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Sample records for drug resistant epilepsy

  1. Sleep instability and cognitive status in drug-resistant epilepsies.

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    Pereira, Alessandra Marques; Bruni, Oliviero; Ferri, Raffaele; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2012-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the sleep habits of children with drug resistant epilepsy and to correlate sleep abnormalities with epilepsy and level of intelligence. Twenty five subjects with drug resistant epilepsy (14 males, age range 2-16.4 years) were recruited for this study. A control group was formed by 23 normal children. Two instruments to assess sleep habits were administered to the patients with epilepsy: a questionnaire on sleep habits (to preschool children) and a questionnaire on sleep behavior (for children aged more than seven years old); a cognitive test (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-WISC) was also performed. Patients underwent a complete polysomnographic study and sleep parameters, including CAP, were analyzed and correlated according to cognitive-behavioral measures in children with epilepsy. Children with drug-resistant epilepsy and severe mental retardation showed sleep abnormalities such as low sleep efficiency, high percentage of wakefulness after sleep onset, reduced slow wave sleep, and reduced REM sleep. Sleep microstructure evaluated by means of CAP analysis showed a decrease in A1 index during N3 in patients with more severe cognitive impairment. Children with epilepsy and cognitive impairment (n=10) had higher Sleep Behavior Questionnaire for Children (SBQC) total scores (65.60 ± 18.56) compared to children with epilepsy and normal IQ (50.00 ± 10.40), pintellectual disability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

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    Jinsoo Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p=0.0284, Fisher’s exact test. Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children.

  3. Surgery for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy in Children.

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    Dwivedi, Rekha; Ramanujam, Bhargavi; Chandra, P Sarat; Sapra, Savita; Gulati, Sheffali; Kalaivani, Mani; Garg, Ajay; Bal, Chandra S; Tripathi, Madhavi; Dwivedi, Sada N; Sagar, Rajesh; Sarkar, Chitra; Tripathi, Manjari

    2017-10-26

    Neurosurgical treatment may improve seizures in children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy, but additional data are needed from randomized trials. In this single-center trial, we randomly assigned 116 patients who were 18 years of age or younger with drug-resistant epilepsy to undergo brain surgery appropriate to the underlying cause of epilepsy along with appropriate medical therapy (surgery group, 57 patients) or to receive medical therapy alone (medical-therapy group, 59 patients). The patients in the medical-therapy group were assigned to a waiting list for surgery. The primary outcome was freedom from seizures at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were the score on the Hague Seizure Severity scale, the Binet-Kamat intelligence quotient, the social quotient on the Vineland Social Maturity Scale, and scores on the Child Behavior Checklist and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. At 12 months, freedom from seizures occurred in 44 patients (77%) in the surgery group and in 4 (7%) in the medical-therapy group (Pchildren and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy who had undergone epilepsy surgery had a significantly higher rate of freedom from seizures and better scores with respect to behavior and quality of life than did those who continued medical therapy alone at 12 months. Surgery resulted in anticipated neurologic deficits related to the region of brain resection. (Funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research and others; Clinical Trial Registry-India number, CTRI/2010/091/000525 .).

  4. Neurological autoantibodies in drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause.

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    Tecellioglu, Mehmet; Kamisli, Ozden; Kamisli, Suat; Yucel, Fatma Ebru; Ozcan, Cemal

    2018-03-09

    Autoimmune epilepsy is a rarely diagnosed condition. Recognition of the underlying autoimmune condition is important, as these patients can be resistant to antiepileptic drugs. To determine the autoimmune and oncological antibodies in adult drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause and identify the clinical, radiological, and EEG findings associated with these antibodies according to data in the literature. Eighty-two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause were prospectively identified. Clinical features were recorded. The levels of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex (anti-VGKCc), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), anti-phospholipid IgG and IgM, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, and onconeural antibodies were determined. Serum antibody positivity suggesting the potential role of autoimmunity in the aetiology was present in 17 patients with resistant epilepsy (22.0%). Multiple antibodies were found in two patients (2.6%). One of these patients (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and ANA, whereas another (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and anti-TPO. A single antibody was present in 15 patients (19.5%). Of the 77 patients finally included in the study, 4 had anti-TPO (5.2%), 1 had anti-GAD (1.3%), 4 had anti-VGKCc (5.2%) 8 had ANA (10.3%), and 2 had onconeural antibodies (2.6%) (1 patient had anti-Yo and 1 had anti-MA2/TA). The other antibodies investigated were not detected. EEG abnormality (focal), focal seizure incidence, and frequent seizures were more common in antibody-positive patients. Autoimmune factors may be aetiologically relevant in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause, especially if focal seizures are present together with focal EEG abnormality and frequent seizures.

  5. Definition of drug-resistant epilepsy: is it evidence based?

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    Wiebe, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Clinical case definitions are the cornerstone of clinical communication and of clinical and epidemiologic research. The ramifications of establishing a case definition are extensive, including potentially large changes in epidemiologic estimates of frequency, and decisions for clinical management. Yet, defining a condition entails numerous challenges such as defining the scope and purpose, incorporating the strongest evidence base with clinical expertise, accounting for patients' values, and considering impact on care. The clinical case definition of drug-resistant epilepsy, in addition, must address what constitutes an adequate intervention for an individual drug, what are the outcomes of relevance, what period of observation is sufficient to determine success or failure, how many medications should be tried, whether seizure frequency should play a role, and what is the role of side effects and tolerability. On the other hand, the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) aim at providing a systematic approach to incorporating the best available evidence into the process of clinical decision for individual patients. The case definition of drug-resistant epilepsy proposed by the the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) in 2009 is evaluated in terms of the principles of EBM as well as the stated goals of the authors of the definition. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Surgical management of cavernous malformations coursing with drug resistant epilepsy

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    Mario Arturo Alonso-Vanegas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cavernous malformations (CM are dynamic lesions characterized by continuous size changes and repeated bleeding. When involving cortical tissue, CM pose a significant risk for the development of drug-resistant epilepsy, which is thought to be result of an altered neuronal network caused by the lesion itself and its blood degradation products. Preoperative evaluation should comprise a complete seizure history, neurological examination, epilepsy-oriented MRI, EEG, video-EEG, completed with SPECT, PET, functional MRI and/or invasive monitoring as needed. Radiosurgery shows variable rates of seizure freedom and a high incidence of complications, thus microsurgical resection remains the optimal treatment for CM coursing with drug-resistant epilepsy.Two thirds of patients reach Engel I class at three-year follow-up, regardless of lobar location. Those with secondarily generalized seizures, a higher seizure frequency, and generalized abnormalities on preoperative or postoperative EEG, show poorer outcomes, while factors such as gender, duration of epilepsy, lesion size, age, bleeding at the time of surgery, do not correlate consistently with seizure outcome. Electrocorticography and a meticulous removal of all cortical hemosiderin –beyond pure lesionectomy– reduce the risk of symptomatic recurrences.

  7. Epilepsy surgery in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy associated with neuronal antibodies.

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    Carreño, Mar; Bien, Christian G; Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael; Marusic, Petr; Elisak, Martin; Pimentel, Jose; Wehner, Tim; Mohanraj, Rajiv; Uranga, Juan; Gómez-Ibáñez, Asier; Villanueva, Vicente; Gil, Francisco; Donaire, Antonio; Bargalló, Nuria; Rumià, Jordi; Roldán, Pedro; Setoain, Xavier; Pintor, Luis; Boget, Teresa; Bailles, Eva; Falip, Mercè; Aparicio, Javier; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the outcome of patients with drug resistant epilepsy and neuronal antibodies who underwent epilepsy surgery. Retrospective study, information collected with a questionnaire sent to epilepsy surgery centers. Thirteen patients identified, with antibodies to GAD (8), Ma2 (2), Hu (1), LGI1 (1) or CASPR2 (1). Mean age at seizure onset: 23 years. Five patients had an encephalitic phase. Three had testicular tumors and five had autoimmune diseases. All had drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (median: 20 seizures/month). MRI showed unilateral temporal lobe abnormalities (mainly hippocampal sclerosis) in 9 patients, bilateral abnormalities in 3, and was normal in 1. Surgical procedures included anteromesial temporal lobectomy (10 patients), selective amygdalohippocampectomy (1), temporal pole resection (1) and radiofrequency ablation of mesial structures (1). Perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates were seen in 7/12 patients. One year outcome available in all patients, at 3 years in 9. At last visit 5/13 patients (38.5%) (with Ma2, Hu, LGI1, and 2 GAD antibodies) were in Engel's classes I or II. Epilepsy surgery may be an option for patients with drug resistant seizures associated with neuronal antibodies. Outcome seems to be worse than that expected in other etiologies, even in the presence of unilateral HS. Intracranial EEG may be required in some patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of verapamil as an adjunctive treatment in children with drug-resistant epilepsy

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    Nicita, Francesco; Spalice, Alberto; Papetti, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Verapamil, a voltage-gated calcium channel blocker, has been occasionally reported to have some effect on reducing seizure frequency in drug-resistant epilepsy or status epilepticus. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of verapamil as add-on treatment in children with drug-resistant epilepsy....

  9. Molecular Genetics of Drug-resistance in Epilepsies

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    Kurupath Radhakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of newly diagnosed patients with epilepsy remain unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, etiopathogenesis of which is poorly understood. The genes encoding the proteins that regulate the pharmacokinetics such as P-glycoprotein [ABCBI], major vault protein [MVP gene] and drug metabolizing enzymes [ABCB1, ABCG2, MVP, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, EPHX1, UGT1A1, UGT2B7], and pharmacodynamics such as sodium channels [SCN1A, SCN2A] and GABA receptors [GABRA1, GABRA6, GABRB2, GABRG2] of AEDs are under intense investigation to unravel the mysteries of AED-resistance. However, till today, a consistent and reliable result that could help the clinician either to predict drug resistance or to overcome it has not been forthcoming. The discrepant results may be related to variations in the definition of drug-resistance, heterogeneous patient populations, ethnic variations in the frequency distribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the selection of SNPs. Understanding of these limitations of existing studies, hopefully, will help in designing better studies. Nearly one-third of newly diagnosed patients with epilepsy remain unresponsive toantiepileptic drugs (AEDs, etiopathogenesis of which is poorly understood. The genesencoding the proteins that regulate the pharmacokinetics such as P-glycoprotein[ABCBI], major vault protein [MVP gene] and drug metabolizing enzymes [ABCB1,ABCG2, MVP, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, EPHX1, UGT1A1, UGT2B7],and pharmacodynamics such as sodium channels [SCN1A, SCN2A] and GABAreceptors [GABRA1, GABRA6, GABRB2, GABRG2] of AEDs are under intenseinvestigation to unravel the mysteries of AED-resistance. However, till today, aconsistent and reliable result that could help the clinician either to predict drugresistanceor to overcome it has not been forthcoming. The discrepant results may berelated to variations in the definition of drug-resistance, heterogeneous patientpopulations, ethnic

  10. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

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    2015-07-01

    may become a key piece in the arsenal of antiepileptic drugs in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy . Thereby, screening for a presynaptic action site may be...neuronal damage, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) in ~30% of patients, and resistance to available anticonvulsant drugs. Therefore, it is of... temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) (months 1-12). Working hypothesis: Drugs acting on presynaptic Ca 2+ channels, autoreceptors, and SV2a will be more

  11. Drug-Resistant Epilepsy: Multiple Hypotheses, Few Answers

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    Fei Tang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that affects over 70 million people worldwide. Despite the recent introduction of new antiseizure drugs (ASDs, about one-third of patients with epilepsy have seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy. Early identification of patients who will become refractory to ASDs could help direct such patients to appropriate non-pharmacological treatment, but the complexity in the temporal patterns of epilepsy could make such identification difficult. The target hypothesis and transporter hypothesis are the most cited theories trying to explain refractory epilepsy, but neither theory alone fully explains the neurobiological basis of pharmacoresistance. This review summarizes evidence for and against several major theories, including the pharmacokinetic hypothesis, neural network hypothesis, intrinsic severity hypothesis, gene variant hypothesis, target hypothesis, and transporter hypothesis. The discussion is mainly focused on the transporter hypothesis, where clinical and experimental data are discussed on multidrug transporter overexpression, substrate profiles of ASDs, mechanism of transporter upregulation, polymorphisms of transporters, and the use of transporter inhibitors. Finally, future perspectives are presented for the improvement of current hypotheses and the development of treatment strategies as guided by the current understanding of refractory epilepsy.

  12. Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia, Surgical Goal in Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

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    Fernando Velandia-Hurtado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neuronal heterotopia is a migration disorder in which these cells do not complete their movement toward the cerebral cortex. Periventricular nodular heterotopia is the most frequently reported form, characterized by neuronal conglomerates adjacent to the lateral ventricles walls. About 90 % of patients with this condition suffer epilepsy at some point in their lives and the major proportion of them will be resistant to pharmacologic treatment. This makes an appropriate diagnostic approach necessary in order to determine which patients would benefit from surgical resection of the lesion, which in most cases offers a high rate of crisis control. Development: This article presents a review of the most important topics approached from the practice of periventricular nodular heterotopia pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis and therapy. It is aimed at exploring the role of this condition as a cause of intractable epilepsy. Conclusion: Pharmacologic treatment for resistant epilepsy will have a severe impact on patient’s quality of life. Periventricular nodular heterotopia is frequently associated to this condition, which must be successfully approached by the medical team attempting to an opportune diagnosis and defining which patients would benefit from surgical management. This positively impacts the quality of life of these patients and their caregivers.

  13. Assessment of clinical risk factors for drug-resistant epilepsy in children and teenagers

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    Marta Kasprzyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological illnesses occurring in children. In approximately 20–30% of cases it is drug-resistant. Aim of the research: To assess the already-known risk factors, analyse the rarely described ones, and find new causes of epilepsy drug resistance in children, taking into account the level of impact of each factor. Material and methods : The study comprised 152 of all 383 children hospitalised in 2012 at the Neurology Department of the Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital in Lodz due to epilepsy. Based on medical documentation, neurological examination, and our own questionnaire, we divided patients into two groups: drug-resistant epilepsy or drug-sensitive epilepsy. We compared the type, level of influence, and prevalence of different factors. For statistical analysis, the 2 test was used. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: Drug-resistant epilepsy was found in 64 patients (42.1%, and drug-sensitive epilepsy was found in 88 patients (57.9%. Factors that were most probable to cause drug resistance included: high prevalence of seizures (Cramer’s V = 0.66, type of epileptic syndrome (V = 0.62, psychomotor developmental delay (V = 0.62, and occurrence of status epilepticus (V = 0.6. Factors such as infections of CNS in early childhood, repeated severe infections of airways in childhood, and mother’s infectious diseases with high fever during pregnancy were rare or non occurring (Cramer’s V = 0.41, 0.32, and 0.31, respectively. Conclusions : The study confirmed the previously known causes of drug resistance and indicated the significance of underestimated inflammatory and infectious factors involving pyrexia, in children and also in mothers during pregnancy.

  14. Fighting Fire with Fire: Surgical Options for Patients with Drug-Resistant Epilepsy.

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    Bayer, Alina D; Blum, Andrew S; Asaad, Wael F; Roth, Julie; Toms, Steven A; Deck, Gina M

    2018-03-01

    While antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) provide adequate seizure control for most patients with epilepsy, ~30% continue to have seizures despite treatment with two or more AEDs.1 In addition to direct harm from seizures, poor epilepsy control correlates with higher mortality, morbidity, 2, 3 and cost to the healthcare system.4 In the subset of patients with persistent seizures despite medical management, surgical intervention and neuromodulation may be more effective. Primary care physicians and general neurologists should be aware of non-AED treatment options that are standard of care for drug- resistant epilepsy (DRE). [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2018-03.asp].

  15. [Contemporary opinions on classification, pathogenesis and treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy].

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    Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological disorders, both in children and adult persons. About 0.5-1% of general population suffer from epilepsy, which means that about 50 million people in the world are affected. First years of life and very late adulthood are periods in human's life particularly predisposing to epilepsy. Repetitive epileptic seizures may cause many life-threatening situations and significantly lower patient's quality of life. To the most serious complications belong status epilepticus and sudden unexpected deaths due to epilepsy (SUDEP). Absences from work or school caused by seizures, difficulties in social life, frequent injuries and necessity of polytherapy are also important for patients. All these factors result in low self-esteem and poor quality of life. The main aim of the treatment was control of epileptic seizures. However, despite of new antiepileptic drugs developed almost every year, in one third of all patients with epilepsy seizures remain out of control. Those patients are regarded to have "drug-resistant epilepsy". Despite of significant scale of the problem, there is no one definition of the phenomenon. In the presented review the authors outline current definitions, recent opinions on pathogenesis and risk factors, and provide practical rules of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, which should help to restrict drug-resistancy.

  16. Signaling to P-glycoprotein-A new therapeutic target to treat drug-resistant epilepsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartz, A.M.; Notenboom, S.; Bauer, B.

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy affects more than 60 million people worldwide. While most patients can be treated with antiepileptic drugs, up to 40% of patients respond poorly to pharmacotherapy. This drug resistance is not well understood and presents a major clinical problem. In this short review we provide background

  17. Diffusion and perfusion MRI for the localisation of epileptogenic foci in drug-resistant epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiniger, P.; El-Koussy, M.; Kiefer, C.; Oswald, H.; Schroth, G.; Schindler, K.; Donati, F.; Loevblad, K.O.; Wissmeyer, M.; Mariani, L.; Weder, B.

    2002-01-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy is an important clinical challenge, both diagnostically and therapeutically. More and more surgical options are being considered, but precise presurgical assessment is necessary. We prospectively studied eight patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, who underwent clinical examination, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal MRI, including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted echoplanar sequences. Lesions suspected on SPECT of being epileptogenic showed mild hypoperfusion, while the diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) revealed increased apparent diffusion coefficients relative to the other side. However, these abnormalities were not visible on the corresponding maps. We showed that DWI and perfusion-weighted MRI could be used confirm the characteristics and site of an epileptogenic area in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. (orig.)

  18. Metabolomics As a Tool for the Characterization of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy.

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    Murgia, Federica; Muroni, Antonella; Puligheddu, Monica; Polizzi, Lorenzo; Barberini, Luigi; Orofino, Gianni; Solla, Paolo; Poddighe, Simone; Del Carratore, Francesco; Griffin, Julian L; Atzori, Luigi; Marrosu, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is a critical issue in the treatment of epilepsy, contributing to clinical emergencies and increasing both serious social and economic burdens on the health system. The wide variety of potential drug combinations followed by often failed consecutive attempts to match drugs to an individual patient may mean that this treatment stage may last for years with suboptimal benefit to the patient. Given these challenges, it is valuable to explore the availability of new methodologies able to shorten the period of determining a rationale pharmacologic treatment. Metabolomics could provide such a tool to investigate possible markers of drug resistance in subjects with epilepsy. Blood samples were collected from (1) controls (C) ( n  = 35), (2) patients with epilepsy "responder" (R) ( n  = 18), and (3) patients with epilepsy "non-responder" (NR) ( n  = 17) to the drug therapy. The samples were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, followed by multivariate statistical analysis. A different metabolic profile based on metabolomics analysis of the serum was observed between C and patients with epilepsy and also between R and NR patients. It was possible to identify the discriminant metabolites for the three classes under investigation. Serum from patients with epilepsy were characterized by increased levels of 3-OH-butyrate, 2-OH-valerate, 2-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, acetone, acetate, choline, alanine, glutamate, scyllo-inositol (C lactate, and citrate compared to C (C > R > NR). In conclusion, metabolomics may represent an important tool for discovery of differences between subjects affected by epilepsy responding or resistant to therapies and for the study of its pathophysiology, optimizing the therapeutic resources and the quality of life of patients.

  19. Metabolomics As a Tool for the Characterization of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

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    Federica Murgia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeDrug resistance is a critical issue in the treatment of epilepsy, contributing to clinical emergencies and increasing both serious social and economic burdens on the health system. The wide variety of potential drug combinations followed by often failed consecutive attempts to match drugs to an individual patient may mean that this treatment stage may last for years with suboptimal benefit to the patient. Given these challenges, it is valuable to explore the availability of new methodologies able to shorten the period of determining a rationale pharmacologic treatment. Metabolomics could provide such a tool to investigate possible markers of drug resistance in subjects with epilepsy.MethodsBlood samples were collected from (1 controls (C (n = 35, (2 patients with epilepsy “responder” (R (n = 18, and (3 patients with epilepsy “non-responder” (NR (n = 17 to the drug therapy. The samples were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, followed by multivariate statistical analysis.Key findingsA different metabolic profile based on metabolomics analysis of the serum was observed between C and patients with epilepsy and also between R and NR patients. It was possible to identify the discriminant metabolites for the three classes under investigation. Serum from patients with epilepsy were characterized by increased levels of 3-OH-butyrate, 2-OH-valerate, 2-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, acetone, acetate, choline, alanine, glutamate, scyllo-inositol (C < R < NR, and decreased concentration of glucose, lactate, and citrate compared to C (C > R > NR.SignificanceIn conclusion, metabolomics may represent an important tool for discovery of differences between subjects affected by epilepsy responding or resistant to therapies and for the study of its pathophysiology, optimizing the therapeutic resources and the quality of life of patients.

  20. Retinal nerve fibre layer thinning is associated with drug resistance in epilepsy.

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    Balestrini, Simona; Clayton, Lisa M S; Bartmann, Ana P; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Novy, Jan; Coppola, Antonietta; Wandschneider, Britta; Stern, William M; Acheson, James; Bell, Gail S; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2016-04-01

    Retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness is related to the axonal anterior visual pathway and is considered a marker of overall white matter 'integrity'. We hypothesised that RNFL changes would occur in people with epilepsy, independently of vigabatrin exposure, and be related to clinical characteristics of epilepsy. Three hundred people with epilepsy attending specialist clinics and 90 healthy controls were included in this cross-sectional cohort study. RNFL imaging was performed using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Drug resistance was defined as failure of adequate trials of two antiepileptic drugs to achieve sustained seizure freedom. The average RNFL thickness and the thickness of each of the 90° quadrants were significantly thinner in people with epilepsy than healthy controls (p<0.001, t test). In a multivariate logistic regression model, drug resistance was the only significant predictor of abnormal RNFL thinning (OR=2.09, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.01, p=0.03). Duration of epilepsy (coefficient -0.16, p=0.004) and presence of intellectual disability (coefficient -4.0, p=0.044) also showed a significant relationship with RNFL thinning in a multivariate linear regression model. Our results suggest that people with epilepsy with no previous exposure to vigabatrin have a significantly thinner RNFL than healthy participants. Drug resistance emerged as a significant independent predictor of RNFL borderline attenuation or abnormal thinning in a logistic regression model. As this is easily assessed by OCT, RNFL thickness might be used to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance, and possibly severity. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Metabolomics As a Tool for the Characterization of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Murgia; Antonella Muroni; Monica Puligheddu; Lorenzo Polizzi; Luigi Barberini; Gianni Orofino; Paolo Solla; Simone Poddighe; Simone Poddighe; Francesco Del Carratore; Francesco Del Carratore; Julian L. Griffin; Luigi Atzori; Francesco Marrosu

    2017-01-01

    PurposeDrug resistance is a critical issue in the treatment of epilepsy, contributing to clinical emergencies and increasing both serious social and economic burdens on the health system. The wide variety of potential drug combinations followed by often failed consecutive attempts to match drugs to an individual patient may mean that this treatment stage may last for years with suboptimal benefit to the patient. Given these challenges, it is valuable to explore the availability of new methodo...

  2. Metabolomics as a Tool for the characterization of Drug-resistant epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Murgia, Federica; Muroni, Antonella; Puligheddu, Monica; Polizzi, Lorenzo; Barberini, Luigi; Orofino, Gianni; Solla, Paolo; Poddighe, Simone; Carratore, Francesco Del; Griffin, Julian L.; Atzori, Luigi; Marrosu, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Drug resistance is a critical issue in the treatment of epilepsy, contributing to clinical emergencies and increasing both serious social and economic burdens on the health system. The wide variety of potential drug combinations followed by often failed consecutive attempts to match drugs to an individual patient may mean that this treatment stage may last for years with suboptimal benefit to the patient. Given these challenges, it is valuable to explore the availability of new metho...

  3. A validation of the new definition of drug-resistant epilepsy by the International League Against Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Zenteno, Jose F; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Buckley, Samantha; Zahagun, Ricardo; Rizvi, Syed

    2014-06-01

    To establish applicability, the recently proposed International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) consensus on drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) requires testing in clinical and research settings. This study evaluates the reliability and validity of these criteria in a clinical population. In phase I, two independent evaluators reviewed 97 randomly selected medical records of patients with epilepsy at two separate intervals. Both ILEA consensus and standard diagnostic criteria were employed. Kappa, weighted kappa, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to determine interobserver and intraobserver variability. In phase II, ILAE consensus criteria were applied to 250 patients with epilepsy to determine risk factors associated with development of DRE and to calculate point prevalence. The interobserver agreement of the four definitions was as follows: Berg (0.56), Kwan and Brodie (0.58), Camfield and Camfield (0.69), and ILAE (0.77). The intraobserver agreement of the four definition was as follows: Berg (0.81), Kwan and Brodie (0.82), Camfield and Camfield (0.72), and ILAE (0.82). The prevalence of DRE was the following: with the Berg's definition was 28.4%, Kwan and Brodie 34%, Camfield and Camfield 37%, and with ILAE was 33%. This is first study to establish reliability and validity of ILAE criteria for the diagnosis of DRE. This new definition compares favorably with previously established constructs, which continue to retain clinical significance. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. EFFICACY OF RUFINAMIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT FOCAL EPILEPSIES IN PAEDIATRIC PRACTICE

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    I. O. Shchederkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among drug-resistant epilepsies, epileptic syndromes, characterized by combination of several types of seizures, are considered to be the most difficult in terms of treatment. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome is one of them. It manifests with polymorphic seizures (tonic axial, myatonic, atypical absence seizures, status epilepticus of minor motor seizures, myoclonic, generalized convulsive, and focal seizures. This is a heterogeneous disease, represented by a complex of clinical and electroencephalographic manifestations with various etiology. Current review is devoted to a novel antiepileptic drug rufinamide, which has a new mechanism of action. The drug has been registered in Russia in 2015. The authors also describe their own experience of rufinamide usage in the treatment of drug-resistant focal epilepsy as a part of multicomponent therapy for polymorphic seizures. One patient achieved clinical remission for 16 months; the second one had more than 50 % decrease in seizures frequency with a remission of drop-attacks.

  5. WITHDRAWN: Oxcarbazepine add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sergio M; Schmidt, Dieter B; White, Sarah; Shukralla, Arif

    2016-11-15

    Most people with epilepsy have a good prognosis and their seizures can be well controlled with the use of a single antiepileptic drug, but up to 30% develop refractory epilepsy, especially those with partial seizures. In this review we summarize the current evidence regarding oxcarbazepine when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. To evaluate the effects of oxcarbazepine when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (28 March 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2006). No language restrictions were imposed. We checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted Novartis (manufacturers of oxcarbazepine) and experts in the field. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, add-on trials of oxcarbazepine in patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted the relevant data. The following outcomes were assessed : (a) 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency; (b) treatment withdrawal (any reason); (c) side effects. Primary analyses were intention-to-treat. Summary odds ratios were estimated for each outcome. Two trials were included representing 961 randomized patients.Overall Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CIs)) for 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency compared to placebo 2.96 (2.20, 4.00).Treatment withdrawal OR (95% CIs) compared to placebo 2.17 (1.59, 2.97).Side effects: OR (99% CIs) compared to placebo, ataxia 2.93 (1.72, 4.99); dizziness 3.05 (1.99, 4.67); fatigue 1.80 (1.02, 3.19); nausea 2.88 (1.77, 4.69); somnolence 2.55 (1.84, 3.55); diplopia 4.32 (2.65, 7.04), were significantly associated with oxcarbazepine. Oxcarbazepine has efficacy as an add-on treatment in patients with drug-resistant

  6. Differences in quality of life of women and men with drug-resistant epilepsy in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Aleksandra; Szantroch, Marta; Gleinert, Alicja; Rysz, Andrzej; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the differences in health-related quality of life in groups of men and women suffering with drug-resistant epilepsy and to determine which factors influence quality of life. The examined group consisted of 64 subjects with drug-resistant epilepsy - 31 men and 33 women. The mean duration of epilepsy was 17.56±8.92 and 19±9.56years, respectively. The following diagnostic tools were used: QOLIE-31-P, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Revised (WAIS-R (PL)), and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Scores in QOLIE-31-P did not differ significantly between groups of men and women with drug-resistant epilepsy; however, a more detailed analysis revealed certain disparities. Multiple regression analyses indicated that some distinct factors were associated with quality of life in each sex. In the group of women, there were no significant predictors of their quality of life. Among the group of men, depression intensity was the only statistically significant QoL predictor, explaining 16% of the variance (adjusted R(2)=0.16, F(6, 24)=19.7, pEmotional Well-Being and Energy/Fatigue subscales, regardless of the sex. The study revealed that, despite similar scores in QOLIE-31-P, specific factors may differentially affect the quality of life of men and women with drug-resistant epilepsy in Poland. Nevertheless, replication of these results with a larger number of participants is needed for a more definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epileptogenic networks and drug-resistant epilepsy: Present and future perspectives of epilepsy research-Utility for the epileptologist and the epilepsy surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirmoy Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary approach is required to understand the complex intricacies of drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE. A challenge that neurosurgeons across the world face is accurate localization of epileptogenic zone. A significant number of patients who have undergone resective brain surgery for epilepsy still continue to have seizures. The reason behind this therapy resistance still eludes us. Thus to develop a cure for the difficult to treat epilepsy, we need to comprehensively study epileptogenesis. Till date, most of the studies on DRE is focused on undermining the abnormal functioning of receptors involved in synaptic transmission and reduced levels of antiepileptic drugs around there targets. But recent advances in imaging and electrophysiological techniques have suggested the role epileptogenic networks in the process of epileptogenesis. According to this hypothesis, the local neurons recruit distant neurons through complex oscillatory circuits, which further recruit more distant neurons, thereby generating a hypersynchronus neuronal activity. The epileptogenic networks may be confined to the lesion or could propagate to distant focus. The success of surgery depends on the precision by which the epileptogenic network is determined while planning a surgical intervention. Here, we summarize various modalities of electrophysiological and imaging techniques to determine the functionally active epileptogenic networks. We also review evidence pertaining to the proposed role of epileptogenic network in abnormal synaptic transmission which is one of the major causes of epileptiform activity. Elucidation of current concepts in regulation of synaptic transmission by networks will help develop therapies for epilepsy cases that cannot be managed pharmacologically.

  8. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure

  9. Major vault protein (MVP) gene polymorphisms and drug resistance in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Radhab, Saradalekshmi Koramannil; Radha, Koramannil; Sathyan, Sanish; Vijai, Joseph; Banerjee, Moinak; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath

    2013-09-10

    The human major vault protein (MVP) has been implicated in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Over expression of MVP has also been reported in brain tissue samples from antiepileptic drug (AED)-resistant human focal epilepsies. To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involving the MVP gene and AED-resistance, we compared the distribution of three SNPs in the MVP gene, rs4788187, rs3815824 and rs3815823, among 220 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype of AED-resistant epilepsy syndrome), 201 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype of AED-responsive epilepsy syndrome) and 213 ethnically matched non-epilepsy controls. All the patients and controls were residents of the South Indian state of Kerala for more than three generations. We did not find any significant difference in allele and genotypic frequencies of the studied SNPs between AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts, and between AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts independently and pooled together when compared with the controls. We conclude that rs4788187, rs3815824, rs3815823 variants of the MVP gene are associated neither with predisposition for epilepsy nor with AED-resistance in the population that we have studied. Our results suggest the need for further research into the link between MVP and AED-resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Unique behavioral characteristics and microRNA signatures in a drug resistant epilepsy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangsup Moon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharmacoresistance is a major issue in the treatment of epilepsy. However, the mechanism underlying pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs is still unclear, and few animal models have been established for studying drug resistant epilepsy (DRE. In our study, spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs were investigated by video-EEG monitoring during the entire procedure. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the mouse pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model, we administered levetiracetam (LEV and valproate (VPA in sequence. AED-responsive and AED-resistant mice were naturally selected after 7-day treatment of LEV and VPA. Behavioral tests (open field, object exploration, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition test and a microRNA microarray test were performed. Among the 37 epileptic mice with SRS, 23 showed significantly fewer SRSs during administration of LEV (n = 16, LEV sensitive (LS group or VPA (n = 7, LEV resistant/VPA sensitive (LRVS group, while 7 epileptic mice did not show any amelioration with either of the AEDs (n = 7, multidrug resistant (MDR group. On the behavioral assessment, MDR mice displayed distinctive behaviors in the object exploration and elevated plus maze tests, which were not observed in the LS group. Expression of miRNA was altered in LS and MDR groups, and we identified 4 miRNAs (miR-206, miR-374, miR-468, and miR-142-5p, which were differently modulated in the MDR group versus both control and LS groups. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to identify a pharmacoresistant subgroup, resistant to 2 AEDs, in the pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model. We hypothesize that modulation of the identified miRNAs may play a key role in developing pharmacoresistance and behavioral alterations in the MDR group.

  11. Correlates of health-related quality of life in children with drug resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Smith, Mary Lou; Ferro, Mark A; Speechley, Kathy N; Connoly, Mary B; Snead, O Carter; Widjaja, Elysa

    2016-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is compromised in children with epilepsy. The current study aimed to identify correlates of HRQL in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Data came from 115 children enrolled in the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PEPSQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study. Individual, clinical, and family factors were evaluated. HRQL was measured using the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE), a parent-rated epilepsy-specific instrument, with composite scores ranging from 0 to 100. A series of univariable linear regression analyses were conducted to identify significant associations with HRQL, followed by a multivariable regression analysis. Children had a mean age of 11.85 ± 3.81 years and 65 (56.5%) were male. The mean composite QOLCE score was 60.18 ± 16.69. Child age, sex, age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, caregiver age, caregiver education, and income were not significantly associated with HRQL. Univariable regression analyses revealed that a higher number of anti-seizure medications (p = 0.020), lower IQ (p = 0.002), greater seizure frequency (p = 0.048), caregiver unemployment (p = 0.010), higher caregiver depressive and anxiety symptoms (p < 0.001 for both), poorer family adaptation, fewer family resources, and a greater number of family demands (p < 0.001 for all) were associated with lower HRQL. Multivariable regression analysis showed that lower child IQ (β = 0.20, p = 0.004), fewer family resources (β = 0.43, p = 0.012), and caregiver unemployment (β = 6.53, p = 0.018) were associated with diminished HRQL in children. The results emphasize the importance of child cognition and family variables in the HRQL of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. The findings speak to the importance of offering comprehensive care to children and their families to address the nonmedical features that impact on HRQL. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  12. Absence of association between major vault protein (MVP) gene polymorphisms and drug resistance in Chinese Han patients with partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luo; Zhang, Mengqi; Long, Hongyu; Long, Lili; Xie, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhaoqian; Kang, Jin; Chen, Qihua; Feng, Li; Xiao, Bo

    2015-11-15

    Drug resistance in epilepsy is common despite many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available for treatment. The development of drug resistant epilepsy may be a result of multiple factors. Several previous studies reported that the major vault protein (MVP) was significantly increased in epileptogenic brain tissues resected from patients with partial-onset seizures, indicating the possible involvement of MVP in drug resistance. In this article, we aimed to identify the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MVP gene and drug resistance of partial epilepsy in a Chinese Han population. A total of 510 patients with partial-onset seizures and 206 healthy controls were recruited. Among the patients, 222 were drug resistant and 288 were responsive. The selection of tagging SNPs was based on the Hapmap database and Haploview software and the genotyping was conducted on the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform. For the selected loci rs12149746, rs9938630 and rs4788186 in the MVP gene, there was no significant difference in allele or genotype distribution between the drug resistant and responsive groups, or between all of the patients and healthy controls. Linkage disequilibrium between any two loci was detected but there was no significant difference in haplotype frequency between the drug resistant and responsive groups. Our results suggest that MVP genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes may not be associated with drug resistance of partial epilepsy in the Chinese Han population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Biofeedback and drug-resistant epilepsy: back to an earlier treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Lanteaume, L; Pallanca, O; Vion-Dury, J; Bartolomei, F

    2014-03-01

    Biofeedback is a complementary non-pharmacological and non-surgical therapeutic developed over the last thirty years in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy. Biofeedback allows learning cognitive and behavioral strategies via a psychophysiological feedback loop. Firstly, this paper describes the different types of biofeedback protocols used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and their physiological justifications. Secondly, this paper analyzes the evidence of effectiveness, from a medical point of view, on reducing the numbers of seizures, and from a neurophysiological point of view, on the changing brain activity. Electroencephalography (EEG) biofeedback (neurofeedback) protocol on sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) has been investigated in many studies, the main limitation being small sample sizes and lack of control groups. The newer neurofeedback protocol on slow cortical potential (SCP) and galvanic skin response (GSR) biofeedback protocols have been used in a smaller number of studies. But, these studies are more rigorous with larger sized samples, matched control groups, and attempts to control the placebo effect. These protocols also open the way for innovative neurophysiological researches and may predict a renewal of biofeedback techniques. Biofeedback would have legitimacy in the field of clinical drug-resistant epilepsy at the interface between therapeutic and clinical neurophysiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Eslicarbazepine acetate add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xian-Chao; Yuan, Hai; Wang, Yi; Xu, Hui-Qin; Hong, Wen-Ke; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2017-10-25

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review published in the Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12.The majority of people with epilepsy have a good prognosis, but up to 30% of people continue to have seizures despite several regimens of antiepileptic drugs. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of ESL when used as an add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. The searches for the original review were run in November 2011. Subsequently, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (6 December 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11) and MEDLINE (1946 to 6 December 2016). There were no language restrictions. We reviewed the reference lists of retrieved studies to search for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted the manufacturers of ESL and experts in the field for information about any unpublished or ongoing studies. Randomized placebo controlled double-blind add-on trials of ESL in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes investigated included 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, seizure freedom, treatment withdrawal, adverse effects, and drug interactions. Primary analyses were by intention to treat (ITT). The dose-response relationship was evaluated in regression models. We included five trials (1799 participants) rated at low risk of bias; all studies were funded by BIAL. The overall risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency was 1.71 (95% CI 1.42 to 2.05). Dose regression analysis showed evidence that ESL reduced seizure frequency with an increase in efficacy with increasing doses of ESL. ESL was significantly associated with seizure freedom

  15. Single-item measure for assessing quality of life in children with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Widjaja, Elysa; Smith, Mary Lou

    2018-03-01

    The current study investigated the psychometric properties of a single-item quality of life (QOL) measure, the Global Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy question (G-QOLCE), in children with drug-resistant epilepsy. Data came from the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PESQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study (n = 118) with observations collected at baseline and at 6 months of follow-up on children aged 4-18 years. QOL was measured with the QOLCE-76 and KIDSCREEN-27. The G-QOLCE was an overall QOL question derived from the QOLCE-76. Construct validity and reliability were assessed with Spearman's correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Responsiveness was examined through distribution-based and anchor-based methods. The G-QOLCE showed moderate (r ≥ 0.30) to strong (r ≥ 0.50) correlations with composite scores, and most subscales of the QOLCE-76 and KIDSCREEN-27 at baseline and 6-month follow-up. The G-QOLCE had moderate test-retest reliability (ICC range: 0.49-0.72) and was able to detect clinically important change in patients' QOL (standardized response mean: 0.38; probability of change: 0.65; Guyatt's responsiveness statistics: 0.62 and 0.78). Caregiver anxiety and family functioning contributed most strongly to G-QOLCE scores over time. Results offer promising preliminary evidence regarding the validity, reliability, and responsiveness of the proposed single-item QOL measure. The G-QOLCE is a potentially useful tool that can be feasibly administered in a busy clinical setting to evaluate clinical status and impact of treatment outcomes in pediatric epilepsy.

  16. Analysis of a case of drug-resistant childhood absence epilepsy concurrent with mysophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karlov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of childhood absence epilepsy concurrent with mysophobia, panic attacks, and the development of alternative psychosis in an accentuated girl with drug-induced remission of absence seizures and EEG changes.

  17. Dentate gyrus expression of nestin-immunoreactivity in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, L; Konopka, H; Escobar, E; Acuña, A; Oddo, S; Solís, P; Seoane, E; Kochen, S

    2015-04-01

    Granule cells pathology in dentate gyrus, have received considerable attention in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the nestin (an intermediate filament protein expressed by newly formed cells), immunoreactivity (IR) in granular cells layers of hippocampal tissue extirpated during epilepsy surgical procedure, in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Hippocampal sections of 16 patients with hippocampal sclerosis and drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy were processed using immunoperoxidase with antibody to nestin. Archival material from 8 normal post-mortem hippocampus, were simultaneously processed. Reactive area for nestin-IR, the total number of positive nestin cells per field (20×), and the MGV (mean gray value) was determined by computerized image analysis (ImageJ), and compared between groups. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Nestin-IR cells were found in granule cells layers of both controls and patients. Larger reactive somas (p gyrus may reflect changes in dentate gyrus neuroplasticity associated to chronic temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical implications on memory an emotional alterations such as depression. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical characteristics, surgical and neuropsychological outcomes in drug resistant tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, Sangeeta; Iyer, Vivek; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Shah, Urvashi; Pradhan, Pranjali; Jain, Neeraj; Godge, Yogesh

    2016-12-01

    Glioneuronal tumors are found in nearly one third patients who undergo surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy with temporal lobe being the most common location. Few studies, however have concentrated on the neurological and neuropsychological outcomes after surgery, hitherto none from India. We studied 34 patients with temporal lobe tumors and drug resistant epilepsy. These patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy or lesionectomy based on the involvement of the hippocampus and mesial temporal structures. The clinical history, EEG, neuropsychology profile and MRI were compared. Seizure outcome was categorized using Engel's classification. At a mean follow up of 62 months, 85.29% of the patients were seizure free (Engel's Class I). All 8 patients with intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) guided resection were seizure free. Presence of a residual lesion was significantly associated with persistence of seizures post surgery (p = 0.002). Group analysis revealed no significant shifts in IQ and memory scores postoperatively. There was a significant improvement in the quality of life scores (total and across all subdomains) in all patients (p temporal lobe tumors and refractory epilepsy offers complete seizure freedom in majority. Complete surgical excision of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in achieving seizure freedom. Intraoperative electrocorticography (EcoG) is a useful adjunct to ensure complete removal of epileptogenic zone, thus achieving optimal seizure freedom. There is a significant improvement in the quality of life scores (p < 0.001) with no negative impact of surgery on memory and intelligence. Even the patients who are not seizure free can achieve worthwhile improvement post surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Historical Risk Factors Associated with Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the possible influence of risk factors on seizure outcome after surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). This retrospective study recruited patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and were followed for a minimum of 1 year. Patients had been prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. After surgery outcome was classified into 2 groups: seizure-free or relapsed. The possible risk factors influencing long-term outcome after surgery were investigated. A total of 275 patients with MTS-TLE were studied. Two thirds of the patients had Engel's class 1 outcome and 48.4% of the patients had sustained seizure freedom, with no seizures since surgery. Patients with a history of tonic-clonic seizures in the year preceding surgery were more likely to experience seizure recurrence (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval 1.19-4.80; P = 0.01). Gender, race, family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizure, history of status epilepticus, duration of disease before surgery, intelligence quotient, and seizure frequency were not predictors of outcome. Many patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE respond favorably to surgery. It is critical to distinguish among different types and etiologies of TLE when predicting outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ring Chromosome 17 Not Involving the Miller-Dieker Region: A Case with Drug-Resistant Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonietta; Morrogh, Deborah; Farrell, Fiona; Balestrini, Simona; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Krithika, S; Sander, Josemir W; Waters, Jonathan J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are often identified in people with neurodevelopmental disorders including intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy. Ring chromosomes, which usually involve gene copy number loss, are formed by fusion of subtelomeric or telomeric chromosomal regions. Some ring chromosomes, including ring 14, 17, and 20, are strongly associated with seizure disorders. We report an individual with a ring chromosome 17, r(17)(p13.3q25.3), with a terminal 17q25.3 deletion and no short arm copy number loss, and with a phenotype characterized by intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy, including a propensity for nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

  1. [Adult patients treated for focal epilepsy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in combination in France: description according to the 2009 ILAE definition of AED resistance (ESPERA study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespignani, H; de Zélicourt, M; Laurendeau, C; Fagnani, F; Levy-Bachelot, L; Murat, C; Kahane, P; de Toffol, B

    2014-02-01

    To describe the adult population treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in combination for focal epilepsy according to the definition of AED resistance proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) in 2009 and to evaluate its implementation in current practice. ESPERA was a multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study with a clinical data collection covering the past 12 months conducted by neurologists. Classifications according to AED responsiveness established by investigators for each enrolled patient were revised by two experts. Seventy-one neurologists enrolled 405 patients. Their mean age was 42.7 years (sex-ratioM/F 0.98). According to the investigators, 60% of epilepsies were drug-resistant, 37% drug-responsive and 3% had an undefined drug-responsiveness. After revision of experts, 71% of epilepsies were classified as drug resistant, 22% as responsive and 7% as undefined. Among the participating neurologists, 76% have made at least one error in classifying their patients according to the 2009 ILAE definition of AED resistance. Because of epilepsy, 24% of patients (age≤65) were inactive and 42% could not drive (respectively 29 and 49% of patients with AED resistant epilepsy). Half of patients had at least one other chronic condition. Number of prescribed drugs in combination and health care resource utilisation were significantly higher in patients with drug-resistant epilepsies than in patients with drug responsive epilepsies. ESPERA study shows that the use of new definition of drug-resistance in everyday practice seems difficult without any additional training and that the social and professional disability is frequent in adults with focal epilepsies treated with polytherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinico-pathological factors influencing surgical outcome in drug resistant epilepsy secondary to mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitr Sastri, B V; Arivazhagan, A; Sinha, Sanjib; Mahadevan, Anita; Bharath, R D; Saini, J; Jamuna, R; Kumar, J Keshav; Rao, S L; Chandramouli, B A; Shankar, S K; Satishchandra, P

    2014-05-15

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is the most common cause of drug resistant epilepsy amenable for surgical treatment and seizure control. This study analyzed the outcome of patients with MTS following anterior temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy (ATL-AH) over 10 years and correlated the electrophysiological and radiological factors with the post operative seizure outcome. Eighty seven patients were included in the study. Sixty seven (77.2%) patients had an Engel Class 1 outcome, 9 (11.4%) had Class 2 outcome. Engel's class 1 outcome was achieved in 89.9% at 1 year, while it reduced slightly to 81.9% at 2 years and 76.2% at 5 year follow up. Seventy seven (88.5%) patients had evidence of hippocampal sclerosis on histopathology. Dual pathology was observed in 19 of 77 specimens with hippocampal sclerosis, but did not influence the outcome. Factors associated with an unfavorable outcome included male gender (p=0.04), and a higher frequency of pre-operative seizures (p=0.005), whereas the presence of febrile seizures (p=0.048) and loss of hippocampal neurons in CA4 region on histopathology (p=0.040) were associated with favorable outcome. The effect of CA4 loss on outcome is probably influenced by neuronal loss in other subfields as well since isolated CA4 loss was rare. Abnormal post operative EEG at the end of 1 week was found to be a significant factor predicting unfavorable outcome (p=0.005). On multivariate analysis, the pre-operative seizure frequency was the only significant factor affecting outcome. The present study observed excellent seizure free outcome in a carefully selected cohort of patients with MTS with refractory epilepsy. The presence of dual pathology did not influence the outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Validating the shortened Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE-55) in a sample of children with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Widjaja, Elysa; Smith, Mary Lou; Speechley, Kathy N; Ferro, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the newly developed shortened Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE-55) in a sample of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. Data came from 136 children enrolled in the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PEPSQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the higher-order factor structure of the QOLCE-55. Convergent and divergent validity was assessed by correlating subscales of the KIDSCREEN-27 with the QOLCE-55. Measurement equivalence of the QOLCE-55 was evaluated using multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis of children with drug-resistant epilepsy from PEPSQOL versus children with new-onset epilepsy from HERQULES (Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with Epilepsy Study). The higher-order factor structure of the QOLCE-55 demonstrated adequate fit: Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.948; Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.946; Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.060 (90% confidence interval [CI] 0.054-0.065); Weighted Root Mean Square Residuals (WRMR) = 1.247. Higher-order factor loadings were strong, ranging from λ = 0.74 to 0.81. Internal consistency reliability was excellent (α = 0.97, subscales α > 0.82). QOLCE-55 subscales demonstrated moderate to strong correlations with similar subscales of the KIDSCREEN-27 (ρ = 0.43-0.75) and weak to moderate correlations with dissimilar subscales (ρ = 0.25-0.42). The QOLCE-55 demonstrated partial measurement equivalence at the level of strict invariance - χ 2 (2,823) = 3,727.9, CFI = 0.961, TLI = 0.962, RMSEA = 0.049 (0.044, 0.053), WRMR = 1.834. The findings provide support for the factor structure of the QOLCE-55 and contribute to its robust psychometric profile as a reliable and valid measure. Researchers and health practitioners should consider the QOLCE-55 as a viable option for reducing respondent burden when assessing health-related quality of life

  4. Low and High Frequency Hippocampal Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew-Na; Lee, Ching-Yi; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Tu, Po-Hsun; Chang, Bao-Luen; Lee, Chih-Hong; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Chang, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Wei-En Johnny; Hsieh, Hsiang-Yao; Chiang, Hsing-I; Wu, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hippocampus offers the possibility to treat patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who are not surgical candidates. We report long-term follow-up results in five patients receiving low or high frequency hippocampal stimulation for drug-resistant MTLE. The patients underwent stereotactic implantation of quadripolar stimulating electrodes in the hippocampus. Two of the patients received unilateral electrode implantation, while the other three received bilateral implantation. Stimulation of the hippocampal electrodes was turned ON immediately after the implantation of an implantable pulse generator, with initial stimulation parameters: 1 V, 90-150 μs, 5 or 145 Hz. The frequency of seizures was monitored and compared with preimplantation baseline data. Two men and three women, aged 27-61 years were studied, with a mean follow-up period of 38.4 months (range, 30-42 months). The baseline seizure frequency was 2.0-15.3/month. The five patients had an average 45% (range 22-72%) reduction in the frequency of seizures after hippocampal stimulation over the study period. Low frequency hippocampal stimulation decreased the frequency of seizures in two patients (by 54% and 72%, respectively). No implantation- or stimulation-related side effects were reported. Electrical stimulation of the hippocampus is a minimally invasive and reversible method that can improve seizure outcomes in patients with drug-resistant MTLE. The optimal frequency of stimulation varied from patient to patient and therefore required individual setting. These experimental results warrant further controlled studies with a large patient population to evaluate the long-term effect of hippocampal stimulation with different stimulation parameters. © 2016 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  5. Mobile phones and seizures: drug-resistant epilepsy is less common in mobile-phone-using patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarjunakonda, Sundarachary; Amalakanti, Sridhar; Uppala, Veeramma; Gajula, Rama Krishna; Tata, Ramya Sree; Bolla, Hima Bindu; Rajanala, Lalitha; Athina, Srinivasulu; Daggumati, Rajeswari; Lavu, Harish; Devanaboina, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a condition where patients have seizures due to abnormal nerve impulses in the brain. The effect of mobile phone radiation on patients with seizures is not known. To compare the seizure profile of patients not using mobile phones with that of their peers using mobile phones. In a retrospective cohort study performed at the neurology outpatient department of Guntur Medical College Hospital, Guntur, India from September 2014 to September 2015, we included 178 consecutive epileptic patients aged 16-65 years, who had had seizure disorder for 1 year or more. On the basis of their possession and usage of mobile phones, patients were divided into three groups: no mobile group (NMG), home mobile group (HMG) and personal mobile group (PMG). We obtained data on seizure frequency and recorded details of mobile phone usage and their antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. 107 NMG, 3 HMG and 68 PMG patients were finalised for the analysis. There was no significant difference in the number of seizures in the past year between the three groups. The PMG (3.7%) contained a clinically significant lower proportion of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy than the NMG (28.2%). Patients with drug-responsive epilepsy were 7.4 (95% CI 1.4 to 39.9) (p=0.01) times more likely to be found in the PMG than in the NMG after adjustment for differences in sex and occupation. Although the experimental data remain inconclusive, our clinical study suggests that patients who use mobile phones are less likely to have drug-resistant epilepsy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeesh Balan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy; and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004. This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004 and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05 cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency

  7. Network Analysis of Foramen Ovale Electrode Recordings in Drug-resistant Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Pastor, Jesús; Torres, Cristina V.; Sola, Rafael G.; Ortega, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% of epilepsy patients are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. In these cases, surgery is the only alternative to eliminate/control seizures. However, a significant minority of patients continues to exhibit post-operative seizures, even in those cases in which the suspected source of seizures has been correctly localized and resected. The protocol presented here combines a clinical procedure routinely employed during the pre-operative evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with a novel technique for network analysis. The method allows for the evaluation of the temporal evolution of mesial network parameters. The bilateral insertion of foramen ovale electrodes (FOE) into the ambient cistern simultaneously records electrocortical activity at several mesial areas in the temporal lobe. Furthermore, network methodology applied to the recorded time series tracks the temporal evolution of the mesial networks both interictally and during the seizures. In this way, the presented protocol offers a unique way to visualize and quantify measures that considers the relationships between several mesial areas instead of a single area. PMID:28060326

  8. Role of I-123-iomazenil SPEDT imaging in drug resistant epilepsy with complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeholm, H.; Rosen, I.; Elmqvist, D. [Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    Fifteen patients with therapy resistant partial complex seizures with no structural lesions were examined interictally with 123-I-IOMAXENIL SPECT for measurement of benzodiazepine receptor distribution and with 99m-Tc-HMPAO SPEDT for measurement of cerebral blood flow distribution. Regional abnormalities were correlated with the seizure onset patterns in EEG later recorded with implanted subdural strips. SPECT scans were made immediately after and at 1 and 2 h after intravenous injection of 123-I-Iomaxenil. During that time there was a continuous change from an immediate flow-related distribution toward a more specific receptor distribution. The decay of radioactivity of I-123 in the brain was linear over time. Two patients on benzodiazepine treatment showed much faster elimination and showed no focal abnormalities. Eight patients with clear-cut unifocal seizure onset showed concordant focal benzodiazepine defects. These patients showed a progressive focus/homotopic non-focus enhancement over time much larger than the HMPAO scans in the same patients. Also the estimated focal area of abnormality was more restricted in the Iomazenil scans than in HMPAO scans. Five patients had more complex seizure onset patterns. In these patients a mismatch between the locations of abnormalities in Iomaxenil and HMPAO scans were often found but benzodiazepine receptor abnormalities were more circumscribed also in these patients. The results suggest that 123-I-Iomazenil SPECT is more useful than 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT when applied interictally in patients with partial complex epilepsy, since in addition to demonstrate the hemispheric laterality of the epileptogenic zone, 123-I-Iomazenil appears to indicate its anatomical location with higher confidence, which could be of practical value for positioning of intracranial EEG electrodes. (au) 36 refs.

