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Sample records for drug prevents muscle

  1. Prevention and Drug Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Mark F.; Smith, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Evidence linking alcohol and other drug abuse with child maltreatment, particularly neglect, is strong. But does substance abuse cause maltreatment? According to Mark Testa and Brenda Smith, such co-occurring risk factors as parental depression, social isolation, homelessness, or domestic violence may be more directly responsible than substance…

  2. Approaches to Drug Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Paula D.

    1971-01-01

    This article concerns the drug abuse related definitions of the words education" and prevention" as they have come to be used today. The writer infers that the changing uses of these words reflects an increasingly more enlightened approach to ameliorating the problem of drug abuse. (Author)

  3. Acquired Muscle Weakness in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Nosology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Hassan; Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Latronico, Nicola; Zafonte, Ross; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is common in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Low muscle mass at ICU admission is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes. The consequences of ICU-acquired muscle weakness depend on the underlying mechanism. Temporary drug-induced weakness when properly managed may not affect outcome. Severe perioperative acquired weakness that is associated with adverse outcomes (prolonged mechanical ventilation, increases in ICU length of stay, and mortality) occurs with persistent (time frame: days) activation of protein degradation pathways, decreases in the drive to the skeletal muscle, and impaired muscular homeostasis. ICU-acquired muscle weakness can be prevented by early treatment of the underlying disease, goal-directed therapy, restrictive use of immobilizing medications, optimal nutrition, activating ventilatory modes, early rehabilitation, and preventive drug therapy. In this article, the authors review the nosology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention of ICU-acquired weakness in surgical ICU patients.

  4. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...... of preventive drugs. Qualitative interviews with patients experiencing discontinuation of preventive drugs addressing: Which attitudes do the patients have towards preventive drugs? Which thoughts do the patients have in relation to discontinuation of the drugs? How do they understand their own and the GP...

  5. Secondary prevention of myocardial infarction with drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R; Forman, S A

    1983-05-01

    Clinical trials in the field of secondary prevention of myocardial infarctions are reviewed, with emphasis on those studies that were randomized and included at least 100 patients. Standardized total mortality data, when available, are provided. Five groups of drugs are reviewed: 1) antiarrhythmic drugs, including studies of phenytoin, tocainide, mexiletine and aprindine. Important, commonly used drugs in this group, which apparently have not been submitted to clinical trials, include procainamide and lidocaine; 2) lipid-lowering drugs, including estradiol, conjugated equine estrogen, dextrothyroxine, clofibrate and nicotinic acid; 3) anticoagulant drugs, the oldest and most controversial preventive drug measure. In this group, only the oral drug derivatives of indandione or coumarin have been tested, and no appropriate studies of parenteral heparin were found; 4) platelet-active drugs--six studies dealing with aspirin alone, one combining aspirin and dipyridamole, and one study of sulfinpyrazone are reviewed; and 5) beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, including practolol and timolol.

  6. Preventing Drug Abuse: Where Are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Richard W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Through a review of the research literature, this article provides information about the characteristics of drug abusers and drug abuse programs that promise to be effective. Common themes which would have meaning for counselors involved in the development and implementation of drug prevention programs are presented. (Author)

  7. Post-war prevention: Emerging frameworks to prevent drug use after the War on Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werb, Dan

    2017-07-19

    The prevention of drug use is one of the primary goals of the War on Drugs. However, despite investment in high-profile interventions such as social marketing campaigns and enforcement-based deterrence, these efforts have generally failed. With the emergence of novel policy frameworks to control and regulate drug use, a window of opportunity exists to test approaches to drug prevention that take into account existing evidence and the rights of individuals who use drugs. Specifically, there is a growing consensus that entry into drug use is a socially-defined event that individuals experience within particular socio-structural contexts. This understanding, coupled with a distinction between the value of preventing problematic drug use rather than all drug use, provides a useful framework within which to develop effective and rights-based approaches to drug prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Myriocin prevents muscle ceramide accumulation but not muscle fiber atrophy during short-term mechanical unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, Erwann; Lefeuvre-Orfila, Luz; Cavey, Thibault; Martin, Brice; Turlin, Bruno; Ropert, Martine; Loreal, Olivier; Derbré, Frédéric

    2016-01-15

    Bedridden patients in intensive care unit or after surgery intervention commonly develop skeletal muscle weakness. The latter is promoted by a variety of prolonged hospitalization-associated conditions. Muscle disuse is the most ubiquitous and contributes to rapid skeletal muscle atrophy and progressive functional strength reduction. Disuse causes a reduction in fatty acid oxidation, leading to its accumulation in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that muscle fatty acid accumulation could stimulate ceramide synthesis and promote skeletal muscle weakness. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the effects of sphingolipid metabolism on skeletal muscle atrophy induced by 7 days of disuse. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were treated with myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo synthesis of ceramides, and subjected to hindlimb unloading (HU) for 7 days. Soleus muscles were assayed for fiber diameter, ceramide levels, protein degradation, and apoptosis signaling. Serum and liver were removed to evaluate the potential hepatoxicity of myriocin treatment. We found that HU increases content of saturated C16:0 and C18:0 ceramides and decreases soleus muscle weight and fiber diameter. HU increased the level of polyubiquitinated proteins and induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. Despite a prevention of C16:0 and C18:0 muscle accumulation, myriocin treatment did not prevent skeletal muscle atrophy and concomitant induction of apoptosis and proteolysis. Moreover, myriocin treatment increased serum transaminases and induced hepatocyte necrosis. These data highlight that inhibition of de novo synthesis of ceramides during immobilization is not an efficient strategy to prevent skeletal muscle atrophy and exerts adverse effects like hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Selective androgen receptor modulators for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James T; Taylor, Ryan P; Mohler, Michael L; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2013-12-01

    This review highlights selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) as emerging agents in late-stage clinical development for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer. Muscle wasting, including a loss of skeletal muscle, is a cancer-related symptom that begins early in the progression of cancer and affects a patient's quality of life, ability to tolerate chemotherapy, and survival. SARMs increase muscle mass and improve physical function in healthy and diseased individuals, and potentially may provide a new therapy for muscle wasting and cancer cachexia. SARMs modulate the same anabolic pathways targeted with classical steroidal androgens, but within the dose range in which expected effects on muscle mass and function are seen androgenic side-effects on prostate, skin, and hair have not been observed. Unlike testosterone, SARMs are orally active, nonaromatizable, nonvirilizing, and tissue-selective anabolic agents. Recent clinical efficacy data for LGD-4033, MK-0773, MK-3984, and enobosarm (GTx-024, ostarine, and S-22) are reviewed. Enobosarm, a nonsteroidal SARM, is the most well characterized clinically, and has consistently demonstrated increases in lean body mass and better physical function across several populations along with a lower hazard ratio for survival in cancer patients. Completed in May 2013, results for the Phase III clinical trials entitled Prevention and treatment Of muscle Wasting in patiEnts with Cancer1 (POWER1) and POWER2 evaluating enobosarm for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer will be available soon, and will potentially establish a SARM, enobosarm, as the first drug for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in cancer patients.

  10. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) prevents age associated skeletal muscle loss

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Md M; Halade, Ganesh V.; Jamali, Amina El; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of CLA isomers in preventing age-associated muscle loss and the mechanisms underlying this effect, using 12 months old C57BL/6 mice fed 10% corn oil (CO) or a diet supplemented with 0.5% c9t11-CLA, t10c12-CLA or c9t11-CLA+t10c12-CLA (CLA-mix) for 6 months. Both t10c12-CLA and CLA-mix groups showed significantly higher muscle mass, as compared to CO and c9t11-CLA groups, measured by dual-energy-Xray-absorptiometry and muscle wet weight. Enhanced mitochondr...

  11. School-Based Drug Prevention: What Kind of Drug Use Does It Prevent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Paddock, Susan; Chiesa, James

    School-based drug prevention programs target not only the use of illicit drugs such as marijuana but also licit substances such as alcohol and tobacco. These programs thus have the potential of benefiting society not only by reducing the violence and criminal justice costs associated with abuse of alcohol and cigarettes. This opportunity for…

  12. [Drug therapy for prevention of falls and fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Johann D

    2006-06-01

    The primary goal in the practical management of osteoporosis is to prevent first or subsequent fractures and thereby to avoid acute or chronic pain and progressive skeletal deformity. Therapeutic strategies should always take the complex pathogenetic mechanisms of fractures into account, especially the fact that mechanical impacts and falls play an important role in the majority of fracture events. Accordingly, recommendations to patients and the selection of drugs should aim at both, falls and fractures. In this context there is an increasing interest in the dual effects of vitamin D on bone and muscle. Controlled studies proved that adequate vitamin D supplementation is able to improve muscle strength, coordination and body sway and thereby reduce the risk of falls and fractures. Alendronate has been studied extensively by large trials of high quality and its efficacy to reduce the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures is in line with the criteria of evidence-based medicine. The innovative combination of 70 mg alendronate with 2,800 IU vitamin D in a once-weekly tablet guarantees a basic supply with this important prohormone for bone and muscle. Due to a regular combined intake an improved compliance can be anticipated which will be followed by better therapeutic results in osteoporosis patients with increased fracture risk.

  13. Oral Drugs Related with Muscle Wasting and Sarcopenia. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Lluis; Camps, Marcella; Riera, Ariadna; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio; Yebenes, Juan Carlos; Serra-Prat, Mateu

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Reported prevalence of this geriatric syndrome, differs depending on the definition, the population and the method used to identify sarcopenia. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial, and can include genetic influence, immobility or disuse, endocrine factors, inflammation and nutritional deficiencies. These disorders involve an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways that rules muscle mass. Many drugs taken regularly for common conditions may interact with some mechanisms that can alter the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. This may lead to a harmful or a beneficial effect on muscle mass and strength. Widely prescribed drugs could play an important role during the time of onset and development of sarcopenia. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding of how can drugs contribute positively or negatively on sarcopenia and muscle wasting. We decided to focus this review on oral common drugs, which are usually prescribed in older adults, leaving aside other drugs as hormone therapy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PREVENT program provides a structure for the introduction of new agents, drugs and vaccines to inhibit, retard or reverse the cancer process. The program was designed to optimize translational opportunities from discovery to the clinic, and provide a mechanism to identify and study efficacy and pharmacodynamics biomarkers that will help in phase II trials to evaluate drug effects.  | Research pipeline for new prevention interventions and biomarkers headed toward clinical trials.

  15. Satellite cell depletion prevents fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-08-15

    The largest mammalian cells are the muscle fibers, and they have multiple nuclei to support their large cytoplasmic volumes. During hypertrophic growth, new myonuclei are recruited from satellite stem cells into the fiber syncytia, but it was recently suggested that such recruitment is not obligatory: overload hypertrophy after synergist ablation of the plantaris muscle appeared normal in transgenic mice in which most of the satellite cells were abolished. When we essentially repeated these experiments analyzing the muscles by immunohistochemistry and in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we found that overload hypertrophy was prevented in the satellite cell-deficient mice, in both the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus muscles. We attribute the previous findings to a reliance on muscle mass as a proxy for fiber hypertrophy, and to the inclusion of a significant number of regenerating fibers in the analysis. We discuss that there is currently no model in which functional, sustainable hypertrophy has been unequivocally demonstrated in the absence of satellite cells; an exception is re-growth, which can occur using previously recruited myonuclei without addition of new myonuclei. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. REDD1 deletion prevents dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Florian A; Begue, Gwenaelle; Rossano, Bernadette; Docquier, Aurélie; Vernus, Barbara; Sar, Chamroeun; Ferry, Arnaud; Bonnieu, Anne; Ollendorff, Vincent; Favier, François B

    2014-12-01

    REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage response 1) has been proposed to inhibit the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) during in vitro hypoxia. REDD1 expression is low under basal conditions but is highly increased in response to several catabolic stresses, like hypoxia and glucocorticoids. However, REDD1 function seems to be tissue and stress dependent, and its role in skeletal muscle in vivo has been poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of REDD1 deletion on skeletal muscle mass, protein synthesis, proteolysis, and mTORC1 signaling pathway under basal conditions and after glucocorticoid administration. Whereas skeletal muscle mass and typology were unchanged between wild-type (WT) and REDD1-null mice, oral gavage with dexamethasone (DEX) for 7 days reduced tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle weights as well as tibialis anterior fiber size only in WT. Similarly, REDD1 deletion prevented the inhibition of protein synthesis and mTORC1 activity (assessed by S6, 4E-BP1, and ULK1 phosphorylation) observed in gastrocnemius muscle of WT mice following single DEX administration for 5 h. However, our results suggest that REDD1-mediated inhibition of mTORC1 in skeletal muscle is not related to the modulation of the binding between TSC2 and 14-3-3. In contrast, our data highlight a new mechanism involved in mTORC1 inhibition linking REDD1, Akt, and PRAS40. Altogether, these results demonstrated in vivo that REDD1 is required for glucocorticoid-induced inhibition of protein synthesis via mTORC1 downregulation. Inhibition of REDD1 may thus be a strategy to limit muscle loss in glucocorticoid-mediated atrophy. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Resonant Messages to Prevent Prescription Drug Misuse by Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C.; Holtz, Kristen D.; Agnew, Christine B.

    2011-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse is a major health problem, particularly among teens. A key step in curbing misuse is the development of effective prescription drug prevention messages. This paper explores the elements of prescription drug misuse prevention messages that resonate with teens using data from focus groups with seventh and eighth grade…

  18. Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse in Adolescence: A Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Beth A.; Fullwood, Harry; Hawthorn, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    With the growing awareness of adolescent prescription drug abuse, communities and schools are beginning to explore prevention and intervention strategies which are appropriate for their youth. This article provides a framework for developing a collaborative approach to prescription drug abuse prevention--called the Prevention Awareness Team--that…

  19. Electrical stimulation using sine waveform prevents unloading-induced muscle atrophy in the deep calf muscles of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Hirayama, Yusuke; Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of electrical stimulation by using rectangular and sine waveforms in the prevention of deep muscle atrophy in rat calf muscles. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: control, hindlimb unloading (HU), and HU plus electrical stimulation (ES). The animals in the ES group were electrically stimulated using rectangular waveform (RS) on the left calves and sine waveform (SS) on the right calves, twice a day, for 2 weeks during unloading. HU for 2 weeks resulted in a loss of the muscle mass, a decrease in the cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers, and overexpression of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In contrast, electrical stimulation with RS attenuated the HU-induced reduction in the cross-sectional area of muscle fibers and the increase of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius muscle. However, electrical stimulation with RS failed to prevent muscle atrophy in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles. Nevertheless, electrical stimulation with SS attenuated the HU-induced muscle atrophy and the up-regulation of ubiquitinated proteins in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. This indicates that SS was more effective in the prevention of deep muscle atrophy than RS. Since the skin muscle layers act like the plates of a capacitor, separated by the subcutaneous adipose layer, the SS can pass through this capacitor more easily than the RS. Hence, SS can prevent the progressive loss of muscle fibers in the deep portion of the calf muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Puppet Play as Interactive Approach in Drug Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic-Bilan, Diana; Vigato, Teodora

    2010-01-01

    The national strategies of drug abuse prevention across Europe have come to recognise that the drug abuse problem presents a complex set of issues of which there is no simple solution. There is a considerable increase in investment in prevention, treatment and harm-reduction activities and increased focus on supply reduction. School settings are…

  1. CRIMINAL POLICY AND PREVENTION OF DRUG ADDICTION AMONG YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Ivandić Zimić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of the criminal policy in the development of the integrated prevention-social policy related to drug addiction is highlyimportant because of the fact that it aims are reducing of the drug related crimes, protecting the victims and community. The paperconsiders interventions of the criminal policy into fi elds of treatment and prevention of drug addiction among youth. This relationrepresent challenge for policymakers because interconnections between different service, who do not always have the same point ofview how to approach to the problem, is strongly needed and expected. Thru the comparing of the implementation of prevention andcriminal policy in Great Britain, Netherlands, Sweden and Croatia, aim of the paper is to detected concepts and models of infl uenceof the criminal policy on the reducing use of drugs among youth and effectiveness of prevention programs. Lack of the support andsocial care for the drug addiction offenders within the criminal policy, have effects of the success of the social reintegration and appearanceof recidivism. There is a strong connection between prevention and criminal policy in the fi led of combating drug problem;on one side good prevention policy could infl uence on the reduction of number of youth who will committee drug crimes and enteredin the criminal justice system, but at the same time the criminal policy have the important role in the preventing of the drug abuse thruthe involving minor drug offenders in the treatment while there are in the criminal proceedings.

  2. Rehabilitation of muscle after injury - the role of anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Mikkelsen, U R; Magnusson, S P

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed among athletes worldwide in relation to muscle injury and soreness. This review aims to provide an overview of studies investigating their effects on skeletal muscle, in particular the repair processes in injured muscle. Muscle in...

  3. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol prevents skeletal muscle atrophy: role of p38 MAPKinase and E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Derbre

    Full Text Available Alterations in muscle play an important role in common diseases and conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during hindlimb unloading due, at least in part, to the activation of xanthine oxidase (XO. The major aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which XO activation causes unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats, and its possible prevention by allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of this enzyme. For this purpose we studied one of the main redox sensitive signalling cascades involved in skeletal muscle atrophy i.e. p38 MAPKinase, and the expression of two well known muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in proteolysis, the Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx; also known as atrogin-1 and Muscle RING (Really Interesting New Gene Finger-1 (MuRF-1. We found that hindlimb unloading induced a significant increase in XO activity and in the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes CuZnSOD and Catalase in skeletal muscle. The most relevant new fact reported in this paper is that inhibition of XO with allopurinol, a drug widely used in clinical practice, prevents soleus muscle atrophy by ~20% after hindlimb unloading. This was associated with the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-MAFbx pathway. Our data suggest that XO was involved in the loss of muscle mass via the activation of the p38MAPK-MAFbx pathway in unloaded muscle atrophy. Thus, allopurinol may have clinical benefits to combat skeletal muscle atrophy in bedridden, astronauts, sarcopenic, and cachexic patients.

  4. Muscle spasms: an unexpected adverse drug reaction of pemetrexed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rouw, Hendrika J. A.; Jessurun, Naomi T.; Masen-Poos, Lucie J. P.; Derijks, Hieronymus J.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we describe a 53-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin combination therapy, followed by pemetrexed monotherapy. The patient developed severe muscle spasms at least twice, shortly after administration of pemetrexed monotherapy. A possible explanation for this observation is that in combination with cisplatin therapy, the patient was hyperhydrated before administration to promote renal excretion and reduce toxicity. Pemetrexed is also renally excreted, which supports the finding that toxicity did not occur when the patient was hyperhydrated. After discontinuation of pemetrexed the symptoms did not reoccur. All aspects of this case point to a possible relationship between pemetrexed and an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We conclude that muscle spasms are a rare, but possibly dose-related ADR of pemetrexed-based therapy. PMID:28203304

  5. How Can Prescription Drug Misuse Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  6. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  7. Adverse Drug Event Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; Baehr, Avi; Peña, Juliet C; Rider, Briana B; Yang, Sandra; Hu, Dale J

    2016-09-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a national patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in August 2014. The following October, the ADE Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference provided an opportunity for federal agencies, national experts, and stakeholders to coordinate and collaborate in the initiative to reduce preventable ADEs. The single-day conference included morning plenary sessions focused on the surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives and oversights, and additional research needs of the drug classes highlighted in the ADE Action Plan: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids. Afternoon breakout sessions allowed for facilitated discussions on measures for tracking national progress in ADE prevention and the identification of opportunities to ensure safe and high-quality health care and medication use.

