB patients. This document has been developed by TBNET and RESIST-TB groups to reach a consensus about reporting standards in the clinical use of molecular DST results. Review of the available literature and the search for evidence included hand-searching journals and searching electronic databases. The panel identified single nucleotide mutations in genomic regions of M. tuberculosis coding for katG, inhA, rpoB, embB, rrs, rpsL and gyrA that are likely related to drug resistance in vivo. Identification of any of these mutations in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis has implications for the management of TB patients, pending the results of in vitro DST. However, false-positive and false-negative results in detecting resistance-associated mutations in drugs for which there is poor or unproven correlation between phenotypic and clinical drug resistance complicate the interpretation. Reports of molecular DST results should therefore include specific information on the mutations identified and provide guidance for clinicians on interpretation and on the choice of the appropriate initial drug regimen.

  10. Long-term foscarnet therapy remodels thymidine analogue mutations and alters resistance to zidovudine and lamivudine in HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Sofie; Dam, Elisabeth; Roge, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the evolution of multi-drug-resistant HIV-1 in treatment-experienced patients receiving foscarnet (PFA) as part of salvage therapy and to investigate the virological consequences of emerging mutations. METHODS: Genotypic and phenotypic resistance tests were performed on plasma...... viruses from seven patients at baseline and during treatment with PFA. The phenotypic effects of mutations suspected to be associated with PFA resistance were evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis of wild-type or thymidine analogue mutations (TAM)-carrying pNL4-3. Reversion of single mutations...... was performed in a patient-derived recombinant clone. RESULTS: Baseline multi-drug-resistant isolates exhibited hypersusceptibility to PFA. In two patients who received > 12 months of PFA treatment, a novel mutation pattern including K70G, V75T, K219R and L228R emerged. These viruses had 3-6-fold resistance...

  11. Understanding Amino Acid Mutations in Hepatitis B Virus Proteins for Rational Design of Vaccines and Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ke; Shen, Li; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Zhi; Shen, Bairong

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome encodes four proteins, i.e., DNA polymerase, surface protein, X, and core proteins. HBV undergoes different selective pressures for drug resistance and immune/vaccine escape and mutations are common for the HBV proteins. We here collected all the reported amino acid mutations happened in these four HBV proteins and studied their patterns. The relationship between the mutations and epitopic functions are investigated with bioinformatics tools, based on their sequence information. Some interesting results are observed for the mutation patterns, such as we found the serine and threonine are both for frequently mutated residues and mutant residues, while the tryptophan and methionine have low mutability. The results provide important information for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of virus evolution and therefore will facilitate the future rational design of HBV vaccines or drugs.

  12. Rational drug design approach for overcoming drug resistance: application to pyrimethamine resistance in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKie, J H; Douglas, K T; Chan, C; Roser, S A; Yates, R; Read, M; Hyde, J E; Dascombe, M J; Yuthavong, Y; Sirawaraporn, W

    1998-04-23

    Pyrimethamine acts by selectively inhibiting malarial dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS). Resistance in the most important human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, initially results from an S108N mutation in the DHFR domain, with additional mutation (most commonly C59R or N51I or both) imparting much greater resistance. From a homology model of the 3-D structure of DHFR-TS, rational drug design techniques have been used to design and subsequently synthesize inhibitors able to overcome malarial pyrimethamine resistance. Compared to pyrimethamine (Ki 1.5 nM) with purified recombinant DHFR fromP. falciparum, the Ki value of the m-methoxy analogue of pyrimethamine was 1.07 nM, but against the DHFR bearing the double mutation (C59R + S108N), the Ki values for pyrimethamine and the m-methoxy analogue were 71.7 and 14.0 nM, respectively. The m-chloro analogue of pyrimethamine was a stronger inhibitor of both wild-type DHFR (with Ki 0.30 nM) and the doubly mutant (C59R +S108N) purified enzyme (with Ki 2.40 nM). Growth of parasite cultures of P. falciparum in vitro was also strongly inhibited by these compounds with 50% inhibition of growth occurring at 3.7 microM for the m-methoxy and 0.6 microM for the m-chloro compounds with the K1 parasite line bearing the double mutation (S108N + C59R), compared to 10.2 microM for pyrimethamine. These inhibitors were also found in preliminary studies to retain antimalarial activity in vivo in P. berghei-infected mice.

  13. Absence of primary integrase resistance mutations in HIV type 1-infected patients in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Héctor R; Garzaro, Domingo; Fabbro, Rona; Martinez, Nahir; Ossenkop, John; Torres, Jaime R; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Pujol, Flor H

    2010-08-01

    The preexistence of mutations to integrase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected Venezuelan patients was evaluated. The integrase region of the HIV-1 genome was amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced in 57 isolates from both naive (n = 24) and treated patients who received protease and/or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (PI and RTI, n = 33), but were never exposed to integrase inhibitors. Only one primary integrase resistance mutation, not conferring drug resistance by itself, was found among these patients, although several minor viral mutations, equally distributed among naive and PI- and RTI-treated patients, were also found. In the limited number of samples, no relation was found among the presence of resistance mutations to PI or RTI and the presence of minor mutations to integrase. The absence of resistance to integrase inhibitors may be related to the recent introduction of these drugs in our country. The availability of in-house assays allows for a more comprehensive surveillance of drug resistance to integrase inhibitors in Venezuela.

  14. Characterization of mutations in streptomycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Sichuan, China and the association between Beijing-lineage and dual-mutation in gidB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Honghu; Zhang, Congcong; Xiang, Ling; Pi, Rui; Guo, Zhen; Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Zhao, Yuding; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Rastogi, Nalin; Li, Yuqing; Sun, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in rpsL, rrs, and gidB are well linked to streptomycin (STR) resistance, some of which are suggested to be potentially associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypic lineages in certain geographic regions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mutation characteristics of streptomycin resistance and the relationship between the polymorphism of drug-resistant genes and the lineage of M. tuberculosis isolates in Sichuan, China. A total of 227 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, including 180 STR-resistant and 47 pan-susceptible isolates, were analyzed for presence of mutations in the rpsL, rrs and gidB loci. Mutation K43R in rpsL was strongly associated with high-level streptomycin resistance (P mutations in rrs and gidB potentially contributed to low-level resistance (P genotype, however, in STR-resistant strains, Beijing genotype was significantly correlated with high-level STR resistance, as well as the rpsL mutation K43R (P genotype has an evolutionary advantage under streptomycin pressure. Notably, in all isolates of Beijing genotype, a dual mutation E92D (a276c) and A205A (a615g) in gidB was detected, suggesting a highly significant association between this dual mutation and Beijing genotype.

  15. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  16. Leprosy Drug Resistance Surveillance in Colombia: The Experience of a Sentinel Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Alzate, Camilo; López Díaz, Fernando; Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Sakamuri, Rama; Li, Wei; Kimura, Miyako; Brennan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    An active search for Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance was carried out, 243 multibacillary patients from endemic regions of Colombia were included from 2004 to 2013 in a surveillance program. This program was a World Health Organization initiative for drug resistance surveillance in leprosy, where Colombia is a sentinel country. M. leprae DNA from slit skin smear and/or skin biopsy samples was amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the drug resistance determining region (DRDR) in rpoB, folP1, gyrA, and gyrB, the genes responsible for rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin drug-resistance, respectively. Three isolates exhibited mutations in the DRDR rpoB gene (Asp441Tyr, Ser456Leu, Ser458Met), two in the DRDR folP1 gene (Thr53Ala, Pro55Leu), and one isolate exhibited mutations in both DRDR rpoB (Ser456Met) and DRDR folP1 (Pro55Leu), suggesting multidrug resistance. One isolate had a double mutation in folP1 (Thr53Ala and Thr88Pro). Also, we detected mutations outside of DRDR that required in vivo evaluation of their association or not with drug resistance: rpoB Arg505Trp, folP1 Asp91His, Arg94Trp, and Thr88Pro, and gyrA Ala107Leu. Seventy percent of M. leprae mutations were related to drug resistance and were isolated from relapsed patients; the likelihood of relapse was significantly associated with the presence of confirmed resistance mutations (OR range 20.1–88.7, p < 0.05). Five of these relapsed patients received dapsone monotherapy as a primary treatment. In summary, the current study calls attention to M. leprae resistance in Colombia, especially the significant association between confirmed resistance mutations and relapse in leprosy patients. A high frequency of DRDR mutations for rifampicin was seen in a region where dapsone monotherapy was used extensively. PMID:27706165

  17. Overcoming mTOR resistance mutations with a new-generation mTOR inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrik-Outmezguine, Vanessa S; Okaniwa, Masanori; Yao, Zhan; Novotny, Chris J; McWhirter, Claire; Banaji, Arpitha; Won, Helen; Wong, Wai; Berger, Mike; de Stanchina, Elisa; Barratt, Derek G; Cosulich, Sabina; Klinowska, Teresa; Rosen, Neal; Shokat, Kevan M

    2016-06-09

    Precision medicines exert selective pressure on tumour cells that leads to the preferential growth of resistant subpopulations, necessitating the development of next-generation therapies to treat the evolving cancer. The PIK3CA-AKT-mTOR pathway is one of the most commonly activated pathways in human cancers, which has led to the development of small-molecule inhibitors that target various nodes in the pathway. Among these agents, first-generation mTOR inhibitors (rapalogs) have caused responses in 'N-of-1' cases, and second-generation mTOR kinase inhibitors (TORKi) are currently in clinical trials. Here we sought to delineate the likely resistance mechanisms to existing mTOR inhibitors in human cell lines, as a guide for next-generation therapies. The mechanism of resistance to the TORKi was unusual in that intrinsic kinase activity of mTOR was increased, rather than a direct active-site mutation interfering with drug binding. Indeed, identical drug-resistant mutations have been also identified in drug-naive patients, suggesting that tumours with activating MTOR mutations will be intrinsically resistant to second-generation mTOR inhibitors. We report the development of a new class of mTOR inhibitors that overcomes resistance to existing first- and second-generation inhibitors. The third-generation mTOR inhibitor exploits the unique juxtaposition of two drug-binding pockets to create a bivalent interaction that allows inhibition of these resistant mutants.

  18. Mutation pattern in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its association with multidrug-resistant isolates from Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sachdev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in PenA, PorB, MtrE and MtrR genes responsible for antimicrobial resistance were checked in 27 drug-resistant clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG. Phenotype PIB (88.88% and mutation at G120 and A121 positions of porB were recurrent. N122K, a novel mutation, was observed in PorB in three resistant isolates. Substitution H105Y in MtrR was widespread (37% of clinical isolates. The presence of a novel mutation (L33V, along with G45D mutation in MtrR, was associated with less-resistant isolates, in contrast to isolates with G45D mutation alone. African-type penicillinase-producing NG plasmid was observed most frequently (17/27 in penicillin-resistant isolates.

  19. Predictive Power of ETRE Polymorphism and Katg463 Mutation to INH-Resistance of M.tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The MIRU-VNTR polymorphism and katG463 mutation are used to genotype the mycobacterium tuberculosis, but the correlation between them and INH-resistance were unknown. This study was aimed to explore whether ETRE polymorphism and katG463 mutation could predict the INH-resistance, and the relationship between ETRE polymorphism and katG463 mutation. Methods: The ETRE, katG463 mutation and drug resistance information of 109 M. tuberculosis strains were collected from online public dat...

  20. The action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in intrinsic drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; JIA Wen-xiang; ZENG Wei; YANG Wei-qing; CHENG Xi; LI Xue-ru; WANG Lan-lan; KANG Mei; ZHANG Zai-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in studying the relationship between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance to drugs. However, the relationship still remains unclear in the macroscopic bacterial growth. Our study is to illuminate the change of bacterial drug resistance of gyrA mutant and active efflux pump during the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms. Methods The strains of type Ⅱ topoisomerase gene mutant (gyrA mutant) and multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump were clinical isolates and detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The process of bacterial biofilms development was observed by scanning electron microscope. Triparental mating experiments were performed to transfer report gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into P. aeruginosa biofilms strains and followed by analysis of bacterial survival rate between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance.Results The fluorescent strains with pGFPuv could develop mature biofilms on Teflon surface. Before a period of 72 hours, the survival rate of biofilms bacteria and intrinsic resistance strains in ciprofloxacin solution was significantly different (P0.05). The carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and azithromycin could significantly reduce the drug resistance of biofilm strains and efflux pump strains.Conclusions In the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms, the strains of gyrA mutation and MDR efflux could be conferred with new level of drug resistance. When co-cultured mutated strains with biofilm strains, biofilms may play a major role in bacterial resistance. But after 72 hours incubation (a mature biofilms had been developed), there was no clearly difference between the number of mutant strains and biofilm strains.

  1. Mutations of the multi-drug resistance-associated protein ABC transporter gene 5 result in reduction of phytic acid in rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiu-Hong; Zhao, Hai-Jun; Liu, Qing-Long; Frank, Thomas; Engel, Karl-Heinz; An, Gynheung; Shu, Qing-Yao

    2009-06-01

    Phytic acid (PA, myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate) is important to the nutritional quality of cereal and legume seeds. PA and its salts with micronutrient cations, such as iron and zinc, cannot be digested by humans and non-ruminant animals, and hence may affect food/feed nutritional value and cause P pollution of groundwater from animal waste. We previously developed a set of low phytic acid (LPA) rice mutant lines with the aim of increasing the nutritional quality of rice. Two of these lines, Os-lpa-XS110-2 (homozygous non-lethal) Os-lpa-XS110-3 (homozygous lethal), contain two mutant alleles of a LPA gene (hereafter XS-lpa2-1 and XS-lpa2-2, respectively). In this study, we mapped the XS-lpa2-1 gene to a region on chromosome 3 between microsatellite markers RM14360 and RM1332, where the rice orthologue (OsMRP5) of the maize lpa1 gene is located. Sequence analysis of the OsMRP5 gene revealed a single base pair change (C/G-T/A transition) in the sixth exon of XS-lpa2-1 and a 5-bp deletion in the first exon of XS-lpa2-2. OsMRP5 is expressed in both vegetative tissues and developing seeds, and the two mutations do not change the level of RNA transcription. A T-DNA insertion line, 4A-02500, in which OsMRP5 was disrupted, also showed the same high inorganic phosphorus phenotype as Os-lpa-XS110-3 and appeared to be homozygous lethal. PA is significantly reduced in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (~20%) and in 4A-02500 (~90%) seeds compared with their wild type lines, and no PA was detected in Os-lpa-XS110-3 using HPLC analysis. This evidence indicates that the OsMRP5 gene plays an important role in PA metabolism in rice seeds.

  2. Smoothened (SMO) receptor mutations dictate resistance to vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricl, Sabrina; Cortelazzi, Barbara; Dal Col, Valentina; Marson, Domenico; Laurini, Erik; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Bossi, Paolo; Perrone, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and a subset of medulloblastomas are characterized by loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, PTCH1. PTCH1 normally functions by repressing the activity of the Smoothened (SMO) receptor. Inactivating PTCH1 mutations result in constitutive Hedgehog pathway activity through uncontrolled SMO signaling. Targeting this pathway with vismodegib, a novel SMO inhibitor, results in impressive tumor regression in patients harboring genetic defects in this pathway. However, a secondary mutation in SMO has been reported in medulloblastoma patients following relapse on vismodegib to date. This mutation preserves pathway activity, but appears to confer resistance by interfering with drug binding. Here we report for the first time on the molecular mechanisms of resistance to vismodegib in two BCC cases. The first case, showing progression after 2 months of continuous vismodegib (primary resistance), exhibited the new SMO G497W mutation. The second case, showing a complete clinical response after 5 months of treatment and a subsequent progression after 11 months on vismodegib (secondary resistance), exhibited a PTCH1 nonsense mutation in both the pre- and the post-treatment specimens, and the SMO D473Y mutation in the post-treatment specimens only. In silico analysis demonstrated that SMO(G497W) undergoes a conformational rearrangement resulting in a partial obstruction of the protein drug entry site, whereas the SMO D473Y mutation induces a direct effect on the binding site geometry leading to a total disruption of a stabilizing hydrogen bond network. Thus, the G497W and D473Y SMO mutations may represent two different mechanisms leading to primary and secondary resistance to vismodegib, respectively.

  3. Predictive value of molecular drug resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Valle del Cauca, Colombia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, B.E.; Garcia, P.K.; Nieto, L.M.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Previous evaluations of the molecular GenoType tests have promoted their use to detect resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs in different geographical regions. However, there are known geographic variations in the mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium

  4. Patterns of transmitted HIV drug resistance in Europe vary by risk group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Frentz (Dineke); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); A.B. Abecasis (Ana ); J. Albert (Jan); O. Hamouda (Osamah); L.B. Jørgensen (Louise); C. Kücherer (Claudia); D. Struck (Daniel); J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); B. Åsjö (Birgitta); C. Balotta (Claudia); P. Bergin; D. Beshkov (Danail); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); A. Griskevicius (Algis); Z. Grossman (Zehava); A. Horban (Andrzej); T. Kolupajeva (Tatjana); K. Korn (Klaus); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); K.L.M. Linka (Kirsi Liitsola Marek); C. Nielsen (Claus); D. Otelea (Dan); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Poljak (Mario); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); A. Sonnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); M. Stanojevic (Maja); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); C.A. Boucher (Charles); A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In Europe, a continuous programme (SPREAD) has been in place for ten years to study transmission of drug resistant HIV. We analysed time trends of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) in relation to the risk behaviour reported. Methods: HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed

  5. New Drugs and Drug Resistance in Malaria: Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-26

    heterologous expressions system in yeast for potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly...medication yet the world faces a crisis-drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the US Military. In a short time there may be parts of the world where no effective

  6. Association between prevalence of pyrimethamine resistance and double mutation in pfdhfr gene in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Das

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find whether antifolate drug (pyrimethamine resistance has occurred in the two malaria endemic zones (Kolkata and Purulia of West Bengal, India. Methods: Parasitic bloods were collected from patients of Kolkata and Purulia, in vitro susceptibility test were performed in those 90 isolates. Now parasitic DNA was isolated by phenol chloroform extraction method and then polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of different codons of pfdhfr gene (51, 59, and 108 were assessed in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from patients in India. Results: Among 45 isolates from Kolkata dhfr mutant isolates at codons 108, 51 and 59 were found in 71.11 %, 100% and 15.55% isolates respectively while in Purulia mutation found in those codons were 42.22%, 57.77% and 0%, respectively. In Kolkata, the isolate having double mutation (N108 + 51I were resistant to pyrimethamine (P < 0.01 whereas in Purulia N108 mutation is occurred with both mixed and mutant 51I mutation. Conclusions: Our present findings implicate that due to enormous drug (pyrimethamine pressure double mutation with dhfr S108N/T and N51I was highly correlated (P < 0.01 with in vitro pyrimethamine resistance in two malaria endemic region of West Bengal. The increase in the number of dhfr mutations was strongly correlated to resistance to pyrimethamine.

  7. Imatinib resistance mutation analysis: experience from a tertiary oncology center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallekavu Suresh Babu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD mutations account for 50-90% of the imatinib resistance observed in patients of CML-chronic phase. In CML-CP patients receiving imatinib first-line, mutation analysis is recommended in case of failure or suboptimal response using European LeukemiaNet (ELN criteria. The present study was carried out at a tertiary oncology centre in south India to assess which mutations accounted for resistance to imatinib among patients of chronic phase CML being treated with imatinib.Methods: This was a retrospective observational study. We analyzed patients who were tested for imatinib resistance mutation in view of suboptimal responses while on imatinib or imatinib failure. Direct sequencing of the BCR-ABL transcript by the Sanger method was used for IRMA testing.Results: Out of 120 tested for IRMA, 36 (30% had detectable mutations. We observed a higher frequency of mutations at amino acids T315, F359 and M351T.Conclusions: Among the patients who were tested for imatinib resistance mutation in view of suboptimal responses while on imatinib or imatinib failure, 30% had IRMA +ve mutations. The high incidence of imatinib resistance in present study may be attributed to the fact that our patients were given higher dose of imatinib (600 mg, if they failed to achieve CCyR at 12 months or CHR at 3 months as they could not afford second generation TKIs.

  8. Acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinomas to gefitinib or erlotinib is associated with a second mutation in the EGFR kinase domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pao

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa or erlotinib (Tarceva usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of "acquired" resistance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec. CONCLUSION: In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers.

  9. Update on HIV-1 acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Lihana, Raphael W; Ugoji, Chinenye; Abimiku, Alash'le; Nkengasong, John; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed a significant scale-up and access to antiretroviral therapy in Africa, which has improved patient quality of life and survival. One major challenge associated with increased access to antiretroviral therapy is the development of antiretroviral resistance due to inconsistent drug supply and/or poor patient adherence. We review the current state of both acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa over the past ten years (2001-2011) to identify drug resistance associated with the different drug regimens used on the continent and to help guide affordable strategies for drug resistance surveillance. A total of 161 references (153 articles, six reports and two conference abstracts) were reviewed. Antiretroviral resistance data was available for 40 of 53 African countries. A total of 5,541 adult patients from 99 studies in Africa were included in this analysis. The pooled prevalence of drug resistance mutations in Africa was 10.6%, and Central Africa had the highest prevalence of 54.9%. The highest prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations was in the west (55.3%) and central (54.8%) areas; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were highest in East Africa (57.0%) and protease inhibitors mutations highest in Southern Africa (16.3%). The major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation in all four African regions was M184V. Major nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as well as protease inhibitor mutations varied by region. The prevalence of drug resistance has remained low in several African countries although the emergence of drug resistance mutations varied across countries. Continued surveillance of antiretroviral therapy resistance remains crucial in gauging the effectiveness of country antiretroviral therapy programs and strategizing on effective and affordable strategies for successful treatment.

  10. Somatic Mutations in PI3Kalpha: Structural Basis for Enzyme Activation and Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Gabelli; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  11. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  12. Strategies to overcome antineoplastic drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirkel, GA

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on various strategies to deal with cancer drug resistance and improve treatment efficacy. Technological advances have enabled researchers to gain more insight in the immense molecular complexity of cancer and mechanisms of drug resistance. The ability to measure cancer-related

  13. Molecular surveillance of drug resistance through imported isolates of Plasmodium falciparum in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelinek, Tomas; Peyerl-Hoffmann, Gabriele; Mühlberger, Nikolai;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from numerous studies point convincingly to correlations between mutations at selected genes and phenotypic resistance to antimalarials in Plasmodium falciparum isolates. In order to move molecular assays for point mutations on resistance-related genes into the realm of applied...... tools for surveillance, we investigated a selection of P. falciparum isolates that were imported during the year 2001 into Europe to study the prevalence of resistance-associated point mutations at relevant codons. In particular, we tested for parasites which were developing resistance to antifolates...... and chloroquine. The screening results were used to map the prevalence of mutations and, thus, levels of potential drug resistance in endemic areas world-wide. RESULTS: 337 isolates have been tested so far. Prevalence of mutations that are associated with resistance to chloroquine on the pfcrt and pfmdr genes...