  9. Neurosurgical treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy on the basis of a fusion of MRI and SPECT images - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, E.; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Misko, J.; Kaminska, A.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Terczynska, I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy concerns at least 0.5% of population and in most of the cases (approx. 70%) can be treated pharmacologically, which helps to prevent seizures. In all other patients, such a treatment does not produce the desired results. Their condition may require neurosurgical management. The aim of this work was to fuse anatomical MRI images and functional SPECT images in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, without structural changes on MRI or with changes so severe that it would be impossible to establish which ones are responsible for seizures. The authors presented a case of a child subjected to a neurosurgical procedure carried out on the basis of the fused MRI and SPECT images. Case Report: A seven-year-old boy with an extensive defect of the right hemisphere (cortical dysplasia with multiple balloon-like cells) operated on three times due to a history of treatment-resistant seizures present since the age of one. A subsequent MRI examination was performed with magnetic field intensity of 1.5 T, within a routine epilepsy protocol applying volumetric thin-slice T1-weighted images. Next, in the interictal period, a SPECT examination was performed with the use of the 99mT c-labelled ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99mT cECD). For fusion and postprocessing, the following software was used: PMOD (Biomedical Image Quantification PMOD Technologies) with PFUS (Flexible Image Matching and Fusion Tool) and a program for a quantitative analysis of counts in the region of interest, so called VOI Constructor (Volume of Interest Constructor). On the basis of the fusion of images, the boy was subjected to the next operation procedure. The remaining fragments of the right frontal and parietal lobe adjacent to the occipital lobe were removed. Seizure remission was obtained and it was already 31 months long when we were writing this article. Conclusions: Owing to this multi-stage procedure, it was possible to avoid a total anatomical and functional hemispherectomy. This

  10. Association between C3435T polymorphism of MDR1 gene and the incidence of drug-resistant epilepsy in the population of Polish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiołek, Mariusz; Romanowicz, Hanna; Połatyńska, Katarzyna; Chamielec, Maciej; Skalski, Dominik; Makowska, Marianna; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-07-08

    Epilepsy is a disease of neurological character. Approximately one third of epileptic patients demonstrate a drug-resistant phenotype, which is associated with the development of drug-resistant epilepsy. The multidrug resistance protein 1 and glycoprotein P, encoded by MDR1, play a significant role in the transmembrane transport of anti-epileptic agents. Single nucleotide polymorphism C3435T (rs1045642) within MDR1 gene may be associated with an increased expression of P-gp which affects the levels of antiepileptic drugs in plasma. The presented studies analysed the association between C3435T polymorphism of MDR1 gene and the incidence of drug-resistant epilepsy in the population of Polish children. C3435T polymorphism of MDR1 gene was analysed by the high resolution melting technique in a group of patients with drug-resistant (n = 106) and drug-responsive epilepsy (n = 67), as well as in non-epileptic children (n = 98) hospitalised at the Department of Neurology, Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz. Genotype and allele distributions were evaluated and their compatibility with the Hardy-Weinberg distribution was assessed by means of the χ(2) test. Genotype and allele evaluation, regarding their relationship with a given feature, was supported by an analysis of odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval, calculated according to the logistic regression model. An association was observed between the incidence rate of DRE and the presence of C allele in C3435T polymorphism of MDR1 gene, which may enhance the risk of the disease. The T allele may then play a protective role. No differences were found in the studied groups, regarding either genotype or allele distribution in reference to patient's gender or concomitant diseases. Following the obtained results, C3435T polymorphism of MDR1 gene may be connected with the incidence of drug-resistant epilepsy in the population of Polish children. ISRCTN ISRCTN73824458. Registered 28th September 2014.

  11. Application of own computer program for assessment of brain-fluid index in the medial temporal lobe portions in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguslawska, R.; Skrobowska, E.; Rysz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy resistant to pharmacological treatment still remains one of the main problems in contemporary epileptology. The problem most frequently concerns patients with focal epilepsy, with the seizure focus possible to localize. In case of drug-resistant epilepsy, both morphological imaging methods (MR) and manual measurements or volumetry are used. Also functional studies, such as MRS (magnetic resonance spectroscopy), fMRI (functional magnetic resonance), SPECT (single photon emission tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography) are performed. Material/Methods: The study presents application of own computer program based on the method of segmentation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the brain tissue. The program calculates automatically the brain-fluin index in the hippocampal region. The material comprises the brain-fluin index results calculated with the presented program in comparison with the method of manual delineation in a group of 50 patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. The program is easy to use, it reads the MR data recorded in DICOM installed on a PC. Results: The brain-fluin index result (expressed as a decimal fraction) is calculated on the basis of 4 consecutive layers examined by MR (evaluating hippocampal structures) performed using SE sequence, and T2-weighted imaging in the frontal plane perpendicular to the long axis of the temporal lobes. The results obtained in epilepsy patients were compared with 24 control subjects. Conclusions: Detailed analysis of the obtained data allowed to conclude that precise hippocampal volume assessment can be obtained by combination of both methods, i.e. manual delineation and automatic calculation of brain-fluin index taking into consideration the total volume of cerebral structures. (authors)

  12. A functional polymorphism of the microRNA-146a gene is associated with susceptibility to drug-resistant epilepsy and seizures frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lili; Tao, Hua; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhou; Xu, Zhien; Zhou, Haihong; Cai, Yujie; Yao, Lifen; Chen, Beichu; Liang, Wandong; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Wanwen; Liu, Tingting; Ma, Guoda; Li, You; Zhao, Bin; Li, Keshen

    2015-04-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder and is characterized by an enduring predisposition for seizures. Recently, a growing body of evidence has suggested that microRNA-146a (miR-146a) is upregulated in the brains of epilepsy patients and of mouse models; furthermore, miR-146a may be involved in the development and progression of seizures through the regulation of inflammation and immune responses. In this report, we performed a case-control study to analyze the relationship between the two potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the miR-146a gene (rs2910464 and rs57095329) and the risk of epilepsy in a Chinese population comprising 249 cases and 249 healthy controls. Our study comprised 249 epilepsy patients and 249 healthy controls in two regions of China. The DNA was genotyped using the ABI PRISM SNapShot method. The statistical analysis was estimated using the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Our results indicated a significant association between the rs57095329 SNP of the miR-146a gene and the risk of drug resistant epilepsy (DRE) (genotypes, p = 0.0258 and alleles, p = 0.0108). Moreover, the rs57095329 A allele was found to be associated with a reduced risk of seizures frequency in DRE patients (all p epilepsy. Our data indicate that the rs57095329 polymorphism in the promoter region of miR-146a is involved in the genetic susceptibility to DRE and the seizures frequency. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Presurgical language localization with visual naming associated ECoG high- gamma modulation in pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Ravindra; Wilson, J Adam; Fujiwara, Hisako; Rozhkov, Leonid; Leach, James L; Byars, Anna W; Greiner, Hansel M; Vannest, Jennifer; Buroker, Jason; Milsap, Griffin; Ervin, Brian; Minai, Ali; Horn, Paul S; Holland, Katherine D; Mangano, Francesco T; Crone, Nathan E; Rose, Douglas F

    2017-04-01

    This prospective study compared presurgical language localization with visual naming-associated high-γ modulation (HGM) and conventional electrical cortical stimulation (ECS) in children with intracranial electrodes. Patients with drug-resistant epilepsy who were undergoing intracranial monitoring were included if able to name pictures. Electrocorticography (ECoG) signals were recorded during picture naming (overt and covert) and quiet baseline. For each electrode the likelihood of high-γ (70-116 Hz) power modulation during naming task relative to the baseline was estimated. Electrodes with significant HGM were plotted on a three-dimensional (3D) cortical surface model. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated compared to clinical ECS. Seventeen patients with mean age of 11.3 years (range 4-19) were included. In patients with left hemisphere electrodes (n = 10), HGM during overt naming showed high specificity (0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-0.85), and accuracy (0.71, 95% CI 0.66-0.75, p oral motor function was regarded as the gold standard. Similar results were reproduced by comparing covert naming-associated HGM with ECS naming sites. With right hemisphere electrodes (n = 7), no ECS-naming deficits were seen without interference with oral-motor function. HGM mapping showed a high specificity (0.81, 95% CI 0.78-0.84), and accuracy (0.76, 95% CI 0.71-0.81, p = 0.006), but modest sensitivity (0.44) compared to ECS interference with oral-motor function. Naming-associated ECoG HGM was consistently observed over Broca's area (left posterior inferior-frontal gyrus), bilateral oral/facial motor cortex, and sometimes over the temporal pole. This study supports the use of ECoG HGM mapping in children in whom adverse events preclude ECS, or as a screening method to prioritize electrodes for ECS testing. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Medium-chain Triglyceride Ketogenic Diet, An Effective Treatment for Drug-resistant Epilepsy and A Comparison with Other Ketogenic Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeou-mei Christiana Liu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet (KD is one of the most effective therapies for drug-resistant epilepsy. The efficacy of the medium-chain triglyceride KD (MCTKD is as excellent as the classic KD (CKD, which has been documented in several subsequent retrospective, prospective, and randomized studies. MCT oil is more ketogenic than long-chain triglycerides. Therefore, the MCTKD allows more carbohydrate and protein food, which makes the diet more palatable than the CKD. The MCTKD is not based on diet ratios as is the CKD, but uses a percentage of calories from MCT oil to create ketones. There has also been literature which documents the associated gastrointestinal side effects from the MCTKD, such as diarrhea, vomiting, bloating, and cramps. Therefore, the MCTKD has been an underutilized diet therapy for intractable epilepsy among children.The author has used up to >70% MCTKD diet to maximize seizure control with gastrointestinal side effects optimally controlled. As long as health care professionals carefully manage MCTKD, many more patients with epilepsy who are not appropriate for CKD or modified Atkins diet or low glycemic index treatment will benefit from this treatment. A comparison between the MCTKD and other KDs is also discussed.

  15. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug-resistance testing is also recommended for all pregnant women with HIV before starting HIV medicines and also in some pregnant women already taking HIV medicines. Pregnant women will work with their health ...

  16. Clinical and sociodemographic variables associated with interictal dysphoric disorder and interictal personality in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Tarifa, Bruna; Santos, Raquel Espagnolla; de Oliveira Dias, Ana Laura; Ulliano, Júlia Rodrigues Leandro; Marques, Lucia Helena Neves

    2017-04-01

    Psychiatric disorders (PD) have an elevated prevalence and an important negative impact on patients with epilepsy (PWE) since they are associated with lower quality of life and clinical refractoriness. However, it is also necessary to identify behavioral conditions possibly associated with epilepsy that are not part of the standard psychiatric classifications, such as Interictal Dysphoric Disorder (IDD) and Interictal Personality (IP). The frequency of IDD and IP in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS) was assessed. The Brazilian versions of the Neurobehavioral Inventory (NBI) and Interictal Dysphoric Disorder Inventory (IDDI) were applied to patients and to a control group. Psychiatric standard assessment was conducted through the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Psychiatric Disorders - 5th edition (DSM-5). The value of p considered significant was Disorder was observed in 18 patients (18.4%) and IP in 36 (37.9%). Interictal Dysphoric Disorder was associated with left-sided MTS (OR=3.22; p=0.008), previous psychiatric treatment (OR=4.29; p=0.007), and more than one AED used (OR=2.73; p=0.02) while presence of bilateral MTS (OR=3.27; p=0.008), longer disease duration (OR=3.39; p=0.006), and presence of Major Depressive Disorder (OR=4.73; p=0.004) were associated with IP. In the present study, there was a high prevalence of IDD and IP in patients with drug-resistant TLE-MTS; studies should be conducted to identify the presence of behavioral conditions that are not present in the conventional psychiatric classifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Successful Treatment of a Drug-Resistant Epilepsy by Long-term Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Sarmiento, Carlos Ignacio; González, Katia Márquez; Orenday Barraza, José Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a reemerged noninvasive cerebral therapy used to treat patients with epilepsy, including focal cortical dysplasia, with controversial results. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with left frontal cortical dysplasia refractory to antiepileptic drugs, characterized by 10-15 daily right tonic hemi-body seizures. The patient received a total of seven sessions of cathodal tDCS (2 mA, 30 min). The first three sessions were applied over three consecutive days, and the remaining four sessions of tDCS were given each at 2-week intervals. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient reported to have a single seizure per month and only mild adverse events.

  18. How do people with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy sleep? A clinical and video-EEG with EOG and submental EMG for sleep staging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Vieira Scarlatelli-Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess subjective and objective sleep parameters in a homogeneous group of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE patients through internationally validated clinical questionnaires, video-electroencephalographic (VEEG and polysomnographic (PSG studies. Fifty-six patients with definite diagnosis of MTLE who were candidates for epilepsy surgery underwent a detailed clinical history, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS, neurological examination, 1.5 T brain magnetic resonance imaging, VEEG and PSG. Sixteen percent of patients reported significant daytime sleepiness as measured by ESS and 27% reported low levels of sleep quality as measured by PSQI. Patients with medically resistant epilepsy by MTLE showed increased wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO with mean ± standard deviation of 17.4 ± 15.6, longer non-rapid eye movement (NREM 1 (7.5 ± 4.6% and NREM3 sleep (26.6 ± 11.8%, abnormal rapid eye movement (REM latency in 30/56 patients, shorter REM sleep (16.7 ± 6.6%, and abnormal alpha delta patterns were observed in 41/56 patients. The analysis of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs evidenced highest spiking rate during NREM3 sleep and higher concordance with imaging data when IEDs were recorded in sleep, mainly during REM sleep. We concluded that patients with MTLE showed disrupted sleep architecture that may result in daytime dysfunction and sleep complaints. Furthermore, NREM sleep activated focal IEDs and them - when recorded during sleep - had higher localizing value.

  19. Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation, particularly transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), are emerging as realistic tools for seizure control. Numerous open-label trials and a few recent randomized controlled trials suggest the capacity of both techniques to suppress seizures. Additionally, specialized TMS protocols aimed to map cortical function and to measure cortical excitability may have realistic roles as diagnostic tools in epilepsy. As the prevalence of drug-resistant epilepsy has not changed in recent years, TMS and tDCS offer noninvasive and nonpharmacological options to improve control of intractable seizures. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Follow-Up of Peripheral IL-1β and IL-6 and Relation with Apoptotic Death in Drug-Resistant Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients Submitted to Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lorigados Pedre

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing amounts of evidence support the role of inflammation in epilepsy. This study was done to evaluate serum follow-up of IL-1β and IL-6 levels, as well as their concentration in the neocortex, and the relationship of central inflammation with NF-κB and annexin V in drug-resistant temporal lobe epileptic (DRTLE patients submitted to surgical treatment. Peripheral and central levels of IL-1β and IL-6were measured by ELISA in 10 DRTLE patients. The sera from patients were taken before surgery, and 12 and 24 months after surgical treatment. The neocortical expression of NF-κB was evaluated by western blotting and annexin V co-localization with synaptophysin by immunohistochemistry. The neocortical tissues from five patients who died by non-neurological causes were used as control. Decreased serum levels of IL-1 and IL-6 were observed after surgery; at this time, 70% of patients were seizure-free. No values of IL-1 and IL-6 were detected in neocortical control tissue, whereas cytokine levels were evidenced in DRTLE. Increased NF-κB neocortex expression was found and the positive annexin V neurons were more obvious in the DRTLE tissue, correlating with IL-6 levels. The follow-up study confirmed that the inflammatory alterations disappeared one year after surgery, when the majority of patients were seizure-free, and the apoptotic death process correlated with inflammation.

  2. The challenges of treating epilepsy with 25 antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Lia; Coppola, Antonietta; Balestrini, Simona; Striano, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays a substantial armamentarium of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is available, including drugs with different mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability; therefore the choice for the right treatment is often challenging. The specific characteristic of the drug, the epileptic syndrome, seizure types and the patient's features need to be taken into consideration driving the choice through available evidence-based studies, which are often lacking for older AEDs. Besides, study conditions in registered clinical trials (RCTs) are quite different from daily clinical practice, which is more complex and various. When dealing with first diagnosed epilepsy, monotherapy is widely accepted as the gold standard option. Likewise, alternative monotherapy should be considered when the first drug treatment fails. However, the association of different AEDs in polytherapy is a common practice. The choice of AEDs used in association is often based on clinical experience or anecdotal observations or small clinical studies. Polytherapy should be as "rational" as possible and consider the mechanism of action, the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the safety of each drug. When dealing with drug resistant patients, clinicians should never give up and consider the use of AEDs acting on new targets. An attempt to come back to a monotherapy or simpler therapeutic regimen should be pursued even in patients who were previously drug resistant. This review will focus on the strategies to treat epilepsy by choosing among 25 available drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Accounting for ethnic-cultural and linguistic diversity in neuropsychological assessment of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, Valeria; Scarpa, Pina; Toraldo, Alessio; Bottini, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    Neuropsychological assessment is critical in both diagnosis and prognosis of patients with epilepsy. Beyond electrophysiological and anatomical alterations, other factors including different ethnic-cultural and linguistic backgrounds might affect neuropsychological performance. Only a few studies considered migration and acculturation effects and they typically concerned nonclinical samples. The current study aimed at investigating the influence of ethnic background and time spent in Italy on a full neuropsychological battery administered to both Italian and foreign-born patients and at providing a brief interview for obtaining relevant information on each patient's transcultural and language-related history. Clinical reports from 43 foreign-born patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were collected from the archives of Milan Niguarda Hospital. Epileptogenic zone, age, education, profession, illness duration, seizure frequency, handedness, and gender were considered in selecting 43 Italian controls. Ethnicity (Italian/foreign-born) and years spent in Italy were analyzed as main predictors on 21 neuropsychological scales by means of General(ized) Linear Models. An additional analysis studied two composite scores of overall verbal and nonverbal abilities. Ethnicity significantly affected the following: the verbal overall score, Verbal Fluency, Naming, Token-test, Digit Span, Attentional Matrices, Trail-Making-Test, Line-Orientation-Test, and Raven matrices; no effects were found on the nonverbal overall score, Word Pairs Learning, Episodic Memory, reading accuracy, visual span, Bells test, Rey Figure, and face memory and recognition. No significant effects of years spent in Italy emerged. While years spent in Italy does not predict neuropsychological performance, linguistic background had a strong impact on it. With respect to Italian-speaking patients, those who were foreign-born showed large task-related variability, with an especially low performance on language

  4. Dieta cetogênica no tratamento de epilepsias farmacorresistentes The ketogenic diet on the treatment of drug resistant epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Barbosa Nonino-Borges

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A epilepsia é uma condição clínica crônica correspondente a um grupo de doenças que tem em comum crises epilépticas; ela atinge de 0,5% a 1,0% da população dos países desenvolvidos, podendo esta prevalência ser maior nos países em desenvolvimento. Aproximadamente um terço dos pacientes evolui com crises epilépticas intratáveis com medicamentos; em alguns casos, é possível o tratamento cirúrgico. Nos pacientes em que cirurgia não é possível, a dieta cetogênica passa a ser uma opção terapêutica, principalmente em crianças. Espera-se que esta terapia seja eficaz para, pelo menos, um terço dos pacientes, resultando em redução ou controle das crises. No presente trabalho, apresentamos métodos para o preparo e uso a dieta cetogênica. O planejamento da dieta é individualizado, seguindo-se recomendações para o consumo energético e proporções de gorduras, proteínas e carboidratos específicos. Sempre que introduzida a dieta, o paciente deve ser monitorizado, devido à possibilidade de efeitos adversos. A orientação dos pais ou responsáveis sobre a dieta cetogênica, e como ela funciona, proporciona maior aceitação e aderência a esta forma de tratamento da epilepsia.Epilepsy is a chronic condition that affects 0.5% to 1.0% of the population in developed countries. This prevalence may be higher in developing countries. A significant proportion of the patients, nearly one third of them will have their condition evolved into a stage of uncontrolled crises, in some cases, surgical procedure may be indicated. However, for several patients, surgery is not possible. In these cases, ketogenic diet is a therapeutic option, especially for children. It is supposed that nearly one third of the patients that use the ketogenic diet, experience seizure control or reduction in the number of seizures. The current study presents methods of preparing and using ketogenic diet. The diet must be individualized, considering the

  5. Does surgery help in reducing stigma associated with drug refractory epilepsy in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Jitin; Tripathi, Manjari; Dwivedi, Rekha; Sapra, Savita; Gulati, Sheffali; Garg, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandra S; Chandra, Sarat P

    2018-03-01

    Epilepsy has several comorbidities and associated stigma. Stigma associated with epilepsy is well known and prevalent worldwide. Surgical treatment is an established treatment for drug refractory epilepsy. Following surgery in children, it is possible that the stigma may reduce, but such an effect has not been studied earlier. Analysis of prospectively collected data was performed for pediatric patients at a single tertiary center for treating epilepsy. Child stigma scale, as described by Austin et al., was used to evaluate stigma both pre- and postoperatively. Analysis was done using Paired t test. In this study, following surgery, there was significant reduction of stigma (Pstigma despite having good seizure outcome. Surgery in drug-resistant epilepsy helps in reducing stigma. Seizure reduction is probably not the only factor responsible for a change in stigma outcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of ABCB1 C3435T polymorphism with phenobarbital resistance in Thai patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keangpraphun, T; Towanabut, S; Chinvarun, Y; Kijsanayotin, P

    2015-06-01

    One-third of patients with epilepsy are resistant to anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Drug-resistant epilepsy is believed to be multifactorial involving both genetic and non-genetic factors. Genetic variations in the ABCB1 gene encoding the drug efflux transporter, p-glycoprotein (p-gp), may influence the interindividual variability in AED response by limiting drugs from reaching their target. Phenobarbital (PB), one of the most cost-effective and widely used AEDs in developing countries, has been reported to be transported by p-gp. This study aimed to investigate the association of a genetic variant, ABCB1 3435C>T, and non-genetic factors with phenobarbital response in Thai patients with epilepsy. One hundred and ten Thai patients with epilepsy who were treated with PB maintenance doses were enrolled in this study. Two phenotypic groups, PB-responsive epilepsy and PB-resistant epilepsy, were defined according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria. Subjects were genotyped for ABCB1 3435C>T (rs1045642). Multiple logistic regression analysis was tested for the association of ABCB1 3435C>T polymorphism and non-genetic factors with PB response. Sixty-two PB-responsive epilepsy subjects and 48 PB-resistant epilepsy subjects were identified. All genotype frequencies of the ABCB1 3435C>T SNP were consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0·05). The ABCB1 3435C>T polymorphism and type of epilepsy were associated with response to PB. Patients with PB-resistant epilepsy had a significantly higher frequency of ABCB1 3435CC genotype and had focal epilepsy more often than patients with PB-responsive epilepsy (adjusted OR = 3·962, 95% CI = 1·075-14·610, P-value = 0·039; adjusted OR = 5·936, 95% CI = 2·272-15·513, P-value phenobarbital. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Go to Information for Researchers ► Credit: ... and infectious diseases. Why Is the Study of Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance a Priority for NIAID? Over time, ...

  8. Novel Polymeric Prodrugs of Valproic Acid as Anti- Epilepsy Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epilepsy Drugs: Synthesis, Characterization and In-vitro ... The release of VPA from polymeric prodrugs was studied using cellophane ... pharmacokinetics and accessibility in market [8]. ..... between the drug and polymer chain can affect.

  9. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy". Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... June 6, 2018 HIV Vaccine Elicits Antibodies in Animals that Neutralize Dozens of HIV Strains , June 4, 2018 ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter share ...

  11. Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Paranoid Schizophrenia and Comorbid Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beppe Micallef-Trigona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of choice for acute schizophrenia is antipsychotic drug treatment and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and should only be considered as an option for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, where treatment with clozapine has already proven ineffective or intolerable. The use of ECT as a maintenance treatment for patients with schizophrenia and comorbid epilepsy is uncommon as scant evidence exists to support this. We describe a patient with a serious case of paranoid schizophrenia and comorbid epilepsy who had not responded to typical and atypical antipsychotic medication, but responded remarkably to acute ECT and required maintenance ECT to sustain a positive therapeutic response.

  12. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  13. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  14. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to hold or seize," and people ... for epilepsy than somebody whose family has no history of seizures. How Can Doctors Help? If a ...

  15. BAD knockout provides metabolic seizure resistance in a genetic model of epilepsy with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jeannine; Burnham, Veronica; Tedoldi, Meghan; Danial, Nika N; Yellen, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic alteration, either through the ketogenic diet (KD) or by genetic alteration of the BAD protein, can produce seizure protection in acute chemoconvulsant models of epilepsy. To assess the seizure-protective role of knocking out (KO) the Bad gene in a chronic epilepsy model, we used the Kcna1 -/- model of epilepsy, which displays progressively increased seizure severity and recapitulates the early death seen in sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Beginning on postnatal day 24 (P24), we continuously video monitored Kcna1 -/- and Kcna1 -/- Bad -/- double knockout mice to assess survival and seizure severity. We found that Kcna1 -/- Bad -/- mice outlived Kcna1 -/- mice by approximately 2 weeks. Kcna1 -/- Bad -/- mice also spent significantly less time in seizure than Kcna1 -/- mice on P24 and the day of death, showing that BadKO provides seizure resistance in a genetic model of chronic epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. [Social aspects of epilepsy: marriage, pregnancy, driving, antiepileptic drug withdrawal and against social stigma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2004-11-01

    Persons with epilepsy need adequate advice and effective counselling about issues such as marriage, pregnancy, risks of inheriting epilepsy, driving, employment and antiepileptic drug withdrawal, because these persons are not receiving important information and education about their condition and possible adverse effects of treatment. Furthermore, women with epilepsy have increased rates of pregnancy complications and poor fetal outcomes including congenital malformations and developmental delay related to both their epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs. However, approximately 90% of all women with epilepsy undergo normal pregnancy and give birth to children free of birth defects. Pregnancy is generally safe in women with epilepsy. The study of long-term prognosis of childhood-onset epilepsy in Japan shows that the majority of these patients have lower levels of educational background as well as employment and marital status compared with the general population (Wakamoto H. et al). Of patients with epilepsy, 60% to 70% achieve control with antiepileptic medication. However, several antiepileptic drug withdrawal studies show variable rates of success, with relapse rates ranging from 12% to 63% (Britton J.W.). Driving is listed as major problem in persons with epilepsy. However, the patients with seizure-free more than two years have been able to get the driver's license since June, 2002. Social attitudes towards epilepsy cause more distress to the patient than the disease itself. We should realize that persons with epilepsy are normal or near-normal. To ameliorate the social stigma against epilepsy, continuous and repetitive educational efforts would be needed.

  17. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems. Other Organizations Epilepsy Foundation National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Questions Questions to Ask Your Doctor What causes epilepsy? What are symptoms other than seizures? What should ...

  18. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  19. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eventually become less frequent or disappear altogether. What Causes Epilepsy? This's no clear-cut answer to why people ... epilepsy. Often doctors can't pinpoint the exact cause of a person's epilepsy. But scientists do know that some things can ...

  20. Language recovery after epilepsy surgery of the Broca's area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilit Mnatsakanyan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is indicated in select patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Seizure freedom or significant reduction of seizure burden without risking new neurological deficits is the expected goal of epilepsy surgery. Typically, when the seizure onset zone overlaps with eloquent cortex, patients are excluded from surgery.We present a patient with drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy who underwent successful surgery with resection of Broca's area, primarily involving the pars triangularis (BA 45. We report transient expressive aphasia followed by recovery of speech. This case provides new insights into adult neuroplasticity of the language network. Keywords: Epilepsy surgery, Eloquent cortex, Language and epilepsy, Refractory epilepsy, Electrocorticography

  1. Report of a parent survey of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis use in pediatric treatment-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Brenda E; Jacobson, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Severe childhood epilepsies are characterized by frequent seizures, neurodevelopmental delays, and impaired quality of life. In these treatment-resistant epilepsies, families often seek alternative treatments. This survey explored the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis in children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. The survey was presented to parents belonging to a Facebook group dedicated to sharing information about the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis to treat their child's seizures. Nineteen responses met the following inclusion criteria for the study: a diagnosis of epilepsy and current use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis. Thirteen children had Dravet syndrome, four had Doose syndrome, and one each had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and idiopathic epilepsy. The average number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) tried before using cannabidiol-enriched cannabis was 12. Sixteen (84%) of the 19 parents reported a reduction in their child's seizure frequency while taking cannabidiol-enriched cannabis. Of these, two (11%) reported complete seizure freedom, eight (42%) reported a greater than 80% reduction in seizure frequency, and six (32%) reported a 25-60% seizure reduction. Other beneficial effects included increased alertness, better mood, and improved sleep. Side effects included drowsiness and fatigue. Our survey shows that parents are using cannabidiol-enriched cannabis as a treatment for their children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Because of the increasing number of states that allow access to medical cannabis, its use will likely be a growing concern for the epilepsy community. Safety and tolerability data for cannabidiol-enriched cannabis use among children are not available. Objective measurements of a standardized preparation of pure cannabidiol are needed to determine whether it is safe, well tolerated, and efficacious at controlling seizures in this pediatric population with difficult-to-treat seizures. © 2013.

  2. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  3. Glucuronidation of antiepileptic drugs in women with epilepsy : on the role of age, steroid hormones and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, I.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with clinically important gender differences in both the expression and the impact of epilepsy. Understanding the complex interactions between sex hormones, epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can greatly improve the care for women with epilepsy. This

  4. Treatment Resistant Epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Increased Risk for Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Karen; Bluvstein, Judith; MacAllister, William S; Avallone, Jennifer; Misajon, Jade; Hedlund, Julie; Goldberg, Rina; Bojko, Aviva; Mitra, Nirmala; Giridharan, Radha; Sultan, Richard; Keller, Seth; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-02-01

    The male:female ratio in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) averages greater than 4:1 while the male:female ratio of ASD with epilepsy averages less than 3:1. This indicates an elevated risk of epilepsy in females with ASD; yet, it is unknown whether phenotypic features of epilepsy and ASD differ between males and females with this comorbidity. The goal of this study is to investigate sex differences in phenotypic features of epilepsy and ASD in a prospective sample of 130 children and young adults with an initial ASD diagnosis and subsequent epilepsy diagnosis. All participants were characterized by standardized diagnostic inventories, parent/caregiver completed questionnaires, and medical/academic record review. Diagnostic classifications of epilepsy, ASD, and intellectual disability were performed by board certified neurologists and a pediatric neuropsychologist. Results demonstrated a lower male:female ratio (1.8:1) in individuals with ASD and treatment-resistant epilepsy relative to those with ASD and treatment-responsive epilepsy (4.9:1), indicating a higher risk of treatment-resistant epilepsy in females. Mild neuroimaging abnormalities were more common in females than males and this was associated with increased risk of treatment-resistance. In contrast, ASD symptom severity was lower in females compared with males. Findings distinguish females with ASD and epilepsy as a distinct subgroup at higher risk for a more severe epilepsy phenotype in the context of a less severe ASD phenotype. Increased risk of anti-epileptic treatment resistance in females with ASD and epilepsy suggests that comprehensive genetic, imaging, and neurologic screening and enhanced treatment monitoring may be indicated for this subgroup. Autism Res 2016, 9: 311-320. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%–30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST; however, the high turn around time of 2–6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  6. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and cl...

  7. Efficacy of a ketogenic diet in resistant myoclono-astatic epilepsy: A French multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Elodie; Schaeffer, Mickael; Cances, Claude; Motte, Jacques; Auvin, Stéphane; Ville, Dorothée; Maurey, Hélène; Nabbout, Rima; de Saint-Martin, Anne

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the early introduction of a ketogenic diet (KD) could improve seizure control in myoclono-astatic epilepsy (MAE). This multicenter study sought to identify the benefits of KD use on seizure control and epilepsy and on developmental outcomes in children with resistant MAE. Fifty children who were diagnosed with severe MAE in the French network of Reference Centers for Rare Epilepsies and who were treated with KD between 2000 and 2013 were included in this study. The seizure frequency and EEG recordings were assessed two weeks before KD introduction, 2 and 6 months after, and during the last follow-up, which also included an assessment of developmental outcome. Patients had a median follow up of 52 months (range 13-136) and received 4.3 antiepileptic drugs [2-9] before KD introduction. Fifty-four percent (54%) of our patients were seizure-free after 6 months of KD or more, and 86% experienced more than a 70% seizure reduction after 2 months of KD. Forty-four percent (44%) of them had a clear benefit of early KD treatment (after four AEDs failed). Early KD treatment did not result in a greater seizure reduction (p=0.055), but significantly resulted in remission (p<0.028). Fifty percent of patients with resistant MAE had normal development outcomes. Earlier KD treatment, after three AEDs failed, was correlated with a better cognitive outcome (p<0.01). Early introduction of KD treatment in resistant MAE has a strong, persistent anticonvulsant effect with long-term remission and better cognitive outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational Studies of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, João Miguel

    Drug resistance has been an increasing problem in patient treatment and drug development. Starting in the last century and becoming a major worry in the medical and scienti c communities in the early part of the current millennium, major research must be performed to address the issues of viral...... is of the utmost importance in developing better and less resistance-inducing drugs. A drug's in uence can be characterized in many diff erent ways, however, and the approaches I take in this work re ect those same different in uences. This is what I try to achieve in this work, through seemingly unrelated...... approaches that come together in the study of drug's and their in uence on proteins and vice-versa. In part I, I aim to understand through combined theoretical ensemble analysis and free energy calculations the e ects mutations have over the binding anity and function of the M2 proton channel. This research...

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    statistics show that almost half a million new ... testing for second-line drugs, no international consensus has been reached about .... Given the high background rates of TB and MDR-TB in several countries, regimens are often constructed ...

  10. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a spectrum of brain disorders ranging from severe, life-threatening and disabling, to ones that are much more benign. In epilepsy, the normal pattern of neuronal activity becomes disturbed, causing strange sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle ...

  11. Animal Models of Seizures and Epilepsy: Past, Present, and Future Role for the Discovery of Antiseizure Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy requires the use of seizure models. Except for some early treatments, including bromides and phenobarbital, the antiseizure activity of all clinically used drugs was, for the most part, defined by acute seizure models in rodents using the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure tests and the electrically kindled rat. Unfortunately, the clinical evidence to date would suggest that none of these models, albeit useful, are likely to identify those therapeutics that will effectively manage patients with drug resistant seizures. Over the last 30 years, a number of animal models have been developed that display varying degrees of pharmacoresistance, such as the phenytoin- or lamotrigine-resistant kindled rat, the 6-Hz mouse model of partial seizures, the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice, or rats in which spontaneous recurrent seizures develops after inducing status epilepticus by chemical or electrical stimulation. As such, these models can be used to study mechanisms of drug resistance and may provide a unique opportunity for identifying a truly novel antiseizure drug (ASD), but thus far clinical evidence for this hope is lacking. Although animal models of drug resistant seizures are now included in ASD discovery approaches such as the ETSP (epilepsy therapy screening program), it is important to note that no single model has been validated for use to identify potential compounds for as yet drug resistant seizures, but rather a battery of such models should be employed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to discover novel, highly effective ASDs. The present review describes the previous and current approaches used in the search for new ASDs and offers some insight into future directions incorporating new and emerging animal models of therapy resistance.

  12. Resistance to valproic acid as predictor of treatment resistance in genetic generalized epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gesche, Joanna; Khanevski, Marina; Solberg, Carl

    2017-01-01

    for refractory seizures. Resistance to valproic acid had a specificity of 100% to identify patients with drug resistance and correlated strongly with bad social outcome and seizure burden. Conversely, 21.2% of all patients with refractory seizures according to the ILAE definition later became seizure free...... (mainly with valproic acid). Our data suggest that "drug resistant GGE" must not be declared unless patients were adequately treated with valproic acid, and advocate resistance to valproic acid as a new clinical biomarker for drug-resistant GGE. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available...

  13. Extensively Drug-Resistant TB

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-16

    Dr. Charlotte Kvasnovsky, a surgery resident and Ph.D. candidate in biostatistics, discusses various types of drug resistance in TB patients in South Africa.  Created: 12/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/16/2016.

  14. Initial drug resistance in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Initial drug resistance in India. There is gradual increase in primary MDR all over India : Pondi= Pondicherry 1985; Bangalore =1986; Jaipur = 1991; Jaipur =2000. Overall the MDR is less than 3% (TRC studies).

  15. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanavana Subbareddy Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  16. Management of Antiepileptic Treatment After Epilepsy Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubboli, Guido; Sabers, Anne; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although epilepsy surgery is a recognized treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsies since several decades, the management of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) after successful surgery still remains one of the most difficult and unsolved therapeutic challenges. Indeed, no systematic cont...

  17. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  18. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, H.G. [University Hospital, Dep. of Neurology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    PET has added valuable information to our knowledge of the human epilepsies. The most important observations have been the identification of localized regions of interictal cerebral dysfunction in patients with partial epilepsy, revealed with PET as local hypometabolism, hypoperfusion, or (in one study) enhanced {mu}opiate receptor binding. The following general conclusions about the anatomy of epilepsy can be drawn from interictal PET studies: (1) interictal neuronal dysfunction is not limited to the site of ictal onset, nor to brain areas immediately adjacent to structural damage, (2) temporal lobe dysfunction is most commonly encountered, usually in association with primary epileptogenic lesions in mesial temporal structures, but also on occasion with lateral temporal or extratemporal epileptogenic lesions which preferentially propagate to mesial temporal structures to give rise to complex partial seizures. It is now accepted that interictal {sup 18}F-FDG PET correctly lateralises the primarily epileptic temporal lobe in approximately 70% of patients. As a consequence of inclusion of PET into the UCLA presurgical evaluation protocol, Engel et al. were able to operate on 28% of the patients without using invasive methods, (3) local isolated neocortical dysfunction associated with simple partial seizures is only rarely revealed by PET, (4) remote interictal cerebral dysfunction associated with complex partial seizures is not necessarily limited to the involved TL, since contralateral temporal, extemporal neocortical and cerebral dysfunction may also be seen, (5) a variety of anatomical patterns of interictal cerebral dysfunction occur in secondary generalized epilepsies, which may be related to symptoms and signs, (6) no diffuse or localized interictal cerebral dysfunction has been identified by PET in patients with primary generalized childhood absence seizures. (author) 29 refs.

  19. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  20. Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18[F]FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18[F]FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references

  1. [Epilepsy-new diagnostic tools, old drugs? : Therapeutic consequences of epilepsy genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, M; Neubauer, B A; Gerstl, L; Roser, T; Rémi, J; Borggraefe, I

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in the field of epilepsy genetics have led to an increased fraction of patients with epilepsies where the etiology of the disease could be identified. Nevertheless, there is some criticism regarding the use of epilepsy genetics because in many cases the identification of a pathogenetic mutation does not lead to an adaptation of therapy or to an improved prognosis. In addition, the interpretation of genetic results might be complicated due to the considerable numbers of variants of unclear significance. This publication presents the arguments in favour of a broad use of genetic investigations for children with epilepsies. Several diseases where a genetic diagnosis does in fact have direct therapeutic consequences are mentioned. In addition, the indirect impact of an established etiology, encompassing the avoidance of unnecessary diagnostic measures, possibility of genetic counselling, and the easing of the psychologic burden for the caregivers, should not be underestimated. The arguments in favour of broad genetic diagnostics prevail notwithstanding the lack of relevant new developments regarding the therapy.

  2. Antiepileptic drug behavioral side effects and baseline hyperactivity in children and adolescents with new onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Follansbee-Junger, Katherine; Smith, Aimee W; Combs, Angela; Ollier, Shannon; Hater, Brooke; Modi, Avani C

    2018-01-01

    To examine baseline psychological functioning and antiepileptic drug (AED) behavioral side effects in new onset epilepsy and determine, by age, whether baseline psychological functioning predicts AED behavioral side effects 1 month following AED initiation. A retrospective chart review was conducted between July 2011 and December 2014 that included youths with new onset epilepsy. As part of routine interdisciplinary care, caregivers completed the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition: Parent Rating Scale to report on baseline psychological functioning at the diagnostic visit and the Pediatric Epilepsy Side Effects Questionnaire to identify AED behavioral side effects at the 1-month follow-up clinic visit following AED initiation. Children (age = 2-11 years) and adolescents (age = 12-18 years) were examined separately. A total of 380 youths with new onset epilepsy (M age  = 8.9 ± 4.3 years; 83.4% Caucasian; 34.8% focal epilepsy, 41.1% generalized epilepsy, 23.7% unclassified epilepsy) were included. Seventy percent of youths had at-risk or clinically elevated baseline psychological symptoms. Children had significantly greater AED behavioral side effects (M = 25.08 ± 26.36) compared to adolescents (M = 12.36 ± 17.73), regardless of AED. Valproic acid demonstrated significantly greater behavioral side effects compared to all other AEDs, with the exception of levetiracetam. Higher hyperactivity/impulsivity at baseline significantly predicted higher AED behavioral side effects 1 month after AED initiation in both age groups. Younger children seem to be more prone to experience behavioral side effects, and these are likely to be higher if youths with epilepsy have baseline hyperactivity/impulsivity. Baseline psychological screening, specifically hyperactivity, can be used as a precision medicine tool for AED selection. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Svob Strac

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy. However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical and genetic evidence, will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of one-molecule-one-target, have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of people with epilepsy. Although no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins present on both neurons and glia cells may represent a new approach in the management of seizures and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Co-morbidity and clinically significant interactions between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs in elderly patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Emmi; Virta, Lauri J; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Keränen, Tapani

    2017-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the frequency of potential pharmacokinetic drug-to-drug interactions in elderly patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We also investigated co-morbid conditions associated with epilepsy. From the register of Kuopio University Hospital (KUH) we identified community-dwelling patients aged 65 or above with newly diagnosed epilepsy and in whom use of the first individual antiepileptic drug (AED) began in 2000-2013 (n=529). Furthermore, register data of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland were used for assessing potential interactions in a nationwide cohort of elderly subjects with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We extracted all patients aged 65 or above who had received special reimbursement for the cost of AEDs prescribed on account of epilepsy in 2012 where their first AED was recorded in 2011-2012 as monotherapy (n=1081). Clinically relevant drug interactions (of class C or D) at the time of starting of the first AED, as assessed via the SFINX-PHARAO database, were analysed. Hypertension (67%), dyslipidemia (45%), and ischaemic stroke (32%) were the most common co-morbid conditions in the hospital cohort of patients. In these patients, excessive polypharmacy (more than 10 concomitant drugs) was identified in 27% of cases. Of the patients started on carbamazepine, 52 subjects (32%) had one class-C or class-D drug interaction and 51 (31%) had two or more C- or D-class interactions. Only 2% of the subjects started on valproate exhibited a class-C interaction. None of the subjects using oxcarbazepine displayed class-C or class-D interactions. Patients with 3-5 (OR 4.22; p=0.05) or over six (OR 8.86; p=0.003) other drugs were more likely to have C- or D-class interaction. The most common drugs with potential interactions with carbamazepine were dihydropyridine calcium-blockers, statins, warfarin, and psychotropic drugs. Elderly patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy are at high risk of clinically relevant pharmacokinetic

  5. Etiologic features and utilization of antiepileptic drugs in people with chronic epilepsy in China: Report from the Epilepsy Cohort of Huashan Hospital (ECoH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yan; Yu, Peimin; Ding, Ding; Wang, Ping; Shi, Yunbo; Zhao, Ting; Tang, Xinghua; Hong, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic epilepsy is estimated to affect more than 2 million people in China. However, data of its clinical characteristics was rarely reported in China. In the present study, we summarized the etiologic features and utilization patterns of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in people with chronic epilepsy in a tertiary medical center in China. We prospectively recruited people with chronic epilepsy treated at the Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic of Huashan Hospital during October 2009 to August 2013. Demographic data, clinical characteristics, AED treatment, epilepsy-associated risk factors and medical history, and results of supplementary examinations of each participant were collected retrospectively via an interviewer-administered questionnaire and confirmed by the medical records. Among 554 people with chronic epilepsy, 58.0% of them were male, 66.8% had focal seizure, and 29.2% had symptomatic cause. Developmental anomalies of cerebral structure (16.7%) and cerebral trauma (16.7%) shared the leading cause of symptomatic epilepsy among children with epilepsy. While cerebral trauma (29.1%) and cerebrovascular disorder (36.4%) were the most common causes in groups of adults and elderly. Fifty percent of participants were taking AED monotherapy. Proportions of people with idiopathic, cryptogenic and symptomatic epilepsy treated by multitherapy were 35%, 46% and 45.6%, respectively. Valproic acid (VPA) was the most frequently utilized AED as monotherapy (32.7%) and within multitherapy (62.5%). This hospital-based study reported that etiologic features were diverse in different age groups of people with chronic epilepsy. VPA was widely utilized to treat chronic epilepsy in mainland China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic drug monitoring in epilepsy clinic: a multi-disciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunee Lertsinudom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common public health problem and needs multi-disciplinary treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is one of step of the multi-disciplinary treatment in epilepsy at Epilepsy clinic, Khon Kaen University (Thailand. The TDM service has been established since 2008. Here, we aimed to study the roles of TDM order and epilepsy control. This is a prospective descriptive study in which data collection was done from January 1 to December 31, 2010, the period when pharmacists took part in assessing the appropriateness in measurement and interpretation of TDM in order to provide suggestions for physicians. The 112 patients under study had an average age of 38.21±15.36 years; 254 samples were collected for therapeutic drug monitoring; phenytoin was submitted mostly for drug monitoring at 46.46%; 44.49% of sub-missions for drug level monitoring were made owing to a suspected sub-therapeutic level. Associations were found between reasons of sending samples for drug level monitoring and the measured drug levels, i.e., 66.67% of drug levels found was so low that they were undetectable in sample for patients’ compliance investigation and 38.94% of the drug levels were found to be sub-therapeutic as for the case where submission of samples was done because of suspected sub-therapeutic level, 40% of the cases were found to be in toxicity range in the cases with suspected over-therapeutic levels and monitoring levels, 58.25% were found to be within the therapeutic range. Pharmacists used the interpreted results in patients’ care by recommending physicians to monitor therapeutic drug closely, to adjust the dosage of drugs, and to recommend checking patients’ compliance in their use of drugs at 56.5, 38.9, and 4.3%, respectively. Physicians’ responses were found to be absolute follow, partial follow and not follow at 77.95, 11.03, and 7.48%, respectively. In conclusion, associations were found between reasons of TDM order and measured drug

  7. Prevalence of resistant occipital lobe epilepsy associated with celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Akcali, Aylin; Varan, Celal; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2014-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder caused by intolerance to ingested gluten. Increased frequency of CD has been reported in occipital lobe epilepsy. The aim of the present study is to investigate the frequency of CD among children followed up due to epilepsy and diagnosed with epileptic activity in the occipital lobe in at least one electroencephalography (EEG) test. For this research, 90 pediatric epilepsy patients with epileptic activity in the occipital lobe were enrolled in the study group, while the control group comprised of 100 healthy children. In addition to the EEG examination, tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody was determined on duodenal biopsy. None of the healthy children in the control group was positive in terms of the tTG antibody test used to scan CD. In the group with epileptic activity in the occipital lobe, two patients out of 90 were tTG antibody positive. The seroprevalence was 1/45 (2.22 %) in this group. These two patients were diagnosed with CD based on the endoscopic duodenal biopsy. In these patients, the seizures were uncontrollable through monotherapy. Our results showed that the prevalence of CD is observed to be higher than the normal population among the patients with occipital lobe epilepsy. This type of seizure disorder seems to be more resistant to monotherapy, compared with other types of occipital epilepsy. Therefore, screening for CD is recommended in children with resistant epileptic activity in the occipital lobe.

  8. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    The modern, ... World Health Organization is based on a four-drug regimen ... Better management and control of tuberculosis specially drug resistant TB by experienced and qualified .... a comprehensive approach including the major DOTS.

  9. Tumor Heterogeneity and Drug Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerova, L.; Skolekova, S.; Kozovska, Z.