  8. The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in the Prevention of Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Gumerson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are genetically diverse but share common phenotypic features of muscle weakness, degeneration, and progressive decline in muscle function. Previous work has focused on understanding how disruptions in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex result in muscular dystrophy, supporting a hypothesis that the muscle sarcolemma is fragile and susceptible to contraction-induced injury in multiple forms of dystrophy. Although benign in healthy muscle, contractions in dystrophic muscle may contribute to a higher degree of muscle damage which eventually overwhelms muscle regeneration capacity. While increased susceptibility of muscle to mechanical injury is thought to be an important contributor to disease pathology, it is becoming clear that not all DGC-associated diseases share this supposed hallmark feature. This paper outlines experimental support for a function of the DGC in preventing muscle damage and examines the evidence that supports novel functions for this complex in muscle that when impaired, may contribute to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy.

  9. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Tanaka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy.

  10. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Adverse Effects and Their Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald E.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid, asp

  11. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  12. Primary prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder:drugs and implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim C Burbiel

    2015-01-01

    Because posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly debilitating condition, prevention is an important research topic. This article reviews possible prevention approaches that involve the administration of drugs before the traumatic event takes place. The considered approaches include drugs that address the sympathetic nervous system, drugs interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, narcotics and other psychoactive drugs, as well as modulators of protein synthesis. Furthermore, some thoughts on potential ethical implications of the use of drugs for the primary prevention of PTDS are presented. While there are many barriers to overcome in this field of study, this paper concludes with a call for additional research, as there are currently no approaches that are well-suited for regular daily use.

  13. Risk factors in prevention of drug dependences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Ol'ga; Gajdosova, Beata; Madarasova-Geckova, Andrea; Van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the state-of-art of knowledge of risk factors of drug use as a form of risk behaviour in adolescents in individual, interpersonal, and environmental domain (family, school, society). The attention is paid to general deviation syndrome and to the construct of general tendency to dr

  14. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  15. Health promotion: Alcohol and drug misuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Currently, average apparent consumption of alcohol for all persons older than 14 is 10 percent higher than 10 years ago, and is equivalent to about 2.75 gallons of ethanol per person per year. Approximately 10 million adult Americans (i.e., 7 percent of those 18 or older) can be considered problem drinkers. Youthful problem drinkers, aged 14 to 17, are estimated to number more than 3 million and comprise 19 percent of this age group. In addition to the social costs, the economic costs to society as a result of alcohol misuse are substantial--an estimated +49.4 billion in 1977. Ten percent of all deaths in the United States are alcohol-related. Cirrhosis, which is largely attributable to alcohol consumption, ranks among the 10 leading causes of death. Alcohol use also is associated with cancer of the liver, pancreas, esophagus, and mouth. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy is associated with a wide range of possible harmful effects to the fetus--among them decreased birth weight, spontaneous abortion, and physical and mental birth defects. Drug misuse is also an expanding problem. There are some 16 million current marijuana users. The popularity of cocaine continues to increase--over 10 million Americans have tried cocaine at least once and there are an estimated 1 to 2 million current users. Misuse of barbiturates remains a significant problem with at least 1 million persons believed to misuse these drugs and the 30,000 estimated to be addicted to them. In addition, heroin addiction is still considered by many to be the most serious drug problem in the United States. Drug misuse leads to a number of social and health problems. Excessive doses of depressants can result in both physical and psychological dependence. The toll from heroin includes premature death and severe disability, family disruption, and crime committed to maintain the habit. Misuse of hallucinogens often results in emergency room visits. A special problem is the relationship of marijuana to

  16. What Schools Are Doing to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Describes current trends in drug and alcohol abuse prevention programs, including decreased emphasis on the school's role in prevention, increased interest in forestalling rather than treating health problems, greater involvement of celebrities in antidrug programs, and improved peer support mechanisms. Noteworthy national programs are cited. (PGD)

  17. A transdisciplinary focus on drug abuse prevention: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan W; Johnson, C Anderson; Pentz, Mary Ann; Robertson, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the scope of the Special Issue. A variety of scientific disciplines are brought together to establish theoretical integration of the arenas of drug use, misuse, "abuse," and drug misuse prevention. Transdisciplinary scientific collaboration (TDSC) is utilized as a process of integration. Introductory comments regarding the strengths and limitations of TDSC are presented. Then, the relevance of genetics to substance misuse and substance misuse prevention is presented. Next, the relevance of cognition for prevention is discussed. Specifically, neurologically plausible distinctions in cognition and implicit cognition and their relevance for prevention are discussed. At a relatively molar social-level of analysis, social network theory, systems dynamic models, geographic information systems models, cultural psychology, and political science approaches to drug misuse and its prevention are introduced. The uses of both quantitative and qualitative statistical approaches to prevention are mentioned next. Finally, targeted prevention, bridging the efficacy-effectiveness gap, and a statement on overcoming disbalance round out the Special Issue. The bridges created will serve to propel drug misuse "prevention science" forward in the years to come. Advances in understanding etiological issues, translation to programs, and ecological fit of programming are desired results.

  18. Integrating Underage Drinking and Drug Use Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsberg, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    During the year 2004, 20% of eighth-graders and 60.3% of twelfth-graders reported that they had gotten drunk at least once over the course of just one year, according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA). Of the 10.7 million underage youth who drink, 7.2 million or 31% of all high school students binge drink with a frequency of at least…

  19. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  20. Current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Xinyue

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention for drug users in China and provide scientific evidence for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in drug users. Literature and articles related to drug abuse in China, as well as the results of prevention efforts and successful cases regarding HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users, are reviewed. Lessons learned are drawn out for the future improvement of work and the sustainable development of treatment programs. The number of drug users in China is increasing. Even though the number of opioid-type drug users is growing more slowly than in the past, the number of amphetamine-type stimulant users has increased sharply. It has been proven that methadone maintenance treatment and syringe exchange programs gradually and successfully control HIV/AIDS transmission in drug users. However, it is necessary to enhance these prevention methods and expand their coverage. In addition, the strengthening of antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment for HIV-infected drug users is crucial for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The rapidly growing number of amphetamine-type stimulant users, along with their high-risk behavior, poses a hidden danger of greater HIV/AIDS transmission through sexual intercourse in the near future.

  1. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  2. Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  3. Preventive effects of Chlorella on skeletal muscle atrophy in muscle-specific mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Kumamoto, Shoichiro; Maruyama, Isao; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Ohta, Shigeo

    2014-10-11

    Oxidative stress is involved in age-related muscle atrophy, such as sarcopenia. Since Chlorella, a unicellular green alga, contains various antioxidant substances, we used a mouse model of enhanced oxidative stress to investigate whether Chlorella could prevent muscle atrophy. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is an anti-oxidative enzyme that detoxifies reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxides such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). We therefore used transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of ALDH2 (ALDH2*2 Tg mice) to selectively decrease ALDH2 activity in the muscles. To evaluate the effect of Chlorella, the mice were fed a Chlorella-supplemented diet (CSD) for 6 months. ALDH2*2 Tg mice exhibited small body size, muscle atrophy, decreased fat content, osteopenia, and kyphosis, accompanied by increased muscular 4-HNE levels. The CSD helped in recovery of body weight, enhanced oxidative stress, and increased levels of a muscle impairment marker, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) induced by ALDH2*2. Furthermore, histological and histochemical analyses revealed that the consumption of the CSD improved skeletal muscle atrophy and the activity of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. This study suggests that long-term consumption of Chlorella has the potential to prevent age-related muscle atrophy.

  4. Genetic variations may help identify best candidates for preventive breast cancer drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  5. Runx1 prevents wasting, myofibrillar disorganization, and autophagy of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Blagden, Chris; Fan, Jihua; Nowak, Scott J.; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Littman, Dan R.; Burden, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    Disruptions in the use of skeletal muscle lead to muscle atrophy. After short periods of disuse, muscle atrophy is reversible, and even after prolonged periods of inactivity, myofiber degeneration is uncommon. The pathways that regulate atrophy, initiated either by peripheral nerve damage, immobilization, aging, catabolic steroids, or cancer cachexia, however, are poorly understood. Previously, we found that Runx1 (AML1), a DNA-binding protein that is homologous to Drosophila Runt and has critical roles in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, is poorly expressed in innervated muscle, but strongly induced in muscle shortly after denervation. To determine the function of Runx1 in skeletal muscle, we generated mice in which Runx1 was selectively inactivated in muscle. Here, we show that Runx1 is required to sustain muscle by preventing denervated myofibers from undergoing myofibrillar disorganization and autophagy, structural defects found in a variety of congenital myopathies. We find that only 29 genes, encoding ion channels, signaling molecules, and muscle structural proteins, depend upon Runx1 expression, suggesting that their misregulation causes the dramatic muscle wasting. These findings demonstrate an unexpected role for electrical activity in regulating muscle wasting, and indicate that muscle disuse induces compensatory mechanisms that limit myofiber atrophy. Moreover, these results suggest that reduced muscle activity could cause or contribute to congenital myopathies if Runx1 or its target genes were compromised. PMID:16024660

  6. Protective effects of Ca2+ handling drugs against abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell damage in myopathic skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yuko; Katanosaka, Yuki; Shijun, Zhu; Kobayashi, Yuko; Hanada, Hironori; Shigekawa, Munekazu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2005-09-01

    Deficiency of delta-sarcoglycan (delta-SG), a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), causes skeletal muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy in BIO14.6 hamsters. Here, we studied the involvement of abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in muscle degeneration and the protective effect of drugs against Ca2+ handling proteins in vivo as well as in vitro. First, we characterized the properties of cultured myotubes from muscles of normal and BIO14.6 hamsters (30-60 days old). While there were no apparent differences in the levels of expression of various Ca2+ handling proteins (L-type Ca2+ channel, ryanodine receptor, SR-Ca2+ ATPase, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger), muscle-specific proteins (contractile actin and acetylcholine receptor), or DGC member proteins except SGs, BIO14.6 myotubes showed a high degree of susceptibility to mechanical stressors, such as cyclic stretching and hypo-osmotic stress as compared to normal myotubes, as evidenced by marked increases in creatine phosphokinase (CK) release and bleb formation. BIO14.6 myotubes showed abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis characterized by elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, frequent Ca2+ oscillation, and increased 45Ca2+ uptake. These abnormal Ca2+ events and CK release were significantly prevented by Ca2+ handling drugs, tranilast, diltiazem, and FK506. The calpain inhibitor E64 prevented CK release, but not 45Ca2+ uptake. Some of these drugs (tranilast, diltiazem, and FK506) also exerted a significant protective effect for muscle degeneration in BIO14.6 hamsters and mdx mice in vivo. These observations suggest that elevated Ca2+ entry through sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels predominantly contributes to muscle degeneration and that the drugs tested here may have novel therapeutic potential against muscular dystrophy.

  7. Role of Exercise Therapy in Prevention of Decline in Aging Muscle Function: Glucocorticoid Myopathy and Unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teet Seene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in skeletal muscle quantity and quality lead to disability in the aging population. Physiological changes in aging skeletal muscle are associated with a decline in mass, strength, and inability to maintain balance. Glucocorticoids, which are in wide exploitation in various clinical scenarios, lead to the loss of the myofibrillar apparatus, changes in the extracellular matrix, and a decrease in muscle strength and motor activity, particularly in the elderly. Exercise therapy has shown to be a useful tool for the prevention of different diseases, including glucocorticoid myopathy and muscle unloading in the elderly. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the possibilities of using exercise therapy in the prevention of glucocorticoid caused myopathy and unloading in the elderly and to describe relationships between the muscle contractile apparatus and the extracellular matrix in different types of aging muscles.

  8. Antiplatelet Drugs for Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases : Drug Utilization, Effectiveness, and Safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorsyahdy, A.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are recommended for secondary prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events in patients who experience diseases in which the pathophysiology is associated with platelet aggregation and atherosclerosis, including acute coronary syndrome, transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke,

  9. Pilot study of smoking, alcohol and drug abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, A; Perry, C; Killen, J; Slinkard, L A; Maccoby, N

    1980-07-01

    A longitudinal pilot study gathered data on the onset and prevention of smoking, alcohol, and drug abuse among 526 students from two junior-high-schools in California. Over two school years, students who were trained to resist social pressures toward tobacco, alcohol, and drug use began smoking at less than one-half the rate of those who did not receive special training. Frequent alcohol and marijuana use was also less prevalent among the students who received such training.

  10. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Roig, Marc; Karatzanos, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy may be useful in early musculoskeletal rehabilitation during acute critical illness. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically...

  11. Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) extract prevents dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy by inhibiting the muscle degradation pathway in Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Kyung Kyun; Chung, Ki Wung; Sung, Bokyung; Kim, Min Jo; Park, Chan Hum; Yoon, Changshin; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Mi Kyung; Kim, Cheol Min; Kim, Nam Deuk; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-09-01

    In the Orient, loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) extract (LE) is widely used in teas, food and folk medicines. The leaves of the loquat tree have been used for generations to treat chronic bronchitis, coughs, phlegm production, high fever and gastroenteric disorders. One of the major active components of loquat leaves is ursolic acid, which was recently investigated in the context of preventing muscle atrophy. The present study investigated the therapeutic potential of LE on dexamethasone‑induced muscle atrophy in rats. Daily intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone caused muscle atrophy and evidence of muscle atrophy prevention by LE was demonstrated using various assays. In particular, dexamethasone‑induced grip strength loss was alleviated by LE and the increase in serum creatine kinase activity, a surrogate marker of muscle damage, caused by dexamethasone injection was reduced by LE. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that dexamethasone markedly increased the protein expression levels of muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1), which causes the ubiquitination and degradation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC), and decreased the protein expression levels of MyHC as well as increased the ubiquitinated MyHC to MyHC ratio. However, LE reduced the dexamethasone‑induced protein expression levels of MuRF1 and ubiquitinated MyHC. Additional experiments revealed that LE supplementation inhibited the nuclear translocation of FoxO1 induced by dexamethasone. These findings suggested that LE prevented dexamethasone‑induced muscle atrophy by regulating the FoxO1 transcription factor and subsequently the expression of MuRF1.

  12. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  13. Effects of drug combinations on smooth muscle cell proliferation: an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Tom J; Thyagarajan, Rathna; Argentieri, Dennis; Falotico, Robert; Siekierka, John; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2006-02-17

    Although sirolimus is a potent inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and is effective at preventing restenosis in the majority of clinical revascularization procedures employing sirolimus-eluting stents, some VSMC may escape the antiproliferative effects of sirolimus. The present study examines the effects of combining sirolimus with other known cell cycle-specific antiproliferative agents (cladribine, topotecan or etoposide) on cultured coronary artery VSMC proliferation and utilizes a novel isobolographic approach to determine whether sirolimus/antiproliferative agent combinations produce subadditive, additive or supraadditive potentiation of antiproliferative activity. All agents were found to inhibit coronary artery VSMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Cladribine was found to potentiate the antiproliferative activity of sirolimus in either an additive or supraadditive manner, depending upon the cladribine concentration. Topotecan potentiated the sirolimus antiproliferative activity by simple additivity while etoposide yielded subadditive potentiation. The present results demonstrate the utility of isobolographic analysis for identifying and optimizing antiproliferative drug combinations.

  14. [Prevention of hepatitis C virus infection in drug users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, B; Stöver, H; Leicht, A; Schnackenberg, K; Reimer, J

    2008-10-01

    The high prevalence and incidence rates of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in drug users demonstrate the urgent necessity for a coordinated national prevention strategy. In the shadow of HIV/AIDS the necessary attention to the rapid spreading of the hepatitis C in drug users was started late, without being able to reach the public attention level of HIV/AIDS. The present efforts in the primary and secondary prevention of the hepatitis C in drug users are obviously not sufficient to reduce the prevalence with long-lasting results. Substitution treatment is of central relevance in the prevention of hepatitis C in opiate-dependent subjects, but requires, as current data of the HCV incidence of substituted opiate dependents illustrate, a stronger HCV-specific accentuation. Further settings, which are relevant for the group of intravenous drug users, have to be accessed and sensitized. Furthermore structural and political efforts are necessary, in order to develop a systematic and evidence-based answer to the challenge of the HCV spreading in drug users, in particular due to the fact that a German HCV strategy is still lacking.

  15. The effect of electrical muscle stimulation on the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy in patients with consciousness disturbance in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Tomoya; Shiozaki, Tadahiko; Shimizu, Kentaro; Mouri, Tomoyoshi; Noguchi, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2013-08-01

    Disuse atrophy of the lower limbs of patients with consciousness disturbance has often been recognized as "an unavoidable consequence," such that the mechanism was not investigated diligently. In this study, we examined the preventive effects of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) against disuse atrophy of the lower limbs in patients in coma after stroke or traumatic brain injury in the intensive care unit. We evaluated changes in cross-sectional area of lower limb muscles weekly with computed tomography in 6 control group patients and 9 EMS group patients. Electrical muscle stimulation was performed daily from day 7 after admission. We evaluated the anterior thigh muscle compartment, posterior thigh muscle compartment, anterior leg muscle compartment, and posterior leg muscle compartment. In the control group, the decrease in cross-sectional area progressed in all compartments every week (P Electrical muscle stimulation is effective in the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy in patients with consciousness disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Systematic Review on the Effects of Botanicals on Skeletal Muscle Health in Order to Prevent Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rondanelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence-based medicine regarding the main botanical extracts and their nutraceutical compounds correlated to skeletal muscle health in order to identify novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function and to improve the quality of life of older subjects. This review contains all eligible studies from 2010 to 2015 and included 57 publications. We focused our attention on effects of botanical extracts on growth and health of muscle and divided these effects into five categories: anti-inflammation, muscle damage prevention, antifatigue, muscle atrophy prevention, and muscle regeneration and differentiation.

  17. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Moroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin (LDA. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy. Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gastrointestinal mucosa today. The effect of the drug differs from that of PPIs: it is a typical gastroand enteroprotector that enhances the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins and possesses a significant anti-inflammatory potential. Rebamipide has long been widely used by doctors inJapan,South Korea, andChinaas an effective and safe agent for the treatment of many diseases of the digestive system. There is a strong evidence base for the efficacy of rebamipide in preventing and treating NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy (including LDA-induced injuries. Controlled studies have found that the drug is not inferior to the classic gastroprotective agent misoprostol, significantly outperforming the latter in its tolerability. This review describes the mechanism of action of rebamipide and main clinical trials of its therapeutic effect in NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy. 

  19. Prevention of disuse muscle atrophy by dietary ingestion of 8-prenylnaringenin in denervated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Mukai

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have attracted considerable attention in relation to their effects upon health. 8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN is found in the common hop (Humulus lupulus and assumed to be responsible for the health impact of beer consumption. We wanted to clarify the effects of prenylation on the physiological functions of dietary flavonoids by comparing the effects of 8-PN with that of intact naringenin in the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy using a model of denervation in mice. Consumption of 8-PN (but not naringenin prevented loss of weight in the gastrocnemius muscle further supported by the lack of induction of the protein content of a key ubiquitin ligase involved in muscle atrophy, atrogin-1, and by the activation of Akt phosphorylation. 8-PN content in the gastrocnemius muscle was tenfold higher than that of naringenin. These results suggested that, compared with naringenin, 8-PN was effectively concentrated into skeletal muscle to exert its preventive effects upon disuse muscle atrophy. It is likely that prenylation generates novel functions for 8-PN by enhancing its accumulation into muscle tissue through dietary intake.