  14. 乙肝基因分型与耐药位点突变的关系%The relation between the genotypes and the mutated drug-resisting position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚佩英; 俞岳峰; 杨文波; 岳美娜; 杨雨

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the HBV - multiplicated patients and To investigate the relation between the genotypes and the anti - virus. Methods: The 45 samples were determined the genotypes by nested PCR with multiplex pairs of genotype - specific primer and analyzed the mutations of the hepatitis B virus on the HBV drug resistance. Results: Of the 45 patients with chronic hepatitis B,7( 15.56% ) were genotype B ,and 34 (75.56%) were genotype C ,3 (6.67 % ) were not genotyped , 1 (2.22%) genotype B + C. The other genotypes were not found. The mean value of serum HBV DNA in the genotype C was 5.67 ± 1.61 ( 1oglncopies/ml ) those of in the genotype B was 4.42 ± 1.39, those in the ungenotyped was 2.65 ± 0.57, those in the genotype B + C was 5.54 ( only one) . The patients with the genotype C are the highest and the mutated drug -resisting position are much more than the other's. Condusion: It is main among the patients with the genotype B and The genotype C in the Zhejiang ,there are the best cured result with anti - virus in those with the genotype B ,otherwise, there are the worse cured result.%目的:检测本地区乙肝病毒复制病人中基因型分布情况,探讨HBV基因型与抗病毒疗效关系.方法:应用乙肝病毒型特异性引物采用巢式PCR方法,对45例HBV-DNA阳性患者进行HBV基因型分析,用DNA测序方法检测耐药位点突变.结果:B型7例,占15.56%;C型34例,占75.56%;未分型3例,占6.67%;B+C混合型1例,占2.22%.未发现其他型别.C型病人人均病毒载量5.67±1.61(loglncopies/ml)较B+C混合型5.54(只有1例)、B型(4.42±1.39)及未分型(2.65±0.57)高.C型病人耐药变异位点多,病人比例高.结论:浙江等地区HBV-DNA基因分型以C、B为主,而B基因型抗病毒治疗疗效最好,C型、混合型及其它型对抗病毒治疗药物疗效较差.

  15. Development of elvitegravir resistance and linkage of integrase inhibitor mutations with protease and reverse transcriptase resistance mutations.

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    Mark A Winters

    Full Text Available Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG and raltegravir (RAL can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point. Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48 typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs.

  16. Acquisition of drug resistance and dependence by prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Weissmann, Charles

    2013-02-01

    We have reported that properties of prion strains may change when propagated in different environments. For example, when swainsonine-sensitive 22L prions were propagated in PK1 cells in the presence of swainsonine, drug-resistant variants emerged. We proposed that prions constitute quasi- populations comprising a range of variants with different properties, from which the fittest are selected in a particular environment. Prion populations developed heterogeneity even after biological cloning, indicating that during propagation mutation-like processes occur at the conformational level. Because brain-derived 22L prions are naturally swainsonine resistant, it was not too surprising that prions which had become swa sensitive after propagation in cells could revert to drug resistance. Because RML prions, both after propagation in brain or in PK1 cells, are swainsonine sensitive, we investigated whether it was nonetheless possible to select swainsonine-resistant variants by propagation in the presence of the drug. Interestingly, this was not possible with the standard line of PK1 cells, but in certain PK1 sublines not only swainsonine-resistant, but even swainsonine-dependent populations (i.e. that propagated more rapidly in the presence of the drug) could be isolated. Once established, they could be passaged indefinitely in PK1 cells, even in the absence of the drug, without losing swainsonine dependence. The misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) associated with a swainsonine-dependent variant was less rapidly cleared in PK1 cells than that associated with its drug-sensitive counterpart, indicating that likely structural differences of the misfolded PrP underlie the properties of the prions. In summary, propagation of prions in the presence of an inhibitory drug may not only cause the selection of drug-resistant prions but even of stable variants that propagate more efficiently in the presence of the drug. These adaptations are most likely due to conformational changes of

  17. Mycobacteria tuberculosis stre ptomycin resistant isolatesrrs gene mutation and its drug resistance levelcorrelation studies%结核分枝杆菌链霉素耐药临床分离株 rrs基因突变与其耐药水平相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈高瞻; 芦莲; 雷航; 马峻; 孙战强; 孙庆文; 余晓丽; 张舒林

    2014-01-01

    研究武汉地区耐链霉素( SM)结核分枝杆菌的耐药分子机制,进一步研究阐明rrs基因突变与结核分枝杆菌耐链霉素的关系;同时探究武汉地区结核分枝杆菌“北京基因型”菌株的流行趋势,为进一步研究武汉地区耐链霉素菌株rrs基因突变与“北京基因型”的相关性奠定基础。84株结核分枝杆菌中,44株对链霉素耐药,20株耐其它药物,20株对链霉素敏感,采用PCR直接测序法分析链霉素菌株rrs基因突变情况;采用RD105缺失法鉴定84株临床分离菌株中“北京基因型”菌株。结果显示44株SM耐药菌株中,16(36.4%)株检测到rrs基因突变,其中9株1401位点A→G,6株514位点A→C突变,1株1487位点G→A突变;20株耐其它药菌株中1401位点A→G和514位点A→C突变各1株,20株敏感菌株中发现1株1029位点C→T点突变;84株临床分离菌株中有77(91.8%)株“北京基因型”菌株,7株非“北京基因型”菌株。研究表明链霉素耐药菌株rrs基因主要突变位点在514和1401位点,武汉地区“北京基因型”菌株为当地流行的结核分枝杆菌,且SM耐药菌株中突变菌株93.8%(15/16)为“北京基因型”,“北京基因型”菌株研究及其鉴定是有其科学价值的,值得我们重视。%The research aims to explore the molecular mechanism of drug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis re-sistance to SM in Wuhan area , and elucidate the relationship between rrs gene mutation and mycobacterium tuber-culosis resistance to streptomycin;at the same time to reveal the transmission of Beijing genotype strains of myco-bacterium tuberculosis in Wuhan , and lay foundation for futher study in the correlation between rrsgene mutation and Beijing genotype in SM-resistant clinical isolates .84 strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis were obtained , of which44 were resistant to SM ,20 were resistant to other drugs , 20 were SM

  18. Predictive Power of ETRE Polymorphism and Katg463 Mutation to INH-Resistance of M.tuberculosis.

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    Yu-Feng Wen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The MIRU-VNTR polymorphism and katG463 mutation are used to genotype the mycobacterium tuberculosis, but the correlation between them and INH-resistance were unknown. This study was aimed to explore whether ETRE polymorphism and katG463 mutation could predict the INH-resistance, and the relationship between ETRE polymorphism and katG463 mutation.The ETRE, katG463 mutation and drug resistance information of 109 M. tuberculosis strains were collected from online public database. We constructed the predictive diagnostic tool of ETRE polymorphism and katG463 mutation. Chi-square test was used to analyze the relationship between ETRE polymorphism, katG463 mutation and INH-resistance. ROC curve analysis and Z-test were used to evaluate the predictive ability of ETRE and katG463. The relationship between ETRE polymorphism and katG463 mutation was analyzed with Spearman correlation analysis.The mutation rate of katG463 was 27.50%, and the h value of ETRE polymorphism was 0.67. KatG463 mutation was associated with INH resistance (OR=3.72. The INH drug resistance rate in VNTR≧5 group was 3.43 times higher than that in VNTR≦3 group (χ(2 =24.77, P<0.01, and there was no significant difference of INH resistance between the VNTR=4 group and VNTR≦3 group. The areas under the ROC curve of two loci prediction diagnostic tools were 0.64 and 0.70 respectively. The katG463 mutation was significantly related to the ETRE polymorphism (r=0.79, P<0.01.Both katG463 mutation and the ETRE polymorphism can predict the INH-resistance of tuberculosis. The katG463 mutation was associated with ETRE VNTR polymorphism.

  19. A Quantitative Model to Estimate Drug Resistance in Pathogens

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    Frazier N. Baker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP is an opportunistic infection that occurs in humans and other mammals with debilitated immune systems. These infections are caused by fungi in the genus Pneumocystis, which are not susceptible to standard antifungal agents. Despite decades of research and drug development, the primary treatment and prophylaxis for PCP remains a combination of trimethoprim (TMP and sulfamethoxazole (SMX that targets two enzymes in folic acid biosynthesis, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS, respectively. There is growing evidence of emerging resistance by Pneumocystis jirovecii (the species that infects humans to TMP-SMX associated with mutations in the targeted enzymes. In the present study, we report the development of an accurate quantitative model to predict changes in the binding affinity of inhibitors (Ki, IC50 to the mutated proteins. The model is based on evolutionary information and amino acid covariance analysis. Predicted changes in binding affinity upon mutations highly correlate with the experimentally measured data. While trained on Pneumocystis jirovecii DHFR/TMP data, the model shows similar or better performance when evaluated on the resistance data for a different inhibitor of PjDFHR, another drug/target pair (PjDHPS/SMX and another organism (Staphylococcus aureus DHFR/TMP. Therefore, we anticipate that the developed prediction model will be useful in the evaluation of possible resistance of the newly sequenced variants of the pathogen and can be extended to other drug targets and organisms.

  20. Src mutation induces acquired lapatinib resistance in ERBB2-amplified human gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma models.

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    Yong Sang Hong

    Full Text Available ERBB2-directed therapy is now a routine component of therapy for ERBB2-amplified metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. However, there is little knowledge of the mechanisms by which these tumors develop acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition. To investigate this question we sought to characterize cell line models of ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma with acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition. We generated lapatinib-resistant (LR subclones from an initially lapatinib-sensitive ERBB2-amplified esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line, OE19. We subsequently performed genomic characterization and functional analyses of resistant subclones with acquired lapatinib resistance. We identified a novel, acquired SrcE527K mutation in a subset of LR OE19 subclones. Cells with this mutant allele harbour increased Src phosphorylation. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of Src resensitized these subclones to lapatinib. Biochemically, Src mutations could activate both the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in the lapatinib-treated LR OE19 cells. Ectopic expression of SrcE527K mutation also was sufficient to induce lapatinib resistance in drug-naïve cells. These results indicate that pathologic activation of Src is a potential mechanism of acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition in ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal cancer. Although Src mutation has not been described in primary tumor samples, we propose that the Src hyperactivation should be investigated in the settings of acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition in esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma.

  1. Drugs that target pathogen public goods are robust against evolved drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, John W

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen drug resistance is a central problem in medicine and public health. It arises through somatic evolution, by mutation and selection among pathogen cells within a host. Here, we examine the hypothesis that evolution of drug resistance could be reduced by developing drugs that target the secreted metabolites produced by pathogen cells instead of directly targeting the cells themselves. Using an agent-based computational model of an evolving population of pathogen cells, we test this hypothesis and find support for it. We also use our model to explain this effect within the framework of standard evolutionary theory. We find that in our model, the drugs most robust against evolved drug resistance are those that target the most widely shared external products, or 'public goods', of pathogen cells. We also show that these drugs exert a weak selective pressure for resistance because they create only a weak correlation between drug resistance and cell fitness. The same principles apply to design of vaccines that are robust against vaccine escape. Because our theoretical results have crucial practical implications, they should be tested by empirical experiments.

  2. Influenza A virus hemagglutinin antibody escape promotes neuraminidase antigenic variation and drug resistance.

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    Scott E Hensley

    Full Text Available Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV neuraminidase (NA are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature.

  3. A molecular dynamics investigation on the crizotinib resistance mechanism of C1156Y mutation in ALK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hui-Yong [Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Ji, Feng-Qin, E-mail: fengqinji@mail.hzau.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study revealed the detailed resistance mechanism of the non-active mutation C1156Y in ALK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C1156Y leads to crizotinib displacement and conformational changes in the binding cavity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conformations cause a decline in the vdW and electrostatic energy between crizotinib and ALK. -- Abstract: Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that has recently been approved in the US for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Despite its outstanding safety and efficacy, several resistant mutations against crizotinib have been detected in the treatment of NSCLC. However, in contrast to the widely accepted mechanism of steric hindrance by mutations at the active site, the mechanism by which the C1156Y non-active site mutation confers resistance against crizotinib remains unclear. In the present study, the resistance mechanism of C1156Y in ALK was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that despite the non-active site mutation, C1156Y causes the dislocation of crizotinib as well as the indirect conformational changes in the binding cavity, which results in a marked decrease in the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between crizotinib and ALK. The obtained results provide a detailed explanation of the resistance caused by C1156Y and may give a vital clue for the design of drugs to combat crizotinib resistance.

  4. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

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    Yuzhe Du

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr, in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel.

  5. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr), in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel. PMID:27809228

  6. ERG11 mutations associated with azole resistance in Candida albicans isolates from vulvovaginal candidosis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Li-Hua Huang; Ji-Xue Zhao; Man Wei; Hua Fang; Dan-Yang Wang; Hong-Fa Wang; Ji-Gang Yin; Mei Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the azole susceptibility of Candida albicans (C. albicans) from vulvovaginal candidosis patients and to analyze the relationship between ERG11 gene mutations in these isolates and azole resistance. Methods:Three hundred and two clinical isolates of Candida species were collected. Azole susceptibility was tested in vitro in microdilution studies. The ERG11 genes of 17 isolates of C. albicans (2 susceptibles, 5 dose-dependent resistants and 10 resistants) were amplified and sequenced. Results:Of the 302 isolates collected, 70.2%were C. albicans, of which 8.5%, 3.8%and 4.2%were resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, respectively. In total, 27 missense mutations were detected in ERG11 genes from resistant/susceptible dose-dependent isolates. Among them, Y132H, A114S, and Y257H substitutions were most prevalent and were known to cause fluconazole resistance. G464S and F72S also has been proved to cause fluconazole resistance. Two novel substitutions (T285A, S457P) in hotspot regions were identified. Conclusions:Twenty seven mutations in the ERG11 gene were identified in azole-resistant C. albicans isolates, which indicated a possible relation with the increase in resistance to azole drugs and the recurrence of vulvovaginal candidosis. The relationship of two novel substitutions (T285A, S457P) with fluconazole resistance needs to be further verified by site-directed mutagenesis.

  7. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-10-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  8. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

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    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  9. The molecular basis of antifolate resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: looking beyond point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinberg, Adina; Kirkman, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Drugs that target the folate-synthesis pathway have a long history of effectiveness against a variety of pathogens. As antimalarials, the antifolates were safe and well tolerated, but resistance emerged quickly and has persisted even with decreased drug pressure. The primary determinants of resistance in Plasmodium falciparum are well-described point mutations in the enzymes dihydropteroate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase targeted by the combination sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Recent work has highlighted the contributions of additional parasite adaptation to antifolate resistance. In fact, the evolution of antifolate-resistant parasites is multifaceted and complex. Gene amplification of the first enzyme in the parasite folate synthesis pathway, GTP-cyclohydrolase, is strongly associated with resistant parasites and potentially contributes to persistence of resistant parasites. Further understanding of how parasites adjust flux through the folate pathway is important to the further development of alternative agents targeting this crucial synthesis pathway.

  10. Drug resistant tuberculosis: A diagnostic challenge

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    M Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is responsible for 1.4 million deaths annually. Wide-spread misuse of anti-tubercular drugs over three decades has resulted in emergence of drug resistant TB including multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant TB globally. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB is one of the paramount importance for instituting appropriate clinical management and infection control measures. The present article provides an overview of the various diagnostic options available for drug resistant TB, by searching PubMed for recent articles. Rapid phenotypic tests still requires days to weeks to obtain final results, requiring biosafety and quality control measures. For newly developed molecular methods, infrastructure, training and quality assurance should be followed. Successful control of drug resistant TB globally will depend upon strengthening TB control programs, wider access to rapid diagnosis and provision of effective treatment. Therefore, political and fund provider commitment is essential to curb the spread of drug resistant TB.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  12. Phylogeny and drug resistance of HIV PR gene among HIV patients receiving RT inhibitors in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazem Baesi; Majedeh Moradbeigi; Mehrdad Ravanshad; Ashrafolnesa Baghban

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey the level and patterns of reverse transcriptase-based drug resistance and subtype distribution among antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected patients receiving only reverse transcriptase inhibitors in Iran. Methods: A total of 25 samples of antiretroviral therapy experienced patients with no history of using protease inhibitors were collected. After RNA extraction, reverse transcriptase-nested PCR was performed. The final products were sequenced and then analysed for drug-resistant mutations and subtypes. Results: No drug resistant mutations were observed among the 25 subjects. The results showed the following subtypes among patients:CRF 35_AD (88%), CRF 28_BF (8%), and CRF 29_BF (4%). Conclusions: A significant increase in drug resistance has been noted in recently-infected patients worldwide. Subtype distributions are needed to perform properly-designed surveillance studies to continuously monitor rates and patterns of transmitted drug resistance and subtypes to help guide therapeutic approaches and limit transmission of these variants.

  13. Variable analysis of drug resistant mutations against nucleos(t)ide analogues in patients with chronic hepatitis B%慢性乙型肝炎患者核苷(酸)类似物耐药位点多变性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怡青; 常静霞; 王洁; 汪茂荣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the new characteristics of drug resistant mutations against nucleos(t) ide analogues in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods Total of 590 CHB patients conducted antiviral therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues were included for analysis. The results of the PCR-product direct sequencing for HBV drug resistance mutations were positive in all patients and 200 μl serum was taken to extract the DNA template and the RT genes of HBV were amplified by PCR technique. Electrophoresis for the purified products was conducted in 1.5% agarose gel and the DNA sequence was measured for HBV drug resistant mutations by the Sequence Scanner. Results It was demonstrated that the higher occured mutation sites in all detected 1354 mutations were L180M, M204I, M204V, A181T, L80I, N236T and A181V, with the frequency of 45.3%, 42.7%, 29.7%, 26.6%, 24.4%, 17.3% and 16.9%. The most common resistant pattern was multiple mutation sites, with the rate of 70.8% and only 29.2% of 590 patients had just one mutation site. The frequency rate concerning LAM, FTC, ETV, ADV, LdT and TDF were 32.7% (909), 26.3% (729), 18.9%(524), 12.9% (359), 9.1% (252) and 0.1% (4), respectively. There were 283 patients involved for two-drug resistant, accounting for 47.9%. The common forms of two-drug resistant were LAM plus LdT and LAM plus ETV, with the rates of 37.6% and 7.1%. There were 33 cases involved for three and more NAs drug resistant, taking the rate of 5.6%, and the most popular drug resistant pattern was the combination of LAM、LdT and ADV. There were 50 cases defined for ETV resistance, taking the rate of 8.5%. Conclusions The drug resistant mutations against NAs are more variable now after decades of administration clinical. The situations of multiple mutation sites and multiple drugs resistance are increasing. Investigation and comprehensive analysis for NAs resistant mutations, especially for multiple drug resistant is valuable for prevention and management of NAs

  14. New insights into fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: functional genetic analysis of gyrA and gyrB mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidu Malik

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are among the most potent second-line drugs used for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB, and resistance to this class of antibiotics is one criterion for defining extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been associated with modification of the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR of gyrA. Recent studies suggest that amino acid substitutions in gyrB may also play a crucial role in resistance, but functional genetic studies of these mutations in M. tuberculosis are lacking. In this study, we examined twenty six mutations in gyrase genes gyrA (seven and gyrB (nineteen to determine the clinical relevance and role of these mutations in fluoroquinolone resistance. Transductants or clinical isolates harboring T80A, T80A+A90G, A90G, G247S and A384V gyrA mutations were susceptible to all fluoroquinolones tested. The A74S mutation conferred low-level resistance to moxifloxacin but susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and ofloxacin, and the A74S+D94G double mutation conferred cross resistance to all the fluoroquinolones tested. Functional genetic analysis and structural modeling of gyrB suggest that M330I, V340L, R485C, D500A, D533A, A543T, A543V and T546M mutations are not sufficient to confer resistance as determined by agar proportion. Only three mutations, N538D, E540V and R485C+T539N, conferred resistance to all four fluoroquinolones in at least one genetic background. The D500H and D500N mutations conferred resistance only to levofloxacin and ofloxacin while N538K and E540D consistently conferred resistance to moxifloxacin only. Transductants and clinical isolates harboring T539N, T539P or N538T+T546M mutations exhibited low-level resistance to moxifloxacin only but not consistently. These findings indicate that certain mutations in gyrB confer fluoroquinolone resistance, but the level and pattern of resistance varies

  15. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  16. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of efflux pump gene expression among drug susceptible and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan Yamchi, Jalil; Haeili, Mehri; Gizaw Feyisa, Seifu; Kazemian, Hossein; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Zahednamazi, Fatemeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Absence of mutations within the genes encoding drug targets in some phenotypically drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggests possible involvement of alternative mechanisms such as over-expression of efflux pumps. We investigated the expression level of Rv1410c, Rv2459, Rv1218c and Rv1273c efflux pumps gene by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in 31 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Susceptibility to first-line drugs was performed using the proportion method. Twenty one isolates were characterized with drug resistance (DR), and among them 12 showed a significantly elevated level of expression (>4 fold) for at least one of the studied genes encoding for efflux pumps. Point mutations in the katG (codons 315 or 335) and rpoB (codons 456 and 441) genes were found in 42.85% and 66.6% of drug resistant isolates, respectively. Only one isolate showed mutation at position -15 of the inhA promoter region. Among the 7 isolates (33.33%) which had no mutation in the studied regions of drug target genes, 5 isolates showed over-expression for efflux pumps. Our results demonstrated that over-expression of efflux pumps can contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  18. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  19. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is next?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Jain; Pratima Dixit

    2008-11-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis is a man made problem. While tuberculosis is hundred percent curable, multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is difficult to treat. Inadequate and incomplete treatment and poor treatment adherence has led to a newer form of drug resistance known as extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). XDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, which is resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid among the first line anti tubercular drugs (MDR-TB) in addition to resistance to any fluroquinolones and at least one of three injectable second line anti tubercular drugs i.e. amikacin, kanamycin and/or capreomycin. Mismanagement of tuberculosis paves the way to drug resistant tuberculosis. Emergence of XDR-TB is reported world wide. Reported prevalence rates of XDR-TB of total MDR cases are; 6.6% overall worldwide, 6.5% in industrialized countries, 13.6% in Russia and Eastern Europe, 1.5% in Asia, 0.6% in Africa and Middle East and 15.4% in Republic of Korea. Better management and control of tuberculosis specially drug resistant TB by experienced and qualified doctors, access to standard microbiology laboratory, co-morbitidy of HIV and tuberculosis, new anti-TB drug regimens, better diagnostic tests, international standards for second line drugs (SLD)-susceptibility testing, invention of newer anti-tubercular molecules and vaccines and knowing the real magnitude of XDR-TB are some of the important issues to be addressed for effective prevention and management of XDR-TB.

  20. ERG11 mutations associated with azole resistance in Candida albicans isolates from vulvovaginal candidosis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin; Wang; Li-Hua; Huang; Ji-Xue; Zhao; Man; Wei; Hua; Fang; Dan-Yang; Wang; Hong-Fa; Wang; Ji-Gang; Yin; Mei; Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the azole susceptibility of Candida albicans(C.albicans)from vulvovaginal candidosis patients and to analyze the relationship between ERG11 gene mutations in these isolates and azole resistance.Methods: Three hundred and two clinical isolates of Candida species were collected.Azole susceptibility was tested in vitro in microdilution studies. The ERG11 genes of 17 isolates of C. albicans(2 susceptibles, 5 dose-dependent resistants and 10 resistants) were amplified and sequenced.Results: Of the 302 isolates collected, 70.2% were C. albicans, of which 8.5%, 3.8% and4.2% were resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, respectively. In total,27 missense mutations were detected in ERG11 genes from resistant/susceptible dosedependent isolates. Among them, Y132 H, A114 S, and Y257 H substitutions were most prevalent and were known to cause fluconazole resistance. G464 S and F72 S also have been proved to cause fluconazole resistance. Two novel substitutions(T285A, S457P) in hotspot regions were identified.Conclusions: Twenty seven mutations in the ERG11 gene were identified in azoleresistant C. albicans isolates, which indicated a possible relation with the increase in resistance to azole drugs and the recurrence of vulvovaginal candidosis. The relationship of two novel substitutions(T285A, S457P) with fluconazole resistance needs to be further verified by site-directed mutagenesis.