    2015-01-01

    New generation of sequencing methodologies revealed unexpected complexity and genomic alterations linked with the tumor subtypes. This diversity exists across the tumor types, histologic tumor subtypes and subsets of the tumor cells within the same tumor. This phenomenon is termed tumor heterogeneity. Regardless of its origin and mechanisms of development it has a major impact in the clinical setting. Genetic, phenotypic and expression pattern diversity of tumors plays critical role in the selection of suitable treatment and also in the prognosis prediction. Intratumoral heterogeneity plays a key role in the intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies. In this review we focus on the mechanisms of intratumoral and inter tumoral heterogeneity and their relationship to the drug resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms and spatiotemporal dynamics of tumor heterogeneity development before and during the therapy is important for the ability to design individual treatment protocols suitable in the given molecular context. (author)

  10. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in Sindh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almani, S.A.; Memon, N.M.; Qureshi, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of primary and secondary drug resistance amongst the clinical isolates of M.tuberculosis, to identify risk factors and how to overcome this problem. Design: A case series of 50 indoor patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Place and duration of Study: Department of Medicine, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Jamshoro, Sindh, (Pakistan) from January 1999 to December 2000. Patients and methods: Four first line anti-tuberculous drugs rifampicine, ethambutol and streptomycin were tested for sensitivity pattern. Results: Twelve (26.66%) were sensitive to all four drugs, 12(26.66%) were resistant to one drug, 14 (31.11%) were resistant to two drugs, 2 (4.44%) were resistant to three drugs, and 5(11.11%) were resistant to all four drugs. Resistance to isoniazid was the most common in 27 cases (60%) with primary resistance in 6(13.33%) and secondary resistance in 21(46.66%), followed by resistance to streptomycin in 17 cases (37.77%) with primary resistance in 5(11.11%) and secondary resistance in 12 (26.66%). Resistance to ethambutol in 10 cases (22.22%) and rifampicine in 11 (24.44%) and all cases were secondary. Similarly multi-drugs resistance (MRD) TB was found in 11(24.44%) isolates. Conclusion: This study showed high prevalence of drug resistance among clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Their is a need to establish centers at number of places with adequate facilities for susceptibility testing so that the resistant pattern could be ascertained and treatment regimens tailored accordingly. (author)

  11. Mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    Development of drug resist chemotherapy. For the past several years, investigators have been striving hard to unravel mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells. Using different experimental models of cancer, some of the major mechanisms of drug resistance identified in mammalian cells include: (a) Altered transport of the drug (decreased influx of the drug; increased efflux of the drug (role of P-glycoprotein; role of polyglutamation; role of multiple drug resistance associated protein)), (b) Increase in total amount of target enzyme/protein (gene amplification), (c) alteration in the target enzyme/protein (low affinity enzyme), (d) Elevation of cellular glutathione, (e) Inhibition of drug-induced apoptosis (mutation in p53 tumor suppressor gene; increased expression of bcl-xl gene). (author)

  12. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  13. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J.; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of “one-molecule-one-target,” have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27891070

  14. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  15. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  16. Women with epilepsy in childbearing age: Pregnancy-related knowledge, information sources, and antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Latica; Sruk, Ana; Bielen, Ivan

    2018-03-01

    Pregnancy-related issues in epilepsy (PRIE) are essential for management of epilepsy in women. We conducted a study among women with epilepsy (WWE) aged 15-45years about their knowledge, sources, and needs for information regarding PRIE, which included their current antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) usage. Women with epilepsy, visitors of Croatian Association for Epilepsy webpage, were offered an online questionnaire, and 200 responses were analyzed. The mean number of correct answers about PRIE was 3.5 out of 5. Main predictors of knowledge on PRIE were a prior consultation with a neurologist and higher usage of books/brochures. A prior neurologist consultation on PRIE was stated by 45% of subjects. As the preferred future mode of being informed on PRIE, majority of women (61%) chooses their neurologist, 22% written materials distributed by a neurologist, and only 13% Internet. Levetiracetam was the most commonly used AED (34.5%). Valproate was used by 26%, and of those 59% stated no previous consultation on PRIE with their neurologist. In summary, we believe our study shows that knowledge of PRIE among WWE in their childbearing age is unsatisfactory, as are the neurologist consultation rates about PRIE. Our results demonstrate that, despite modern technologies, educational activities should be based on neurologist consultations and providing the patients with appropriate written materials. This is especially true for the relatively large proportion of women still taking valproate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of reflexology and antiepileptic drugs in managing intractable epilepsy--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Krishna; Devarajan, Elanchezhiyan; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Subbiah, Vivekanandan; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    This report is based on the results of a randomized parallel controlled trial conducted to determine the efficacy of reflexology therapy in managing intractable epilepsy. Subjects who failed epilepsy surgery or were not candidates for epilepsy surgery or were non-responders of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) took part in this study. The trial was completed by 77 subjects randomly assigned to 2 arms: control (AEDs) and reflexology (AEDs + reflexology therapy). The hypothesis was that hand reflexology therapy could produce results similar to those of vagus nerve stimulation, and foot reflexology therapy could maintain homeostasis in the functional status of individual body parts. Reflexology therapy was applied by family members. The follow-up period was 1.5 years. Quality of life in epilepsy patients was assessed with the QOLIE-31 instrument. In the reflexology group, the median baseline seizure frequency decreased from 9.5 (range 2-120) to 2 (range 0-110) with statistical significance (p reflexology group were 41.05 ± 7 and 43.6 ± 8, respectively. Posttherapy data were 49.07 ± 6 and 65.4 ± 9, respectively (p reflexology method allowed detection of knee pain in 85% of the reflexology group patients (p reflexology group patients reported nausea/vomiting (n = 1), change in voice (n = 2), and hoarseness (n = 1). Reflexology therapy together with AEDs may help reducing seizure frequency and improving quality of life in individuals with epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Combined antiretroviral and anti- tuberculosis drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these epidemics, many challenges remain.[3] Antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance pose considerable threats to the control of these epidemics.[4,5]. The breakdown in HIV/TB control within prisons is another emerging threat.[6,7] We describe one of the first reports of combined antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance ...

  19. Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: In Burkina Faso, there is no recent data about the level of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains among newly diagnosed tuberculosis cases. OBJECTIVE: To provide an update of the primary drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis among patients in Burkina faso. METHODS: ...

  20. Emergence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) outbreaks have been reported in South Africa, and strains have been identified on 6 continents. Dr. Peter Cegielski, team leader for drug-resistant TB with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at CDC, comments on a multinational team's report on this emerging global public health threat.

  1. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  2. Effects of epilepsy and selected antiepileptic drugs on risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death in patients with or without previous stroke: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Erdal, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death associated with epilepsy and examined if this risk was modified by treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).......Patients with epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death associated with epilepsy and examined if this risk was modified by treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)....

  3. The effect of depression and side effects of antiepileptic drugs on injuries in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur-Ozmen, S; Mula, M; Agrawal, N; Cock, H R; Lozsadi, D; von Oertzen, T J

    2017-09-01

    People with epilepsy are at increased risk of accidents and injuries but, despite several studies on this subject, data regarding preventable causes are still contradictory. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between injuries, side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and depression. Data from a consecutive sample of adult patients with epilepsy attending the outpatient clinics at St George's University Hospital in London were included. All patients were asked if they had had any injury since the last clinic appointment and completed the Liverpool Adverse Event Profile (LAEP) and Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy. Among 407 patients (243 females, mean age 43.1 years), 71 (17.4%) reported injuries since the last appointment. A two-step cluster analysis revealed two clusters with the major cluster (53.5% of the injured group) showing a total score for LAEP ≥45, a positive Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy screening and presence of AED polytherapy. A total score for LAEP ≥45 was the most important predictor. Antiepileptic drug treatment should be reviewed in patients reporting injuries in order to evaluate the potential contribution and burden of AED side effects. © 2017 EAN.

  4. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i....

  5. Interleukin-1β causes fluoxetine resistance in an animal model of epilepsy-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Eduardo A; Hensler, Julie G; Sankar, Raman; Shin, Don; Burke, Teresa F; Mazarati, Andréy M

    2012-04-01

    Depression represents a common comorbidity of epilepsy and is frequently resistant to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). We tested the hypothesis that the SSRI resistance in epilepsy associated depression may be a result of a pathologically enhanced interleukin-1β (IL1-β) signaling, and consequently that the blockade of IL1-β may restore the effectiveness of SSRI. Epilepsy and concurrent depression-like impairments were induced in Wistar rats by pilocarpine status epilepticus (SE). The effects of the 2-week long treatment with fluoxetine, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and their combination were examined using behavioral, biochemical, neuroendocrine, and autoradiographic assays. In post-SE rats, depression-like impairments included behavioral deficits indicative of hopelessness and anhedonia; the hyperactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis; the diminished serotonin output from raphe nucleus; and the upregulation of presynaptic serotonin 1-A (5-HT1A) receptors. Fluoxetine monotherapy exerted no antidepressant effects, whereas the treatment with IL-1ra led to the complete reversal of anhedonia and to a partial improvement of all other depressive impairments. Combined administration of fluoxetine and IL-1ra completely abolished all hallmarks of epilepsy-associated depressive abnormalities, with the exception of the hyperactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, the latter remaining only partially improved. We propose that in certain forms of depression, including but not limited to depression associated with epilepsy, the resistance to SSRI may be driven by the pathologically enhanced interleukin-1β signaling and by the subsequent upregulation of presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. In such forms of depression, the use of interleukin-1β blockers in conjunction with SSRI may represent an effective therapeutic approach.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  7. A comprehensive approach to identifying repurposed drugs to treat SCN8A epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Talia A; Maher, Chani M; Gerlach, Aaron C; Gay, Bryant C; Antonio, Brett M; Santos, Sonia C; Padilla, Karen M; Rader, JulieAnn; Krafte, Douglas S; Fox, Matthew A; Stewart, Gregory R; Petrovski, Slavé; Devinsky, Orrin; Might, Matthew; Petrou, Steven; Goldstein, David B

    2018-04-01

    Many previous studies of drug repurposing have relied on literature review followed by evaluation of a limited number of candidate compounds. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a more comprehensive approach using high-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of a gain-of-function mutation in the SCN8A gene associated with severe pediatric epilepsy. We developed cellular models expressing wild-type or an R1872Q mutation in the Na v 1.6 sodium channel encoded by SCN8A. Voltage clamp experiments in HEK-293 cells expressing the SCN8A R1872Q mutation demonstrated a leftward shift in sodium channel activation as well as delayed inactivation; both changes are consistent with a gain-of-function mutation. We next developed a fluorescence-based, sodium flux assay and used it to assess an extensive library of approved drugs, including a panel of antiepileptic drugs, for inhibitory activity in the mutated cell line. Lead candidates were evaluated in follow-on studies to generate concentration-response curves for inhibiting sodium influx. Select compounds of clinical interest were evaluated by electrophysiology to further characterize drug effects on wild-type and mutant sodium channel functions. The screen identified 90 drugs that significantly inhibited sodium influx in the R1872Q cell line. Four drugs of potential clinical interest-amitriptyline, carvedilol, nilvadipine, and carbamazepine-were further investigated and demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium channel currents. A comprehensive drug repurposing screen identified potential new candidates for the treatment of epilepsy caused by the R1872Q mutation in the SCN8A gene. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Epilepsy - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or antiepileptic drugs), may reduce the number of future seizures: These drugs are taken by mouth. Which ... 23986299 . Wiebe S. The epilepsies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  9. Glutamate metabotropic receptors as targets for drug therapy in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldrich, Randal X; Chapman, Astrid G; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Meldrum, Brian S

    2003-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have multiple actions on neuronal excitability through G-protein-linked modifications of enzymes and ion channels. They act presynaptically to modify glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic transmission and can contribute to long-term changes in synaptic function. The recent identification of subtype-selective agonists and antagonists has permitted evaluation of mGlu receptors as potential targets in the treatment of epilepsy. Agonists acting on group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5) are convulsant. Antagonists acting on mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptors are anticonvulsant against 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced seizures and in mouse models of generalized motor seizures and absence seizures. The competitive, phenylglycine mGlu1/5 receptor antagonists generally require intracerebroventricular administration for potent anticonvulsant efficacy but noncompetitive antagonists, e.g., (3aS,6aS)-6a-naphthalen-2-ylmethyl-5-methyliden-hexahydrocyclopenta[c]furan-1-on (BAY36-7620), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), and 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) block generalized seizures with systemic administration. Agonists acting on group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2, mGlu3) to reduce glutamate release are anticonvulsant, e.g., 2R,4R-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC], (+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY354740), and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylate (LY379268). The classical agonists acting on group III mGlu receptors such as L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, and L-serine-O-phosphate are acutely proconvulsant with some anticonvulsant activity. The more recently identified agonists (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine [(R,S)-PPG] and (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine [(S)-3,4-DCPG] and (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid [ACPT-1] are all anticonvulsant without proconvulsant effects. Studies in animal models of kindling

  10. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potschka, Heidrun; Fischer, Andrea; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Common criteria for the diagnosis of drug resistance and the assessment of outcome are needed urgently as a prerequisite for standardized evaluation and reporting of individual therapeutic responses in canine epilepsy. Thus, we provide a proposal for the definition of drug resistance and partial ...

  11. Emergence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) outbreaks have been reported in South Africa, and strains have been identified on 6 continents. Dr. Peter Cegielski, team leader for drug-resistant TB with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at CDC, comments on a multinational team's report on this emerging global public health threat.  Created: 3/1/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/26/2007.

  12. Psychiatric and behavioral side effects of anti-epileptic drugs in adolescents and children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Detyniecki, K; Choi, H; Hirsch, L; Katz, A; Legge, A; Wong, R; Jiang, A; Buchsbaum, R; Farooque, P

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the psychiatric and behavioral side effect (PBSE) profiles of both older and newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in children and adolescent patients with epilepsy. We used logistic regression analysis to test the correlation between 83 non-AED/patient related potential predictor variables and the rate of PBSE. We then compared for each AED the rate of PBSEs and the rate of PBSEs that led to intolerability (IPBSE) while controlling for non-AED predictors of PBSEs. 922 patients (≤18 years old) were included in our study. PBSEs and IPBSEs occurred in 13.8% and 11.2% of patients, respectively. Overall, a history of psychiatric condition, absence seizures, intractable epilepsy, and frontal lobe epilepsy were significantly associated with increased PBSE rates. Levetiracetam (LEV) had the greatest PBSE rate (16.2%). This was significantly higher compared to other AEDs. LEV was also significantly associated with a high rate of IPBSEs (13.4%) and dose-decrease rates due to IPBSE (6.7%). Zonisamide (ZNS) was associated with significantly higher cessation rate due to IPBSE (9.1%) compared to other AEDs. Patients with a history of psychiatric condition, absence seizures, intractable epilepsy, or frontal lobe epilepsy are more likely to develop PBSE. PBSEs appear to occur more frequently in adolescent and children patients taking LEV compared to other AEDs. LEV-attributed PBSEs are more likely to be associated with intolerability and subsequent decrease in dose. The rate of ZNS-attributed IPBSEs is more likely to be associated with complete cessation of AED. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N; Paredes, Roger

    2015-01-01

    to Southern Europe. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a concurrent decline in virological failure and testing, drug resistance was commonly detected. This suggests a selective approach to resistance testing. The regional differences identified indicate that policy aiming to minimize the emergence of resistance......OBJECTIVES: To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. DESIGN: Multinational cohort...... study. METHODS: Individuals in EuroSIDA with virological failure (>1 RNA measurement >500 on ART after >6 months on ART) after 1997 were included. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for resistance testing following virological failure and aORs for the detection of resistance among those who had a test were...

  14. Influence of genetic variants of CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 on antiepileptic drug metabolism in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Miguel A; Feria-Romero, Iris A; Serrano, Héctor; Rayo-Mares, Darío; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Grijalva, Israel; Escalante-Santiago, David; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    Identified the polymorphisms of CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4, within a rigorously selected population of pediatric patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. The genomic DNA of 23 drug-resistant epilepsy patients and 7 patients with good responses were analyzed. Ten exons in these four genes were genotyped, and the drug concentrations in saliva and plasma were determined. The relevant SNPs with pharmacogenomics relations were CYP2D6*2 (rs16947) decreased your activity and CYP2D6*4 (rs1065852), CYP2C19*2 (rs4244285) and CYP3A4*1B (rs2740574) by association with poor metabolizer. The strongest risk factors were found in the AA genotype and allele of SNP rs3892097 from the CYP2D6 gene, followed by the alleles A and T of SNPs rs2740574 and rs2687116, respectively from CYP3A4. The most important concomitance was between homozygous genotype AA of rs3892097 and genotype AA of rs2740574 with 78.3% in drug-resistant epilepsy patients as compared to 14.3% in control patients. The results demonstrated the important role of the CYP 3A4*1B allelic variant as risk factor for developing drug resistance and CYP2D6, CYP2C19 SNPs and haplotypes may affect the response to antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  15. Executive functions and psychiatric symptoms in drug-refractory juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jordana; Thomas, Rhys H; Church, Carla; Rees, Mark I; Marson, Anthony G; Baker, Gus A

    2014-06-01

    The pattern of executive dysfunction reported in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) resembles that of patients with cluster B personality disorders. This study examined whether executive dysfunction and maladaptive behavior reported in patients with JME are related. Sixty patients with drug-refractory JME were administered tests of intellect, memory, and executive dysfunction. Anxiety, depression, personality traits, impact of epilepsy, and perceived cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs were measured. Half of the cohort exhibited moderate to severe anxiety symptoms. The patients performed most poorly on naming ability and inhibition switching. Duration of epilepsy exacerbated poor performance on inhibition switching. Females presented with pathological scores for neurotic and introvert traits and males for introvert traits. Abnormal personality traits and psychiatric disorders were associated with worse intellectual and executive functioning. People with extreme Eysenck Personality Scale - Brief Version (EPQ-BV) scores demonstrated the greatest level of executive impairment. Furthermore, the same degree of dysfunction was not seen in any individual with unremarkable EPQ-BV scores. This study indicates that specific patterns of executive dysfunction are related to maladaptive behavior in JME. Distinct behavioral patterns may be used to identify functional and anatomical differences between people with JME and for stratification to enable gene discovery. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Drug resistance in the mouse cancer clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottenberg, Sven; Borst, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the most pressing problems in treating cancer patients today. Local and regional disease can usually be adequately treated, but patients eventually die from distant metastases that have become resistant to all available chemotherapy. Although work on cultured tumor cell

  17. Malaria epidemic and drug resistance, Djibouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno; Bogreau, H; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Kamil, Mohamed-Ali; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected before, during, and after a 1999 malaria epidemic in Djibouti shows that, despite a high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the epidemic cannot be attributed to a sudden increase in drug resistance of local parasite populations.

  18. Impact of health education on drug adherence and self-care in people with epilepsy with low education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Sebastian, Teenu Mary; Aggarwal, Meena; Tripathi, Manjari

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to observe the effect of a structured educational program on drug adherence and self-care management in people with epilepsy in a developing country. A total of 180 consecutive people with epilepsy were enrolled from the epilepsy clinic of a tertiary care hospital in North India. Out of these, 90 were randomized to the epilepsy health education group and received the educational program and 90 were in the control group and received the standard of care but did not receive any structured educational program. The modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and Epilepsy Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) were administered to assess drug adherence and self-care, respectively, on the day of enrollment. The patients enrolled in the epilepsy health education group received 4 sessions of the structured educational program. The MMAS and ESES questionnaires were again administered to both groups after 6months. Continuous and categorical variables were compared between control and epilepsy health education groups using a chi-square test, with p value less than 0.05 considered significant. A comparison between pretest and posttest MMAS scores and ESES scores was done using a paired t-test. In the epilepsy health education group, the pretest mean MMAS score was 6.58 whereas the posttest mean MMAS score was 7.53; the difference was significant (p=0.001). The mean MMAS scores for the control group's pretest and posttest were 6.46 and 6.58, respectively, which were not significantly different (p=0.224). On comparing the ESES scores at the beginning of the study and after 6months, there was no significant change in both groups. The present study proves the efficacy of a structured educational program in improving drug adherence in a cohort of people with epilepsy with low educational background. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Polymeric Prodrugs of Valproic Acid as Anti- Epilepsy Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The release of VPA from polymeric prodrugs was studied using cellophane membrane dialysis bags containing aqueous buffer solutions (pH 1, 7 and 10) at 37 oC. The quantity of released drug was detected by ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. Results: 1H-NMR and elemental analyses data for calculating mole composition of ...

  20. Possible roles for frequent salivary antiepileptic drug monitoring in the management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkes, G K; Eadie, M J

    1990-07-01

    Salivary levels of phenytoin, phenobarbitone, carbamazepine and carbamazepine-epoxide correlate with the simultaneous plasma water levels of these substances, after correcting for the effects of pH differences between saliva and plasma in the case of phenobarbitone. Saliva is easy and painless to collect, and salivary levels of the drugs are conveniently measured. Frequent (often daily) monitoring of pre-dose morning anticonvulsant drug concentrations in saliva over periods of weeks or months in 3 groups of epileptic subjects showed that (i) in some but not all poorly controlled epileptic patients seizures tended to occur on days when salivary anticonvulsant levels were lower than on non-seizure days, (ii) in such subjects it was possible to estimate an anticipated optimal drug concentration and dose to minimize seizure activity from the plot of seizure frequency against drug concentrations, (iii) in women with 'catamenial' epilepsy, salivary anticonvulsant levels were lower on perimenstrual days than at mid-cycle in half of the subjects studied, and (iv) in pregnant epileptic women the time course of the change in drug levels relative to dose could be followed more closely throughout pregnancy and the post-natal period than was practicable when using blood level measurements. Frequent measurement of salivary anticonvulsant concentrations appears a promising and inexpensive adjunct to the investigation and management of certain problem areas in epilepsy.

  1. MR contribution in surgery of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiners, L.C.; Valk, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Veelen, C.W.M. van

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of MR imaging in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy considered for surgical therapy is discussed. In this review we focus on: (a) focal abnormalities (mesial temporal sclerosis, focal migration disorders, hamartomatous lesions and low-grade tumours, phakomatosis and vascular malformations) associated with therapy-resistant partial epilepsy, requiring resective surgery; (b) abnormalities leading to generalized seizures that require more drastic surgical procedures, such as callosotomy and functional hemispherectomy; and (c) localisation of implanted depth-electrodes. (orig.)

  2. Comparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androsova, Ganna; Krause, Roland; Borghei, Mojgansadat; Wassenaar, Merel; Auce, Pauls; Avbersek, Andreja; Becker, Felicitas; Berghuis, Bianca; Campbell, Ellen; Coppola, Antonietta; Francis, Ben; Wolking, Stefan; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Craig, John; Delanty, Norman; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Kunz, Wolfram S; Lerche, Holger; Marson, Anthony G; Sander, Josemir W; Sills, Graeme J; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Depondt, Chantal

    2017-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is a common epilepsy syndrome that is often poorly controlled by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Comparative AED effectiveness studies in this condition are lacking. We report retention, efficacy, and tolerability in a cohort of patients with MTLE-HS. Clinical data were collected from a European database of patients with epilepsy. We estimated retention, 12-month seizure freedom, and adverse drug reaction (ADR) rates for the 10 most commonly used AEDs in patients with MTLE-HS. Seven hundred sixty-seven patients with a total of 3,249 AED trials were included. The highest 12-month retention rates were observed with carbamazepine (85.9%), valproate (85%), and clobazam (79%). Twelve-month seizure freedom rates varied from 1.2% for gabapentin and vigabatrin to 11% for carbamazepine. Response rates were highest for AEDs that were prescribed as initial treatment and lowest for AEDs that were used in a third or higher instance. ADRs were reported in 47.6% of patients, with the highest rates observed with oxcarbazepine (35.7%), topiramate (30.9%), and pregabalin (27.4%), and the lowest rates with clobazam (6.5%), gabapentin (8.9%), and lamotrigine (16.6%). The most commonly reported ADRs were lethargy and drowsiness, dizziness, vertigo and ataxia, and blurred vision and diplopia. Our results did not demonstrate any clear advantage of newer versus older AEDs. Our results provide useful insights into AED retention, efficacy, and ADR rates in patients with MTLE-HS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  5. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and Gonorrhea

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-12-26

    Dr. Robert Kirkcaldy, a medical officer at CDC, discusses his article on antimicrobial resistance and gonorrhea.  Created: 12/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/26/2017.

  6. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembruff, Stacey L; Laberge, Monique L; Villeneuve, David J; Guo, Baoqing; Veitch, Zachary; Cecchetto, Melanie; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2008-01-01

    Anthracyclines and taxanes are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer. However, tumor resistance to these drugs often develops, possibly due to overexpression of drug transporters. It remains unclear whether drug resistance in vitro occurs at clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy drugs and whether both the onset and magnitude of drug resistance can be temporally and causally correlated with the enhanced expression and activity of specific drug transporters. To address these issues, MCF-7 cells were selected for survival in increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (MCF-7 DOX-2 ), epirubicin (MCF-7 EPI ), paclitaxel (MCF-7 TAX-2 ), or docetaxel (MCF-7 TXT ). During selection cells were assessed for drug sensitivity, drug uptake, and the expression of various drug transporters. In all cases, resistance was only achieved when selection reached a specific threshold dose, which was well within the clinical range. A reduction in drug uptake was temporally correlated with the acquisition of drug resistance for all cell lines, but further increases in drug resistance at doses above threshold were unrelated to changes in cellular drug uptake. Elevated expression of one or more drug transporters was seen at or above the threshold dose, but the identity, number, and temporal pattern of drug transporter induction varied with the drug used as selection agent. The pan drug transporter inhibitor cyclosporin A was able to partially or completely restore drug accumulation in the drug-resistant cell lines, but had only partial to no effect on drug sensitivity. The inability of cyclosporin A to restore drug sensitivity suggests the presence of additional mechanisms of drug resistance. This study indicates that drug resistance is achieved in breast tumour cells only upon exposure to concentrations of drug at or above a specific selection dose. While changes in drug accumulation and the expression of drug transporters does occur at the threshold dose, the magnitude of

  7. Oxidative Stress in Patients with Drug Resistant Partial Complex Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lorigados Pedre

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS has been implicated as a pathophysiological mechanism of drug-resistant epilepsy, but little is known about the relationship between OS markers and clinical parameters, such as the number of drugs, age onset of seizure and frequency of seizures per month. The current study’s aim was to evaluate several oxidative stress markers and antioxidants in 18 drug-resistant partial complex seizure (DRPCS patients compared to a control group (age and sex matched, and the results were related to clinical variables. We examined malondialdehyde (MDA, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, advanced glycation end products (AGEs, nitric oxide (NO, uric acid, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione, vitamin C, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE and nitrotyrosine (3-NT. All markers except 4-HNE and 3-NT were studied by spectrophotometry. The expressions of 4-HNE and 3-NT were evaluated by Western blot analysis. MDA levels in patients were significantly increased (p ≤ 0.0001 while AOPP levels were similar to the control group. AGEs, NO and uric acid concentrations were significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.004, p ≤ 0.005, p ≤ 0.0001, respectively. Expressions of 3-NT and 4-HNE were increased (p ≤ 0.005 similarly to SOD activity (p = 0.0001, whereas vitamin C was considerably diminished (p = 0.0001. Glutathione levels were similar to the control group. There was a positive correlation between NO and MDA with the number of drugs. The expression of 3-NT was positively related with the frequency of seizures per month. There was a negative relationship between MDA and age at onset of seizures, as well as vitamin C with seizure frequency/month. We detected an imbalance in the redox state in patients with DRCPS, supporting oxidative stress as a relevant mechanism in this pathology. Thus, it is apparent that some oxidant and antioxidant parameters are closely linked with clinical variables.

  8. Radiosensitivity of drug-resistant human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattern, J.; Bak, M. Jr.; Volm, M.; Hoever, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of three drug-resistant sublines of a human epidermoid lung carcinoma growing as xenografts in nude mice was investigated. Drug resistance to vincristine, actinomycin D and cisplatin was developed in vivo by repeated drug treatment. It was found that all three drug-resistant tumour lines were not cross-resistant to irradiation. (orig.) [de

  9. Overview of drug-resistant tuberculosis worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A Velayati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Even in the 21st century, we are losing the battle against eradication of tuberculosis (TB. In 2015, 9.6 million people were estimated to have fallen ill with TB, of which 1.5 million people died. This is the real situation despite the well-structured treatment programs and availability of effective treatment options since the 1950s. The high mortality rate has been associated with other risk factors, such as the HIV epidemic, underlying diseases, and decline of socioeconomic standards. Furthermore, the problem of drug resistance that was recognized in the early days of the chemotherapeutic era raises serious concerns. Although resistance to a single agent is the most common type, resistance to multiple agents is less frequent but of greater concern. The World Health Organization estimated approximately 5% of all new TB cases involved multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB. The estimation for MDR-TB is 3.3% for new cases, and 20.5% for previously treated cases. Failure to identify and appropriately treat MDR-TB patients has led to more dangerous forms of resistant TB. Based on World Health Organization reports, 5% of global TB cases are now considered to be extensively drug resistant (XDR, defined as MDR with additional resistance to both fluoroquinolones and at least one second-line injectable drug. XDR-TB had been reported by 105 countries by 2015. An estimated 9.7% of people with MDR-TB have XDR-TB. More recently, another dangerous form of TB bacillus was identified, which was named totally drug resistant (TDR-TB or extremely drug resistant TB. These strains were resistant to all first- and second-line anti-TB drugs. Collectively, it is accepted that 2% of MDR-TB strains turn to be TDR-TB. This number, however, may not reflect the real situation, as many laboratories in endemic TB countries do not have proper facilities and updated protocols to detect the XDR or TDR-TB strains. Nevertheless, existing data emphasize the need for additional control

  10. Patient emotions and perceptions of antiepileptic drug changes and titration during treatment for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jesse; Cohen, Greg; Josephson, Colin; Collier, Ann Marie; Bharatham, Srikanth; Zhang, Ying; Wild, Imane

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the impact of antiepileptic drug (AED) change and dose titration on the emotional well-being of patients with epilepsy. Members of an online epilepsy community were invited to voluntarily participate in an online survey. The cross-sectional anonymous survey consisted of 31 multiple choice questions balanced in terms of variety and positivity/negativity of emotions concerning participants' most recent AED change. To substantiate survey results, spontaneous comments from epilepsy-related online forums and social media websites that mentioned participants' experiences with AED medication changes (termed passive listening statements) were analyzed and categorized by theme. All 345 survey participants (270 [78.3%] female; 172 [49.9%] were 26-45years old) self-reported an epilepsy/seizure diagnosis and were currently taking seizure medication; 263 (76.2%) were taking ≥2 AEDs and 301 (87.2%) had ≥1 seizure in the previous 18months. All participants reported a medication change within the previous 12months (dose increased [153 participants (44.3%)], medication added [105 (30.4%)], dose decreased [49 (14.2%)], medication removed [38 (11.0%)]). Improving seizure control (247 [71.6%]) and adverse events (109 [31.6%]) were the most common reasons for medication change. Primary emotions most associated (≥10% of participants) with an AED regimen change were (before medication change; during/after medication change) hopefulness (50 [14.5%]; 43 [12.5%]), uncertainty (50 [14.5%]; 69 [20.0%]), and anxiety (35 [10.1%]; 45 [13.0%]), and were largely due to concerns whether the change would work (212/345 [61.4%]; 180/345 [52.2%]). In the text analysis segment aimed at validating the survey, 230 participants' passive listening statements about medication titration were analyzed; additional seizure activity during dose titration (93 [40.4%]), adverse events during titration (71 [30.9%]), higher medication dosages (33 [14.3%]), and drug costs (25 [10.9%]) were the

  11. HIV Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, André F.; Soares, Marcelo A.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the current knowledge on antiretroviral (ARV) drug development and resistance is based on the study of subtype B of HIV-1, which only accounts for 10% of the worldwide HIV infections. Cumulative evidence has emerged that different HIV types, groups and subtypes harbor distinct biological properties, including the response and susceptibility to ARV. Recent laboratory and clinical data highlighting such disparities are summarized in this review. Variations in drug susceptibility, in the emergence and selection of specific drug resistance mutations, in viral replicative capacity and in the dynamics of resistance acquisition under ARV selective pressure are discussed. Clinical responses to ARV therapy and associated confounding factors are also analyzed in the context of infections by distinct HIV genetic variants. PMID:21994646

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinases Contribute to Neuronal Dysfunction in Animal Models of Drug Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mizoguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs remodel the pericellular environment by regulating the cleavage of extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface components, neurotransmitter receptors, and growth factors that mediate cell adhesion, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Interestingly, increased MMP activity and dysregulation of the balance between MMPs and TIMPs have also been implicated in various pathologic conditions. In this paper, we discuss various animal models that suggest that the activation of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis of drug dependence, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy.

  13. Mesenchymal change and drug resistance in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiditch, Jessica A; Jie, Chunfa; Lautz, Timothy B; Yu, Songtao; Clark, Sandra; Voronov, Dimitry; Chu, Fei; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic initiation has many phenotypic similarities to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including loss of cell-cell adhesion, increased invasiveness, and increased cell mobility. We have previously demonstrated that drug resistance is associated with a metastatic phenotype in neuroblastoma (NB). The purpose of this project was to determine if the development of doxorubicin resistance is associated with characteristics of mesenchymal change in human NB cells. Total RNA was isolated from wild type (WT) and doxorubicin-resistant (DoxR) human NB cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C) and analyzed using the Illumina Human HT-12 version 4 Expression BeadChip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Volcano plots and heat maps were generated. Genes of interest with a fold change in expression >1.5 and an adjusted P change via multiple pathways in the transition to a drug-resistant state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. HIPPOCAMPAL SCLEROSIS IN EPILEPSY AND CHILDHOOD FEBRILE SEIZURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; COOK, MJ; FISH, DR; STEVENS, JM; SHORVON, SD

    1993-01-01

    The connection between hippocampal sclerosis and childhood febrile seizures (CFS) is a contentious issue in the study of epilepsy. We investigated 107 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy by high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 20 had a history of CFS, 45 had focal (26) or

  15. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhvaryu MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Meghna Adhvaryu1, Bhasker Vakharia21Department of Biotechnology, SRK Institute of Computer Education and Applied Sciences, 2R&D, Bhuma Research in Ayurvedic and Herbal Medicine, Surat, Gujarat, IndiaAbstract: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and

  16. Strategies for improving adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Gershuni, Olga; Al-Sabhan, Jawza; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-02-03

    Poor adherence to antiepileptic medication is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. In this review, we focus on interventions designed and tested in randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials to assist people with adherence to antiepileptic medication. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2010. To determine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving adherence to antiepileptic medication in adults and children with epilepsy. For the latest update, on 4 February 2016 we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946 to 4 February 2016), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost 1937 to 4 February 2016), PsycINFO (EBSCOhost 1887 to 4 February 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions aimed at people with a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy (as defined in individual studies), of any age and treated with antiepileptic drugs in a primary care, outpatient or other community setting. All review authors independently assessed lists of potentially relevant citations and abstracts. At least two review authors independently extracted data and performed quality assessment of each study according to the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias. We graded the level of evidence for each outcome according to the GRADE working group scale.The studies differed widely according to the type of intervention and measures of adherence; therefore combining data was not appropriate. We included 12 studies reporting data on 1642 participants (intervention = 833, control = 809). Eight studies targeted adults with epilepsy, one study included participants

  17. Economic implications of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M; Phillips-Howard, P A

    1996-09-01

    The widespread evolution of drug resistance in malarial parasites has seriously hampered efforts to control this debilitating disease. Chloroquine, the mainstay of malaria treatment for many decades, is now proving largely ineffective in many parts of the world, particularly against the most severe form of malaria--falciparum. Alternative drugs have been developed, but they are frequently less safe and are all between 50 and 700% more expensive than chloroquine. Choice of drug clearly has important budgetary implications and national malaria control programmes need to weigh up the costs and benefits in deciding whether to change to more effective but more expensive drugs. The growth in drug resistance also has implications for the choice of diagnostic tool. Clinical diagnosis of malaria is relatively cheap, but less specific than some technological approaches. As more expensive drugs are employed, the cost of wasted treatment on suspected cases who do not in fact have malaria rises and the more worthwhile it becomes to invest in more specific diagnostic techniques. This paper presents an economic framework for analysing the various malaria drug and diagnostic tool options available. It discusses the nature of the key factors that need to be considered when making choices of malaria treatment (including treatment costs, drug resistance, the costs of treatment failure and compliance) and diagnosis (including diagnosis cost and accuracy, and the often overlooked costs associated with delayed treatment), and uses some simple equations to illustrate the impact of these on the relative cost effectiveness of the alternatives being considered. On the basis of some simplifying assumptions and illustrative calculations, it appears that in many countries more effective drugs and more specific and rapid diagnostic approaches will be worth adopting even although they imply additional expense.

  18. Antiepileptic drug prescribing patterns in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Natalie N; Baca, Christine B; Van Cott, Anne C; Parko, Karen L; Amuan, Megan E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2015-05-01

    We examined patterns of antiepileptic drug (AED) use in a cohort of Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans (IAVs) who were previously identified as having epilepsy. We hypothesized that clinicians would be more likely to prescribe newer AEDs and would select specific AEDs to treat seizures based on patient characteristics including gender and comorbidities. From the cohort of IAVs previously identified with epilepsy between fiscal years 2009 and 2010, we selected those who received AEDs from the Veterans Health Administration in FY2010. Regimens were classified as monotherapy or polytherapy, and specific AED use was examine overall and by gender. Multivariable logistic regression examined associations of age; gender; race/ethnicity; medical, psychiatric, and neurological comorbidities; and receipt of neurology specialty care associated with the six most commonly used AEDs. Among 256,284 IAVs, 2123 met inclusion criteria (mean age: 33years; 89% men). Seventy-two percent (n=1526) received monotherapy, most commonly valproate (N=425) and levetiracetam (n=347). Sixty-one percent of those on monotherapy received a newer AED (levetiracetam, topiramate, lamotrigine, zonisamide, oxcarbazepine). Although fewer women than men received valproate, nearly 90% (N=45) were of reproductive age (≤45years). Antiepileptic drug prescribing patterns were associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, cerebrovascular disease, dementia/cognitive impairment, headache, and receipt of neurological specialty care (all p<0.01). In this cohort of veterans with epilepsy, most received AED monotherapy and newer AEDs. Prescribing patterns were different for men and women. The patterns observed between AEDs and neurological/psychiatric comorbidities suggest that clinicians are practicing rational prescribing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Drug resistance patterns in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoharo, H.K.; Shaikh, I.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the resistance patterns of mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates among category I and II patients of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Jamshoro, from November 2008 to September 2009. Patients were divided into category I and II. The sputa were collected, stained with Ziehl-Nielsen (Z-N) staining and ultimately inoculated on Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) media for six weeks. Out of 890 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients, the growth was obtained in 285 cases. The Drug sensitivity testing (DST) for Isoniazid (INH), Rifampicin (RIF), Ethambutol (EMB) Pyrazinamide (PZA) and Streptomycin (SM) were performed. The data was analyzed on SPSS 10.0. A p-value of <0.05 was taken as significant. Result: Out of 285 cases, 176 (61.75%) were male and 109 (38.24%) female. The mean age was 37 +- 19.90 years. The DST showed drug sensitive and drug resistant isolates in 80 (28.05%) and 205 (71.92%) cases respectively (p=0.001). The drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) rates for individual drugs; INH, RIF, EMB, PZA and SM were 51,22%, 15.4%, 13.33%, 9%12, and 3.85% respectively (p=0.03). The MDR-TB isolates were detected in 120 (42.10%) cases, including 5 (5.88%) in category I and 115 (57.50%) in category II patients (p=0.0001). Conclusion: Drug resistant and multidrug resistant tuberculosis was observed mainly in category II patients. However, primary MDR was also observed in category I patients and reflects dissemination of MDR cases within the community. (author)

  20. ECG changes in epilepsy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tigaran, S; Rasmussen, V; Dam, M

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of ECG abnormalities suggestive of myocardial ischaemia in patients with severe drug resistant epilepsy and without any indication of previous cardiac disease, assuming that these changes may be of significance for the group of epileptic patients with sudden unexpected...

  1. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  2. Individualized prediction of seizure relapse and outcomes following antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberink, Herm J; Boshuisen, Kim; Otte, Willem M; Geleijns, Karin; Braun, Kees P J

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to create a clinically useful tool for individualized prediction of seizure outcomes following antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery. We used data from the European retrospective TimeToStop study, which included 766 children from 15 centers, to perform a proportional hazard regression analysis. The 2 outcome measures were seizure recurrence and seizure freedom in the last year of follow-up. Prognostic factors were identified through systematic review of the literature. The strongest predictors for each outcome were selected through backward selection, after which nomograms were created. The final models included 3 to 5 factors per model. Discrimination in terms of adjusted concordance statistic was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.69) for predicting seizure recurrence and 0.73 (95% CI 0.72-0.75) for predicting eventual seizure freedom. An online prediction tool is provided on www.epilepsypredictiontools.info/ttswithdrawal. The presented models can improve counseling of patients and parents regarding postoperative antiepileptic drug policies, by estimating individualized risks of seizure recurrence and eventual outcome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. characterization of drug resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Lizards as well as some other reptiles have been known to carry pathogenic bacteria organisms as well as drug resistant pathogens. Despite the fact that they remain asymptomatic in many cases, they nevertheless play significant roles in the epidemiology of these pathogens through their dissemination to the ...

  4. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  5. Population mobility, globalization, and antimicrobial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Douglas W; Gushulak, Brian D; Baine, William B; Bala, Shukal; Gubbins, Paul O; Holtom, Paul; Segarra-Newnham, Marisel

    2009-11-01

    Population mobility is a main factor in globalization of public health threats and risks, specifically distribution of antimicrobial drug-resistant organisms. Drug resistance is a major risk in healthcare settings and is emerging as a problem in community-acquired infections. Traditional health policy approaches have focused on diseases of global public health significance such as tuberculosis, yellow fever, and cholera; however, new diseases and resistant organisms challenge existing approaches. Clinical implications and health policy challenges associated with movement of persons across barriers permeable to products, pathogens, and toxins (e.g., geopolitical borders, patient care environments) are complex. Outcomes are complicated by high numbers of persons who move across disparate and diverse settings of disease threat and risk. Existing policies and processes lack design and capacity to prevent or mitigate adverse health outcomes. We propose an approach to global public health risk management that integrates population factors with effective and timely application of policies and processes.

  6. [Modern aspects of epilepsy treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajbegović, Azra; Kantardzić, Dzelaludin; Suljić, Enra; Alajbegović, Salem

    2003-01-01

    It is a general rule today, after a relevant diagnostics of an epilepsy, to start a monotherapy treatment, depending on a kind of a seizure, a life age and a general health condition. First line of monotherapy epilepsy drugs remain carbamazapine and sodium valproat. New drugs that are being introduced are: felbamat, gabapentin, lamotrigin, oxcarbazepin, tiagabin, topiramat, vigabatin and zanisamid. These are commonly used as add-on therapy, or as an addition for previously used antiepileptic. Their indicated areas are complex resistant partial seizures with or without generalization. Attention should be paid on proper dosage, interactions and toxicity. Regardless on the new epileptic era, according to reports of International League against epilepsy, most of the patients do not receive the drug that is the most appropriate for them concerning the price (cost-benefit). Neurosurgical methods in epilepsy treatment are: selective amygdalo-hyppocampotomy, temporal lobotomy, subpial resection, hemispherectomy, corpus callosotomy, removal of lesions like tumors or cysts provide encouraging results in reduction of epileptic seizures that can be followed by reduction of drug therapy. N. vagus stimulation is being wider introduced in resident epileptics. Treatment of epilepsy in women requires an approach to sexuality, conception, pregnancy, introduction of medicaments, antiepileptic terratogenity, contraception, motherhood and menopause. A special significance of modern approach to epilepsy is in treatment of elderly who have cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease as a cause of seizures. A complex treatment of epilepsy using pharmacological and neurosurgical approach requires supportive psychotherapy, socio-therapy, the work with a family, education about epilepsy and living a life with more quality having one.

  7. Does mechanism of drug action matter to inform rational polytherapy in epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Giorgia; Beghi, Ettore

    2013-05-01

    When monotherapy for epilepsy fails, add-on therapy is an alternative option. There are several possible antiepileptic drug combinations based on their different and multiple mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, only when benefits of drug combinations outweigh the harms, polytherapy can be defined as "rational". In the past 20 years, second generation AEDs have been marketed, some of which have better defined mechanisms of action and better pharmacokinetic profile. The mechanisms of action of AEDs involve, among others, blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels, blockade of voltage-gated calcium channel, activation of the ionotropic GABAA receptor and increase of GABA levels at the synaptic cleft, blockade of glutamate receptors, binding to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, and opening of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels. Aim of this review was to examine published reports on AEDs combinations in animal models and humans focusing on mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic interactions. Studies in animals have shown that AED combinations are more effective when using drugs with different mechanisms of action. The most effective combination was found using a drug with a single mechanism of action and another with multiple mechanisms of action. In humans some combinations between a blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels and a drug with multiple mechanisms of action may be synergistic. Future studies are necessary to better define rational combinations and complementary mechanisms of action, considering also pharmacokinetic interactions and measures of toxicity and not only drug efficacy.

  8. Trends in Antiepileptic Drug Use in Children and Adolescents With Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Carney, Paul R; Bussing, Regina; Segal, Richard; Cottler, Linda B; Winterstein, Almut G

    2017-09-01

    We describe the trends in antiepileptic drug (AED) use in children and adolescents with epilepsy in the United States. We undertook a cross-sectional study based on Medicaid Analytic eXtract data set from 26 US states. Children and adolescents aged three to 18 years with at least one year continuous Medicaid fee-for-service coverage after the second outpatient or the first inpatient diagnosis of epilepsy in each calendar year during 1999 to 2009 were included in the study; therefore, 11 cohorts were established. A patient was defined as being exposed to a specific AED if he or she had at least one-day supply of the AED during the 1-year follow-up period. The annual prevalence of AEDs was reported, stratified by gender and age. The trends in AED use were evaluated through linear regression. The sample sizes of the 11 cohorts ranged between 17,304 and 22,672. The annual prevalence of valproic acid use declined from 42.4% in 1999 to 26.5% in 2009, and the prevalence of carbamazepine use declined from 37.1% to 10.2%. Meanwhile, the prevalence of levetiracetam use increased from 5.1% to about 32.0% in 2009, and the prevalence of oxcarbazepine use increased from 1.3% to 19.1%. Since 2008, levetiracetam (29.6%) has replaced valproic acid (27.8%) as the most commonly used AED in children and adolescents with epilepsy. The prevalence of diazepam use increased from 11.6% to 28.1%. Compared with first- and second-generation antiepileptic drugs, third-generation AEDs have fewer adverse side effects, resulting in increased patient treatment adherence. Equally important is the economic impact of these newer AEDs. This first-of-its-kind study underscores the need for large database studies that objectively assess the cost-effectiveness of third-generation AEDs versus first- and second-generation AEDs in the treatment of childhood epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug resistance in Mexico: results from the National Survey on Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojorquez-Chapela, I; Bäcker, C E; Orejel, I; López, A; Díaz-Quiñonez, A; Hernández-Serrato, M I; Balandrano, S; Romero, M; Téllez-Rojo Solís, M M; Castellanos, M; Alpuche, C; Hernández-Ávila, M; López-Gatell, H

    2013-04-01

    To present estimations obtained from a population-level survey conducted in Mexico of prevalence rates of mono-, poly- and multidrug-resistant strains among newly diagnosed cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), as well as the main factors associated with multidrug resistance (combined resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin). Study data came from the National Survey on TB Drug Resistance (ENTB-2008), a nationally representative survey conducted during 2008-2009 in nine states with a stratified cluster sampling design. Samples were obtained for all newly diagnosed cases of pulmonary TB in selected sites. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed for anti-tuberculosis drugs. DST results were obtained for 75% of the cases. Of these, 82.2% (95%CI 79.5-84.7) were susceptible to all drugs. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) was estimated at 2.8% (95%CI 1.9-4.0). MDR-TB was associated with previous treatment (OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.1-9.4). The prevalence of drug resistance is relatively low in Mexico. ENTB-2008 can be used as a baseline for future follow-up of drug resistance.

  10. Novel approaches to epilepsy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kokaia, Merab

    2013-01-01

    The aim of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete seizure freedom. Nonetheless, numerous side effects and seizure resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affecting about 30-40% of all patients are main unmet needs in today's epileptology. For this reason, novel approaches to treat epilepsy......, and inhibitory neurotransmitters. We also address new molecular-genetic approaches utilizing optogenetic technology. The therapeutic strategies presented herein are predominately aimed toward treatment of partial/focal epilepsies, but could also be envisaged for targeting key seizure propagation areas...... are highly needed. Herein, we highlight recent progress in stem-cell-based and gene transfer-based therapies in epilepsy according to findings in animal models and address their potential clinical application. Multiple therapeutic targets are described, including neuropeptides, neurotrophic factors...

  11. SAFETY AND TOLERABILITY OF ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS AT WOMEN WITH EPILEPSY (DATA OF SVT. LUKA’S INSTITUTE OF CHILD NEUROLOGY AND EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Women with epilepsy are referred to the special risk group due to the development of side effects of antiepileptic drugs (АED. Women’s neuroendocrinal disorders can be caused by the disease itself-epilepsy, as well as by the undertaken therapy. We have carried out a retrospective research in order to assess the safety and the tolerance of different AED at young girls and women of reproductive age. Was analyzed the data base of patients of Svt. Luka’s Institute of Child Neurology and Epilepsy, comprising all patients, who have been monitored in the period between 2000 and 2014 inclusive at the age between 15–40 years (n = 301. The research included patients, with different diagnosed forms of focal or generalized epilepsy, who were taking AED both during mono and polytherapy. Were analyzed all cases of neuroendocrinal, especially reproductive disorders, including the considerable gain of weight, menstrual disorder, sterility at AED background. Also was analyzed the result of all registered pregnancies at women with epilepsy (at the background of the antiepileptic therapy, as well as without treatment during pregnancy. The retrospective data analysis has revealed 51 сase (17 % in the group under review of expressed neuroendocrinal, reproductive and cosmetic side effects (including the menstrual disorder: dysmenorrhea, opsomenorrhea, amenorrhea, anovulatory cycles, sterility, unfavorable pregnancy outcomes, as well as cosmetic endocrinal side effects: obesity, hirsutism, hair loss. Most patients have got such combined side effects. Our research results show, that in most cases the pregnancy at women with epilepsy ends by birth of a healthy child, the pregnancy outcome depends on many factors, it also differs according to applied AED. Valproic acid drugs show the highest teratogenic risk. Also at the back ground of the therapy with valproic acid have been registered most cases of neuroendocrinal reproductive diseases at women

  12. Epilepsy surgery: Recommendations for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article recommends guidelines for epilepsy surgery for India. This article reviews the indications, the various surgical options available and the outcome of surgery for drug resistant epilepsy based on current evidence. Epilepsy surgery is a well-established option for patients who have been diagnosed to have drug resistant epilepsy (DRE (on at least two appropriate, adequate anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs (either in monotherapy or in combination with continuing seizures, where the presurgical work-up has shown concordance of structural imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and electrical mapping data (electroencephalography (EEG, video EEG. There may be a requirement of functional imaging techniques in a certain number of DRE like positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission tomography, (SPECT. Invasive monitoring should be restricted to a few when all noninvasive investigations are inconclusive, there is a dual pathology or there is a discordance of noninvasive data. The types of surgery could be curative (resective surgeries: amygdalo hippocampectomy, lesionectomy and multilobar resections; functional surgeries: hemispherotomy and palliative (multiple subpial transaction, corpus callosotomy, vagal nerve stimulation. Epilepsy surgery in indicated cases has a success range from 50 to 86% in achieving seizure freedom as compared with < 5% success rate with AEDs only in persons with DRE. Centers performing surgery should be categorized into Level I and Level II.

  13. Investigation of altered microstructure in patients with drug refractory epilepsy using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yuwei; Yan, Xu; Fan, Mingxia [East China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Shanghai (China); Mao, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Ding, Jing [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Xu, Dongrong [Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, MRI Unit/Epidemiology Division, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The risk of refractory epilepsy can be more dangerous than the adverse effect caused by medical treatment. In this study, we employed voxel-wise analysis (VWA) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) methods to measure microstructural changes using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients of drug refractory epilepsy (DRE) who had been epileptic for more than 10 years. To examine the specific microstructural abnormalities in DRE patients and its difference from medically controlled epilepsy (MCE), we acquired DTI data of 7 DRE patients, 37 MCE patients, and 31 healthy controls (HCs) using a 3 T MRI scanner. Comparisons between epileptic patients and HCs between MCE and DRE patients were performed based on calculated diffusion anisotropic indices data using VWA and TBSS. Compared to HCs, epileptic patients (including MCE and DRE) showed significant DTI changes in the common affected regions based on VWA, whereas TBSS found that widespread DTI changes in parts of microstructures of bilateral hemispheres were more obvious in the DRE patients than that in the MCE patients when compared with HCs. In contrast, significant reduction of fractional anisotropy values of thalamo-cortical fibers, including left superior temporal gyrus, insular cortex, pre-/post-central gyri, and thalamus, were further found in DRE patients compared with MCE. The results of multiple diffusion anisotropic indices data provide complementary information to understand the dysfunction of thalamo-cortical pathway in DRE patients, which may be contributors to disorder of language and motor functions. Our current study may shed light on the pathophysiology of DRE. (orig.)