  20. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  1. Recent advances using zebrafish animal models for muscle disease drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maves, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal models have enabled great progress in the discovery and understanding of pharmacological approaches for treating muscle diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Areas covered With this article, the author provides the reader with a description of the zebrafish animal model, which has been employed to identify and study pharmacological approaches to muscle disease. In particular, the author focuses on how both large-scale chemical screens and targeted drug treatment studies have established zebrafish as an important model for muscle disease drug discovery. Expert opinion There are a number of opportunities arising for the use of zebrafish models for further developing pharmacological approaches to muscle diseases, including studying drug combination therapies and utilizing genome editing to engineer zebrafish muscle disease models. It is the author’s particular belief that the availability of a wide range of zebrafish transgenic strains for labeling immune cell types, combined with live imaging and drug treatment of muscle disease models, should allow for new elegant studies demonstrating how pharmacological approaches might influence inflammation and the immune response in muscle disease. PMID:24931439

  2. Effect of Vibration in Prevention of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: A Recent Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubia Veqar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is muscular pain and discomfort experienced approximately 24-72 hours after exercise. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears and is more common after unfamiliar high-force muscular work. It is seen predominantly post eccentric exercise. It is commonly seen after the intensity and volume of training are increased, the order of progression in exercise or a new training regime is performed. DOMS is not a disorder or disease; it can be considered as a painful type I muscle strain injury. DOMS can limit further exercise in the days following an initial training. It is a matter of concern for coaches, athletic trainers, physiotherapist, and other sports medicine personnel concerned with the athletes. Various pre- and post exercise interventions have been investigated with respect to preventing the subsequent symptoms and treating DOMS. Interventions like pharmacological treatments, therapeutic treatments using physical modalities, and interventions using nutritional supplements have been researched. In the aspect of prevention and treatment of DOMS vibration therapy is effective. Vibration therapy helps to synchronization of motor unit activity by preventing sarcoma disruption and also improves muscular strength, power development and kinesthetic awareness. Thus optimal muscle performance prevents the muscle damage, reducing the chances of DOMS. The purpose of this review is to find out the role of Vibration therapy in preventing DOMS.

  3. Delphinidin Prevents Muscle Atrophy and Upregulates miR-23a Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Motoki; Nonaka, Haruna; Komatsu, Satomi; Goto, Megumi; Morozumi, Mai; Yamada, Shuhei; Lin, I-Chian; Yamashita, Shuya; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2017-01-11

    Delphinidin, one of the major anthocyanidins, shows protective effects against a variety of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, and muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to determine the preventive mechanism of delphinidin on disuse muscle atrophy. In vitro and in vivo models were used to validate the effects of delphinidin on the expression of MuRF1, miR-23a, and NFATc3. Delphinidin suppressed the upregulation of MuRF1 (1.77 ± 0.05 vs 1.03 ± 0.17, P muscle weight loss was prevented by oral administration of delphinidin. Moreover, delphinidin suppressed MuRF1 (3.35 ± 0.13 vs 2.26 ± 0.3, P muscle atrophy by inducing miR-23a expression and suppressing MuRF1 expression.

  4. New Technology Tools: Using Social Media for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to using social media technology for alcohol, drug abuse, and violence prevention, Thomas Workman, at Baylor College of Medicine's John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science, points out that social media is interactive. This means that a person is entering a conversation rather than a declaration, and…

  5. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide.

  6. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meamarbashi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role. Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized. Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS. Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered. PMID:28265543

  7. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Meamarbashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role.Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized.Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS.Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered.

  8. Comparison of premodulated interferential and pulsed current electrical stimulation in prevention of deep muscle atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Hirayama, Yusuke; Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of electrical stimulation using pulsed current (PC) and premodulated interferential current (IC) on prevention of muscle atrophy in the deep muscle layer of the calf. Rats were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: control, hindlimb unloading for 2 weeks (HU), and HU plus electrical stimulation for 2 weeks. The animals in the electrical stimulation group received therapeutic stimulation of the left (PC) or right (IC) calf muscles twice a day during the unloading period. Animals undergoing HU for 2 weeks exhibited significant loss of muscle mass, decreased cross-sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers, and increased expression of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles compared with control animals. Stimulation with PC attenuated the effects on the muscle mass, fiber CSA, and ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius muscle. However, PC stimulation failed to prevent atrophy of the deep layer of the gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus muscle. In contrast, stimulation with IC inhibited atrophy of both the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In addition, the IC protocol inhibited the HU-induced increase in ubiquitinated protein expression in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. These results suggest that electrical stimulation with IC is more effective than PC in preventing muscle atrophy in the deep layer of limb muscles.

  9. YOUNGSTER’S ATTITUDES TO SCHOOL-BASED PREVENTION PROGRAMS FOCUSED ON DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Odraskova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available paper focuses on primary prevention of drug addiction, in particular the primary prevention programs implemented in school environments. It contains the results of a quantitative research conducted using a non-standardized questionnaire method. The study objective was to identify differences in attitudes of a group of pupils towards the issue of drug addiction before and after they completed the school-based prevention program. The study found that after completing the school-based prevention program there was improvement in attitudes towards the issue of drug addiction in the specific group of pupils. The number of appropriate answers to the question “Alcohol makes people happy” increased by 18.82 %. respondents (62.70% disagreed that they would adapt themselves if their opinion differed to the majority. The number of positive answers to the question “Smoking is addictive” increased by 13.66%; the number of positive answers to the question “Drinking alcohol is harmful” increased by 24.93%; and all respondents agreed with the statement that smoking threatens health.

  10. Combined isometric, concentric, and eccentric resistance exercise prevents unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G R; Haddad, F; Bodell, P W; Tran, P D; Baldwin, K M

    2007-11-01

    Previously, we reported that an isometric resistance training program that was effective in stimulating muscle hypertrophy in ambulatory rats could not completely prevent muscle atrophy during unloading (Haddad F, Adams GR, Bodell PW, Baldwin KM. J Appl Physiol 100: 433-441, 2006). These results indicated that preventing muscle atrophy does not appear to be simply a function of providing an anabolic stimulus. The present study was undertaken to determine if resistance training, with increased volume (3-s contractions) and incorporating both static and dynamic components, would be effective in preventing unloading-induced muscle atrophy. Rats were exposed to 5 days of muscle unloading via tail suspension. During that time one leg received electrically stimulated resistance exercise (RE) that included an isometric, concentric, and eccentric phase. The results of this study indicate that this combined-mode RE provided an anabolic stimulus sufficient to maintain the mass and myofibril content of the trained but not the contralateral medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle. Relative to the contralateral MG, the RE stimulus increased the amount of total RNA (indicative of translational capacity) as well as the mRNA for several anabolic/myogenic markers such as insulin-like growth factor-I, myogenin, myoferlin, and procollagen III-alpha-1 and decreased that of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle size. The combined-mode RE protocol also increased the activity of anabolic signaling intermediates such as p70S6 kinase. These results indicate that a combination of static- and dynamic-mode RE of sufficient volume provides an effective stimulus to stimulate anabolic/myogenic mechanisms to counter the initial stages of unloading-induced muscle atrophy.

  11. Stroke Prevention: Not all Antihypertensive Drugs are Created Equal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz H Messerli

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Reductions in blood pressure (BP through intervention can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients. However, a number of trials indicate that beta-blockers, despite lowering BP, do not reduce the risk of stroke.A recent meta-analysis suggested that, over and beyond BP reduction, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors appear superior to calcium channel blockers for prevention of coronary heart disease whereas calcium channel blockers appear superior to ACE inhibitors for prevention of stroke.Indeed, in the Syst-EUR study a 42% reduction in strokes was achieved in the calcium antagonist arm when compared to the placebo arm.It is hypothesised that antihypertensive agents that stimulate the AT2-receptor (thiazide diuretics, dihydropyridine calcium antagonists and angiotensin receptor blockers are more cerebroprotective than drug classes that do not stimulate the AT2-receptor (beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors.The angiotensin receptor blockers are the only drug class that have a dual mechanism of action that could be helpful in preventing strokes in that they not only inhibit the AT1-receptor but also allow stimulation of the AT2-receptor. Not surprisingly therefore, in trials such as LIFE, VALUE and MOSES, angiotensin receptor blockers showed excellent cerebroprotection.

  12. Prevención contra las drogas Prevention against drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Jiménez Herrera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Explorar de manera general algunos aspectos relacionados al tema de la prevención contra las drogas. Metodología: Identificación y revisión de artículos de las bases de datos: EBRARY, E-Libro, EBSCO, ProQuest, Science Direct y Springer Link, con la intención de organizar la información encontrada en las secciones siguientes: contexto general, factores involucrados en el uso y abuso de las drogas, acciones - políticas - prevención contra las drogas y hacia dónde va la investigación. Resultados: Aunque existe una variedad de conceptos relacionados con las drogas, algunos de ellos siguen en discusión dados los múltiples factores involucrados en el proceso. En los últimos años han ocurrido pocos cambios en la oferta y la demanda, pero el consumo entre hombres y mujeres tiende a igualarse, mientras el consumo inicia a edades más tempranas. Se sabe que existen factores protectores y de riesgo que median el uso, abuso y dependencia de las drogas, pero los jóvenes representan el grupo más vulnerable a los efectos de las drogas. Se realizan esfuerzos en muchos sectores pero de una manera no homogénea ni armónica y aunque ha habido esfuerzos por lograr prevención, en especial en el escenario educativo, hay factores que dificultan esta labor. Se evidencia la necesidad de contar con más investigación que permita orientar las distintas acciones para sopesar los efectos dentro del complejo mundo de las drogas Conclusión: Ante el complejo fenómeno de las drogas, se requiere conocer los distintos componentes involucrados para que puedan ser abordados de manera integral. La revisión permitió realizar un acercamiento al tema de prevención contra las drogas.Objective: To explore of general way some aspects related to the subject of the prevention against drugs. Methodology: Identification and article revision of the data bases: EBRARY, E-Libro, EBSCO, ProQuest, Science Direct and Springer Link, with the intention to organize

  13. Reaching Prevention Professionals: The Mentor Portal Cost-Benefit Analysis of a Drug Misuse Prevention Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    such as NIDA and the Pompidou Group. Figure 4-1 depicts the setting and the target groups of the portal in a schematic way. It serves as a framework...584,000  1,138,000 584,000 611,500 1,195,500 22 5.2 Outcomes The Drug Policy Research Center study (Caulkins 1999) researched whether...13, Chicago 1990a. Benard, B., K. Marshall, Meta-analyses provide decade of evidence: effective school-based drug prevention programs, Center

  14. Drug- and Gene-eluting Stents for Preventing Coronary Restenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, Kamali Manickavasagam; Che, Hui-Lian; Cho, Chong-Su

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been reported to be a major cause of death worldwide. Current treatment methods include atherectomy, coronary angioplasty (as a percutaneous coronary intervention), and coronary artery bypass. Among them, the insertion of stents into the coronary artery is one of the commonly used methods for CAD, although the formation of in-stent restenosis (ISR) is a major drawback, demanding improvement in stent technology. Stents can be improved using the delivery of DNA, siRNA, and miRNA rather than anti-inflammatory/anti-thrombotic drugs. In particular, genes that could interfere with the development of plaque around infected regions are conjugated on the stent surface to inhibit neointimal formation. Despite their potential benefits, it is necessary to explore the various properties of gene-eluting stents. Furthermore, multifunctional electronic stents that can be used as a biosensor and deliver drug- or gene-based on physiological condition will be a very promising way to the successful treatment of ISR. In this review, we have discussed the molecular mechanism of restenosis, the use of drug- and gene-eluting stents, and the possible roles that these stents have in the prevention and treatment of coronary restenosis. Further, we have explained how multifunctional electronic stents could be used as a biosensor and deliver drugs based on physiological conditions. PMID:28184335

  15. Assessing organizational effectiveness in higher education drug prevention consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon-Keller, A E; Lloyd-McGarvey, E; Canterbury, R J

    1995-01-01

    Eighty-three consortia of institutions of higher education, organized under funding from the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE) Drug Prevention Programs of the Department of Education, were surveyed to measure organizational effectiveness. Generalized satisfaction with the functioning of the consortia was related to the number of active members, the average miles traveled to meetings, satisfaction with performance of task functions, members' roles, the level of trust among members and the level of creativity and innovation in problem-solving. Satisfaction with goal attainment was significantly related to the presence of at least one "internal" goal for the consortium.

  16. [Extravasation of Cytostatic Drugs - Prevention and Best Practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maňásek, V

    2016-01-01

    Extravasation is the leakage of a drug (intended primarily for intravenous administration) into tissues surrounding the vascular system. The damage to surrounding varies depending on the nature and volume of extravasation. Cytostatic extravasation is associated with poor outcomes for patients. This paper summarizes the types of risk associated with cytostatic extravasation, and the preventative measures that can be used when such an event occurs. We also provide information on potential treatments. However, justification for their use has only been substantiated in papers with different levels of significance and these papers are not available in all countries. We summarize current international recommendations for actions to be taken in the event of extravasation.

  17. Preventive Effects of Eccentric Training on Acute Hamstring Muscle Injury in Professional Baseball

    OpenAIRE

    Seagrave, Richard A.; Perez, Luis; McQueeney, Sean; Toby, E. Bruce; Key, Vincent; Nelson, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hamstring injuries are the second most common injury causing missed days in professional baseball field players. Recent studies have shown the preventive benefit of eccentric conditioning on the hamstring muscle group in injury prevention. Specifically, Nordic-type exercises have been shown to decrease the incidence of acute hamstring injuries in professional athletes. Purpose: This was a prospective study performed in coordination with a single Major League Baseball (MLB) organiz...

  18. Nucleic Acid Drugs for Prevention of Cardiac Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Suzuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation has been broadly performed in humans. However, occurrence of acute and chronic rejection has not yet been resolved. Several inflammatory factors, such as cytokines and adhesion molecules, enhance the rejection. The graft arterial disease (GAD, which is a type of chronic rejection, is characterized by intimal thickening comprised of proliferative smooth muscle cells. Specific treatments that target the attenuation of acute rejection and GAD formation have not been well studied in cardiac transplantation. Recent progress in the nucleic acid drugs, such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs to regulate the transcription of disease-related genes, has important roles in therapeutic applications. Transfection of cis-element double-stranded DNA, named as “decoy,” has been also reported to be a useful nucleic acid drug. This decoy strategy has been not only a useful method for the experimental studies of gene regulation but also a novel clinical strategy. In this paper, we reviewed the experimental results of NF-κB, E2F, AP-1, and STAT-1 decoy and other ODNs using the experimental heart transplant models.

  19. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Sezin; Jung, Dae Young; Friedline, Randall H; Noh, Hye Lim; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Inashima, Kunikazu; Tran, Duy A; Hu, Xiaodi; Loubato, Marilia M; Craige, Siobhan M; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2017-02-01

    Altered energy balance and insulin resistance are important characteristics of aging. Skeletal muscle is a major site of glucose disposal, and the role of aging-associated inflammation in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unclear. To investigate, we examined glucose metabolism in 18-mo-old transgenic mice with muscle-specific overexpression of IL-10 (M(IL10)) and in wild-type mice during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping. Despite similar fat mass and energy balance, M(IL10) mice were protected from aging-associated insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose infusion rates, whole-body glucose turnover, and skeletal muscle glucose uptake (∼60%; P age-matched WT mice. This protective effect was associated with decreased muscle inflammation, but no changes in adipose tissue inflammation in aging M(IL10) mice. These results demonstrate the importance of skeletal muscle inflammation in aging-mediated insulin resistance, and our findings further implicate a potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory cytokine in the treatment of aging-mediated insulin resistance.-Dagdeviren, S., Jung, D. Y., Friedline, R. H., Noh, H. L., Kim, J. H., Patel, P. R., Tsitsilianos, N., Inashima, K., Tran, D. A., Hu, X., Loubato, M. M., Craige, S. M., Kwon, J. Y., Lee, K. W., Kim, J. K. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. © FASEB.

  20. The Role of Exercise and TFAM in Preventing Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilen, Nicholas T; Kunkel, George H; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is the consequence of protein degradation exceeding protein synthesis. This arises for a multitude of reasons including the unloading of muscle during microgravity, post-surgery bedrest, immobilization of a limb after injury, and overall disuse of the musculature. The development of therapies prior to skeletal muscle atrophy settings to diminish protein degradation is scarce. Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy and contributes to the induction of protein degradation and cell apoptosis through increased levels of ROS observed with the loss of organelle function. ROS binds mtDNA, leading to its degradation and decreasing functionality. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) will bind and coat mtDNA, protecting it from ROS and degradation while increasing mitochondrial function. Exercise stimulates cell signaling pathways that converge on and increase PGC-1α, a well-known activator of the transcription of TFAM and mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, in the present review we are proposing, separately, exercise and TFAM treatments prior to atrophic settings (muscle unloading or disuse) alleviate skeletal muscle atrophy through enhanced mitochondrial adaptations and function. Additionally, we hypothesize the combination of exercise and TFAM leads to a synergistic effect in targeting mitochondrial function to prevent skeletal muscle atrophy. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2348-2358, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  1. A traditional herbal medicine, rikkunshi-to (TJ-43), prevents intracellular signaling disorders in gastric smooth muscle of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasushi; Nobe, Koji; Maruyama, Yoshiaki; Momose, Kazutaka; Homma, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Prevention of diabetic gastrointestinal dysfunction is of utmost importance. The present study demonstrated that diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) activity in diabetic gastric smooth muscle in the resting state was approximately 3.5-fold greater than that in controls. However, oral administration of TJ-43 (1% of food intake) or subcutaneous insulin injection (12 units/kg/day) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (DM) for 2 weeks prevented DGK abnormalities based on the control level. Increased DGK activity in the resting state of DM was inhibited significantly by R59022, neomycin or staurosporine; in contrast, these drugs did not affect DGK activity in controls, insulin-treated DM or TJ-43-treated DM. In controls, the endogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) level was inhibited significantly by R59022 or neomycin but not affected by staurosporine. On the other hand, these three drugs significantly inhibited endogenous PA levels in DM, and neomycin significantly inhibited endogenous PA levels in insulin-treated and TJ-43-treated DM. This suggests that TJ-43 could prevent alteration of DGK activity and PA formation without reduction of blood glucose levels. Moreover, these effects were greater than those of insulin treatment. Results suggested that TJ-43 treatment influenced the hyperreactivity of DGK and DAG formation via phospholipase C activity. In conclusion, TJ-43 can be recommended with respect to enhancement of the quality of life in patients displaying diabetic gastrointestinal complications.

  2. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  3. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shouta Miyatake,1 Yuko Shimizu-Motohashi,2 Shin’ichi Takeda,1 Yoshitsugu Aoki1 1Department of Molecular Therapy, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Child Neurology, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. Keywords: calcium channels, ryanodine receptor 1, exon skipping, NF-κB, myokine, ROS

  4. Bumetanide prevents transient decreases in muscle force in murine hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Cannon, Stephen C

    2013-03-19

    To test the hypothesis that inhibition of the Na-K-2Cl transporter with bumetanide will reduce the susceptibility to decreases in muscle force in a mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP). In vitro contraction tests were performed on soleus muscle isolated from mice with knock-in missense mutations that result in HypoPP (sodium channel NaV1.4-R669H) or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP; sodium channel NaV1.4-M1592V). Bumetanide prevented the development of weakness in 2 mM K(+) and also restored force during an established attack of HypoPP. Stimulation of the Na-K-2Cl transporter via induction of hyperosmolality exacerbated the weakness seen in low K(+) and was also prevented by bumetanide. Bumetanide was more efficacious than acetazolamide for preventing weakness in low K(+) conditions. Decreases in force in HyperPP muscle exposed to 10 mM K(+) were not prevented by treatment with bumetanide. The Na-K-2Cl inhibitor bumetanide was highly effective in preventing attacks of weakness in the NaV1.4-R669H mouse model of HypoPP and should be considered for management of patients with HypoPP due to sodium channel mutations. Dehydration may aggravate HypoPP by stimulating the Na-K-2Cl transporter.