  1. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Multi-drug Resistance in Indian Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noman Siddiqi

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 116 isolates from patients attending the out-patient department at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi and the New Delhi Tuberculosis Centre, New Delhi, India were collected. They were analyzed for resistance to drugs prescribed in the treatment for tuberculosis. The drug resistance was initially determined by microbiological techniques. The Bactec 460TB system was employed to determine the type and level of resistance in each isolate. The isolates were further characterized at molecular level. The multi-drug loci corresponding to rpo b, gyr A, kat G were studied for mutation(s by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP technique. The SSCP positive samples were sequenced to characterize the mutations in rpo b, and gyr A loci. While previously reported mutations in the gyr A and rpo b loci were found to be present, several novel mutations were also scored in the rpo b locus. Interestingly, analysis of the gyr A locus showed the presence of point mutation(s that could not be detected by PCR-SSCP. Furthermore, rifampicin resistance was found to be an important marker for checking multi-drug resistance (MDR in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This is the first report on molecular genetic analysis of MDR tuberculosis one from India, highlights the increasing incidence of MDR in the Indian isolates of M. tuberculosis.

  2. Transforming a drug/H+ antiporter into a polyamine importer by a single mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Shlomo; Falk, Ofir Sade; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2012-10-16

    EmrE, a multidrug antiporter from Escherichia coli, has presented biochemists with unusual surprises. Here we describe the transformation of EmrE, a drug/H(+) antiporter to a polyamine importer by a single mutation. Antibiotic resistance in microorganisms may arise by mutations at certain chromosomal loci. To investigate this phenomenon, we used directed evolution of EmrE to assess the rate of development of novel specificities in existing multidrug transporters. Strikingly, when a library of random mutants of EmrE was screened for resistance to two major antibacterial drugs--norfloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, and erythromycin, a macrolide--proteins with single mutations were found capable of conferring resistance. The mutation conferring erythromycin resistance resulted from substitution of a fully conserved and essential tryptophan residue to glycine, and, as expected, this protein lost its ability to recognize and transport the classical EmrE substrates. However, this protein functions now as an electrochemical potential driven importer of a new set of substrates: aliphatic polyamines. This mutant provides a unique paradigm to understand the function and evolution of distinct modes of transport.

  3. A database of antimalarial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringwald Pascal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A large investment is required to develop, license and deploy a new antimalarial drug. Too often, that investment has been rapidly devalued by the selection of parasite populations resistant to the drug action. To understand the mechanisms of selection, detailed information on the patterns of drug use in a variety of environments, and the geographic and temporal patterns of resistance is needed. Currently, there is no publically-accessible central database that contains information on the levels of resistance to antimalaria drugs. This paper outlines the resources that are available and the steps that might be taken to create a dynamic, open access database that would include current and historical data on clinical efficacy, in vitro responses and molecular markers related to drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The goal is to include historical and current data on resistance to commonly used drugs, like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and on the many combinations that are now being tested in different settings. The database will be accessible to all on the Web. The information in such a database will inform optimal utilization of current drugs and sustain the longest possible therapeutic life of newly introduced drugs and combinations. The database will protect the valuable investment represented by the development and deployment of novel therapies for malaria.

  4. The calculated genetic barrier for antiretroviral drug resistance substitutions is largely similar for different HIV-1 subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, D.A. van de; Wensing, A.M.J.; Angarano, G.; Asjo, B.; Balotta, C.; Camacho, R.; Chaix, M.; Costagliola, D.; De Luca, A.; Derdelinckx, I.; Grossman, Z.; Hamouda, O.; Hatzakis, A.; Hemmer, R.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Horban, A.; Korn, K.; Kücherer, C.; Leitner, T.; Loveday, C.; MacRae, E.; Maljkovic, I.; Mendoza, C. de; Meyer, L.; Nielsen, C.; Op de Coul, E.L.M.; Omaasen, V.; Paraskevis, D.; Perrin, L.; Puchhammer-Stöckl, E.; Salminen, M.; Schmit, J.; Scheider, F.; Schuurman, R.; Soriano, V.; Stanczak, G.; Stanojevic, M.; Vandamme, A.; Laethem, K. van; Violin, M.; Wilde, K.; Yerly, S.; Zazzi, M.; Boucher, C.A.B.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic barrier, defined as the number of mutations required to overcome drug-selective pressure, is an important factor for the development of HIV drug resistance. Because of high variability between subtypes, particular HIV-1 subtypes could have different genetic barriers for drug resistance s

  5. TAM类突变对B'亚型HIV病毒耐药和复制能力的影响%The impact of thymidine analogue resistance mutations on the level of drug resistance and replicative capacity of HIV-1 subtype B' viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周茜; 邢辉; 方志明; 陈彬; 王铮; 邵一鸣; 廖玲洁; 黄汉菊

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the influence of thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs) such as T215Y and L210W on antiretroviral drug resistance and replicative capacity of HIV-1 viruses under the genetic background of pol fragment of subtype B' strains.Methods The plasma sample was collected from a patient infected with HIV-1 subtype B' strains who was under antiretroviral therapy and with TAM mutations.Partial pol gene was amplified from three different viral quasispecies with single genome amplification (SGA),T215Y and L210W was reverse mutated to wild type codons by PCR based point mutation.Recombinant infectious clones were constructed by replacing pol fragment of pNL4-3-BstⅡ with counterparts from the patient's viruses.The level of drug resistance and replicative dynamics were evaluated via luciferase assay and P24 measurement.Results Three recombinant infectious clones were successfully constructed,named as pNL-PAT-1,pNL-PAT-2 and pNL-PAT-3 with mutations T215Y,M41L/L210W/T215Y and M41L/L210W/T215Y,respectively.Three corresponding infectious clones with reverse mutations at 215 and 201 positions were pNL-PAT-1-T215Y (-),pNL-PAT-2-L210W(-) and pNL-PAT-3-L210W(-).Compared with the IC50 values to AZT in the original viruses,those in the mutated viruses had been lowered for 4.9,8.1 and 2.7 times.pNL-PAT-1-T215Y(-) had a higher level of P24 in supernatant than pNL-PAT-1 did.The viruses with reverse mutation of L210W had different levels of replication as compared with the original ones:pNL-PAT-2-L210W(-) had a slightly lower level of P24 than pNL-PAT-2 did,but pNL-PAT-3-L210W(-) had a much higher level of P24 as compared with pNL-PAT-3.Conclusions TAM mutations such as T215Y and L210W can raise the resistance to AZT of subtype B' strains to certain levels.T215Y can impair viral replicative fitness.However,L210W might have different impacts on replicative capacity in different HIV-1 strains.Genetic diversity may have a role in drug resistance and viral replicative

  6. Five-year surveillance of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum antimalarial drug resistance in Korogwe District, Tanzania: accumulation of the 581G mutation in the em>P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alifrangis, Michael; Lusingu, John P; Mmbando, Bruno;

    2009-01-01

    In January 2007, Tanzania replaced sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) with artemether-lumefantrine for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. This study examined the impact of widespread SP use on molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in blood samples from persons living in two vill...

  7. Recent developments in genomics, bioinformatics and drug discovery to combat emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Palaniappan, Alangudi Natarajan; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a big challenge in TB control. The delay in diagnosis of DR-TB leads to its increased transmission, and therefore prevalence. Recent developments in genomics have enabled whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) from 3-day-old liquid culture and directly from uncultured sputa, while new bioinformatics tools facilitate to determine DR mutations rapidly from the resulting sequences. The present drug discovery and development pipeline is filled with candidate drugs which have shown efficacy against DR-TB. Furthermore, some of the FDA-approved drugs are being evaluated for repurposing, and this approach appears promising as several drugs are reported to enhance efficacy of the standard TB drugs, reduce drug tolerance, or modulate the host immune response to control the growth of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Recent developments in genomics and bioinformatics along with new drug discovery collectively have the potential to result in synergistic impact leading to the development of a rapid protocol to determine the drug resistance profile of the infecting strain so as to provide personalized medicine. Hence, in this review, we discuss recent developments in WGS, bioinformatics and drug discovery to perceive how they would transform the management of tuberculosis in a timely manner.

  8. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M; Myatt, Mark; Hearps, Anna C; Jordan, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented.

  9. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A.; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Myatt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Methods Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. Results The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. Conclusions The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented. PMID:28146591

  10. Mutations in transcription factor Mrr2p contribute to fluconazole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jin-Yan; Shi, Ce; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Lan; Xiang, Ming-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The Candida albicans zinc cluster proteins are a family of transcription factors (TFs) that play essential roles in the development of antifungal drug resistance. Gain-of-function mutations in several TFs, such as Tac1p, Mrr1p and Upc2p, have been previously well documented in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates. Mrr2p (multidrug resistance regulator 2) is a novel TF controlling expression of the ABC transporter gene CDR1 and mediating fluconazole resistance. In this study, the relationship between naturally occurring mutations in MRR2 and fluconazole resistance in clinical C. albicans isolates was investigated. Among a group of 20 fluconazole-resistant clinical C. albicans and 10 fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans, 12 fluconazole-resistant isolates overexpressed CDR1 by at least two-fold compared with the fluconazole-susceptible isolates. Of these 12 resistant isolates, three (C7, C9, C15) contained 11 identical missense mutations, 6 of which occurred only in the azole-resistant isolates. The contribution of these mutations to CDR1 overexpression and therefore to fluconazole resistance was further verified by generating recombinant strains containing the mutated MRR2 gene. The mutated MRR2 alleles from isolate C9 contributed to an almost six-fold increase in CDR1 expression and an eight-fold increase in fluconazole resistance; the missense mutations S466L and T470N resulted in an increase in CDR1 expression of more than two-fold and a four-fold increase in fluconazole resistance. In contrast, the other four missense mutations conferred only two- to four-fold increases in fluconazole resistance, with no significant increase in CDR1 expression. These findings provide some insight into the mechanism by which MRR2 regulates C. albicans multidrug resistance.

  11. Detection of mutations in mtrR gene in quinolone resistant strains of N.gonorrhoeae isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emergence of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae resulting from new genetic mutation is a serious threat in controlling gonorrhea. This study was undertaken to identify and characterise mutations in the mtrR genes in N.gonorrhoeae isolates resistant to six different antibiotics in the quinolone group. Materials and Methods: The Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of five quinolones for 64 N.gonorrhoeae isolates isolated during Jan 2007-Jun 2009 were determined by E-test method. Mutations in MtrR loci were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing. Results: The proportion of N.gonorrhoeae strains resistant to anti-microbials was 98.4% for norfloxacin and ofloxacin, 96.8% for enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, 95.3% for lomefloxacin. Thirty-one (48.4% strains showed mutation (single/multiple in mtrR gene. Ten different mutations were observed and Gly-45 → Asp, Tyr-105 → His being the most common observed mutation. Conclusion: This is the first report from India on quinolone resistance mutations in MtrRCDE efflux system in N.gonorrhoeae. In conclusion, the high level of resistance to quinolone and single or multiple mutations in mtrR gene could limit the drug choices for gonorrhoea.

  12. Emergence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) outbreaks have been reported in South Africa, and strains have been identified on 6 continents. Dr. Peter Cegielski, team leader for drug-resistant TB with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at CDC, comments on a multinational team's report on this emerging global public health threat.  Created: 3/1/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/26/2007.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information ...

  14. Quadruple-first line drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Vietnam: What can we learn from genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Quang; Nguyen, Nhung Viet; Contamin, Lucie; Tran, Thanh Hoa Thi; Vu, Thuong Thi; Nguyen, Hung Van; Nguyen, Ngoc Lan Thi; Nguyen, Son Thai; Dang, Anh Duc; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Nguyen, Van Anh Thi

    2017-02-21

    In Vietnam, a country with high tuberculosis (137/100.000 population) and multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB burdens (7.8/100.000 population), little is known about the molecular signatures of drug resistance in general and more particularly of second line drug (SLD) resistance. This study is specifically focused on Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to four first-line drugs (FLDs) that make TB much more difficult to treat. The aim is to determine the proportion of SLD resistance in these quadruple drug resistant isolates and the genetic determinants linked to drug resistance to better understand the genetic processes leading to quadruple and extremely drug resistance (XDR). 91 quadruple (rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol and streptomycin) FLD resistant and 55 susceptible isolates were included. Spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU-VNTR techniques were performed and 9 genes and promoters linked to FLD and SLD resistance were sequenced. SLD susceptibility testing was carried out on a subsample of isolates. High proportion of quadruple-FLD resistant isolates was resistant to fluoroquinolones (27%) and second-line injectable drugs (30.2%) by drug susceptibility testing. The sequencing revealed high mutation diversity with prevailing mutations at positions katG315, inhA-15, rpoB531, embB306, rrs1401, rpsL43 and gyrA94. The sensitivity and specificity were high for most drug resistances (>86%), but the sensitivity was lower for injectable drug resistances (<69%). The mutation patterns revealed 23.1% of pre-XDR and 7.7% of XDR isolates, mostly belonging to Beijing family. The genotypic diversity and the variety of mutations reflect the existence of various evolutionary paths leading to FLD and SLD resistance. Nevertheless, particular mutation patterns linked to high-level resistance and low fitness costs seem to be favored.

  15. Drug resistance in Schistosomiasis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance associated with the treatment of human schistosomiasis appears to be an emerging problem requiring more attention from the scientific community than the subject currently receives. Drug-resistant strains of Schistosoma mansoni have been isolated by various investigators as a result of laboratory experimentation or from a combination of field and laboratory studies. Review of this data appears to indicate that the lack of susceptibility observed for some of the isolated strains cannot be ascribed solely to previous administration of antischistosome drugs and thus further studies are required to elucidate this phenomena. Strains of S. mansoni have now been identified from Brazil which are resistant to oxamniquine, hycanthone and niridazole; from Puerto Rico which are resistant to hycanthone and oxamniquine; and from Kenya which are resistant to niridazole and probably oxamniquine. Strains derived by in vitro selection and resistant to oxamniquine and possibly to oltipraz are also available. All of these strains are currently maintained in the laboratory in snails and mice, thus providing for the first time an opportunity for indepth comparative studies. Preliminary data indicates that S. haematobium strains resistant to metrifonate may be occurring in Kenya. This problem could poise great difficulty in the eventual development of antischistosomal agents. Biomphalaria glabrata from Puerto Rico and Brazil were found to be susceptible to drug-resistant S. mansoni from each country.

  16. Malaria Epidemic and Drug Resistance, Djibouti

    OpenAIRE

    Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno; Bogreau, H.; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Kamil, Mohamed-Ali; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected before, during, and after a 1999 malaria epidemic in Djibouti shows that, despite a high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the epidemic cannot be attributed to a sudden increase in drug resistance of local parasite populations.

  17. Antifungal Drug Resistance - Concerns for Veterinarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B. Bhanderi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, there were increased incidences of fungal infectious diseases in human population which might be due to increase in immunosuppressive diseases. But the major concern was increase in prevalence of resistance to antifungal drugs which were reported both in the fungal isolates of human beings and that of animal origin. In both animals and human beings, resistance to antimicrobial agents has important implications for morbidity, mortality and health care costs, because resistant strains are responsible for bulk of infection in animals and human beings, and large number of antimicrobial classes offers more diverse range of resistance mechanisms to study and resistance determinants move into standard well-characterized strains that facilitates the detailed study of molecular mechanisms of resistance in microorganisms. Studies on resistance to antifungal agents has been lagging behind that of antibacterial resistance for several reasons, the foremost reason might be fungal agents were not recognized as important animal and human pathogens, until relatively in recent past. But the initial studies of antifungal drug resistance in the early 1980s, have accumulated a wealth of knowledge concerning the clinical, biochemical, and genetic aspects of this phenomenon. Presently, exploration of the molecular aspects for antifungal drug resistance has been undertaken. Recently, the focus was on several points like developing a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, methods to prevent the emergence and spread of resistance and new antimicrobial options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms. [Vet. World 2009; 2(5.000: 204-207

  18. Collateral Resistance and Sensitivity Modulate Evolution of High-Level Resistance to Drug Combination Treatment in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Gumpert, Heidi; Munck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    revealed that resistance to drug combinations was mediated largely by mutations in the same genes as single-drug-evolved lineages highlighting the importance of the component drugs in determining the rate of resistance evolution. Results of this work suggest that the mechanisms of resistance to constituent......As drug-resistant pathogens continue to emerge, combination therapy will increasingly be relied upon to treat infections and to help combat further development of multidrug resistance. At present a dichotomy exists between clinical practice, which favors therapeutically synergistic combinations......, and the scientific model emerging from in vitro experimental work, which maintains that this interaction provides greater selective pressure toward resistance development than other interaction types. We sought to extend the current paradigm, based on work below or near minimum inhibitory concentration levels...

  19. Molecular phylogenetics of transmitted drug resistance in newly diagnosed HIV Type 1 individuals in Denmark: a nation-wide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Highly active antiretroviral treatment is compromised by viral resistance mutations. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is therefore monitored closely, but follow-up studies of these patients are limited. Virus from 1405 individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 in Denmark between 2001 and 2009...... without resistance mutations. We observed no difference in progression of the infection between individuals infected with TDR and individuals infected with wild-type HIV-1. The prevalence of TDR is low in Denmark and transmission of dual-drug-resistant HIV-1 is infrequent. The TDR isolates were shown...... resulting in a prevalence of 6.1%, with no changes over time. The main resistance mutations were nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation 215 revertants, as well as nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutation 103N/S and protease inhibitor (PI) mutations 90M and 85V...

  20. Molecular Phylogenetics of Transmitted Drug Resistance in Newly Diagnosed HIV Type 1 Individuals in Denmark, a Nation-Wide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Highly active antiretroviral treatment is compromised by viral resistance mutations. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is therefore monitored closely, but follow-up studies of these patients are limited. Virus from 1405 individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 in Denmark between 2001 and 2009...... without resistance mutations. We observed no difference in progression of the infection between individuals infected with TDR and individuals infected with wild-type HIV-1. The prevalence of TDR is low in Denmark and transmission of dual-drug-resistant HIV-1 is infrequent. The TDR isolates were shown...... resulting in a prevalence of 6.1%, with no changes over time. The main resistance mutations were nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation 215 revertants, as well as nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutation 103N/S and protease inhibitor (PI) mutations 90M and 85V...

  1. Multiple drug resistance and bacterial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad U Khan

    2008-01-01

    Drug resistance is becoming a great problem in developing countries due to excessive use and misuse of antibi-otics.The emergence of new pathogenic strains with resistance developed against most of the antibiotics which may cause,difficult to treat infection.To understand the current scenario in different mode of infection is most important for the clinicians and medical practitioners.This article summarized some common infections and an-tibiotic resistance pattern found among these pathogens.

  2. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  3. Compensatory evolution of pbp mutations restores the fitness cost imposed by β-lactam resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Albarracín Orio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria is a major challenge to treating many infectious diseases. The spread of these genes is driven by the strong selection imposed by the use of antibacterial drugs. However, in the absence of drug selection, antibiotic resistance genes impose a fitness cost, which can be ameliorated by compensatory mutations. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, β-lactam resistance is caused by mutations in three penicillin-binding proteins, PBP1a, PBP2x, and PBP2b, all of which are implicated in cell wall synthesis and the cell division cycle. We found that the fitness cost and cell division defects conferred by pbp2b mutations (as determined by fitness competitive assays in vitro and in vivo and fluorescence microscopy were fully compensated by the acquisition of pbp2x and pbp1a mutations, apparently by means of an increased stability and a consequent mislocalization of these protein mutants. Thus, these compensatory combinations of pbp mutant alleles resulted in an increase in the level and spectrum of β-lactam resistance. This report describes a direct correlation between antibiotic resistance increase and fitness cost compensation, both caused by the same gene mutations acquired by horizontal transfer. The clinical origin of the pbp mutations suggests that this intergenic compensatory process is involved in the persistence of β-lactam resistance among circulating strains. We propose that this compensatory mechanism is relevant for β-lactam resistance evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  4. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  5. Sequence and gene expression of chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt in the association of in vitro drugs resistance of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Patrick G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR transporter protein (PfCRT is known to be the important key of CQR. Recent studies have definitively demonstrated a link between mutations in the gene pfcrt and resistance to chloroquine in P. falciparum. Although these mutations are predictive of chloroquine resistance, they are not quantitatively predictive of the degree of resistance. Methods In this study, a total of 95 recently adapted P. falciparum isolates from Thailand were included in the analysis. Parasites were characterized for their drug susceptibility phenotypes and genotypes with respect to pfcrt. From the original 95 isolates, 20 were selected for complete pfcrt sequence analysis. Results Almost all of the parasites characterized carried the previously reported mutations K76T, A220S, Q271E, N326S, I356T and R371I. On complete sequencing, isolates were identified with novel mutations at K76A and E198K. There was a suggestion that parasites carrying E198K were less resistant than those that did not. In addition, pfcrt and pfmdr1 gene expression were investigated by real-time PCR. No relationship between the expression level of either of these genes and response to drug was observed. Conclusion Data from the present study suggest that other genes must contribute to the degree of resistance once the resistance phenotype is established through mutations in pfcrt.

  6. Quantitative predictions of binding free energy changes in drug-resistant influenza neuraminidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Ripoll

    Full Text Available Quantitatively predicting changes in drug sensitivity associated with residue mutations is a major challenge in structural biology. By expanding the limits of free energy calculations, we successfully identified mutations in influenza neuraminidase (NA that confer drug resistance to two antiviral drugs, zanamivir and oseltamivir. We augmented molecular dynamics (MD with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange and calculated binding free energy changes for H274Y, N294S, and Y252H mutants. Based on experimental data, our calculations achieved high accuracy and precision compared with results from established computational methods. Analysis of 15 micros of aggregated MD trajectories provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying drug resistance that are at odds with current interpretations of the crystallographic data. Contrary to the notion that resistance is caused by mutant-induced changes in hydrophobicity of the binding pocket, our simulations showed that drug resistance mutations in NA led to subtle rearrangements in the protein structure and its dynamics that together alter the active-site electrostatic environment and modulate inhibitor binding. Importantly, different mutations confer resistance through different conformational changes, suggesting that a generalized mechanism for NA drug resistance is unlikely.

  7. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  9. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veitch Zachary

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthracyclines and taxanes are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer. However, tumor resistance to these drugs often develops, possibly due to overexpression of drug transporters. It remains unclear whether drug resistance in vitro occurs at clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy drugs and whether both the onset and magnitude of drug resistance can be temporally and causally correlated with the enhanced expression and activity of specific drug transporters. To address these issues, MCF-7 cells were selected for survival in increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (MCF-7DOX-2, epirubicin (MCF-7EPI, paclitaxel (MCF-7TAX-2, or docetaxel (MCF-7TXT. During selection cells were assessed for drug sensitivity, drug uptake, and the expression of various drug transporters. Results In all cases, resistance was only achieved when selection reached a specific threshold dose, which was well within the clinical range. A reduction in drug uptake was temporally correlated with the acquisition of drug resistance for all cell lines, but further increases in drug resistance at doses above threshold were unrelated to changes in cellular drug uptake. Elevated expression of one or more drug transporters was seen at or above the threshold dose, but the identity, number, and temporal pattern of drug transporter induction varied with the drug used as selection agent. The pan drug transporter inhibitor cyclosporin A was able to partially or completely restore drug accumulation in the drug-resistant cell lines, but had only partial to no effect on drug sensitivity. The inability of cyclosporin A to restore drug sensitivity suggests the presence of additional mechanisms of drug resistance. Conclusion This study indicates that drug resistance is achieved in breast tumour cells only upon exposure to concentrations of drug at or above a specific selection dose. While changes in drug accumulation and the expression of drug transporters does

  10. Profiling evolutionary landscapes underlying drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, Rachel

    by exploring antibiotic resistance loci, and the in the second by whole-gene sequencing. The desired outcome from both studies is to find methods to use antibiotic therapy more rationally to treat infection efficiently and effectively whilst reducing the evolution of antibiotic resistance....... procedures to occur due to antibiotics preventative/ prophylactic and therapeutic qualities. Despite bacterial antibiotic resistance mechanisms always being present in nature, the overuse and misuse of antibiotics by humans are accelerating the rise and dissemination of bacterial antibiotic resistance....... Bacterial antibiotic resistance is global threat to public health; especially because of lack of new drugs. It has been highlighted that understanding antibiotic resistance by further elucidating mechanisms of evolution, molecular mechanisms of action and reservoirs of resistance are essential Therefore...