  14. Malformation risks of antiepileptic drug monotherapies in pregnancy: updated results from the UK and Ireland Epilepsy and Pregnancy Registers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Campbell, E

    2014-09-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure during pregnancy increases the risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs). The magnitude of this risk varies by AED exposure. Here we provide updated results from the UK Epilepsy and Pregnancy Register of the risk of MCMs after monotherapy exposure to valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine.

  15. Effects of a ketogenic diet on brain metabolism in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    For a subpopulation of drug-resistant epilepsies, a ketogenic diet constitutes the treatment of choice. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet, which induces ketosis. Despite the use in treatment of epilepsy since 1924, the clinical efficacy was not demonstrated...... in a controlled, randomized trial until 2008, showing its capability of reducing seizure frequency with more than 50%. However, the exact mechanism of this form of treatment is still unknown. We report here a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, where a brain 18F-FDG PET examination...

  16. Listening to Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunquell, Phillip J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses what epilepsy is and what it is not, defines types of epileptic seizures, identifies epilepsy syndromes, discusses antiepileptic drugs, describes seizure surgery, and examines issues of quality of life. (JDD)

  17. Epilepsy and homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  18. First-drug treatment failures in 42 Turkish children with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incecik, Faruk; Herguner, Ozlem M; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2015-01-01

    The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC) are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of failure to respond to the initial antiepileptic drug (AED). A total of 42 children with BOEC were enrolled. Predictive factors were analyzed by survival methods. Among the 42, 25 patients (59.5%) were boys and 17 (40.5%) were girls and the mean age at the seizure onset was 7.46 ± 2.65 years (4-14 years). Of the 42 patients, 34 (81.0%) were treated relatively successfully with the first AED treatment, and 8 (19.0%) were not responded initial AED treatment. There was no correlation between response to initial AED treatment and sex, consanguinity, epilepsy history of family, age of seizure onset, frequency of seizures, history of status epilepticus, duration of starting first treatment, findings on electroencephalogram. However, history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC were significantly associated with failure risk. Factors predicting failure to respond to the AED were history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC in children with BOEC.

  19. First-drug treatment failures in 42 Turkish children with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of failure to respond to the initial antiepileptic drug (AED. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 children with BOEC were enrolled. Predictive factors were analyzed by survival methods. Results: Among the 42, 25 patients (59.5% were boys and 17 (40.5% were girls and the mean age at the seizure onset was 7.46 ± 2.65 years (4-14 years. Of the 42 patients, 34 (81.0% were treated relatively successfully with the first AED treatment, and 8 (19.0% were not responded initial AED treatment. There was no correlation between response to initial AED treatment and sex, consanguinity, epilepsy history of family, age of seizure onset, frequency of seizures, history of status epilepticus, duration of starting first treatment, findings on electroencephalogram. However, history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC were significantly associated with failure risk. Conclusions: Factors predicting failure to respond to the AED were history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC in children with BOEC.

  20. Neuropsychological effects of antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine versus valproate in adult males with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaydaa A Shehata

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Abd El-aziz M Bateh,2 Sherifa A Hamed,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Yaser B Elsorogy11Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt; 2Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Banha University, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs on cognition and behavior in adult epileptic males controlled on treatment with conventional antiepileptic medications. Methods: Cognitive, mood, behavior and personality traits were assessed in 45 epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine and/or valproate and free of seizures for ≥1 year. Thirty-four newly diagnosed or untreated patients with epilepsy and 58 matched healthy subjects were also included for comparison. A battery of psychometric tests was utilized including Stanford-Binet (4th edition, Beck Inventory for Depression, Aggressive Scale and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire.Results: Compared to matched control subjects, treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance in different cognitive and behavioral functions testing. Treated patients had worse scores in memory for digits forward and backward, total short-term memory, extroversion and psychosis. The duration of AEDs intake was correlated with memory of objects (r = -0.323; P = 0.030, bead memory (r = -0.314; P = 0.036 and total nonverbal short-term memory (r = -0.346; P = 0.020. Treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance of similar extent in behavioral functions testing (depression, aggression and neurosis. The dose of AEDs was correlated with testing scores for neurosis (r = 0.307; P = 0.040, verbal aggression (r = 0.483; P = 0.001 and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.526; P = 0.000, and duration of drug intake was correlated with scores for depression (r = 0.384; P = 0.009, psychosis (r = 0.586; P = 0.0001 and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.300; P = 0.045.Conclusions: This study provides support for the notion that AEDs can impair performance

  1. Supermolecular drug challenge to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yasuhiko; Eshita, Yuki; Ji, Rui-Cheng; Kobayashi, Takashi; Onishi, Masayasu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun; Kubota, Naoji

    2018-06-04

    Overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells can be accomplished using drug delivery systems in large-molecular-weight ATP-binding cassette transporters before entry into phagolysosomes and by particle-cell-surface interactions. However, these hypotheses do not address the intratumoral heterogeneity in cancer. Anti-MDR must be related to alterations of drug targets, expression of detoxification, as well as altered proliferation. In this study, it is shown that the excellent efficacy and sustainability of anti-MDR is due to a stable ES complex because of the allosteric facilities of artificial enzymes when they are used as supramolecular complexes. The allosteric effect of supermolecular drugs can be explained by the induced-fit model and can provide stable feedback control systems through the loop transfer function of the Hill equation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antituberculosis drug resistance patterns in adults with tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senbayrak, Seniha; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Erdem, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to antituberculosis drugs is an increasingly common clinical problem. This study aimed to evaluate drug resistance profiles of TBM isolates in adult patients in nine European countries involving 32 centers...

  3. Telomerase and drug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lipinska, Natalia; Romaniuk, Aleksandra; Paszel-Jaworska, Anna; Toton, Ewa; Kopczynski, Przemyslaw; Rubis, Blazej

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that a decreased expression or inhibited activity of telomerase in cancer cells is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to some drugs (e.g., doxorubicin, cisplatin, or 5-fluorouracil). However, the mechanism of the resistance resulting from telomerase alteration remains elusive. There are theories claiming that it might be associated with telomere shortening, genome instability, hTERT translocation, mitochondria functioning modulation, or even alterations in ABC family gen...

  4. Multi-drug resistant Ewingella Americana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, Syed Z.; Ashshi, Ahmad M.; Hussain, Waleed M.; Fatani, Mohammad I.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of pneumonia due to multi-drug resistant Ewingella Americana in a young patient admitted in the Intensive Care Unit of Hera General Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia with severe head injury in a road traffic accident. He was an Indonesian pilgrim who had traveled to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to perform Hajj in December 2007. Ewingella Americana was identified to be the pathogen of pneumonia with clinical signs and symptoms along with positive radiological findings. (author)

  5. Changes in the sensitivity of GABAA current rundown to drug treatments in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierangelo eCifelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, the most common epileptic syndrome in adults, is still unsatisfactory, as one third of the patients are or become refractory to antiepileptic agents. Refractoriness may depend upon drug-induced alterations, but the disease per se may also undergo a progressive evolution that affects the sensitivity to drugs. mTLE has been shown to be associated with a dysfunction of the inhibitory signaling mediated by GABAA receptors. In particular, the repetitive activation of GABAA receptors produces a use-dependent decrease (rundown of the evoked currents (IGABA, which is markedly enhanced in the hippocampus and cortex of drug-resistant mTLE patients. This phenomenon has been also observed in the pilocarpine model, where the increased IGABA rundown is observed in the hippocampus at the time of the first spontaneous seizure, then extends to the cortex and remains constant in the chronic phase of the disease. Here, we examined the sensitivity of IGABA to pharmacological modulation. We focused on the antiepileptic agent levetiracetam and on the neurotrophin BDNF, which were previously reported to attenuate mTLE-induced increased rundown in the chronic human tissue. In the pilocarpine model, BDNF displayed a paramount effect, decreasing rundown in the hippocampus at the time of the first seizure, as well as in the hippocampus and cortex in the chronic period. In contrast, levetiracetam did not affect rundown in the hippocampus, but attenuated it in the cortex. Interestingly, this effect of levetiracetam was also observed on the still unaltered rundown observed in the cortex at the time of the first spontaneous seizure. These data suggest that the sensitivity of GABAA receptors to pharmacological interventions undergoes changes during the natural history of mTLE, implicating that the site of seizure initiation and the timing of treatment may highly affect the therapeutic outcome.

  6. Cerebral perfusion abnormalities in therapy-resistant epilepsy in mentally retarded pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Nawaz, K.; Hassoon, M.; Rahman, M.; Olofsson, O.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies sites of cerebral perfusion abnormalities in therapy-resistant epilepsy in mentally retarded pediatric patients (TREMRPP) using Tc-99m HMPAO and to compare it with the results of electroencephalography (EEG) and fluorographic CT. Thirteen children underwent Tc-99m HMPAO single photon emission CT (SPECT) studies; 11 had fluorographic CT, and 12 had EEG (four had EEG twice). All studies for same patients were within 2 weeks of each other. SPECT studies were reviewed twice by two nuclear medicine physicians without any knowledge of the results of other tests. Fluorographic CT results showed cerebral atrophy in only three and were normal in eight. EEG results were abnormal in all 12 patients examined. Epileptogenic spikes (EPS) were seen in eight patients only. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT studies were abnormal in all patients; they showed 21 foci of decreased perfusion on nine patients and nine foci of increased perfusion in seven patients (three patients had mixed lesions)

  7. Drug utilization profile in adult patients with refractory epilepsy at a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Freitas-Lima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the utilization profile of antiepileptic drugs in a population of adult patients with refractory epilepsy attending a tertiary center. Method Descriptive analyses of data were obtained from the medical records of 112 patients. Other clinical and demographic characteristics were also registered. Results Polytherapies with ≥3 antiepileptic drugs were prescribed to 60.7% of patients. Of the old agents, carbamazepine and clobazam were the most commonly prescribed (72.3% and 58.9% of the patients, respectively. Among the new agents, lamotrigine was the most commonly prescribed (36.6% of the patients. At least one old agent was identified in 103 out of the 104 polytherapies, while at least one new agent was prescribed to 70.5% of the population. The most prevalent combination was carbamazepine + clobazam + lamotrigine. The mean AED load found was 3.3 (range 0.4–7.7. Conclusion The pattern of use of individual drugs, although consistent with current treatment guidelines, is strongly influenced by the public health system.

  8. Anti-Neuronal Autoantibodies in Both Drug Responsive and Resistant Focal Seizures with Unknown Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozubatik-Celik, Gokcen; Ozkara, Cigdem; Ulusoy, Canan; Gunduz, Aysegul; Delil, Sakir; Yeni, Naz; Tuzun, Erdem

    2017-09-01

    and Objective Autoimmunity is an emerging field of research in the etiology of different neurological disorders including epilepsy. We aimed to investigate the presence of neuronal autoantibodies in focal epilepsy with unknown cause and their clinical correlates in both drug-responsive and resistant patients. Between 2009 and 2010 94 patients were prospectively enrolled, had their antibodies tested and clinically followed." An additional 50 age- and gender-matched controls were also tested for antibodies. Age at examination, gender, age at onset, seizure frequency, risk factors, seizure precipitants, and type of seizures were noted. Plasma obtained from patients was frozen at -80°C and analysed for autoantibodies against VGKC-complex, VGCC, GAD, LGI1, CASPR2, NMDA, AMPA and GABAB receptors with immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay as required. Thirteen (13.8%) patients, but none of the controls, had antibodies (p=0.003). Antibodies were directed against the uncharacterized components of VGKC-complex in 5 patients (5.3%), GAD in 4 patients (4.2%), NMDA-R in 1 patient (1%), AMPA-R in 1 patient (1%) and both GAD and VGKC-complex in 2 patients (2.1%). Prognosis of epilepsy, in subsequent follow-up, did not correlate to general presence of anti-neuronal antibodies with slightly more patients with antibodies epilepsy control than without (76.9% vs. 69.1%, not-statistically significant. Three patients with suspected active autoimmunity and epilepsy who were treated, showed a response to treatment with a reduction in the seizure frequency. Although most clinical features were identical between seropositive and seronegative patient groups, seropositive patients were more likely to have inflammatory/autoimmune disorders in their medical history. In keeping with previous studies, we have shown anti-neuronal antibodies in a proportion of focal epilepsy patients. Although autoimmunity might merely occur as a bystander effect in many chronic neurological disorders

  9. Differential impact of contraceptive methods on seizures varies by antiepileptic drug category: Findings of the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G; Mandle, Hannah B; Cahill, Kaitlyn E; Fowler, Kristen M; Hauser, W Allen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether categories of contraception differ in their impact on seizures in women with epilepsy and whether the impact varies by antiepileptic drug category. Retrospective survey data came from 2712 contraceptive experiences reported by 1144 women with epilepsy. We compared risk ratios for reports of increase and decrease in seizure frequency on hormonal versus nonhormonal contraception, stratified by antiepileptic drug categories. More women with epilepsy reported a change in seizures on hormonal (28.2%) than on nonhormonal contraception (9.7%) (pcontraception (4.2%) was 4.47 (pcontraception (5.5%) was 1.71, pcontraception, the risk ratio for seizure increase was greater than for decrease (1.98, pmethod with a greater risk ratio for seizure decrease than combined pills. Seizure increase was greater for hormonal than nonhormonal contraception for each antiepileptic drug category (pcontraception, relative to the non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug category which had the lowest rate, each of the other categories had significantly greater risks for seizure increase, especially the enzyme-inhibiting (valproate) category (risk ratio=2.53, p=0.0002). The findings provide community-based, epidemiological survey evidence that contraceptive methods may differ in their impact on seizures and that this impact may vary by antiepileptic drug category. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. To treat or not to treat drug-refractory epilepsy by the ketogenic diet? That is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-23

    Epilepsy is a serious neurologic disorder worldwide which affects about 1% of the population (ca. 50 million people), the highest prevalence occurring in both children and elderly. Apart from idiopathic forms, etiology of the disease involves multiple brain risk factors - the most frequent being cerebrovascular diseases, tumours and traumatic injuries. Several treatment options exist, including, for instance, pharmacotherapy, vagal nerve stimulation or epilepsy surgery. In spite of treatment, about 30% of patients with epilepsy still have seizures and become drug-refractory. This is why other treatment options may be recommended, and ketogenic diet seems a last-chance method, especially in children and adolescents with epilepsy. The diet contains high amounts of fat and low carbohydrates with vitamin supplementation. The elevated concentrations of ketones induced by the diet may result in inhibition of the synaptic activity of glutamate, the mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway, and activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels. One of the main ketones is acetone, shown to increase the seizure threshold and potentiate the anticonvulsant activity of some antiepileptic drugs. The clinical effectiveness of the ketogenic diet has been confirmed in a number of clinical trials carried out mainly on children. A wider use of the ketogenic diet may be limited by the number of early adverse effects (gastrointestinal distress, acidosis, hypoglycaemia, dehydration and lethargy), and late adverse effects (hyperuricaemia, hyperlipidaemia, kidney stones, easy bruising, and decreases in height and weight). Recently, data are available on the negative impact of the ketogenic diet on the qualitative characteristics of lipoprotein subfractions which points to the atherogenic fenotype as a new side-effect. In conclusion, future research directed to the proper identification of patients (in terms of age, epilepsy type and duration, recommended antiepileptic

  11. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi; Nilsson Wallin, Annika

    2014-01-01

    the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during...... adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance......Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability...

  12. Lysosomes as mediators of drug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitomirsky, Benny; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a leading cause of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and cancer-related mortality. While some mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance have been well characterized, multiple mechanisms remain elusive. In this respect, passive ion trapping-based lysosomal sequestration of multiple hydrophobic weak-base chemotherapeutic agents was found to reduce the accessibility of these drugs to their target sites, resulting in a markedly reduced cytotoxic effect and drug resistance. Recently we have demonstrated that lysosomal sequestration of hydrophobic weak base drugs triggers TFEB-mediated lysosomal biogenesis resulting in an enlarged lysosomal compartment, capable of enhanced drug sequestration. This study further showed that cancer cells with an increased number of drug-accumulating lysosomes are more resistant to lysosome-sequestered drugs, suggesting a model of drug-induced lysosome-mediated chemoresistance. In addition to passive drug sequestration of hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics, other mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance have also been reported; these include active lysosomal drug sequestration mediated by ATP-driven transporters from the ABC superfamily, and a role for lysosomal copper transporters in cancer resistance to platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, lysosomal exocytosis was suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the clearance of chemotherapeutics which highly accumulated in lysosomes, thus providing an additional line of resistance, supplementing the organelle entrapment of chemotherapeutics away from their target sites. Along with these mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance, several approaches were recently developed for the overcoming of drug resistance or exploiting lysosomal drug sequestration, including lysosomal photodestruction and drug-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In this review we explore the current literature addressing the role of lysosomes in mediating cancer drug

  13. Predicted levels of HIV drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambiano, Valentina; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Jordan, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    -term effects. METHODS: The previously validated HIV Synthesis model was calibrated to South Africa. Resistance was modeled at the level of single mutations, transmission potential, persistence, and effect on drug activity. RESULTS: We estimate 652 000 people (90% uncertainty range: 543 000-744 000) are living...... are maintained, in 20 years' time HIV incidence is projected to have declined by 22% (95% confidence interval, CI -23 to -21%), and the number of people carrying NNRTI resistance to be 2.9-fold higher. If enhancements in diagnosis and retention in care occur, and ART is initiated at CD4 cell count less than 500......  cells/μl, HIV incidence is projected to decline by 36% (95% CI: -37 to -36%) and the number of people with NNRTI resistance to be 4.1-fold higher than currently. Prevalence of people with viral load more than 500  copies/ml carrying NRMV is not projected to differ markedly according to future ART...

  14. Understanding Death in Children With Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Elizabeth J; Camfield, Peter; Brooks, Linda; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Camfield, Carol; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Wirrell, Elaine

    2017-05-01

    Death in children with epilepsy is profoundly disturbing, with lasting effects on the family, community, and health care providers. The overall risk of death for children with epilepsy is about ten times that of the general population. However, the risk of premature death for children without associated neurological comorbidities is similar to that of the general population, and most deaths are related to the cause of the epilepsy or associated neurological disability, not seizures. The most common cause of seizure-related death in children with epilepsy is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). SUDEP is relatively uncommon in childhood, but the risk increases if epilepsy persists into adulthood. Although the direct cause of SUDEP remains unknown, most often death follows a generalized convulsive seizure and the risk of SUDEP is strongly related to drug-resistant epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The most effective SUDEP prevention strategy is to reduce the frequency of seizures, although a number of seizure detection devices are under development and in the future may prove to be useful for seizure detection for those at particularly high risk. There are distinct benefits for health care professionals to discuss mortality with the family soon after the diagnosis of epilepsy. An individual approach is appropriate. When a child with epilepsy dies, particularly if the death was unexpected, family grief may be profound. Physicians and other health care professionals have a critical role in supporting families that lose a child to epilepsy. This review will provide health care providers with information needed to discuss the risk of death in children with epilepsy and support families following a loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  16. Prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis in Arsi Zone, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wide spread of occurrence of multi-drug resistance tuberculosis is becoming a major challenge to effective tuberculosis control. Thus, it is imperative to monitor the sensitivity of anti-TB drugs regularly. Objective: To determine the prevalence resistance to anti-TB drugs in a well established control program area ...

  17. Antiepileptic drug monotherapy for epilepsy: a network meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Sudell, Maria; Weston, Jennifer; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Marson, Anthony G

    2017-12-15

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Approximately 60% to 70% of people with epilepsy will achieve a longer-term remission from seizures, and most achieve that remission shortly after starting antiepileptic drug treatment. Most people with epilepsy are treated with a single antiepileptic drug (monotherapy) and current guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom for adults and children recommend carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line treatment for partial onset seizures and sodium valproate for generalised onset seizures; however a range of other antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments are available, and evidence is needed regarding their comparative effectiveness in order to inform treatment choices. To compare the time to withdrawal of allocated treatment, remission and first seizure of 10 AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, phenobarbitone, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide) currently used as monotherapy in children and adults with partial onset seizures (simple partial, complex partial or secondary generalised) or generalised tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types (absence, myoclonus). We searched the following databases: Cochrane Epilepsy's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and SCOPUS, and two clinical trials registers. We handsearched relevant journals and contacted pharmaceutical companies, original trial investigators, and experts in the field. The date of the most recent search was 27 July 2016. We included randomised controlled trials of a monotherapy design in adults or children with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). This was an individual participant data (IPD) review and network meta-analysis. Our primary outcome was 'time to withdrawal of allocated treatment', and our secondary

  18. GEAR: A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Ying; Chen, Wei-Hua; Xiao, Pei-Pei; Xie, Wen-Bin; Luo, Qibin; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is becoming a serious problem that leads to the failure of standard treatments, which is generally developed because of genetic mutations of certain molecules. Here, we present GEAR (A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance) that aims to provide comprehensive information about genomic elements (including genes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microRNAs) that are responsible for drug resistance. Right now, GEAR contains 1631 associations between 201 human drugs and 758 genes, 106 associations between 29 human drugs and 66 miRNAs, and 44 associations between 17 human drugs and 22 SNPs. These relationships are firstly extracted from primary literature with text mining and then manually curated. The drug resistome deposited in GEAR provides insights into the genetic factors underlying drug resistance. In addition, new indications and potential drug combinations can be identified based on the resistome. The GEAR database can be freely accessed through http://gear.comp-sysbio.org. PMID:28294141

  19. Study on drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by drug resistance gene detecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Li Hongmin; Wu Xueqiong; Wang Ansheng; Ye Yixiu; Wang Zhongyuan; Liu Jinwei; Chen Hongbing; Lin Minggui; Wang Jinhe; Li Sumei; Jiang Ping; Feng Bai; Chen Dongjing

    2004-01-01

    To investigate drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in different age group, compare detecting effect of two methods and evaluate their the clinical application value, all of the strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis were tested for resistance to RFP, INH SM PZA and EMB by the absolute concentration method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and the mutation of the rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB resistance genes in M. tuberculosis was tested by PCR-SSCP. In youth, middle and old age group, the rate of acquired drug resistance was 89.2%, 85.3% and 67.6% respectively, the gene mutation rate was 76.2%, 81.3% and 63.2% respectively. The rate of acquired drug resistance and multiple drug resistance in youth group was much higher than those in other groups. The gene mutation was correlated with drug resistance level of mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene mutation rate was higher in strains isolated from high concentration resistance than those in strains isolated from low concentration resistance. The more irregular treatment was longer, the rate of drug resistance was higher. Acquired drug resistance varies in different age group. It suggested that surveillance of drug resistence in different age group should be taken seriously, especially in youth group. PCR - SSCP is a sensitive and specific method for rapid detecting rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB genes mutations of MTB. (authors)

  20. A Structural View on Medicinal Chemistry Strategies against Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Stefano; Brand, Michael; Chellat, Mathieu F; Gazzola, Silvia; Riedl, Rainer

    2018-05-30

    The natural phenomenon of drug resistance represents a generic impairment that hampers the benefits of drugs in all major clinical indications. Antibacterials and antifungals are affected as well as compounds for the treatment of cancer, viral infections or parasitic diseases. Despite the very diverse set of biological targets and organisms involved in the development of drug resistance, underlying molecular processes have been identified to understand the emergence of resistance and to overcome this detrimental mechanism. Detailed structural information of the root causes for drug resistance is nowadays frequently available to design next generation drugs anticipated to suffer less from resistance. This knowledge-based approach is a prerequisite in the fight against the inevitable occurrence of drug resistance to secure the achievements of medicinal chemistry in the future. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Role of Neuroinflammation in Evolution of Childhood Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sookyong

    2018-01-01

    Until a decade ago, epilepsy research had focused mainly on alterations of neuronal activities and excitability. Such neurocentric emphasis has neglected the role of glia and involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. It is becoming clear that immune and inflammatory reactions do occur in the brain despite the brain's lack of conventional lymphatic drainage and graft acceptance and the presence of vascular brain barrier that tightly regulates infiltration of blood monocytes and lymphocytes. The critical roles of brain-resident immune mediators and of brain-infiltrating peripheral leukocytes are increasingly recognized. Inflammatory processes, including activation of microglia and astrocytes and production of proinflammatory cytokines and related molecules, occur in human epilepsy as well as in experimental models of epilepsy. Immune mechanism that underlies evolution of drug-resistant epilepsy and epileptic encephalopathy represents a new target and will aid in development of novel immunotherapeutic drugs and therapies against the key constituents in immune pathways.

  2. Simple strategy to assess linezolid exposure in patients with multi-drug-resistant and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, Jasper; Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Tiberi, Simon; Akkerman, Onno W.; Centis, Rosella; de lange, Wiel C.; Kosterink, Jos G.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Migliori, Giovanni B.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    Linezolid is used increasingly for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB). However, linezolid can cause severe adverse events, such as peripheral and optical neuropathy or thrombocytopenia related to higher drug exposure. This study aimed

  3. Multidrug resistance in epilepsy and polymorphisms in the voltage-gated sodium channel genes SCN1A, SCN2A, and SCN3A: correlation among phenotype, genotype, and mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Patrick; Poon, Wai Sang; Ng, Ho-Keung; Kang, David E; Wong, Virginia; Ng, Ping Wing; Lui, Colin H T; Sin, Ngai Chuen; Wong, Ka S; Baum, Larry

    2008-11-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prevent seizures by blocking voltage-gated brain sodium channels. However, treatment is ineffective in 30% of epilepsy patients, which might, at least in part, result from polymorphisms of the sodium channel genes. We investigated the association of AED responsiveness with genetic polymorphisms and correlated any association with mRNA expression of the neuronal sodium channels. We performed genotyping of tagging and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of SCN1A, 2A, and 3A in 471 Chinese epilepsy patients (272 drug responsive and 199 drug resistant). A total of 27 SNPs were selected based on the HapMap database. Genotype distributions in drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients were compared. SCN2A mRNA was quantified by real-time PCR in 24 brain and 57 blood samples. Its level was compared between patients with different genotypes of an SCN2A SNP found to be associated with drug responsiveness. SCN2A IVS7-32A>G (rs2304016) A alleles were associated with drug resistance (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-3.7, P=0.007). Haplotypes containing the IVS7-32A>G allele A were also associated with drug resistance. IVS7-32A>G is located within the putative splicing branch site for splicing exons 7 and 9. PCR of reverse-transcribed RNA from blood or brain of patients with different IVS7-32A>G genotypes using primers in exons 7 and 9 showed no skipping of exon 8, and real-time PCR showed no difference in SCN2A mRNA levels among genotypes. Results of this study suggest an association between SCN2A IVS7-32A>G and AED responsiveness, without evidence of an effect on splicing or mRNA expression.

  4. Multi-drug resistance and molecular pattern of erythromycin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appearance and dissemination of penicillin resistant and macrolide resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains has caused increasing concern worldwide. The aim of this study was to survey drug resistance and genetic characteristics of macrolide and penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae. This is a cross-sectional ...

  5. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs. Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74–0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85–0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65–0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82–0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06–1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98–1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58–0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35–0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26–1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses. The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  6. [Consensus clinical practice guidelines of the Andalusian Epilepsy Society on prescribing generic antiepileptic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadillas-Hidalgo, F M; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Serrano-Castro, P J; Mercadé-Cerdá, J M

    Pharmaceutical spending in Spain accounts for 1.2-1.4% of the gross domestic product and is increasing by 5-12% per year. One of the measures adopted by the government to cut this spending is the possible substitution of original prescribed drugs by generics. In the case of antiepileptic drugs (AED), which are characterised by a scant therapeutic margin, these steps have sparked a scientific debate about their repercussion on the control of epileptic patients. We propose to draw up a set of implicit evidence-based consensus practice guidelines concerning issues related with this topic. A selective search for quality scientific information on the subject was conducted on PubMed-Medline, Tripdatabase and the Biblioteca Cochrane Plus. The selected references were analysed and discussed by the authors, and the recommendations deriving from them were collected. A total of 21 primary documents and 16 practice guidelines, protocols or experts' recommendations were identified. Our recommendations were explicitly included at the end of the text. The Andalusian Epilepsy Society makes the following recommendations: 1) not replacing an innovative AED by its generic in a controlled patient; 2) beginning treatment with a generic AED in monotherapy or in association is acceptable; 3) not exchanging generic AED from different pharmaceutical companies; 4) explaining to the patient the rules governing the authorization of generics and the importance of avoiding exchanges between different generic AED; and 5) if there is some worsening of the clinical condition or side effects appear following the introduction of a generic, the causes must be investigated and communicated to the bodies responsible for pharmacovigilance.

  7. [Pathological neocortical findings in patients with medication-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy submitted to surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupiñán-Díaz, B; Morales-Chacón, L M; Lorigados-Pedre, L; García-Maeso, I; Bender-del Busto, J E; Trápaga-Quincoses, O; Hidalgo-Portal, L; García-Navarro, M E; Sánchez-Coroneaux, A; Orozco-Suárez, S

    The dual pathology consisting of hippocampal sclerosis plus focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often reported in patients with medication-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). To determine the histopathological changes that take place in the neocortex of patients with medication-resistant MTLE submitted to surgery and to evaluate the relation between the histopathological changes, pathological background and the clinical course of patients who had received surgical treatment. Tissue obtained by en bloc resection from the neocortex of 18 patients with MTLE refractory to medical treatment was processed histologically and a tailored temporal lobectomy was performed with electrocorticography. Dual pathology was diagnosed in 13 patients (72.2%). Imaging studies confirmed the existence of mesial sclerosis of the temporal in 100% of cases and there was no evidence of neocortical lesions. Histologically, 46.15% and 38.46% of the patients were diagnosed as belonging to FCD type 1a and FCD type 1b, respectively. Only one patient presented FCD type 2a. A statistically significant relation was found between the presence of dual pathology and the existence of an early precipitating injury (p = 0.04). One year after surgery, 72.7% (8/11) patients with dual pathology were classified as belonging to Engel class I. In patients with MTLE there are microscopic FCD-type alterations in the neocortex. There is an association between these alterations and the existence of an initial precipitating injury. Complete resection of the epileptogenic area, which is guaranteed by the lobectomy tailored by electrocorticography, allows patients to enjoy a favourable post-surgical progression one year after surgery.

  8. The role of cannabinoids and endocannabinoid system in the treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędracka Monika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The treatment of epilepsy is still a major challenge. Despite the introduction of many new antiepileptic drugs, approximately 30% of patients still remain drug resistant. In the absence of a satisfactory therapy outcome, which is sometimes associated with numerous side effects, there is a need for new and effective drugs with low toxicity. Cannabinoids have been shown in preliminary animal model studies and in studies of patients with epilepsy to have antiepileptic activity.

  9. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  10. The reasons for the epilepsy treatment gap in Kilifi, Kenya: using formative research to identify interventions to improve adherence to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Julie A; Molyneux, Catherine S; Mbuba, Caroline K; Jenkins, Jo; Newton, Charles R J C; Hartley, Sally D

    2012-12-01

    Many people with epilepsy (PWE) in resource-poor countries do not receive appropriate treatment, a phenomenon referred to as the epilepsy treatment gap (ETG). We conducted a qualitative study to explore the reasons for this gap and to identify possible interventions in Kilifi, Kenya. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out of PWE and their caregivers. Individual interviews were conducted of PWE, their caregivers, traditional healers, community health workers and leaders, nurses and doctors. In addition, a series of workshops was conducted, and four factors contributing to the ETG were identified: 1) lack of knowledge about the causes, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy; 2) inaccessibility to antiepileptic drugs; 3) misconceptions about epilepsy derived from superstitions about its origin; 4) and dissatisfaction with the communication skills of health providers. These data indicated possible interventions: 1) education and support for PWE and their caregivers; 2) communication skills training for health providers; 3) and improved drug provision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of radiation decontamination on drug-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    More than 80% of food poisoning bacteria such as Salmonella are reported as antibiotic-resistant to at least one type antibiotic, and more than 50% as resistant to two or more. For the decontamination of food poisoning bacteria in foods, radiation resistibility on drug-resistant bacteria were investigated compared with drug-sensitive bacteria. Possibility on induction of drug-resistant mutation by radiation treatment was also investigated. For these studies, type strains of Escherichia coli S2, Salmonella enteritidis YK-2 and Staphylococcus aureus H12 were used to induce drug-resistant strains with penicillin G. From the study of radiation sensitivity on the drug-resistant strain induced from E. coli S2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.20 kGy compared with 0.25 kGy at parent strain. On S. enteritidis YK-2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.14 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.16 kGy at parent strain. D 10 value was also obtained to be 0.15 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.21 kGy at parent strain of St. aureus H12. Many isolates of E. coli 157:H7 or other type of E. coli from meats such as beef were resistant to penicillin G, and looked to be no relationship on radiation resistivities between drug-resistant strains and sensitive strains. On the study of radiation sensitivity on E. coli S2 at plate agars containing antibiotics, higher survival fractions were obtained at higher doses compared with normal plate agar. The reason of higher survival fractions at higher doses on plate agar containing antibiotics should be recovery of high rate of injured cells by the relay of cell division, and drug-resistant strains by mutation are hardly induced by irradiation. (author)

  12. Distribution of red blood cell antigens in drug-resistant and drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sofo

    Frequency distribution of ABO, Rh-Hr, MN, Kell blood group system antigens were studied in 277 TB patients (151-drug-sensitive and 126 drug-resistant) of pulmonary tuberculosis to know whether there was any association between them, and also between drug resistance and sensitiveness. They were compared with 485 ...

  13. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Tanzania: Initial description of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug resistant Tuberculosis is well documented worldwide and is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality complicating Tuberculosis control with increasing costs of managing the disease. Broad. Objective: To describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis ...

  14. Drug-resistance in chronic tuberculosis cases in Southern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria has a high burden of tuberculosis but the drug resistant situationwas previously unknown. This report evaluates the firstline drug resistance and associated factors among chronic tuberculosis cases from the tuberculosis control programme in South south and South east zones ofNigeria. Descriptive study of chronic ...

  15. Tuberculosis drug resistance in the Western Cape | Weyer | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Drug resistance is a serious problem in the treatment of tuberculosis and a threat to successful tuberculosis control programmes. Local health workers have expressed concern that the increasing tuberculosis epidemic in the Western Cape is partly attributable to drug resistance. The aim of this study was to ...

  16. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis: a challenge in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) will not usually respond to short course chemotherapy. Unless the individual infected with this bug is treated appropriately, they can continue spreading resistant strains in the community and further fuel the tuberculosis epidemic. Diagnosis requires drug sensitivity testing and the ...

  17. Adaptation and evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergval, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on drug resistance and the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Notwithstanding, many molecular mechanisms facilitating the emergence, adaptation and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis have yet to be discovered. This thesis reports studies of the adaptive

  18. Drug resistance in leishmaniasis: current drug-delivery systems and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasinzai, Masoom; Khan, Momin; Nadhman, Akhtar; Shahnaz, Gul

    2013-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex of diseases with numerous clinical manifestations for instance harshness from skin lesions to severe disfigurement and chronic systemic infection in the liver and spleen. So far, the most classical leishmaniasis therapy, despite its documented toxicities, remains pentavalent antimonial compounds. The arvailable therapeutic modalities for leishmaniasis are overwhelmed with resistance to leishmaniasis therapy. Mechanisms of classical drug resistance are often related with the lower drug uptake, increased efflux, the faster drug metabolism, drug target modifications and over-expression of drug transporters. The high prevalence of leishmaniasis and the appearance of resistance to classical drugs reveal the demand to develop and explore novel, less toxic, low cost and more promising therapeutic modalities. The review describes the mechanisms of classical drug resistance and potential drug targets in Leishmania infection. Moreover, current drug-delivery systems and future perspectives towards Leishmaniasis treatment are also covered.

  19. Early antiretroviral therapy and potent second-line drugs could decrease HIV incidence of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Bellan, Steven E

    2017-06-28

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of drug-sensitive HIV transmission but may increase the transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We used a mathematical model to estimate the long-term population-level benefits of ART and determine the scenarios under which earlier ART (treatment at 1 year post-infection, on average) could decrease simultaneously both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence (new infections). We constructed an infection-age-structured mathematical model that tracked the transmission rates over the course of infection and modelled the patients' life expectancy as a function of ART initiation timing. We fitted this model to the annual AIDS incidence and death data directly, and to resistance data and demographic data indirectly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco. Using counterfactual scenarios, we assessed the impact on total and drug-resistant HIV incidence of ART initiation timing, frequency of acquired drug resistance, and second-line drug effectiveness (defined as the combination of resistance monitoring, biomedical drug efficacy and adherence). Earlier ART initiation could decrease the number of both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence when second-line drug effectiveness is sufficiently high (greater than 80%), but increase the proportion of new infections that are drug resistant. Thus, resistance may paradoxically appear to be increasing while actually decreasing. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Multi drug resistance tuberculosis: pattern seen in last 13 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, R.; Shabbir, I.; Munir, K.; Tabassum, M.N.; Khan, S.U.; Khan, M.Z.U.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Drug resistance in tuberculosis is a serious problem throughout the world especially, after the emergence of multi drug resistant TB strains. Objectives: To estimate drug resistance in TB patients and compare it with previous studies to see the changing trends. Materials and Methods: The PMRC Research Centre receives sputum samples from all the leading hospitals of Lahore. This retrospective analysis was done from 1996 to 2008 on the multi drug resistant TB strains that were seen during these years. Five first lines anti tuberculosis drugs were tested on Lowenstein Jensen medium using standard proportion method. Results: A total of 2661 confirmed isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were seen over the past 13 years. Of the total, 2182 were pulmonary and 479 were extra pulmonary specimens. The patients comprised of those with and without history of previous treatment. These specimens were subjected to drug susceptibility testing. Almost half of the patient had some resistance; multiple drug resistance was seen in 12.3% and 23.0% cases without and with history of previous treatment respectively. Overall resistance to rifampicin was 26.4%, isoniazid 24.1% streptomycin 21.6% ethambutol 13.4% and pyrazinamide 28.4% respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen between primary and acquired resistance. When compared with the reports from previous studies from the same area, there was a trend of gradual increase of drug resistance. Conclusions Resistance to anti tuberculosis drugs is high. Policy message. TB Control Program should start 'DOTS Plus' schemes for which drug susceptibility testing facilities should be available for correctly managing the patients. (author)

  1. Multi drug resistance tuberculosis: pattern seen in last 13 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, R; Shabbir, I; Munir, K [King Edward Medical University Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Research Centre; Tabassum, M N; Khan, S U; Khan, M Z.U. [King Edward Medical University Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Chest Medicine

    2011-01-15

    Background: Drug resistance in tuberculosis is a serious problem throughout the world especially, after the emergence of multi drug resistant TB strains. Objectives: To estimate drug resistance in TB patients and compare it with previous studies to see the changing trends. Materials and Methods: The PMRC Research Centre receives sputum samples from all the leading hospitals of Lahore. This retrospective analysis was done from 1996 to 2008 on the multi drug resistant TB strains that were seen during these years. Five first lines anti tuberculosis drugs were tested on Lowenstein Jensen medium using standard proportion method. Results: A total of 2661 confirmed isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were seen over the past 13 years. Of the total, 2182 were pulmonary and 479 were extra pulmonary specimens. The patients comprised of those with and without history of previous treatment. These specimens were subjected to drug susceptibility testing. Almost half of the patient had some resistance; multiple drug resistance was seen in 12.3% and 23.0% cases without and with history of previous treatment respectively. Overall resistance to rifampicin was 26.4%, isoniazid 24.1% streptomycin 21.6% ethambutol 13.4% and pyrazinamide 28.4% respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen between primary and acquired resistance. When compared with the reports from previous studies from the same area, there was a trend of gradual increase of drug resistance. Conclusions Resistance to anti tuberculosis drugs is high. Policy message. TB Control Program should start 'DOTS Plus' schemes for which drug susceptibility testing facilities should be available for correctly managing the patients. (author)

  2. Malformation risk of antiepileptic drug exposure during pregnancy in women with epilepsy: Results from a pregnancy registry in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sanjeev V; Jose, Manna; Divakaran, Srividya; Sankara Sarma, Prabhakaran

    2017-02-01

    Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy had been prospectively evaluating the reproductive issues of women with epilepsy since April 1998. This analysis aimed to estimate the relative risk of major congenital malformations (MCM) to the registrants. All pregnancies with known outcome in this register until December 2013 were included. Malformation status was evaluated by antenatal ultrasonography, physical examination at birth, echocardiography, and abdomen ultrasonography at 3 months of age and a final review at 1 year of age. There were 1,688 fetuses (singlets 1,643, twins 21, and triplet 1) resulting in 1,622 live births. All were born to women of Asian origin living in South India. The MCM rate for all live births was 6.84% (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.71-8.18) and for all pregnancy outcomes including fetal loss was 7.11% (95% CI 5.98-8.44). The MCM rates (mean with 95% CI) for exposed group were 6.4% (5.03-8.03) for monotherapy and 9.9% (7.37-13.13) for polytherapy; internal control group (women with epilepsy [WWE] not on antiepileptic drugs [AEDs] in first trimester) 5.6% (3.34-9.11), external control group (women without epilepsy or AED exposure in first trimester) 3.45% (1.94-6.07). Valproate monotherapy group had a dose-dependent relative risk for MCM of 2.6 (95% CI 1.30-5.20) compared to the external control group. The preliminary data on MCM rate for the nine total clobazam monotherapy (22.2%; 95% CI 6.2-54.7) signals increased risk that needs further validation on larger sample size. There was no association between MCM rate and maternal socioeconomic status, epilepsy syndrome, or use of folic acid in first trimester. This dataset from South India confirms the increased risk of MCM with exposure to AEDs, particularly polytherapy. A dose-dependent increased risk was observed with valproate. The increased risk associated with clobazam monotherapy is an important signal that needs to be confirmed in a larger sample. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017

  3. Repurposing and Revival of the Drugs: A New Approach to Combat the Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis like multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB and totally drug resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB has created a new challenge to fight against these bad bugs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Repurposing and revival of the drugs are the new trends/options to combat these worsen situations of tuberculosis in the antibiotics resistance era or in the situation of global emergency. Bactericidal and synergistic effect of repurposed/revived drugs along with the latest drugs bedaquiline and delamanid used in the treatment of MDR-TB, XDR-TB, and TDR-TB might be the choice for future promising combinatorial chemotherapy against these bad bugs.

  4. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Chevereau

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the "morbidostat", a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations-an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation

  5. Shigella Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Mechanisms, 2004-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Heini, Nicole; Zurfluh, Katrin; Althaus, Denise; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger

    2016-06-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance mechanisms of Shigella spp., we analyzed 344 isolates collected in Switzerland during 2004-2014. Overall, 78.5% of isolates were multidrug resistant; 10.5% were ciprofloxacin resistant; and 2% harbored mph(A), a plasmid-mediated gene that confers reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, a last-resort antimicrobial agent for shigellosis.

  6. Cancer stem cells and drug resistance: the potential of nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs. PMID:22471722

  7. Enhanced Transmission of Drug-Resistant Parasites to Mosquitoes following Drug Treatment in Rodent Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Andrew S.; Huijben, Silvie; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Sim, Derek G.; Chan, Brian H. K.; Nelson, William A.; Read, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistant Plasmodium parasites is a major challenge to effective malaria control. In theory, competitive interactions between sensitive parasites and resistant parasites within infections are a major determinant of the rate at which parasite evolution undermines drug efficacy. Competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated hosts slows the spread of resistance; competitive release following treatment enhances it. Here we report that for the murine model Plasm...

  8. The impact of an educational intervention, the New GP Contract and NICE guidelines on anti-epilepsy therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, I; Berry, D; Smith, D

    2011-03-01

    Since the early 1970s therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of anti-epilepsy drug (AED) levels has been available to assist in the review process of patients with epilepsy. Routine blood levels were not part of the Quality and Outcomes Framework in the New GP Contract, neither have they been generally recommended in National Guidelines (NICE and SIGN) for the management of patients with epilepsy. To assess the impact of an educational intervention, the New GP Contract and NICE guidelines on the number of requests for TDM. Retrospective study. 39 general practices serving Chester (13), the Rural area surrounding Chester (13) and Ellesmere Port (13). An educational intervention took place in the individual Chester practices between December 2001 and March 2003. For the Rural and Ellesmere Port practices there was one combined event in March 2004 and in March 2007, respectively. Practices were encouraged, not to routinely request TDM, except in certain circumstances. The number of TDM requests for Chester, Rural and Ellesmere Port were obtained from the local laboratory in Chester, plus other nearby hospitals, to provide control groups. The number of TDM requests from primary care for Chester, Rural, Ellesmere Port, Wirral, Crewe, Warrington and Wrexham, April to April, 2002 through to 2008, where available. There has been a fall in the number requests in all districts. The most significant falls were in Chester (47%), Rural (34%) and Ellesmere Port (47%), and corresponded to the time of their educational intervention. The fall has been less marked in Wirral (25%), Crewe (27%), Wrexham (10%) and Warrington (9%). In 2004, the first year after the introduction of the New GP Contract, TDM in Chester and the Rural fell significantly, while those in Ellesmere Port, Wirral, Crewe and Wrexham increased. TDM dropped significantly in Ellesmere Port in the year after their educational intervention. Despite the valproate assay being clinically unhelpful there were still 611 requests

  9. Psychiatric and behavioral side effects of antiepileptic drugs in adults with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-11-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral side effects (PBSEs) are common, undesirable effects associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) use. The objective of the study was to compare the PBSE profiles of older and newer AEDs in a large specialty practice-based sample of patients diagnosed with epilepsy. As part of the Columbia and Yale AED Database Project, we reviewed patient records including demographics, medical history, AED use, and side effects for 4085 adult patients (age: 18 years) newly started on an AED regimen. Psychiatric and behavioral side effects were determined by patient or physician report in the medical record, which included depressive mood, psychosis, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, irritability, aggression, and tantrum. Significant non-AED predictors of PBSE rate were first determined from 83 variables using logistic regression. Predictors were then controlled for in the comparison analysis of the rate of PBSEs and intolerable PBSEs (PBSEs that led to dosage reduction or discontinuation) between 18 AEDs. Psychiatric and behavioral side effects occurred in 17.2% of patients and led to intolerability in 13.8% of patients. History of psychiatric condition(s), secondary generalized seizures, absence seizures, and intractable epilepsy were associated with increased incidence of PBSE. Levetiracetam (LEV) had the greatest PBSE rate (22.1%). This was statistically significant when compared with the aggregate of the other AEDs (P<0.001, OR=6.87). Levetiracetam was also significantly (P<0.001) associated with higher intolerability rate (17.7%), dose decreased rate (9.4%), and complete cessation rate (8.3%), when compared with the aggregate of the other AEDs. Zonisamide (ZNS) was also significantly associated with a higher rate of PBSE (9.7%) and IPBSE (7.9%, all P<0.001). On the other hand, carbamazepine (CBZ), clobazam (CLB), gabapentin (GBP), lamotrigine (LTG), oxcarbazepine (OXC), phenytoin (PHT), and valproate (VPA) were significantly associated with a decreased PBSE

  10. [Sleep disorders in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, O V; Akarachkova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review of the literature on sleep disorders in epilepsy over the last two decades is presented. Paroxysmal phenomena of epileptic origin, nonepileptic paroxysms, antiepileptic drugs, polypragmasia and comorbid depression may affect sleep in epilepsy.Shortening of sleep time may cause seizures, hallucinations and depression because sleep plays an important role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the brain both in healthy people and in patients with epilepsy. According to the literature data, drugs (short treatment courses of hypnotics) or nonpharmacological methods should be used for treatment insomnia inpatients with epilepsy.

  11. Diversity and evolution of drug resistance mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Saeedi M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mashael Al-Saeedi, Sahal Al-Hajoj Department of Infection and Immunity, Mycobacteriology Research Section, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Despite the efficacy of antibiotics to protect humankind against many deadly pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nothing can prevent the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Several mechanisms facilitate drug resistance in M. tuberculosis including compensatory evolution, epistasis, clonal interference, cell wall integrity, efflux pumps, and target mimicry. In this study, we present recent findings relevant to these mechanisms, which can enable the discovery of new drug targets and subsequent development of novel drugs for treatment of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, antibiotic resistance, compensatory evolution, epistasis, efflux pumps, fitness cost

  12. Drug-resistant gram-negative uropathogens: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnood, Saeed; Heidary, Mohsen; Mirnejad, Reza; Bahramian, Aghil; Sedighi, Mansour; Mirzaei, Habibollah

    2017-10-01

    Urinary tract infection(UTI) caused by Gram-negative bacteria is the second most common infectious presentation in community medical practice. Approximately 150 million people are diagnosed with UTI each year worldwide. Drug resistance in Gram-negative uropathogens is a major global concern which can lead to poor clinical outcomes including treatment failure, development of bacteremia, requirement for intravenous therapy, hospitalization, and extended length of hospital stay. The mechanisms of drug resistance in these bacteria are important due to they are often not identified by routine susceptibility tests and have an exceptional potential for outbreaks. Treatment of UTIs depends on the access to effective drugs, which is now threatened by antibiotic resistant Gram-negative uropathogens. Although several effective antibiotics with activity against highly resistant Gram-negatives are available, there is not a unique antibiotic with activity against the high variety of resistance. Therefore, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, correlation between clinicians and laboratories, development of more rapid diagnostic methods, and continuous monitoring of drug resistance are urgent priorities. In this review, we will discuss about the current global status of drug-resistant Gram-negative uropathogens and their mechanisms of drug resistance to provide new insights into their treatment options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Fitness of Leishmania donovani parasites resistant to drug combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel García-Hernández

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance represents one of the main problems for the use of chemotherapy to treat leishmaniasis. Additionally, it could provide some advantages to Leishmania parasites, such as a higher capacity to survive in stress conditions. In this work, in mixed populations of Leishmania donovani parasites, we have analyzed whether experimentally resistant lines to one or two combined anti-leishmanial drugs better support the stress conditions than a susceptible line expressing luciferase (Luc line. In the absence of stress, none of the Leishmania lines showed growth advantage relative to the other when mixed at a 1:1 parasite ratio. However, when promastigotes from resistant lines and the Luc line were mixed and exposed to different stresses, we observed that the resistant lines are more tolerant of different stress conditions: nutrient starvation and heat shock-pH stress. Further to this, we observed that intracellular amastigotes from resistant lines present a higher capacity to survive inside the macrophages than those of the control line. These results suggest that resistant parasites acquire an overall fitness increase and that resistance to drug combinations presents significant differences in their fitness capacity versus single-drug resistant parasites, particularly in intracellular amastigotes. These results contribute to the assessment of the possible impact of drug resistance on leishmaniasis control programs.

  14. Surveillance of drug resistance for tuberculosis control: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulet, P; Boulahbal, F; Grosset, J

    1995-12-01

    The resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antibiotics, which reflects the quality of the chemotherapy applied in the community, is one of the elements of epidemiological surveillance used in national tuberculosis programmes. Measurement of drug resistance poses problems for biologists in standardization of laboratory methods and quality control. The definition of rates of acquired and primary drug resistance also necessitates standardization in the methods used to collect information transmitted by clinicians. Finally, the significance of the rates calculated depends on the choice of the patients sample on which sensitivity tests have been performed. National surveys of drug resistance therefore require multidisciplinary participation in order to select the only useful indicators: rates of primary resistance and of acquired resistance. These indicators, gathered in representative groups of patients over a long period, are a measurement of the impact of modern chemotherapy regimens on bacterial ecology.