  5. Muscle wasting and impaired myogenesis in tumor bearing mice are prevented by ERK inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Penna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The onset of cachexia is a frequent feature in cancer patients. Prominent characteristic of this syndrome is the loss of body and muscle weight, this latter being mainly supported by increased protein breakdown rates. While the signaling pathways dependent on IGF-1 or myostatin were causally involved in muscle atrophy, the role of the Mitogen-Activated-Protein-Kinases is still largely debated. The present study investigated this point on mice bearing the C26 colon adenocarcinoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C26-bearing mice display a marked loss of body weight and muscle mass, this latter associated with increased phosphorylated (p-ERK. Administration of the ERK inhibitor PD98059 to tumor bearers attenuates muscle depletion and weakness, while restoring normal atrogin-1 expression. In C26 hosts, muscle wasting is also associated with increased Pax7 expression and reduced myogenin levels. Such pattern, suggestive of impaired myogenesis, is reversed by PD98059. Increased p-ERK and reduced myosin heavy chain content can be observed in TNFα-treated C2C12 myotubes, while decreased myogenin and MyoD levels occur in differentiating myoblasts exposed to the cytokine. All these changes are prevented by PD98059. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that ERK is involved in the pathogenesis of muscle wasting in cancer cachexia and could thus be proposed as a therapeutic target.

  6. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruven, Carolin; Li, Wen; Li, Heng; Wong, Wai-Man; Wu, Wutian

    2017-02-27

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200-300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy.

  7. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Ruven

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200–300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy.

  8. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Hojman

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight, food intake as well as muscle mass, strength and signalling. Mice were treated weekly with 4 mg/kg cisplatin or saline for 6 weeks, and randomized to voluntary wheel running or not. Cisplatin treatment induced loss of body weight (29.8%, P < 0.001, lean body mass (20.6%, P = 0.001, as well as anorexia, impaired muscle strength (22.5% decrease, P < 0.001 and decreased glucose tolerance. In addition, cisplatin impaired Akt-signalling, induced genes related to protein degradation and inflammation, and reduced muscle glycogen content. Voluntary wheel running during treatment attenuated body weight loss by 50% (P < 0.001, maintained lean body mass (P < 0.001 and muscle strength (P < 0.001, reversed anorexia and impairments in Akt and protein degradation signalling. Cisplatin-induced muscular inflammation was not prevented by voluntary wheel running, nor was glucose tolerance improved. Exercise training may preserve muscle mass in cancer patients receiving cisplatin treatment, potentially improving physical capacity, quality of life and overall survival.

  9. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  10. Drug injection of Lanwei acupoint to prevent pull response duringappendectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Sheng Liang; Yu Chuah Liu; Yun Chun Zhang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To observe the effects of Lanwei acupiont blockade with drug to prevent pull re,ponse duringappendectomy.METHODS Sixty patients with appendix (37 male and 23 female, ASA Ⅰ - Ⅱ) aged from 16 to 58 yearsold, were divided into two groups at random, and they underwent persistent epidural nerve ,lock and McBurney opening. Group A for experiment (nA = 30) received persistent epidural nerve blck plus druginjection of Lanwei acupoint. And the control group, group B (nB=30), received simple epidural nerveblock. No remarkable difference was found in the general data of both groups (P>0.05).RESULTS None of the experimental group had marked nausea and vomiting. Twenty-six cases belonged tograde 0 (account for 86.67%). Three cases were of grade Ⅰ. One case was of grade Ⅱ. None belonged tograde Ⅲ. There were fewer changes in HR, BP and SPO2 during the operation. Compared with the experimental group. The results in the control group showed obvious changes in HR,BP and SPO2, especially at the time of 5 minute post-pull appendix (P<0.01). Eleven cases belonged tograde Ⅲ (36.67%), seven cases to grade Ⅱ and Four cases to grade Ⅰ, only 2 cases to grade 0.CONCLUSION Adjusting the function of Zang and Fu, maintaining the coordination and the balanceamong Zang and Fu, drug injection of Lanwei acupoint may prevent vagus-vagus reflex. The method issimple, easy, inexpensive and effective. It is advantageous to anesthetic care during the operation.

  11. Adverse drug reactions and cost effectiveness of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and neurotropic drugs in patients with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Patel

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Patient on combination of three drugs (NSAIDs, muscle relaxants, and neurotropic agents had maximum ADRs and their prescription cost per day was highest among the three groups. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 273-277

  12. Federal Strategy for Prevention of Drug Abuse and Drug Trafficking, 1982. Prepared for the President Pursuant to the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Policy Development, Washington, DC.

    This document describes the Federal response to drug abuse and drug trafficking. The actions of President Reagan, in Executive Order 12368, establishing an official advisor on drug abuse policy matters, and the priorities, issues, and objectives (international cooperation, drug law enforcement, education and prevention, detoxification and…

  13. Melatonin prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Bruno G; Baraldi, Flavia G; Sampaio, Igor H; Bomfim, Lucas H M; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Carneiro, Everardo M; Alberici, Luciane C; Gomis, Ramon; Amaral, Fernanda G; Cipolla-Neto, José; Araújo, Michel B; Lima, Tanes; Akira Uyemura, Sérgio; Silveira, Leonardo R; Vieira, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin has a number of beneficial metabolic actions and reduced levels of melatonin may contribute to type 2 diabetes. The present study investigated the metabolic pathways involved in the effects of melatonin on mitochondrial function and insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle. The effect of melatonin was tested both in vitro in isolated rats skeletal muscle cells and in vivo using pinealectomized rats (PNX). Insulin resistance was induced in vitro by treating primary rat skeletal muscle cells with palmitic acid for 24 hr. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was reduced by palmitic acid followed by decreased phosphorylation of AKT which was prevented my melatonin. Palmitic acid reduced mitochondrial respiration, genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and the levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates whereas melatonin counteracted all these parameters in insulin-resistant cells. Melatonin treatment increases CAMKII and p-CREB but had no effect on p-AMPK. Silencing of CREB protein by siRNA reduced mitochondrial respiration mimicking the effect of palmitic acid and prevented melatonin-induced increase in p-AKT in palmitic acid-treated cells. PNX rats exhibited mild glucose intolerance, decreased energy expenditure and decreased p-AKT, mitochondrial respiration, and p-CREB and PGC-1 alpha levels in skeletal muscle which were restored by melatonin treatment in PNX rats. In summary, we showed that melatonin could prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance via activation of CREB-PGC-1 alpha pathway. Thus, the present work shows that melatonin play an important role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial function which could explain some of the beneficial effects of melatonin in insulin resistance states.

  14. Prevention of muscle fibers atrophy during gravitational unloading: The effect of L-arginine administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashkina, N.; Lomonosova, Y.; Shevchenko, T. F.; Bugrova, A. E.; Turtikova, O. V.; Kalamkarov, G. R.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational unloading results in pronounced atrophy of m.soleus. Probably, the output of NO is controlled by the muscle activity. We hypothesized that NO may be involved in the protein metabolism and increase of its concentration in muscle can prevent atrophic changes induced by gravitational unloading. In order to test the hypothesis we applied NO donor L-arginine during gravitational unloading. 2.5-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 220-230g were divided into sedentary control group (CTR, n=7), 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS, n=7), 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-arginine (HSL, n=7) (with a daily supplementation of 500 mg/kg wt L-arginine) and 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-NAME (HSN, n=7) (90 mg/kg wt during 14 days). Cross sectional area (CSA) of slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) soleus muscle fibers decreased by 45% and 28% in the HS group ( patrophy of FT muscle fibers in the HSL group was completely prevented since FT fiber CSA had no significant differences from the CTR group. In HS group, the percentage of fibers revealing either gaps/disruption of the dystrophin layer of the myofiber surface membrane increased by 27% and 17%, respectively, as compared to the controls (CTR group, patrophy level under gravitational unloading.

  15. A 2 week routine stretching programme did not prevent contraction-induced injury in mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jonathon D J; Freeman, Marcus; Stevens, E Don

    2002-10-01

    Most athletes stretch as part of their training regimen and it is commonly believed that this practice prevents muscle injury. We tested this belief using an animal model, in situ mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. One lower hindlimb was slowly stretched for 1 min on alternate days for 12 days; the other leg served as a control. The mouse was lightly anaesthetized during the stretching protocol (isofluorane). Both legs were tested in situ by measuring maximum isometric force and maximum work before and after an eccentric contraction that was designed to cause a contraction-induced injury. The difference between a contraction before and after (i.e. the deficit) was used as a measure of damage caused by the eccentric contraction. There was a threshold for force deficit at a peak to peak eccentric excursion amplitude of 19.5 % (i.e. L(o) +/- 9.75 %, where L(o) is muscle length at peak isometric force). There was a significant increase in force deficit, work deficit, and curve shift with an increase in eccentric excursion amplitude above the threshold. There was no statistical difference in the force deficit, work deficit, or curve shift between the stretched leg and the control leg (P > 0.05). A routine stretching programme, at least at the intensities employed in this experiment, did not prevent contraction-induced injury in the in situ mouse EDL muscle.

  16. A Novel Striated Muscle-Specific Myosin-Blocking Drug for the Study of Neuromuscular Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Dante J; Schubert, Douglas; Maligireddy, Siddhardha; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    The failure to transmit neural action potentials (APs) into muscle APs is referred to as neuromuscular transmission failure (NTF). Although synaptic dysfunction occurs in a variety of neuromuscular diseases and impaired neurotransmission contributes to muscle fatigue, direct evaluation of neurotransmission by measurement of successfully transduced muscle APs is difficult due to the subsequent movements produced by muscle. Moreover, the voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitor used to study neurotransmitter release at the adult neuromuscular junction is ineffective in embryonic tissue, making it nearly impossible to precisely measure any aspect of neurotransmission in embryonic lethal mouse mutants. In this study we utilized 3-(N-butylethanimidoyl)-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BHC), previously identified in a small-molecule screen of skeletal muscle myosin inhibitors, to suppress movements without affecting membrane currents. In contrast to previously characterized drugs from this screen such as N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), which inhibit skeletal muscle myosin ATPase activity but also block neurotransmission, BHC selectively blocked nerve-evoked muscle contraction without affecting neurotransmitter release. This feature allowed a detailed characterization of neurotransmission in both embryonic and adult mice. In the presence of BHC, neural APs produced by tonic stimulation of the phrenic nerve at rates up to 20 Hz were successfully transmitted into muscle APs. At higher rates of phrenic nerve stimulation, NTF was observed. NTF was intermittent and characterized by successful muscle APs following failed ones, with the percentage of successfully transmitted muscle APs diminishing over time. Nerve stimulation rates that failed to produce NTF in the presence of BHC similarly failed to produce a loss of peak muscle fiber shortening, which was examined using a novel optical method of muscle fatigue, or a loss of peak cytosolic calcium transient intensity, examined

  17. A Novel Striated Muscle-Specific Myosin-Blocking Drug for the Study of Neuromuscular Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Dante J.; Schubert, Douglas; Maligireddy, Siddhardha; Hennig, Grant W.; Gould, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The failure to transmit neural action potentials (APs) into muscle APs is referred to as neuromuscular transmission failure (NTF). Although synaptic dysfunction occurs in a variety of neuromuscular diseases and impaired neurotransmission contributes to muscle fatigue, direct evaluation of neurotransmission by measurement of successfully transduced muscle APs is difficult due to the subsequent movements produced by muscle. Moreover, the voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitor used to study neurotransmitter release at the adult neuromuscular junction is ineffective in embryonic tissue, making it nearly impossible to precisely measure any aspect of neurotransmission in embryonic lethal mouse mutants. In this study we utilized 3-(N-butylethanimidoyl)-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BHC), previously identified in a small-molecule screen of skeletal muscle myosin inhibitors, to suppress movements without affecting membrane currents. In contrast to previously characterized drugs from this screen such as N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), which inhibit skeletal muscle myosin ATPase activity but also block neurotransmission, BHC selectively blocked nerve-evoked muscle contraction without affecting neurotransmitter release. This feature allowed a detailed characterization of neurotransmission in both embryonic and adult mice. In the presence of BHC, neural APs produced by tonic stimulation of the phrenic nerve at rates up to 20 Hz were successfully transmitted into muscle APs. At higher rates of phrenic nerve stimulation, NTF was observed. NTF was intermittent and characterized by successful muscle APs following failed ones, with the percentage of successfully transmitted muscle APs diminishing over time. Nerve stimulation rates that failed to produce NTF in the presence of BHC similarly failed to produce a loss of peak muscle fiber shortening, which was examined using a novel optical method of muscle fatigue, or a loss of peak cytosolic calcium transient intensity, examined

  18. Development of a functional food or drug against unloading-mediated muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Nakao, Reiko; Kagawa, Sachiko; Yamada, Chiharu; Abe, Manami; Tamura, Seiko; Kohno, Shohei; Sukeno, Akiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Okumura, Yuushi; Ishidoh, Kazumi

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a primary regulator of muscle protein turnover, providing a mechanism for selective degradation of regulatory and structural proteins. This pathway is constitutively active in muscle fibers and mediates both intracellular signaling events and normal muscle protein turnover. However, conditions of decreased muscle use, so called unloading, remarkably stimulate activity of this pathway, resulting in loss of muscle protein. In fact, we previously reported that expression of several ubiquitin ligase genes, such as MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, are significantly up-regulated in rat skeletal muscle during spaceflight. Moreover, we found that Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an important intermediates of IGF-1 signal transduction, contributes to muscle atrophy during unloading. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 leads to prevention of muscle atrophy during unloading. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oligopeptide as an inhibitor against ubiquitination of IRS-1 by Cbl-b. We synthesized various oligopeptides that may competitively inhibit the binding of Cbl-b to IRS-1 on the basis of their structures and screened inhibitory effects of these synthesized oligopeptides on Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 using in vitro ubiquitination systems. We found that two synthetic oligopeptides with specific amino acid sequences effectively inhibited interaction with Cbl-b and IRS-1, resulting in decreased ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 (Patent pending). In contrast, we also found inhibitory activity against Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 in soy protein-derived oligopeptides, whereas their inhibitory effects were weaker than those of synthetic oligopeptides. Our results suggest that specific oligopeptides may be available as a functional food against the muscle

  19. Maintenance of GLUT4 expression in smooth muscle prevents hypertension-induced changes in vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Kevin B; Seki, Yoshinori; Saha, Jharna; Eichinger, Felix; Charron, Maureen J; Brosius, Frank C

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that expression of GLUT4 is decreased in arterial smooth muscle of hypertensive rats and mice and that total body overexpression of GLUT4 in mice prevents enhanced arterial reactivity in hypertension. To demonstrate that the effect of GLUT4 overexpression on vascular responses is dependent on vascular smooth muscle GLUT4 rather than on some systemic effect we developed and tested smooth-muscle-specific GLUT4 transgenic mice (SMG4). When made hypertensive with angiotensin II, both wild-type and SMG4 mice exhibited similarly increased systolic blood pressure. Responsiveness to phenylephrine, serotonin, and prostaglandin F2α was significantly increased in endothelium-intact aortic rings from hypertensive wild-type mice but not in aortae of SMG4 mice. Inhibition of Rho-kinase equally reduced serotonin-stimulated contractility in aortae of hypertensive wild-type and SMG4-mice. In addition, acetylcholine-stimulated relaxation was significantly decreased in aortic rings of hypertensive wild-type mice, but not in rings of SMG4 mice. Inhibition of either prostacylin receptors or cyclooxygenase-2 reduced relaxation in rings of hypertensive SMG4 mice. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 had no effect on relaxation in rings of hypertensive wild-type mice. Cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression was decreased in hypertensive wild-type aortae but not in hypertensive SMG4 aortae compared to nonhypertensive controls. Our results demonstrate that smooth muscle expression of GLUT4 exerts a major effect on smooth muscle contractile responses and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and that normal expression of GLUT4 in vascular smooth muscle is required for appropriate smooth muscle and endothelial responses.

  20. Sodium Intake During an Ultramarathon Does Not Prevent Muscle Cramping, Dehydration, Hyponatremia, or Nausea

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Martin D.; Stuempfle, Kristin J.; Valentino, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultramarathon runners commonly believe that sodium replacement is important for prevention of muscle cramping, dehydration, hyponatremia, and nausea during prolonged continuous exercise. The purpose of this study was to measure total sodium intake to determine if these beliefs are supported. Methods Participants of a 161-km ultramarathon (air temperature reaching 39 °C) provided full dietary information during the race, underwent body weight measurements before and after the race, ...

  1. Disappearance of spasticity after selective dorsal rhizotomy does not prevent muscle shortening in children with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, Margje; Strijers, Rob L M; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Becher, Jules G

    2009-05-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy is an effective treatment for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy who have a spastic motor disorder. It is hypothesized that muscle shortening is related to spasticity; the lack of stretch of a muscle is thought to be the cause of muscle shortening. If this is true, the treatment for spasticity should prevent the occurrence of muscle shortening during growth. We present the case of 1 child with cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia, for whom the treatment with selective dorsal rhizotomy was successful in improving the walking abilities. She did, however, develop muscle shortening during growth. In conclusion, the development of muscle shortening during growth in children with cerebral palsy and spastic paresis cannot be prevented by treatment for the spasticity alone.

  2. Sports celebrities and public health: Diego Maradona's influence on drug use prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William J; de Matviuk, Marcela Alejandra Chavan

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to a sports celebrity through media and sporting events can have important influences on a public health issue associated with that celebrity. The battle against drug use by Argentinean soccer icon Diego Maradona has provoked concerns about drug abuse and prevention in Argentina, particularly among young people. The present study analyzes how two forms of involvement with Maradona affected the public's concern and perceptions of drug use after Maradona's drug-related health crisis in 2004. Results indicate that those who had a greater degree of parasocial interaction with Maradona were more likely to have an increased awareness of drug abuse, a greater personal concern about drug abuse, abstained from drug use, and more strongly support drug abuse prevention programs. In contrast, identification with Maradona had a mitigating effect on drug use prevention. Implications of these findings regarding the influence of sports celebrities on substance abuse are discussed.

  3. Preventing Abuse of Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco by Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Mathea

    From the mid-1960s until 1980, adolescent drug use rose sharply. Although use has declined somewhat since, adolescent cocaine use remains at peak levels, and crack presents a major threat. Treatment for compulsive drug or alcohol use is needed by 5 to 15 percent of the teenagers who experiment with drugs and alcohol. Drug abuse experts now believe…

  4. Penetration of antimicrobials to pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and muscle and impact of drug physicochemical properties determined by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottbøll, Lisa Amanda Holm; Friis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to characterize antimicrobial drug penetration into the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and extracellular fluid (ECF) of muscle in relation to physicochemical properties of the drugs (molecular mass, Log D, polar surface area and charge......), using intrabronchial microdialysis. The series of drugs tested include gentamicin, sulfadiazine, cefquinome, minocycline and colistin. METHODS: Drug concentrations were measured during 2h of steady state plasma drug concentrations at therapeutic levels in anesthetized pigs. Microdialysis probes were...

  5. Postural muscle atrophy prevention and recovery and bone remodelling through high frequency proprioception for astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Rossitto, Franco; Battocchio, Luciano

    2009-09-01

    The difficulty in applying active exercises during space flights increases the importance of passive countermeasures, but coupling load and instability remains indispensable for generating high frequency (HF) proprioceptive flows and preventing muscle atrophy and osteoporosis. The present study, in microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight, verified whether an electronic system, composed of a rocking board, a postural reader and a bungee-cord loading apparatus creates HF postural instability comparable to that reachable on the Earth. Tracking the subject, in single stance, to real-time visual signals is necessary to obtain HF instability situations. The bungee-cord loading apparatus allowed the subject to manage the 81.5% body weight load (100% could easily be exceeded). A preliminary training programme schedule on the Earth and in space is suggested. Comparison with a pathological muscle atrophy is presented. The possibility of generating HF proprioceptive flows could complement current countermeasures for the prevention and recovery of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis in terrestrial and space environments. These exercises combine massive activation of spindles and joint receptors, applying simultaneously HF variations of pressure to different areas of the sole of the foot. This class of exercises could improve the effectiveness of current countermeasures, reducing working time and fatigue.