  11. Dual channel real-time PCR melting curve analysis-based assay for detecting of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis%双通道实时荧光PCR熔解曲线法检测结核分枝杆菌药物耐药相关基因突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳清云; 罗涛; 李静; 梅建; 高谦

    2013-01-01

    目的 基于双标记荧光探针熔解曲线分析技术,建立一种利用实时荧光PCR快速检测结核分枝杆菌耐药突变的方法.方法 根据结核分枝杆菌一线药物常见耐药突变位点(包括rpoB 81 bp耐药决定区、inhA启动子、katG315、ahpC启动子以及embB306)设计6条荧光双标记探针和对应引物,通过PCR扩增耐药突变位点所在基因片段,在扩增完成后通过熔解曲线检测分析实现对耐药突变的快速检测.通过对2008年上海市疾控中心收集的76株临床耐多药(MDR)菌株进行检测,验证本方法的敏感度和特异度.结果 本方法成功从76株MDR菌株中检测出相关耐药突变,各种突变对应ATm值范围为1.8~14.4℃.将检测结果和测序结果对比表明该方法检测敏感度和特异度都为100%(rpoB,80/80:inhA,7/7;katG315,59/59;ahpC,8/8;embB306,27/27).本方法可以成功从最低浓度为100拷贝/μl的结核分枝杆菌DNA样本中准确地检测耐药突变.结论 双通道实时荧光PCR熔解曲线法可以快速灵敏地检测结核分枝杆菌常见耐药突变.该方法具有检测迅速准确、结果易判读、交叉污染概率低等特点,可用于快速检测临床结核耐药相关的基因突变,并对结核耐药情况进行评估.%Objective Based on dual channel melting curve analysis-based assay,we developed a method to rapidly detect the drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis through real-time PCR.Methods According to the common first-line drug-resistant mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis,we designed six dual-labeled fluorescence probes to rapidly detect the drug-resistant mutations through realtime PCR melting curve after amplifications of drug-resistant related gene region of DNA.The targets include rpoB 81 bp core region,katG315,inhA promoter,ahpC promoter and embB306.To validate the sensitivity and specificity of our method,we performed real-time PCR assays to detect drug-resistant mutations in 76

  12. Novel V600E BRAF mutations in imatinib-naive and imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Wong, Grace C; Guo, Tianhua; Maki, Robert G; Singer, Samuel; Dematteo, Ronald P; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2008-10-01

    BRAF and NRAS are commonly mutated in cancer and represent the most frequent genetic events in malignant melanoma. More recently, a subset of melanomas was shown to overexpress KIT and harbor KIT mutations. Although most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) exhibit activating mutations in either KIT or PDGFRA, about 10% of the cases lack mutations in these genes. It is our hypothesis following the melanoma model that mutations in BRAF or NRAS may play a role in wild-type GIST pathogenesis. Alterations in RAS/MEK/ERK pathway may also be involved in development of imatinib resistance in GIST, particularly in tumors lacking secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Imatinib-naive wild-type GISTs from 61 patients, including 15 children and 28 imatinib-resistant tumors without secondary KIT mutations were analyzed. Screening for hot spots mutations in BRAF (exons 11 and 15) and NRAS (exons 2 and 3) was performed. A BRAF exon 15 V600E was identified in 3 of 61 GIST patients, who shared similar clinical features, being 49- to 55-years-old females and having their tumors located in the small bowel. The tumors were strongly KIT immunoreactive and had a high risk of malignancy. An identical V600E BRAF mutation was also identified in one of 28 imatinib resistant GIST lacking a defined mechanism of drug resistance. In conclusion, we identified a primary BRAF V600E mutations in 7% of adult GIST patients, lacking KIT/PDGFRA mutations. The BRAF-mutated GISTs show predilection for small bowel location and high risk of malignancy. A secondary V600E BRAF mutation could represent an alternative mechanism of imatinib resistance. Kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF may be effective therapeutic options in this molecular GIST subset.

  13. Smoothened Mutation Confers Resistance to a Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauch, Robert L.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Alicke, Bruno; Januario, Thomas; Ahn, Christina P.; Holcomb, Thomas; Pujara, Kanan; Stinson, Jeremy; Callahan, Christopher A.; Tang, Tracy; Bazan, J. Fernando; Kan, Zhengyan; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Hann, Christine L.; Gould, Stephen E.; Low, Jennifer A.; Rudin, Charles M.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.

    2017-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is inappropriately activated in certain human cancers, including medulloblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor. GDC-0449, a drug that inhibits Hh signaling by targeting the serpentine receptor Smoothened (SMO), has produced promising anti-tumor responses in early clinical studies of cancers driven by mutations in this pathway. To evaluate the mechanism of resistance in a medulloblastoma patient who had relapsed after an initial response to GDC-0449, we determined the mutational status of Hh signaling genes in the tumor after disease progression. We identified an amino acid substitution at a conserved aspartic acid residue of SMO that had no effect on Hh signaling but disrupted the ability of GDC-0449 to bind SMO and suppress this pathway. A mutation altering the same amino acid also arose in a GDC-0449–resistant mouse model of medulloblastoma. These findings show that acquired mutations in a serpentine receptor with features of a G protein–coupled receptor can serve as a mechanism of drug resistance in human cancer. PMID:19726788

  14. Antifungal drug resistance to azoles and polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiá Canuto, Mar; Gutiérrez Rodero, Félix

    2002-09-01

    There is an increased awareness of the morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections caused by resistant fungi in various groups of patients. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors associated with antifungal drug resistance. Selection pressure due to the continuous exposure to azoles seems to have an essential role in developing resistance to fluconazole in Candida species. Haematological malignancies, especially acute leukaemia with severe and prolonged neutropenia, seem to be the main risk factors for acquiring deep-seated mycosis caused by resistant filamentous fungi, such us Fusarium species, Scedosporium prolificans, and Aspergillus terreus. The still unacceptably high mortality rate associated with some resistant mycosis indicates that alternatives to existing therapeutic options are needed. Potential measures to overcome antifungal resistance ranges from the development of new drugs with better antifungal activity to improving current therapeutic strategies with the present antifungal agents. Among the new antifungal drugs, inhibitors of beta glucan synthesis and second-generation azole and triazole derivatives have characteristics that render them potentially suitable agents against some resistant fungi. Other strategies including the use of high doses of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, combination therapy, and adjunctive immune therapy with cytokines are under investigation. In addition, antifungal control programmes to prevent extensive and inappropriate use of antifungals may be needed.

  15. Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi malaria parasites can develop stable resistance to atovaquone with a mutation in the cytochrome b gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Ana C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum, has developed resistance to many of the drugs in use. The recommended treatment policy is now to use drug combinations. The atovaquone-proguanil (AP drug combination, is one of the treatment and prophylaxis options. Atovaquone (ATQ exerts its action by inhibiting plasmodial mitochondria electron transport at the level of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Plasmodium falciparum in vitro resistance to ATQ has been associated with specific point mutations in the region spanning codons 271-284 of the cytochrome b gene. ATQ -resistant Plasmodium yoelii and Plasmodium berghei lines have been obtained and resistant lines have amino acid mutations in their CYT b protein sequences. Plasmodium chabaudi model for studying drug-responses and drug-resistance selection is a very useful rodent malaria model but no ATQ resistant parasites have been reported so far. The aim of this study was to determine the ATQ sensitivity of the P. chabaudi clones, to select a resistant parasite line and to perform genotypic characterization of the cytb gene of these clones. Methods To select for ATQ resistance, Plasmodium. chabaudi chabaudi clones were exposed to gradually increasing concentrations of ATQ during several consecutive passages in mice. Plasmodium chabaudi cytb gene was amplified and sequenced. Results ATQ resistance was selected from the clone AS-3CQ. In order to confirm whether an heritable genetic mutation underlies the response of AS-ATQ to ATQ, the stability of the drug resistance phenotype in this clone was evaluated by measuring drug responses after (i multiple blood passages in the absence of the drug, (ii freeze/thawing of parasites in liquid nitrogen and (iii transmission through a mosquito host, Anopheles stephensi. ATQ resistance phenotype of the drug-selected parasite clone kept unaltered. Therefore, ATQ resistance in clone AS-ATQ is genetically encoded. The Minimum Curative Dose of AS-ATQ showed a six

  16. Catalysis and Sulfa Drug Resistance in Dihydropteroate Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M. Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Lee, Richard E.; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W. (SJCH)

    2013-04-08

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S{sub N}1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises.

  17. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub......-Saharan Africa is sparse. METHODS: HIV viral load (VL) and resistance mutations pre-ART and after 6 months were determined in a prospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Jimma, Ethiopia. VL measurements were done at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Genotypic HIV drug...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  18. Communicating trends in resistance using a drug resistance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, but communicating this challenge to policymakers and non-experts is complicated by the multiplicity of bacterial pathogens and the distinct classes of antibiotics used to treat them. It is difficult, even for experts aware of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics, to infer the seriousness of resistance without information on how commonly the antibiotic is being used and whether alternative antibiotics are available. Difficulty in aggregating resistance to multiple drugs to assess trends poses a further challenge to quantifying and communicating changes in resistance over time and across locations. Methods We developed a method for aggregating bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics, creating an index comparable to the composite economic indices that measure consumer prices and stock market values. The resulting drug resistance index (DRI) and various subindices show antibiotic resistance and consumption trends in the USA but can be applied at any geographical level. Findings The DRI based on use patterns in 1999 for Escherichia coli rose from 0.25 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.26) to 0.30 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.32) between 1999 and 2006. However, the adaptive DRI, which includes treatment of baseline resistant strains with alternative agents, climbed from 0.25 to 0.27 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.28) during that period. In contrast, both the static-use and the adaptive DRIs for Acinetobacter spp. rose from 0.41 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.42) to 0.48 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.49) between 1999 and 2006. Interpretation Divergence between the static-use and the adaptive-use DRIs for E coli reflects the ability of physicians to adapt to increasing resistance. However, antibiotic use patterns did not change much in response to growing resistance to Acinetobacter spp. because physicians were unable to adapt; new drugs for Acinetobacter spp. are therefore needed. Composite indices that aggregate resistance to various drugs can be useful for assessing

  19. Genotypic drug resistance and long-term mortality in patients with triple-class antiretroviral drug failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Jørgensen, Louise B; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in HIV patients with triple-drug class virological failure (TCF) and their association with long-term mortality. DESIGN: Population-based study from the Danish HIV Cohort Study (DHCS). METHODS: We included all patients...... with increased mortality (mortality rate ratio [MRR] 2.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.8]), as were the individual mutations T215Y (MRR 3.4 [95% CI 1.6-7.0]), G190A/S (MRR 3.2 [95% CI 1.6-6.6]) and V82F/A/T/S (MRR 2.5 [95% CI 1.2-5.3]). CONCLUSIONS: In HIV patients with TCF, the total number of genotypic...... resistance mutations and specific single mutations predicted mortality.OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in HIV patients with triple-drug class virological failure (TCF) and their association with long-term mortality. DESIGN: Population-based study from the Danish...

  20. Detection and evaluation of the mutations of embB gene in ethambutol-susceptible and resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xue-qiong; LIANG Jian-qin; ZHANG Jun-xian; LU Yang; LI Hong-min; ZHANG Guang-yu; YAN Guo-rui; DING Bei-chuan

    2005-01-01

    @@ The situation of tuberculosis (TB) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) drug resistance is still very serious in China. Improper treatment for TB may lead to a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy and spreading of drug resistant strains. Thus, rapid detection of drug resistant strains will allow prompt initiation and adjustment of effective chemotherapeutic treatment of TB. Ethambutol (EMB) is a first line anti-TB drug. embB Met306 is located in a cytoplasmic loop that forms an EMB resistance determining region,1 Lety et al2 have demonstrated that a missense mutation in the M. smegmatis embB gene confers EMB resistance. The identification of mutations in embB gene may offer a means to rapidly screen M. tuberculosis isolates for EMB resistance. Thus, in this study, we analysed 197 isolates of M. tuberculosis from Chinese people and characterized mutations in the 258 bp region of the embB gene.

  1. Characterisation of rpsL, rrs and embB mutations associated with streptomycin and ethambutol resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracevska, Tatjana; Jansone, Inta; Nodieva, Anda; Marga, Olgerts; Skenders, Girts; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2004-12-01

    In order to characterise molecular mechanisms of first-line drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to evaluate the use of molecular markers of resistance (gene point mutations), we analysed 66 multi-drug-resistant (MDR) isolates from Latvian tuberculosis patients. They were all resistant to rifampin (RIF), isoniazid (INH) and streptomycin (SM), and 33 were resistant to ethambutol (EMB). Enzymatic digestion by MboII and nucleotide sequencing of the rpsL gene fragment detected a single nucleotide substitution K43R in 40 (61%) of the 66 SM-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. Of the other 26 SM-resistant isolates, 16 (24%) had mutations at positions 513A-->C and 516C-->T of the rrs gene and 10 (15%) had the wild-type sequence. The single-stranded DNA conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method was used to detect mutations in the embB gene associated with EMB resistance. Substitutions in the embB gene were found by SSCP analysis in 15 (45%) and by sequencing in 17 (52%) of the 33 EMB-resistant isolates. Surprisingly, SSCP revealed a nucleotide mutation at codon M306 in five (15%) of 33 in vitro EMB-susceptible MDR isolates.

  2. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L; Dhingra, Satish K.; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Legrand, Eric; David A Fidock; Neafsey, Daniel E; Musset, Lise

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations ...

  3. Mesenchymal change and drug resistance in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiditch, Jessica A; Jie, Chunfa; Lautz, Timothy B; Yu, Songtao; Clark, Sandra; Voronov, Dimitry; Chu, Fei; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic initiation has many phenotypic similarities to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including loss of cell-cell adhesion, increased invasiveness, and increased cell mobility. We have previously demonstrated that drug resistance is associated with a metastatic phenotype in neuroblastoma (NB). The purpose of this project was to determine if the development of doxorubicin resistance is associated with characteristics of mesenchymal change in human NB cells. Total RNA was isolated from wild type (WT) and doxorubicin-resistant (DoxR) human NB cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C) and analyzed using the Illumina Human HT-12 version 4 Expression BeadChip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Volcano plots and heat maps were generated. Genes of interest with a fold change in expression >1.5 and an adjusted P change via multiple pathways in the transition to a drug-resistant state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromosomal Instability Confers Intrinsic Multi-Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alvin J X; Endesfelder, David; Rowan, Andrew J; Walther, Axel; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Futreal, P Andrew; Downward, Julian; Szallasi, Zoltan; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Kschischo, Maik; Swanton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aneuploidy is associated with poor prognosis in solid tumours. Spontaneous chromosome mis-segregation events in aneuploid cells promote Chromosomal Instability (CIN) that may contribute to the acquisition of multi-drug resistance in vitro and heighten risk for tumour relapse in animal models. Identification of distinct therapeutic agents that target tumour karyotypic complexity has important clinical implications. In order to identify distinct therapeutic approaches to specifically limit the growth of CIN tumours we focussed on a panel of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, previously classified as either chromosomally-unstable (CIN+) or diploid/near-diploid (CIN−), and treated them individually with a library of kinase inhibitors targeting components of signal transduction, cell cycle and trans-membrane receptor signalling pathways. CIN+ cell lines displayed significant intrinsic multi-drug resistance compared to CIN− cancer cell lines and this appeared to be independent of somatic mutation status and proliferation rate. Confirming the association of CIN rather than ploidy status with multi-drug resistance, tetraploid isogenic cells that had arisen from diploid cell lines displayed lower drug sensitivity than their diploid parental cells only with increasing chromosomal heterogeneity, and isogenic cell line models of CIN+ displayed multi-drug resistance relative to their CIN− parental cancer cell line derivatives. In a meta-analysis of CRC outcome following cytotoxic treatment, CIN+ predicted worse progression-free or disease-free survival relative to patients with CIN− disease. Our results suggest that stratifying tumour responses according to CIN status should be considered within the context of clinical trials to minimize the confounding effects of tumour CIN status on drug sensitivity. PMID:21363922

  5. Mutation in grlA and norA genes in Fluoroquinolone resistant strains of S. aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Asadpour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Fluoroquinolones are one of the most commonly used broad spectrum classes of antibiotics with increasingly drug resistance. The present study was aimed to investigate mutation in grlA and norA genes in fluoroquinolone resistant strains of   S. aureus. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 85 strains of S. aureus was isolated from different clinical samples by biochemical and molecular tests. Susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in the isolates was tested by the disc diffusion method and broth macrodilution method was used to investigate ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration. Mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR in chromosomal grlA gene and norA gen mutations was investigated in quinolone-resistant S. aureus isolates, by PCR amplification of grlA and norA genes and sequencing.   Results. Out of 85 tested bacteria, 17 (20% isolates recognized as fluoroquinolones resistant. Minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofluxacin for resistant isolates ranged between 32 to 512 µg/ml. Two single point mutations S80F and P144S and one double mutation S80F + P144S were determined in grlA gene of Fluoroquinolone resistant strains of S. aureus  but none of resistant strains showed mutation in norA gene. Conclusion. The obtained results demonstrated that grlA gene mutation is one of the most important mechanisms of resistance to ciprofloxacin in clinical isolates of S. aureus in Rasht and most of resistant isolates acquired common mutation in codon 80. Key Words: Fluoroquinolone, S. aureus, grlA , norA

  6. Molecular epidemiology of drug-resistant malaria in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menge David M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the late 1980s a series of malaria epidemics has occurred in western Kenya highlands. Among the possible factors that may contribute to the highland malaria epidemics, parasite resistance to antimalarials has not been well investigated. Methods Using parasites from highland and lowland areas of western Kenya, we examined key mutations associated with Plasmodium falciparum resistance to sulfadoxine – pyrimethamine and chloroquine, including dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr and dihydropteroate synthetase (pfdhps, chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt, and multi-drug resistance gene 1 (pfmdr1. Results We found that >70% of samples harbored 76T pfcrt mutations and over 80% of samples harbored quintuple mutations (51I/59R/108N pfdhfr and 437G/540E pfdhps in both highland and lowland samples. Further, we did not detect significant difference in the frequencies of these mutations between symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria volunteers, and between highland and lowland samples. Conclusion These findings suggest that drug resistance of malaria parasites in the highlands could be contributed by the mutations and their high frequencies as found in the lowland. The results are discussed in terms of the role of drug resistance as a driving force for malaria outbreaks in the highlands.

  7. Resistance of Francisella novicida to Fosmidomycin Associated with Mutations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S Mackie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway is essential in most prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells, and is a validated target for antimicrobial drug development. The formation of MEP is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR. MEP pathway genes have been identified in many Category A and B biothreat agents, including Francisella tularensis, which causes the zoonosis tularemia. Fosmidomycin inhibits purified Francisella DXR. This compound also inhibits the growth of F. tularensis NIH B38, F. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS bacteria. Related compounds such as FR900098 and lipophilic prodrugs of FR900098 have been developed to improve the bioavailability of these DXR inhibitors. In disc-inhibition assays with these compounds, we observed breakthrough colonies of F. novicida in the presence of fosmidomycin, suggesting spontaneous development of fosmidomycin resistance (FosR. FosR bacteria had decreased sensitivity to both fosmidomycin and FR900098. The two most likely targets for the development of mutants would be the DXR enzyme or the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT that allows entry of fosmidomycin into the bacteria. Sensitivity of FosR F. novicida bacteria to compound 1 was not abated suggesting that spontaneous resistance is not due to mutation of DXR. We thus predicted that the glpT transporter may be mutated leading to this resistant phenotype. Supporting this, transposon insertion mutants at the glpT locus were also found to be resistant to fosmidomycin. DNA sequencing of four different spontaneous FosR colonies demonstrated a variety of deletions in the glpT coding region. The overall frequency of FosR mutations in F. novicida was determined to be 6.3 x 10-8. Thus we conclude that one mechanism of resistance of F. novicida to fosmidomycin is caused by mutations in GlpT. This is the first description of mutations in Francisella leading to fosmidomycin

  8. Flu channel drug resistance: a tale of two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielak, Rafal M; Chou, James J

    2010-03-01

    The M2 proteins of influenza A and B virus, AM2 and BM2, respectively, are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize in the viral membrane to form proton-selective channels. Proton conductance of the M2 proteins is required for viral replication; it is believed to equilibrate pH across the viral membrane during cell entry and across the trans-Golgi membrane of infected cells during viral maturation. In addition to the role of M2 in proton conductance, recent mutagenesis and structural studies suggest that the cytoplasmic domains of the M2 proteins also play a role in recruiting the matrix proteins to the cell surface during virus budding. As viral ion channels of minimalist architecture, the membrane-embedded channel domain of M2 has been a model system for investigating the mechanism of proton conduction. Moreover, as a proven drug target for the treatment of influenza A infection, M2 has been the subject of intense research for developing new anti-flu therapeutics. AM2 is the target of two anti-influenza A drugs, amantadine and rimantadine, both belonging to the adamantane class of compounds. However, resistance of influenza A to adamantane is now widespread due to mutations in the channel domain of AM2. This review summarizes the structure and function of both AM2 and BM2 channels, the mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of AM2, as well as the development of new M2 inhibitors as potential anti-flu drugs.

  9. Mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region contribute to Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhenling; Li, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Song; Yang, Hua; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi; Ge, Baoxue

    2014-11-01

    The rapid increase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol (EMB) threatens the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB). We investigated the role of mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region (IGR) in EMB-resistant clinical strains from east China. A total of 767 M. tuberculosis clinical strains were collected and analyzed for their drug susceptibility to EMB using the MGIT 960 system and MIC assay, and the embC-embA IGRs of these strains were sequenced. The transcriptional activity of the embC-embA IGR mutations was examined by reporter gene assays in recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains, and the effect of IGR mutations on its binding to EmbR, a transcription regulator of embAB, was analyzed by gel mobility shift assays. Correlation coefficient analysis showed that the embC-embA IGR mutation is associated with EMB resistance. The clinical strains carrying IGR mutations had a much higher level of embA and embB mRNA as well as higher MICs to EMB. IGR mutations had higher transcriptional activity when transformed into M. smegmatis strains. Mutated IGRs bound to EmbR with much higher affinity than wild-type fragments. The sensitivity of molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) with IGR mutations as an additional marker increased from 65.5% to 73.5%. Mutations of the embC-embA IGR enhance the binding of EmbR to the promoter region of embAB and increase the expression of embAB, thus contributing to EMB resistance. Therefore, identification of IGR mutations as markers of EMB resistance could increase the sensitivity of molecular DST.

  10. Identification of mutations conferring streptomycin resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Hai-Can; Sun, Qing; Xiao, Tong-Yang; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Gui-Lian; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Wan, Kang-Lin

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the spectrum and frequency of mutations in rpsL, rrs, and gidB among 140 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) clinical isolates from China. The association between mutations and different genotypes was also analyzed. Our data revealed that 65.7% of MDR-TB were resistant to streptomycin (STR), and 90.2% of STR-resistant isolates were Beijing strains. STR resistance was correlated with Beijing family (P=0.00). Compared with phenotypic data, detection of mutations for the combination of these 3 genes exhibited 94.6% sensitivity, 91.7% specificity, and 93.6% accuracy. The most common mutations in STR-resistant isolates were rpsL128, 262, and rrs514, of which rpsL128 showed association with Beijing lineage (P=0.00). A combination of these 3 mutations can serve as the reliable predictors for STR resistance, showing the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85.9%, 97.9%, and 90.0%, respectively. Furthermore, gidBA276C, not A615G, was Beijing lineage specific. These findings are useful to develop rapid molecular diagnostic methods for STR resistance in China.