  15. Pharmacogenomics in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2018-02-22

    There is high variability in the response to antiepileptic treatment across people with epilepsy. Genetic factors significantly contribute to such variability. Recent advances in the genetics and neurobiology of the epilepsies are establishing the basis for a new era in the treatment of epilepsy, focused on each individual and their specific epilepsy. Variation in response to antiepileptic drug treatment may arise from genetic variation in a range of gene categories, including genes affecting drug pharmacokinetics, and drug pharmacodynamics, but also genes held to actually cause the epilepsy itself. From a purely pharmacogenetic perspective, there are few robust genetic findings with established evidence in epilepsy. Many findings are still controversial with anecdotal or less secure evidence and need further validation, e.g. variation in genes for transporter systems and antiepileptic drug targets. The increasing use of genetic sequencing and the results of large-scale collaborative projects may soon expand the established evidence. Precision medicine treatments represent a growing area of interest, focussing on reversing or circumventing the pathophysiological effects of specific gene mutations. This could lead to a dramatic improvement of the effectiveness and safety of epilepsy treatments, by targeting the biological mechanisms responsible for epilepsy in each specific individual. Whilst much has been written about epilepsy pharmacogenetics, there does now seem to be building momentum that promises to deliver results of use in clinic. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA origami as a carrier for circumvention of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiao; Song, Chen; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Xiaowei; Lin, Lin; Qiu, Dengli; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Zou, Guozhang; Liang, Xingjie; Yan, Hao; Ding, Baoquan

    2012-08-15

    Although a multitude of promising anti-cancer drugs have been developed over the past 50 years, effective delivery of the drugs to diseased cells remains a challenge. Recently, nanoparticles have been used as drug delivery vehicles due to their high delivery efficiencies and the possibility to circumvent cellular drug resistance. However, the lack of biocompatibility and inability to engineer spatially addressable surfaces for multi-functional activity remains an obstacle to their widespread use. Here we present a novel drug carrier system based on self-assembled, spatially addressable DNA origami nanostructures that confronts these limitations. Doxorubicin, a well-known anti-cancer drug, was non-covalently attached to DNA origami nanostructures through intercalation. A high level of drug loading efficiency was achieved, and the complex exhibited prominent cytotoxicity not only to regular human breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells (MCF 7), but more importantly to doxorubicin-resistant cancer cells, inducing a remarkable reversal of phenotype resistance. With the DNA origami drug delivery vehicles, the cellular internalization of doxorubicin was increased, which contributed to the significant enhancement of cell-killing activity to doxorubicin-resistant MCF 7 cells. Presumably, the activity of doxorubicin-loaded DNA origami inhibits lysosomal acidification, resulting in cellular redistribution of the drug to action sites. Our results suggest that DNA origami has immense potential as an efficient, biocompatible drug carrier and delivery vehicle in the treatment of cancer.

  17. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  18. Mathematical modeling and computational prediction of cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Bin

    2017-06-23

    Diverse forms of resistance to anticancer drugs can lead to the failure of chemotherapy. Drug resistance is one of the most intractable issues for successfully treating cancer in current clinical practice. Effective clinical approaches that could counter drug resistance by restoring the sensitivity of tumors to the targeted agents are urgently needed. As numerous experimental results on resistance mechanisms have been obtained and a mass of high-throughput data has been accumulated, mathematical modeling and computational predictions using systematic and quantitative approaches have become increasingly important, as they can potentially provide deeper insights into resistance mechanisms, generate novel hypotheses or suggest promising treatment strategies for future testing. In this review, we first briefly summarize the current progress of experimentally revealed resistance mechanisms of targeted therapy, including genetic mechanisms, epigenetic mechanisms, posttranslational mechanisms, cellular mechanisms, microenvironmental mechanisms and pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Subsequently, we list several currently available databases and Web-based tools related to drug sensitivity and resistance. Then, we focus primarily on introducing some state-of-the-art computational methods used in drug resistance studies, including mechanism-based mathematical modeling approaches (e.g. molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic model of molecular networks, ordinary differential equation model of cellular dynamics, stochastic model, partial differential equation model, agent-based model, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model, etc.) and data-driven prediction methods (e.g. omics data-based conventional screening approach for node biomarkers, static network approach for edge biomarkers and module biomarkers, dynamic network approach for dynamic network biomarkers and dynamic module network biomarkers, etc.). Finally, we discuss several further questions and future directions for the use of

  19. Drug-Resistant Bacteria: On the Edge of a Crisis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drug-resistant bacteria research program. Why are certain bacteria becoming more resistant to drugs? There is a ... a national, even global crisis of drug-resistant bacteria. Why is that? The more we see this ...

  20. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  1. Molecular chess? Hallmarks of anti-cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Ian A; Charlton, Peter

    2017-01-05

    The development of resistance is a problem shared by both classical chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Patients may respond well at first, but relapse is inevitable for many cancer patients, despite many improvements in drugs and their use over the last 40 years. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs can be acquired by several mechanisms within neoplastic cells, defined as (1) alteration of drug targets, (2) expression of drug pumps, (3) expression of detoxification mechanisms, (4) reduced susceptibility to apoptosis, (5) increased ability to repair DNA damage, and (6) altered proliferation. It is clear, however, that changes in stroma and tumour microenvironment, and local immunity can also contribute to the development of resistance. Cancer cells can and do use several of these mechanisms at one time, and there is considerable heterogeneity between tumours, necessitating an individualised approach to cancer treatment. As tumours are heterogeneous, positive selection of a drug-resistant population could help drive resistance, although acquired resistance cannot simply be viewed as overgrowth of a resistant cancer cell population. The development of such resistance mechanisms can be predicted from pre-existing genomic and proteomic profiles, and there are increasingly sophisticated methods to measure and then tackle these mechanisms in patients. The oncologist is now required to be at least one step ahead of the cancer, a process that can be likened to 'molecular chess'. Thus, as well as an increasing role for predictive biomarkers to clinically stratify patients, it is becoming clear that personalised strategies are required to obtain best results.

  2. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: the mTOR pathway as an antiepileptogenic target.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galanopoulou, A.S.; Gorter, J.A.; Cepeda, C.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway regulates cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, and metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in upstream regulators of mTOR have been highly associated with dysplasias, epilepsy, and neurodevelopmental disorders. These include tuberous

  3. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: The mTOR pathway as an antiepileptogenic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Gorter, Jan A.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mTOR signaling pathway regulates cell growth, differentiation, proliferation and metabolism. Loss of function mutations in upstream regulators of mTOR have been highly associated with dysplasias, epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. These include tuberous sclerosis, which is due to mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 genes, mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) as in Cowden syndrome, polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) due to mutations in the STE20-related kinase adaptor alpha (STRADalpha), and neurofibromatosis type 1 attributed to neurofibromin 1 mutations. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway with rapamycin may prevent epilepsy and improve the underlying pathology in mouse models with disrupted mTOR signaling, due to PTEN or TSC mutations. However the timing and duration of its administration appear critical in defining the seizure and pathology-related outcomes. Rapamycin application in human cortical slices from patients with cortical dysplasias reduces the 4-aminopyridine induced oscillations. In the multiple-hit model of infantile spasms, pulse high dose rapamycin administration can reduce the cortical overactivation of the mTOR pathway, suppresses spasms and has disease-modifying effects by partially improving cognitive deficits. In post-status epilepticus models of temporal lobe epilepsy, rapamycin may ameliorate the development of epilepsy-related pathology and reduce the expression of spontaneous seizures, but its effects depend on the timing and duration of administration, and possibly the model used. The observed recurrence of seizures and epilepsy-related pathology after rapamycin discontinuation suggests the need for continuous administration to maintain the benefit. However, the use of pulse administration protocols may be useful in certain age-specific epilepsy syndromes, like infantile spasms, whereas repetitive pulse rapamycin protocols may suffice to sustain a long-term benefit in genetic disorders

  4. Aggressive chemotherapy and the selection of drug resistant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Huijben

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant pathogens are one of the key public health challenges of the 21st century. There is a widespread belief that resistance is best managed by using drugs to rapidly eliminate target pathogens from patients so as to minimize the probability that pathogens acquire resistance de novo. Yet strong drug pressure imposes intense selection in favor of resistance through alleviation of competition with wild-type populations. Aggressive chemotherapy thus generates opposing evolutionary forces which together determine the rate of drug resistance emergence. Identifying treatment regimens which best retard resistance evolution while maximizing health gains and minimizing disease transmission requires empirical analysis of resistance evolution in vivo in conjunction with measures of clinical outcomes and infectiousness. Using rodent malaria in laboratory mice, we found that less aggressive chemotherapeutic regimens substantially reduced the probability of onward transmission of resistance (by >150-fold, without compromising health outcomes. Our experiments suggest that there may be cases where resistance evolution can be managed more effectively with treatment regimens other than those which reduce pathogen burdens as fast as possible.

  5. mtct regimen choice, drug resistance and the treatment of hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk of transmission is highest during labour and delivery, ... will have a major impact on controlling perinatally acquired HIV infection. ... could result in the development of drug resistance with potential .... dosing, pharmacokinetics and safety.

  6. Life cycle synchronization is a viral drug resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia A Neagu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are one of the major causes of death worldwide, with HIV infection alone resulting in over 1.2 million casualties per year. Antiviral drugs are now being administered for a variety of viral infections, including HIV, hepatitis B and C, and influenza. These therapies target a specific phase of the virus's life cycle, yet their ultimate success depends on a variety of factors, such as adherence to a prescribed regimen and the emergence of viral drug resistance. The epidemiology and evolution of drug resistance have been extensively characterized, and it is generally assumed that drug resistance arises from mutations that alter the virus's susceptibility to the direct action of the drug. In this paper, we consider the possibility that a virus population can evolve towards synchronizing its life cycle with the pattern of drug therapy. The periodicity of the drug treatment could then allow for a virus strain whose life cycle length is a multiple of the dosing interval to replicate only when the concentration of the drug is lowest. This process, referred to as "drug tolerance by synchronization", could allow the virus population to maximize its overall fitness without having to alter drug binding or complete its life cycle in the drug's presence. We use mathematical models and stochastic simulations to show that life cycle synchronization can indeed be a mechanism of viral drug tolerance. We show that this effect is more likely to occur when the variability in both viral life cycle and drug dose timing are low. More generally, we find that in the presence of periodic drug levels, time-averaged calculations of viral fitness do not accurately predict drug levels needed to eradicate infection, even if there is no synchronization. We derive an analytical expression for viral fitness that is sufficient to explain the drug-pattern-dependent survival of strains with any life cycle length. We discuss the implications of these findings for

  7. Drug resistance in the sexually transmitted protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REBECCA L DUNNE; LINDA A DUNN; PETER UPCROFT; PETER J O'DONOGHUE; JACQUELINE A UPCROFT

    2003-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is the most common, sexually transmitted infection. It is caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Symptoms include vaginitis and infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight and increased infant mortality, as well as predisposing to HIV/AIDS and cervical cancer. Trichomoniasis has the highest prevalence and incidence of any sexually transmitted infection. The 5-nitroimidazole drugs, of which metronidazole is the most prescribed, are the only approved,effective drugs to treat trichomoniasis. Resistance against metronidazole is frequently reported and crossresistance among the family of 5-nitroimidazole drugs is common, leaving no alternative for treatment, with some cases remaining unresolved. The mechanism of metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis from treatment failures is not well understood, unlike resistance which is developed in the laboratory under increasing metronidazole pressure. In the latter situation, hydrogenosomal function which is involved in activation of the prodrug, metronidazole, is down-regulated. Reversion to sensitivity is incomplete after removal of drug pressure in the highly resistant parasites while clinically resistant strains, so far analysed, maintain their resistance levels in the absence of drug pressure. Although anaerobic resistance has been regarded as a laboratory induced phenomenon, it clearly has been demonstrated in clinical isolates. Pursuit of both approaches will allow dissection of the underlying mechanisms. Many alternative drugs and treatments have been tested in vivo in cases of refractory trichomoniasis, as well as in vitro with some successes including the broad spectrum anti-parasitic drug nitazoxanide. Drug resistance incidence in T. vaginalis appears to be on the increase and improved surveillance of treatment failures is urged.

  8. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  9. Molecular basis of antifungal drug resistance in yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morio, Florent; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Besides inherent differences in in vitro susceptibilities, clinically-relevant yeast species may acquire resistance upon exposure to most antifungal drugs used in the clinic. In recent years, major fundamental research studies have been conducted to improve our understanding of the molecular basis...... of antifungal resistance. This topic is of major interest as antifungal resistance in yeast is clearly evolving and is correlated with clinical failure. This minireview is an overview of the most recent findings about key molecular mechanisms evolving in human pathogenic yeasts, particularly Candida spp......., in the context of antifungal drug resistance. Also included are the methods currently available for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing and for molecular detection of mutations associated with resistance. Finally, the genetic drivers of antifungal resistance are discussed in light of the spectra...

  10. Competitive release of drug resistance following drug treatment of mixed Plasmodium chabaudi infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roode, Jacobus C; Culleton, Richard; Bell, Andrew S; Read, Andrew F

    2004-09-14

    Malaria infections are often genetically diverse, potentially leading to competition between co-infecting strains. Such competition is of key importance in the spread of drug resistance. The effects of drug treatment on within-host competition were studied using the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi. Mice were infected simultaneously with a drug-resistant and a drug-sensitive clone and were then either drug-treated or left untreated. Transmission was assessed by feeding mice to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. In the absence of drugs, the sensitive clone competitively suppressed the resistant clone; this resulted in lower asexual parasite densities and also reduced transmission to the mosquito vector. Drug treatment, however, allowed the resistant clone to fill the ecological space emptied by the removal of the sensitive clone, allowing it to transmit as well as it would have done in the absence of competition. These results show that under drug pressure, resistant strains can have two advantages: (1) they survive better than sensitive strains and (2) they can exploit the opportunities presented by the removal of their competitors. When mixed infections are common, such effects could increase the spread of drug resistance.

  11. Do gene polymorphism in IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 influence therapeutic response in patients with drug refractory epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Prabhakar; Dwivedi, Rekha; Mansoori, Nasim; Alam, Rizwan; Chauhan, Ugam Kumari; Tripathi, Manjari; Mukhopadhyay, Asok Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines may play an important pathophysiological role in patients with epilepsy. To understand the role of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines in epilepsy, this study aimed to evaluate the polymorphisms of the promoter regions of IL-1β-511C>T (rs16944), TNF-α-308G>A (rs1800629) and IL-6-174G>C (rs1800795) genes and to look into the interaction between these genes in influencing seizure susceptibility, seizure frequency and response to therapy. The comparative frequency of polymorphism was determined in rs16944, rs1800629 and rs1800795 using PCR-RFLP in a group of 120 persons with epilepsy (PWE) and 110 ethnically matched healthy subjects of comparable age and sex in the North Indian population. Alleles and genotypes of rs16944, rs1800629 and rs1800795 were not found to influence the odds ratio of having susceptibility to epilepsy. Also gene-gene interaction of possible nine combinations of these genes did not show any positive association with epilepsy. The genotype and allelic frequency of rs1800795 showed a significant association (prs16944 and rs1800629 were not found to have such effect. This study demonstrates that the rs16944, rs1800629 and rs1800795 polymorphism does not act as a strong susceptibility factor for epilepsy in North Indian population. The genotypic association of rs1800795 with seizure frequency and drug-refractory epilepsy raises the issue that a specific set of polymorphic genes can influence seizures and therapeutic response in epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance | Igwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at determining the antibiotics susceptibility pattern of E. coli isolates claimed to be multidrug resistance using disc diffusion method. It also determined the presence of transferable resistance plasmids through conjugation and evaluated the medical significance of plasmid encoding E. coli and drug ...

  13. Antiretroviral drug resistance: A guide for the southern African clinician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both private and public sector see a bewildering clinical array of patients taking failing antiretroviral (ARV) regimens. We intend this article to provide a practical guide to help clinicians understand and manage ARV drug resistance in an African context. ARV resistance is a rapidly evolving field, requiring expertise in dealing ...

  14. Options for modulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, HJG; Van der Zee, AGJ; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an update of mechanisms responsible for drug resistance in ovarian cancer and the possible therapeutic options to modulate this resistance using literature review with emphasis on data acquired in studies comprising ovarian tumor samples. The classic

  15. Characterization of drug resistant Enterobacter species isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter species are emerging clinical pathogens and they play important roles in the dissemination of drug resistant traits within the food chain due to their intrinsic abilities for resistance to commonly used antibiotics such as cephalosporins. Two Enterobacter cloacae and one Enterobacter hormaechei characterized in ...

  16. Drug Resistant Hypertension - No SIMPLE Way Out

    OpenAIRE

    Janusz Skrzypecki; Marcin Ufnal

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension poses growing challenge for health policy-makers and doctors worldwide. Recently published results of Symplicity-III trial (HTN-3), the first blinded, randomized, multicenter study on the efficacy of renal denervation for the treatment of resistant hypertension did not show a significant reduction of BP in patients with resistant hypertension 6 months after renal-artery denervation, as compared with controls. In this paper we review clinical and experimental studies on renal dene...

  17. Multi drug resistance and β-lactamase production by Klebsiella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... *Corresponding author. E-mail: gnsimha123@rediffmail.com. (Rice, 1999). plasmid that can be easily spread from one organisms to another (Sirot, 1995) these enzymes are capable of inactivating a variety of β-lactam drugs (Rice,. 1999). The ESBL producing organisms often show multi- drug resistant as ...

  18. Towards an understanding of drug resistance in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemcke, T; Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1999-01-01

    and structural differences. Based on this analysis the molecular consequences of point mutations known to be involved in drug resistance were discussed. The significance of the most important point mutation causing resistance, S108N, could be explained by the model, whereas the point mutations associated...... with enhanced resistance, N51I and C59R, seem to have a more indirect effect on inhibitor binding....

  19. Research Highlights: Helping Adolescents Resist Drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    Project ALERT departs boldly from prevention models of the 196Os and 197Os, which emphasized informing adolescents about the long-term consequences of drug use or building their decisionmaking skills...

  20. A study on Prevalence of Drug Resistance in Drug Default ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), and particularly multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), has become a significant public health problem in a number of countries and an obstacle to effective global TB control. Method: This is a prospective randomized cross sectional study to ...

  1. Ayurveda and botanical drugs for epilepsy: Current evidence and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranjini, Sitaram Jaideep; Sandhya, Kumar; Mamta, Vernekar Sanjeeva

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of epilepsy has progressed since its earliest impression as a disease associated with paranormal and superstitious beliefs. Landmark advances have been made in deciphering the pathophysiological substrates involved in the disease process, and treatment advances have contributed significantly to ameliorating the seizures. However, disease-modifying agents are yet to be discovered. Ayurveda is a system of medicine that stresses a holistic approach to disease, and treatment is focused on disease modification and symptom management. Herbs form the core of Ayurveda medicine; though many of them have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity, very few actually mention the reference of these herbs in Ayurveda literature. Other therapeutic interventions used in Ayurveda are relatively unexplored, and future research will need to focus on this. The current manuscript briefly discusses the understanding of epilepsy as per Ayurveda and reviews herbs that have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity mentioned in Ayurveda literature. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of epilepsy in patients with Rett syndrome: perspectives and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnc, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that appears in infancy with regression of acquired motor skills, loss of purposeful activity, hand stereotypies, loss of acquired spoken language, and seizures. Epilepsy affects the majority of patients in a specific clinical stage of the disease and is drug resistant in approximately one-third of cases. The association of epilepsy and even drug-resistant epilepsy has been reported in certain genotypes of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 mutation, which is present in a majority of patients with classical RTT. The evolution of electroencephalographic abnormalities accompanying the clinical development of the syndrome is well described, but much less is known about the seizure semiology and the effectiveness of specific antiepileptic drugs. The aim of this review is to present the clinical and electrophysiological aspects of epilepsy in RTT and the current treatment approach.

  3. Rationale for treating epilepsy in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrini, R; Arzimanoglou, A; Brouwer, O

    2002-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the effects of antiepileptic drugs on childhood epilepsies are partly linked to the specific type of epilepsy or epilepsy syndrome. Most (but not all) types of epilepsy can be classified into categories that are conceptually meaningful. It is likewise logical to set

  4. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  5. Trends in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Botre, Abhijit; Udani, Vrajesh

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery has become an accepted treatment for drug resistant epilepsy in infants and children. It has gained ground in India over the last decade. Certain epilepsy surgically remediable syndromes have been delineated and should be offered surgery earlier rather than later, especially if cognitive/behavioral development is being compromised. Advances in imaging, particularly in MRI has helped identify surgical candidates. Pre-surgical evaluation includes clinical assessment, structural and functional imaging, inter-ictal EEG, simultaneous video -EEG, with analysis of seizure semiology and ictal EEG and other optional investigations like neuropsychology and other newer imaging techniques. If data are concordant resective surgery is offered, keeping in mind preservation of eloquent cortical areas subserving motor, language and visual functions. In case of discordant data or non-lesional MRI, invasive EEG maybe useful using a two-stage approach. With multi-focal / generalized disease, palliative surgery like corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation maybe useful. A good outcome is seen in about 2/3rd of patients undergoing resective surgery with a low morbidity and mortality. This review outlines important learning aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery for the general pediatrician.

  6. Drug Resistant Hypertension - No SIMPLE Way Out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skrzypecki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension poses growing challenge for health policy-makers and doctors worldwide. Recently published results of Symplicity-III trial (HTN-3, the first blinded, randomized, multicenter study on the efficacy of renal denervation for the treatment of resistant hypertension did not show a significant reduction of BP in patients with resistant hypertension 6 months after renal-artery denervation, as compared with controls. In this paper we review clinical and experimental studies on renal denervation. In order to identify causes of inconsistent results in renal denervation studies we look at basic science support for renal denervation and at designs of clinical trials.

  7. Quantitative EEG and Current Source Density Analysis of Combined Antiepileptic Drugs and Dopaminergic Agents in Genetic Epilepsy: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Hamlin; Wells, Christopher; Mizrahi, Neptune

    2015-07-01

    Two adolescent females with absence epilepsy were classified, one as attention deficit and the other as bipolar disorder. Physical and cognitive exams identified hypotension, bradycardia, and cognitive dysfunction. Their initial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were considered slightly slow, but within normal limits. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) data included relative theta excess and low alpha mean frequencies. A combined treatment of antiepileptic drugs with a catecholamine agonist/reuptake inhibitor was sequentially used. Both patients' physical and cognitive functions improved and they have remained seizure free. The clinical outcomes were correlated with statistically significant changes in QEEG measures toward normal Z-scores in both anterior and posterior regions. In addition, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) Z-scored source correlation analyses of the initial and treated QEEG data showed normalized patterns, supporting a neuroanatomic resolution. This study presents preliminary evidence for a neurophysiologic approach to patients with absence epilepsy and comorbid disorders and may provide a method for further research. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  8. Functional miRNAs in breast cancer drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu WZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Weizi Hu,1–3,* Chunli Tan,1–3,* Yunjie He,4 Guangqin Zhang,2 Yong Xu,3,5 Jinhai Tang1 1Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 2School of Basic Medicine and Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, 3Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, 4The First Clinical School of Nanjing Medical University, 5Jiangsu Key Lab of Cancer Biomarkers, Prevention and Treatment, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Owing to improved early surveillance and advanced therapy strategies, the current death rate due to breast cancer has decreased; nevertheless, drug resistance and relapse remain obstacles on the path to successful systematic treatment. Multiple mechanisms responsible for drug resistance have been elucidated, and miRNAs seem to play a major part in almost every aspect of cancer progression, including tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. In recent years, exosomes have emerged as novel modes of intercellular signaling vehicles, initiating cell–cell communication through their fusion with target cell membranes, delivering functional molecules including miRNAs and proteins. This review particularly focuses on enumerating functional miRNAs involved in breast cancer drug resistance as well as their targets and related mechanisms. Subsequently, we discuss the prospects and challenges of miRNA function in drug resistance and highlight valuable approaches for the investigation of the role of exosomal miRNAs in breast cancer progression and drug resistance. Keywords: microRNA, exosome, breast cancer, drug resistance

  9. Quantification of Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MALISA DR

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... vivo method for the detection of resistance, and has the potential to guide public health policy in a timely manner. .... signal such that the greater the intensity the greater the parasite .... was carried out by light box illumination, while the phophoimager ..... weakness of underestimation of SNPs/haplotypes.

  10. Insulin resistance induced by antiretroviral drugs: Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the prognosis of patients with AIDS, but it has also increased the incidence of various metabolic disorders, in particular insulin resistance accompanied by dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and lipodystrophy. This is often accompanied by frank type 2 ...

  11. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  12. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  13. MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasias and seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, K; Dimova, P.; Penkov, M.; Nachev, G.; Kostadinova, I.; Zlatareva, D.; Gabrovsky, K.; Naydenov, E.; Romansky, K.; Marinov, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) are a main cause of drug-resistant epilepsies. The MRI appearance of FCD is specific but some FCD remain hidden for the MRI. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the success rate of epilepsy surgery in patients with FCD and especially MRI-negative FCD during the first 6 years of the epilepsy surgery program of University Hospital 'St. Ivan Rilski', Sofia. Material and methods: Fourteen patients with drug resistant epilepsy and focal cortical dysplasias were operated on from January 2006 to april 2012. The mean age at surgery was 13 years (7-35 years) and the mean age of epilepsy onset was 7 years (1 year - 19 years). The presurgical work-up have included preoperative MRI (1.5T, GE) and seizures registration with video- EEG in all patients, PET-CT in 4 patients and invasive EEG in 5 patients. Eleven patients have MRI-positive cortical dysplasia and 3 patients were MRI negative. Results: Complete seizure control (Engel class I) was achieved in 9 patients, significant improvement (Engel class II) was observed in 3 patients and two patients remain without improvement (Engel class IV). In the small group of 3 patients with MRI-negative FCD, complete seizure control was achieved in two patients. No significant improvement was observed in one patient with MRI-negative FCD and one patient with MRI-positive FCD. Discussion: FCD type I are frequently invisible for the MRI and the localization of the epileptogenic zone is a difficult problem. Many studies have demonstrated the negative predictive value of MRI-negative FCD regarding seizure control after epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy. Conclusions: Patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and MRI-negative FCD are good candidates for epilepsy surgery but need comprehensive presurgical workup including PET-CT and invasive-EEG.

  14. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  15. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Sarmah

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... distribution in dhps and dhfr from Northeast India ... The findings of this study strongly discourage the use SP as a partner drug in ACT. ... led to critical hindrances in controlling of Plasmodium fal- ciparum (Pf) malaria in this part of India. ..... alignment editor and analysis programme for Windows95/98/. NT.

  16. Profiling evolutionary landscapes underlying drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, Rachel

    bacterial communities i.e. biofilms or dormant metabolic states. Antibiotic drugs are currently our best medicine to treat (against) bacterial pathogens due to antibiotics unique properties of being small molecules that are soluble and act systemically. These qualities allow for many modern medical...

  17. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  18. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue: A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Miyata, Hajime; Sarnat, Harvey B.; Thom, Maria; Roessler, Karl; Rydenhag, Bertil; Jehi, Lara; Krsek, Pavel; Wiebe, Samuel; Spreafico, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the

  19. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue : A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blümcke, I.; Aronica, E.; Miyata, H.; Sarnat, H.B.; Thom, M.; Roessler, K.; Rydenhag, B.; Jehi, L.; Krsek, P.; Wiebe, S.; Spreafico, R.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the

  20. Comparative effectiveness of eight antiepileptic drugs in adults with focal refractory epilepsy: the influence of age, gender, and the sequence in which drugs were introduced onto the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Jussi; Peltola, Jukka; Raitanen, Jani; Alapirtti, Tiina; Rainesalo, Sirpa

    2017-07-01

    The first objective was to determine the long-term retention rate of eight antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) commonly used as adjunctive therapy in adults with focal refractory epilepsy. Second, we assessed the effects of age and gender on retention rates. Third, we examined if the retention rate could be influenced by the sequence in which the AEDs had entered the market. Patients with focal refractory epilepsy treated with any of the eight AEDs in Tampere University Hospital were identified retrospectively (N = 507). Retention rates were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Follow-up started at the first date of treatment and each individual was followed a maximum of 36 months. We calculated the following 3-year retention rates: lacosamide 77.1% (N = 137), lamotrigine 68.3% (N = 177), levetiracetam 66.7% (N = 319), clobazam 65.6% (N = 130), topiramate 61.6% (N = 178), zonisamide 60.4% (N = 103), pregabalin 54.6% (N = 127), and gabapentin 40.2% (N = 66). Lacosamide, levetiracetam, and clobazam were the most effective AEDs in the elderly. The retention rate for pregabalin was higher in males (65%) than females (51%) whereas females had higher retention rates for both topiramate (72 vs. 58%) and zonisamide (67 vs. 57%). The retention rate was influenced by the sequence in which these AEDs entered the market. We provide important information about practical aspects of these eight AEDs, revealing that there are differences in their effectiveness as adjunctive treatment for focal refractory epilepsy. Most importantly, the retention rate appears to be influenced by the sequence in which these AEDs were introduced onto the market.

  1. COMPARATIVE EFFICАCY AND TOLERABILITY OF MONOTHERAPY WITH DEPAKINE CHRONOSPHERE, DRUGS OF CARBAMAZEPINE GROUP WITH EXTENDED RELEASE AND OXCARBAZEPINE IN SYMPTOMATIC AND CRYPTOGENIC FOCAL EPILEPSY (SVT. LUKA’S INSTITUTE OF CHILD NEUROLOGY AND EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on comparative efficаcy and tolerability of monotherapy with Depakine chronosphere, drugs of Carbamazepine group with extended release and oxcarbazepine in symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy has been conducted at Svt. Luka’s Institute of Child Neurology and Epilepsy (ICNE (Moscow. This retrospective study covers a random sample of patients treated in ICNE in the period from December 1, 2013 to September 1, 2014.  The study included 131 patients aged 1 to 18 years with symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy receiving treatment with one of the study drugs in monotherapy: group 1 – monotherapy with Depakine chronosphere (n = 56; group 2 – monotherapy with drugs of carbamazepine group with extended release (n = 55; group 3 – monotherapy with oxcarbazepine (trileptal (n = 20. The obtained results allow us to conclude that the effectiveness of Depakin chronosphere, carbamazepine with extended release and oxcarbazepine in monotherapy of symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy was comparable (statistically significant differences in efficacy were not found. However, carbamazepine was awarded the highest frequency of seizures aggravation. Drugs showed approximately same tolerability (statistically significant differences in tolerability were not found. However, withdrawal of the drug due to side effects was the rarest in Depakine (3.5 %, and withdrawal due to intolerance was higher in carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine (5 and 10 % respectively. Depakinum and oxcarbazepine had the best results in the blocking of pathological activity on the electroencephalogram, whereas carbamazepine was clearly inferior to them. In this regard, complete clinical-electroencephalographic remission (lasting 12 months or more was achieved under treatment of Depakine chromosphere in 21.5 % of cases, oxcarbazepi on therapy for 12 months was similar in all study drugs. Considering that the objective of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete

  2. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Principles of Resistance, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W; Tsukayama, Dean T

    2016-04-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is an unfortunate by-product of mankind's medical and pharmaceutical ingenuity during the past 60 years. Although new drug developments have enabled TB to be more readily curable, inappropriate TB management has led to the emergence of drug-resistant disease. Extensively drug-resistant TB describes Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is collectively resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, a fluoroquinolone, and an injectable agent. It proliferates when established case management and infection control procedures are not followed. Optimized treatment outcomes necessitate time-sensitive diagnoses, along with expanded combinations and prolonged durations of antimicrobial drug therapy. The challenges to public health institutions are immense and most noteworthy in underresourced communities and in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary case management approach is required to optimize outcomes. We review the principles of TB drug resistance and the risk factors, diagnosis, and managerial approaches for extensively drug-resistant TB. Treatment outcomes, cost, and unresolved medical issues are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoparticles: Alternatives Against Drug-Resistant Pathogenic Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudepalya Renukaiah Rudramurthy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial substances may be synthetic, semisynthetic, or of natural origin (i.e., from plants and animals. Antimicrobials are considered “miracle drugs” and can determine if an infected patient/animal recovers or dies. However, the misuse of antimicrobials has led to the development of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, which is one of the greatest challenges for healthcare practitioners and is a significant global threat. The major concern with the development of antimicrobial resistance is the spread of resistant organisms. The replacement of conventional antimicrobials by new technology to counteract antimicrobial resistance is ongoing. Nanotechnology-driven innovations provide hope for patients and practitioners in overcoming the problem of drug resistance. Nanomaterials have tremendous potential in both the medical and veterinary fields. Several nanostructures comprising metallic particles have been developed to counteract microbial pathogens. The effectiveness of nanoparticles (NPs depends on the interaction between the microorganism and the NPs. The development of effective nanomaterials requires in-depth knowledge of the physicochemical properties of NPs and the biological aspects of microorganisms. However, the risks associated with using NPs in healthcare need to be addressed. The present review highlights the antimicrobial effects of various nanomaterials and their potential advantages, drawbacks, or side effects. In addition, this comprehensive information may be useful in the discovery of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs for use against multi-drug-resistant microbial pathogens in the near future.

  4. Rational management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkataraman

    2014-09-01

    Management of epilepsies in children has improved considerably over the last decade, all over the world due to the advances seen in the understanding of the patho-physiology of epileptogenesis, availability of both structural and functional imaging studies along with better quality EEG/video-EEG recordings and the availability of a plethora of newer anti-epileptic drugs which are tailormade to act on specific pathways. In spite of this, there is still a long way to go before one is able to be absolutely rational about which drug to use for which type of epilepsy. There have been a lot of advances in the area of epilepsy surgery and is certainly gaining ground for specific cases. Better understanding of the genetic basis of epilepsies will hopefully lead to a more rational treatment plan in the future. Also, a lot of work needs to be done to dispel various misunderstandings and myths about epilepsy which still exists in our country.

  5. Ketogenic Diets for Adults With Highly Refractory Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Tanya J. W.; Cervenka, Mackenzie C.

    2017-01-01

    The current review highlights the evidence supporting the use of ketogenic diets in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy and status epilepticus in adults. Ketogenic diet variants are compared and advantages and potential side effects of diet therapy are discussed.

  6. Does Listening to Mozart benefit Children with Severe Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-08-01

    Investigators from the Universities of Salerno and Perugio, Italy, studied the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions on sleep quality, behavior, and seizure recurrence in 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5 and 21 years of age (mean age, 11.9 years), with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  7. An investigation of classification algorithms for predicting HIV drug resistance without genotype resistance testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brandt, P

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available is limited in low-resource settings. In this paper we investigate machine learning techniques for drug resistance prediction from routine treatment and laboratory data to help clinicians select patients for confirmatory genotype testing. The techniques...

  8. Spread of anti-malarial drug resistance: Mathematical model with implications for ACT drug policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dondorp Arjen M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most malaria-endemic countries are implementing a change in anti-malarial drug policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. The impact of different drug choices and implementation strategies is uncertain. Data from many epidemiological studies in different levels of malaria endemicity and in areas with the highest prevalence of drug resistance like borders of Thailand are certainly valuable. Formulating an appropriate dynamic data-driven model is a powerful predictive tool for exploring the impact of these strategies quantitatively. Methods A comprehensive model was constructed incorporating important epidemiological and biological factors of human, mosquito, parasite and treatment. The iterative process of developing the model, identifying data needed, and parameterization has been taken to strongly link the model to the empirical evidence. The model provides quantitative measures of outcomes, such as malaria prevalence/incidence and treatment failure, and illustrates the spread of resistance in low and high transmission settings. The model was used to evaluate different anti-malarial policy options focusing on ACT deployment. Results The model predicts robustly that in low transmission settings drug resistance spreads faster than in high transmission settings, and treatment failure is the main force driving the spread of drug resistance. In low transmission settings, ACT slows the spread of drug resistance to a partner drug, especially at high coverage rates. This effect decreases exponentially with increasing delay in deploying the ACT and decreasing rates of coverage. In the high transmission settings, however, drug resistance is driven by the proportion of the human population with a residual drug level, which gives resistant parasites some survival advantage. The spread of drug resistance could be slowed down by controlling presumptive drug use and avoiding the use of combination therapies containing drugs with

  9. mTOR Signaling Confers Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Yakir; Hall, Michael N

    2016-11-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and a leading cause of death worldwide. Extensive research over decades has led to the development of therapies that target cancer-specific signaling pathways. However, the clinical benefits of such drugs are at best transient due to tumors displaying intrinsic or adaptive resistance. The underlying compensatory pathways that allow cancer cells to circumvent a drug blockade are poorly understood. We review here recent studies suggesting that mammalian TOR (mTOR) signaling is a major compensatory pathway conferring resistance to many cancer drugs. mTOR-mediated resistance can be cell-autonomous or non-cell-autonomous. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling should be monitored routinely in tumors and that an mTOR inhibitor should be considered as a co-therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of genotypic HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watitpun Chotip

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prices of reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitors in Thailand have been reduced since December 1, 2001. It is expected that reduction in the price of these inhibitors may influence the drug resistance mutation pattern of HIV-1 among infected people. This study reports the frequency of HIV-1 genetic mutation associated with drug resistance in antiretroviral-treated patients from Thailand. Methods Genotypic resistance testing was performed on samples collected in 2002 from 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Automated DNA sequencing was used to genotype the HIV-1 polymerase gene isolated from patients' plasma. Results Resistance to protease inhibitors, nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were found in 10 (12%, 42 (48% and 19 (21% patients, respectively. The most common drug resistance mutations in the protease gene were at codon 82 (8%, 90 (7% and 54 (6%, whereas resistant mutations at codon 215 (45%, 67 (40%, 41 (38% and 184 (27% were commonly found in the RT gene. This finding indicates that genotypic resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was prevalent in 2002. The frequency of resistant mutations corresponding to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was three times higher-, while resistant mutation corresponding to protease inhibitors was two times lower than those frequencies determined in 2001. Conclusion This study shows that the frequencies of RT inhibitor resistance mutations have been increased after the reduction in the price of RT inhibitors since December 2001. We believe that this was an important factor that influenced the mutation patterns of HIV-1 protease and RT genes in Thailand.

  11. Enhanced transmission of drug-resistant parasites to mosquitoes following drug treatment in rodent malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Bell

    Full Text Available The evolution of drug resistant Plasmodium parasites is a major challenge to effective malaria control. In theory, competitive interactions between sensitive parasites and resistant parasites within infections are a major determinant of the rate at which parasite evolution undermines drug efficacy. Competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated hosts slows the spread of resistance; competitive release following treatment enhances it. Here we report that for the murine model Plasmodium chabaudi, co-infection with drug-sensitive parasites can prevent the transmission of initially rare resistant parasites to mosquitoes. Removal of drug-sensitive parasites following chemotherapy enabled resistant parasites to transmit to mosquitoes as successfully as sensitive parasites in the absence of treatment. We also show that the genetic composition of gametocyte populations in host venous blood accurately reflects the genetic composition of gametocytes taken up by mosquitoes. Our data demonstrate that, at least for this mouse model, aggressive chemotherapy leads to very effective transmission of highly resistant parasites that are present in an infection, the very parasites which undermine the long term efficacy of front-line drugs.

  12. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Engel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment.

  13. Dynamic optical tweezers based assay for monitoring early drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Siwei; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Yuquan; Min, Changjun; Yuan, X-C

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, a dynamic optical tweezers based assay is proposed and investigated for monitoring early drug resistance with Pemetrexed-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. The validity and stability of the method are verified experimentally in terms of the physical parameters of the optical tweezers system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is more convenient and faster than traditional techniques when the capability of detecting small variations of the response of cells to a drug is maintained. (letter)

  14. Seizure control in patients with epilepsy: the physician vs. medication factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsell Christopher J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the relationship between types of healthcare providers and outcomes in patients with epilepsy. This study compares the relative effects of provider type (epileptologist vs. other neurologist and pharmacologic treatment (newer vs. older antiepileptic drugs on seizure control in patients with epilepsy. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients with medication-resistant epilepsy. Consecutive charts of 200 patients were abstracted using a standard case report form. For each patient, data included seizure frequency and medication use prior to, and while being treated by an epileptologist. Changes in seizure frequency were modeled using a generalized linear model. Results After transferring care from a general neurologist to specialized epilepsy center, patients experienced fewer seizures (p Conclusion Our findings suggest an association between subspecialty epilepsy care and improved seizure control in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy. Further research should prospectively determine whether patients with medication-resistant epilepsy would benefit from being routinely referred to an epilepsy specialist.

  15. Multi drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy: Genes involved and blockers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.

    2007-01-01

    During the last three decades, important and considerable research efforts had been performed to investigate the mechanism through which cancer cells overcome the cytotoxic effects of a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. Most of the previously published work has been focused on the resistance of tumor cells to those anticancer drugs of natural source. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cellular cross-resistance to a broad spectrum of natural products used in cancer chemotherapy and is believed to be the major cause of the therapeutic failures of the drugs belonging to different naturally obtained or semisynthetic groups including vinca alkaloids, taxans, epipodophyllotoxins and certain antibiotics. This phenomenon results from overexpression of four MDR genes and their corresponding proteins that act as membrane-bound ATP consuming pumps. These proteins mediate the efflux of many structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs of natural source. MDR may be intrinsic or acquired following exposure to chemotherapy. The existence of intrinsically resistant tumor cell clone before and following chemotherapeutic treatment has been associated with a worse final outcome because of increased incidence of distant metasis. In view of irreplaceability of natural product anticancer drugs as effective chemotherapeutic agents, and in view of MDR as a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy, this review is aimed to highlight the genes involved in MDR, classical MDR blockers and gene therapy approaches to overcome MDR. (author)

  16. "A'ole" Drugs! Cultural Practices and Drug Resistance of Rural Hawai'ian Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po'A-Kekuawela, Ka'Ohinani; Okamoto, Scott K.; Nebre, La Risa H.; Helm, Susana; Chin, Coralee I. H.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how Native Hawai'ian youths from rural communities utilized cultural practices to promote drug resistance and/or abstinence. Forty-seven students from five different middle schools participated in gender-specific focus groups that focused on the cultural and environmental contexts of drug use for Native Hawai'ian…

  17. Epilepsy surgery in a liver-transplanted girl with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis following PRES with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Nebbia, Gabriella; Fiorica, Lorenzo; Farallo, Marcello; Degrassi, Irene; Gozzo, Francesca; Pelliccia, Veronica; Barbieri, Sergio; Cossu, Massimo; Tassi, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with status epilepticus may occur after liver transplant. This may rarely lead to refractory epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We report the first case of epilepsy surgery in a liver-transplanted patient with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. A 3-year-old girl underwent liver transplant for congenital biliary atresia. Four days after transplant she manifested PRES with status epilepticus, but she recovered within a couple of weeks. At the age of 5 years she started presenting complex partial seizures, that became refractory to antiepileptic drugs (AED), worsening psychosocial performances. The pre-surgical work-up identified a left HS and temporal pole alterations. A left antero-mesial temporal lobectomy was performed, leading to epilepsy remission and allowing AED withdrawal. Drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and HS may occur as sequelae of PRES with status epilepticus related to liver transplant and cyclosporine use. In this setting early epilepsy surgery may reduce the time of chronic exposure to AED and severe illness due to repeated seizures. This option might have additional advantages in the subgroup of epileptic patients with liver transplant, preserving the liver from the potential damage due to multiple AED trials and their interaction with commonly used immunosuppressant drugs. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-11-15

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens.

  19. Epigenetic Modulation of the Biophysical Properties of Drug-Resistant Cell Lipids to Restore Drug Transport and Endocytic Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Lu, Shan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    In our recent studies exploring the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids, and the role they play in drug transport, we demonstrated the difference of drug-resistant breast cancer cells from drug-sensitive cells in lipid composition and biophysical properties, suggesting that cancer cells acquire a drug-resistant phenotype through the alteration of lipid synthesis to inhibit intracellular drug transport to protect from cytotoxic effect. In cancer cells, epigenetic changes (e.g....

  20. Influence of multidrug resistance and drug transport proteins on chemotherapy drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Helena; McCann, Andrew; Clynes, Martin; Larkin, Annemarie

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy involving the use of anticancer drugs remains an important strategy in the overall management of patients with metastatic cancer. Acquisition of multidrug resistance remains a major impediment to successful chemotherapy. Drug transporters in cell membranes and intracellular drug metabolizing enzymes contribute to the resistance phenotype and determine the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs in the body. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate the transport of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics including cytotoxic drugs out of cells. Solute carrier (SLC) transporters mediate the influx of cytotoxic drugs into cells. This review focuses on the substrate interaction of these transporters, on their biology and what role they play together with drug metabolizing enzymes in eliminating therapeutic drugs from cells. The majority of anticancer drugs are substrates for the ABC transporter and SLC transporter families. Together, these proteins have the ability to control the influx and the efflux of structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby modulating the intracellular drug concentration. These interactions have important clinical implications for chemotherapy because ultimately they determine therapeutic efficacy, disease progression/relapse and the success or failure of patient treatment.

  1. Post-epilepsy stroke: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Chen, Rong; Xiao, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Stroke and epilepsy are two of the most common neurological disorders and share a complicated relationship. It is well established that stroke is one of the most important causes of epilepsy, particularly new-onset epilepsy among the elderly. However, post-epilepsy stroke has been overlooked. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that epilepsy patients have increased risk and mortality from stroke when compared with the general population. Additionally, it was proposed that post-epilepsy stroke might be associated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), epileptic seizures and the lifestyle of epileptic patients. Here, we comprehensively review the epidemiology, causes and interventions for post-epilepsy stroke.

  2. Emerging drug -resistance and guidelines for treatment of malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Smego Jr, R.A.; Razi, S.T.; Beg, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multi-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria worldwide is a serious public health threat to the global control of malaria, especially in poor countries like Pakistan. In many countries chloroquine-resistance is a huge problem, accounting for more than 90% of malaria cases. In Pakistan, resistance to chloroquine is on the rise and reported in up to 16- 62% of Plasmodium falciparum. Four to 25% of Plasmodium falciparum also reported to be resistant to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and several cases of delayed parasite clearance have been observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria treated with quinine. In this article we have introduced the concept of artemisinin- based combination therapy (ACT) and emphasize the use of empiric combination therapy for all patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria to prevent development of drug resistance and to obtain additive and synergistic killing of parasite. (author)

  3. Pattern of secondary acquired drug resistance to antituberculosis drug in Mumbai, India--1991-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowgule, R V; Deodhar, L

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective observational study was conducted to find out whether secondary acquired drug resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol is high and to rifamycin and pyrazinamide is low, as is commonly believed in India. There were 2033 patients, whose sputum samples (6099) were reviewed from a specimen registry of the microbiology laboratory for the years 1991 to 1995. Of these, 521 (25.6%) patients [335 males and 186 females; age ranged from 11 to 75 years] had sputum positive culture and sensitivity for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). The drug resistance patterns in our study were: isoniazid (H) 15%, rifamycin (R) 66.8%, pyrazinamide (Z) 72.2%, ethambutol (E) 8.4%, streptomycin (S) 53.6%, cycloserine (C) 39.2% kanamycin (K) 25.1% and ethionamide (Eth) 65.3%. The resistance to streptomycin showed a significant fall over a year while there was a rise in resistance to cycloserine and kanamycin which is significant. The rate of secondary acquired resistance of isoniazid and ethambutol was low, and the rate of secondary acquired resistance to rifamycin and pyrazinamide was high, which is contarary to the common belief regarding these drugs in India. This implies that isoniazid is still a valuable drug in the treatment of multidrug resistance in India.

  4. Drug Targets and Mechanisms of Resistance in the Anaerobic Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoa Giardia duodenalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Entamoeba histolytica infect up to a billion people each year. G. duodenalis and E. histolytica are primarily pathogens of the intestinal tract, although E. histolytica can form abscesses and invade other organs, where it can be fatal if left untreated. T. vaginalis infection is a sexually transmitted infection causing vaginitis and acute inflammatory disease of the genital mucosa. T. vaginalis has also been reported in the urinary tract, fallopian tubes, and pelvis and can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and oral lesions. Respiratory infections can be acquired perinatally. T. vaginalis infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased mortality as well as predisposing to human immunodeficiency virus infection, AIDS, and cervical cancer. All three organisms lack mitochondria and are susceptible to the nitroimidazole metronidazole because of similar low-redox-potential anaerobic metabolic pathways. Resistance to metronidazole and other drugs has been observed clinically and in the laboratory. Laboratory studies have identified the enzyme that activates metronidazole, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, to its nitroso form and distinct mechanisms of decreasing drug susceptibility that are induced in each organism. Although the nitroimidazoles have been the drug family of choice for treating the anaerobic protozoa, G. duodenalis is less susceptible to other antiparasitic drugs, such as furazolidone, albendazole, and quinacrine. Resistance has been demonstrated for each agent, and the mechanism of resistance has been investigated. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis is well documented, and the principal mechanisms have been defined. Bypass metabolism, such as alternative oxidoreductases, have been discovered in both organisms. Aerobic versus anaerobic resistance in T. vaginalis is discussed. Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in E. histolytica have recently

  5. Ribonucleotide reductase as a drug target against drug resistance Mycobacterium leprae: A molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Partha Sarathi; Bansal, Avi Kumar; Naaz, Farah; Gupta, Umesh Datta; Dwivedi, Vivek Dhar; Yadava, Umesh

    2018-06-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of skin and nerve caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The treatment is based on standard multi drug therapy consisting of dapsone, rifampicin and clofazamine. The use of rifampicin alone or with dapsone led to the emergence of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae strains. The emergence of drug-resistant leprosy put a hurdle in the leprosy eradication programme. The present study aimed to predict the molecular model of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for biosynthesis of nucleotides, to screen new drugs for treatment of drug-resistant leprosy. The study was conducted by retrieving RNR of M. leprae from GenBank. A molecular 3D model of M. leprae was predicted using homology modelling and validated. A total of 325 characters were included in the analysis. The predicted 3D model of RNR showed that the ϕ and φ angles of 251 (96.9%) residues were positioned in the most favoured regions. It was also conferred that 18 α-helices, 6 β turns, 2 γ turns and 48 helix-helix interactions contributed to the predicted 3D structure. Virtual screening of Food and Drug Administration approved drug molecules recovered 1829 drugs of which three molecules, viz., lincomycin, novobiocin and telithromycin, were taken for the docking study. It was observed that the selected drug molecules had a strong affinity towards the modelled protein RNR. This was evident from the binding energy of the drug molecules towards the modelled protein RNR (-6.10, -6.25 and -7.10). Three FDA-approved drugs, viz., lincomycin, novobiocin and telithromycin, could be taken for further clinical studies to find their efficacy against drug resistant leprosy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Seizure outcomes in non-resective epilepsy surgery: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Birk, Harjus; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    In approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy, seizures are refractory to medical therapy, leading to significant morbidity and increased mortality. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the benefit of surgical resection in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy, and in the present journal, we recently reviewed seizure outcomes in resective epilepsy surgery. However, not all patients are candidates for or amenable to open surgical resection for epilepsy. Fortunately, several non-resective surgical options are now available at various epilepsy centers, including novel therapies which have been pioneered in recent years. Ablative procedures such as stereotactic laser ablation and stereotactic radiosurgery offer minimally invasive alternatives to open surgery with relatively favorable seizure outcomes, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For certain individuals who are not candidates for ablation or resection, palliative neuromodulation procedures such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, or responsive neurostimulation may result in a significant decrease in seizure frequency and improved quality of life. Finally, disconnection procedures such as multiple subpial transections and corpus callosotomy continue to play a role in select patients with an eloquent epileptogenic zone or intractable atonic seizures, respectively. Overall, open surgical resection remains the gold standard treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, although it is significantly under-utilized. While non-resective epilepsy procedures have not replaced the need for resection, there is hope that these additional surgical options will increase the number of patients who receive treatment for this devastating disorder - particularly individuals who are not candidates for or who have failed resection. PMID:27206422

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug-resistance in previously treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corresponding to: Professor Lassana Sangaré, Department of Bacteriology and Virology, University Hospital Centre. Yalgado Ouedraogo, 03 BP 7022 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso. E-mail: sangarel@hotmail.com. Abstract. Background: Tuberculosis drug-resistance becomes common in sub-Saharan Africa; however, ...

  8. Diversity of Urinary Tract Pathogens and Drug Resistant Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This paper was mainly aimed to investigate drug resistance of the various urinary tract infection (UTI) pathogens from patients of different gender and age groups of Pakistanis. Method: For these purposes, urine samples of 109 patients were analyzed. Samples were screened on CLED agar. Antimicrobial ...