  6. An Ounce of Prevention, a Pound of Uncertainty: The Cost-Effectiveness of School-Based Drug Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Rydell, C. Peter; Everingham, Susan S.; Chiesa, James; Bushway, Shawn

    This book describes an analysis of the cost-effectiveness of model school-based drug prevention programs at reducing cocaine consumption. It compares prevention's cost-effectiveness with that of several enforcement programs and with that of treating heavy cocaine users. It also assesses the cost of nationwide implementation of model prevention…

  7. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  8. Clinical rules in hospital pharmacy practice to prevent adverse drug events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, Mirjam Kristien

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) refer to any injury from the use of a drug. ADEs occur frequently in hospitalized patients and a substantial proportion are considered preventable. A method to prevent ADEs is computerized physician order entry (CPOE) combined with a clinical decision support system

  9. Clinical rules in hospital pharmacy practice to prevent adverse drug events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, Mirjam Kristien

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) refer to any injury from the use of a drug. ADEs occur frequently in hospitalized patients and a substantial proportion are considered preventable. A method to prevent ADEs is computerized physician order entry (CPOE) combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS)

  10. Isokinetic eccentric resistance training prevents loss in mechanical muscle function after running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Anderson S. C.; Caputo, Fabrizio; Aagaard, Per

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify whether 8 weeks of resistance training employing maximal isokinetic eccentric (IERT) knee extensor actions would reduce the acute force loss observed after high-intensity treadmill running exercise. It was hypothesized that specific IERT would induce protective...... effects against muscle fatigue and ultrastructural damages, preventing or reducing the loss in mechanical muscle function after running. Subjects were tested before and after IERT protocol for maximal isometric, concentric and eccentric isokinetic knee extensor strength (60° and 180° s(-1)). In a second...... session, subjects performed treadmill running (~35 min) and the previously mentioned measurements were repeated immediately after running. Subsequently, subjects were randomized to training (n = 12) consisting of 24 sessions of maximal IERT knee extensors actions at 180° s(-1), or served as controls (n...

  11. drug use evaluation on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy for people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    care hospitals' drug expenditure and they are prescribed ... 3 Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Medical School, Faculty of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 378, Jimma .... Patient monitoring .... on the drug prescribing pattern and use of.

  12. A prospective analysis of the preventability of adverse drug reactions reported in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövborg, Henrik; Eriksson, Linda Ring; Jönsson, Anna K; Bradley, Thomas; Hägg, Staffan

    2012-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major patient safety issue, and a substantial proportion of ADRs are, in fact, preventable. The aim of this study was to describe the proportion and pattern of preventable ADRs in spontaneously reported suspected ADRs and to study the feasibility of using data from an ADR reporting system for this purpose. All reports of ADRs, except those in which a vaccine was the suspected drug, submitted to the regional pharmacovigilance center of southeastern Sweden between 2008 and 2009 were analyzed. Causality between the suspected ADR and the medication was assessed using the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and preventability was assessed using Hallas criteria. During the study period, 1,290 ADRs were received and 1,255 were classified as having at least a possible causality between a reaction and a drug. Of these, 172 (14%) ADRs were considered preventable, 35 (20%) were classified as definitely preventable, and 137 (80%) as possibly preventable. Of all preventable ADRs, 96 (56%) were related to prescribing, 35 (20%) to administration, and 41 (24%) to clinical and laboratory monitoring of treatment. Warfarin, oxycodone, and ioversol were the most common drugs with preventable ADRs. This study found that a substantial part of reported ADRs are preventable. Most of these are related to drug prescription, suggesting that interventions aiming to reduce preventable ADRs should focus on this process. Moreover, systems for ADR reporting may be useful in the mission of reducing the unsafe use of drugs.

  13. Potential benefits of taurine in the prevention of skeletal muscle impairment induced by disuse in the hindlimb-unloaded rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; De Bellis, Michela; Cannone, Maria; Gramegna, Gianluca; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Basco, Davide; Svelto, Maria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2012-07-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) in rats induces severe atrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotype transition in postural slow-twitch muscles, as occurs in human disuse conditions, such as spaceflight or bed rest. In rats, a reduction of soleus muscle weight and a decrease of cross-sectional area (CSA) were observed as signs of atrophy. An increased expression of the fast-isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed the phenotype transition. In parallel the resting cytosolic calcium concentration (restCa) was decreased and the resting chloride conductance (gCl), which regulates muscle excitability, was increased toward the values of the fast-twitch muscles. Here, we investigated the possible role of taurine, which is known to modulate calcium homeostasis and gCl, in the restoration of muscle impairment due to 14-days-HU. We found elevated taurine content and higher expression of the taurine transporter TauT in the soleus muscle as compared to the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of control rats. Taurine level was reduced in the HU soleus muscle, although, TauT expression was not modified. Taurine oral supplementation (5 g/kg) fully prevented this loss, and preserved resting gCl and restCa together with the slow MHC phenotype. Taurine supplementation did not prevent the HU-induced drop of muscle weight or fiber CSA, but it restored the expression of MURF-1, an atrophy-related gene, suggesting a possible early protective effect of taurine. In conclusion, taurine prevented the HU-induced phenotypic transition of soleus muscle and might attenuate the atrophic process. These findings argue for the beneficial use of taurine in the treatment of disuse-induced muscle dysfunction.

  14. [Health promotion as a strategy for the prevention of drug use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchele, Fátima; Coelho, Elza Berger Salema; Lindner, Sheila Rubia

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses health promotion and prevention of drug use, reviewing approaches and conceptualizations without specifying determinate classes of drugs and their licitness or illicitness. The objective of this paper is to describe the prevention of drug use and to raise pertinent aspects of drug abuse for the construction of a health promotion strategy. As refers to drug use, Brazil has invested in the formulation of policies for health promotion, protection and recovery, however humanized, inter-sectorial, decentralized, integrated, democratic and active approaches need to be implemented. This review shows the need for more discussions about the prevention of drug use involving educators, parents and the community, in a structured multiple process integrating and involving institutions and sectors in the co-responsibility to promote the health of the population in this sense. This article also shows our concern with finding ways that contribute to the implementation of public policies as refers to drug addiction.

  15. Suggested Cognitive and Behavioral Strategies for Coaches to Prevent Drug Abuse in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark H.

    In this discussion of the prevalence of drug abuse by athletes, suggestions are made for coaches to prevent or reduce the abusive intake of drugs by athletes who participate on their teams. The following cognitive strategies deal with eliminating unwanted drug use: (1) show concern; (2) articulate ethical issues; (3) set behavior limits; (4)…

  16. Developing a Web-Based Intervention to Prevent Drug Use among Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinn, Traci Marie; Hopkins, Jessica Elizabeth; Schinke, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Girls' rates of drug use have met up with and, in some instances, surpassed boys' rates. Although girls and boys share risk and protective factors associated with drug use, girls also have gender-specific risks. Interventions to prevent girls' drug use must be tailored to address the dynamics of female adolescence. Methods: One such…

  17. Myotubularin family phosphatase ceMTM3 is required for muscle maintenance by preventing excessive autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xiaokun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autophagy is a ubiquitous cellular process responsible for the bulk degradation of cytoplasmic components through the autophagosomal-lysosomal pathway. In skeletal muscle, autophagy has been regarded as a key regulator for muscle mass maintenance, and its imbalance leads to sarcopenia. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Results In this study, we demonstrate that ceMTM3, a FYVE-domain containing myotubalarin family phosphatase, is required for the maintenance of muscle fibers by preventing excessive autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans. Knockdown of ceMTM3 by using feeding-based RNA interference caused loss of muscle fibers accompanied by shortening of muscle cell and body size in aged C. elegans worms. This was preceded by the occurrence of excessive autophagy in the muscle and other tissues, which subsequently resulted in increased lysosomal activity and necrotic cell death. However, knockdown of ceMTM3 did not aggravate the abnormalities of muscle wasting in autophagy-deficient atg-18 mutant worms. Conclusions Our data suggest an important role of ceMTM3 in regulating autophagy and maintaining muscle fibers. This study may have clinical implications for prevention and treatment of sarcopenia.

  18. Recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs to treat or prevent sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Cooper, Cyrus; Rizzoli, René; Kanis, John A; Appelboom, Geoff; Bautmans, Ivan; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Boers, Maarten; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Bruyère, Olivier; Cherubini, Antonio; Flamion, Bruno; Fielding, Roger A; Gasparik, Andrea Ildiko; Van Loon, Luc; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitlak, Bruce H; Pilotto, Alberto; Reiter-Niesert, Suzanne; Rolland, Yves; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-related muscle condition which is frequently a precursor of frailty, mobility disability and premature death. It has a high prevalence in older populations and presents a considerable social and economic burden. Potential treatments are under development but, as yet, no guidelines support regulatory studies for new drugs to manage sarcopenia. The objective of this position paper is therefore to suggest a set of potential endpoints and target population definitions to stimulate debate and progress within the medico-scientific and regulatory communities. A multidisciplinary expert working group was hosted by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, which reviewed and discussed the recent literature from a perspective of clinical experience and guideline development. Relevant parallels were drawn from the development of definition of osteoporosis as a disease and clinical assessment of pharmaceutical treatments for that indication. A case-finding decision tree is briefly reviewed with a discussion of recent prevalence estimations of different relevant threshold values. The selection criteria for patients in regulatory studies are discussed according to the aims of the investigation (sarcopenia prevention or treatment) and the stage of project development. The possible endpoints of such studies are reviewed and a plea is made for the establishment of a core outcome set to be used in all clinical trials of sarcopenia. The current lack of guidelines for the assessment of new therapeutic treatments for sarcopenia could potentially hinder the delivery of effective medicines to patients at risk.

  19. Strategies that delay or prevent the timely availability of affordable generic drugs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory H; Carrier, Michael A; Silver, Richard T; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-03-17

    High cancer drug prices are influenced by the availability of generic cancer drugs in a timely manner. Several strategies have been used to delay the availability of affordable generic drugs into the United States and world markets. These include reverse payment or pay-for-delay patent settlements, authorized generics, product hopping, lobbying against cross-border drug importation, buying out the competition, and others. In this forum, we detail these strategies and how they can be prevented.

  20. Adolescent Drug Use: Trends in Abuse, Treatment and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Susan M.

    This report highlights the important trends in adolescent drug use. Although the focus is on the abuse of alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and inhalants, it is important to remember that adolescents abuse a wide range and combination of drugs. This report also addresses state-of-the-art treatment methods, and summarizes research on…

  1. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

  2. Janus kinase inhibition prevents cancer- and myocardial infarction-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ira J; Roberts, Brandon; Beharry, Adam; Godinez, Guillermo L; Payan, Donald G; Kinsella, Todd M; Judge, Andrew R; Ferreira, Leonardo F

    2016-04-15

    Respiratory dysfunction is prevalent in critically ill patients and can lead to adverse clinical outcomes, including respiratory failure and increased mortality. Respiratory muscles, which normally sustain respiration through inspiratory muscle contractions, become weakened during critical illness, and recent studies suggest that respiratory muscle weakness is related to systemic inflammation. Here, we investigate the pathophysiological role of the inflammatory JAK1/3 signaling pathway in diaphragm weakness in two distinct experimental models of critical illness. In the first experiment, mice received subcutaneous injections of PBS or C26 cancer cells and were fed chow formulated with or without the JAK1/3 inhibitor R548 for 26 days. Diaphragm specific force was significantly reduced in tumor-bearing mice receiving standard chow; however, treatment with the JAK1/3 inhibitor completely prevented diaphragm weakness. Diaphragm cross-sectional area was diminished by ∼25% in tumor-bearing mice but was similar to healthy mice in tumor-bearing animals treated with R548. In the second study, mice received sham surgery or coronary artery ligation, leading to myocardial infarction (MI), and were treated with R548 or vehicle 1 h postsurgery, and once daily for 3 days. Diaphragm specific force was comparable between sham surgery/vehicle, sham surgery/R548 and MI/R548 groups, but significantly decreased in the MI/vehicle group. Markers of oxidative damage and activated caspase-3, mechanisms previously identified to reduce muscle contractility, were not elevated in diaphragm extracts. These experiments implicate JAK1/3 signaling in cancer- and MI-mediated diaphragm weakness in mice, and provide a compelling case for further investigation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Public enemy number one: the US Advertising Council's first drug abuse prevention campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Molly

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the Advertising Council's first national drug abuse prevention campaign in the 1970s. Scholarship thus far has demonstrated the ways in which the issue of drug abuse represented a chief political strategy for President Nixon. Evidence from major trade press publications, congressional hearings, and an array of archival sources suggest that this campaign was also part of a public relations crusade on behalf of the advertising industry in response to public criticism of its role in abetting a culture of drug dependence. These institutional and political pressures helped shape drug abuse prevention in the 1970 s and for the decades that followed.

  4. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes.

  5. FDA, companies test RFID tracking to prevent drug counterfeiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John S

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. has an apparently growing problem with fake, counterfeit drugs entering the mainstream drug supply, and being fraudulently sold at full price in regular pharmacies and hospitals; some have no active ingredient, or too little, or substitute a cheap drug for an expensive one. The FDA has asked drug manufacturers to develop technology to track all shipments electronically as they move through the distribution chain; currently, RFID (radio frequency identification) is the preferred method for doing so. This article explains what is happening, and why we do not believe that this use of RFID is a privacy threat--though other privacy issues are among the most important questions we face today.

  6. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described.

  7. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Warin Krityakiarana; Jariya Budworn; Chatchawan Khajohnanan; Nutchanad Suramas; Watcharaporn Puritasang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated) on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years) were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated) (CG), n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14). Method: Before inducing D...

  8. Neoadjuvant therapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a model for rational accelerated drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balar, Arjun V; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2015-05-01

    Since the advent of cisplatin-based combination therapy in the management of muscle-invasive and advanced bladder cancer, there has been little progress in improving outcomes for patients. Novel therapies beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy are needed. The neoadjuvant paradigm lends to acquiring ample pretreatment and posttreatment tumor tissue as a standard of care, which enables comprehensive biomarker analyses to better understand mechanisms of both response and resistance, which will aid drug development. This article discusses the evolution of neoadjuvant therapy as standard treatment and the role it may serve toward the development of novel therapies.

  9. Given financial constraints, it would be unethical to divert antiretroviral drugs from treatment to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Ruth; Cowan, Ethan

    2012-07-01

    Striking advances in HIV prevention have set the stage for renewed debate on setting priorities in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Two new prevention strategies--preexposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention--use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of HIV/AIDS in addition to treating patients. The potential for success of these new prevention strategies sets up an ethical dilemma: where resources are limited and supplies of lifesaving antiretroviral medications are insufficient to treat those currently living with HIV, how should these resources be divided between treatment and prevention? This article explores several ethical principles used in formulating public health policy. Assuming that limited resources are available for spending on drugs, we conclude that it would be unethical to watch patients with treatable AIDS worsen and die, even with supportive care, so that medications for treatment can be diverted for prevention.

  10. Dietary Genistein Prevents Denervation-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Male Rodents via Effects on Estrogen Receptor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shinya; Jia, Huijuan; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Yamamura, Junki; Saito, Kenji; Kato, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    Genistein has high estrogenic activity. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of estrogen or hormone replacement therapy on muscle mass and muscle atrophy. We investigated the preventive effects and underlying mechanisms of genistein on muscle atrophy. In Expt. 1, male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing no genistein [control (CON)] or 0.05% genistein (GEN; wt:wt diet) for 24 d. On day 14, the sciatic nerve in the left hind leg was severed, and the right hind leg was sham-treated. In Expt. 2, male C57BL6J mice were subcutaneously administered a vehicle (Veh group) or the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI group) via an osmotic pump for 27 d, and each group was subsequently fed CON or GEN diets from day 3 to day 27. Muscle atrophy was induced on day 17 as in Expt. 1. In Expt. 3, male C57BL6J mice were subcutaneously administered vehicle or a selective ER agonist-ER-α [4,4',4'-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT)] or ER-β [2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN)]-or genistein (GEN-sc-i) via an osmotic pump for 13 d, and muscle atrophy was induced on day 3 as in Expt. 1. The ratio of denervated soleus muscle weight to sham-operated soleus muscle weight (d/s ratio) was used as the index of muscle atrophy. Expt. 1: The d/s ratio in the GEN group was 20% higher than that in the CON group (P muscle atrophy. ER-α was related to the preventive effect of genistein on muscle atrophy. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Whole-Body Vibration and the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian-Far, Atefeh; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian, Saeed; Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Numerous recovery strategies have been used in an attempt to minimize the symptoms of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a viable warm-up for athletes. However, scientific evidence to support the protective effects of WBV training (WBVT) on muscle damage is lacking. Objective: To investigate the acute effect of WBVT applied before eccentric exercise in the prevention of DOMS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 healthy, untrained volunteers were randomly assigned to either the WBVT (n  =  15) or control (n  =  17) group. Intervention(s): Volunteers performed 6 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic (60°/s) eccentric contractions of the dominant-limb knee extensors on a dynamometer. In the WBVT group, the training was applied using a vibratory platform (35 Hz, 5 mm peak to peak) with 100° of knee flexion for 60 seconds before eccentric exercise. No vibration was applied in the control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and pressure pain threshold were recorded at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase was measured at baseline and at 1, 2, and 7 days postexercise. Results: The WBVT group showed a reduction in DOMS symptoms in the form of less maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength loss, lower creatine kinase levels, and less pressure pain threshold and muscle soreness (P < .05) compared with the control group. However, no effect on thigh circumference was evident (P < .05). Conclusions: Administered before eccentric exercise, WBVT may reduce DOMS via muscle function improvement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBVT in

  12. 34 CFR 86.1 - What is the purpose of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse... ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION General § 86.1 What is the purpose of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention regulations? The purpose of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention regulations is to implement section 22...

  13. Doctors May Not Be Telling High-Risk Patients about HIV Prevention Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_161405.html Doctors May Not Be Telling High-Risk Patients About HIV Prevention Drug Less ... Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights reserved. News stories are provided by HealthDay and do not reflect ...

  14. Concentration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the pelvic floor muscles: an experimental comparative rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chin-Jung

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle.

  15. Concentration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Pelvic Floor Muscles: An Experimental Comparative Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. Materials and Methods We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Results Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Conclusion Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle. PMID:24954342

  16. Sunitinib prevents cachexia and prolongs survival of mice bearing renal cancer by restraining STAT3 and MuRF-1 activation in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Francesca; Ghilardi, Carmen; Moschetta, Michele; Bassi, Andrea; Rovida, Alessandra; Scarlato, Valentina; Talamini, Laura; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Bisighini, Cinzia; Damia, Giovanna; Bani, Maria Rosa; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Giavazzi, Raffaella

    2015-02-20

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, affecting angiogenesis, have shown therapeutic efficacy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The increased overall survival is not fully explained by their anti-tumor activity, since these drugs frequently induce disease stabilization rather than regression. RCC patients frequently develop cachectic syndrome. We used the RXF393 human renal carcinoma xenograft that recapitulates the characteristics of the disease, including the growth in the mouse kidney (orthotopic implantation), and the induction of cachexia with subsequent premature death. Sunitinib prevents body weight loss and muscle wasting and significantly improves the survival of RXF393-bearing nude mice. The anti-cachectic effect was not associated to direct anti-tumor activity of the drug. Most relevant is the ability of sunitinib to reverse the cachectic phenotype and rescue the animals from the loss of fat tissue. Body weight loss is prevented also in mice bearing the C26 colon carcinoma, classically reported to induce cachexia in immunocompetent mice. Among the mechanisms, we herein show that sunitinib is able to restrain the overactivation of STAT3 and MuRF-1 pathways, involved in enhanced muscle protein catabolism during cancer cachexia. We suggest that off-target effects of angiogenesis inhibitors targeting STAT3 are worth considering as a therapeutic option for patients who develop cachexia, independently of their anti-tumor activity.