  11. GidB mutation as a phylogenetic marker for Q1 cluster Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and intermediate-level streptomycin resistance determinant in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Macedo, R; Machado, D; Silva, C; Jordão, L; Couto, I; Viveiros, M; Portugal, I

    2014-05-01

    Development of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is usually associated with mutations in rpsL and rrs genes, although up to 50% of clinical streptomycin-resistant isolates may present no mutation in either of these genes. In the present report we investigate the role of gidB gene mutations in streptomycin resistance. We have analyzed 52 streptomycin-resistant and 30 streptomycin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates by sequencing and endonuclease analysis of the gidB and rpsL genes. All clinical isolates were genotyped by 12-loci MIRU-VNTR. The gidB gene of 18 streptomycin-resistant isolates was sequenced and four missense mutations were found: F12L (1/18), L16R (18/18), A80P (4/18) and S100F (18/18). The remaining isolates were screened by endonuclease analysis for mutations A80P in the gidB gene and K43R in the rpsL gene. Overall, mutation A80P in the gidB gene was found in eight streptomycin-resistant isolates and 11 streptomycin-susceptible multidrug-resistant isolates. Also noteworthy, is the fact that gidB mutations were only present in isolates without rpsL and rrs mutations, all from genetic cluster Q1. Streptomycin quantitative drug susceptibility testing showed that isolates carrying the gidB A80P mutation were streptomycin intermediate-level resistant and that standard drug susceptibility testing yielded inconsistent results, probably due to borderline resistance. We conclude that gidB mutations may explain the high number of streptomycin-resistant strains with no mutation in rpsL or rrs. These mutations might occasionally confer low-level streptomycin resistance that will go undetected in standard susceptibility testing.

  12. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and lamivudine resistance mutations in Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and identify prevalent hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and to explore lamivudine-resistant mutations among treated and untreated patients in Jordan.METHODS: A total of 107 cases with chronic hepatitis B were recruited from different medical centers in Jordan. Serological tests were preformed for all cases using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. HBV Genotyping was performed for 70 cases using Line probe genotyping assay, The YMDD mutations were explored for 20 cases (4 were lamivudine naive) using the INNO-LiPA HBV DR assay.RESULTS: Genotype D was the only detected genotype. A total of 6 YMDD mutations were detected in 5 treated patients (31%) while one mutation was detected in the naive patients. Seventeen percent of cases were positive for HBeAg and had statistically significant higher levels of serum aminotransferases.CONCLUSION: HBV genotype D appears to be the only circulating type in Jordanian patients. The YMDD mutations were detected in 31% of lamivudine-treated cases with similar patterns to those found in the lit-erature. We also found a relatively low prevalence of HBeAg expression among examined cases (17%). Awareness of these serologic, genotypic and resistance patterns might help in the formulation of management plans and for predicting clinical outcomes. Further larger scale studies are needed to confirm our results and to examine possible associations among clinical, serologic, and genetic patterns of HBV infections in Jordan.

  13. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  14. Molecular diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Han; Park, Yong Kwang; Park, Eun-Sook; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2014-05-21

    Oral antiviral agents have been developed in the last two decades for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). However, antiviral resistance remains an important challenge for long-term CHB therapy. All of the clinically available oral antiviral agents are nucleoside or nucleotide analogues that target the activity of viral reverse transcriptase (RT), and all are reported to have resistant mutations. Since the hepatitis B virus (HBV) RT, like other viral polymerases, lacks proofreading activity, the emergence of drug-resistance occurs readily under selective pressure from the administration of antiviral agents. The molecular diagnosis of drug-resistant HBV is based on sequence variations, and current diagnostic methods include sequencing, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis, and hybridization. Here, we will discuss the currently available molecular diagnosis tools, in vitro phenotypic assays for validation of drug-resistant HBV, and treatment options for drug-resistant HBV.

  15. Mutation of the mitochondrial large ribosomal RNA can provide pentamidine resistance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örs, Ş Tomris; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D

    2014-09-01

    Pentamidine is used to treat several trypanosomal diseases, as well as opportunistic infection by pathogenic fungi. However, the relevant targets of this drug are unknown. We isolated dominant mutations providing pentamidine resistance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of which was localized to mitochondrial DNA. Next-generation sequencing revealed alteration of a widely conserved base at the peptidyl transferase center of the mitochondrial 21S ribosomal RNA. Our results provide a potential rationale for the toxicity of this drug to patients, and we discuss whether blockade of mitochondrial translation is the mechanism by which pathogenic fungi or protists are killed by pentamidine.

  16. Distinct Afatinib Resistance Mechanisms Identified in Lung Adenocarcinoma Harboring an EGFR Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Toshimitsu; Ohmori, Tohru; Ohba, Motoi; Arata, Satoru; Murata, Yasunori; Kusumoto, Sojiro; Ando, Koichi; Ishida, Hiroo; Ohnishi, Tsukasa; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2017-03-13

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are associated with significant responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR-activating mutations. However, acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs remains a major obstacle. In particular, while the second-generation irreversible EGFR-TKI afatinib is currently used for treating NSCLC patients, the mechanisms underlying acquired afatinib resistance remain poorly understood. Here, heterogeneous mechanisms of acquired resistance were identified following long-term exposure to increasing doses of afatinib in EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells. Notably, three resistant cell lines, PC-9AFR1, PC-9AFR2, and PC-9AFR3 (AFR1, AFR2, and AFR3, respectively), employed distinct mechanisms for avoiding EGFR inhibition, with increased EGFR expression being detected in all resistant cell lines. Moreover, an activating EGFR mutation was partially lost in AFR1 and AFR2 cells. AFR1 cells exhibited afatinib resistance as a result of wild-type KRAS amplification and overexpression; however, these cells showed a progressive decrease and eventual loss of the acquired KRAS dependence, as well as resensitization to afatinib, following a drug holiday. Meanwhile, AFR2 cells exhibited increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), which promoted insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) activity and subsequent AKT phosphorylation, thereby indicating a potential bypass signaling pathway associated with IGFR1. Finally, AFR3 cells harbored the secondary EGFR mutation T790M. Our findings constitute the first report showing acquired wild-type KRAS overexpression and attenuation of afatinib resistance following a drug holiday.

  17. Death receptor ligands, in particular TRAIL, to overcome drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S; Timmer, T; Heijenbrok, FJ; de Vries, EGE

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is hampered by the occurrence of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance. A variety of mechanisms cause drug-resistance. A final common factor, however, is the reduced capacity of drug resistant cells to go into apoptosis following treatment with DNA damaging ag

  18. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  19. [Estimation of Probiotic Lactobacilli Drug Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruslik, N L; Akhatova, D R; Toimentseva, A A; Abdulkhakov, S R; Ilyinskaya, O N; Yarullina, D R

    2015-01-01

    An actual problem of analysis of probiotic lactobacilli resistance to antibiotics and other drugs used in the treatment of gastro-intestinal disturbances has been for the first time solved. The levels of resistance of 19 strains of Lactobacillus (14 strains of L. fermentum, 4 strains of L.plantarum and 1 strain of L.rhamnosus) isolated from commercial probiotics and sour milk products to 14 antibiotics of various nature, i.e. β-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, vancomycin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol were determined. All the isolates were practically susceptible to the drugs of the first line antihelicobacterial therapy, i.e. amoxicillin and clarithromycin, that makes inexpedient the parallel use of the probiotics containing the above lactobacilli in the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcer, despite the lactobacilli antagonism with respect to Helicobacter pylory. Lactobacilli are as well resistant to mesalazin and can be used for correction of dysbiosis in inflammatory affections of the intestine.

  20. Cancer Exosomes as Mediators of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Maria do Rosário; Pedro, Ana; Lyden, David

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, several studies demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is a critical determinant not only of tumor progression and metastasis, but also of resistance to therapy. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin, which contain mRNAs, DNA fragments, and proteins, and are released by many different cell types, including cancer cells. Mounting evidence has shown that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with the tumor microenvironment. Understanding how exosomes and the tumor microenvironment impact drug resistance will allow novel and better strategies to overcome drug resistance and treat cancer. Here, we describe a technique for exosome purification from cell culture, and fresh and frozen plasma, and further analysis by electron microscopy, NanoSight microscope, and Western blot.

  1. Genotypic characterization of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Khin Saw; Nakajima, Chie; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Win, Min Min; Shwe, Mu Mu; Win, Aye Aye; Lwin, Thandar; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Ti, Ti; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-03-01

    The number of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases is rising worldwide. As a countermeasure against this situation, the implementation of rapid molecular tests to identify MDR-TB would be effective. To develop such tests, information on the frequency and distribution of mutations associating with phenotypic drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required in each country. During 2010, the common mutations in the rpoB, katG and inhA of 178 phenotypically MDR M. tuberculosis isolates collected by the National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) in Myanmar were investigated by DNA sequencing. Mutations affecting the 81-bp rifampicin (RIF) resistance-determining region (RRDR) of the rpoB were identified in 127 of 178 isolates (71.3%). Two of the most frequently affected codons were 531 and 526, with percentages of 48.3% and 14.0% respectively. For isoniazid (INH) resistance, 114 of 178 MDR-TB isolates (64.0%) had mutations in the katG in which a mutation-conferring amino acid substitution at codon 315 from Ser to Thr was the most common. Mutations in the inhA regulatory region were also detected in 20 (11.2%) isolates, with the majority at position -15. Distinct mutation rate and pattern from surrounding countries might suggest that MDR-TB has developed and spread domestically in Myanmar.

  2. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  3. Analysis of gene mutations associated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergence of drug resistance is one of the most important threats to tuberculosis control programs. This study was aimed to analyze the frequency of gene mutations associated with resistance to isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) and ethambutol (EMB) among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Northwest Ethiopia, and to assess the performance of the GenoType® MTBDRplus and GenoType® MTBDRsl assays as compared to the BacT/ALERT 3D system. Methods Two hundred sixty Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from smear positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed between March 2009 and July 2009 were included in this study. Drug susceptibility tests were performed in the Institute of Medical Microbiology and Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Leipzig, Germany. Results Of 260 isolates, mutations conferring resistance to INH, RMP, or EMB were detected in 35, 15, and 8 isolates, respectively, while multidrug resistance (MDR) was present in 13 of the isolates. Of 35 INH resistant strains, 33 had mutations in the katG gene at Ser315Thr 1 and two strains had mutation in the inhA gene at C15T. Among 15 RMP resistant isolates, 11 had rpoB gene mutation at Ser531Leu, one at His526Asp, and three strains had mutations only at the wild type probes. Of 8 EMB resistant strains, two had mutations in the embB gene at Met306Ile, one at Met306Val, and five strains had mutations only at the wild type probes. The GenoType® MTBDRplus assay had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 99% for INH resistance, and 100% sensitivity and specificity to detect RMP resistance and MDR. The GenoType® MTBDRsl assay had a sensitivity of 42% and specificity of 100% for EMB resistance. Conclusion The dominance of single gene mutations associated with the resistance to INH and RMP was observed in the codon 315 of the katG gene and codon 531 of the rpoB gene, respectively. The GenoType® MTBDRplus assay is a sensitive and specific tool for diagnosis of resistance to INH

  4. Analysis of gene mutations associated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessema Belay

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of drug resistance is one of the most important threats to tuberculosis control programs. This study was aimed to analyze the frequency of gene mutations associated with resistance to isoniazid (INH, rifampicin (RMP and ethambutol (EMB among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Northwest Ethiopia, and to assess the performance of the GenoType® MTBDRplus and GenoType® MTBDRsl assays as compared to the BacT/ALERT 3D system. Methods Two hundred sixty Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from smear positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed between March 2009 and July 2009 were included in this study. Drug susceptibility tests were performed in the Institute of Medical Microbiology and Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Leipzig, Germany. Results Of 260 isolates, mutations conferring resistance to INH, RMP, or EMB were detected in 35, 15, and 8 isolates, respectively, while multidrug resistance (MDR was present in 13 of the isolates. Of 35 INH resistant strains, 33 had mutations in the katG gene at Ser315Thr 1 and two strains had mutation in the inhA gene at C15T. Among 15 RMP resistant isolates, 11 had rpoB gene mutation at Ser531Leu, one at His526Asp, and three strains had mutations only at the wild type probes. Of 8 EMB resistant strains, two had mutations in the embB gene at Met306Ile, one at Met306Val, and five strains had mutations only at the wild type probes. The GenoType® MTBDRplus assay had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 99% for INH resistance, and 100% sensitivity and specificity to detect RMP resistance and MDR. The GenoType® MTBDRsl assay had a sensitivity of 42% and specificity of 100% for EMB resistance. Conclusion The dominance of single gene mutations associated with the resistance to INH and RMP was observed in the codon 315 of the katG gene and codon 531 of the rpoB gene, respectively. The GenoType® MTBDRplus assay is a sensitive and specific tool for

  5. Study of rifampicin and isoniazid resistance mutation genes of M. tuberculosis isolates in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, J B; Rai, S K; Shrestha, S; Maharjan, B; Bhatta, D R; Ghimire, P

    2011-09-01

    We studied the rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistant genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from sputum samples of re-treated TB cases using phenotypic drug susceptibility test (DST) and rapid molecular method (Genotype; MTBDR plus, Hains Life Science, Nehren, Germany). Of the total 207 isolates included in this study, 90 (42.0%) were RIF resistant, 107 (50.7%) were INH resistant whereas 86 (41.5%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) by DST. According to genotypic analysis, 37.0% (77/207) were RIF resistant, 50.2% (105/207) INH resistant and 70 (33.8%) were MDR. Among the total 90 RIF resistant isolates, 85.5% (77/90) showed mutation in 81 bp of rpoB gene and the mutation locus were distributed as follows; MUT1 Asp516Val (16.7%; 15/90), MUT2A His526Tyr (6.6%; 6/90), MUT2B His526Asp (5.5%; 5/90) and MUT3 Ser531Lue (56.7%; 51/90). Among the total 107 INH resistant isolates, the mutation located in katG gene was 98.1% (105/107) and in inhA MUT1 gene was (16.8%; 18/107). The mutation locus were distributed as follows; MUT1 Ser315Thr (77.6%; 83/107), MUT2 Ser315Ile (3.7%; 4/107) in katG and in inhA MUT1Cys15Thr (16.8%; 18/107). The highest frequency of mutations in rpoB gene was found at the region of codon Ser531Leu (56.7%) while the frequency of mutation in katG and inhA gene were found at the region of codon Ser315Thr (77.6%) and Cyst15Thr (17.1%), respectively. The rapid molecular test kit used in this study was found to be sensitive as well as specific for detection of RIF and INH resistant gene and also helpful in early detection of MDR-TB.

  6. Resistance to cyclosporin A derives from mutations in hepatitis C virus nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masaaki; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Takagi, Asako; Tobita, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kazuaki; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-05-23

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug that targets cyclophilins, cellular cofactors that regulate the immune system. Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is suppressed by CsA, but the molecular basis of this suppression is still not fully understood. To investigate this suppression, we cultured HCV replicon cells (Con1, HCV genotype 1b, FLR-N cell) in the presence of CsA and obtained nine CsA-resistant FLR-N cell lines. We determined full-length HCV sequences for all nine clones, and chose two (clones #6 and #7) of the nine clones that have high replication activity in the presence of CsA for further analysis. Both clones showed two consensus mutations, one in NS3 (T1280V) and the other in NS5A (D2292E). Characterization of various mutants indicated that the D2292E mutation conferred resistance to high concentrations of CsA (up to 2 μM). In addition, the missense mutation T1280V contributed to the recovery of colony formation activity. The effects of these mutations are also evident in two established HCV replicon cell lines-HCV-RMT ([1], genotype 1a) and JFH1 (genotype 2a). Moreover, three other missense mutations in NS5A-D2303H, S2362G, and E2414K-enhanced the resistance to CsA conferred by D2292E; these double or all quadruple mutants could resist approximately 8- to 25-fold higher concentrations of CsA than could wild-type Con1. These four mutations, either as single or combinations, also made Con1 strain resistant to two other cyclophilin inhibitors, N-methyl-4-isoleucine-cyclosporin (NIM811) or Debio-025. Interestingly, the changes in IC50 values that resulted from each of these mutations were the lowest in the Debio-025-treated cells, indicating its highest resistant activity against the adaptive mutation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The skill and style to model the evolution of resistance to pesticides and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Resistance to pesticides and drugs led to the development of theoretical models aimed at identifying the main factors of resistance evolution and predicting the efficiency of resistance management strategies. We investigated the various ways in which the evolution of resistance has been modelled over the last three decades, by reviewing 187 articles published on models of the evolution of resistance to all major classes of pesticides and drugs. We found that (i) the technical properties of the model were most strongly influenced by the class of pesticide or drug and the target organism, (ii) the resistance management strategies studied were quite similar for the different classes of pesticides or drugs, except that the refuge strategy was mostly used in models of the evolution of resistance to insecticidal proteins, (iii) economic criteria were rarely used to evaluate the evolution of resistance and (iv) the influence of mutation, migration and drift on the speed of resistance development has been poorly investigated. We propose guidelines for the future development of theoretical models of the evolution of resistance. For instance, we stress the potential need to give more emphasis to the three evolutionary forces migration, mutation and genetic drift rather than simply selection.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug-resistance testing: challenges, recent developments and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, T; Miotto, P; Köser, C U; Viveiros, M; Böttger, E; Cambau, E

    2017-03-01

    Drug-resistance testing, or antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), is mandatory for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cases of failure on standard therapy. We reviewed the different methods and techniques of phenotypic and genotypic approaches. Although multiresistant and extensively drug-resistant (MDR/XDR) tuberculosis is present worldwide, AST for M. tuberculosis (AST-MTB) is still mainly performed according to the resources available rather than the drug-resistance rates. Phenotypic methods, i.e. culture-based AST, are commonly used in high-income countries to confirm susceptibility of new cases of tuberculosis. They are also used to detect resistance in tuberculosis cases with risk factors, in combination with genotypic tests. In low-income countries, genotypic methods screening hot-spot mutations known to confer resistance were found to be easier to perform because they avoid the culture and biosafety constraint. Given that genotypic tests can rapidly detect the prominent mechanisms of resistance, such as the rpoB mutation for rifampicin resistance, we are facing new challenges with the observation of false-resistance (mutations not conferring resistance) and false-susceptibility (mutations different from the common mechanism) results. Phenotypic and genotypic approaches are therefore complementary for obtaining a high sensitivity and specificity for detecting drug resistances and susceptibilities to accurately predict MDR/XDR cure and to gather relevant data for resistance surveillance. Although AST-MTB was established in the 1960s, there is no consensus reference method for MIC determination against which the numerous AST-MTB techniques can be compared. This information is necessary for assessing in vitro activity and setting breakpoints for future anti-tuberculosis agents. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA.    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org.

  10. Emergence of primary NNRTI resistance mutations without antiretroviral selective pressure in a HAART-treated child.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Machado

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The use of antiretrovirals (ARV during pregnancy has drastically reduced the rate of the human immunodeficiency virus perinatal transmission (MTCT. As a consequence of widespread ARV use, transmission of drug resistant strains from mothers to their babies is increasing. Ultra-sensitive PCR techniques have permitted the quantification of minority viral populations, but little is known about the transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 minority population in the setting of MTCT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the case of a female child born to an HIV-infected mother, which had not taken any ARV during the pregnancy. The child's first genotype demonstrated a minor non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (K101E, and during her treatment with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors full resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI emerged (G190A. Phenotypic/genotypic analysis of variant quasispecies through yeast TyHRT assay was conducted to characterize minority resistant viral strains circulating in both mother and child. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian MCMC phylogenetic analyses were performed with samples from the pair to assess genetic relatedness among minor viral strains. The analysis showed that the child received a minor NNRTI resistant variant, containing the mutation K101E that was present in less than 1% of the mother's quasispecies. Phylogenetic analyses have suggested common ancestry between the mother's virus strain carrying K101E with the viral sequences from the child. CONCLUSION: This is the first documentation of MTCT of a minority resistant strain of HIV-1. The transmission of minor resistant variants carries the threat of emergence of multi-drug primary mutations without identified specific selective pressures.

  11. Dose-response curve slope is a missing dimension in the analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampah, Maame Efua S; Shen, Lin; Jilek, Benjamin L; Siliciano, Robert F

    2011-05-03

    HIV-1 drug resistance is a major clinical problem. Resistance is evaluated using in vitro assays measuring the fold change in IC(50) caused by resistance mutations. Antiretroviral drugs are used at concentrations above IC(50), however, and inhibition at clinical concentrations can only be predicted from IC(50) if the shape of the dose-response curve is also known. Curve shape is influenced by cooperative interactions and is described mathematically by the slope parameter or Hill coefficient (m). Implicit in current analysis of resistance is the assumption that mutations shift dose-response curves to the right without affecting the slope. We show here that m is altered by resistance mutations. For reverse transcriptase and fusion inhibitors, single resistance mutations affect both slope and IC(50). For protease inhibitors, single mutations primarily affect slope. For integrase inhibitors, only IC(50) is affected. Thus, there are fundamental pharmacodynamic differences in resistance to different drug classes. Instantaneous inhibitory potential (IIP), the log inhibition of single-round infectivity at clinical concentrations, takes into account both slope and IC(50), and thus provides a direct measure of the reduction in susceptibility produced by mutations and the residual activity of drugs against resistant viruses. The standard measure, fold change in IC(50), does not correlate well with changes in IIP when mutations alter slope. These results challenge a fundamental assumption underlying current analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance and suggest that a more complete understanding of how resistance mutations reduce antiviral activity requires consideration of a previously ignored parameter, the dose-response curve slope.

  12. Strategies to manage antifungal drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsiang-Kuang; Perfect, John R

    2011-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. From more than half a million deaths from cryptococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa to an unchanging death rate from invasive candidiasis, despite three antifungal classes of drugs, insights into better strategies to reduce therapeutic failures or resistance are needed. This review examines the issues around antifungal drug resistance from both a basic description of the failures and how they are detected to the variety of issues that need to be addressed to help prevent failures for successful management. The reader will gain an understanding of the clinical complexities in this patient population for management of invasive fungal infections. Throughout the review, principles of management are given along with some specific clinical examples to illustrate the issues and frame the knowledge base. From this discussion it is hoped that the clinician can use the insights provided to manage individual patients and find links to the evidence-based material that support its conclusions. Also, this review specifically identifies the limitations of present management and directs clinicians to gather additional information and provide even better treatment strategies. Invasive fungal infections are life-threatening complications of serious underlying diseases. Their management can be complicated by both direct and clinical drug resistance and by understanding these possibilities and correcting them; most patients can be successfully managed with present antifungal drugs if the underlying diseases can be controlled.