  9. Beijing/W genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis and drug resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glynn, Judith R; Kremer, Kristin; Borgdorff, Martien W; Rodriguez, Mar Pujades; Soolingen, Dick van

    2006-01-01

    Beijing/W genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis is widespread, may be increasing, and may have a predilection for drug resistance. Individual-level data on >29,000 patients from 49 studies in 35 countries were combined to assess the Beijing genotype's prevalence worldwide, trends over time and with

  10. National anti-tuberculosis drug resistance study in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, T. M.; Basra, D.; Mfinanga, S. G. M.; Range, N.; Lwilla, F.; Shirima, R. P.; van Deun, A.; Zignol, M.; Cobelens, F. G.; Egwaga, S. M.; van Leth, F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in a national representative sample of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Tanzania according to recommended methodology. DESIGN: Cluster survey, with 40 clusters sampled proportional to size, of notified TB patients from all

  11. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: time for visionary political leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Ibrahim; Zignol, Matteo; Falzon, Dennis; Raviglione, Mario; Ditiu, Lucica; Masham, Susan; Adetifa, Ifedayo; Ford, Nathan; Cox, Helen; Lawn, Stephen D; Marais, Ben J; McHugh, Timothy D; Mwaba, Peter; Bates, Matthew; Lipman, Marc; Zijenah, Lynn; Logan, Simon; McNerney, Ruth; Zumla, Adam; Sarda, Krishna; Nahid, Payam; Hoelscher, Michael; Pletschette, Michel; Memish, Ziad A; Kim, Peter; Hafner, Richard; Cole, Stewart; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Maeurer, Markus; Schito, Marco; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2013-06-01

    Two decades ago, WHO declared tuberculosis a global emergency, and invested in the highly cost-effective directly observed treatment short-course programme to control the epidemic. At that time, most strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were susceptible to first-line tuberculosis drugs, and drug resistance was not a major issue. However, in 2013, tuberculosis remains a major public health concern worldwide, with prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis rising. WHO estimates roughly 630 000 cases of MDR tuberculosis worldwide, with great variation in the frequency of MDR tuberculosis between countries. In the past 8 years, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis has emerged, and has been reported in 84 countries, heralding the possibility of virtually untreatable tuberculosis. Increased population movement, the continuing HIV pandemic, and the rise in MDR tuberculosis pose formidable challenges to the global control of tuberculosis. We provide an overview of the global burden of drug-resistant disease; discuss the social, health service, management, and control issues that fuel and sustain the epidemic; and suggest specific recommendations for important next steps. Visionary political leadership is needed to curb the rise of MDR and XDR tuberculosis worldwide, through sustained funding and the implementation of global and regional action plans. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Drug-resistant post-neurosurgical nosocomial Acinetobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug-resistant post-neurosurgical nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis in two Iranian hospitals. ... Vol 11, No 17 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Acinetobacter baumannii may cause meningitis and ventriculitis, particularly after head trauma and/or neurosurgery. The rate of ...

  13. Laboratory methods for diagnosis and detection of drug resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data source: Published series of peer reviewed journals and manuals written on laboratory methods that are currently used for diagnosis and detection of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex were reviewed using the index medicus, pubmed and medline search. Conventional bacteriological microscopy ...

  14. Elucidating the Interdependence of Drug Resistance from Combinations of Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Debra A; Whitfield, Troy W; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Swanstrom, Ronald; Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2017-11-14

    HIV-1 protease is responsible for the cleavage of 12 nonhomologous sites within the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol polyproteins in the viral genome. Under the selective pressure of protease inhibition, the virus evolves mutations within (primary) and outside of (secondary) the active site, allowing the protease to process substrates while simultaneously countering inhibition. The primary protease mutations impede inhibitor binding directly, while the secondary mutations are considered accessory mutations that compensate for a loss in fitness. However, the role of secondary mutations in conferring drug resistance remains a largely unresolved topic. We have shown previously that mutations distal to the active site are able to perturb binding of darunavir (DRV) via the protein's internal hydrogen-bonding network. In this study, we show that mutations distal to the active site, regardless of context, can play an interdependent role in drug resistance. Applying eigenvalue decomposition to collections of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions from a series of molecular dynamics simulations of 15 diverse HIV-1 protease variants, we identify sites in the protease where amino acid substitutions lead to perturbations in nonbonded interactions with DRV and/or the hydrogen-bonding network of the protease itself. While primary mutations are known to drive resistance in HIV-1 protease, these findings delineate the significant contributions of accessory mutations to resistance. Identifying the variable positions in the protease that have the greatest impact on drug resistance may aid in future structure-based design of inhibitors.

  15. Clinical presentation of neurocysticercosis-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Kevin R; Burneo, Jorge G

    2017-11-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system and a major risk factor for seizures and epilepsy. Seizure types in NCC vary largely across studies and seizure semiology is poorly understood. We discuss here the studies regarding seizure types and seizure semiology in NCC, and examine the clinical presentation in patients with NCC and drug-resistant epilepsy. We also provide evidence of the role of MRI and EEG in the diagnosis of NCC-related epilepsy. Focal seizures are reported in 60-90% of patients with NCC-related epilepsy, and around 90% of all seizures registered prospectively are focal not evolving to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures. A great number of cases suggest that seizure semiology is topographically related to NCC lesions. Patients with hippocampal sclerosis and NCC have different clinical and neurophysiological characteristics than those with hippocampal sclerosis alone. Different MRI protocols have allowed to better differentiate NCC from other etiologies. Lesions' stages might account on the chances of finding an interictal epileptiform discharge. Studies pursuing the seizure onset in patients with NCC are lacking and they are specially needed to determine both whether the reported events of individual cases are seizures, and whether they are related to the NCC lesion or lesions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Neurocysticercosis and Epilepsy". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos H. C. Duran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners’ Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%, seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  18. Prolonged life of human acute hippocampal slices from temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickham, J; Brödjegård, N G; Vighagen, R

    2018-01-01

    Resected hippocampal tissue from patients with drug-resistant epilepsy presents a unique possibility to test novel treatment strategies directly in target tissue. The post-resection time for testing and analysis however is normally limited. Acute tissue slices allow for electrophysiological...... granule whole-cell recordings, can be consistently induced in these slices, underlying the usefulness of this methodology for testing and/or validating novel treatment strategies for epilepsy....

  19. Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, David C

    2010-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first described in 1995 and is the most closely related species to the predominant human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. C. dubliniensis is significantly less prevalent and less pathogenic than C. albicans and is primarily associated with infections in HIV-infected individuals and other immunocompromised cohorts. The population structure of C. dubliniensis consists of three well-defined major clades and is significantly less diverse than C. albicans. The majority of C. dubliniensis isolates are susceptible to antifungal drugs commonly used to treat Candida infections. To date only two major patterns of antifungal drug resistance have been identified and the molecular mechanisms of these are very similar to the resistance mechanisms that have been described previously in C. albicans. However, significant differences are evident in the predominant antifungal drug mechanisms employed by C. dubliniensis, differences that reflect its more clonal nature, its lower prevalence and characteristics of its genome, the complete sequence of which has only recently been determined.

  20. Clinical effectiveness, tolerability and cost-effectiveness of newer drugs for epilepsy in adults: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, J; Kainth, A; Hawkins, N; Epstein, D; McIntosh, H; McDaid, C; Mason, A; Golder, S; O'Meara, S; Sculpher, M; Drummond, M; Forbes, C

    2005-04-01

    To examine the clinical effectiveness, tolerability and cost-effectiveness of gabapentin (GBP), lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), tiagabine (TGB), topiramate (TPM) and vigabatrin (VGB) for epilepsy in adults. Electronic databases. Internet resources. Pharmaceutical company submissions. Selected studies were screened and quality assessed. Separate analyses assessed clinical effectiveness, serious, rare and long-term adverse events and cost-effectiveness. An integrated economic analysis incorporating information on costs and effects of newer and older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) was performed to give direct comparisons of long-term costs and benefits. A total of 212 studies were included in the review. All included systematic reviews were Cochrane reviews and of good quality. The quality of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was variable. Assessment was hampered by poor reporting of methods of randomisation, allocation concealment and blinding. Few of the non-randomised studies were of good quality. The main weakness of the economic evaluations was inappropriate use of the cost-minimisation design. The included systematic reviews reported that newer AEDs were effective as adjunctive therapy compared to placebo. For newer versus older drugs, data were available for all three monotherapy AEDs, although data for OXC and TPM were limited. There was limited, poor-quality evidence of a significant improvement in cognitive function with LTG and OXC compared with older AEDs. However, there were no consistent statistically significant differences in other clinical outcomes, including proportion of seizure-free patients. No studies assessed effectiveness of AEDs in people with intellectual disabilities or in pregnant women. There was very little evidence to assess the effectiveness of AEDs in the elderly; no significant differences were found between LTG and carbamazepine monotherapy. Sixty-seven RCTs compared adjunctive therapy with placebo, older

  1. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a cause of epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Monacelli, Debora; Castagnino, Miriam; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a variety of inherited connective tissue disorders that have been described in association with various neurological features. Until now the neurological symptoms have not been studied in detail; therefore, the aim of this review is to analyze the possible association between EDS, epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia (PH). We have carried out a critical review of all cases of epilepsy in EDS patients with and without PH. Epilepsy is a frequent neurological manifestation of EDS; generally, it is characterized by focal seizures with temporo-parieto-occipital auras and the most common EEG findings epileptiform discharges and slow intermittent rhythm with delta-theta waves. Epilepsy in EDS patients is usually responsive to common antiepileptic therapy; very few cases of drug resistant focal epilepsy requested surgical treatment, with favorable results in terms of outcome. Epilepsy is the most common presenting neurological manifestation associated with PH in EDS patients. Abnormal anatomic circuitries (including heterotopic nodules) could generate epilepsy in patients with PH. Among the principal neurological manifestations, epilepsy and PH have a considerable importance and can influence the long-term evolution of these patients. We hypothesize that PH may determine the epileptic manifestations in patients with EDS; much remains to be learnt about the relationships between nodules and the epileptic manifestations in EDS syndrome. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mortality in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitiris, Nikolas; Mohanraj, Rajiv; Norrie, John; Brodie, Martin J

    2007-05-01

    All studies report an increased mortality risk for people with epilepsy compared with the general population. Population-based studies have demonstrated that the increased mortality is often related to the cause of the epilepsy. Common etiologies include neoplasia, cerebrovascular disease, and pneumonia. Deaths in selected cohorts, such as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), status epilepticus (SE), suicides, and accidents are more frequently epilepsy-related. SUDEP is a particular cause for concern in younger people, and whether and when SUDEP should be discussed with patients with epilepsy remain problematic issues. Risk factors for SUDEP include generalized tonic-clonic seizures, increased seizure frequency, concomitant learning disability, and antiepileptic drug polypharmacy. The overall incidence of SE may be increasing, although case fatality rates remain constant. Mortality is frequently secondary to acute symptomatic disorders. Poor compliance with treatment in patients with epilepsy accounts for a small proportion of deaths from SE. The incidence of suicide is increased, particularly for individuals with epilepsy and comorbid psychiatric conditions. Late mortality figures in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery vary and are likely to reflect differences in case selection. Future studies of mortality should be prospective and follow agreed guidelines to better quantify risk and causation in individual populations.

  3. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Mavrič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy poses a risk for all participants in road traffic; therefore people with epilepsy do not meet the criteria for an unlimited driving license. Their driving is affected not only by epileptic seizures causing impaired consciousness and involuntary movements, but also by antiepileptic drugs with their many unwanted affects. The experts have not yet agreed on whether people with epilepsy have an increased risk of experiencing a road traffic accident. However, recent data suggests that the overall risk is lower compared to other medical conditions. Scientific evidence forms the basis of legislation, which by limiting people with epilepsy, enables all participants in road traffic to drive in the safest possible environment. The legislation that governs epilepsy and driving in Slovenia has been recently thoroughly reformed and thus allows a less discriminatory management of people with epilepsy. Although people with epilepsy experience many issues in their daily life, including their personal relationships and employment, they often list the need for driving as a top concern in surveys. General physicians play an important role in managing the issues of people with epilepsy.

  4. Epigenetic modulation of the biophysical properties of drug-resistant cell lipids to restore drug transport and endocytic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Lu, Shan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2012-09-04

    In our recent studies exploring the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids, and the role they play in drug transport, we demonstrated the difference of drug-resistant breast cancer cells from drug-sensitive cells in lipid composition and biophysical properties, suggesting that cancer cells acquire a drug-resistant phenotype through the alteration of lipid synthesis to inhibit intracellular drug transport to protect from cytotoxic effect. In cancer cells, epigenetic changes (e.g., DNA hypermethylation) are essential to maintain this drug-resistant phenotype. Thus, altered lipid synthesis may be linked to epigenetic mechanisms of drug resistance. We hypothesize that reversing DNA hypermethylation in resistant cells with an epigenetic drug could alter lipid synthesis, changing the cell membrane's biophysical properties to facilitate drug delivery to overcome drug resistance. Herein we show that treating drug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR) with the epigenetic drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) significantly alters cell lipid composition and biophysical properties, causing the resistant cells to acquire biophysical characteristics similar to those of sensitive cell (MCF-7) lipids. Following decitabine treatment, resistant cells demonstrated increased sphingomyelinase activity, resulting in a decreased sphingomyelin level that influenced lipid domain structures, increased membrane fluidity, and reduced P-glycoprotein expression. Changes in the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids facilitated doxorubicin transport and restored endocytic function for drug delivery with a lipid-encapsulated form of doxorubicin, enhancing the drug efficacy. In conclusion, we have established a new mechanism for efficacy of an epigenetic drug, mediated through changes in lipid composition and biophysical properties, in reversing cancer drug resistance.

  5. What does the U.S. Medicare administrative claims database tell us about initial antiepileptic drug treatment for older adults with new-onset epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy C; Faught, Edward; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Richman, Joshua; Funkhouser, Ellen; Piper, Kendra; Juarez, Lucia; Dai, Chen; Pisu, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Disparities in epilepsy treatment are not uncommon; therefore, we examined population-based estimates of initial antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in new-onset epilepsy among racial/ethnic minority groups of older US Medicare beneficiaries. We conducted retrospective analyses of 2008-2010 Medicare administrative claims for a 5% random sample of beneficiaries augmented for minority representation. New-onset epilepsy cases in 2009 had ≥1 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) 345.x or ≥2 ICD-9 780.3x, and ≥1 AED, AND no seizure/epilepsy claim codes or AEDs in preceding 365 days. We examined AED use and concordance with Quality Indicators of Epilepsy Treatment (QUIET) 6 (monotherapy as initial treatment = ≥30 day first prescription with no other concomitant AEDs), and prompt AED treatment (first AED within 30 days of diagnosis). Logistic regression examined likelihood of prompt treatment by demographic (race/ethnicity, gender, age), clinical (number of comorbid conditions, neurology care, index event occurring in the emergency room (ER)), and economic (Part D coverage phase, eligibility for Part D Low Income Subsidy [LIS], and ZIP code level poverty) factors. Over 1 year of follow-up, 79.6% of 3,706 new epilepsy cases had one AED only (77.89% of whites vs. 89% of American Indian/Alaska Native [AI/AN]). Levetiracetam was the most commonly prescribed AED (45.5%: from 24.6% AI/AN to 55.0% whites). The second most common was phenytoin (30.6%: from 18.8% Asians to 43.1% AI/AN). QUIET 6 concordance was 94.7% (93.9% for whites to 97.3% of AI/AN). Only 50% received prompt AED therapy (49.6% whites to 53.9% AI/AN). Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with AED patterns, monotherapy use, or prompt treatment. Monotherapy is common across all racial/ethnic groups of older adults with new-onset epilepsy, older AEDs are commonly prescribed, and treatment is frequently delayed. Further studies on reasons for treatment delays are warranted

  6. [Economic aspects of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argumosa, A; Herranz, J L

    2000-06-01

    The economic magnitude of epilepsy is determined by its effect on the employment status of the patients, the cost of drug treatment for them and the healthcare system and the repercussion worldwide. Studies of the cost of the disease show that it has economic importance due to the sum of the direct and indirect costs caused by it. In the case of epilepsy, the results of studies in various countries led to the creation of a Commission on Economic Aspects of Epilepsy. The lack of epidemiological studies regarding epilepsy in Spain may explain the lack of publications on this subject in our country. The percentage of the total cost due to antiepileptic drugs is considerable and will probably increase in the future. The pharmaco-economic evaluation made by cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, cost-usefulness analysis and studies to minimize costs should serve to use healthcare resources in the most effective manner and justify the rational use of the new antiepileptic drugs. The economic impact of epilepsy is added to the repercussion of the disease itself on the patient and his family. The different distribution of costs in children and adults with epilepsy suggest the need for intervention at an early age to try to reduce the long term economic and personal repercussions. The pharmaco-economic evaluation of the new antiepileptic drugs will make it clear whether their considerable cost is worth paying for their greater effectivity.

  7. Resistance patterns and trends of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: 5-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amresh Kumar Singh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB strains were emerged when multidrug-resistant TB (MDR- TB was inadequately treated. Inadequate treatment of MDR-TB cases may result in additional resistance especially non-XDR-TB and then XDR-TB. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence, resistance patterns and trends of the XDR-TB strains among the MDR-TB at a tertiary care hospital in Lucknow, India Methods: A total of 430 Mycobacterium isolates were underwent NAP test and TB MPT64 Ag test for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. Drug-susceptibility test (DST was performed over MTBC for the first line drugs by 1% proportion method (Bactec and for the second-line drugs by 1% proportion method (Lowenstein- Jensen media. The XDR-TB status was further confirmed by line probe assay (GenoType® MTBDRsl assay. Results: Among the 430 isolates of mycobacterium, 365 (84.9% were MTBC and 139 (38.1% were MDR-TB respectively. Further 97 MDR-TB from “highly suspected drug resistant-TB (DR-TB” cases among MDR-TB were tested with second line drugs in which 15 (15.5% XDR-TB and 82 (84.5% were non-XDR-TB. Regarding XDR-TB status, using the 1% proportion method a 100% agreement was seen with the GenoType® MTBDRsl assay. Resistance patterns of XDR-TB were as; 10/15 (66.7% as isoniazid + rifampicin + ciprofloxacin + amikacin resistance and 5/15 (33.3% as isoniazid + rifampicin + ciprofloxacin + amikacin + kanamycin resistance. Conclusion:The prevalence of XDR-TB was 15.5% among MDR-TB. Hence laboratory testing of “highly suspected drug resistant-TB” isolates should be done for both first and second line drugs simultaneously especially in developing countries.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013;3(4: 169-175

  8. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Ben; de Oliveira, Tulio; Seebregts, Chris; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS) which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  9. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  10. Molecular Basis for Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia A. Schiffer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 protease is one of the major antiviral targets in the treatment of patients infected with HIV-1. The nine FDA approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors were developed with extensive use of structure-based drug design, thus the atomic details of how the inhibitors bind are well characterized. From this structural understanding the molecular basis for drug resistance in HIV-1 protease can be elucidated. Selected mutations in response to therapy and diversity between clades in HIV-1 protease have altered the shape of the active site, potentially altered the dynamics and even altered the sequence of the cleavage sites in the Gag polyprotein. All of these interdependent changes act in synergy to confer drug resistance while simultaneously maintaining the fitness of the virus. New strategies, such as incorporation of the substrate envelope constraint to design robust inhibitors that incorporate details of HIV-1 protease’s function and decrease the probability of drug resistance, are necessary to continue to effectively target this key protein in HIV-1 life cycle.

  11. Predictors of meaningful improvement in quality of life after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carla; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; de Oliveira Thais, Maria Emilia Rodrigues; Kondageski, Charles; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Guarnieri, Ricardo; de Lemos Zingano, Bianca; Ben, Juliana; Nunes, Jean Costa; Markowitsch, Hans Joachim; Wolf, Peter; Wiebe, Samuel; Lin, Katia; Walz, Roger

    2017-05-01

    To investigate prospectively the independent predictors of a minimum clinically important change (MCIC) in quality of life (QOL) after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy related to hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) in Brazilian patients. Multiple binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the clinical, demographic, radiologic, and electrophysiologic variables independently associated with MCIC in the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 Inventory (QOLIE-31) overall score 1 year after ATL in 77 consecutive patients with unilateral MTLE-HS. The overall QOLIE-31 score and all its subscale scores increased significantly (p Epilepsy.

  12. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Murata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted.

  13. The influence of folate serum levels on depressive mood and mental processing in patients with epilepsy treated with enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösche, J; Uhlmann, C; Weber, R; Fröscher, W

    2003-04-01

    Folate deficiency is common in patients with epilepsy and also occurs in patients with depression or cognitive deficits. This study investigates whether low serum folate levels may contribute to depressive mood and difficulties in mental processing in patients with epilepsy treated with anti-epileptic drugs inducing the cytochrome P450. We analysed the serum folate levels, the score in the Self Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the results of a bedside test in mental processing in 54 patients with epilepsy. There was a significant negative correlation between the serum folate levels and the score in SDS and significant positive correlations between the score in SDS and the time needed to process an interference task or a letter-reading task. Low serum folate levels may contribute to depressive mood and therefore to difficulties in mental processing. Further studies utilizing total plasma homocysteine as a sensitive measure of functional folate deficiency and more elaborate tests of mental processing are required to elucidate the impact of folate metabolism on depressive mood and cognitive function in patients with epilepsy.

  14. Drug resistance following irradiation of RIF-1 tumors: Influence of the interval between irradiation and drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, L.E.; Davies, B.M.; Moulder, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    RIF-1 tumors contain a small number of cells (1 to 100 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or adriamycin. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors is highly variable. Radiation, delivered in vivo at doses of 3 to 12 Gy, increases the frequency of methotrexate- and 5-fluorouracil-resistant cells, but not the frequency of adriamycin-resistant cells. The magnitude of induction of 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance shows a complex dependence on the radiation dose and on the interval between irradiation and assessment of drug resistance. For a dose of 3 Gy, induced 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance is seen only after an interval of 5 to 7 days, whereas for a dose of 12 Gy, high levels of induced resistance are observed 1 to 3 days after irradiation. The maximum absolute risk for induction of resistance is 4 per 10(4) cells per Gy for methotrexate, and 3 per 10(6) cells per Gy for 5-fluorouracil. These results indicate that tumor hypoxia may play a role in the increased levels of drug resistance seen after irradiation, and that both genetic and environmental factors may influence radiation-induction of drug resistance. These studies provide essential data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be caused by radiation-induced drug resistance

  15. Drug resistance patterns of acinetobacter baumannii in makkah, saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Ashshi, A.M.; Mahomed, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii causes infections of respiratory, urinary tract, blood stream and surgical sites. Its clinical significance has increased due to its rapidly developing resistance to major groups of antibiotics used for its treatment. There is limited data available on antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii from Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To determine the patterns of drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii and predisposing factors for its acquisition.Subjects and Methods: In this descriptive study, 72 hospitalized patients infected with A baumannii were studied. The clinical and demographic data of the patients were collected using a predesigned questionnaire. Isolation and identification of A.baumannii from all clinical specimens were done using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susce ptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Majority of the isolates (61.1%) were from respiratory tract infections. A.baumannii isolates showed high drug resistance to piperacil lin (93.1%), aztreonam (80.5%), ticarcillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline (76.4%, each) and cefotaxime (75%). Only amikacin showed low rate of resistance compared to other antibiotics (40.3%). About 36% patients had some underlying diseases with diabetes mellitus (11%) being the predominant underlying disease. Conclusions: High antimicrobial resistance to commonly used antibiotics was seen against A.baumannii isolates. Only amikacin was most effective against it. (author)

  16. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis presenting as anterior mediastinal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmarth Chandane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enlargement of the mediastinal lymphatic glands is a common presentation of intrathoracic tuberculosis (TB in children. However, usually, the mediastinal TB nodes enlarge to 2.8 ± 1.0 cm. In this report, we describe a case of anterior mediastinal lymphnode TB seen as huge mass (7 cm on computed tomography (CT thorax without respiratory or food pipe compromise despite anterior mediastinum being an enclosed space. CT guided biopsy of the mass cultured Mycobacterium TB complex which was resistant to isoniazide, rifampicin, streptomycin ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and pyrazinamide. Hence, we report primary multi drug resistant TB presenting as anterior mediastinal mass as a rare case report.

  17. Personalized Cancer Medicine: Molecular Diagnostics, Predictive biomarkers, and Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez de Castro, D; Clarke, P A; Al-Lazikani, B; Workman, P

    2013-01-01

    The progressive elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has fueled the rational development of targeted drugs for patient populations stratified by genetic characteristics. Here we discuss general challenges relating to molecular diagnostics and describe predictive biomarkers for personalized cancer medicine. We also highlight resistance mechanisms for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in lung cancer. We envisage a future requiring the use of longitudinal genome sequencing and other omics technologies alongside combinatorial treatment to overcome cellular and molecular heterogeneity and prevent resistance caused by clonal evolution. PMID:23361103

  18. Drug membrane interaction and the importance for drug transport, distribution, accumulation, efficacy and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, J K; Coats, E A; Cordes, H P; Wiese, M

    1994-10-01

    Some aspects of drug membrane interaction and its influence on drug transport, accumulation, efficacy and resistance have been discussed. The interactions manifest themselves macroscopically in changes in the physical and thermodynamic properties of "pure membranes" or bilayers. As various amounts of foreign molecules enter the membrane, in particular the main gel to liquid crystalline phase transition can be dramatically changed. This may change permeability, cell-fusion, cell resistance and may also lead to changes in conformation of the embedded receptor proteins. Furthermore, specific interactions with lipids may lead to drug accumulation in membranes and thus to much larger concentrations at the active site than present in the surrounding water phase. The lipid environment may also lead to changes in the preferred conformation of drug molecules. These events are directly related to drug efficacy. The determination of essential molecular criteria for the interaction could be used to design new and more selective therapeutics. This excursion in some aspects of drug membrane interaction underlines the importance of lipids and their interaction with drug molecules for our understanding of drug action, but this is not really a new thought but has been formulated in 1884 by THUDICUM: "Phospholipids are the centre, life and chemical soul of all bioplasm whatsoever, that of plants as well as of animals".

  19. Epilepsy treatment. Targeting LDH enzymes with a stiripentol analog to treat epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Nagisa; Lee, Suni; Katsu, Takashi; Otsuki, Takemi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-20

    Neuronal excitation is regulated by energy metabolism, and drug-resistant epilepsy can be suppressed by special diets. Here, we report that seizures and epileptiform activity are reduced by inhibition of the metabolic pathway via lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a component of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle. Inhibition of the enzyme LDH hyperpolarized neurons, which was reversed by the downstream metabolite pyruvate. LDH inhibition also suppressed seizures in vivo in a mouse model of epilepsy. We further found that stiripentol, a clinically used antiepileptic drug, is an LDH inhibitor. By modifying its chemical structure, we identified a previously unknown LDH inhibitor, which potently suppressed seizures in vivo. We conclude that LDH inhibitors are a promising new group of antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Drug accumulation in the presence of the multidrug resistance pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, S; Litman, Thomas; Stein, W D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the interaction between the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein, and two compounds that interact with it: vinblastine, a classical substrate of the pump, and verapamil, a classical reverser. Steady-state levels of accumulation of these two drugs were determined in a multidrug resistant...... P388 leukemia cell line, P388/ADR. The time course of accumulation of these drugs, and the effect of energy starvation and the presence of chloroquine on the level of their steady-state accumulation were quite disparate. Vinblastine inhibited the accumulation of verapamil whereas it enhanced...

  1. The current state of epilepsy guidelines: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Khara M; Wiebe, Samuel; Dunkley, Colin; Janszky, Jozsef; Kumlien, Eva; Moshé, Solomon; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Pedley, Timothy A; Perucca, Emilio; Senties, Horacio; Thomas, Sanjeev V; Wang, Yuping; Wilmshurst, Jo; Jetté, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Epilepsy Guidelines Task Force, composed of 14 international members, was established in 2011 to identify, using systematic review methodology, international epilepsy clinical care guidelines, assess their quality, and determine gaps in areas of need of development. A systematic review of the literature (1985-2014) was performed in six electronic databases (e.g. Medline, Embase) using a broad search strategy without initial limits to language or study design. Six gray literature databases (e.g., American Academy of Neurology [AAN], ILAE) were also searched to minimize publication bias. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, reviewed full text articles, and performed data abstraction. Descriptive statistics and a meta-analysis were generated. The search identified 10,926 abstracts. Of the 410 articles selected for full text review, 63 met our eligibility criteria for a guideline. Of those included, 54 were in English and 9 were in other languages (French, Spanish, and Italian). Of all guidelines, 29% did not specify the target age groups, 27% were focused on adults, 22% included only children, and 6% specifically addressed issues related to women with epilepsy. Guidelines included in the review were most often aimed at guiding clinical practice for status epilepticus (n = 7), first seizure (n = 6), drug-resistant epilepsy (n = 5), and febrile seizures (n = 4), among others. Most of the guidelines were therapeutic (n = 35) or diagnostic (n = 16) in nature. The quality of the guidelines using a 1-7 point scale (7 = highest) varied and was moderate overall (mean = 4.99 ± 1.05 [SD]). We identified substantial gaps in topics (e.g., epilepsy in the elderly) and there was considerable heterogeneity in methodologic quality. The findings should offer a valuable resource for health professionals caring for people with epilepsy, since they will help guide the prioritization, development, and dissemination of future

  2. Androgen receptor variation affects prostate cancer progression and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Edel; Sissung, Tristan M; Price, Douglas K; Chau, Cindy H; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Significant therapeutic progress has been made in treating prostate cancer in recent years. Drugs such as enzalutamide, abiraterone, and cabazitaxel have expanded the treatment armamentarium, although it is not completely clear which of these drugs are the most-effective option for individual patients. Moreover, such advances have been tempered by the development of therapeutic resistance. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current literature pertaining to the biochemical effects of AR variants and their consequences on prostate cancer therapies at both the molecular level and in clinical treatment. We address how these AR splice variants and mutations affect tumor progression and therapeutic resistance and discuss potential novel therapeutic strategies under development. It is hoped that these therapies can be administered with increasing precision as tumor genotyping methods become more sophisticated, thereby lending clinicians a better understanding of the underlying biology of prostate tumors in individual patients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Susu; Chandler, Michael; Varani, Alessandro M; Hickman, Alison B; Dekker, John P; Dyda, Fred

    2016-12-06

    The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content) of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance. The spread of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria is a serious public health threat, as it can critically limit the types of drugs that can be used to treat infected patients. In particular, carbapenem-resistant members of the Enterobacteriaceae family are responsible for a significant and growing burden of morbidity and mortality. Here, we report on the mechanisms underlying the evolution of several plasmids carried by previously sequenced clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIH CC). Our ability to track genetic rearrangements that occurred within resistance plasmids was dependent on accurate annotation of the mobile genetic elements within the plasmids, which was greatly aided by access to long-read DNA sequencing data and knowledge of their mechanisms. Mobile genetic elements such as

  4. Systematic drug screening reveals specific vulnerabilities and co-resistance patterns in endocrine-resistant breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Jaiswal, Alok; Edgren, Henrik; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Eldfors, Samuli; Brück, Oscar; Aittokallio, Tero; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) inhibitor tamoxifen reduces breast cancer mortality by 31 % and has served as the standard treatment for ER-positive breast cancers for decades. However, 50 % of advanced ER-positive cancers display de novo resistance to tamoxifen, and acquired resistance evolves in 40 % of patients who initially respond. Mechanisms underlying resistance development remain poorly understood and new therapeutic opportunities are urgently needed. Here, we report the generation and characterization of seven tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines from four parental strains. Using high throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing (DSRT) with 279 approved and investigational oncology drugs, exome-sequencing and network analysis, we for the first time, systematically determine the drug response profiles specific to tamoxifen resistance. We discovered emerging vulnerabilities towards specific drugs, such as ERK1/2-, proteasome- and BCL-family inhibitors as the cells became tamoxifen-resistant. Co-resistance to other drugs such as the survivin inhibitor YM155 and the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel also occurred. This study indicates that multiple molecular mechanisms dictate endocrine resistance, resulting in unexpected vulnerabilities to initially ineffective drugs, as well as in emerging co-resistances. Thus, combatting drug-resistant tumors will require patient-tailored strategies in order to identify new drug vulnerabilities, and to understand the associated co-resistance patterns. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2452-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  5. Systematic drug screening reveals specific vulnerabilities and co-resistance patterns in endocrine-resistant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Jaiswal, Alok; Edgren, Henrik; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Eldfors, Samuli; Brück, Oscar; Aittokallio, Tero; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2016-07-04

    The estrogen receptor (ER) inhibitor tamoxifen reduces breast cancer mortality by 31 % and has served as the standard treatment for ER-positive breast cancers for decades. However, 50 % of advanced ER-positive cancers display de novo resistance to tamoxifen, and acquired resistance evolves in 40 % of patients who initially respond. Mechanisms underlying resistance development remain poorly understood and new therapeutic opportunities are urgently needed. Here, we report the generation and characterization of seven tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines from four parental strains. Using high throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing (DSRT) with 279 approved and investigational oncology drugs, exome-sequencing and network analysis, we for the first time, systematically determine the drug response profiles specific to tamoxifen resistance. We discovered emerging vulnerabilities towards specific drugs, such as ERK1/2-, proteasome- and BCL-family inhibitors as the cells became tamoxifen-resistant. Co-resistance to other drugs such as the survivin inhibitor YM155 and the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel also occurred. This study indicates that multiple molecular mechanisms dictate endocrine resistance, resulting in unexpected vulnerabilities to initially ineffective drugs, as well as in emerging co-resistances. Thus, combatting drug-resistant tumors will require patient-tailored strategies in order to identify new drug vulnerabilities, and to understand the associated co-resistance patterns.

  6. Implementation of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, Timothy M.; Doulla, Basra; van Leth, Frank; Mfinanga, Sayoki G. M.; Range, Nyagosya; Lwilla, Fred; Mfaume, Saidi M.; van Deun, Armand; Zignol, Matteo; Cobelens, Frank G.; Egwaga, Saidi M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A drug resistance survey is an essential public health management tool for evaluating and improving the performance of National Tuberculosis control programmes. The current manuscript describes the implementation of the first national drug resistance survey in Tanzania. METHODS:

  7. Rationale and uses of a public HIV drug-resistance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Robert W

    2006-09-15

    Knowledge regarding the drug resistance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is critical for surveillance of drug resistance, development of antiretroviral drugs, and management of infections with drug-resistant viruses. Such knowledge is derived from studies that correlate genetic variation in the targets of therapy with the antiretroviral treatments received by persons from whom the variant was obtained (genotype-treatment), with drug-susceptibility data on genetic variants (genotype-phenotype), and with virological and clinical response to a new treatment regimen (genotype-outcome). An HIV drug-resistance database is required to represent, store, and analyze the diverse forms of data underlying our knowledge of drug resistance and to make these data available to the broad community of researchers studying drug resistance in HIV and clinicians using HIV drug-resistance tests. Such genotype-treatment, genotype-phenotype, and genotype-outcome correlations are contained in the Stanford HIV RT and Protease Sequence Database and have specific usefulness.

  8. Drug resistance-related mutations in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from diverse geographical regions

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    Senia Rosales-Klintz

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study confirms that there are significant geographical differences in the distribution of resistance-related mutations and suggests that an increased understanding of such differences in the specific distribution of resistance conferring mutations is crucial for development of new, generally applicable, molecular tools for rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. The fact that a narrower distribution of mutations in high MDR-TB prevalence settings was seen suggests that much of the problems in these settings can be a result of an ongoing transmission of certain MDR-TB strains.

  9. Changing prevalence and resistance patterns in children with drug-resistant tuberculosis in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ira; Shah, Forum

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence of drug-resistant (DR) tuberculosis (TB) in children is increasing. Although, in India, multi-drug-resistant (MDR) TB rates have been relatively stable, the number of children with pre-extensively drug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB is increasing. To determine whether the prevalence of DR TB in children in Mumbai is changing and to study the evolving patterns of resistance. A retrospective study was undertaken in 1311 paediatric patients referred between April 2007 and March 2013 to the Paediatric TB clinic at B. J. Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai. Children were defined as having DR TB on the basis of drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown on culture of body fluids (in the case of extra pulmonary TB) or from gastric lavage/bronchi-alveolar lavage/sputum in patients with pulmonary TB or from DST of the contacts. The prevalence of DR TB was calculated and the type of DR was evaluated yearly and in the pre-2010 and post-2010 eras. The overall prevalence of DR TB was 86 (6.6%) with an increase from 23 (5.6%) patients pre-2010 to 63 (7%) post-2010 (P = 0.40). Nine (10.4%) patients were diagnosed on the basis of contact with a parent with DR TB. Overall fluoroquinolone resistance increased from 9 (39.1%) pre-2010 to 59 (93.7%) post-2010 (P = 0.0001): moxifloxacin resistance increased from 2 (8.7%) to 29 (46%) (P = 0.0018) and ofloxacin resistance increased from 7 (30.4%) to 30 (47.6%) (P = 0.14). Ethionamide resistance also increased from 6 (26.1%) to 31 (49.2%) (P = 0.04), aminoglycoside resistance was one (4.3%) pre-2010 and 12 (19%) post-2010 (P = 0.17) and resistance remained virtually the same for both amikacin [0 pre-2010 and 6 (9.5%) after 2010] and kanamycin [one (4.3%) pre- and 6 (9.5%) post-2010]. Of the first-line drugs, resistance remained the same for isoniazid [23 (100%) to 61 (96.8%)], rifampicin [22 (95.7%) to 51 (80.9%),P = 0.17], pyrazinamide [15 (65.2%) to

  10. Impact of drug resistance on the tuberculosis treatment outcome

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    E. Lesnic

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The standard treatment of a new case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB according to WHO recommendations in the Republic of Moldova is performed since 2005 showing a low treatment succes. Actually the treatment success rate increased due to excluding of MDR-TB patients from the general cohort. The major rate of patients with low outcome is represented by the failed and lost to follow-up cases. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of multidrug-resiatnce and MDR-TB on the tuberculosis treatment outcome. Materials and methods. A retrospective selective, descriptive study targeting social, demographic, economic and epidemiological peculiarities, case-management, diagnostic radiological aspects and microbiological characteristics of 187 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis registered during 2013–2015 distributed in two groups: 1st group (61 patients with established multidrug-resistant strains using conventional cultural methods and the 2nd group (126 patients with MDR-TB. Results. Multidrug-resistance was established more frequently in new cases and MDR-TB in two thirds of retreated patients. No difference was identified in gender and age distribution, social, economical, educational characteristics; case-management assessment identified a similar proportion of patients revealed by general practitioners and specialists, with low rate of screened high risk groups. All patients from the multidrug-resistant group began the standard treatment for drug-responsiveness tuberculosis before drug susceptibility testing and one third of MDR-TB group was treated from the onset with the DOTS-Plus regimen. Highest success rate was identified in the new-case subgroups of both groups and higher rate of died patients was determined in the retreated subgroups. Such a low rate of patients aggrevates the resistance. Conclusions. Early diagnosis, drug responsiveness testing and raising awareness among about treatment compliance will

  11. Drug Resistance Mechanisms of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to Macrolide Antibiotics

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    Xijie Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Throat swabs from children with suspected Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae infection were cultured for the presence of M. pneumoniae and its species specificity using the 16S rRNA gene. Seventy-six M. pneumoniae strains isolated from 580 swabs showed that 70 were erythromycin resistant with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC around 32–512 mg/L. Fifty M. pneumoniae strains (46 resistant, 4 sensitive were tested for sensitivity to tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin. Tetracycline and ciprofloxacin had some effect, and gentamicin had an effect on the majority of M. pneumoniae strains. Domains II and V of the 23S rRNA gene and the ribosomal protein L4 and L22 genes, both of which are considered to be associated with macrolide resistance, were sequenced and the sequences were compared with the corresponding sequences in M129 registered with NCBI and the FH strain. The 70 resistant strains all showed a 2063 or 2064 site mutation in domain V of the 23S rRNA but no mutations in domain II. Site mutations of L4 or L22 can be observed in either resistant or sensitive strains, although it is not known whether this is associated with drug resistance.

  12. Investigational drugs to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Cuong; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon YC; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is to a large extent due to antibiotic-resistant strains, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). While the toll of invasive MRSA infections appears to decrease in U.S. hospitals, the rate of community-associated MRSA infections remains constant and there is a surge of MRSA in many other countries. This situation calls for continuing if not increased efforts to find novel strategies to combat MRSA infections. Areas covered This review will provide an overview of current investigational antibiotics in clinical development (up to phase II), and of therapeutic antibodies and alternative drugs against S. aureus in preclinical and clinical development, including a short description of the mechanism of action and a presentation of microbiological and clinical data. Expert opinion Increased recent antibiotic development efforts and results from pathogenesis research have led to several new antibiotics and alternative drugs, as well as a more informed selection of targets for vaccination efforts against MRSA. This developing portfolio of novel anti-staphylococcal drugs will hopefully provide us with additional and more efficient ways to combat MRSA infections in the near future and prevent us from running out of treatment options, even if new resistances arise. PMID:26536498

  13. CHEMOTHERAPY, WITHIN-HOST ECOLOGY AND THE FITNESS OF DRUG-RESISTANT MALARIA PARASITES

    OpenAIRE

    Huijben, Silvie; Nelson, William A.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Sim, Derek G.; Drew, Damien R.; Read, Andrew F.

    2010-01-01

    A major determinant of the rate at which drug-resistant malaria parasites spread through a population is the ecology of resistant and sensitive parasites sharing the same host. Drug treatment can significantly alter this ecology by removing the drug-sensitive parasites, leading to competitive release of resistant parasites. Here, we test the hypothesis that the spread of resistance can be slowed by reducing drug treatment and hence restricting competitive release. Using the rodent malaria mod...

  14. Molecular biological studies on the human radioresistance and drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Hong, Weon Seon

    1992-04-01

    We irradiated the MKN45 and PC14 cell lines with 500 rads and also established the adriamycin-resistant and cis-platinum resistant cell line. The genomic DNA and total RNA were extracted and subjected to the Southern and Northern analysis using various probes including heat shock protein 70, MDR1, fos, TGFb etc. The mRNA transcript was increased 1 hour after the irradiation and sustained during the 48 hours and returned to the level of pre-irradiation. No significant change was observed with the drug resistant cell lines at the level of gene dosage. We suggest that the marked increase of the hsp70 transcript is very important finding and is believed to be a good candidate for the modulation of the cellular response to irradiation and the radioresistance. (Author)

  15. SURGERY FOR DRUG-RESISTANT DESTRUCTIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

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    S. N. Skornyakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experience in surgically treating 145 patients with destructive, mainly fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. All the patients completed treatment. In the preoperative preparation, particular emphasis is laid on the promptest determination of a spectrum of pathogen susceptibility/resistance, individualized chemotherapy, and collapse therapy options. Postoperative complications occurred in 27 (18.6% patients, fatal outcomes in 4 (2.7%. The former were recorded most frequently after pneumonectomy in 13 (37.1% cases, the later were seen in 3 (8.6%. Sputum culture conversion was generally achieved in 111 (78% patients, particularly in 97 (78.2% patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and in 14 (66.7% with a broad drug resistance in the pathogen. Out of the 64 patients followed up for more than 3 years, 48 (75.0% were in clinical and bacteriological remission.

  16. Mechanisms of first-line antimicrobial resistance in multi-drug and extensively drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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    Navisha Dookie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In South Africa, drug resistant tuberculosis is a major public health crisis in the face of the colossal HIV pandemic. Methods In an attempt to understand the distribution of drug resistance in our setting, we analysed the rpoB, katG, inhA, pncA and embB genes associated with resistance to key drugs used in the treatment of tuberculosis in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the KwaZulu-Natal province. Results Classical mutations were detected in the katG, inhA and embB genes associated with resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol. Diverse mutations were recorded in the multidrug resistant (MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR isolates for the rpoB and pncA gene associated with resistance to rifampicin and pyrazinamide. Conclusions M.tuberculosis strains circulating in our setting display a combination of previously observed mutations, each mediating resistance to a different drug. The MDR and XDR TB isolates analysed in this study displayed classical mutations linked to INH and EMB resistance, whilst diverse mutations were linked to RIF and PZA resistance. The similarity of the XDR strains confirms reports of the clonality of the XDR epidemic. The successful dissemination of the drug resistant strains in the province underscores the need for rapid diagnostics to effectively diagnose drug resistance and guide treatment.

  17. Characterization of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Ajay; Maharjan, Bhagwan; Nakajima, Chie; Fukushima, Yukari; Pandey, Basu D; Beneke, Antje; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has raised public health concern for global control of TB. Although molecular characterization of drug resistance-associated mutations in multidrug-resistant isolates in Nepal has been made, mutations in XDR isolates and their genotypes have not been reported previously. In this study, we identified and characterized 13 XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from clinical isolates in Nepal. The most prevalent mutations involved in rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin, and kanamycin/capreomycin resistance were Ser531Leu in rpoB gene (92.3%), Ser315Thr in katG gene (92.3%), Asp94Gly in gyrA gene (53.9%) and A1400G in rrs gene (61.5%), respectively. Spoligotyping and multilocus sequence typing revealed that 69% belonged to Beijing family, especially modern types. Further typing with 26-loci variable number of tandem repeats suggested the current spread of XDR M. tuberculosis. Our result highlights the need to reinforce the TB policy in Nepal with regard to control and detection strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of phenobarbital with bromide as a first-choice antiepileptic drug for treatment of epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, Dawn Merton; Dewey, Curtis; Carpenter, David Mark

    2012-05-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of treatment with phenobarbital or bromide as the first-choice antiepileptic drug (AED) in dogs. Double-blinded, randomized, parallel, clinical trial. 46 AED-naïve dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy. Study inclusion was based on age, history, findings on physical and neurologic examinations, and clinicopathologic test results. For either phenobarbital treatment (21 dogs) or bromide treatment (25), a 7-day loading dose period was initiated along with a maintenance dose, which was adjusted on the basis of monthly monitoring. Efficacy and safety outcomes were compared between times (baseline and study end [generally 6 months]) and between drugs. Phenobarbital treatment resulted in eradication of seizures (17/20 [85%]) significantly more often than did bromide (12/23 [52%]); phenobarbital treatment also resulted in a greater percentage decrease in seizure duration (88 ± 34%), compared with bromide (49 ± 75%). Seizure activity worsened in 3 bromide-treated dogs only. In dogs with seizure eradication, mean ± SD serum phenobarbital concentration was 25 ± 6 μg/mL (phenobarbital dosage, 4.1 ± 1.1 mg/kg [1.9 ± 0.5 mg/lb], p.o., q 12 h) and mean serum bromide concentration was 1.8 ± 0.6 mg/mL (bromide dosage, 31 ± 11 mg/kg [14 ± 5 mg/lb], p.o., q 12 h). Ataxia, lethargy, and polydipsia were greater at 1 month for phenobarbital-treated dogs; vomiting was greater for bromide-treated dogs at 1 month and study end. Both phenobarbital and bromide were reasonable first-choice AEDs for dogs, but phenobarbital was more effective and better tolerated during the first 6 months of treatment.

  19. Drug Resistance and the Kinetics of Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, Krastan B.

    2012-02-01

    Most metastatic cancers after initial response to current drug therapies develop resistance to the treatment. We present cancer data and a theory that explains the observed kinetics of tumor growth in cancer patients and using a stochastic model based on this theory we relate the kinetics of tumor growth to Kaplan-Meyer survival curves. The theory points to the tumor growth rate as the most important parameter determining the outcome of a drug treatment. The overall tumor growth or decay rate is a reflection of the balance between cell division, senescence and apoptosis and we propose that the deviation of the decay rate from exponential is a measure of the emergence of drug resistance. In clinical trials the progression free survival, the overall survival, and the shape of the Kaplan-Meyer plots are determined by the tumor growth rate probability distribution among the patients in the trial. How drug treatments modify this distribution will also be described. At the end of the talk we will discuss the connection between the theory described here and the age related cancer mortality rates in the United States.

  20. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Novel diagnostics and therapeutics for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosky, Melody; Javid, Babak

    2014-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This is at least partly due to late diagnosis and ineffective treatment of drug-resistant status. Selective search of the literature on DR-TB supplemented by recent guidelines from the World Health Organization. Better and more rapid diagnosis of DR-TB by new techniques such as Xpert Mtb/RIF are likely to make a substantial impact on the disease. New therapeutics for DR-TB are entering, or about to enter the market for the first time in decades. It is not clear whether new treatments should be restricted for DR-TB or also used for drug-susceptible tuberculosis. With several new agents on the horizon, there is the real possibility of an entirely new regimen for tuberculosis. An inexpensive 'near-patient' diagnostic test is still needed. Optimizing new drug combination regimens in a timely manner is urgently required. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Prognostic analysis of patients with epilepsy according to time of relapse after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs following four seizure-free years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soochul; Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Seung Woo; Roh, Yun Ho

    2017-01-01

    We performed a retrospective, prognostic analysis of a cohort of patients with epilepsy according to time of relapse after four seizure-free years. Planned withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and at least 3 years of follow-up after AED discontinuation were performed. The following two groups were assessed: (1) an early relapse (ER) group of patients who experienced recurrence during AED withdrawal and (2) a late relapse (LR) group of patients who experienced recurrence after completion of the AED discontinuation process. After dichotomization, the relapse rate, prognostic factors, and their impacts for each group were compared with those of a group of patients who continued to be seizure-free after AED withdrawal (SF group) using multiple logistic regression analysis. The AED intake mode was also analyzed. Two hundred seventeen (64.6%) of the 336 total patients experienced relapse. One hundred thirty-nine patients (41.4%) and 78 patients (23.2%) were included in the LR and ER groups, respectively. Symptom duration >120 months showed the strongest negative prognostic impact as demonstrated by the 4.7-fold higher risk of recurrence in the ER group compared with the SF group. Additional factors with a negative prognostic impact included an age at epilepsy onset of ≤20 years and the presence of localization-related epilepsy. No reliable predictor between the SF and LR groups was revealed. After exclusion of the SF group, post hoc analysis according to age at epilepsy onset and symptom duration showed that the above-mentioned negative prognostic factors significantly affected the relapse patterns of the LR and ER groups. The results suggest that longer symptom duration, which could be associated with intrinsic reactivation of epilepsy, is the strongest negative prognostic factor for relapse. Relapse after AED withdrawal in prolonged follow-up of seizure-free patients is one aspect of the natural history of epilepsy. © 2016 The Authors. Epilepsia published by

  3. Preoperative visual field deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Sanjeet S. Grewal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection and laser thermoablation have been used to treat drug resistant epilepsy with good results. However, they are not without risk. One of the most commonly reported complications of temporal lobe surgery is contralateral superior homonymous quadrantanopsia. We describe a patient with asymptomatic preoperative quadrantanopsia fortuitously discovered as part of our recently modified protocol to evaluate patients prior to temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. This visual field deficit was subtle and not detected on routine clinical neurological examination. While we understand that this is a single case, we advocate further study for more detailed preoperative visual field examinations to characterize the true incidence of postoperative visual field lesions.

  4. Movement disorder and epilepsy in subependymal nodular heterotopia

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    Anurag Lohmror

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subependymal nodular heterotopia is a cortical development malformation that is commonly associated with refractory epilepsy. Patients with heterotopia show a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, from being asymptomatic to presenting with intractable seizures and intellectual impairment. We report a case of drug-resistant epilepsy with normal intelligence, having bilateral subependymal heterotopic nodules in the brain, presenting to us with a movement disorder in the form of myoclonus of bilateral lower limbs which is an unusual manifestation of gray matter heterotopias. Although rare, gray matter heterotopias may present as movement disorder and should be considered in differential diagnosis while workup of movement disorders.

  5. The roles of variants in human multidrug resistance (MDR1 gene and their haplotypes on antiepileptic drugs response: a meta-analysis of 57 studies.

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    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported the associations between the ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1, also known as MDR1 polymorphisms and their haplotypes with risk of response to antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy, however, the results were inconclusive.The Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI and Chinese Biomedicine databases were searched up to July 15, 2014. Pooled odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model based on heterogeneity tests. Meta-regression and Galbraith plot analysis were carried out to explore the possible heterogeneity.A total of 57 studies involving 12407 patients (6083 drug-resistant and 6324 drug-responsive patients with epilepsy were included in the pooled-analysis. For all three polymorphisms (C3435T, G2677T/A, and C1236T, we observed a wide spectrum of minor allele frequencies across different ethnicities. A significantly decreased risk of AEDs resistance was observed in Caucasian patients with T allele of C3435T variant, which was still significant after adjusted by multiple testing corrections (T vs C: OR=0.83, 95%CI=0.71-0.96, p=0.01. However, no significant association was observed between the other two variants and AEDs resistance. Of their haplotypes in ABCB1 gene (all studies were in Indians and Asians, no significant association was observed with AEDs resistance. Moreover, sensitivity and Cumulative analysis showed that the results of this meta-analysis were stable.In summary, this meta-analysis demonstrated that effect of C3435T variant on risk of AEDs resistance was ethnicity-dependent, which was significant in Caucasians. Additionally, further studies in different ethnic groups are warranted to clarify possible roles of haplotypes in ABCB1 gene in AEDs resistance, especially in Caucasians.