  17. Isokinetic eccentric resistance training prevents loss in mechanical muscle function after running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson Souza; Caputo, Fabrizio; Aagaard, Per; Corvino, Rogério Bulhões; Gonçalves, Mauro; Denadai, Benedito Sergio

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to verify whether 8 weeks of resistance training employing maximal isokinetic eccentric (IERT) knee extensor actions would reduce the acute force loss observed after high-intensity treadmill running exercise. It was hypothesized that specific IERT would induce protective effects against muscle fatigue and ultrastructural damages, preventing or reducing the loss in mechanical muscle function after running. Subjects were tested before and after IERT protocol for maximal isometric, concentric and eccentric isokinetic knee extensor strength (60° and 180° s(-1)). In a second session, subjects performed treadmill running (~35 min) and the previously mentioned measurements were repeated immediately after running. Subsequently, subjects were randomized to training (n = 12) consisting of 24 sessions of maximal IERT knee extensors actions at 180° s(-1), or served as controls (n = 8). The effects of acute running-induced fatigue and training on isokinetic and isometric peak torque, and rate of force development (RFD) were investigated. Before IERT, running-induced eccentric torque loss at 180° s(-1) was -8 %, and RFD loss was -11 %. Longitudinal IERT led to reduced or absent acute running-induced losses in maximal IERT torque at 180° s(-1) (+2 %), being significantly reduced compared to before IERT (p 0.05). In conclusion, IERT yields a reduced strength loss after high-intensity running workouts, which may suggest a protective effect against fatigue and/or morphological damages. However, IERT may not avoid reductions in explosive muscle actions. In turn, this may allow more intense training sessions to be performed, facilitating the adaptive response to running training.

  18. Endurance training prevents negative effects of the hypoxia mimetic dimethyloxalylglycine on cardiac and skeletal muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Francois B; Britto, Florian A; Ponçon, Benjamin; Begue, Gwenaelle; Chabi, Beatrice; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Gregory; Py, Guillaume

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic preconditioning is a promising strategy to prevent hypoxia-induced damages to several tissues. This effect is related to prior stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α via inhibition of the prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), which are responsible for its degradation under normoxia. Although PHD inhibition has been shown to increase endurance performance in rodents, potential side effects of such a therapy have not been explored. Here, we investigated the effects of 1 wk of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) treatment (150 mg/kg) on exercise capacity, as well as on cardiac and skeletal muscle function in sedentary and endurance-trained rats. DMOG improved maximal aerobic velocity and endurance in both sedentary and trained rats. This effect was associated with an increase in red blood cells without significant alteration of skeletal muscle contractile properties. In sedentary rats, DMOG treatment resulted in enhanced left ventricle (LV) weight together with impairment in diastolic function, LV relaxation, and pulse pressure. Moreover, DMOG decreased maximal oxygen uptake (state 3) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle. Importantly, endurance training reversed the negative effects of DMOG treatment on cardiac function and restored maximal mitochondrial oxygen uptake to the level of sedentary placebo-treated rats. In conclusion, we provide here evidence that the PHD inhibitor DMOG has detrimental influence on myocardial and mitochondrial function in healthy rats. However, one may suppose that the deleterious influence of PHD inhibition would be potentiated in patients with already poor physical condition. Therefore, the present results prompt us to take into consideration the potential side effects of PHD inhibitors when administrated to patients.

  19. Perspectives on biomedical HIV prevention options among women who inject drugs in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Yotebieng, Kelly A; Agot, Kawango; Rota, Grace; Syvertsen, Jennifer L

    2017-08-05

    Due to heightened vulnerability to HIV from frequent engagement in sex work and overlapping drug-using and sexual networks, women who inject drugs should be a high priority population for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and other biomedical HIV prevention tools. Kenya is one of the first African countries to approve oral PrEP for HIV prevention among "key populations," including people who inject drugs and sex workers. The objective of this study was to explore preferences and perceived challenges to PrEP adoption among women who inject drugs in Kisumu, Kenya. We conducted qualitative interviews with nine HIV-uninfected women who inject drugs to assess their perceptions of biomedical HIV interventions, including oral PrEP, microbicide gels, and intravaginal rings. Despite their high risk and multiple biomedical studies in the region, only two women had ever heard of any of these methods. All women were interested in trying at least one biomedical prevention method, primarily to protect themselves from partners who were believed to have multiple other sexual partners. Although women shared concerns about side effects and product efficacy, they did not perceive drug use as a significant deterrent to adopting or adhering to biomedical prevention methods. Beginning immediately and continuing throughout Kenya's planned PrEP rollout, efforts are urgently needed to include the perspectives of high risk women who use drugs in biomedical HIV prevention research and programing.

  20. The Coach's Role in Alcohol/Drug Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Richard

    A 1989 National Youth Sports Coaches Association survey of about 1,200 youth aged 10-14 indicated that young athletes identify somewhat with their drug-using athlete models. Forty-three percent of respondents felt that steroids are not harmful if properly used, and 45% felt that steroids were likely to increase their athletic performance. Steroids…

  1. hiv prevention among drug and alcohol users: models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Few programs have been implemented in Africa to deal specifically ... INTRODUCTION. The abuse of ... Identification Test (AUDIT) (Shaffer et al. 2004). .... actual diagnosis meeting the DSM-IV-TR ..... effective entry point for screening clients ... also manage the HIV care of the drug and .... perspective, it is still an essential.

  2. Preventing Drug Abuse among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The…

  3. Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Prevention: The Role and the Limitations of Currently Available Antiplatelet Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tufano

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of currently available antiplatelet drugs in primary and secondary prevention of vascular events in diabetic patients and the limitations of these drugs, and it discusses the role of novel and more potent antiplatelets and of new agents currently under clinical development.

  4. Why Do Teachers Choose to Implement or Reject Drug Abuse Prevention Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James Reed; Swanchak, John

    State and local school systems have developed comprehensive drug abuse prevention programs that appear to have little influence on the rising tide of teenage drug abuse. Classroom teachers, as implementors of such programs, frequently veto them or change them considerably. Forty secondary teachers were selected as research subjects to examine this…

  5. Creatine prevents the imbalance of redox homeostasis caused by homocysteine in skeletal muscle of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolling, Janaína; Scherer, Emilene B S; Siebert, Cassiana; Marques, Eduardo Peil; Dos Santos, Tiago Marcom; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-07-15

    Homocystinuria is a neurometabolic disease caused by severe deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase activity, resulting in severe hyperhomocysteinemia. Affected patients present several symptoms including a variable degree of motor dysfunction, being that the pathomechanism is not fully understood. In the present study we investigated the effect of chronic hyperhomocysteinemia on some parameters of oxidative stress, namely 2'7'dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT and GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), total sulfhydryl and carbonyl content, as well as nitrite levels in soleus skeletal muscle of young rats subjected to model of severe hyperhomocysteinemia. We also evaluated the effect of creatine on biochemical alterations elicited by hyperhomocysteinemia. Wistar rats received daily subcutaneous injection of homocysteine (0.3-0.6 μmol/g body weight), and/or creatine (50mg/kg body weight) from their 6th to the 28th days age. Controls and treated rats were decapitated at 12h after the last injection. Chronic homocysteine administration increased 2'7'dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, an index of production of reactive species and TBARS levels, an index of lipoperoxidation. Antioxidant enzyme activities, such as SOD and CAT were also increased, but GPx activity was not altered. The content of GSH, sulfhydril and carbonyl were decreased, as well as levels of nitrite. Creatine concurrent administration prevented some homocysteine effects probably by its antioxidant properties. Our data suggest that the oxidative insult elicited by chronic hyperhomocystenemia may provide insights into the mechanisms by which homocysteine exerts its effects on skeletal muscle function. Creatine prevents some alterations caused by homocysteine.

  6. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  7. Metformin: Can a Diabetes Drug Help Prevent Cancer? | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1957, the first results from a clinical trial of the diabetes drug metformin in patients were published. Yet, it would take nearly 40 years for the drug to be approved in the United States as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Now researchers want to know whether this decades-old drug may have additional uses in another disease—cancer. |

  8. Liraglutide prevents microvascular insulin resistance and preserves muscle capillary density in high-fat diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Weidong; Fu, Zhuo; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Liu, Zhenqi

    2016-09-01

    Muscle microvasculature critically regulates endothelial exchange surface area to facilitate transendothelial delivery of insulin, nutrients, and oxygen to myocytes. Insulin resistance blunts insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment and decreases muscle capillary density; both contribute to lower microvascular blood volume. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its analogs are able to dilate blood vessels and stimulate endothelial cell proliferation. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of sustained stimulation of the GLP-1 receptors on insulin-mediated capillary recruitment and metabolic insulin responses, small arterial endothelial function, and muscle capillary density. Rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 wk with or without simultaneous administration of liraglutide and subjected to a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp for 120 min after an overnight fast. Insulin-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and muscle oxygenation were determined before and during insulin infusion. Muscle capillary density was determined and distal saphenous artery used for determination of endothelial function and insulin-mediated vasodilation. HFD induced muscle microvascular insulin resistance and small arterial vessel endothelial dysfunction and decreased muscle capillary density. Simultaneous treatment of HFD-fed rats with liraglutide prevented all of these changes and improved insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. These were associated with a significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation and the expressions of VEGF and its receptors. We conclude that GLP-1 receptor agonists may exert their salutary glycemic effect via improving microvascular insulin sensitivity and muscle capillary density during the development of insulin resistance, and early use of GLP-1 receptor agonists may attenuate metabolic insulin resistance as well as prevent cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Annotated Bibliography of Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention Resources, 2006-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segars, Lance, Ed.; Akinola, Olayinka, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention has developed this annotated bibliography to provide those interested in prevention at colleges and universities--and in surrounding communities--with a ready reference of current, important, and available information resources.…

  10. Using Mindfulness to Develop Health Education Strategies for Blood Borne Virus Prevention in Injecting Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Carla; Laybutt, Becky; Carruthers, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Prevention education has had limited success in reducing transmission of blood borne virus among people who inject drugs. Innovative approaches to prevention education are required. Method: This study used video recordings of injecting episodes and interviews with participants reviewing their video recordings to explore the concept of…

  11. Project SMART: A Social Approach to Drug Abuse Prevention. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. Anderson; And Others

    This document presents the teacher's guide for an experimental research and demonstration project which focuses on the prevention of drug abuse among youth through self-management and resistance training. The major purpose of the curriculum described in this document is to prevent and reduce the incidence of habitual cigarette smoking and of…

  12. Drug Abuse Prevention Research Needs among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes the literature regarding alcohol and drug abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives noting four major knowledge gaps in the literature. Discusses abuse prevention efforts among American Indians and notes research questions to be considered regarding primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention efforts. Makes eight recommendations…

  13. [About free delivery of therapeutical and preventive drugs to the people during Ottoman Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukçu, B

    2001-01-01

    In this study, free delivery of medical drugs (dispensed in Ottoman Empire hospital pharmacies) to the outpatients in addition to the inpatients in Darüşşifas (patient care houses) have been investigated in the chronological order from the Vakfiye enrollments and documents of Ottoman Empire. On the other hand free delivery of drugs dispensed in the Palaces, Mesir paste delivery and other preventive drugs for the epidemic diseases have been studied.

  14. Research progress of new antiplatelet drugs in the prevention and treatment for ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yu-ying; Li, Pan

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, antiplatelet drugs are still the routine medication in the acute phase and in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Although the clinical effect of classic antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin and clopidogrel, has been recognized, some problems still exist, such as clopidogrel resistance and increased bleeding risk. Therefore, new antiplatelet drugs have been studied and are incorporated into the clinical use currently. Their different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic propertie...

  15. Lecithin Prevents Cortical Cytoskeleton Reorganization in Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers under Short-Term Gravitational Disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, Irina V; Biryukov, Nikolay S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prevent the cortical cytoskeleton reorganization of rat soleus muscle fibers under short-term gravitational disuse. Once a day, we injected the right soleus muscle with 0.5 ml lecithin at a concentration of 200 mg/ml and the left soleus muscle with a diluted solution in an equal volume for 3 days prior to the experiment. To simulate microgravity conditions in rats, an anti-orthostatic suspension was used according to the Ilyin-Novikov method modified by Morey-Holton et al. for 6 hours. The following groups of soleus muscle tissues were examined: "C", "C+L", "HS", and "HS+L". The transversal stiffness of rat soleus muscle fibers after 6 hours of suspension did not differ from that of the control group for the corresponding legs; there were no differences between the groups without lecithin «C» and «HS» or between the groups with lecithin "C+L" and "HS+L". However, lecithin treatment for three days resulted in an increase in cell stiffness; in the "C+L" group, cell stiffness was significantly higher by 22.7% (p lecithin treatment: the beta-actin and gamma-actin mRNA content in group "C+L" increased by 200% compared with that of group "C", and beta-tubulin increased by 100% (as well as the mRNA content of tubulin-binding proteins Ckap5, Tcp1, Cct5 and Cct7). In addition, desmin mRNA content remained unchanged in all of the experimental groups. As a result of the lecithin injections, there was a redistribution of the mRNA content of genes encoding actin monomer- and filament-binding proteins in the direction of increasing actin polymerization and filament stability; the mRNA content of Arpc3 and Lcp1 increased by 3- and 5-fold, respectively, but the levels of Tmod1 and Svil decreased by 2- and 5-fold, respectively. However, gravitational disuse did not result in changes in the mRNA content of Arpc3, Tmod1, Svil or Lcp1. Anti-orthostatic suspension for 6 hours resulted in a decrease in the mRNA content of alpha-actinin-4 (Actn4) and

  16. The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in the Prevention of Muscle Damage

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetically diverse but share common phenotypic features of muscle weakness, degeneration, and progressive decline in muscle function. Previous work has focused on understanding how disruptions in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex result in muscular dystrophy, supporting a hypothesis that the muscle sarcolemma is fragile and susceptible to contraction-induced injury in multiple forms of dystrophy. Although benign in healthy muscle, contractions in dystrophic muscle ...

  17. Effectiveness of muscle strengthening and description of protocols for preventing falls in the elderly: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Y. Ishigaki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are a geriatric syndrome that is considered a significant public health problem in terms of morbidity and mortality because they lead to a decline in functional capacity and an impaired quality of life in the elderly. Lower limb muscle strengthening seems to be an effective intervention for preventing falls; however, there is no consensus regarding the best method for increasing lower limb muscle strength. Objectives: To analyze the effectiveness of lower limb muscle strengthening and to investigate and describe the protocols used for preventing falls in elderly subjects. Method: We performed a systematic review of randomized and controlled clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 in the databases PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PEDro that cited some type of lower limb muscle strengthening protocol and that evaluated the incidence of falls as the primary outcome exclusively in elderly subjects. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Qualitative analysis was performed by independent reviewers applying the PEDro scale. Results: The data obtained from the selected studies showed lower fall rates in the intervention groups compared to controls. Six studies described the lower limb muscle strengthening protocol in detail. High methodological quality was found in 6 studies (PEDro score ≥7/10 points. Conclusions: The methodological quality of the studies in this area appears to leave little doubt regarding the effectiveness of lower limb strengthening exercises for preventing falls in elderly subjects, however the interventions in these studies were poorly reported.

  18. Nemaline myopathy-related skeletal muscle α-actin (ACTA1 mutation, Asp286Gly, prevents proper strong myosin binding and triggers muscle weakness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Ochala

    Full Text Available Many mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1 lead to muscle weakness and nemaline myopathy. Despite increasing clinical and scientific interest, the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of weakness remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed at unraveling these mechanisms using muscles from a transgenic mouse model of nemaline myopathy expressing the ACTA1 Asp286Gly mutation. We recorded and analyzed the mechanics of membrane-permeabilized single muscle fibers. We also performed molecular energy state computations in the presence or absence of Asp286Gly. Results demonstrated that during contraction, the Asp286Gly acts as a "poison-protein" and according to the computational analysis it modifies the actin-actin interface. This phenomenon is likely to prevent proper myosin cross-bridge binding, limiting the fraction of actomyosin interactions in the strong binding state. At the cell level, this decreases the force-generating capacity, and, overall, induces muscle weakness. To counterbalance such negative events, future potential therapeutic strategies may focus on the inappropriate actin-actin interface or myosin binding.

  19. Nemaline myopathy-related skeletal muscle α-actin (ACTA1) mutation, Asp286Gly, prevents proper strong myosin binding and triggers muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochala, Julien; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2012-01-01

    Many mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) lead to muscle weakness and nemaline myopathy. Despite increasing clinical and scientific interest, the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of weakness remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed at unraveling these mechanisms using muscles from a transgenic mouse model of nemaline myopathy expressing the ACTA1 Asp286Gly mutation. We recorded and analyzed the mechanics of membrane-permeabilized single muscle fibers. We also performed molecular energy state computations in the presence or absence of Asp286Gly. Results demonstrated that during contraction, the Asp286Gly acts as a "poison-protein" and according to the computational analysis it modifies the actin-actin interface. This phenomenon is likely to prevent proper myosin cross-bridge binding, limiting the fraction of actomyosin interactions in the strong binding state. At the cell level, this decreases the force-generating capacity, and, overall, induces muscle weakness. To counterbalance such negative events, future potential therapeutic strategies may focus on the inappropriate actin-actin interface or myosin binding.

  20. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0618 TITLE: Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury...Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...military and veterans. All persons with SCI are at increased risk of pressure ulcer development which remains one of the most significant secondary

  1. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    drug events in the primary care setting (Article 1). Construction of the preventable adverse drug events assessment model required four steps. The first step consisted of the development, validation, and feasibility of preventable adverse drug event indicators for type 2 diabetes (Articles 2 and 3...... associated with HbA1c monitoring and treatment was determined using logistic regression. The fourth step in the model was a health economic evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of shifting patients from inadequate to adequate medical treatment. The database used for the AMI indicator study formed...... in patients with type 2 diabetes, and apply a new register-based model with the ability to assess the epidemiology and economic impact of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes, in order to give health care decision makers a clinical and health economic rationale for prioritizing...

  2. People who inject drugs in prison: HIV prevalence, transmission and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Kate; Moazen, Babak; Noori, Atefeh; Rahimzadeh, Shadi; Farzadfar, Farshad; Hariga, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    In 2011, over 10.1 million people were held in prisons around the world. HIV prevalence is elevated in prison and this is due to the over representation of people who inject drugs (PWID). Yet HIV prevention programs for PWID are scarce in the prison setting. With a high proportion of drug users and few prevention programs, HIV transmission occurs and sometimes at an alarming rate. This commentary focuses primarily on drug users in prison; their risk behaviours and levels of infection. It also comments on the transmission of HIV including outbreaks and the efforts to prevent transmission within the prison setting. The spread of HIV in prison has substantial public health implications as virtually all prisoners return to the community. HIV prevention and treatment strategies known to be effective in community settings, such as methadone maintenance treatment, needle and syringe programs, condoms and antiretroviral therapy should be provided to prisoners as a matter of urgency.

  3. C60 Fullerene as Promising Therapeutic Agent for the Prevention and Correction of Skeletal Muscle Functioning at Ischemic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozdrenko, D. M.; Zavodovskyi, D. O.; Matvienko, T. Yu.; Zay, S. Yu.; Bogutska, K. I.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Ritter, U.; Scharff, P.