  13. Prevalence and evolution of drug resistance HIV-1 variants in Henan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing; Yun; LI; Han; Ping; LI; Lin; LI; Hong; LI; Zhe; WANG; Kun; YANG; Zuo; Yi; BAO; Dao; Min; ZHUANG; Si; Yang; LIU; Yong; Jian; LIU; Hui; XING; Yi; Ming; SHAO

    2005-01-01

    To understand the prevalence and evolution of drug resistant HIV strains in Henan China after the implementation of free antiretroviral therapy for AIDS patients. 45 drug naive AIDS patients, 118 AIDS patients who received three months antiretroviral therapy and 124 AIDS patients who received six months antiretroviral treatment were recruited in the southern part of Henan province. Information on general condition, antiretroviral medicines, adherence and clinical syndromes were collected by face to face interview. Meanwhile, 14ml EDTA anticoagulant blood was drawn. CD4/CD8 T cell count, viral load and genotypic drug resistance were tested. The rates of clinical improvement were 55.1% and 50.8% respectively three months and six months after antiretroviral therapy. The mean CD4 cell count after antiretroviral therapy was significantly higher than in drug naive patients. The prevalence rate of drug resistant HIV strains were 13.9%, 45.4% and 62.7% in drug naive patients, three month treatment patients and six month treatment patients, respectively.The number of resistance mutation codons and the frequency of mutations increased significantly with continued antiretroviral therapy. The mutation sites were primarily at the 103, 106 and 215 codons in the three-month treatment group and they increased to 15 codon mutations in the six-month treatment group. From this result, the evolution of drug resistant strains was inferred to begin with the high level NNRTI resistant strain, and then develop low level resistant strains to NRTIs. The HIV strains with high level resistance to NVP and low level resistance to AZT and DDI were highly prevalent because of the AZT+DDI+NVP combination therapy. These HIV strains were also cross resistant to DLV, EFV, DDC and D4T. Poor adherence to therapy was believed to be the main reason for the emergence and prevalence of drug resistant HIV strains. The prevalence of drug resistant HIV strains was increased with the continuation of

  14. The N550K/H Mutations in FGFR2 Confer Differential Resistance to PD173074, Dovitinib, and Ponatinib ATP-Competitive Inhibitors

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    Sara A Byron

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We sought to identify fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 kinase domain mutations that confer resistance to the pan-FGFR inhibitor, dovitinib, and explore the mechanism of action of the drug-resistant mutations. We cultured BaF3 cells overexpressing FGFR2 in high concentrations of dovitinib and identified 14 dovitinib-resistant mutations, including the N550K mutation observed in 25% of FGFR2mutant endometrial cancers (ECs. Structural and biochemical in vitro kinase analyses, together with BaF3 proliferation assays, showed that the resistance mutations elevate the intrinsic kinase activity of FGFR2. BaF3 lines were used to assess the ability of each mutation to confer cross-resistance to PD173074 and ponatinib. Unlike PD173074, ponatinib effectively inhibited all the dovitinib-resistant FGFR2 mutants except the V565I gatekeeper mutation, suggesting ponatinib but not dovitinib targets the active conformation of FGFR2 kinase. EC cell lines expressing wild-type FGFR2 were relatively resistant to all inhibitors, whereas EC cell lines expressing mutated FGFR2 showed differential sensitivity. Within the FGFR2mutant cell lines, three of seven showed marked resistance to PD173074 and relative resistance to dovitinib and ponatinib. This suggests that alternative mechanisms distinct from kinase domain mutations are responsible for intrinsic resistance in these three EC lines. Finally, overexpression of FGFR2N550K in JHUEM-2 cells (FGFR2C383R conferred resistance (about five-fold to PD173074, providing independent data that FGFR2N550K can be associated with drug resistance. Biochemical in vitro kinase analyses also show that ponatinib is more effective than dovitinib at inhibiting FGFR2N550K. We propose that tumors harboring mutationally activated FGFRs should be treated with FGFR inhibitors that specifically bind the active kinase.

  15. Investigating BRCA Mutations: A Breakthrough in Precision Medicine of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Iacovelli, Roberto; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Massari, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the development of novel effective therapeutic strategies, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a disease with a lethal course and a high biological and molecular heterogeneity. To date, germline mutations in the BRCA gene represent one of the main risk factors for developing prostate cancer, with a strong association with aggressive phenotype and poor clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the genomic landscape of prostate cancer has strengthened the idea that "synthetic lethality" of this disease might be useful in cancer-drug discovery, focusing on agents such as platinum compounds and poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). In this review, we summarize the main data available on BRCA mutations and discuss the clinical implications of these genomic aberrations in the management of prostate cancer, stressing the need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers and to deeply understand the mechanisms of treatment resistance, in order to maximize personalized medicine protocols and therefore clinical benefit.

  16. P-loop conformation governed crizotinib resistance in G2032R-mutated ROS1 tyrosine kinase: clues from free energy landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyong Sun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinases are regarded as excellent targets for chemical drug therapy of carcinomas. However, under strong purifying selection, drug resistance usually occurs in the cancer cells within a short term. Many cases of drug resistance have been found to be associated with secondary mutations in drug target, which lead to the attenuated drug-target interactions. For example, recently, an acquired secondary mutation, G2032R, has been detected in the drug target, ROS1 tyrosine kinase, from a crizotinib-resistant patient, who responded poorly to crizotinib within a very short therapeutic term. It was supposed that the mutation was located at the solvent front and might hinder the drug binding. However, a different fact could be uncovered by the simulations reported in this study. Here, free energy surfaces were characterized by the drug-target distance and the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop conformational change of the crizotinib-ROS1 complex through advanced molecular dynamics techniques, and it was revealed that the more rigid P-loop region in the G2032R-mutated ROS1 was primarily responsible for the crizotinib resistance, which on one hand, impaired the binding of crizotinib directly, and on the other hand, shortened the residence time induced by the flattened free energy surface. Therefore, both of the binding affinity and the drug residence time should be emphasized in rational drug design to overcome the kinase resistance.

  17. P-loop conformation governed crizotinib resistance in G2032R-mutated ROS1 tyrosine kinase: clues from free energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiyong; Li, Youyong; Tian, Sheng; Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2014-07-01

    Tyrosine kinases are regarded as excellent targets for chemical drug therapy of carcinomas. However, under strong purifying selection, drug resistance usually occurs in the cancer cells within a short term. Many cases of drug resistance have been found to be associated with secondary mutations in drug target, which lead to the attenuated drug-target interactions. For example, recently, an acquired secondary mutation, G2032R, has been detected in the drug target, ROS1 tyrosine kinase, from a crizotinib-resistant patient, who responded poorly to crizotinib within a very short therapeutic term. It was supposed that the mutation was located at the solvent front and might hinder the drug binding. However, a different fact could be uncovered by the simulations reported in this study. Here, free energy surfaces were characterized by the drug-target distance and the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) conformational change of the crizotinib-ROS1 complex through advanced molecular dynamics techniques, and it was revealed that the more rigid P-loop region in the G2032R-mutated ROS1 was primarily responsible for the crizotinib resistance, which on one hand, impaired the binding of crizotinib directly, and on the other hand, shortened the residence time induced by the flattened free energy surface. Therefore, both of the binding affinity and the drug residence time should be emphasized in rational drug design to overcome the kinase resistance.

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Primary Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng Fen; ZHOU Yang; PANG Yu; ZHENG Hui Wen; ZHAO Yan Lin

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigatetheprevalence of primary drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and associated risk factors in China.We also explored factors contributing tothe transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). MethodsA total of 2794 representative,Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from treatment-naive patients were subjected to drug susceptibility testing, and risk factors for drug-resistant TBwere analyzed. We also analyzed MDR-TB strain sublineages, drug-resistance-conferring mutations, and risk factors associated with clustered primary MDR strains. ResultsAmong 2794Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from treatment-naive patients, the prevalence of any resistance to first-line drugs was 33.2%andthe prevalence of MDR-TB was 5.7%. We did not find any risk factors significantly associated with resistance to first-line drugs.The93 primary MDR-TB isolates were classified into six sublineages, of which, 75 (80.6%) isolates were the RD105-deleted Beijing lineage.The largest sublineage included 65 (69.9%) isolates with concurrent deletions of RD105, RD207, and RD181.Twenty-nine (31.2%) primary MDR strains grouped in clusters;MDR isolates in clusters were more likely to have S531LrpoBmutation. ConclusionThis study indicates that primary drug-resistantTBand MDR-TBstrains are prevalent in China,and multiplemeasures should be taken toaddress drug-resistant TB.

  19. A Molecular Modeling Study of the Hydroxyflutamide Resistance Mechanism Induced by Androgen Receptor Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyflutamide (HF, an active metabolite of the first generation antiandrogen flutamide, was used in clinic to treat prostate cancer targeting androgen receptor (AR. However, a drug resistance problem appears after about one year’s treatment. AR T877A is the first mutation that was found to cause a resistance problem. Then W741C_T877A and F876L_T877A mutations were also reported to cause resistance to HF, while W741C and F876L single mutations cannot. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method have been carried out to analyze the interaction mechanism between HF and wild-type (WT/mutant ARs. The obtained results indicate that AR helix 12 (H12 plays a pivotal role in the resistance of HF. It can affect the coactivator binding site at the activation function 2 domain (AF2, surrounded by H3, H4, and H12. When H12 closes to the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD like a lid, the coactivator binding site can be formed to promote transcription. However, once H12 is opened to expose LBD, the coactivator binding site will be distorted, leading to invalid transcription. Moreover, per-residue free energy decomposition analyses indicate that N705, T877, and M895 are vital residues in the agonist/antagonist mechanism of HF.

  20. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

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    C Brandon Ogbunugafor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  1. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Wylie, C Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with regards to their

  2. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Wylie, C. Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions—drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors—pyrimethamine and cycloguanil—across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary “forks in the road” that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  3. Antiviral therapy against chronic hepatitis B in Brazil: high rates of lamivudine resistance mutations and correlation with HBV genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Campello do Amaral Mello

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of antiviral treatments of chronic hepatitis B has been poorly studied in Brazil. Here, hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA positivity, drug resistance mutations and their association with HBV genotypes were evaluated in chronically HBV-infected patients under different drug regimens in Brazil. The study involved 129 patients under interferon or nucleos(tide analogue therapy for a median treatment time of 12 months. One hundred and five (81% of these patients were treated with lamivudine (LAM, either in monotherapy or in combination with newer drugs, such as entecavir (ETV or tenofovir (TDF. High (37.5-100% rates of HBV DNA positivity were observed with all but one drug regimen (LAM + ETV. However, patients that were treated with ETV alone, TDF alone or with LAM combination therapies had a mean viral load that was 3-4 log lower than patients treated with LAM monotherapy. Of the patients treated with LAM, 47% developed resistance mutations. HBV genotypes A (59.1%, D (30.3% and F (9.1% were found. There was no association between the presence of LAM resistance mutations and genotypes, HBeAg status or treatment duration. Nevertheless, the rtM204V mutation was observed more frequently (12/13, 92% in genotype A than in the others (p = 0.023. Six out of nine isolates that contained the rtM204I mutation belonged to genotype D and half of them displayed a single mutation. Genotype D isolates with the rtM204V variant preferentially displayed a triple mutation, while genotype A preferentially displayed a double mutation (p = 0.04.

  4. Characteristics of rpoB and katG gene mutation in drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Lu'an area%六安地区结核分枝杆菌耐药基因katG和rpoB的突变特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常宏伟; 李开春; 马泰; 杨卫; 张凤; 张丽梅; 孙林; 李娟; 李伟

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析临床分离的结核分枝杆菌katG和rpoB基因的突变情况与耐药之间的关系,了解六安地区耐药结核分枝杆菌的基因突变特征。方法采用比例法对六安地区65株结核分枝杆菌临床分离株进行药敏试验;通过特异性引物,对目的基因片段katG和rpoB进行扩增、测序后进行分析。结果60株结核分枝杆菌中分别有有9株耐异烟肼和14株耐利福平,其中同时耐异烟肼和利福平的6株。9株耐异烟肼菌株中,4株katG在315(A GC→ACC或ACA)位点发生突变,占44.4%;14株耐利福平菌株中,11株rpoB分别在516(GAC→GTC)、526(CAC→CGC或TAC)和531(TCG→TTG)位点发生突变,占总耐药菌株的78.6%;6株同时对利福平和异烟肼耐药,其中5株katG或rpoB基因发生突变,占83.3%。结论六安地区结核分枝杆菌耐异烟肼和耐利福平分别主要是由katG和rpoB基因突变引起,其中耐异烟肼主要在315(AGC→ACC或ACA)位,而耐利福平在516(GAC→GTC)、526(CAC→CGC或TAC)和531(TCG→TTG)位,都发生了突变。%Objective To investigate the characteristics of mutations in the rpoB and katG genes(clini⁃cal isolates) leading to drug-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis(M. tuberculosis) in Lu’an area. Methods Drug sensitive test was performed in 65 strains of M. tuberculosis clinically isolated from the sputum samples col⁃lected in Lu'an area, and the gene fragments of rpoB and katG were amplified with specific primers, sequenced and analyzed. Results Of the 60 strains of M. tuberculosis, 9 were mutations involved in resistance against isoni⁃azid, 14 against rifampin, and 6 against both. The mutation for the 4 in 9 isoniazid-resistant strains(katG gene) occurred at codon 315(codon change from AGG to ACC or ACA, 44.4%), and 11 of 14 rifampin resistant strains(rpoB gene) occurred at codon 516(GAC→GTC), 526(CAC→CGC or TAC) and 531(TCG→TTG, 78.6 %). Five in 6

  5. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Elisea; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Ganiats, Theodore; Brodine, Stephanie; Alcaraz, John; Rodwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance. In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution. Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay. Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection of all gyr

  6. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisea Avalos

    Full Text Available The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance.In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution.Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay.Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection

  7. Fitness trade-offs in the evolution of dihydrofolate reductase and drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna S Costanzo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patterns of emerging drug resistance reflect the underlying adaptive landscapes for specific drugs. In Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the most serious form of malaria, antifolate drugs inhibit the function of essential enzymes in the folate pathway. However, a handful of mutations in the gene coding for one such enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, confer drug resistance. Understanding how evolution proceeds from drug susceptibility to drug resistance is critical if new antifolate treatments are to have sustained usefulness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use a transgenic yeast expression system to build on previous studies that described the adaptive landscape for the antifolate drug pyrimethamine, and we describe the most likely evolutionary trajectories for the evolution of drug resistance to the antifolate chlorcycloguanil. We find that the adaptive landscape for chlorcycloguanil is multi-peaked, not all highly resistant alleles are equally accessible by evolution, and there are both commonalities and differences in adaptive landscapes for chlorcycloguanil and pyrimethamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that cross-resistance between drugs targeting the same enzyme reflect the fitness landscapes associated with each particular drug and the position of the genotype on both landscapes. The possible public health implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Multi Drug Resistant (MDR and Extensively Resistant (XDR Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Cesur

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis that is resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most powerful first-line anti-TB drugs. Extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis that is resistant to resistant to isoniazid and rifampin and to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of three injectable second-line drugs (namely, amikacin, kanamicin, or capreomycin. MDR-TB and XDR- TB are great dangers that threaten the public health. XDR-TB has been reported from many countries including the United States. In Turkey, among newly diagnosed cases, it was reported that the number of MDR-TB patients was 101 (3.1%, MDR-TB rate in the retreatment cases was 17.7% (90 patients, and MDR-TB rate in all cases was 5.1 (191 patients in 2005. The percentages were calculated through the number of patients who were tested in terms of susceptibility for both isoniazide and rifampin. In 2009, it was reported that the number of MDR-TB patients was 99 (2.7% among newly diagnosed cases, it was 123 (20.5 % in the retreatment cases and the total number of MDR-TB cases was 222 (5.1%. The first patient with XDR-TB was identified in 2010 in Turkey. Diagnosis of XDR TB takes several weeks by using conventional culture-based methods, although (however some molecular test can detect it rapidly. Treatment of XDR-TB patients is difficult and usually requiring at least 18-24 months of four to six second-line anti-TB drugs. The success rate with the treatment is about 30-50%, and mortality rate is higher in HIV-infected patients. Prevention of contact to XDR-TB patients is more complicated by the lack of a proven effective preventive treatment for XDR latent tuberculosis infection. Rapid diagnostic tests and new anti-TB drugs are needed to control the spread of this worldwide public health problem. [Dis Mol Med 2013; 1(4.000: 72-76

  9. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  10. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  11. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  12. Tuberculosis drug resistance in the Western Cape | Weyer | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Drug resistance is a serious problem in the treatment of tuberculosis ... Design, setting, subjects, outcome measures: During a defined period, all adult ... Logistic regression analysis of the data indicated that drug resistance was not ...

  13. [Conventional and molecular diagnosis in a group of patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindru, Roxana; Spînu, Victor; Popa, Cristina; Botezatu, Elena; Spătaru, Ruxandra

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, although the incidence of the sensitive/susceptible tuberculosis diminished, the number of drug resistant tuberculosis is growing. The bacteriological diagnosis, genetic and phenotypic, becomes essential for the epidemic control. The resistance appears as a phenotypic expression of mutations from M. tuberculosis genome. The mutations that appear for Rifampicin are in region rpoB, for Isoniazid in region katG and inhA, for Ethambutol-embB, Quinolone-gyrA, Aminoglicozid and Cyclical Peptides-rrs. To follow the concordance of results of drug sensitivity test (DST) through phenotypic and genetic method, we analyzed a group of 40 patients with TB-DR. We performed drug susceptibility testing on Lowenstein-Jensen medium according to the instructions of the manufacturer. The strains were tested indirect genetic too, Genotype MTBDR plus forl INH and RIF and Genotype MTBDRsl for the second line drugs. The concordance between genetic method and the phenotypic method is 95%, 5% from the patients have different sensitivity to INH and RIF, butphenotypical they are resistant, meaning that they have other mutations undetected by the strip. The most common mutation in region rpoB is MUT3 (52%) associating the absence of band W8. Mutations in the region rpoB MUT1 and MUT2A are 12.5%, and 15% respectively. For high resistance to INH, the mostcommon isMUT1 forkatG 95% and forlow resistance to INHMUTI from region inhA-30%. For the second line drugs, the most frequent concordance between genetic method andphenotypic method is for EMB, of 30%, geneticallyspeaking the strains display no mutation in region embB, but are resistantin phenotypic method. For FQ, KAN, AMKand CAP the concordance between the two methods is of 100% to all tested strains. In conclusion, genetic methods have high sensitivity, they are fast and shorten significantly the diagnosis time.

  14. Screening for Stress Resistance Mutations in the Mouse

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    Wallace S Chick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Longevity is correlated with stress resistance in many animal models. However, previous efforts through the boosting of the antioxidant defense system did not extend life span, suggesting that longevity related stress resistance is mediated by other uncharacterized pathways. We have developed a high-throughput platform for screening and rapid identification of novel genetic mutants in the mouse that are stress-resistant. Selection for resistance to stressors occurs in mutagenized mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, which are carefully treated so as to maintain pluripotency for mouse production. Initial characterization of these mutant ES cells revealed mutations in Pigl, Tiam1, and Rffl, among others. These genes are implicated in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis, NADPH oxidase function, and inflammation. These mutants: (1 are resistant to two different oxidative stressors, paraquat and the omission of 2-mercaptoethanol, (2 have reduced levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, (3 are capable of generating live mice, and (4 transmit the stress resistance phenotype to the mice. This strategy offers an efficient way to select for new mutants expressing a stress resistance phenotype, to rapidly identify the causative genes, and to develop mice for in vivo studies.

  15. Multiple origins of resistance-conferring mutations in Plasmodium vivax dihydrofolate reductase

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    O'Neil Michael T

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to maximize the useful therapeutic life of antimalarial drugs, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms by which parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs are selected and spread in natural populations. Recent work has demonstrated that pyrimethamine-resistance conferring mutations in Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr have arisen rarely de novo, but spread widely in Asia and Africa. The origin and spread of mutations in Plasmodium vivax dhfr were assessed by constructing haplotypes based on sequencing dhfr and its flanking regions. Methods The P. vivax dhfr coding region, 792 bp upstream and 683 bp downstream were amplified and sequenced from 137 contemporary patient isolates from Colombia, India, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vanuatu. A repeat motif located 2.6 kb upstream of dhfr was also sequenced from 75 of 137 patient isolates, and mutational relationships among the haplotypes were visualized using the programme Network. Results Synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the dhfr coding region were identified, as was the well-documented in-frame insertion/deletion (indel. SNPs were also identified upstream and downstream of dhfr, with an indel and a highly polymorphic repeat region identified upstream of dhfr. The regions flanking dhfr were highly variable. The double mutant (58R/117N dhfr allele has evolved from several origins, because the 58R is encoded by at least 3 different codons. The triple (58R/61M/117T and quadruple (57L/61M/117T/173F, 57I/58R/61M/117T and 57L/58R/61M/117T mutant alleles had at least three independent origins in Thailand, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea/Vanuatu. Conclusion It was found that the P. vivax dhfr coding region and its flanking intergenic regions are highly polymorphic and that mutations in P. vivax dhfr that confer antifolate resistance have arisen several times in the Asian region. This contrasts

  16. Longitudinal Detection and Persistence of Minority Drug-Resistant Populations and Their Effect on Salvage Therapy.

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    Masako Nishizawa

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant HIV are more prevalent and persist longer than previously demonstrated by bulk sequencing due to the ability to detect low-frequency variants. To clarify a clinical benefit to monitoring minority-level drug resistance populations as a guide to select active drugs for salvage therapy, we retrospectively analyzed the dynamics of low-frequency drug-resistant population in antiretroviral (ARV-exposed drug resistant individuals.Six HIV-infected individuals treated with ARV for more than five years were analyzed. These individuals had difficulty in controlling viremia, and treatment regimens were switched multiple times guided by standard drug resistance testing using bulk sequencing. To detect minority variant populations with drug resistance, we used a highly sensitive allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR with detection thresholds of 0.3-2%. According to ARV used in these individuals, we focused on the following seven reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutations: M41L, K65R, K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, and T215F/Y. Results of AS-PCR were compared with bulk sequencing data for concordance and presence of additional mutations. To clarify the genetic relationship between low-frequency and high-frequency populations, AS-PCR amplicon sequences were compared with bulk sequences in phylogenetic analysis.The use of AS-PCR enabled detection of the drug-resistant mutations, M41L, K103N, Y181C, M184V and T215Y, present as low-frequency populations in five of the six individuals. These drug resistant variants persisted for several years without ARV pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that pre-existing K103N and T215I variants had close genetic relationships with high-frequency K103N and T215I observed during treatment.Our results demonstrate the long-term persistence of drug-resistant viruses in the absence of drug pressure. The rapid virologic failures with pre-existing mutant viruses detectable by AS-PCR highlight the clinical importance of

  17. Recent trends in HIV-1 drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    Once considered an inevitable consequence of HIV treatment, drug resistance is declining. This decline supports the hypothesis that antiretroviral therapy can arrest replication and prevent the evolution of resistance. Further support comes from excellent clinical outcomes, the failure of treatment intensification to reduce residual viremia, the lack of viral evolution in patients on optimal therapy, pharmacodynamics studies explaining the extraordinarily high antiviral activity of modern regimens, and recent reports of potential cures. Evidence supporting ongoing replication includes higher rates of certain complications in treated patients and an increase in circular forms of the viral genome after intensification with integrase inhibitors. Recent studies also provide an explanation for the observation that some patients fail protease-inhibitor based regimens without evidence for resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 恶性疟在抗药性时期%Falciparum Malaria in the Age of Drug Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Deninns Shanks

    2002-01-01

    @@ Ant malarial drug resistance exists when adequate drug blood concentration are to kill a previously susceptible parasite. This occurs by evolutionary selection of spontaneously arising mutant parasites that aredrug insensitive. Drug resistance is often, but not always, due to point mutations that change drug accumulation/effiux in the erythrocyte or reduce affinity for target molecule. Drug resistance can present in several ways to include: failure of treatment to clear parasites in a single patient, increase in malaria prevalence, malaria occurring in areas where it had not been seen recently such as epidemic malaria.