  6. Definition of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs in patients with multidrugresistant tuberculosis and TB with extremely drug resistant depending on the case of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryzhanovsky D.G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the profile of drug resistance to the main (I line and reserve (II line antituberculosis drugs in patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, depending of the case of the disease. According to the randomized retrospective research 200 patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, who received treatment in the clinic of hospital Municipal institution «Dnipropetrovsk rigional clinical association «Phthisiology» Dnipropetrovsk regional Council» during the period 2010 – 2012 were involved. Data about patients contained the data on a case of the disease and the results of the test of drug sensitivity to MBT. XDR – TB was revealed in 7.5% of patients with MDR tuberculosis. In patients with MDR tuberculosis as compared with patients with XDR tuberculosis «new cases» were diagnosed in 19.5% against 18.5% (p <0.05. In patients with MDR tuberculosis and with XDR tuberculosis resistance to the antituberculosis drug more commonly developed to S - 88.5%, E - 55% and Z - 24%. The presence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB prevails in patients, who underwent previous courses of treatment with anti-TB drugs in case history as compared with patients with «new cases» of treatment. The development of resistance to anti-TB drugs depends on the availability of these drugs in the previous treatment regimens.

  7. Trial of Cannabidiol for Drug-Resistant Seizures in the Dravet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Cross, J Helen; Laux, Linda; Marsh, Eric; Miller, Ian; Nabbout, Rima; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Wright, Stephen

    2017-05-25

    The Dravet syndrome is a complex childhood epilepsy disorder that is associated with drug-resistant seizures and a high mortality rate. We studied cannabidiol for the treatment of drug-resistant seizures in the Dravet syndrome. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 120 children and young adults with the Dravet syndrome and drug-resistant seizures to receive either cannabidiol oral solution at a dose of 20 mg per kilogram of body weight per day or placebo, in addition to standard antiepileptic treatment. The primary end point was the change in convulsive-seizure frequency over a 14-week treatment period, as compared with a 4-week baseline period. The median frequency of convulsive seizures per month decreased from 12.4 to 5.9 with cannabidiol, as compared with a decrease from 14.9 to 14.1 with placebo (adjusted median difference between the cannabidiol group and the placebo group in change in seizure frequency, -22.8 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -41.1 to -5.4; P=0.01). The percentage of patients who had at least a 50% reduction in convulsive-seizure frequency was 43% with cannabidiol and 27% with placebo (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 0.93 to 4.30; P=0.08). The patient's overall condition improved by at least one category on the seven-category Caregiver Global Impression of Change scale in 62% of the cannabidiol group as compared with 34% of the placebo group (P=0.02). The frequency of total seizures of all types was significantly reduced with cannabidiol (P=0.03), but there was no significant reduction in nonconvulsive seizures. The percentage of patients who became seizure-free was 5% with cannabidiol and 0% with placebo (P=0.08). Adverse events that occurred more frequently in the cannabidiol group than in the placebo group included diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue, pyrexia, somnolence, and abnormal results on liver-function tests. There were more withdrawals from the trial in the cannabidiol group. Among patients with

  8. Marijuana for epilepsy?

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana has been used for centuries for medical reasons. In the early 20th century it was first linked to treatment for epilepsy. Over the last few decades researchers have been unravelling the truth behind the drug. Prof. Giuseppe Di Giovanni tells us more about using marijuana for medical research and his own research on this controversial drug.

  9. Intelligence quotient improves after antiepileptic drug withdrawal following pediatric epilepsy surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuisen, Kim; van Schooneveld, Monique M. J.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Cross, J. Helen; Harrison, Sue; Polster, Tilman; Daehn, Marion; Djimjadi, Sarina; Yalnizoglu, Dilek; Turanli, Guzide; Sassen, Robert; Hoppe, Christian; Kuczaty, Stefan; Barba, Carmen; Kahane, Philippe; Schubert-Bast, Susanne; Reuner, Gitta; Bast, Thomas; Strobl, Karl; Mayer, Hans; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Seegmuller, Caroline; Laurent, Agathe; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Braun, Kees P. J.

    ObjectiveAntiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have cognitive side effects that, particularly in children, may affect intellectual functioning. With the TimeToStop (TTS) study, we showed that timing of AED withdrawal does not majorly influence long-term seizure outcomes. We now aimed to evaluate the effect of

  10. Gene expression profile in temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Gorter, Jan A.

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) represents the most frequent epilepsy syndrome in adult patients with resistance to pharmacological treatment. In TLE, the origin of seizure activity typically involves the hippocampal formation, which displays

  11. Gene expression profile in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, E.M.A.; Gorter, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) represents the most frequent epilepsy syndrome in adult patients with resistance to pharmacological treatment. In TLE, the origin of seizure activity typically involves the hippocampal formation, which displays

  12. Repurposing Clinical Molecule Ebselen to Combat Drug Resistant Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Thangamani

    Full Text Available Without a doubt, our current antimicrobials are losing the battle in the fight against newly-emerged multidrug-resistant pathogens. There is a pressing, unmet need for novel antimicrobials and novel approaches to develop them; however, it is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to develop new antimicrobials. One strategy to reduce the time and cost associated with antimicrobial innovation is drug repurposing, which is to find new applications outside the scope of the original medical indication of the drug. Ebselen, an organoselenium clinical molecule, possesses potent antimicrobial activity against clinical multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, the activity of ebselen against Gram-positive pathogens exceeded those activities determined for vancomycin and linezolid, drugs of choice for treatment of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ebselen at which 90% of clinical isolates of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus were inhibited (MIC90 were found to be 0.5 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Ebselen showed significant clearance of intracellular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in comparison to vancomycin and linezolid. We demonstrated that ebselen inhibits the bacterial translation process without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, ebselen was found to exhibit excellent activity in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans MRSA-infected whole animal model. Finally, ebselen showed synergistic activities with conventional antimicrobials against MRSA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ebselen, with its potent antimicrobial activity and safety profiles, can be potentially used to treat multidrug resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections alone or in combination with other antibiotics and should be further clinically evaluated.

  13. Repurposing Clinical Molecule Ebselen to Combat Drug Resistant Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    Without a doubt, our current antimicrobials are losing the battle in the fight against newly-emerged multidrug-resistant pathogens. There is a pressing, unmet need for novel antimicrobials and novel approaches to develop them; however, it is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to develop new antimicrobials. One strategy to reduce the time and cost associated with antimicrobial innovation is drug repurposing, which is to find new applications outside the scope of the original medical indication of the drug. Ebselen, an organoselenium clinical molecule, possesses potent antimicrobial activity against clinical multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, the activity of ebselen against Gram-positive pathogens exceeded those activities determined for vancomycin and linezolid, drugs of choice for treatment of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ebselen at which 90% of clinical isolates of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus were inhibited (MIC90) were found to be 0.5 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Ebselen showed significant clearance of intracellular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in comparison to vancomycin and linezolid. We demonstrated that ebselen inhibits the bacterial translation process without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, ebselen was found to exhibit excellent activity in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans MRSA-infected whole animal model. Finally, ebselen showed synergistic activities with conventional antimicrobials against MRSA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ebselen, with its potent antimicrobial activity and safety profiles, can be potentially used to treat multidrug resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections alone or in combination with other antibiotics and should be further clinically evaluated.

  14. Analysis of metal and biocides resistance genes in drug resistance and susceptible Salmonella enterica from food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Generally drug resistant bacteria carry antibiotic resistance genes and heavy metal and biocide resistance genes on large conjugative plasmids. The presence of these metal and biocide resistance genes in susceptible bacteria are not assessed comprehensively. Hence, WGS data of susceptib...

  15. "DRUG RESISTANCE PATTERN IN ISOLATED BACTERIA FROM BLOOD CULTURES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sobhani

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia is an important infectious disease which may lead to death. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance in different communities are different and understanding these differences is important. In the present study, relative frequency and pattern of drug resistance have been examined in bacteria isolated from blood cultures in Razi Hospital laboratory. The method of the study was descriptive. Data collection was carried out retrospectively. Total sample consisted of 311 positive blood cultures from 1999 to 2001. Variables under study were bacterial strains, antibiotics examined in antibiogram, microbial resistance, and patients' age and sex. The most common isolated bacteria were Salmonella typhi (22.2% and the least common ones were Citrobacter (1.6%. The highest antibiotic resistance was seen against amoxicillin (88.4%. The proportion of males to females was1: 1/1 and the most common age group was 15-44 (47.3%. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance were different in some areas and this subject requires further studies in the future.

  16. Current position of phenobarbital in epilepsy and its future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Martin J; Kwan, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews the current position of phenobarbital using articles published since 2000 and speculates on its likely future contribution to epilepsy care. Over the last decade there have been no major double-blind randomized placebo-controlled or comparative trials with phenobarbital. Previous studies have suggested that phenobarbital is as effective in monotherapy as phenytoin and carbamazepine. Several observational studies undertaken in developing countries over the last decade have confirmed its efficacy and safety for the common epilepsies. This was particularly so in the substantial demonstration project undertaken in rural China under the auspices of the World Health Organization in partnership with the International League Against Epilepsy and International Bureau for Epilepsy. Phenobarbital is still widely used for neonatal and childhood seizures and for drug-resistant convulsive and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. Recent data have confirmed in a prospective cohort of women taking phenobarbital as monotherapy that the drug can be associated with a range of congenital defects in exposed infants. Much effort has gone into exploring the apparent contradiction of higher withdrawal rates due to cognitive and behavioral side effects in studies undertaken in developed countries but not in those sited in the developing world. A raft of data over the last 10 years, including a systematic review, showed no important differences between the tolerability of phenobarbital compared to that with other antiepileptic drugs. Finally, cognitive test scores and mood ratings in 136 people with epilepsy receiving phenobarbital for a year were similar to those in 137 age-, sex-, and education-matched controls in a number of Chinese villages. Indeed, there were some cognitive gains in the patients possibly due to improved seizure control. Phenobarbital is still the most cost-effective pharmacologic treatment for epilepsy. All these data predict a healthy future for

  17. Comorbidities associated with epilepsy and headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalles P. Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Comorbidities are often associated with chronic neurological diseases, such as headache and epilepsy. OBJECTIVES: To identify comorbidities associated with epilepsy and headaches, and to determine possible drug interactions. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire with information about type of epilepsy/headache, medical history, and medication was administered to 80 adult subjects (40 with epilepsy and 40 with chronic headache. RESULTS: Patients with epilepsy had an average of two comorbidities and those with headache of three. For both groups, hypertension was the most prevalent. On average, patients with epilepsy were taking two antiepileptic medications and those with headache were taking only one prophylactic medication. Regarding concomitant medications, patients with epilepsy were in use, on average, of one drug and patients with headache of two. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with chronic neurological diseases, such as epilepsy and headaches, have a high number of comorbidities and they use many medications. This may contribute to poor adherence and interactions between different medications.

  18. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the one before it. Some children have a strange sensation before a seizure. Sensations may be tingling, ... Prognosis) Most children with epilepsy live a normal life. Certain types of childhood epilepsy go away or ...

  19. Accelerating resistance, inadequate antibacterial drug pipelines and international responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula

    2012-04-01

    The pandemic of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens and their continuing spread is beyond dispute. In contrast to the past, today's antibacterial research and development (R&D) pipelines are nearly dry, failing to provide the flow of novel antibiotics required to match the clinical challenges of the multidrug resistance (MDR) crisis. Concerned over the rapidly worsening potential global healthcare crisis caused by MDR bacteria and the lack of robust drug pipelines, several multinational campaigns have issued policy recommendations and have initiated broad discussion with a goal of stimulating the development of novel antibacterial drugs and technologies. These activities have resulted in intensified co-operation between the USA and the EU. The recently announced extensive 'Action plan against the rising threats from antimicrobial resistance' substantially ramps up action within the EU. In recognising the potential crisis caused by MDR and the limited treatment options, the European Commission decided on an unprecedented approach to drive the search for novel antibiotics by integrating the pharmaceutical industry, the research capacities of universities and small companies supported by public funding along with pricing/reimbursement and regulatory bodies. The European Commission has shown leadership and put action plans in place. Only the future will tell whether these initiatives will help curb the impact of the MDR pandemic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA...... as several apoptosis-related genes, in particular STK17A and CRYAB. As MPP1 and CRYAB are also among the 14 genes differentially expressed in all three of the drug-resistant sublines, they represent the strongest candidates for resistance against DNA-damaging drugs....

  1. Comments on the Eslicarbazepine Acetate Section of the Article ‘Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Soares-da-Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent review of Matthew D. Krasowski on ‘Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications’ is a useful foundation of comparative interpretations on our current knowledge about therapeutic drug monitoring. Within the review, the statement that therapeutic drug monitoring has a minimal role in the therapeutic use of eslicarbazepine acetate due to its relatively predictable pharmacokinetics reflects the existing body of evidence although some information such as eslicarbazepine acetate’s chemical structure, proportions of its metabolites, their pharmacokinetics and chiral method of plasma level measurement need to be revised. These critical characteristics differentiate the novel compound from former dibenzazepines such as carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine in its clinical effects and needs for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  2. Health-related quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs at National Referral Hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabukenya, Anne M; Matovu, Joseph K B; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Makumbi, Fredrick

    2014-04-12

    Epilepsy is a devastating disorder that impacts on patients' quality of life, irrespective of use of anti epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study estimates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associated predictors among epilepsy patients receiving AEDs. A total of 175 epilepsy patients already receiving AED for at least 3 months were randomly selected and interviewed from mental clinics at Mulago and Butabika national referral hospitals in Uganda between May - July 2011. A HRQOL index, the primary outcome, was constructed using items from Quality Of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The internal consistency and adequacy of these items was also computed using Cronbach's alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests. Partial correlations were used to evaluate the contribution of the health dimensions (mental, psychological, social, physical functioning and emotional well being) and, multiple linear regressions to determine factors independently associated with HRQOL. Just about half of the respondents (54%) were males, and nearly two thirds (62%) had received AEDs for at least 12 months. The average age was 26.6 years (SD = 11.1). The overall HRQOL mean score was 58 (SD = 13) on a scale of 0-100. The average scores of different dimensions or subscales ranged from 41 (physical) to 65 (psychological). At least three quarters (75%) of all subscales had good internal consistency and adequacy. The largest variations in the overall HRQOL were explained by social and mental functioning; each accounting for about 30% of the difference in the HRQOL but seizure control features explained a little (6%) variation. Factors negatively associated with HRQOL were poly-therapy (-1.16, p = 0.01) and frequency of seizures (-2.29, p = 0.00). Other factors associated with overall HRQOL included drug side effects, sex, marital status and education. Duration on AEDs was not a significant predictor of HRQOL. The HRQOL

  3. Mortality rates and causes of death in children with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs: a retrospective cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackers, Ruth; Besag, Frank M C; Hughes, Elaine; Squier, Waney; Murray, Macey L; Wong, Ian C K

    2011-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy, including children, have an increased risk of mortality compared with the general population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were the most frequent class of drugs reported in a study looking at fatal suspected adverse drug reactions in children in the UK. The objective of the study was to identify cases and causes of death in a paediatric patient cohort prescribed AEDs with an associated epilepsy diagnosis. This was a retrospective cohort study supplemented with general practitioner-completed questionnaires, post-mortem reports and death certificates. The setting was UK primary care practices contributing to the General Practice Research Database. Participants were children and adolescents aged 0-18 years prescribed AEDs between 1993 and 2005. Causality assessment was undertaken by a consensus panel comprising paediatric specialists in neuropathology, neurology, neuropsychiatry, paediatric epilepsy, pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacy to determine crude mortality rate (CMR) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and the likelihood of an association between AED(s) and the event of death. There were 6190 subjects in the cohort (contributing 26,890 person-years of data), of whom 151 died. Median age at death was 8.0 years. CMR was 56.2 per 10,000 person-years and the SMR was 22.4 (95% CI 18.9, 26.2). The majority of deceased subjects had severe underlying disorders. Death was attributable to epilepsy in 18 subjects; in 9 the cause of death was sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) [3.3 per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 1.5, 6.4)]. AEDs were probably (n = 2) or possibly (n = 3) associated causally with death in five subjects. Two status epilepticus deaths were associated causally with AED withdrawal. Children prescribed AEDs have an increased risk of mortality relative to the general population. Most of the deaths were in children with serious underlying disorders. A small number of SUDEP cases were identified. AEDs are not a major

  4. Identification of new treatments for epilepsy: issues in preclinical methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Buckmaster, Paul S.; Staley, Kevin J.; Moshé, Solomon L.; Perucca, Emilio; Engel, Jerome; Löscher, Wolfgang; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Pitkänen, Asla; Stables, James; White, Steve H.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Simonato, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preclinical research has facilitated the discovery of valuable drugs for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy. Yet, despite these therapies, seizures are not adequately controlled in a third of all affected individuals, and comorbidities still impose a major burden on quality of life. The introduction of multiple new therapies into clinical use over the past two decades has done little to change this. There is an urgent demand to address the unmet clinical needs for: (a) new symptomatic anti-seizure treatments for drug-resistant seizures with improved efficacy/tolerability profiles, (b) disease modifying treatments that prevent or ameliorate the epileptogenic state, and (c) treatments for the common comorbidities that contribute to disability in people with epilepsy. New therapies also need to address the special needs of certain subpopulations, i.e. age- or gender-specific treatments. Preclinical development in these treatment areas is complex due to heterogeneity in presentation and etiology, and may need to be formulated with a specific seizure, epilepsy syndrome or comorbidity in mind. The aim of this report is to provide a framework that will help define future guidelines that improve and standardize the design, reporting, and validation of data across preclinical anti-epilepsy therapy development studies targeting drug-resistant seizures, epileptogenesis and comorbidities. PMID:22292566

  5. Identification of new epilepsy treatments: issues in preclinical methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Buckmaster, Paul S; Staley, Kevin J; Moshé, Solomon L; Perucca, Emilio; Engel, Jerome; Löscher, Wolfgang; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Pitkänen, Asla; Stables, James; White, H Steve; O'Brien, Terence J; Simonato, Michele

    2012-03-01

    Preclinical research has facilitated the discovery of valuable drugs for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy. Yet, despite these therapies, seizures are not adequately controlled in a third of all affected individuals, and comorbidities still impose a major burden on quality of life. The introduction of multiple new therapies into clinical use over the past two decades has done little to change this. There is an urgent demand to address the unmet clinical needs for: (1) new symptomatic antiseizure treatments for drug-resistant seizures with improved efficacy/tolerability profiles, (2) disease-modifying treatments that prevent or ameliorate the process of epileptogenesis, and (3) treatments for the common comorbidities that contribute to disability in people with epilepsy. New therapies also need to address the special needs of certain subpopulations, that is, age- or gender-specific treatments. Preclinical development in these treatment areas is complex due to heterogeneity in presentation and etiology, and may need to be formulated with a specific seizure, epilepsy syndrome, or comorbidity in mind. The aim of this report is to provide a framework that will help define future guidelines that improve and standardize the design, reporting, and validation of data across preclinical antiepilepsy therapy development studies targeting drug-resistant seizures, epileptogenesis, and comorbidities. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Risk Factors for Acquisition of Drug Resistance during Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, Julia; Vlasova, Natalia; Nikishova, Elena; Tarasova, Irina; Eliseev, Platon; Maryandyshev, Andrey O.; Shemyakin, Igor G.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antituberculosis drugs decreases effective treatment options and the likelihood of treatment success. We identified risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and evaluated the effect on treatment outcomes. Data were collected prospectively from adults from Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, who had pulmonary MDR TB during 2005–2008. Acquisition of resistance to capreomycin and of extensively drug-resistant TB were more likely among patients who received 3 effective drugs (9.4% vs. 0% and 8.6% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Poor outcomes were more likely among patients with acquired capreomycin resistance (100% vs. 25.9%), acquired ofloxacin resistance (83.6% vs. 22.7%), or acquired extensive drug resistance (100% vs. 24.4%). To prevent acquired drug resistance and poor outcomes, baseline susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs should be determined quickly, and treatment should be adjusted to contain >3 effective drugs. PMID:25988954

  7. Collateral Resistance and Sensitivity Modulate Evolution of High-Level Resistance to Drug Combination Treatment in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Gumpert, Heidi; Munck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    As drug-resistant pathogens continue to emerge, combination therapy will increasingly be relied upon to treat infections and to help combat further development of multidrug resistance. At present a dichotomy exists between clinical practice, which favors therapeutically synergistic combinations......, to reflect drug concentrations more likely to be encountered during treatment. We performed a series of adaptive evolution experiments using Staphylococcus aureus. Interestingly, no relationship between drug interaction type and resistance evolution was found as resistance increased significantly beyond wild......-type levels. All drug combinations, irrespective of interaction types, effectively limited resistance evolution compared with monotreatment. Cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity were found to be important factors in the extent of resistance evolution toward a combination. Comparative genomic analyses...

  8. Low-level quinolone-resistance in multi-drug resistant typhoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirza, S H; Khan, M A [Armed Forces Inst. of Pathology, Rawalpindi (Pakistan). Dept. of Microbiolgy

    2008-01-15

    To find out the frequency of low-level quinolone-resistance in Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) typhoid using nalidixic acid screening disc. Blood was obtained from suspected cases of typhoid fever and cultured in to BacT/ALERT. The positive blood cultures bottles were subcultured. The isolates were identified by colony morphology and biochemical tests using API-20E galleries. Susceptibility testing of isolates was done by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method on Muellar Hinton Agar. For the isolates, which were resistant to nalidixic acid by disc diffusion method, Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were determined by using the E-test strips. Disc diffusion susceptibility tests and MICs were interpreted according to the guidelines provided by National Committee for Control Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). A total of 21(65.5%) out of 32 isolates of Salmonellae were nalidixic acid-resistant by disk diffusion method. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates by disc diffusion method were confirmed by MICs for both ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates had a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.25-1 microg/ml (reduced susceptibility) and nalidixic acid MICs > 32 microg (resistant). Out of all Salmonella isolates, 24 (75%) were found to be MDR, and all were S. typbi. Low-level quinolone-resistance in typhoid was high in this small series. Screening for nalidixic acid resistance with a 30 microg nalidixic acid disk is a reliable and cost-effective method to detect low-level fluoroquinolone resistance, especially in the developing countries. (author)

  9. Low-level quinolone-resistance in multi-drug resistant typhoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, S.H.; Khan, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    To find out the frequency of low-level quinolone-resistance in Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) typhoid using nalidixic acid screening disc. Blood was obtained from suspected cases of typhoid fever and cultured in to BacT/ALERT. The positive blood cultures bottles were subcultured. The isolates were identified by colony morphology and biochemical tests using API-20E galleries. Susceptibility testing of isolates was done by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method on Muellar Hinton Agar. For the isolates, which were resistant to nalidixic acid by disc diffusion method, Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were determined by using the E-test strips. Disc diffusion susceptibility tests and MICs were interpreted according to the guidelines provided by National Committee for Control Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). A total of 21(65.5%) out of 32 isolates of Salmonellae were nalidixic acid-resistant by disk diffusion method. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates by disc diffusion method were confirmed by MICs for both ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates had a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.25-1 microg/ml (reduced susceptibility) and nalidixic acid MICs > 32 microg (resistant). Out of all Salmonella isolates, 24 (75%) were found to be MDR, and all were S. typbi. Low-level quinolone-resistance in typhoid was high in this small series. Screening for nalidixic acid resistance with a 30 microg nalidixic acid disk is a reliable and cost-effective method to detect low-level fluoroquinolone resistance, especially in the developing countries. (author)

  10. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehman, J. Alexander; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Due to various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most β-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant, or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii. PMID:25091170

  11. Dodecyltriphenylphosphonium inhibits multiple drug resistance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorre, Dmitry A; Markova, Olga V; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F

    2014-08-08

    Multiple drug resistance pumps are potential drug targets. Here we asked whether the lipophilic cation dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP) can interfere with their functioning. First, we found that suppression of ABC transporter gene PDR5 increases the toxicity of C12TPP in yeast. Second, C12TPP appeared to prevent the efflux of rhodamine 6G - a fluorescent substrate of Pdr5p. Moreover, C12TPP increased the cytostatic effects of some other known Pdr5p substrates. The chemical nature of C12TPP suggests that after Pdr5p-driven extrusion the molecules return to the plasma membrane and then into the cytosol, thus effectively competing with other substrates of the pump. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. HIV protease drug resistance and its impact on inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, P J; Rodgers, J D; Chang, C H

    1999-07-01

    The primary cause of resistance to the currently available HIV protease inhibitors is the accumulation of multiple mutations in the viral protease. So far more than 20 substitutions have been observed in the active site, dimer interface, surface loops and flaps of the homodimer. While many mutations reduce the protease's affinity for inhibitors, others appear to enhance its catalytic efficiency. This high degree of genetic flexibility has made the protease an elusive drug target. The design of the next generation of HIV protease inhibitors will be discussed in light of the current structural information.

  13. Cattle breeding, trypanosomosis prevalence and drug resistance in Northern Togo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamdja, E; Kulo, A E; Vitouley, H S; Batawui, K; Bankolé, A A; Adomefa, K; Cecchi, G; Hoppenheit, A; Clausen, P H; De Deken, R; Van Den Abbeele, J; Marcotty, T; Delespaux, V

    2017-03-15

    African Animal Trypanosomosis (AAT) is a major disease of cattle in Togo and its control is essentially based on chemotherapy. However, because of excessive use of trypanocides during the past decades, chemo-resistance in the parasites has developed. In order to assess the current situation of AAT and resistance to trypanocidal drugs in Northern Togo, a study was conducted on cattle from December 2012 to August 2013 in the regions of Kara and Savanes. An initial cross-sectional survey was carried out in 40 villages using the Haematocrit Centrifugation Technique (HCT). Out of these, 5 villages with a trypanosome prevalence of >10% were selected for a block treatment study (BT) with diminazene diaceturate (DA: 3.5mg/kg for a 14-day follow-up) and isometamidium chloride (ISM: 0.5mg/kg for a 28-day follow-up). Positive blood samples collected during the parasitological surveys and an equivalent number of negatives were further analyzed by PCR-RFLP for trypanosome species confirmation and molecular diagnosis of resistance to DA in Trypanosoma congolense. The results from 1883 bovine blood samples confirmed a high overall trypanosome prevalence of 10.8% in Northern Togo. PCR-RFLP revealed that T. congolense is the dominant pathogenic trypanosome species (50.5%) followed by T. vivax (27.3%), and T. brucei (16.2%). The BT showed varying levels of treatment failures ranging from 0 to 30% and from 0 to 50% for DA and for ISM respectively, suggesting the existence of resistant trypanosome populations in the study area. Our results show that AAT still represents a major obstacle to the development of cattle husbandry in Northern Togo. In areas of high AAT risk, a community-based integrated strategy combining vector control, rational use of trypanocidal drugs and improving the general condition of the animals is recommended to decision makers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasmonic Nanobubbles Rapidly Detect and Destroy Drug-Resistant Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Townley, Debra; Wu, Xiangwei; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of residual cancer cells after oncological resection to adjuvant chemoradiotherapies results in both high recurrence rates and high non-specific tissue toxicity, thus preventing the successful treatment of such cancers as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The patients' survival rate and quality of life therefore depend upon the efficacy, selectivity and low non-specific toxicity of the adjuvant treatment. We report a novel, theranostic in vivo technology that unites both the acoustic diagnostics and guided intracellular delivery of anti-tumor drug (liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, Doxil) in one rapid process, namely a pulsed laser-activated plasmonic nanobubble (PNB). HNSCC-bearing mice were treated with gold nanoparticle conjugates, Doxil, and single near-infrared laser pulses of low energy. Tumor-specific clusters of gold nanoparticles (solid gold spheres) converted the optical pulses into localized PNBs. The acoustic signals of the PNB detected the tumor with high specificity and sensitivity. The mechanical impact of the PNB, co-localized with Doxil liposomes, selectively ejected the drug into the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Cancer cell-specific generation of PNBs and their intracellular co-localization with Doxil improved the in vivo therapeutic efficacy from 5-7% for administration of only Doxil or PNBs alone to 90% thus demonstrating the synergistic therapeutic effect of the PNB-based intracellular drug release. This mechanism also reduced the non-specific toxicity of Doxil below a detectable level and the treatment time to less than one minute. Thus PNBs combine highly sensitive diagnosis, overcome drug resistance and minimize non-specific toxicity in a single rapid theranostic procedure for intra-operative treatment. PMID:23139725

  15. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1: Correlation of tumor and cell culture results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulder, J.E.; Hopwood, L.E.; Volk, D.M.; Davies, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    The RIF-1 tumor line contains cells that are resistant to various anti-neoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), adriamycin (ADR), and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of these drug-resistant cells is increased after irradiation. The frequency of drug-resistant cells and the magnitude of radiation-induced drug resistance are different in cell culture than in tumors. The dose-response and expression time relationships for radiation induction of drug resistance observed in RIF-1 tumors are unusual.We hypothesize that at high radiation doses in vivo, we are selecting for cells that are both drug resistant and radiation resistant due to microenvironmental factors, whereas at low radiation doses in vivo and all radiation doses in vitro, we are observing true mutants. These studies indicate that there can be significant differences in drug-resistance frequencies between tumors and their cell lines of origin, and that radiation induction of drug resistance depends significantly on whether the induction is done in tumors or in cell culture. These results imply that theories about the induction of drug resistance that are based on cell culture studies may be inapplicable to the induction of drug resistance in tumors

  16. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance

  17. Extensively and Pre-Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Clinical Isolates of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Using Classical Second Line Drugs (Levofloxacin and Amikacin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, I. A.; Khan, F. A.; Khan, K. A.; Satti, L.; Ghafoor, T.; Fayyaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To find out the frequency of Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR) and pre-XDR tuberculosis in clinical isolates of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Tuberculosis (TB) by determining the susceptibilities against Levofloxacin and Amikacin (classical second line antituberculosis drugs). Study Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Microbiology Department, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from September 2011 to August 2013. Methodology: Amikacin (AK) and Levofloxacin (LEVO) were obtained in chemically pure form from Sigma (Taufkirchen, Germany). The breakpoint concentration used for AK was 1.0 micro g/ml and for LEVO 2.0 micro g/ml. Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 system was used to carry out drug susceptibility testing as per recommended protocol. Results: A total of 3 MDR-TB isolates (3 percentage) turned out to be XDR-TB based upon simultaneous resistance to injectable second line antituberculosis drug AK and one of the fluoro-quinolones (LEVO). A total of 24 MDR-TB isolates (24 percentage) were found to be pre-XDR based upon resistance to LEVO alone. Treatment status record of patients with XDR and pre-XDRTB isolates revealed that majority of patients had received fluoroquinolones (FQs) during the course of treatment. Conclusion: XDR-TB has started to emerge in MDR-TB isolates in our set up. The worrying sign is the high frequency of pre-XDR tuberculosis. Urgent steps need to be taken to stem the tide of pre-XDR-TB in our population. It is thus recommended to develop facilities to carry out drug susceptibility testing to monitor the status of pre-XDR and XDR-TB in our population. (author)

  18. [Driving license of patients with epilepsy, management of their oral drugs and suppositories by non-medical professionals, and the role of pediatric neurologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masatoshi; Miyake, Shouta

    2004-05-01

    In June 2002, the following new driving regulations were enforced in Japan: 1. A person with epilepsy may be granted a driving license after a seizure-free period of two years. 2. A person with simple partial seizures that would not impair driving safety may be granted a driving license if no other seizures that may impair driving safety have occurred over a period of at least one year. 3. A person with seizures occurring only in sleep may be granted a driving license if no seizures have occurred in waking over a period of at least two years. 4. In case that the above requirements are going to be met within 6 months, driving should be prohibited for 6 months. 5. A person with epilepsy is recommended to apply for a license to drive heavy and/or public vehicles only after a seizure-free period of 5 years without medication. The committee for legal problems of the Japan Epilepsy Society proposed a guideline for non-medical teaching or caring professionals to give children with epilepsy antiepileptic medication or to insert suppositories, if needed, at schools or care institutions. The guideline indicated the following preconditions as important: 1. There must be a wish and consent of the patient or his/her family. 2. Drugs or suppositories are usually taken or used at home and regarded as a safe procedure. 3. Attending doctor should provide clear information about the use and risk of the medication or suppository. 4. Privacy of the patient should be protected. Pediatric neurologists are expected to play an important role on these issues.

  19. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Lang, Sen-Yang; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED) to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproate (VPA), have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. Methods: This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), or levetiracetam (LEV), were identified and followed up from May 2007 to October 2014, and time to first seizure after treatment, 12-month remission rate, retention rate, reasons for treatment discontinuation, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: A total of 789 patients were enrolled. The median time of follow-up was 56.95 months. CBZ exhibited the best time to first seizure, with a median time to first seizure of 36.06 months (95% confidential interval: 30.64–44.07). CBZ exhibited the highest 12-month remission rate (85.55%), which was significantly higher than those of TPM (69.38%, P = 0.006), LTG (70.79%, P = 0.001), LEV (72.54%, P = 0.005), and VPA (73.33%, P = 0.002). CBZ, OXC, and LEV had the best retention rate, followed by LTG, TPM, and VPA. Overall, adverse effects occurred in 45.87% of patients, and the most common adverse effects were memory problems (8.09%), rashes (7.76%), abnormal hepatic function (6.24%), and drowsiness (6.24%). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that CBZ, OXC, and LEV are relatively effective in managing focal epilepsy as measured by time to first seizure

  20. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ and valproate (VPA, have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. Methods: This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM, oxcarbazepine (OXC, lamotrigine (LTG, or levetiracetam (LEV, were identified and followed up from May 2007 to October 2014, and time to first seizure after treatment, 12-month remission rate, retention rate, reasons for treatment discontinuation, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: A total of 789 patients were enrolled. The median time of follow-up was 56.95 months. CBZ exhibited the best time to first seizure, with a median time to first seizure of 36.06 months (95% confidential interval: 30.64-44.07. CBZ exhibited the highest 12-month remission rate (85.55%, which was significantly higher than those of TPM (69.38%, P = 0.006, LTG (70.79%, P = 0.001, LEV (72.54%, P = 0.005, and VPA (73.33%, P = 0.002. CBZ, OXC, and LEV had the best retention rate, followed by LTG, TPM, and VPA. Overall, adverse effects occurred in 45.87% of patients, and the most common adverse effects were memory problems (8.09%, rashes (7.76%, abnormal hepatic function (6.24%, and drowsiness (6.24%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that CBZ, OXC, and LEV are relatively effective in managing focal epilepsy as measured by time to first

  1. Detection of First-Line Drug Resistance Mutations and Drug-Protein Interaction Dynamics from Tuberculosis Patients in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachappa, Somanna Ajjamada; Neelambike, Sumana M; Amruthavalli, Chokkanna; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2018-05-01

    Diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis predominantly relies on culture-based drug susceptibility testing, which take weeks to produce a result and a more time-efficient alternative method is multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR). Also, understanding the role of mutations in causing resistance helps better drug designing. To evaluate the ability of MAS-PCR in the detection of drug resistance and to understand the mechanism of interaction of drugs with mutant proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Detection of drug-resistant mutations using MAS-PCR and validation through DNA sequencing. MAS-PCR targeted five loci on three genes, katG 315 and inhA -15 for the drug isoniazid (INH), and rpoB 516, 526, and 531 for rifampicin (RIF). Furthermore, the sequence data were analyzed to study the effect on interaction of the anti-TB drug molecule with the target protein using in silico docking. We identified drug-resistant mutations in 8 out of 114 isolates with 2 of them as multidrug-resistant TB using MAS-PCR. DNA sequencing confirmed only six of these, recording a sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 99.3% for MAS-PCR. Molecular docking showed estimated free energy of binding (ΔG) being higher for RIF binding with RpoB S531L mutant. Codon 315 in KatG does not directly interact with INH but blocks the drug access to active site. We propose DNA sequencing-based drug resistance detection for TB, which is more accurate than MAS-PCR. Understanding the action of resistant mutations in disrupting the normal drug-protein interaction aids in designing effective drug alternatives.

  2. Effectiveness of the ketogenic diet used to treat resistant childhood epilepsy in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallböök, Tove; Sjölander, Arvid; Åmark, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This Scandinavian collaborative retrospective study of children treated with ketogenic diet (KD) highlights indications and effectiveness over two years follow-up. METHODS: Five centres specialised in KD collected data retrospectively on 315 patients started on KD from 1999 to 2009....... Twenty-five patients who stopped the diet within four weeks because of compliance-problems and minor side-effects were excluded. Seizure-type(s), seizure-frequency, anti-epileptic drugs and other treatments, mental retardation, autism-spectrum disorder and motor-dysfunction were identified and treatment......-response was evaluated. RESULTS: An intention-to-treat analysis was used. Responders (>50% seizure-frequency reduction) at 6, 12 and 24 months were 50%, 46% and 28% respectively, seizure-free were 16%, 13% and 10%. Still on the diet were 80%, 64% and 41% after 6, 12 and 24 months. No child had an increased seizure...

  3. Ion channels and transporters in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is the major challenge in the treatment of cancer. MDR can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux and the failure to undergo drug-induced apoptosis. Evasion of drug-induced apoptosis through modulation of i...

  4. Incidence of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pan-drug-resistant bacteria in children hospitalized at Dr. Hasan Sadikin general hospital Bandung Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrizain, R.; Suryaningrat, F.; Alam, A.; Setiabudi, D.

    2018-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a global issue, with 700,000 deaths attributable to multidrug-resistance (MDR) occurring each year. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show rapidly increasing rates of infection due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of the study isto describe the incidence of MDR, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and pan drug-resistant (PDR) in Enterococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, K. pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumanii, P. aeruginosin, and Enterobacter spp. (ESKAPE) pathogens in children admitted to Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital. All pediatric patients having blood culture drawn from January 2015 to December 2016 were retrospectively studied. Data include the number of drawn blood culture, number of positive results, type of bacteria, sensitivity pattern. International standard definitions for acquired resistance by ECDC and CDC was used as definitions for MDR, XDR and PDR bacteria. From January 2015 to December 2016, 299 from 2.542 (11.7%) blood culture was positive, with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp., respectively 5, 6, 24, 5, 20 with total 60 (20%). The MDR and XDR pathogen found were 47 and 13 patients, respectively.

  5. Antihypertensive drug use in resistant and nonresistant hypertension and in controlled and uncontrolled resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Armario, Pedro; Oliveras, Anna; Banegas, José R; Gorostidi, Manuel; Vinyoles, Ernest; de la Cruz, Juan J; Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis M

    2018-07-01

    Treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is associated with particular clinical features, nonadherence, and suboptimal treatment. We assessed possible associations of antihypertensive drug classes, specific agents inside each class, and types of combinations, with the presence of non-TRH vs. TRH, and with controlled vs. uncontrolled TRH. Comparisons were done in 14 264 patients treated with three drugs (non-TRH: 2988; TRH: 11 276) and in 6974 treated with at least four drugs (controlled TRH: 1383; uncontrolled TRH: 5591). Associations were adjusted for age, sex, and previous cardiovascular event. In both groups of patients treated with three or with at least four drugs, aldosterone antagonists among drug classes [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.82 and 1.41, respectively], and ramipril (OR: 1.28 and 1.30), olmesartan (OR: 1.31 and 1.37), and amlodipine (OR: 1.11 and 1.41) inside each class were significantly associated with blood pressure control (non-TRH or controlled TRH). In patients treated with three drugs, non-TRH was also associated with the use of chlorthalidone (OR: 1.50) and bisoprolol (OR: 1.19), whereas in patients treated with at least four drugs, controlled TRH was significantly associated with the triple combination of a renin-angiotensin system blocker, a calcium channel blocker, and a diuretic (OR: 1.17). The use of aldosterone antagonists is associated with blood pressure control in patients treated with three or more drugs. Similar results are observed with specific agents inside each class, being ramipril, olmesartan, chlorthalidone, amlodipine, and bisoprolol those exhibiting significant results. An increased use of these drugs might probably reduce the burden of TRH.

  6. [Functional connectivity and complex networks in focal epilepsy. Pathophysiology and therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Jesús; Sola, Rafael G; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Garnes, Óscar; Ortega, Guillermo J

    2014-05-01

    The traditional surgical approach to treat drug-resistant focal epileptic patients is in the resection or disconnection of the epileptic focus. However, a significant minority of patients continue to experience seizures after surgery, which shows the incomplete level of knowledge that currently we have of this pathology. This paper introduces some concepts of functional connectivity and complex networks methodology with its application to the study of neurophysiological recordings from patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy. In order to fully understand the new developments in the area of complex networks and its applications to the study of epilepsy, we will here review fundamental concepts in complex networks methodology, synchronization and functional connectivity. Some of the most recent published works dealing with focal epilepsy viewed under this new perspective will be revised and commented. We think that a wider perspective in the study of epilepsy, such as the one reviewed in this work, will allow epileptologists to consider surgical alternatives in the usual treatment of focal epilepsy at those currently performed in most medical centers around the world. Combining the traditional knowledge with new insights provided by network theory will certainly fill many of the gaps we have today in the fragmented understanding of epilepsy.

  7. The role side effects play in the choice of antiepileptic therapy in brain tumor-related epilepsy: a comparative study on traditional antiepileptic drugs versus oxcarbazepine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carapella Maria Carmine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seizure control doesn't represent the only challenging goal in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy. Side effects have often taken precedence for patients' quality of life. Methods We performed an observational retrospective study on patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy: 35 who had assumed oxcarbazepine monotherapy and 35 patients who had undergone treatment with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Primary variable of efficacy was the mean seizure frequency per month and safety variables were the drop-out for side effects and total incidence of side effects. We applied the Propensity Score technique to minimize selection bias. Results Our results showed a similar efficacy of oxcarbazepine and traditional antiepileptic drugs over time, but the difference in safety and tolerability between the two groups was significant: traditional AEDs caused more side effects, both serious and non serious. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of taking into consideration not only seizure control but also the appearance of side effects when choosing antiepileptic drugs in this patients population.

  8. The role side effects play in the choice of antiepileptic therapy in brain tumor-related epilepsy: a comparative study on traditional antiepileptic drugs versus oxcarbazepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Vidiri, Antonello; Pace, Andrea; Fabi, Alessandra; Pompili, Alfredo; Carapella, Maria Carmine; Jandolo, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Background Seizure control doesn't represent the only challenging goal in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy. Side effects have often taken precedence for patients' quality of life. Methods We performed an observational retrospective study on patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy: 35 who had assumed oxcarbazepine monotherapy and 35 patients who had undergone treatment with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Primary variable of efficacy was the mean seizure frequency per month and safety variables were the drop-out for side effects and total incidence of side effects. We applied the Propensity Score technique to minimize selection bias. Results Our results showed a similar efficacy of oxcarbazepine and traditional antiepileptic drugs over time, but the difference in safety and tolerability between the two groups was significant: traditional AEDs caused more side effects, both serious and non serious. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of taking into consideration not only seizure control but also the appearance of side effects when choosing antiepileptic drugs in this patients population. PMID:19419544

  9. Emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance among drug resistant tuberculosis patients at a tertiary care facility in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Mohammad Asad; Haseeb, Abdul; Habib, Shifa Salman; Malik, Amyn; Khowaja, Saira; SaifUllah, Nausheen; Rizvi, Nadeem

    2017-07-25

    Pakistan is classified as one of the high multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) burden countries. A poorly regulated private sector, over-prescription of antibiotics and self-medication has led to augmented rates of drug-resistance in the country. Pakistan's first national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey identified high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance among MDR-TB patients. Further institutional evidence of fluoroquinolone drug-resistance can support re-evaluation of treatment regimens as well as invigorate efforts to control antibiotic resistance in the country. In this study, data for drug-susceptibility testing (DST) was retrospectively analyzed for a total of 133 patients receiving MDR-TB treatment at the Chest Department of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, Pakistan. Frequency analyses for resistance patterns was carried out and association of fluoroquinolone (ofloxacin) resistance with demographics and past TB treatment category were assessed. Within first-line drugs, resistance to isoniazid was detected in 97.7% of cases, followed by rifampicin (96.9%), pyrazinamide (86.4%), ethambutol (69.2%) and streptomycin (64.6%). Within second-line drugs, ofloxacin resistance was detected in 34.6% of cases. Resistance to ethionamide and amikacin was 2.3% and 1.6%, respectively. Combined resistance of oflaxacin and isoniazid was detected in 33.9% of cases. Age, gender and past TB treatment category were not significantly associated with resistance to ofloxacin. Fluoroquinolone resistance was observed in an alarmingly high proportion of MDR-TB cases. Our results suggest caution in their use for empirical management of MDR-TB cases and recommended treatment regimens for MDR-TB may require re-evaluation. Greater engagement of private providers and stringent pharmacy regulations are urgently required.

  10. Drug Resistance versus Spiritual Resistance: A Comparative Analysis from the Perspective of Spiritual Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Baqer Mohammadi Laini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Taking into account a few principles concerning human being, it becomes plausible that the human spirit would also have a similar reaction to spiritual “medicine” provided to it. In order to better understand how this is possible, we must consider the means by which the human spirit becomes resistant to spiritual remedies and compare them with the resistance developed by the body against physical drugs. As such, this research aimed at creating a comparative analysis between the elements that cause the human spirit to become resistant against spiritual remedies in comparison to the body’s resistance against physical treatments (e.g. drugs and other physical treatment. Methods: The research at hand highlights the conclusions of an overall study of the Holy Quran, books of Islamic narration, and extensive Internet research concerning this subject. With these resources, the various aspects of the spirit’s resistance against spiritual remedies were discussed in detail. Results: According to Holy Quran and Islamic narrations: Based on the expectations which God has of man, his heart (i.e. spirit has the potential to fall under one of two categories – positive or negative. An afflicted heart may at times, like an afflicted body, become resistant against a remedy designed to cure it. In both cases of physical or metaphysical resistance, the underlying element that causes this resistance as well as the symptoms which accompany it are similar to one another. Having considered the teachings found in religious texts, this research discovered the underlying causes of spiritual resistance, and outlined some solutions which can prevent this issue from arising in the first place. Conclusion: Based on the standards of health and spiritual wellbeing as outlined in Holy Quran, it is said that some hearts are unhealthy and require treatment and healing. In Holy Quran, there is also no doubt in it, guidance to the God wary

  11. Transcranial direct-current stimulation as treatment in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-12-01

    Neuromodulation (NM) is a complementary therapy for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagal nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus are established techniques and have shown their efficacy in lowering seizure frequency, but they are invasive and rarely render patients seizure-free. Non-invasive NM techniques are therefore increasingly investigated in a clinical context. Areas covered: Current knowledge about transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and other non-invasive NM in patients with epilepsy, based on the available animal and clinical studies from PubMed search. Expert commentary: tDCS modulates neuronal membrane potentials, and consequently alters cortical excitability. Cathodal stimulation leads to cortical inhibition, which is of particular importance in epilepsy treatment. The antiepileptic efficacy is promising but still lacks systematic studies. The beneficial effect, seen in ~20%, outlasts the duration of stimulation, indicating neuronal plasticity and is therefore of great interest to obtain long-term effects.

  12. Simple strategy to assess linezolid exposure in patients with multi-drug-resistant and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Jasper; Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Tiberi, Simon; Akkerman, Onno W; Centis, Rosella; de Lange, Wiel C; Kosterink, Jos G; van der Werf, Tjip S; Migliori, Giovanni B; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2017-06-01

    Linezolid is used increasingly for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB). However, linezolid can cause severe adverse events, such as peripheral and optical neuropathy or thrombocytopenia related to higher drug exposure. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to predict the area under the concentration curve (AUC) for linezolid using a limited number of blood samples. Data from patients with MDR-/XDR-TB who received linezolid and therapeutic drug monitoring as part of their TB treatment were used. Mw\\Pharm 3.82 (Mediware, Zuidhorn, The Netherlands) was used to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and limited sampling strategy (LSS) for linezolid. LSS was evaluated over a time span of 6 h. Blood sampling directly before linezolid administration and 2 h after linezolid administration were considered to be the most clinically relevant sampling points. The model and LSS were evaluated by analysing the correlation between AUC 12h,observed and AUC 12h,estimated . In addition, LSS was validated with an external group of patients with MDR-/XDR-TB from Sondalo, Italy. Fifty-two pharmacokinetic profiles were used to develop the model. Thirty-three profiles with a 300 mg dosing regimen and 19 profiles with a 600 mg dosing regimen were obtained. Model validation showed prediction bias of 0.1% and r 2 of 0.99. Evaluation of the most clinically relevant LSS showed prediction bias of 4.8% and r 2 of 0.97. The root mean square error corresponding to the most relevant LSS was 6.07%. The developed LSS could be used to enable concentration-guided dosing of linezolid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural Biology Meets Drug Resistance: An Overview on Multidrug Resistance Transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman

    2017-01-01

    . Research on the underlying causes of multidrug resistance in cancerous cells and later on in infectious bacteria revealed the involvement of integral membrane transporters, capable of recognizing a broad range of structurally different molecules as substrates and exporting them from the cell using cellular...... superfamilies, viz., ATP-binding cassette superfamily, major facilitator superfamily and resistance nodulation division superfamily are presented. Further, the future role of structural biology in improving our understanding of drug-transporter interactions and in designing novel inhibitors against MDR pump...... century, mankind has become aware and confronted with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In parallel to the failure of antibiotic therapy against infectious pathogens, there had been continuous reports of cancerous cells not responding to chemotherapy with increase in the duration of therapy...

  14. Comparative study of the health-related quality of life of children with epilepsy and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompori, Eleni; Niakas, Dimitrios; Nakou, Iliada; Siamopoulou-Mavridou, Antigoni; Tzoufi, Meropi S

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of schoolchildren with epilepsy and its determinants and the HRQoL of their parents in comparison with those of healthy children and their parents. The study sample comprised 100 children with epilepsy (58 males), 8-16 years of age, diagnosed at least 6 months earlier. The children with epilepsy were divided into two subgroups: A, with well controlled idiopathic epilepsy, and B, with drug-resistant or symptomatic epilepsy and with concomitant neurodevelopmental problems. A control group consisted of 100 healthy age- and gender-matched children. One parent in each family completed two questionnaires standardized for use in Greece: KIDSCREEN-27 (version for parents) to assess the HRQoL of the children and SF-12 to assess the parental HRQoL. For each of the five dimensions of KIDSCREEN-27 and for the physical and mental component scales of the SF-12 tool, the standardized mean difference (SMD) was used for comparison between the various groups and subgroups. Linear regression analysis was used to explore the effect of specific illness-related factors on the five dimensions of KIDSCREEN-27 in the children with epilepsy. The parent-reported scores on KIDSCREEN-27 of the children with epilepsy were worse overall than those of healthy children, but the difference reached statistical significance only for the dimensions of "physical well-being" (p = 0.001) and "school environment" (p children with severe epilepsy, in the dimensions "physical well-being" (p children with resistant epilepsy and accompanying neurodevelopmental problems scored significantly worse on the SF-12 mental health scale than those of healthy children (p Epilepsy, particularly severe epilepsy with concomitant neurodevelopmental problems, adversely affects the HRQoL of both schoolchildren and their parents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distinctive electro-clinical features of epilepsy in severe early onset SCN8A encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardella, E.; Larsen, Jan; Wolff, M.

    2015-01-01

    of 5 months with polymorphic, drug resistant seizures, cognitive deterioration and pyramidal/extra-pyramidal signs +/- loss of eye contact (6/9pt). Non-convulsive status epilepticus occurred in 5/9 and SUDEP in 2/9 patients. Interictal EEG at epilepsy onset was normal in 5/9 patients; during the follow...