    2017-02-01

    The therapeutic effect of pristine C60 fullerene aqueous colloid solution (C60FAS) on the functioning of the rat soleus muscle at ischemic injury depending on the time of the general pathogenesis of muscular system and method of administration C60FAS in vivo was investigated. It was found that intravenous administration of C60FAS is the optimal for correction of speed macroparameters of contraction for ischemic muscle damage. At the same time, intramuscular administration of C60FAS shows pronounced protective effect in movements associated with the generation of maximum force responses or prolonged contractions, which increase the muscle fatigue level. Analysis of content concentration of creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymes in the blood of experimental animals indicates directly that C60FAS may be a promising therapeutic agent for the prevention and correction of ischemic-damaged skeletal muscle function.

  4. Muscle stretching for treatment and prevention of contracture in people with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, L A; Herbert, R D

    2002-01-01

    Contracture, or reduced joint mobility, is a common and disabling sequel of spinal cord injury. The primary intervention for the treatment and prevention of contracture is regular stretch to soft tissues. While the rationale for this intervention appears sound, the effectiveness of stretching has not been verified with well designed clinical trials. One recent randomised trial suggests there is no clinically worthwhile effect from a typical stretch protocol applied to spinal cord injured patients. Despite the negative results of this first trial, we argue that therapists should continue administering stretch for the treatment and prevention of contracture until the results of further studies emerge. To maximise the probability of attaining a clinically worthwhile effect, we suggest that therapists stretch soft tissues for long periods (at least 20 min, and perhaps for as long as 12 h a day). Practical suggestions are given on how to readily provide spinal cord injured patients with sustained stretch to key joints and muscle groups. Stretch is most likely to be effective if started before the onset of contracture. Soft tissues most at risk should be targeted, particularly if contracture is likely to impose functionally important limitations.

  5. Pelvic floor muscle training in the prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence in women - what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, G.

    2008-01-01

    Many women suffer from urinary incontinence (UI). During and after pregnancy, women are advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to prevent the development of UI. In established UI, PFMT is prescribed routinely as first-line treatment. Published studies are small, underpowered...

  6. Leg crossing with muscle tensing, a physical counter-manoeuvre to prevent syncope, enhances leg blood flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, J.T.; Dijk, N. van; Woerds, W. ter; Wieling, W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2007-01-01

    In patients with orthostatic intolerance, the mechanisms to maintain BP (blood pressure) fail. A physical counter-manoeuvre to postpone or even prevent orthostatic intolerance in these patients is leg crossing combined with muscle tensing. Although the central haemodynamic effects of physical counte

  7. Drug packaging and delivery using perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for targeted inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-xiong ZHOU; Bai-gen ZHANG; Hao ZHANG; Xiao-zhong HUANG; Ya-li HU; Li SUN; Xiao-min WANG; Ji-wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the in vitro release profile of drugs encapsulated within perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles (NPs) and their ability to inhibit the activity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs).Methods: Dexamethasone phosphate (DxP) or dexamethasone acetate (DxA) was encapsulated into PFC nanoparticles using a high-pressure homogenous method. The morphology and size of the NPs were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a laser particle size analyzer. Drug loading and in vitro release were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The impact of NP capsules on SMC proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro was assessed using cell counting kit-8, transwell cell migration and flow cytometry assays.Results: The sizes of DxP-NPs and DxA-NPs were 224±6 nm and 236±9 nm, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of DxP-NPs was 66.4%±1.0%, with an initial release rate of 77.2%, whereas the EE of DxA-NPs was 95.3%±1.3%, with an initial release rate of 23.6%. Both of the NP-coated drugs could be released over 7 d. Human umbilical artery SMCs were harvested and cultured for four to six passages. Compared to free DxP, SMCs treated with tissue factor (TF)-directed DxP-NPs showed significant differences in the inhibition of proliferation, migration and apoptosis (P<0.05).Conclusion: The results collectively suggest that PFC nanoparticles will be beneficial for targeted drug delivery because of the sustained drug release and effective inhibition of SMC proliferation and migration.

  8. PGC1-α over-expression prevents metabolic alterations and soleus muscle atrophy in hindlimb unloaded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2014-10-15

    Prolonged skeletal muscle inactivity causes muscle fibre atrophy. Redox imbalance has been considered one of the major triggers of skeletal muscle disuse atrophy, but whether redox imbalance is actually the major cause or simply a consequence of muscle disuse remains of debate. Here we hypothesized that a metabolic stress mediated by PGC-1α down-regulation plays a major role in disuse atrophy. First we studied the adaptations of soleus to mice hindlimb unloading (HU) in the early phase of disuse (3 and 7 days of HU) with and without antioxidant treatment (trolox). HU caused a reduction in cross-sectional area, redox status alteration (NRF2, SOD1 and catalase up-regulation), and induction of the ubiquitin proteasome system (MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 mRNA up-regulation) and autophagy (Beclin1 and p62 mRNA up-regulation). Trolox completely prevented the induction of NRF2, SOD1 and catalase mRNAs, but not atrophy or induction of catabolic systems in unloaded muscles, suggesting that oxidative stress is not a major cause of disuse atrophy. HU mice showed a marked alteration of oxidative metabolism. PGC-1α and mitochondrial complexes were down-regulated and DRP1 was up-regulated. To define the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and disuse muscle atrophy we unloaded mice overexpressing PGC-1α. Transgenic PGC-1α animals did not show metabolic alteration during unloading, preserving muscle size through the reduction of autophagy and proteasome degradation. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in disuse atrophy and that compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat/prevent muscle atrophy. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  9. Lanthanum prevents high phosphate-induced vascular calcification by preserving vascular smooth muscle lineage markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Paola; Elli, Francesca; Brenna, Irene; Volpi, Elisa; Romagnoli, Solange; Tosi, Delfina; Braidotti, Paola; Brancaccio, Diego; Cozzolino, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) represents a major cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease patients. High phosphate (Pi) levels are strongly associated with VC in this population. Therefore, Pi binders are commonly used to control high Pi levels. The aim of this work was to study the mechanism of action of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on the progression of Pi-induced VC through its direct effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. High Pi induced VSCM Ca deposition. We evaluated the action of LaCl3, compared to gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), and found different effects on the modulation of VSMC lineage markers, such as α-actin and SM22α. In fact, only LaCl3 preserved the expression of both VSMC lineage markers compared to high Pi-treated cells. Interestingly, both LaCl3 and GdCl3 reduced the high Pi-induced elevations of bone morphogenic protein 2 mRNA expression, with no reduction of the high core binding factor-alpha 1 mRNA levels observed in calcified VSMCs. Furthermore, we also found that only LaCl3 completely prevented the matrix GLA protein mRNA levels and osteonectin protein expression elevations induced by high Pi compared to GdCl3. Finally, LaCl3, in contrast to GdCl3, prevented the high Pi-induced downregulation of Axl, a membrane tyrosine kinase receptor involved in apoptosis. Thus, our results suggest that LaCl3 prevents VC by preserving VSMC lineage markers and by decreasing high Pi-induced osteoblastic differentiation.

  10. A Natural Wonder Drug Helps to Prevent Cancer: Garlic Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran MIRUNALINI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Garlic is one of the oldest and popular spices in the World that also contain very good nutritional value. Garlic has a wide spectrum of actions not only is it antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal and antiprotozoan but it also has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune systems. They contain unique oil which is very easily digested and is stable to oxidative stress and for this reasons they are useful and healthy for consumption. Several epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that garlic oil has been thought to bring about its anticarcinogenic effect and other pharmacological properties through a number of mechanisms, such as the scavenging of radicals, increasing glutathione levels, increasing the activities of enzymes such as glutathione S transferase, catalase, incubation of cytochrome p450 2E1, DNA repair mechanisms, prevention of chromosomal damage etc. Future research should standardize the dosage of garlic and type. Several hypotheses suggest that the anticancer mechanism may be due to DNA repair mechanism, prevention of chromosomal damage, antiproliferative effect and alteration of the cell cycle. Garlic and garlic oil should be considered as one of the most valuable food for good quality of life in general.

  11. Montelukast prevents microparticle-induced inflammatory and functional alterations in human bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Stefano; Stefanelli, Fabio; Neri, Tommaso; Bardelli, Claudio; Amoruso, Angela; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Celi, Alessandro; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are membrane fragments that may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic respiratory diseases. We aimed to investigate whether human monocytes/macrophage-derived MPs could induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) and the effect of montelukast in this setting. Experimental methods included isolation of human monocytes/macrophages and generation of monocyte-derived MPs, RT-PCR analysis of gene expression, immunoenzymatic determination of pro-inflammatory factor release, bioluminescent assay of intracellular cAMP levels and electromobility shift assay analysis of NF-κB nuclear translocation. Stimulation of human BSMC with monocyte-derived MPs induced a pro-inflammatory switch in human BSMC by inducing gene expression (COX-2 and IL-8), protein release in the supernatant (PGE2 and IL-8), and heterologous β2-adrenoceptor desensitization. The latter effect was most likely related to autocrine PGE2 since pre-treatment with COX inhibitors restored the ability of salbutamol to induce cAMP synthesis in desensitized cells. Challenge with MPs induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and selective NF-κB inhibition decreased MP-induced cytokine release in the supernatant. Montelukast treatment prevented IL-8 release and heterologous β2-adrenoceptor desensitization in human BSMC exposed to monocyte-derived MPs by blocking NF-κB nuclear translocation. These findings provide evidence on the role of human monocyte-derived MPs in the airway smooth muscle phenotype switch as a novel potential mechanism in the progression of chronic respiratory diseases and on the protective effects by montelukast in this setting.

  12. Attitudes and knowledge about naloxone and overdose prevention among detained drug users in Ningbo, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date there has been limited research on both the prevalence of overdose and drug user knowledge about overdose prevention and response methods in China. In addition, there has been no effort to integrate naloxone information and distribution into pre-release services for drug users detained in isolated compulsory detoxification facilities in China. Methods The authors conducted a survey of 279 heroin users in isolated compulsory detoxification centers in Ningbo, China in an attempt to evaluate the possibility of conducting prelease peer naloxone programs in Ningbo isolated compulsory detoxification centers. Respondents' demographic background, history of heroin overdoses, and attitudes/knowledge about overdose prevention and response were collected. Results While drug users in Ningbo's compulsory detoxification centers have limited understandings of how to effectively respond to overdoses, they expressed concern about the possibility of overdose, interest in participating in overdose prevention and response programs, and a willingness to help their peers. In general, there was no significant difference in history and attitudes/knowledge of overdose between male and female participants. Conclusion Based on the findings of this research, our survey provides preliminary evidence that detained drug users have considerable interest in overdose prevention and response information and willingness to help peers. However, drug users in Ningbo isolated compulsory detoxification centers currently have limited understandings of effective ways of helping to prevent overdose deaths.

  13. Lipin-1 regulates autophagy clearance and intersects with statin drug effects in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peixiang; Verity, M Anthony; Reue, Karen

    2014-08-05

    LPIN1 encodes lipin-1, a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme that catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to form diacylglycerol. Homozygous LPIN1 gene mutations cause severe rhabdomyolysis, and heterozygous LPIN1 missense mutations may promote statin-induced myopathy. We demonstrate that lipin-1-related myopathy in the mouse is associated with a blockade in autophagic flux and accumulation of aberrant mitochondria. Lipin-1 PAP activity is required for maturation of autolysosomes, through its activation of the protein kinase D (PKD)-Vps34 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling cascade. Statin treatment also reduces PKD activation and autophagic flux, which are compounded by diminished mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) abundance in lipin-1-haploinsufficent and -deficient muscle. Lipin-1 restoration in skeletal muscle prevents myonecrosis and statin toxicity in vivo, and activated PKD rescues autophagic flux in lipin-1-deficient cells. Our findings identify lipin-1 PAP activity as a component of the macroautophagy pathway and define the basis for lipin-1-related myopathies.

  14. Aerobic exercise training prevents heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by anti-catabolic, but not anabolic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo W A; Piedade, Warlen P; Soares, Luana C; Souza, Paula A T; Aguiar, Andreo F; Vechetti-Júnior, Ivan J; Campos, Dijon H S; Fernandes, Ana A H; Okoshi, Katashi; Carvalho, Robson F; Cicogna, Antonio C; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with cachexia and consequent exercise intolerance. Given the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise training (ET) in HF, the aim of this study was to determine if the ET performed during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF would alter the expression of anabolic and catabolic factors, thus preventing skeletal muscle wasting. We employed ascending aortic stenosis (AS) inducing HF in Wistar male rats. Controls were sham-operated animals. At 18 weeks after surgery, rats with cardiac dysfunction were randomized to 10 weeks of aerobic ET (AS-ET) or to an untrained group (AS-UN). At 28 weeks, the AS-UN group presented HF signs in conjunction with high TNF-α serum levels; soleus and plantaris muscle atrophy; and an increase in the expression of TNF-α, NFκB (p65), MAFbx, MuRF1, FoxO1, and myostatin catabolic factors. However, in the AS-ET group, the deterioration of cardiac function was prevented, as well as muscle wasting, and the atrophy promoters were decreased. Interestingly, changes in anabolic factor expression (IGF-I, AKT, and mTOR) were not observed. Nevertheless, in the plantaris muscle, ET maintained high PGC1α levels. Thus, the ET capability to attenuate cardiac function during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF was accompanied by a prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy that did not occur via an increase in anabolic factors, but through anti-catabolic activity, presumably caused by PGC1α action. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of aerobic ET to block HF-induced muscle atrophy by counteracting the increased catabolic state.

  15. Aerobic exercise training prevents heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by anti-catabolic, but not anabolic actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo W A Souza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF is associated with cachexia and consequent exercise intolerance. Given the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise training (ET in HF, the aim of this study was to determine if the ET performed during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF would alter the expression of anabolic and catabolic factors, thus preventing skeletal muscle wasting. METHODS AND RESULTS: We employed ascending aortic stenosis (AS inducing HF in Wistar male rats. Controls were sham-operated animals. At 18 weeks after surgery, rats with cardiac dysfunction were randomized to 10 weeks of aerobic ET (AS-ET or to an untrained group (AS-UN. At 28 weeks, the AS-UN group presented HF signs in conjunction with high TNF-α serum levels; soleus and plantaris muscle atrophy; and an increase in the expression of TNF-α, NFκB (p65, MAFbx, MuRF1, FoxO1, and myostatin catabolic factors. However, in the AS-ET group, the deterioration of cardiac function was prevented, as well as muscle wasting, and the atrophy promoters were decreased. Interestingly, changes in anabolic factor expression (IGF-I, AKT, and mTOR were not observed. Nevertheless, in the plantaris muscle, ET maintained high PGC1α levels. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the ET capability to attenuate cardiac function during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF was accompanied by a prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy that did not occur via an increase in anabolic factors, but through anti-catabolic activity, presumably caused by PGC1α action. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of aerobic ET to block HF-induced muscle atrophy by counteracting the increased catabolic state.

  16. Targeting memory processes with drugs to prevent or cure PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Christopher K; Maynard, George D; Kehne, John H

    2012-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic debilitating psychiatric disorder resulting from exposure to a severe traumatic stressor and an area of great unmet medical need. Advances in pharmacological treatments beyond the currently approved SSRIs are needed. Background on PTSD, as well as the neurobiology of stress responding and fear conditioning, is provided. Clinical and preclinical data for investigational agents with diverse pharmacological mechanisms are summarized. Advances in the understanding of stress biology and mechanisms of fear conditioning plasticity provide a rationale for treatment approaches that may reduce hyperarousal and dysfunctional aversive memories in PTSD. One challenge is to determine if these components are independent or reflect a common underlying neurobiological alteration. Numerous agents reviewed have potential for reducing PTSD core symptoms or targeted symptoms in chronic PTSD. Promising early data support drug approaches that seek to disrupt dysfunctional aversive memories by interfering with consolidation soon after trauma exposure, or in chronic PTSD, by blocking reconsolidation and/or enhancing extinction. Challenges remain for achieving selectivity when attempting to alter aversive memories. Targeting the underlying traumatic memory with a combination of pharmacological therapies applied with appropriate chronicity, and in combination with psychotherapy, is expected to substantially improve PTSD treatment.

  17. Prevention of radiation emesis in dogs by combinations of drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, J.L.; Cordts, R.E.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1984-07-01

    Male mixed-breed dogs were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cimetidine (Cim), promethazine (Pro), and thiethylperazine (Thi), singly and in combination, to raise the threshold for radiation-induced emesis. Cim was chosen as an H/sub 2/ antihistamine, Pro as an H/sub 1/ antihistamine, and Thi as a phenothiazine derivative dopamine blocker. Doses were calculated to approximate doses for an average human. Exposure was to /sup 60/Co at 60 rad (midline) per min. The dogs were fed 0.4 kg canned dog food 1 hour before exposure, and injected with the appropriate drugs 30 minutes prior to exposure. Emesis onset times, number of episodes, and time to last episode were recorded. The radiation dose (midline tissue rad) to cause a 50% incidence of emesis (ED/sub 50/) was calculated using an up-and-down procedure. The ED/sub 50/ were: 258 (212-315) for controls; 240 (151-380) for Cim; 313 (256-384) for Pro; 405 (319-514) for Thi; 334 (284-394) for Cim + Pro; 446 (365-546) for Cim + Thi; 347 (306-399) for Pro + Thi; and 478 (428-539) for Cim + Pro + Thi.

  18. Heat Stress Modulates Both Anabolic and Catabolic Signaling Pathways Preventing Dexamethasone-Induced Muscle Atrophy In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Wakako; Iwata, Masahiro; Akimoto, Takayuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Asai, Yuji; Suzuki, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    It is generally recognized that synthetic glucocorticoids induce skeletal muscle weakness, and endogenous glucocorticoid levels increase in patients with muscle atrophy. It is reported that heat stress attenuates glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy; however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Therefore, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effects of heat stress against glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy using C2C12 myotubes in vitro, focusing on expression of key molecules and signaling pathways involved in regulating protein synthesis and degradation. The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone decreased myotube diameter and protein content, and heat stress prevented the morphological and biochemical glucocorticoid effects. Heat stress also attenuated increases in mRNAs of regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1 (REDD1) and Kruppel-like factor 15 (KLF15). Heat stress recovered the dexamethasone-induced inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling. These data suggest that changes in anabolic and catabolic signals are involved in heat stress-induced protection against glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. These results have a potentially broad clinical impact because elevated glucocorticoid levels are implicated in a wide range of diseases associated with muscle wasting. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 650-664, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. EFFECT OF STATIC STRETCHING AND LPG SYSTEM TECHNIQUE ON TREATMENT AND PREVENT OF DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Vahideh Kianmarz; Afshar Jafari

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was done in order to determining effect of static stretching and LPG systemtechnique on treatment and prevent of delayed onset muscle soreness.Methods: In order to thirtynon-athletic females [aged 21.8±1.15 years; fat percent 23.69±1.43 kg; BMI 21.79±1.52 kg/m2]were voluntarily selected and randomly assigned to equal three groups. The stretching groupexecuted a static stretch of hamstrings muscle for 20 min pre exercise and 12 hours postexercise. Hold each stretch 30 secon...