  19. Predicted levels of HIV drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambiano, Valentina; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Jordan, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern that the expansion of antiretroviral roll-out may impact future drug resistance levels and hence compromise the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) at an individual and population level. We aimed to predict future drug resistance in South Africa and its long...... are maintained, in 20 years' time HIV incidence is projected to have declined by 22% (95% confidence interval, CI -23 to -21%), and the number of people carrying NNRTI resistance to be 2.9-fold higher. If enhancements in diagnosis and retention in care occur, and ART is initiated at CD4 cell count less than 500......  cells/μl, HIV incidence is projected to decline by 36% (95% CI: -37 to -36%) and the number of people with NNRTI resistance to be 4.1-fold higher than currently. Prevalence of people with viral load more than 500  copies/ml carrying NRMV is not projected to differ markedly according to future ART...

  20. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in southern Brazil

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    Laynara Katize Grutzmacher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT strains with mutations that could result in resistance to the main drugs used in treatment in a region with one of the highest numbers of tuberculosis (TB cases in southern Brazil. METHODS: Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA from 120 sputum samples from different patients suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis who attended the Municipal Public Laboratory for Mycobacterium sp. diagnosis was directly amplified and analyzed by PCR-SSCP. The DNA was amplified in known hotspot mutation regions of the genes rpoB, ahpC, embB, katG, inhA, and pncA. RESULTS: The percentage of samples positive by culture was 9.2% (11/120; 5% (6/120 were positive by bacilloscopy and MT-PCR, and DNA fragments of the aforementioned resistance genes could be amplified from seven (7 of the eleven (11 samples with positive results, either by culture or PCR/bacilloscopy. All presented a SSCP pattern similar to a native, nonresistant genotype, with the ATCC strain 25177 as control, except for one sample (0.01%, which presented a SSCP profile demonstrating mutation at the embB gene. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with the empirical observations by physicians treating TB patients in our region of a low occurrence of cases that are refractory to conventional treatment schemes, in contrast to other parts of the country. Continued surveillance, especially molecular, is essential to detect and monitor the outbreak of MT-resistant strains.

  1. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newman MJ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mercy J Newman1, Enoch Frimpong2, Eric S Donkor1, Japheth A Opintan1, Alex Asamoah-Adu31Department of Microbiology, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana, 2School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, 3Public Health Reference Laboratory, Korle-Bu, Accra, GhanaBackground: Antimicrobial drug resistance is a global issue that affects health, economic, and social development. The problem has been attributed to misuse of antimicrobial agents.Purpose: To identify the agents of bacterial infection in Ghana, determine their antibiogram, and the possibility of setting up a surveillance program.Patients and methods: A prospective quantitative study set in various hospitals including two teaching hospitals, seven regional hospitals, and two district hospitals in Ghana. A total of 5099 bacterial isolates from various clinical specimens were collected over a period of 1 year, including data related to the patients. Susceptibility of the isolates was determined by the Kirby–Bauer method. In addition, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of multidrug-resistant isolates of epidemiological significance was also determined using the E-test.Results: A wide range of bacterial isolates were identified in both teaching and regional hospitals. High percentage of resistance was observed for tetracycline (82%, cotrimoxazole (73%, ampicillin (76%, and chloramphenicol (75%. Multidrug resistance was observed to a combination of ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and cotrimoxazole. On the other hand, a lower percentage of resistance was observed for ceftriaxone (6.3%, ciprofloxacin (11%, and amikacin (9.9%.Conclusion: Generally, the prevalence of multidrug resistance was widespread among the various isolates. Some multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS had high MIC to cefuroxime (>256, gentamicin (>256, and ciprofloxacin (>32.Keywords

  2. Study of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Patients Receiving Free Antiretroviral Therapy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ping LI; Hai-wei ZHOU; Jiang-hong HUANG; Hong PENG; Peng-fei MA; Yi-ming SHAO; Hui XING; Zhe WANG; Xue-feng SI; Lian-en WANG; Hua CHENG; Wei-guo CUI; Shu-lin JIANG; Ling-jie LIAO

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of drug-resistance mutations, resistance to antiretroviral drugs, and the subsequent virological response to therapy in treatment-naive and antiretroviral-treated patients infected with HIV/AIDS in Henan, China, a total of 431 plasma samples were collected in Queshan county between 2003 and 2004, from patients undergoing the antiretroviral regimen Zidovudine + Didanosine + Nevirapine (Azt+Ddi+Nvp). Personal information was collected by face to face interview. Viral load and genotypic drug resistance were tested. Drug resistance mutation data were obtained by analyzing patient-derived sequences through the HIVdb Program (http://hivdb.stanford.edu). Overall, 38.5% of treatment-naive patients had undetectable plasma viral load (VL), the rate significantly increased to 61.9% in 0 to 6 months treatment patients (mean 3 months) (P<0.005) but again significantly decrease to 38.6% in 6 to 12 months treatment patients (mean 9 months) (P<0.001) and 40.0% in patients receiving more than 12 months treatment (mean 16 months) (P<0.005). The prevalence of drug resistance in patients who had a detectable VL and available sequences were 7.0%, 48.6%, 70.8%, 72.3% in treatment-na(1)ve, 0 to 6 months treatment, 6 to 12 months treatment, and treatment for greater than 12 months patients, respectively. No mutation associated with resistance to Protease inhibitor (PI) was detected in this study. Nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) mutations always emerged after non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations, and were only found in patients treated for more than 6 months, with a frequency less than 5%, with the exception of mutation T215Y (12.8%, 6/47) which occurred in patients treated for more than 12 months. NNRTI mutations emerged quickly after therapy begun, and increased significantly in patients treated for more than 6 months (P<0.005), and the most frequent mutations were K103N, V106A, Y181C, G190A. There had been optimal viral suppression in

  3. Increased in vitro fitness of multi- and extensively drug-resistant F15/LAM4/KZN strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, C C; Pillay, M

    2014-06-01

    The role of fitness in transmission of drug-resistant strains has been explored in previous studies; but has not been established for F15/LAM4/KZN strains, which were responsible for the extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) outbreak in Tugela Ferry, South Africa. The biological fitness of 15 clinical strains representing the F15/LAM4/KZN, Beijing, F11 and F28 families was determined by growth, viability and competition assays and correlated with DNA sequencing of eight genes associated with drug resistance and putative compensatory mechanisms. Similar growth rates were observed among susceptible, multidrug-resistant (MDR) and XDR strains of the KZN and F28 genotypes. In contrast, Beijing and F11 MDR strains demonstrated significantly reduced fitness. Resistant strains exhibited heterogeneous fitness profiles in competition with different susceptible strains, suggesting strain dependence. In addition, co-culture growth rates were consistently higher than independent growth rates in 13/14 competition pairs. All 14 drug-resistant strains retained viability, at a low CFU/mL, when paired with susceptible strains. The persistence of such resistant strains could consequently support the acquisition of additional drug-resistance-conferring mutations and/or the evolution of compensatory mechanisms. Frequently occurring mutations were detected in KZN and F28 resistant strains whereas, the Beijing MDR strain harboured a less common katG mutation and the F11 MDR strain had no katG mutation. Contrary to drug-resistant Beijing and F11 strains, the successful transmission of KZN strains, particularly during the outbreak, may be attributed to the presence of drug-resistance-conferring mutations associated with little or no associated fitness costs. Amplified growth in co-culture may be suggestive of in vivo trans-complementation.

  4. Sensitivity of drug-resistant mutants of hepatitis B virus to poly-IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Chen, E; Chen, L; Nong, Y; Cheng, X; He, M; Tang, H

    2014-01-01

    The long-term benefits of antiviral treatment are limited by the resistance of hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, the effect of interferon (IFN)α treatment on drug-resistant HBVs is so far unknown. We, therefore, investigated the effects of IFN-α inducer poly-IC on the replication of HBV mutants resistant to drugs such as lamivudine (LAM), adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and entecavir (ETV) in mice. HBV DNA and HBV DNA intermediate (RI) were employed as markers of the virus replication and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthase (OAS) mRNA as a marker of IFN-α/β induction. Poly-IC inhibited wtHBV replication and increased levels of OAS mRNA. Compared to the wt virus, the capacity of virus replication was reduced in most LAMr and ETVr mutants except those with mutations rtM(204V+L180M+V173L), and was similary in the ADVr mutants except rt(A121V+N236T). The virus replication was reduced after poly-IC treatment with LAMr and ADVr mutants similary to the wt virus. In contrast, ETVr mutants were resistant to the poly-IC treatment. In conclusion, the capacity of HBV replication and the sensitivity to IFN therapy are influenced by drug-resistant mutations. The IFN therapy may effectively inhibit HBV replication in particular in patients with LAMr or ADVr mutations but not in patients with ETVr mutations.

  5. DRUG RESISTANCE, VIABILITY AND VIRULENCE IN VITRO ОF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS STRAINS OF DIFFERENT GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Manicheva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The drug resistance, mutation spectrum caused resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid, viability, cytotoxicity were studied as well as 111 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MBT were genotyped. Spoligotyping revealed 28 spoligotypes; the greatest number of strains belonged to genetic families Beijing and LAM. The typing of 59 strains of spoligotype SIT1 (Beijing allowed to differentiate 19 variants of IS6110-RFLP-profiles: 13 of them were individual and 6 were presented by clusters. The clusters А0 and В0 included the greatest number of M. tuberculosis strains — 21 (35,6% and 17 (28,8% accordingly. The high frequency of MLU and SLU of Beijing strains was associated with mutations rpoB Ser531→Leu and katG Ser315→Thr. The strains of M. tuberculosis belonged to another genetic families (T, H, Ural, U have shown drug resistance more often. The level of resistance to isoniazid in vitro in MLU/SLU strains of MBT of different genotypes, especially, was high in case of mixed mutations such as katG Ser315→Thr и inhA_T15. The rates of viability and cytotoxicity of MBT strains of studied genotypes with different spectrum of mutations and phenotypic drug resistance were not substantially distinguished.

  6. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  7. Mechanism of cancer drug resistance and the involvement of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongping; Hui, Kam M

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer therapies. Although our understanding of resistance to targeted cancer drugs remains incomplete, new and more creative approaches are being exploited to intercept this phenomenon. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding that cancer drug resistance can be caused by alterations of drug efflux, increases in drug metabolism, mutations of drug targets, alterations in DNA repair and cell cycle, changes in cell apoptosis and autophagy, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Furthermore, intracellular signalling pathways have been shown to play key physiological roles and the abnormal activation of signalling pathways may be correlated with drug resistance. Recently, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important regulators of gene expression and alternative splicing, which provides cells with yet another mode to greatly increase regulatory complexity and fine-tune their transcriptome and can rapidly adjust their proteome in response to stimuli. Consequently, a wide variety of biological functions have been shown to depend on the coordinated interactions between noncoding RNAs and cellular signalling networks to achieve a concerted desired physiological outcome, whereas mutations and dysregulation of ncRNAs have been linked to diverse human diseases, including cancer drug resistance. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory ncRNAs on the signalling pathways involved in cancer drug resistance and the therapeutic potential of reverse drug resistance.

  8. Adamantane-Resistant Influenza A Viruses in the World (1902–2013): Frequency and Distribution of M2 Gene Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoying; Peng, Chao; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Han, Le; Wu, Bin; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) have been used to prevent and treat influenza A virus infections for many years; however, resistance to these drugs has been widely reported in the world. To investigate the frequency and distribution of M2 gene mutations in adamantane-resistant influenza variants circulated in the world between 1902 and 2013, 31251 available M2 protein sequences from different HA-subtype influenza A viruses (H1–H17) were analyzed and adamantane resistance-associated mutations were compared (L26F, V27A, A30T, A30V, S31N, G34E, and L38F). We find that 45.2% (n = 14132) of influenza A (H1–H17) viruses circulating globally were resistant to adamantanes, and the vast majority of resistant viruses (95%) bear S31N mutations. Whereas, only about 1% have V27A mutations and other mutations (L26F, A30T, G34E, and L38F) were extremely rare (their prevalence appeared to be resistance to adamantanes. In contrast, the appearance of adamantane-resistant mutants in H2, H4, H6, H10, and H11 subtypes was rare. However, no adamantane resistance viruses were identified among other HA subtypes (H8, H12–H16). Our findings indicate that the frequency and distribution of adamantane-resistant influenza variants varied among different HA subtypes, host species, years of isolation, and geographical areas. This comprehensive study raises concerns about the increasing prevalence of adamantane-resistant influenza A viruses and highlights the importance of monitoring the emergence and worldwide spread of adamantane-resistant variants. PMID:25768797

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing Based Characterization of Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pakistan

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Asho

    2015-02-26

    Improved molecular diagnostic methods for detection drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains are required. Resistance to first- and second- line anti-tuberculous drugs has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in particular genes. However, these SNPs can vary between MTB lineages therefore local data is required to describe different strain populations. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to characterize 37 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) MTB isolates from Pakistan and investigated 40 genes associated with drug resistance. Rifampicin resistance was attributable to SNPs in the rpoB hot-spot region. Isoniazid resistance was most commonly associated with the katG codon 315 (92%) mutation followed by inhA S94A (8%) however, one strain did not have SNPs in katG, inhA or oxyR-ahpC. All strains were pyrazimamide resistant but only 43% had pncA SNPs. Ethambutol resistant strains predominantly had embB codon 306 (62%) mutations, but additional SNPs at embB codons 406, 378 and 328 were also present. Fluoroquinolone resistance was associated with gyrA 91-94 codons in 81% of strains; four strains had only gyr B mutations, while others did not have SNPs in either gyrA or gyrB. Streptomycin resistant strains had mutations in ribosomal RNA genes; rpsL codon 43 (42%); rrs 500 region (16%), and gidB (34%) while six strains did not have mutations in any of these genes. Amikacin/kanamycin/capreomycin resistance was associated with SNPs in rrs at nt1401 (78%) and nt1484 (3%), except in seven (19%) strains. We estimate that if only the common hot-spot region targets of current commercial assays were used, the concordance between phenotypic and genotypic testing for these XDR strains would vary between rifampicin (100%), isoniazid (92%), flouroquinolones (81%), aminoglycoside (78%) and ethambutol (62%); while pncA sequencing would provide genotypic resistance in less than half the isolates. This work highlights the importance of expanded

  10. Effect of transmission reduction by insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs on antimalarial drug resistance in western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Shah

    Full Text Available Despite the clear public health benefit of insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs, the impact of malaria transmission-reduction by vector control on the spread of drug resistance is not well understood. In the present study, the effect of sustained transmission reduction by ITNs on the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum gene mutations associated with resistance to the antimalarial drugs sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ in children under the age of five years was investigated during an ITN trial in Asembo area, western Kenya. During the ITN trial, the national first line antimalarial treatment changed from CQ to SP. Smear-positive samples collected from cross sectional surveys prior to ITN introduction (baseline, n = 250 and five years post-ITN intervention (year 5 survey, n = 242 were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at dhfr-51, 59, 108, 164 and dhps-437, 540 (SP resistance, and pfcrt-76 and pfmdr1-86 (CQ resistance. The association between the drug resistance mutations and epidemiological variables was evaluated. There were significant increases in the prevalence of SP dhps mutations and the dhfr/dhps quintuple mutant, and a significant reduction in the proportion of mixed infections detected at dhfr-51, 59 and dhps-437, 540 SNPs from baseline to the year 5 survey. There was no change in the high prevalence of pfcrt-76 and pfmdr1-86 mutations. Multivariable regression analysis further showed that current antifolate use and year of survey were significantly associated with more SP drug resistance mutations. These results suggest that increased antifolate drug use due to drug policy change likely led to the high prevalence of SP mutations 5 years post-ITN intervention and reduced transmission had no apparent effect on the existing high prevalence of CQ mutations. There is no evidence from the current study that sustained transmission reduction by ITNs reduces the prevalence of genes associated with malaria

  11. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Wah Wah; Ei, Phyu Win; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Swe, Thyn Lei; Lwin, Thandar; Htwe, Mi Mi; Kim, Kyung Jun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Chang Ki; Cho, Sang Nae; Song, Sun Dae; Chang, Chulhun L

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious health problems in Myanmar. Because TB drug resistance is associated with genetic mutation(s) relevant to responses to each drug, genotypic methods for detecting these mutations have been proposed to overcome the limitations of classic phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST). We explored the current estimates of drug-resistant TB and evaluated the usefulness of genotypic DST in Myanmar. We determined the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from sputum smear-positive patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB at two main TB centers in Myanmar during 2013 by using conventional phenotypic DST and the GenoType MTBDRplus assay (Hain Lifescience, Germany). Discrepant results were confirmed by sequencing the genes relevant to each type of resistance (rpoB for rifampicin; katG and inhA for isoniazid). Of 191 isolates, phenotypic DST showed that 27.7% (n=53) were resistant to at least one first-line drug and 20.9% (n=40) were resistant to two or more, including 18.3% (n=35) multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) strains. Monoresistant strains accounted for 6.8% (n=13) of the samples. Genotypic assay of 189 isolates showed 17.5% (n=33) MDR-TB and 5.3% (n=10) isoniazid-monoresistant strains. Genotypic susceptibility results were 99.5% (n=188) concordant and agreed almost perfectly with phenotypic DST (kappa=0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.01). The results highlight the burden of TB drug resistance and prove the usefulness of the genotypic DST in Myanmar.

  13. Genetic Mutations Associated with Pesticide Resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of gene mutation in various arthropods have been found to be associated with pesticide resistance. Some of these mutations have been found in the two cattle pests, Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans. Sodium channel gene mutations have been associated with pyrethroid resistance ...

  14. HIV-1 Drug Resistance in the iPrEx Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegler, Teri; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Bentley, L. Gordon; Atchison, Robert; Schmidt, Timothy; Javier, Jacqueline; Mehrotra, Megha; Eden, Christopher; Glidden, David V.; McMahan, Vanessa; Anderson, Peter L.; Li, Peilin; Wong, Joseph K.; Buchbinder, Susan; Guanira, Juan V.; Grant, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The iPrEx study demonstrated that combination oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) protects against HIV acquisition in men who have sex with men and transgender women. Selection for drug resistance could offset PrEP benefits. Methods. Phenotypic and genotypic clinical resistance assays characterized major drug resistant mutations. Minor variants with FTC/TDF mutations K65R, K70E, M184V/I were measured using 454 deep sequencing and a novel allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) diagnostic tolerant to sequence heterogeneity. Results. Control of primer-binding site heterogeneity resulted in improved accuracy of minor variant measurements by AS-PCR. Of the 48 on-study infections randomized to FTC/TDF, none showed FTC/TDF mutations by clinical assays despite detectable drug levels in 8 participants. Two randomized to FTC/TDF had minor variant M184I detected at 0.53% by AS-PCR or 0.75% by deep sequencing, only 1 of which had low but detectable drug levels. Among those with acute infection at randomization to FTC/TDF, M184V or I mutations that were predominant at seroconversion waned to background levels within 24 weeks after discontinuing drug. Conclusions. Drug resistance was rare in iPrEx on-study FTC/TDF-randomized seroconverters, and only as low-frequency minor variants. FTC resistance among those initiating PrEP with acute infection waned rapidly after drug discontinuation. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00458393. PMID:24740633

  15. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  16. Evolution of Primary HIV Drug Resistance in a Subtype C Dominated Epidemic in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bila, Dulce Celina Adolfo; Young, Peter; Merks, Harriet; Vubil, Adolfo Salvador; Mahomed, Mussagy; Augusto, Angelo; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Mabunda, Nédio Jonas; Brooks, James I.; Tanuri, Amilcar; Jani, Ilesh Vinodrai

    2013-01-01

    Objective In Mozambique, highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) was introduced in 2004 followed by decentralization and expansion, resulting in a more than 20-fold increase in coverage by 2009. Implementation of HIV drug resistance threshold surveys (HIVDR-TS) is crucial in order to monitor the emergence of transmitted viral resistance, and to produce evidence-based recommendations to support antiretroviral (ARV) policy in Mozambique. Methods World Health Organization (WHO) methodology was used to evaluate transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected pregnant women attending ante-natal clinics in Maputo and Beira to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Subtypes were assigned using REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool and phylogenetic trees constructed using MEGA version 5. Results Although mutations associated with resistance to all three drug were detected in these surveys, transmitted resistance was analyzed and classified as Mozambique. PMID:23935858

  17. Detection of drug resistance mutation in HBV using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry%飞行时间质谱检测HBV耐药位点变异及其影响因素探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖鑫; 管彦芳; 李晶晶; 赵饮虹; 杨焕明; 黄健

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish a rapid method for detection of drug-resistance mutation in HBV, based on PCR-MALDI-TOF MS, and to explore the influential factors on this method. Methods One hundred blood serum samples, which were collected from chronic HBV patients with single drug-resistance or multiple drug-resistance of Lamivudin, Adefovi, Entecavir and Telbivudine, and 10 kinds of mutant HBV plasmids were analyzed using PCR-MALDI-TOF MS and confirmed by PCR-based sequencing. Results Of 100 samples detected, thirty-one samples were positive for drug-resistance and 69 samples were negative. The PCR-MALDI-TOF MS results of 94 samples were completely consistent with PCR-based sequencing. Six samples were inconsistent , of which three samples were positive by the two methods, but more mutation loci were detected by PCR-MALDI-TOF MS than sequencing. The consistent rate of two methods was 94%,detection sensitivity was up to 100 copies/μl, and the cut off value of detectable mutation level was 5%.Conclusion PCR-MALDI-TOF MS could be used for rapid and simple analysis of the drug resistance for the clinical application with features of high sensitivity and accuracy, high throughput and automation.%目的 建立PCR-MALDI-TOF MS检测乙型肝炎病毒针对核苷类药物耐药突变位点的检测方法,探讨PCR-MALDI-TOF MS技术的影响因素,为正确应用该技术提供参考.方法 采用PCR-MALDI-TOF MS检测10份HBV质粒标准品及100份HBV阳性临床标本(均单独或者联合使用过拉米夫定、阿德福韦酯、恩替卡韦和替比夫定等核苷类药物),并用PCR产物测序进行验证.结果 100份HBV阳性的临床标本,PCR-MALDI-TOF MS检测耐药阳性结果31份,阴性结果69份.与测序结果相比完全一致的有94份(94%),6份检测结果不一致,其中3份质谱与测序结果均为耐药阳性,但质谱检测结果耐药位点多于测序.PCR-MALDI-TOF MS检测灵敏度为100 copies/μl,突变型的检出阈值为5%.结论 PCR

  18. Management of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, D C S; Drobniewski, F A; Milburn, H J

    2003-01-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) which has in the past been associated with a poor prognosis. In the U.K., about half of the cases live in the London area and we have set out to obtain further information on their treatment and outcome. We examined the risk factors, drug resistance, drug treatment, sputum conversion, and outcome in patients with MDR-TB at three hospitals in South London and diagnosed during the period June 1995-January 1999. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-positive patients were excluded. There were 760 patients resident in Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Health Authority (LSLHA) who were notified as tuberculosis (TB) during the time period and who were of negative or unknown HIV status. (The population of LSLHA is approx.750,000.) There was a total of 13 patients with MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HlV negative. Their median age was 28 years (range 15-53); nine (69%) were born outside the U.K. and 11 had pulmonary disease; they had organisms resistant to a median of two first-line drugs (range 2-4) and to a median of four of all drugs tested (range 2-10). They received treatment with a median of six drugs (range 3-9). Eight were followed up for at least 3 years (range 3-6) after the completion of treatment; at their last assessment none had features of active TB and all were sputum negative (smear and culture). Two returned to their countries of origin during treatment; they were sputum negative at that time. Two patients are well and continue on treatment in the U.K. One patient (known HIV negative) died following treatment failure. In conclusion, we obtained disease-free survival in eight cases of MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HIV negative and followed up for 3 years or more. The prognosis for patients treated at specialised centres is good (and better than is generally believed). We describe a new protocol for the detection and management of MDR-TB.