  16. Childhood Idiopathic Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome, Different Drugs and Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S. S. H.; Hafeez, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is quite difficult in paediatric patients. Not only the remission is difficult but also these patients are at risk of progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The goal of treatment is either to achieve complete remission or even partial remission as it is the most important predictor of disease outcome. Methods: This study was conducted at The Children Hospital, Lahore from February 2014 to May 2015. The SRNS patients of either sex between ages of 1-12 years were included with histology showing mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (MesangioPGN), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or minimal change disease (MCD). Patients were given different immunosuppressant drugs and steroid 30 mg/m/sup 2/ alternate day therapy on case to case basis and kept on regular follow up to check for response and adverse effects. Results: Total of 105 patients included, 63 (60 percent) male and 42 (40 percent) female patients. The age ranges from 1.08 to 12 years, mean age of 6.53 years and SD of ±3.17. Tacrolimus was the most common drug used 43 (41 percent) patients followed by cyclosporine in 38 (36.2 percent) patients, while Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was prescribed in 21 (20 percent) patients. Complete response was in 96 (91.4 percent) initially while partial response was seen in 8 (7.6 percent) patients. On follow up, 92 (87.6 percent) patients showed complete response and partial response was in 5 (4.7 percent) patients. Cushingoid features and hypertrichosis were the most common adverse effect seen. Conclusion: Steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome can be managed well with various immunosuppressant drugs and steroids but treatment should be individualized according to clinical presentation, disease histology and cost/social factors. (author)

  17. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, G. J.; Flens, M. J.; van Leusden, M. R.; de Haas, M.; Mülder, H. S.; Lankelma, J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Scheper, R. J.; Baas, F.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an

  18. Drug resistance and genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum parasites from Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, Ron; van Gool, Tom; Panchoe, Daynand; Greve, Sophie; Bus, Ellen; Resida, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum in Suriname was studied for the presence of drug resistance and genetic variation in blood samples of 86 patients with symptomatic malaria. Drug resistance was predicted by determining point mutations in the chloroquine resistance marker of the P. falciparum chloroquine

  19. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A meta-analysis of Drug resistant Tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Sub-Saharan Africa, the fight against tuberculosis (TB) has encountered a great challenge because of the emergence of drug resistant TB strains and the high prevalence of HIV infection. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the association of drug-resistant TB with anti-TB drug treatment history ...

  1. New-Onset Psychosis in a Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis poses a serious challenge to global control of TB. These forms of TB do not respond to the standard six-month treatment; it can take two years or more to treat with category IV drugs that are less potent, more toxic and much more expensive. Treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is still ...

  2. Simple PCR assays improve the sensitivity of HIV-1 subtype B drug resistance testing and allow linking of resistance mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The success of antiretroviral therapy is known to be compromised by drug-resistant HIV-1 at frequencies detectable by conventional bulk sequencing. Currently, there is a need to assess the clinical consequences of low-frequency drug resistant variants occurring below the detection limit of conventional genotyping. Sensitive detection of drug-resistant subpopulations, however, requires simple and practical methods for routine testing. METHODOLOGY: We developed highly-sensitive and simple real-time PCR assays for nine key drug resistance mutations and show that these tests overcome substantial sequence heterogeneity in HIV-1 clinical specimens. We specifically used early wildtype virus samples from the pre-antiretroviral drug era to measure background reactivity and were able to define highly-specific screening cut-offs that are up to 67-fold more sensitive than conventional genotyping. We also demonstrate that sequencing the mutation-specific PCR products provided a direct and novel strategy to further detect and link associated resistance mutations, allowing easy identification of multi-drug-resistant variants. Resistance mutation associations revealed in mutation-specific amplicon sequences were verified by clonal sequencing. SIGNIFICANCE: Combined, sensitive real-time PCR testing and mutation-specific amplicon sequencing provides a powerful and simple approach that allows for improved detection and evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations.

  3. Impact of treatment heterogeneity on drug resistance and supply chain costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Eirini; Boni, Maciej F; Yadav, Prashant

    2013-09-01

    The efficacy of scarce drugs for many infectious diseases is threatened by the emergence and spread of resistance. Multiple studies show that available drugs should be used in a socially optimal way to contain drug resistance. This paper studies the tradeoff between risk of drug resistance and operational costs when using multiple drugs for a specific disease. Using a model for disease transmission and resistance spread, we show that treatment with multiple drugs, on a population level, results in better resistance-related health outcomes, but more interestingly, the marginal benefit decreases as the number of drugs used increases. We compare this benefit with the corresponding change in procurement and safety stock holding costs that result from higher drug variety in the supply chain. Using a large-scale simulation based on malaria transmission dynamics, we show that disease prevalence seems to be a less important factor when deciding the optimal width of drug assortment, compared to the duration of one episode of the disease and the price of the drug(s) used. Our analysis shows that under a wide variety of scenarios for disease prevalence and drug cost, it is optimal to simultaneously deploy multiple drugs in the population. If the drug price is high, large volume purchasing discounts are available, and disease prevalence is high, it may be optimal to use only one drug. Our model lends insights to policy makers into the socially optimal size of drug assortment for a given context.

  4. Ketogenic diet guidelines for infants with refractory epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    van der Louw, E.; van den Hurk, D.; Neal, E.; Leiendecker, B.; Fitzsimmon, G.; Dority, L.; Thompson, L.; Marchio, M.; Dudzinska, M.; Dressler, A.; Klepper, J.; Auvin, S.; Cross, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ketogenic diet (KD) is an established, effective non-pharmacologic treatment for drug resistant childhood epilepsy. For a long time, the KD was not recommended for use in infancy (under the age of 2 years) because this is such a crucial period in development and the perceived high risk of nutritional inadequacies. Indeed, infants are a vulnerable population with specific nutritional requirements. But current research shows that the KD is highly effective and well tolerated in ...

  5. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M; Myatt, Mark; Hearps, Anna C; Jordan, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented.

  6. Drug resistance detection and mutation patterns of multidrug resistant tuberculosis strains from children in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Arora

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 312 sputum samples from pediatric patients presumptive of multidrug resistant tuberculosis were tested for the detection of drug resistance using the GenoTypeMTBDRplus assay. A total of 193 (61.8% patients were smear positive and 119 (38.1% were smear negative by Ziehl–Neelsen staining. Line probe assay (LPA was performed for 208 samples/cultures (193 smear positive samples and 15 cultures from smear negative samples. Valid results were obtained from 198 tests. Of these, 125/198 (63.1% were sensitive to both rifampicin (RIF and isoniazid (INH. 73/198 (36.9% were resistant to at least INH/RIF, out of which 49 (24.7% were resistant to both INH and RIF (multidrug resistant. Children with tuberculosis are often infected by someone close to them, so strengthening of contact tracing in the program may help in early diagnosis to identify additional cases within the household. There is a need to evaluate newer diagnostic assays which have a high sensitivity in the case of smear negative samples, additional samples other than sputum among young children not able to expectorate, and also to fill the gap between estimated and reported cases under the program.

  7. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms. PMID:23034325

  8. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Laboratory (kind gift of Dr. Venkatesh Murthy, Harvard University). For the induction of status epilepticus animals received methylscopolamine nitrate ...vesicle protein 2 (SV2) isoforms. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2012; 13: 5063-5067. [70] Schivell AE, Mochida S, Kensel-Hammes P, Custer KL, Bajjalieh SM. SV2A...Animals received methylscopolamine nitrate (0.1 mg/kg in saline, subcutane- ous) 30 min before pilocarpine to minimize peripheral effects of cho- linergic

  9. Depressive and anxiety disorders in epilepsy: do they differ in their potential to worsen common antiepileptic drug-related adverse events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Andres M; Barry, John J; Gilliam, Frank; Hermann, Bruce; Meador, Kimford J

    2012-06-01

    To compare the effect of anxiety disorders, major depressive episodes (MDEs), and subsyndromic depressive episodes (SSDEs) on antiepileptic drug (AED)-related adverse events (AEs) in persons with epilepsy (PWE). The study included 188 consecutive PWE from five U.S. outpatient epilepsy clinics, all of whom underwent structured interviews (SCID) to identify current and past mood disorders and other current Axis I psychiatric diagnoses according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria. A diagnosis of SSDE was made in patients with total Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) scores >12 or the Centers of Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) > 16 (in the absence of any DSM diagnosis of mood disorder. The presence and severity of AEs was measured with the Adverse Event Profile (AEP). Compared to asymptomatic patients (n = 103), the AEP scores of patients with SSDE (n = 26), MDE only (n = 10), anxiety disorders only (n = 21), or mixed MDE/anxiety disorders (n = 28) were significantly higher, suggesting more severe AED-related AEs. Univariate analyses revealed that having persistent seizures in the last 6 months and taking antidepressants was associated with more severe AEs. Post hoc analyses, however, showed that these differences were accounted for by the presence of a depressive and/or anxiety disorders. Depressive and anxiety disorders worsen AED-related AEs even when presenting as a subsyndromic type. These data suggest that the presence of psychiatric comorbidities must be considered in their interpretation, both in clinical practice and AED drug trials. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. The usefulness of Quality of Life Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire in evaluating the quality of life of children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarska, D

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of quality of life has become a frequently used method in treatment effects supervision. Quality of Life Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire, which is completed by patients' parents, has been prepared for children with epilepsy. It enables to determine the quality of life in children aged 4-18 years. The aim of the study was to show the usefulness of QOLCE questionnaire in evaluating the quality of life of children with epilepsy. 160 epileptic children, aged 8-18 years and their parents were examined in the Chair and Department of Developmental Neurology, K. Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences in Poznań. QOLCE questionnaire was completed by parents and "Young people and epilepsy" questionnaire was designed for children. Reliability index of the complete questionnaire in own research and in the original amounted to 0.93 Cronbach alpha coefficient. Epileptic, drug-resistant children constituted 28% of the examined group. Parents of children with controlled seizures evaluated children's functioning in analyzed areas of quality of life higher. 1. QOLCE questionnaire is a suitable tool to evaluate the quality of children's and adolescents' life. 2. The most significant differences in functioning of epileptic, drug-resistant patients and those with controlled seizures were observed in areas of cognitive processes and social activity.

  11. HIV-1 evolution, drug resistance, and host genetics: The Indian scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Shankarkumar, U.; Pawar,Aruna; Ghosh,Kanjaksha

    2009-01-01

    U Shankarkumar, A Pawar, K GhoshNational Institute of Immunohaematology (ICMR), KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: A regimen with varied side effects and compliance is of paramount importance to prevent viral drug resistance. Most of the drug-resistance studies, as well as interpretation algorithms, are based on sequence data from HIV-1 subtype B viruses. Increased resistance to antiretroviral drugs leads to poor prognosis by restricting treatment optio...

  12. Experimental studies on the ecology and evolution of drug-resistant malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Huijben, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious problem in health care in general, and in malaria treatment in particular, rendering many of our previously considered ‘wonder drugs’ useless. Recently, large sums of money have been allocated for the continuous development of new drugs to replace the failing ones. We seem to be one step behind the evolution of antimalarial resistance; is it possible to get one step ahead? Are interventions which slow down the evolution and spread of drug-resistant ...

  13. Drug Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has dramatically changed the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. EGFR-targeted therapies show considerable promise, but drug resistance has become a substantial issue. We reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the drug resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC. The mechanisms causing primary, acquired and persistent drug resistance to TKIs vary.

  14. Nanoantibiotics: strategic assets in the fight against drug- resistant superbugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurana C

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chandni Khurana, Bhupendra Chudasama Laboratory of Nanomedicine, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala, Punjab, India Abstract: Antimicrobial characteristics of metals reveal that Ag despite its economic constraints remains the most popular antibiotic agent. Antimicrobial characteristics of copper nanoparticles (CNPs are not well understood. To our knowledge, no systematic comparative study on microbial properties of silver nanoparticles (SNPs and CNPs exists. In this article, a comparative study on microbial properties of engineered metal nanoantibiotics against clinically important strains has been attempted. Our results indicate that biocidal activities of CNPs are better than SNPs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of CNPs are 10 times lower than the corresponding MICs of SNPs. These improved biocidal activities of CNPs would make it affordable and potent nontraditional antibiotics against which microbes are least susceptible to develop any drug resistance. Keywords: antibiotics, silver, copper, nanoparticles

  15. The problem of resistant Trichomonas vaginalis to antiprotozoal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Poznyak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents recent data on the energy metabolism of Trichomonas vaginalis and ways the activation of metronidazole. The sensitivity of microorganisms to the 5-nitroimidazole by the presence of their enzyme systems, generating and transporting electrons, which can then transfer them to the nitro group of the drug. In T.vaginalis these are pyruvate ferredoxin-oxydoreductase, thioredoxin reductase and flavin reductase. The development of resistance T.vaginalis to metronidazole preparations of this multistep process, based on the gradual reduction (up to a loss activity hydrogenosomal enzymes and / or violation of the flavindependent metabolic pathways.

  16. Mortality and causes of death in children referred to a tertiary epilepsy center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Uldall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy, including children, have an increased mortality rate when compared to the general population. Only few studies on causes of mortality in childhood epilepsy exist and pediatric SUDEP rate is under continuous discussion. To describe general mortality, incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), causes of death and age distribution in a pediatric epilepsy patient population. The study retrospectively examined the mortality and causes of death in 1974 patients with childhood-onset epilepsy at a tertiary epilepsy center in Denmark over a period of 9 years. Cases of death were identified through their unique civil registration number. Information from death certificates, autopsy reports and medical notes were collected. 2.2% (n = 43) of the patient cohort died during the study period. This includes 9 patients with SUDEP (8 SUDEP cases per 10,000 patient years). 9 patients died in the course of neurodegenerative disease and 28 children died of various causes. Epilepsy was considered drug resistant in more than 95% of the deceased patients, 90% were diagnosed with intellectual disability. Mortality of patients that underwent dietary epilepsy treatment was slightly higher than in the general cohort. There were no epilepsy-related deaths due to drowning. This study confirms that SUDEP must not be disregarded in the pediatric age group. The vast majority of SUDEP cases in this study displays numerous risk factors similar to those described in adult epilepsy patients. Including SUDEP, only 30% of the mortality was directly seizure related. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction...

  18. Mosaic Structure of a Multiple-Drug-Resistant, Conjugative Plasmid from Campylobacter jejuni

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nirdnoy, Warawadee; Mason, Carl J; Guerry, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    ..., where it apparently integrated into the chromosome and expressed high-level resistance to multiple aminoglycoside antibiotics. This work provides new information about both the nature of drug resistance in C...

  19. Resistance to different classes of drugs is associated with impaired apoptosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); M.L. den Boer (Monique); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); R. Pieters (Rob)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractResistance of leukemic cells to chemotherapeutic agents is associated with an unfavorable outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To investigate the underlying mechanisms of cellular drug resistance, the activation of various apoptotic parameters in

  20. Tuberculosis drug resistance isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis patients, Kassala State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima A Khalid

    2015-01-01

    This study revealed that high resistance to rifampicin was associated with various point mutations in and out of the RRDR of the rpoB gene. Molecular methods are needed for early detection of TB disease and drug resistance.

  1. Drug resistant Salmonella in broiler chicken sold at local market in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Key words: Antibiogram, Salmonellosis, PCR, broiler chicken, drug resistance. ... of zoonotic origin and have gained their resistance in an animal host ..... dynamics of Salmonella enterica serotypes in commercial egg and.

  2. Molecular Evidence of Drug Resistance in Asymptomatic Malaria Infections, Myanmar, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyunt, Myat Htut; Shein, Thinzar; Zaw, Ni Ni; Han, Soe Soe; Muh, Fauzi; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Han, Jin-Hee; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Han, Eun-Taek; Kyaw, Myat Phone

    2017-03-01

    Artemisinin resistance containment in Myanmar was initiated in 2011 after artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria was reported. Molecular evidence suggests that asymptomatic malaria infections harboring drug resistance genes are present among residents of the Myanmar artemisinin resistance containment zone. This evidence supports efforts to eliminate these hidden infections.

  3. Disinfectant-susceptibility of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Shinoda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been an important problem in public health around the world. However, limited information about disinfectant-susceptibility of multi-drug-resistant strain of M. tuberculosis was available. Findings We studied susceptibility of several Japanese isolates of multi-drug-resistant M. tuberculosis against disinfectants, which are commonly used in clinical and research laboratories. We selected a laboratory reference strain (H37Rv and eight Japanese isolates, containing five drug-susceptible strains and three multi-drug-resistant strains, and determined profiles of susceptibility against eight disinfectants. The M. tuberculosis strains were distinguished into two groups by the susceptibility profile. There was no relationship between multi-drug-resistance and disinfectant-susceptibility in the M. tuberculosis strains. Cresol soap and oxydol were effective against all strains we tested, regardless of drug resistance. Conclusions Disinfectant-resistance is independent from multi-drug-resistance in M. tuberculosis. Cresol soap and oxydol were effective against all strains we tested, regardless of drug resistance.

  4. Primary drug resistance in a region with high burden of tuberculosis. A critical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Rosas, Cecilia; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael; Oceguera-Palao, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    To determine rates of drug resistance in new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in a region with a high burden of the disease. New case suspects were referred for drug susceptibility testing. 28.9% of new cases were resistant to at least one first line drug; 3.9% had a multidrug-resistant strain, 15.6% a monoresistant strain and 9.4% a polyresistant strain. Our rate of drug resistant tuberculosis in new cases is very high; this has important clinical implications, since even monoresistance can have a negative impact on the outcome of new cases treated empirically with a six month regimen.

  5. Reaching consensus on drug resistance conferring mutations (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Cirillo

    2016-01-01

    A user-friendly interface designed for nonexpert or expert operability.A standardized and validated analysis pipeline for variant analyses of M. tuberculosis next-generation sequencing (NGS data.Access to data beyond the published literature with dynamic and iterative updates of new data generated by global surveillance and clinical trials.A well-developed legal structure to ensure intellectual property rights and data ownership remain with contributors.A structured data-sharing architecture to restrict access to sensitive or unpublished data sets.Metadata standardization using CDISC: supports global, platform-independent data standards that enable information system interoperability.An emphasis on data quality and rigorous, expert curation with multiple quality control checks for whole-genome sequencing and other metadata.Validation of NGS analysis output by an expert committee with grading of resistance conferring mutations based on rigorous statistical standards.Regulatory-compliant analysis pipeline and database architecture. Successful execution of such an extensive database platform requires substantial collaboration from scientists investigating the genetic basis for drug resistance worldwide, and from developers with expertise in database design and implementation.

  6. Molecular detection methods of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, F; Sougakoff, W

    2017-09-01

    Molecular methods predict drug resistance several weeks before phenotypic methods and enable rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic treatment. We aimed to detail the most representative molecular tools used in routine practice for the rapid detection of resistance to antituberculosis drugs among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. The molecular diagnosis of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in clinical samples or from in vitro cultures is based on the detection of the most common mutations in the genes involved in the development of resistance in M. tuberculosis strains (encoding either protein targets of antibiotics, or antibiotic activating enzymes) by commercial molecular kits or by sequencing. Three hypotheses could explain the discrepancies between the genotypic results and the phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results: a low percentage of resistant mutants precluding the detection by genotypic methods on the primary culture; a low level of resistance not detected by phenotypic testing; and other resistance mechanisms not yet characterized. Molecular methods have varying sensitivity with regards to detecting antituberculosis drug resistance; that is why phenotypic susceptibility testing methods are mandatory for detecting antituberculosis drug-resistant isolates that have not been detected by molecular methods. The questionable ability of existing phenotypic and genotypic drug susceptibility testing to properly classify strains as susceptible or resistant, and at what level of resistance, was raised for several antituberculosis agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of low frequency multi-drug resistance and novel putative maribavir resistance in immunocompromised paediatric patients with cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed paediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analysed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54 and C480F (UL97. In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of eleven subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  8. The role of compensatory mutations in the emergence of drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens that evolve resistance to drugs usually have reduced fitness. However, mutations that largely compensate for this reduction in fitness often arise. We investigate how these compensatory mutations affect population-wide resistance emergence as a function of drug treatment. Using a model of gonorrhea transmission dynamics, we obtain generally applicable, qualitative results that show how compensatory mutations lead to more likely and faster resistance emergence. We further show that resistance emergence depends on the level of drug use in a strongly nonlinear fashion. We also discuss what data need to be obtained to allow future quantitative predictions of resistance emergence.

  9. Comparative Long-Term Effectiveness of a Monotherapy with Five Antiepileptic Drugs for Focal Epilepsy in Adult Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pan; He, Ru-Qian; Bao, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Rong-Yuan; Xu, Hui-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare long-term effectiveness of five antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for monotherapy of adult patients with focal epilepsy in routine clinical practice. Methods Adult patients with focal epilepsy, who were prescribed with carbamazepine (CBZ), valproate (VPA), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), or oxcarbazepine (OXC) as monotherapy, during the period from January 2004 to June 2012 registered in Wenzhou Epilepsy Follow Up Registry Database (WEFURD), were included in the study. Prospective long-term follow-up was conducted until June 2013. The endpoints were time to treatment failure, time to seizure remission, and time to first seizure. Results This study included 654 patients: CBZ (n=125), VPA (n=151), LTG (n=135), TPM (n=76), and OXC (n=167). The retention rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC at the third year were 36.1%, 32.4%, 57.6%, 37.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. For time to treatment failure, LTG was significantly better than CBZ and VPA (LTG vs. CBZ, hazard ratio, [HR] 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.96], LTG vs. VPA, 0.53 [0.37-0.74]); TPM was worse than LTG (TPM vs. LTG, 1.77 [1.15-2.74]), and OXC was better than VPA (0.86 [0.78-0.96]). After initial target doses, the seizure remission rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC were 63.0%, 77.0%, 83.6%, 67.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. LTG was significantly better than CBZ (1.44 [1.15-1.82]) and OXC (LTG vs. OXC, 0.76 [0.63-0.93]); OXC was less effective than LTG in preventing the first seizure (1.20 [1.02-1.40]). Conclusion LTG was the best, OXC was better than VPA only, while VPA was the worst. The others were equivalent for comparisons between five AEDs regarding the long-term treatment outcomes of monotherapy for adult patients with focal epilepsy in a clinical practice. For selecting AEDs for these patients among the first-line drugs, LTG is an appropriate first choice; others are reservation in the first-line but VPA is not. PMID:26147937

  10. Comparative Long-Term Effectiveness of a Monotherapy with Five Antiepileptic Drugs for Focal Epilepsy in Adult Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Yi Zeng

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare long-term effectiveness of five antiepileptic drugs (AEDs for monotherapy of adult patients with focal epilepsy in routine clinical practice.Adult patients with focal epilepsy, who were prescribed with carbamazepine (CBZ, valproate (VPA, lamotrigine (LTG, topiramate (TPM, or oxcarbazepine (OXC as monotherapy, during the period from January 2004 to June 2012 registered in Wenzhou Epilepsy Follow Up Registry Database (WEFURD, were included in the study. Prospective long-term follow-up was conducted until June 2013. The endpoints were time to treatment failure, time to seizure remission, and time to first seizure.This study included 654 patients: CBZ (n=125, VPA (n=151, LTG (n=135, TPM (n=76, and OXC (n=167. The retention rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC at the third year were 36.1%, 32.4%, 57.6%, 37.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. For time to treatment failure, LTG was significantly better than CBZ and VPA (LTG vs. CBZ, hazard ratio, [HR] 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.96], LTG vs. VPA, 0.53 [0.37-0.74]; TPM was worse than LTG (TPM vs. LTG, 1.77 [1.15-2.74], and OXC was better than VPA (0.86 [0.78-0.96]. After initial target doses, the seizure remission rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC were 63.0%, 77.0%, 83.6%, 67.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. LTG was significantly better than CBZ (1.44 [1.15-1.82] and OXC (LTG vs. OXC, 0.76 [0.63-0.93]; OXC was less effective than LTG in preventing the first seizure (1.20 [1.02-1.40].LTG was the best, OXC was better than VPA only, while VPA was the worst. The others were equivalent for comparisons between five AEDs regarding the long-term treatment outcomes of monotherapy for adult patients with focal epilepsy in a clinical practice. For selecting AEDs for these patients among the first-line drugs, LTG is an appropriate first choice; others are reservation in the first-line but VPA is not.

  11. Malaria medicines to address drug resistance and support malaria elimination efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achan, Jane; Mwesigwa, Julia; Edwin, Chinagozi Precious; D'alessandro, Umberto

    2018-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are essential weapons to fight malaria and have been used effectively since the 17 th century. However, P.falciparum resistance has been reported to almost all available antimalarial drugs, including artemisinin derivatives, raising concerns that this could jeopardize malaria elimination. Areas covered: In this article, we present a historical perspective of antimalarial drug resistance, review current evidence of resistance to available antimalarial drugs and discuss possible mitigating strategies to address this challenge. Expert commentary: The historical approach to drug resistance has been to change the national treatment policy to an alternative treatment. However, alternatives to artemisinin-based combination treatment are currently extremely limited. Innovative approaches utilizing available schizonticidal drugs such as triple combination therapies or multiple first line treatments could delay the emergence and spread of drug resistance. Transmission blocking drugs like primaquine may play a key role if given to a substantial proportion of malaria infected persons. Deploying antimalarial medicines in mass drug administration or mass screening and treatment campaigns could also contribute to containment efforts by eliminating resistant parasites in some settings. Ultimately, response to drug resistance should also include further investment in the development of new antimalarial drugs.

  12. Expression and cellular distribution of major vault protein: a putative marker for pharmacoresistance in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Erwin A.; Aronica, Eleonora; Redeker, Sandra; Gorter, Jan A.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Because drug transporters might play a role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), we investigated the expression of a vesicular drug transporter, the major vault protein (MVP), in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy. METHODS: By using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

  13. Expression and Cellular Distribution of Major Vault Protein: A Putative Marker for Pharmacoresistance in a Rat Model for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet van, E.A.; Aronica, E.; Redeker, S.; Gorter, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Purpose: Because drug transporters might play a role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), we investigated the expression of a vesicular drug transporter, the major vault protein (MVP), in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: By using real-time polymerase chain

  14. Status of drug-resistant tuberculosis in China: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingya; Gou, Haimei; Hu, Xuejiao; Hu, Xin; Shang, Mengqiao; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Yi; Ye, Yuanxin; Song, Xingbo; Lu, Xiaojun; Chen, Xuerong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Lanlan

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on drug-resistant tuberculosis in China to provide useful data for tuberculosis (TB) surveillance and treatment. Several databases, including PubMed, Embase, and the Chinese Biological Medical Database, were systematically searched between January 1, 1999, and August 31, 2015, using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. The corresponding drug-resistant TB prevalence between the new and previously treated cases was significantly different in almost all of the economic regions. The Eastern coastal region is the most developed economic region with the lowest total drug-resistant TB prevalence (any drug resistance: 28%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-32%; multidrug resistance: 9%; 95% CI, 8%-12%) and the lowest number of new cases (any drug resistance: 21%; 95% CI, 19%-23%; multidrug resistance: 4%; 95% CI, 3%-5%). The Northwest is the least developed area with the lowest drug-resistant TB prevalence for previously treated cases (any drug resistance: 45%; 95% CI, 36%-55%; multidrug resistance: 17%; 95% CI, 11%-26%). The prevalence (multidrug and first-line drug resistance) exhibited a downward trend from 1996-2014. The extensively drug-resistant prevalence in China was 3% (95% CI, 2%-5%) in this review. Overall, the status of drug-resistant tuberculosis in China is notably grim and exhibits regional epidemiologic characteristics. We are in urgent need of several comprehensive and effective control efforts to reverse this situation. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroinflammatory targets and treatments for epilepsy validated in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Bauer, Sebastian; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Dingledine, Raymond; Gorter, Jan A; Henshall, David C; Kaufer, Daniela; Koh, Sookyong; Löscher, Wolfgang; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Mishto, Michele; Norwood, Braxton A; Palma, Eleonora; Poulter, Michael O; Terrone, Gaetano; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2017-07-01

    A large body of evidence that has accumulated over the past decade strongly supports the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of human epilepsy. Specific inflammatory molecules and pathways have been identified that influence various pathologic outcomes in different experimental models of epilepsy. Most importantly, the same inflammatory pathways have also been found in surgically resected brain tissue from patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. New antiseizure therapies may be derived from these novel potential targets. An essential and crucial question is whether targeting these molecules and pathways may result in anti-ictogenesis, antiepileptogenesis, and/or disease-modification effects. Therefore, preclinical testing in models mimicking relevant aspects of epileptogenesis is needed to guide integrated experimental and clinical trial designs. We discuss the most recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies validating a number of therapeutic approaches against inflammatory mechanisms in animal models that could represent novel avenues for drug development in epilepsy. Finally, we suggest future directions to accelerate preclinical to clinical translation of these recent discoveries. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy - An overview of surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Patil, Manoj; Goel, Atul; Ravat, Sangeeta; Sawant, Nina; Shah, Urvashi

    2016-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the commonest indications for epilepsy surgery. Presurgical evaluation for drug resistant epilepsy and identification of appropriate candidates for surgery is essential for optimal seizure freedom. The anatomy of mesial temporal lobe is complex and needs to be understood in the context of the advanced imaging, ictal and interictal Video_EEG monitoring, neuropsychology and psychiatric considerations. The completeness of disconnection of epileptogenic neural networks is paramount and is correlated with the extent of resection of the mesial temporal structures. In the Indian subcontinent, a standard but extended anterior temporal lobectomy is a viable option in view of the diverse socioeconomic, cultural and pathological considerations. The maximum utilization of epilepsy surgery services in this region is also a challenge. There is a need for regional comprehensive epilepsy care teams in a tertiary care academic hospital to form centers of excellence catering to a large population. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-wide mutagenesis and multi-drug resistance in American trypanosomes induced by the front-line drug benznidazole

    KAUST Repository

    Campos, Mônica C.

    2017-10-25

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and affects 5–8 million people in Latin America. Although the nitroheterocyclic compound benznidazole has been the front-line drug for several decades, treatment failures are common. Benznidazole is a pro-drug and is bio-activated within the parasite by the mitochondrial nitroreductase TcNTR-1, leading to the generation of reactive metabolites that have trypanocidal activity. To better assess drug action and resistance, we sequenced the genomes of T. cruzi Y strain (35.5 Mb) and three benznidazole-resistant clones derived from a single drug-selected population. This revealed the genome-wide accumulation of mutations in the resistant parasites, in addition to variations in DNA copy-number. We observed mutations in DNA repair genes, linked with increased susceptibility to DNA alkylating and inter-strand cross-linking agents. Stop-codon-generating mutations in TcNTR-1 were associated with cross-resistance to other nitroheterocyclic drugs. Unexpectedly, the clones were also highly resistant to the ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor posaconazole, a drug proposed for use against T. cruzi infections, in combination with benznidazole. Our findings therefore identify the highly mutagenic activity of benznidazole metabolites in T. cruzi, demonstrate that this can result in multi-drug resistance, and indicate that vigilance will be required if benznidazole is used in combination therapy.

  18. A clinical case of epilepsy in a female patient with double mutations in the SCN2A and PCDH19 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a 6-year-old female patient with epilepsy caused by mutations in the SCN2A and PCDH19 genes, which clinically appears as epileptic seizures, drug-resistant epilepsy, secondary microcephaly, mental retardation, and autism. It reviews the literature regarding both mutations. World literature lacks publications on a combination of two SCN2A and PCDH19 mutations in one female patient with epileptic encephalopathies.

  19. Temporal anteroinferior encephalocele: An underrecognized etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavalainen, Taavi; Jutila, Leena; Mervaala, Esa; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Vanninen, Ritva; Immonen, Arto

    2015-10-27

    To report the increasing frequency with which temporal anteroinferior encephalocele is a cause of adult temporal lobe epilepsy, to illustrate the clinical and imaging characteristics of this condition, and to report its surgical treatment in a series of 23 adult patients. Epilepsy patients diagnosed with temporal anteroinferior encephalocele from January 2006 to December 2013 in a national epilepsy reference center were included in this noninterventional study. Twenty-three epilepsy patients (14 female, mean age 43.8 years) were diagnosed with temporal anteroinferior encephalocele in our institute. Thirteen patients had ≥2 encephaloceles; 7 cases presented bilaterally. The estimated frequency of this condition was 0.3% among MRI examinations performed due to newly diagnosed epilepsy (n = 6) and 1.9% among drug-resistant patients referred to our center (n = 17). Nine patients with local encephalocele disconnection (n = 4) or anterior temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy (n = 5) have become seizure-free (Engel 1) for a mean 2.8 years (range 3 months-6.2 years) of follow-up. Three patients with local encephalocele disconnection were almost seizure-free or exhibited worthwhile improvement. Histologically, all 12 surgical patients had gliosis at the base of the encephalocele; some had cortical laminar disorganization (n = 5) or mild hippocampal degeneration (n = 1). The possibility of a temporal encephalocele should be considered when interpreting MRI examinations of patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. These patients can significantly benefit from unitemporal epilepsy surgery, even in cases with bilateral encephaloceles. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Global Health: Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amza

    2018-04-01

    Epilepsy is a frequently misunderstood and highly stigmatized condition. Major treatment gaps exist across the world, most so in areas of financial constraint. Classification permits the best approaches to treatment and to ascertaining prognosis. The International League Against Epilepsy's new classification system emphasizes clinical aspects and utilizes all available resources to determine whether it is a focal or generalized epilepsy. The most important tools are a careful history, clinical examination, electroencephalography, and appropriate neuroimaging. Inadequate, delayed, and incomplete evaluation may lead to misdiagnosis and costly mismanagement. Treatment is generally pharmacological, with approximately 20 to 30% of patients eventually proving refractory to medications and thus becoming potential surgical candidates. The type of epilepsy, age, gender, comorbidities, drug interactions, and drug cost are important factors in choosing an antiepileptic drug (AED). The teratogenic potential of some AEDs, weight gain, and menstrual hormone-related issues are important considerations in women. The impact of AEDs on bone health is critical in all age groups, particularly in the elderly. Psychiatric problems, mostly depression and anxiety, can have a great impact on seizure control and overall quality of life. Finally, effective partnerships and collaborations can bring resources, both human and financial, to regions that would otherwise find it impossible to effect change on their own. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Epilepsy in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-An Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly people are the largest and continuously fastest growing population among patients with epilepsy. Elderly patients with epilepsy are very different from other age groups in many respects and clinicians shouldn’t treat them in the same way as younger adults. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy in the elderly is much more difficult and atypical manifestations and misdiagnoses are certainly not the exception. Syncope is probably the most important differential diagnosis. High clinical suspicion and proper investigation are the best tools for prompt diagnosis. Etiologies of late-onset epilepsy are mainly symptomatic and cerebrovascular diseases are the most common causes in this age group, followed by degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. It is appropriate to consider starting antiepileptic drug (AED treatment at the first-ever seizure in elderly patients who have remote symptomatic causes such as stroke and dementia. According to the high recurrence rate of seizure and the good response to AEDs in elderly patients, the proper choice from various AEDs for seizure control is very important. Decision-making for AED choice depends on many different factors, including pharmacological properties, efficacy, tolerability from side effects, drug interactions, and medical comorbidities. The newer AEDs with lesser adverse effects and fewer drug interactions appear to be reasonable treatment options for elderly patients. However, more evidence from clinical trials in this specific age group is warranted.

  2. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  3. Prevalence of transmitted drug resistance and impact of transmitted resistance on treatment success in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bartmeyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to analyse the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance, TDR, and the impact of TDR on treatment success in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort. METHODS: Genotypic resistance analysis was performed in treatment-naïve study patients whose sample was available 1,312/1,564 (83.9% October 2008. A genotypic resistance result was obtained for 1,276/1,312 (97.3%. The resistance associated mutations were identified according to the surveillance drug resistance mutations list recommended for drug-naïve patients. Treatment success was determined as viral suppression below 500 copies/ml. RESULTS: Prevalence of TDR was stable at a high level between 1996 and 2007 in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort (N = 158/1,276; 12.4%; CI(wilson 10.7-14.3; p(for trend = 0.25. NRTI resistance was predominant (7.5% but decreased significantly over time (CI(Wilson: 6.2-9.1, p(for trend = 0.02. NNRTI resistance tended to increase over time (NNRTI: 3.5%; CI(Wilson: 2.6-4.6; p(for trend= 0.07, whereas PI resistance remained stable (PI: 3.0%; CI(Wilson: 2.1-4.0; p(for trend = 0.24. Resistance to all drug classes was frequently caused by singleton resistance mutations (NRTI 55.6%, PI 68.4%, NNRTI 99.1%. The majority of NRTI-resistant strains (79.8% carried resistance-associated mutations selected by the thymidine analogues zidovudine and stavudine. Preferably 2NRTI/1PIr combinations were prescribed as first line regimen in patients with resistant HIV as well as in patients with susceptible strains (susceptible 45.3%; 173/382 vs. resistant 65.5%; 40/61. The majority of patients in both groups were treated successfully within the first year after ART-initiation (susceptible: 89.9%; 62/69; resistant: 7/9; 77.8%. CONCLUSION: Overall prevalence of TDR remained stable at a high level but trends of resistance against drug classes differed over time. The significant decrease of NRTI-resistance in patients newly infected

  4. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pan Drug-Resistant Environmental Isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Seruga Music, Martina; Kovacic, Ana; Tonkic, Marija; Hrenovic, Jasna

    2017-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen with also emerging resistance to different antibiotics. Multidrug and pan drug-resistant clinical isolates were reported worldwide. Here we report the first evidence of pan drug-resistant environmental isolate of A. baumannii. The isolate was recovered from the effluent of secondary treated municipal wastewater of the City of Zagreb, Croatia. The isolate was resistant to penicillins/β-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, folate pathway inhibitors, and polymyxins, except intermediately susceptible to minocycline and tigecycline. Intrinsic chromosomally located bla OXA-51-like gene and acquired plasmid-located bla OXA-23-like gene were related to clinical isolates. Pan drug-resistant A. baumannii can occur in natural environments outside of the hospital. Secondary treated municipal wastewater represents a potential epidemiological reservoir of pan drug-resistant A. baumannii and carbapenem resistance gene.

  6. Mechanisms of Acquired Drug Resistance to the HDAC6 Selective Inhibitor Ricolinostat Reveals Rational Drug-Drug Combination with Ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual, Jennifer E; Prabhu, Sathyen A; Lombardo, Maximilian; Zullo, Kelly; Johannet, Paul M; Gonzalez, Yulissa; Scotto, Luigi; Serrano, Xavier Jirau; Wei, Ying; Duong, Jimmy; Nandakumar, Renu; Cremers, Serge; Verma, Akanksha; Elemento, Olivier; O'Connor, Owen A

    2017-06-15

    Purpose: Pan-class I/II histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are effective treatments for select lymphomas. Isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors are emerging as potentially more targeted agents. ACY-1215 (ricolinostat) is a first-in-class selective HDAC6 inhibitor. To better understand the discrete function of HDAC6 and its role in lymphoma, we developed a lymphoma cell line resistant to ACY-1215. Experimental Design: The diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line OCI-Ly10 was exposed to increasing concentrations of ACY-1215 over an extended period of time, leading to the development of a resistant cell line. Gene expression profiling (GEP) was performed to investigate differentially expressed genes. Combination studies of ACY-1215 and ibrutinib were performed in cell lines, primary human lymphoma tissue, and a xenograft mouse model. Results: Systematic incremental increases in drug exposure led to the development of distinct resistant cell lines with IC 50 values 10- to 20-fold greater than that for parental lines. GEP revealed upregulation of MAPK10, HELIOS, HDAC9, and FYN, as well as downregulation of SH3BP5 and LCK. Gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed modulation of the BTK pathway. Ibrutinib was found to be synergistic with ACY-1215 in cell lines as well as in 3 primary patient samples of lymphoma. In vivo confirmation of antitumor synergy was demonstrated with a xenograft of DLBCL. Conclusions: The development of this ACY-1215-resistant cell line has provided valuable insights into the mechanistic role of HDAC6 in lymphoma and offered a novel method to identify rational synergistic drug combinations. Translation of these findings to the clinic is underway. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); 3084-96. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Targeting Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abilities of people with epilepsy, fear seizures, or lack knowledge about seizure first aid or are not comfortable ... they help eliminate barriers to care, such as lack of transportation or ... both English- and Spanish-speaking adults with epilepsy. Researchers are ...

  8. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in two children in Greece: report of the first extensively drug-resistant case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katragkou, Aspasia; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Hatziagorou, Elpis; Sdougka, Maria; Roilides, Emmanuel; Tsanakas, John

    2013-04-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) represents a serious and growing problem in both endemic and non-endemic countries. We describe a 2.5-year-old girl with XDR-pulmonary TB and an 18-month-old boy with pre-XDR-central nervous system TB. Patients received individualized treatment with second-line anti-TB agents based on genotypic and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results. Both children achieved culture conversion 3 months and 1 month after treatment initiation, respectively. The child with XDR-pulmonary TB showed evidence of cure while treatment adverse events were managed without treatment interruption. The child with pre-XDR-central nervous system TB after 6-month hospitalization with multiple infectious complications had a dismal end due to hepatic insufficiency possibly related to anti-TB treatment. This is the first report of children with pre-XDR and XDR TB in Greece, emphasizing the public health dimensions and management complexity of XDR TB.

  9. Time-programmable drug dosing allows the manipulation, suppression and reversal of antibiotic drug resistance in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Mari; Galiñanes Reyes, Sabrina Galiñanes; Tsuda, Soichiro; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug strategies have been attempted to prolong the efficacy of existing antibiotics, but with limited success. Here we show that the evolution of multi-drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be manipulated in vitro by administering pairs of antibiotics and switching between them in ON/OFF manner. Using a multiplexed cell culture system, we find that switching between certain combinations of antibiotics completely suppresses the development of resistance to one of the antibiotics. Using thi...

  10. Epilepsie aktuell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Hüelsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.

    2016-01-01

    of the consensus statements “IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals” and “IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in German language to inform German veterinarians and professional...... circles about new knowledge and innovations in these fields. In the first part of the article, it is explained, why a new classification system of epilepsy and a common language to describe the disease is necessary. The proposals of the IVETF regarding the classification system and the terminology...... Richtlinien zur Klassifikation und Empfehlungen zu allen Aspekten der Epilepsie bei Hund und Katze in englischer Sprache publiziert (IVETF, 2015a, b). Im vorliegenden Artikel werden die Inhalte der Konsenspapiere „IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion...

  11. Exosomes from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells transmit drug resistance partly by delivering miR-222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Lv, Meng-Meng; Chen, Wei-Xian; Chen, Xiu; Yang, Su-Jin; Shen, Hongyu; Zhong, Shan-Liang; Tang, Jin-Hai; Zhao, Jian-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is one of the major deadly cancers in women. However, treatment of BCa is still hindered by the acquired-drug resistance. It is increasingly reported that exosomes take part in the development, metastasis, and drug resistance of BCa. However, the specific role of exosomes in drug resistance of BCa is poorly understood. In this study, we investigate whether exosomes transmit drug resistance through delivering miR-222. We established an adriamycin-resistant variant of Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/Adr) from a drug-sensitive variant (MCF-7/S). Exosomes were isolated from cell supernatant by ultracentrifugation. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. Individual miR-222 molecules in BCa cells were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Then, FISH was combined with locked nucleic acid probes and enzyme-labeled fluorescence (LNA-ELF-FISH). Individual miR-222 could be detected as bright photostable fluorescent spots and then the quantity of miR-222 per cell could be counted. Stained exosomes were taken in by the receipt cells. MCF-7/S acquired drug resistance after co-culture with exosomes from MCF-7/Adr (A/exo) but did not after co-culture with exosomes from MCF-7/S (S/exo). The quantity of miR-222 in A/exo-treated MCF-7/S was significantly greater than in S/exo-treated MCF-7/S. MCF-7/S transfected with miR-222 mimics acquired adriamycin resistance while MCF-7/S transfected with miR-222 inhibitors lost resistance. In conclusion, exosomes are effective in transmitting drug resistance and the delivery of miR-222 via exosomes may be a mechanism.

  12. MicroRNA regulation and dysregulation in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyella Barbosa Dogini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy, one of the most frequent neurological disorders, represents a group of diseases that have in common the clinical occurrence of seizures. The pathogenesis of different types of epilepsy involves many important biological pathways; some of which have been shown to be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs. In this paper, we will critically review relevant studies regarding the role of miRNAs in epilepsy. Overall, the most common type of epilepsy in the adult population is temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, and the form associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS, called mesial TLE, is particularly relevant due to the high frequency of resistance to clinical treatment. There are several target studies, as well few genome-wide miRNA expression profiling studies reporting abnormal miRNA expression in tissue with MTS, both in patients and in animal models. Overall, these studies show a fine correlation between miRNA regulation/dysregulation and inflammation, seizure-induced neuronal death and other relevant biological pathways. Furthermore, expression of many miRNAs is dynamically regulated during neurogenesis and its dysregulation may play a role in the process of cerebral corticogenesis leading to malformations of cortical development (MCD, which represent one of the major causes of drug-resistant epilepsy. In addition, there are reports of miRNAs involved in cell proliferation, fate specification and neuronal maturation and these processes are tightly linked to the pathogenesis of MCD. Large-scale analyzes of miRNA expression in animal models with induced status epilepticus have demonstrated changes in a selected group of miRNAs thought to be involved in the regulation of cell death, synaptic reorganization, neuroinflammation and neural excitability. In addition, knocking-down specific miRNAs in these animals have demonstrated that this may consist in a promising therapeutic intervention.

  13. Drug ratio-dependent antagonism: a new category of multidrug resistance and strategies for its circumvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, Troy O; Liboiron, Barry D; Mayer, Lawrence D

    2010-01-01

    A newly identified form of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is presented, pertaining to the commonly encountered resistance of cancer cells to anticancer drug combinations at discrete drug:drug ratios. In vitro studies have revealed that whether anticancer drug combinations interact synergistically or antagonistically can depend on the ratio of the combined agents. Failure to control drug ratios in vivo due to uncoordinated pharmacokinetics could therefore lead to drug resistance if tumor cells are exposed to antagonistic drug ratios. Consequently, the most efficacious drug combination may not occur at the typically employed maximum tolerated doses of the combined drugs if this leads to antagonistic ratios in vivo after administration and resistance to therapeutic effects of the drug combination. Our approach to systematically screen a wide range of drug ratios and concentrations and encapsulate the drug combination in a liposomal delivery vehicle at identified synergistic ratios represents a means to mitigate this drug ratio-dependent MDR mechanism. The in vivo efficacy of the improved agents (CombiPlex formulations) is demonstrated and contrasted with the decreased efficacy when drug combinations are exposed to tumor cells in vivo at antagonistic ratios.

  14. The fitness of drug-resistant malaria parasites in a rodent model: multiplicity of infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huijben, Silvie; Sim, Derek G.; Nelson, William, A.; Read, Andrew F.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria infections normally consist of more than one clonally-replicating lineage. Within-host interactions between sensitive and resistant parasites can have profound effects on the evolution of drug resistance. Here, using the Plasmodium chabaudi mouse malaria model, we ask whether the costs and benefits of resistance are affected by the number of co-infecting strains competing with a resistant clone. We found strong competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated infections and...

  15. Lacosamide in the treatment of patients with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities: A long-term study of 136 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Stefan; Lutz, Martin T; Mayer, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the retention rate of lacosamide (LCM) in patients with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities (IDs), to identify factors influencing retention rate, and to investigate the LCM retention rate with and without concomitant sodium channel blocker (SCB). We hypothesized that the retention rate of LCM with concomitant SCB would be lower than without SCB. Using the Kaplan-Meier estimator, we conducted a monocentric, retrospective, observational, open-label study to evaluate LCM retention rates in patients with IDs and drug-resistant epilepsy. In addition, the impact of therapy-related variables on the long-term retention of LCM was evaluated. One hundred thirty-six subjects with IDs and drug-resistant epilepsy were included (age 2-66 years); most patients had focal epilepsy. Long-term retention rates were 62.0% at 1 year, 43.7% at 2 years, and 29.1% at 3 and 4 years. Reasons for LCM discontinuation included insufficient therapeutic benefits (69%), adverse events (11%), or a combination of both factors (8%). The LCM retention rate was influenced by the number of background antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). An additional and independent influence of concomitant therapy with SCB on retention rate could not be confirmed. One of the major challenges in medically caring for patients with epilepsy and IDs is the high rate of drug resistance. However, there is a lack of evidence-based information about the efficacy and tolerability of AEDs in this population. It has been shown that concomitant SCB use is a key factor in increasing the risk of LCM failure in children with epilepsy. This finding has not been replicated in our predominantly adult sample of patients with IDs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Eva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain. All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros. In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively. Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  17. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Eva; Cots, Francesc; Sala, Maria; Comas, Mercè; Belvis, Francesc; Riu, Marta; Salvadó, Margarita; Grau, Santiago; Horcajada, Juan P; Montero, Maria Milagro; Castells, Xavier

    2012-05-23

    We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain). All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros). In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively). P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  18. Transferable and non-transferable drug resistance in enteric bacteria from hospital and from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, JK; Bak, AL; Bülow, P

    1976-01-01

    Drug resistance to 8 different antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from different hospitals and two groups of general practitioners was studied. Escherichia coli dominated among the 632 strains investigated. Drug resistance was found in 62% of the 512 hospital strains and in 38% of the 120...

  19. Surveillance of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe, 2003-2007.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devaux, I.; Manissero, D.; Fernandez de la Hoz, K.; Kremer, K.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of second-line drug (SLD) susceptibility tests among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) cases reported in 20 European countries aiming to identify extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) cases. A project on molecular surveillance of MDR TB cases was

  20. A study on demographic characteristics of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Belarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Surkova

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: As Belarus is a high-burden MDR-TB country and treatment of drug-resistant TB is long and complicated, the findings of this study provided useful information to deliver effective community-based disease control measures and a proposed plane for the effective management of drug-resistant TB at the national level.

  1. Exploring Culturally Specific Drug Resistance Strategies of Hawaiian Youth in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Po'a-Kekuawela, Ka'ohinani; Chin, Coralee I. H.; Nebre, La Risa H.; Helm, Susana

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the drug resistance strategies of Hawaiian youth residing in rural communities in Hawai'i. Forty seven youth participated in 14 focus groups which focused on the social and environmental context of drug use for these youth. The findings indicated that there were 47 references to resistance strategies used in drug…

  2. Antituberculosis drug resistance in the south of Vietnam: prevalence and trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huong, Nguyen T.; Lan, Nguyen T. N.; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Duong, Bui D.; Co, Nguyen V.; Bosman, Maarten C.; Kim, Sang-Jae; van Soolingen, Dick; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence that the DOTS (directly observed therapy, short course) strategy for tuberculosis (TB) control can contain the emergence and spread of drug resistance in the absence of second-line treatment. We compared drug-resistance levels between 1996 and 2001 in the south

  3. The Association between Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Genotype and Drug Resistance in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Grandjean

    Full Text Available The comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterial genotypes with phenotypic, demographic, geospatial and clinical data improves our understanding of how strain lineage influences the development of drug-resistance and the spread of tuberculosis.To investigate the association of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterial genotype with drug-resistance. Drug susceptibility testing together with genotyping using both 15-loci MIRU-typing and spoligotyping, was performed on 2,139 culture positive isolates, each from a different patient in Lima, Peru. Demographic, geospatial and socio-economic data were collected using questionnaires, global positioning equipment and the latest national census.The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM clade (OR 2.4, p<0.001 was significantly associated with drug-resistance and alone accounted for more than half of all drug resistance in the region. Previously treated patients, prisoners and genetically clustered cases were also significantly associated with drug-resistance (OR's 2.5, 2.4 and 1.8, p<0.001, p<0.05, p<0.001 respectively.Tuberculosis disease caused by the LAM clade was more likely to be drug resistant independent of important clinical, genetic and socio-economic confounding factors. Explanations for this include; the preferential co-evolution of LAM strains in a Latin American population, a LAM strain bacterial genetic background that favors drug-resistance or the "founder effect" from pre-existing LAM strains disproportionately exposed to drugs.

  4. A typology and analysis of drug resistance strategies of rural Native Hawaiian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Scott K; Helm, Susana; Giroux, Danielle; Kaliades, Alexis; Kawano, Kaycee Nahe; Kulis, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    This study examines the drug resistance strategies described by Native Hawaiian youth residing in rural communities. Sixty-four youth from 7 middle and intermediate schools on the Island of Hawai'i participated in a series of gender-specific focus groups. Youth responded to 15 drug-related problem situations developed and validated from prior research. A total of 509 responses reflecting primary or secondary drug resistance strategies were identified by the youth, whi