  19. Development of Auxotrophy by Streptomycin-Resistant Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S. L.; Maitra, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    Several streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli have been isolated which require exogenous isoleucine for growth. The majority of these strains were of streptomycin-dependent phenotype. If grown in the absence of streptomycin, these streptomycin-dependent auxotrophs (Smd-aux) strains were unable to produce β-galactosidase and aldolase activities and also failed to exhibit donor properties in conjugation. Genetic analysis indicated that the isoleucine requirement of these strains could be caused by a mutation at the strA locus. PMID:4597998

  20. HIV-1 drug resistance among untreated patients in India: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachamuthu Balakrishnan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available HAART has dramatically improved survival and quality of life among people living with HIV and AIDS globally. However, drug resistant mutations of HIV are a great challenge to the benefits of HAART. Antiviral resistance can be mediated either by changes in the molecular target of therapy (the primary mechanism observed in HIV-1 or in other viral proteins that indirectly interfere with a drug′s activity. Drug resistant mutations easily evolve in the presence of sub-optimal adherence. With the introduction of generic HAART, there has been a steep increase in the number of patients put on HAART in India. It should also be noted that since most patients pay for medications out of their own pockets, interruptions in therapy due to monetary constraints are not uncommon. There is little information on HIV drug resistance in resource constrained settings like India where the predominant circulating HIV-1 sub-type is C. The transmissibility of drug-resistant forms of the virus is also a major concern especially when formulating treatment guidelines. This article reviews published data available on the patterns of HIV-1 drug resistance among treatment naοve in India.

  1. Genotypic Detection of rpoB and katG Gene Mutations Associated with Rifampicin and Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Isolates: A Local Scenario (Kelantan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nurul-Ain; Ismail, Mohd Fazli; Noor, Siti Suraiya Md; Camalxaman, Siti Nazrina

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) remains a public health issue that is of major concern on a global scale. The characterisation of clinical isolates may provide key information regarding the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance, and helps to augment therapeutic options. This study aims to evaluate the frequency of gene mutations associated with Rifampicin (RIF) and Isoniazid (INH) resistance among nine clinical isolates. A total of nine drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates were screened for genetic mutations in rpoB and katusing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Genotypic analysis was performed to detect the mutations in the sequence of the target genes. Our findings reveal that 80% of the isolates possess mutations at codon 119 (His119Tyr) and 135 (Arg135Trp and Ser135Leu) within the rpoB gene; and 70% possess mutations in the katG gene at codon 238 with amino acid change (Leu238Arg). Findings from this study provide an overview of the current situation of RIF and INH resistance in a hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) located in Kelantan, Malaysia, which could facilitate molecular-based detection methods of drug-resistant strains. Further information regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in resistance in RR-/MDR-TB should be addressed in the near future.

  2. Characterization of RPO B gene for detection of rifampicin drug resistance by SSCP and sequence analysis

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    Negi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in recent times, the rapid detection of resistance to the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug rifampicin was felt worldwide. Accordingly, this study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic potential of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP for checking its utility as a rapid screening test for determination of rifampicin drug resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M. tuberculosis (22 rifampicin resistant, 11 rifampicin sensitive and one control H37Rv strains were analysed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing within the 157-bp region of the rpo B gene (Ala 500 -Val 550 . Results: Rifampicin resistance was detected successfully by PCR-SSCP in 20/22(90.90% of rifampicin-resistant strains showing a total of nine different mutations in seven codon positions: codon 513 (CAA→CCA, 516 (GAC→GTC, 507 (GGC→GAC, 526 (CAC→GAC, TAC, 531 (TCG→TTG, TGG, 522 (TCG→TGG and 533 (GTG→CCG. Two rifampicin-resistant strains showed an identical PCR-SSCP pattern with the wild type H37Rv; 77.27% rifampicin-resistant strains showed a single point mutation and 9.09% had no mutation. Three rifampicin-resistant strains showed characteristic double mutations at codon positions 526 and 531. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated as 90.90% and 100%. Conclusions: Rifampicin-resistant genotypes were mainly found in codon positions 516, 526 and 531. PCR-SSCP seems to be an efficacious method of predicting rifampicin resistance and substantially reduces the time required for susceptibility testing from 4 to 6 weeks to a few weeks.

  3. Emergence of an NNRTI resistance mutation Y181C in an HIV-infected NNRTI-naive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sambatakou, Helen; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Haida, Caterina; Vassilakis, Alexandros; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine the emergence of the Y181C resistance mutation in an NNRTI-naive subject (index patient) at different time points. Phylogenetic trees in protease (PR) and partial reverse transcriptase (RT) regions were inferred by the maximum likelihood (ML) method. The Y181C mutation was detected for the first time when the patient was receiving d4T + ddI + LPV/r; the previous drug combination was 3TC + AZT + IDV. The particular mutation (Y181C) was not present at any time point during the treatment period with 3TC + AZT + IDV. Moreover, there was no evidence of resistance mutations in RT before the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Phylogenetic analysis including sequences from the index patient and his spouse sampled at different time points, as well as control sequences belonging to the same HIV-1 subtype, revealed that there is no evidence of coinfection or reinfection with Y181C resistance strains, while the virus for both subjects was classified as subtype CRF14_BG. Overall, our findings suggest that the Y181C resistance mutation may be selected, not only by NNRTIs, but also by d4T. This may be of particular significance in developing countries where treatment with Triomune, a fixed combination of d4T, ddI, and nevirapine, is common. The genetic barrier against resistance of this combination may be lower than previously thought.

  4. Molecular approaches for detection of the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in Bangladesh.

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    Tafsina Haque Aurin

    Full Text Available The principal obstacles in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB are delayed and inaccurate diagnosis which often leads to the onset of the drug resistant TB cases. To avail the appropriate treatment of the patients and to hinder the transmission of drug-resistant TB, accurate and rapid detection of resistant isolates is critical. Present study was designed to demonstrate the efficacy of molecular techniques inclusive of line probe assay (LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF methods for the detection of multi-drug resistant (MDR TB. Sputum samples from 300 different categories of treated and new TB cases were tested for the detection of possible mutation in the resistance specific genes (rpoB, inhA and katG through Genotype MTBDRplus assay or LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF tests. Culture based conventional drug susceptibility test (DST was also carried out to measure the efficacy of the molecular methods employed. Among 300 samples, 191 (63.7% and 193 (64.3% cases were found to be resistant against rifampicin in LPA and GeneXpert methods, respectively; while 189 (63% cases of rifampicin resistance were detected by conventional DST methods. On the other hand, 196 (65.3% and 191 (63.7% isolates showed isoniazid resistance as detected by LPA and conventional drug susceptibility test (DST, respectively. Among the drug resistant isolates (collectively 198 in LPA and 193 in conventional DST, 189 (95.6% and 187 (96.9% were considered to be MDR as examined by LPA and conventional DST, respectively. Category-II and -IV patients encountered higher frequency of drug resistance compared to those from category-I and new cases. Considering the higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy along with the required time to results significantly shorter, our study supports the adoption of LPA and GeneXpert assay as efficient tools in detecting drug resistant TB in Bangladesh.

  5. Use of Nystatin-Resistant Mutations in Parasexual Genetic Analysis in DICTYOSTELIUM DISCOIDEUM

    OpenAIRE

    Kasbekar, Durgadas P.; Madigan, Sanford; Katz, Eugene R.

    1983-01-01

    Nystatin-resistant mutations exhibit extreme sensitivity to 1.3 mm coumarin. The mutations fall into three complementation groups so it is possible to select for nonallelic mutations conferring sensitivity to coumarin by selection on nystatin-containing nutrient agar plates. Complementation between such coumarin-sensitive mutations allows the selection of diploids on coumarin-containing nutrient agar. Two of the nystatin resistance genes, nysB and nysC, have been mapped tentatively to the pr...

  6. Impact of mecA promoter mutations on mecA expression and beta-lactam resistance levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Miriam; McCallum, Nadine; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2008-10-01

    The reason for the extremely low-level oxacillin resistance in a so-called 'drug clone', a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus circulating among injection drug users in Zurich, Switzerland, could be traced back to the mecA promoter sequence and particularly to the strain's genetic background. Sequencing of its mec complex identified a point mutation (TATACT to TATATT), creating a perfect palindrome in the -10 region of the mecA promoter/operator region containing the binding sites for the mecA repressors MecI and BlaI. Two strains with vastly different beta-lactam resistance phenotypes, the low-level resistant drug clone type strain CHE482 and the highly homogeneously resistant strain COLn, were cured of their SCCmec elements and subsequently transformed with plasmids containing mecA under the control of either the wild-type or mutant promoter. Expression studies showed that this mutation had significant effects on both mecA transcription and corresponding PBP2a production, but only small effects on beta-lactam resistance levels within a given genetic background. A further mutation in the mecA ribosomal binding site (GGAGG to GGAGT), common to SCCmec type IV strains, was found to have no discernable effect on mecA transcription and PBP2a content, and only minimal effects on beta-lactam resistance. Factors associated with the genetic backgrounds into which these differently controlled mecA genes were introduced had a much higher impact on beta-lactam resistance levels than the rates of mecA transcription. The tight repression of mecA expression in this drug clone in the absence of beta-lactams could contribute to the apparent fitness of this fast growing strain.

  7. Relationship between antifungal resistance of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans and mutations in ERG11 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Li-juan; WAN Zhe; WANG Xiao-hong; LI Ruo-yu; LIU Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background The cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase(Erg11p) encoded by ERG11 gene is the primary target for azole antifungals.Changes in azole affinity of this enzyme caused by amino acid substitutions have been reported as a mechanism of azole antifungal resistance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between amino acid substitutions in Erg11p from fluconazole resistant Candida albicans (C.albicans)isolates and their cross-resistance to azoles.Methods Mutations in ERG11 gene were screened in 10 clinical isolates of fluconazole resistant C.albicans strains.DNA sequence of ERG11 was determined by PCR based DNA sequencing.Results In the 10 isolates,19 types of amino acid substitutions were found,of which 10 substitutions (F72S, F103L, F145I, F198L, G206D, G227D, N349S, F416S, F422L and T482A) have not been reported previously. Mutations in ERG11 gene were detected in 9 isolates of fluconazole resistant C. albicans, but were not detected in 1 isolate. Conclusions Although no definite correlation was found between the type of amino acid substitutions in Erg11p and the phenotype of cross-resistance to azoles, the substitutions F72S, F145I and G227D in our study may be highly associated with resistance to azoles because of their special location in Erg11p.

  8. Pyrosequencing for detection of drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of Hepatitis B virus and its clinical application%焦磷酸测序法检测乙肝病毒P区基因耐药突变的临床应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈占国; 李艳; 童永清; 周武

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the accuracy and clinical application of Pyrosequencing for detection of drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of Hepatitis B virus (HBV).Methods Compared with Sanger sequencing,the accuracy and sensitivity of Pyrosequencing were assessed.Pyrosequencing was used to determine the serum of 1164 patients with chronic Hepatitis B and its results were analyzed.Results The sensitivity of Pyrosequencing was 1 × 103 KIU/L,the same as Sanger sequencing.But Pyrosequencing was more stable and specific than Sanger sequencing to detect low rate of mutation with over 10% mutation.The mutations couldn't be detected in 248 patients with chronic Hepatitis B,but positive results occurred in 919 patients,among them,61.5 % without mutation,38.5 % with mutation (including 47.5% of the single locus mutation and 52.5% of the combined mutation).Other sites had different degree of mutations except the sites of rtI169T and rtA194T; the main mutation sites in patients with chronic Hepatitis B were rtM204V/I (32.1%),rtL180M (19.8%),rtA181V/T (6.7%) and rtN236T (5.3%),in which fractional mutation had high ratio in the sites of rtA181V/T (6.7%) and rtN236T (5.3%).Conclusions Pyrosequencing has good sensitivity,specificity and accuracy and can early detect the drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of HBV,which is suitable for monitoring patients with chronic Hepatitis B for the treatment of nucleoside analogues (acid).The different sites and frequencies of mutations may be associated with different habits of doctors for using different anti-HBV drugs.%目的 探讨焦磷酸测序法检测乙型肝炎病毒(HBV)P区基因耐药突变的可靠性及临床应用.方法 以Sanger测序法为参考,验证焦磷酸测序法检测HBV P区基因耐药突变的性能.选取2009年6月至2012年8月温州医科大学附属第一医院及武汉大学人民医院确诊的慢性乙型肝炎(乙肝)患者1164例,

  9. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  10. Biophysical characterization and mutational analysis of the antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav; McSweeney, Seán M

    2010-04-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ) is an antibiotic commonly used to treat anaerobic bacterial infections in humans and animals. Antibiotic resistance toward this class of 5-nitroimidazole (5-Ni) drug derivatives has been related to the Nim genes thought to encode a reductase. Here we report the biophysical characteristics of the NimA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) binding to MTZ and three other 5-Ni drugs. The interaction energies of the protein and antibiotic are studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and with free energy and linear interaction energy (LIE) calculations, where the latter method revealed that the antibiotic binding is mainly of hydrophobic character. ITC measurements further found that one DrNimA dimer has two antibiotic binding sites which were not affected by mutation of the reactive His71. The observed association constants (K(a)) were in the range of 5.1-4910(4)M(-1) and the enthalpy release upon binding to DrNimA for the four drugs studied was relatively low (approximately -1 kJ/mol) but still measurable. The drug binding is mainly entropy driven and along with the hydrophobic drug binding site found by crystallography, this possibly explains the low observed enthalpy values. The effect of the His71 mutation and the presence of MTZ were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Native DrNimA is a yellow colored protein where the interaction from His71 to the cofactor is thought to be responsible for the coloring. Mutations of His71 to Ala, Ser, Leu or Asp all gave transparent, colorless protein solutions, and the two mutant crystal structures of DrNimA-H71A and DrNimA-H71S presented revealed no cofactor binding.

  11. Drug resistance in Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, S

    2001-11-01

    Throughout the world, pentavalent antimonial compounds (Sb(v)) have been the mainstay of antileishmanial therapy for more than 50 years. Sb(v) has been highly effective in the treatment of Indian visceral leishmaniasis (VL: kala-azar) at a low dose (10 mg/kg) for short durations (6-10 days). But in the early 1980s reports of its ineffectiveness emerged, and the dose of Sb(v) was eventually raised to 20 mg/kg for 30-40 days. This regimen cures most patients with VL except in India, where the proportion of patients unresponsive to Sb(v) has steadily increased. In hyperendemic districts of north Bihar, 50-65% patients fail treatment with Sb(v). Important reasons are rampant use of subtherapeutic doses, incomplete duration of treatment and substandard drugs. In vitro experiments have established emergence of Sb(v) resistant strains of Leishmania donovani, as isolates from unresponsive patients require 3-5 times more Sb(v) to reach similarly effectiveness against the parasite as in Sb(v) responders. Anthroponotic transmission in India has been an important factor in rapid increase in the Sb(v) refractoriness. Pentamidine was the first drug to be used and cured 99% of these refractory patients, but over time even with double the amount of initial doses, it cures only 69-78% patients now and its use has largely been abandoned in India. Despite several disadvantages, amphotericin B is the only drug available for use in these areas and should be used as first-line drug instead of Sb(v). The new oral antileishmanial drug miltefosine is likely to be the first-line drug in future. Unfortunately, development of newer antileishmanial drugs is rare; two promising drugs, aminosidine and sitamaquine, may be developed for use in the treatment of VL. Lipid associated amphotericin B has an excellent safety and efficacy profile, but remains out of reach for most patients because of its high cost.

  12. Heterozygous mutation of cysteine528 in XPO1 is sufficient for resistance to selective inhibitors of nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neggers, Jasper Edgar; Vanstreels, Els; Baloglu, Erkan; Shacham, Sharon; Landesman, Yosef; Daelemans, Dirk

    2016-10-18

    Exportin-1 (CRM1/XPO1) is a crucial nuclear export protein that transports a wide variety of proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These cargo proteins include tumor suppressors and growth-regulatory factors and as such XPO1 is considered a potential anti-cancer target. From this perspective, inhibition of the XPO1-mediated nuclear export by selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds has shown broad-spectrum anti-cancer activity. Furthermore, the clinical candidate SINE, selinexor, is currently in multiple phase I/II/IIb trials for treatment of cancer. Resistance against selinexor has not yet been observed in the clinic, but in vitro selection of resistance did not reveal any mutations in the target protein, XPO1. However, introduction of a homozygous mutation at the drug's target site, the cysteine 528 residue inside the XPO1 cargo-binding pocket, by genetic engineering, confers resistance to selinexor. Here we investigated whether this resistance to selinexor is recessive or dominant. For this purpose we have engineered multiple leukemia cell lines containing heterozygous or homozygous C528S substitutions using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. Our findings show that heterozygous mutation confers similar resistance against selinexor as homozygous substitution, demonstrating that SINE resistance can be obtained by a single and dominant mutation of the cysteine528 residue in XPO1.

  13. Rapid determination of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance from whole-genome sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2015-05-27

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance (DR) challenges effective tuberculosis disease control. Current molecular tests examine limited numbers of mutations, and although whole genome sequencing approaches could fully characterise DR, data complexity has restricted their clinical application. A library (1,325 mutations) predictive of DR for 15 anti-tuberculosis drugs was compiled and validated for 11 of them using genomic-phenotypic data from 792 strains. A rapid online ‘TB-Profiler’ tool was developed to report DR and strain-type profiles directly from raw sequences. Using our DR mutation library, in silico diagnostic accuracy was superior to some commercial diagnostics and alternative databases. The library will facilitate sequence-based drug-susceptibility testing.

  14. Discovery of novel drug sensitivities in T-PLL by high-throughput ex vivo drug testing and mutation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E I; Pützer, S; Yadav, B; Dufva, O; Khan, S; He, L; Sellner, L; Schrader, A; Crispatzu, G; Oleś, M; Zhang, H; Adnan-Awad, S; Lagström, S; Bellanger, D; Mpindi, J P; Eldfors, S; Pemovska, T; Pietarinen, P; Lauhio, A; Tomska, K; Cuesta-Mateos, C; Faber, E; Koschmieder, S; Brümmendorf, T H; Kytölä, S; Savolainen, E-R; Siitonen, T; Ellonen, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Ding, W; Stern, M-H; Huber, W; Anders, S; Tang, J; Aittokallio, T; Zenz, T; Herling, M; Mustjoki, S

    2017-08-14

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare and aggressive neoplasm of mature T-cells with an urgent need for rationally designed therapies to address its notoriously chemo-refractory behavior. The median survival of T-PLL patients is PLL patient samples using an ex vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform and correlated the findings with somatic mutations and gene expression profiles. Intriguingly, all T-PLL samples were sensitive to the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which overcame stromal-cell-mediated protection and elicited robust p53-activation and apoptosis. Across all patients, the most effective classes of compounds were histone deacetylase, phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin, heat-shock protein 90 and BH3-family protein inhibitors as well as p53 activators, indicating previously unexplored, novel targeted approaches for treating T-PLL. Although Janus-activated kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription factor (JAK-STAT) pathway mutations were common in T-PLL (71% of patients), JAK-STAT inhibitor responses were not directly linked to those or other T-PLL-specific lesions. Overall, we found that genetic markers do not readily translate into novel effective therapeutic vulnerabilities. In conclusion, novel classes of compounds with high efficacy in T-PLL were discovered with the comprehensive ex vivo drug screening platform warranting further studies of synergisms and clinical testing.Leukemia advance online publication, 1 September 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.252.

  15. Comprehensive treatment of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitnick, Carole D; Shin, Sonya S; Seung, Kwonjune J; Rich, Michael L; Atwood, Sidney S; Furin, Jennifer J; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Alcantara Viru, Felix A; Appleton, Sasha C; Bayona, Jaime N; Bonilla, Cesar A; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F; Fraser, Hamish S F; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2008-08-07

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [+/-SD] number of regimens, 4.2+/-1.9 vs. 3.2+/-1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4+/-1.1 vs. 5.3+/-1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3+/-1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  16. Survey of chloroquine-resistant mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes in Hadhramout, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-09-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Yemen. More than 95% of the malaria cases are due to Plasmodium ‎falciparum‎. Recently in Yemen, the antimalarial treatment policy was changed from chloroquine (CQ) to artemisinin combination therapy (ACTs). However, CQ is still available and prescribed in the Yemeni market. The persistence of CQ resistance will be prolonged if the shift to ACT and the simultaneous withdrawal of CQ are not rigorously implemented. The aim of the current survey is to detect chloroquine-resistant mutations in P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (pfmdr1) genes. These data will be important for future monitoring and assessment of antimalarial drug policy in Yemen. Blood specimens were collected from 735 individuals from different districts of the Hadhramout province, Yemen by house-to-house visit. Mutation-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used to investigate the mutations in the pfmdr1(codons 86 and 1246) and pfcrt (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) genes. The overall prevalence of pfcrt mutations at codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 were 50.4%, 58.7%, 54.3% and 44.9%, respectively. All isolates had wild-type pfcrt 356 allele. The majority of pfmdr1 86 alleles (83.3%) and all pfmdr1 1246 alleles were wild type. There was no association between pfcrt mutations and symptomatology, gender and age groups. In conclusion, point mutations in codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 of pfcrt of P. falciparum are high suggesting a sustained high CQ resistance even after 4 years of shifting to ACTs. These findings warrant complete withdrawal of CQ use from the Yemeni market for P. falciparum and careful usage of CQ for treating Plasmodium vivax.

  17. Evolution of primary HIV drug resistance in a subtype C dominated epidemic in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Celina Adolfo Bila

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In Mozambique, highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART was introduced in 2004 followed by decentralization and expansion, resulting in a more than 20-fold increase in coverage by 2009. Implementation of HIV drug resistance threshold surveys (HIVDR-TS is crucial in order to monitor the emergence of transmitted viral resistance, and to produce evidence-based recommendations to support antiretroviral (ARV policy in Mozambique. METHODS: World Health Organization (WHO methodology was used to evaluate transmitted drug resistance (TDR in newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected pregnant women attending ante-natal clinics in Maputo and Beira to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI and protease inhibitors (PI. Subtypes were assigned using REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool and phylogenetic trees constructed using MEGA version 5. RESULTS: Although mutations associated with resistance to all three drug were detected in these surveys, transmitted resistance was analyzed and classified as <5% in Maputo in both surveys for all three drug classes. Transmitted resistance to NNRTI in Beira in 2009 was classified between 5-15%, an increase from 2007 when no NNRTI mutations were found. All sequences clustered with subtype C. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the epidemic is dominated by subtype C, where the first-line option based on two NRTI and one NNRTI is still effective for treatment of HIV infection, but intermediate levels of TDR found in Beira reinforce the need for constant evaluation with continuing treatment expansion in Mozambique.

  18. Supplementary Material for: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-03-23

    Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel resistance

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    in multi-drug-resistant PRs. Computational analysis of a vast number of inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 PR variants can broaden the knowledge of how and why the mutations arise, which would be a great advantage in the design on resistance-evading inhibitors. Here we present a diverse system to select...... in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted...... for catalytically active HIV-1 PR in the presence of inhibitor. The system is based on the protein AraC, which regulates transcription of the araA, araB and araD genes necessary for arabinose catabolism in Escherichia coli, and its effectiveness was demonstrated by the isolation of both known and unknown inhibitor-resistant...

  1. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Chong, Jennifer; Lee, Kok Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia.

  2. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Sian Kuan

    Full Text Available The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia.

  3. AHAS herbicide resistance endowing mutations: effect on AHAS functionality and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2010-09-01

    Twenty-two amino acid substitutions at seven conserved amino acid residues in the acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) gene have been identified to date that confer target-site resistance to AHAS-inhibiting