  20. Is a gender differential intervention necessary in the prevention of adolescent drug use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Carmen; Charro, Belén

    2014-01-01

    To examine the significant differences in smoking, drug and alcohol use between adolescent boys and girls, and to raise the possible need to design and implement prevention programs from a gender perspective. A qualitative study using eight discussion groups of adolescents aged 14-18 years (n=56) and 6 semi-structured interviews with experts and professionals in drug prevention in the Community of Madrid. Categorical interpretive analysis was performed. The adolescents and prevention professional indicated differences between boys and girls in drug and alcohol use. The significances, reasons associated with the consumption and the patterns of consumption were perceived differently by each sex. To lose weight, calm down or an image of rebelliousness was related to girls who smoked, while boys smoked less because they did more sports. The perception of certain precocity of drug consumption was associated with the step from school to Higher Education Institutions. They found smoking associated with a good social image among their groups. Adolescents showed the ineffectiveness of the campaigns and prevention messages they received, incoherence of adults between messages and actions, and the attraction of all behaviours that are banned. Professionals observed the need to include a gender perspective in prevention programs, but did not know how to achieve it, mainly because it has been translated into different activities for each sex until now. The significant differences associated with smoking, drug and alcohol use observed in the adolescents should lead us to design and implement prevention programs that incorporate a gender perspective. It is perhaps from this strategy where drug and alcohol use among girls can be reduced. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Methenamine: a forgotten drug for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in a multidrug resistance era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tze Shien; Hammer, Kimberly D P; Zegarra, Milagros; Cho, William C S

    2014-05-01

    In the era of multidrug resistance, it is critical to utilize antibiotics in an appropriate manner and to identify new treatments or revisit the use of 'forgotten' drugs. Because urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, particularly in an increasing elderly population, the 'forgotten' drug, methenamine, may become important as a preventive therapy for recurrent UTIs. Methenamine, a urinary antibacterial agent, can be used as methenamine hippurate or methenamine mandelate preparations and is United States Food and Drug Administration-approved. This article discusses the place of preventive therapy for recurrent UTIs, chemistry, mechanism of action, pharmacology, clinical uses, dosage, adverse reactions and safety, and drug interactions of methenamine. Because of its unique antiseptic property, the authors suggest that methenamine should be considered when more commonly used antibiotics fail to suppress recurrent UTIs.

  2. Deletion of skeletal muscle SOCS3 prevents insulin resistance in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck Jørgensen, Sebastian; O'Neill, Hayley M; Sylow, Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to defects in energy metabolism and insulin resistance. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 expression is increased in skeletal muscle of obese humans. SOCS3 inhibits leptin signaling in the hypothalamus and insulin...... deleted in skeletal muscle (SOCS MKO). The SOCS3 MKO mice had normal muscle development, body mass, adiposity, appetite, and energy expenditure compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Despite similar degrees of obesity when fed a high-fat diet, SOCS3 MKO mice were protected against the development...... of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance because of enhanced skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and Akt phosphorylation that resulted in increased skeletal muscle glucose uptake. These data indicate that skeletal muscle SOCS3 does not play a critical role in regulating muscle development or energy...

  3. Preventing prescription drug misuse: field test of the SmartRx Web program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Diane K; Cook, Royer F; Hendrickson, April

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the project was to test a Web-based program designed to prevent prescription drug misuse. Study sample consisted of 346 working women randomized into either an experimental or wait-list control condition. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression were used to compare responses. Women receiving the intervention had greater knowledge of drug facts and greater self-efficacy in medication adherence and ability to manage problems with medications compared with controls. Women receiving the intervention also had reduced symptoms reported on the CAGE for prescription medications. Findings suggest that multimedia Web-based programs can be a beneficial addition to substance misuse prevention services. The study's limitations are noted.

  4. Process evaluation of the implementation of the Unplugged Program for drug use prevention in Brazilian schools

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, Pollyanna F. P.; Joselaine I. Cruz; R. Schneider, Daniela; Sanudo, Adriana; Zila M. Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background Most Brazilian schools do not have a continuous program for drug use prevention. To address this gap, the Ministry of Health adapted the European evidence-based program Unplugged to improve the drug use prevention efforts of Brazilian public schools. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of program implementation in three Brazilian cities among middle school students between 6th and 9th grade (11 to 14 years old). Methods Mixed methods were used in this process evaluati...

  5. THE MODEL IN PREVENTING AND SOLVING DRUGS IN THE THAI-LAO BORDER VILLAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattana Puttichart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A drug issue is a problem at both national and international levels. The root causes of the problems lie inside and outside the humans. To solve the problems in a sustainable way, it is essential to get cooperation from many parties. The research aimed to study the situations and prevention and solution of drugs in the border villages, to construct the model to prevent and solve the drug issues and to evaluate the model for preventing and solving the drugs prevalent in the border villages. The work was a qualitative research. It analyzed documentary data and those from the field study gained by surveying, observing, interviewing, focus group and workshop. Twenty border villages in Khemarat district were used as the samples which derived by a specific random sampling. The research found that (1 as regards the drug situations, the drugs were prevalent in Khemarat. There were two guidelines to deal with the situation: Internal factor or participation from all; external factors or the cooperation between the state and the community residents. (2 Considering the guidelines for constructing the model for preventing drugs, there were four types of measures: (1 Integration from all sectors, (2 objectives in constructing the model which consisted of two items: 2.1 promotion and support for the state officials’ performance, 2.2 observation and protection of the community members from drugs. (3 The process of constructing the model was composed of the following: Finding a leader, communication to effect changes, multilateral communication in society, community participation in solving the problems, linking ideas from a variety of people, public forum to exchange the ideas, feedback on problems, turning burdens into energy, progress in people’s participation. (4 evaluation of the state officials’ and the community’s participation. (3 Given the suitability and practicality of the model, the model in question was found to be suitable and also found to

  6. Using Elite Athletes to Promote Drug Abstinence: Evaluation of a Single-Session School-Based Drug Use Prevention Program Delivered by Junior Hockey Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    School-based substance use prevention programs are a common method to approaching drug use in youths. Project SOS is a single-session drug prevention program developed by police officers and delivered by elite junior hockey players to students in grades 6 and 7. The current study evaluates the effects of Project SOS at achieving its objectives of…

  7. Designing an Effective Prevention Program: Principles Underlying the Rand Smoking and Drug Prevention Experiment,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    to resist as well as resistance skills; o its integration of elements from the Health Belief Model, social learning theory , and the self-efficacy...resistance behavior, the principles underlying the curriculum represent a unique synthesis of the Health Belief Model of prevention, social learning theory , and...15 - REFERENCES Bandura, A. (1977a) Social Learning Theory Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Bandura, A. (1977b) "Self-efficacy: Toward a Unifying

  8. [Recomendations for the prevention of adverse drug reactions in older adults with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pavón, Javier; González García, Paloma; Francés Román, Inés; Vidán Astiz, Maite; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, José; Jiménez Díaz, Gregorio; Montero Fernández, Nuria Pilar; Alvarez Fernández, Baldomero; Jiménez Páez, José María

    2010-01-01

    The elderly are one of the groups at greatest risk for adverse drugs reactions (ADR). The mean prevalence of these reactions in this population is 30%. Dementia is not an independent risk factor of ADR, but is the main condition that increases all risk factors (polypharmacy, comorbidity, inappropriate prescribing, drug-drug interactions, advanced age, and treatment adherence). The present article discusses revised and consensual recommendations for the prevention of ADR in the elderly, as well as recommendations specifically for dementia patients in relation to the management of comorbidity and cognitive, behavioral and psychological symptoms. Copyright 2009 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors associated with the implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Dias Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if characteristics of managers, schools, and curriculum are associated with the implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in elementary and high schools. METHODS Cross-sectional study, with random sample of 263 school managers. Data were collected between 2012 and 2013 by a program that sends forms via internet. A closed self-filling questionnaire was applied online. Statistical analysis included Chi-square tests and logistic regression models. The outcome variable was the presence of program for drug abuse prevention inserted in the daily life and educational program of the school. The explanatory variables were divided into: demographic data of the manager; characteristics of the school and of the curriculum; health education; and drug use in the school. RESULTS We found that 42.5% (95%CI 36.1–49.1 of the evaluated schools had programs for drug abuse prevention. With the multiple logistic regression model, we observed that the more time the manager has worked with education, the chance of the school having a program increased at about 4.0%. Experimenting with innovative teaching techniques also increased at about six times the chance of the school developing a program for drug abuse prevention. The difficulties in the implementation of the programs were more present in state and municipal schools, when compared with private schools, due to, for instance: lack of teaching materials, lack of money, and competing demands for teaching other subjects. CONCLUSIONS The implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in the city of Sao Paulo is associated with the experience of the manager in education and with the teaching strategies of the school.

  10. The NARCONON™ drug education curriculum for high school students: A non-randomized, controlled prevention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecchini Marie A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 13 million youths aged 12 to 17 become involved with alcohol, tobacco and other drugs annually. The number of 12- to 17-year olds abusing controlled prescription drugs increased an alarming 212 percent between 1992 and 2003. For many youths, substance abuse precedes academic and health problems including lower grades, higher truancy, drop out decisions, delayed or damaged physical, cognitive, and emotional development, or a variety of other costly consequences. For thirty years the Narconon program has worked with schools and community groups providing single educational modules aimed at supplementing existing classroom-based prevention activities. In 2004, Narconon International developed a multi-module, universal prevention curriculum for high school ages based on drug abuse etiology, program quality management data, prevention theory and best practices. We review the curriculum and its rationale and test its ability to change drug use behavior, perceptions of risk/benefits, and general knowledge. Methods After informed parental consent, approximately 1000 Oklahoma and Hawai'i high school students completed a modified Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP Participant Outcome Measures for Discretionary Programs survey at three testing points: baseline, one month later, and six month follow-up. Schools assigned to experimental conditions scheduled the Narconon curriculum between the baseline and one-month follow-up test; schools in control conditions received drug education after the six-month follow-up. Student responses were analyzed controlling for baseline differences using analysis of covariance. Results At six month follow-up, youths who received the Narconon drug education curriculum showed reduced drug use compared with controls across all drug categories tested. The strongest effects were seen in all tobacco products and cigarette frequency followed by marijuana. There were also significant

  11. Cold-water immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bleakley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimizing delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15 °C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library (2010, Issue 1, Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL, British Nursing Index and archive (BNI, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro. We also searched the reference lists of articles, handsearched journals and conference proceedings and contacted experts. In November 2011, we updated the searches of Central (2011, Issue 4, Medline (up to November Week 3 2011, Embase (to 2011 Week 46 and CINAHL (to 28 November 2011 to check for more recent publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing the effect of using cold-water immersion after exercise with: passive intervention (rest/no intervention, contrast immersion, warm-water immersion, active recovery, compression, or a different duration/dosage of cold-water immersion. Primary outcomes were pain (muscle soreness or tenderness (pain on palpation, and subjective recovery (return to previous activities without signs or symptoms. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently evaluated study quality and extracted data. Some of the data were obtained following author correspondence or extracted from graphs in the trial reports. Where possible, data were pooled using the fixed-effect model. MAIN RESULTS: Seventeen small trials were included, involving a total of 366 participants. Study quality was low. The temperature, duration and

  12. Design of study without drugs--a Surinamese school-based drug-prevention program for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaak, Fariel; de Vries, Nanne Karel; van der Wolf, Kees

    2015-10-12

    The aim of this study was to design the content and accompanying materials for a school-based program--Study without Drugs--for adolescents in junior secondary schools in Suriname based on the starting points and tasks of the fourth step of the Intervention Mapping protocol (which consists of six steps). A program based on this protocol should include a combination of theory, empirical evidence, and qualitative and quantitative research. Two surveys were conducted when designing the program. In Survey I, teachers and students were asked to complete a questionnaire to determine which school year they thought would be most appropriate for implementing a drug-prevention program for adolescents (we completed a similar survey as part of previous research). An attempt was made to identify suitable culturally sensitive elements to include in the program. In Survey II, the same teachers were asked to complete a questionnaire to determine the programs' scope, sequence, structure, and topics as well as the general didactic principles to serve as a basis for program design. After outlining the program plan, lessons, and materials, we conducted a formative pretest evaluation among teachers, students, and parents. That evaluation included measures related to the program's attractiveness, comprehensibility, and usefulness. The resulting lessons were presented to the teachers for assessment. The drug-prevention program we developed comprises 10 activities and lasts 2-2.5 months in an actual school setting. The activities take place during Dutch, biology, physical education, art, religion, and social studies lessons. We based the structure of the lessons in the program on McGuire's Persuasion Communication Model, which takes into account important didactic principles. Evaluations of the program materials and lesson plans by students, teachers, and parents were mostly positive. We believe that using the fourth step of the Intervention Mapping protocol to develop a drug-prevention

  13. Definition and Outcome of a Curriculum to Prevent Disordered Eating and Body-Shaping Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L.; Moe, Esther L.; Goldberg, Linn; DeFrancesco, Carol A.; Durham, Melissa B.; Hix-Small, Hollie

    2006-01-01

    Almost one half of male and female students participate in high school-sponsored athletics, and high school also is a time when classroom health promotion curricula are less effective. The Athletes Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids is a sport team-centered drug-use prevention program for male high school athletes, which has been shown to…

  14. Effectiveness of School-based Drug Prevention Programs for Marijuana Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Nancy S.; Lessard, Terri; Marshall, Diana; Ochshorn, Peter; Roona, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Synthesizes evaluation of drug use programs (N=37) in schools for grades 6-12 by coding program characteristics and calculating weighted effect sizes (WES) for marijuana use. Program type and sample size were found to be significant predictors of program effectiveness. The primary finding for prevention program planning is that interactive…

  15. School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Programs in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj; Branscum, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse, or substance abuse, is a substantial public health problem in the United States, particularly among high school students. The purpose of this article was to review school-based programs implemented in high schools for substance abuse prevention and to suggest recommendations for future interventions. Included were English language…

  16. Reliability of the assessment of preventable adverse drug events in daily clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doormaal, J.E.; Mol, P.G.; van den Bemt, P.M.; Egberts, A.C.; Kosterink, J.G.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; Zaal, Rianne J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the reliability of the assessment of preventable adverse drug events (ADES) in daily practice and to explore the impact of the assessors' professional background and the case characteristics on reliability. Methods We used a combination of the simplified Yale algorithm and the N

  17. Going the Distance: Delivery of High School Drug Prevention via Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, David L.; Fearnow-Kenney, Melodie; Wyrick, Cheryl Haworth; Orsini, Muhsin Michael; Strack, Robert W.; Milroy, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a technology that can be used in schools where there are insufficient resources to implement a quality drug prevention program. The specific technology--distance education via teleconferencing--allows a highly qualified teacher to deliver programs in such settings with increased quality. A promising high…

  18. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Alcohol- or Other Drug-Use Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports the results of the study in the area of alcohol- or other drug-use prevention, covering the following topics: (1) Health Education;…

  19. Evaluating an In-School Drug Prevention Program for At-Risk Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWit, David J.; Steep, Barbara; Silverman, Gloria; Stevens-Lavigne, Andrea; Ellis, Kathy; Smythe, Cindy; Rye, Barbara J.; Braun, Kathy; Wood, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    A drug prevention program involving 167 at-risk students in grades 8-10 at 9 Ontario schools resulted in reduced use of and less supportive attitudes toward alcohol, cannabis, tobacco, and tranquilizers. Program success is attributed to high attendance and retention, community health professionals' participation, comprehensive approach, strong…

  20. The Role of the School's Social Environment in Preventing Student Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaps, Eric; Solomon, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes studies of school environmental factors associated with student drug use and prevention. Major factors that emerge are school supportiveness, sense of community, and opportunities for students to interact and to exert influence. A common conclusion seems to be that a supportive environment increases students' attachment to school and…

  1. December 1993 National Drunk and Drugged Driving (3D) Prevention Month: Program Planner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This program planner's kit is based on the experiences of the first 12 years of the National Drunk and Drugged Driving (3D) Prevention Month program and provides practical advice to help readers plan activities for this year's campaign. Included in the kit is a background and resource guide that explains the background and goals of the program and…

  2. Myo/Nog cells: targets for preventing the accumulation of skeletal muscle-like cells in the human lens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Gerhart

    Full Text Available Posterior capsule opacification (PCO is a vision impairing condition that arises in some patients following cataract surgery. The fibrotic form of PCO is caused by myofibroblasts that may emerge in the lens years after surgery. In the chick embryo lens, myofibroblasts are derived from Myo/Nog cells that are identified by their expression of the skeletal muscle specific transcription factor MyoD, the bone morphogenetic protein inhibitor Noggin, and the epitope recognized by the G8 monoclonal antibody. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that depletion of Myo/Nog cells will prevent the accumulation of myofibroblasts in human lens tissue. Myo/Nog cells were present in anterior, equatorial and bow regions of the human lens, cornea and ciliary processes. In anterior lens tissue removed by capsulorhexis, Myo/Nog cells had synthesized myofibroblast and skeletal muscle proteins, including vimentin, MyoD and sarcomeric myosin. Alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was detected in a subpopulation of Myo/Nog cells. Areas of the capsule denuded of epithelial cells were surrounded by Myo/Nog cells. Some of these cell free areas contained a wrinkle in the capsule. Depletion of Myo/Nog cells eliminated cells expressing skeletal muscle proteins in 5-day cultures but did not affect cells immunoreactive for beaded filament proteins that accumulate in differentiating lens epithelial cells. Transforming growth factor-betas 1 and 2 that mediate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, did not induce the expression of skeletal muscle proteins in lens cells following Myo/Nog cell depletion. This study demonstrates that Myo/Nog cells in anterior lens tissue removed from cataract patients have undergone a partial differentiation to skeletal muscle. Myo/Nog cells appear to be the source of skeletal muscle-like cells in explants of human lens tissue. Targeting Myo/Nog cells with the G8 antibody during cataract surgery may reduce the incidence of PCO.

  3. An Evaluation of Immediate Outcomes and Fidelity of a Drug Abuse Prevention Program in Continuation High Schools: Project towards No Drug Abuse (TND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisha, Nadra E.; Sun, Ping; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Unger, Jennifer B.; Sussman, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The present study provides an implementation fidelity, process, and immediate outcomes evaluation of Project Towards No Drug Abuse (TND), a drug prevention program targeting continuation high school youth (n = 1426) at risk for drug abuse. A total of 24 schools participated in three randomized conditions: TND Only, TND and motivational…

  4. An Evaluation of Immediate Outcomes and Fidelity of a Drug Abuse Prevention Program in Continuation High Schools: Project towards No Drug Abuse (TND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisha, Nadra E.; Sun, Ping; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Unger, Jennifer B.; Sussman, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The present study provides an implementation fidelity, process, and immediate outcomes evaluation of Project Towards No Drug Abuse (TND), a drug prevention program targeting continuation high school youth (n = 1426) at risk for drug abuse. A total of 24 schools participated in three randomized conditions: TND Only, TND and motivational…

  5. [Effects of community-based comprehensive fall prevention program on muscle strength, postural balance and fall efficacy in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jeongyee; Cho, Seong Il

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study was to develop a comprehensive community-based fall prevention program and to test the effects of the program on the muscle strength, postural balance and fall efficacy for elderly people. The design of this study was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. There were 28 participants in the experimental group and 29 in the control group. The program consisted of balance exercises, elastic resistance exercises and prevention education. The program was provided five times a week for 8 weeks and each session lasted 90 minutes. Data were analyzed using χ²-test, independent t-test and paired t-test using the SPSS program. Muscle strength of the lower extremities, postural balance and fall efficacy scores significantly improved in the experimental group compared to the control group. These results suggest that this program can improve lower extremity muscle strength, postural balance and fall efficacy in elders. Therefore, this program is recommended for use in fall prevention programs for elders living in the community.

  6. [Risk/protective factors and prevention programs for drug dependence in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas-Rojas, William

    2012-03-01

    Risk/ protective factors (RPF) are main elements for the analysis, understanding and formulation of answers for the prevention of drug dependences. The objective of this article is to present a literature review about the RPF and their implications in the design of preventive programs. It will focus on individual (genetic aspects, early experiences and psicosocial skills), family (parental control and monitoring, permissiveness, parenting styles), peer (group pressure and social norms) and communitarian (disorganization) RPF. On the other hand, the need of incorporating a multifactor conceptual framework for the preventive approach to drug dependences, articulating the intervention spaces (school, family and community), assuming and evolving perspective allowing the implementations of sustained actions is evidenced. On top, the implications for future research and public policy formulation are discussed.

  7. Blood flow restriction prevents muscle damage but not protein synthesis signaling following eccentric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Mizuki; Ando, Soichi; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that resistance training exercise combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) increases muscle size and strength in humans. Eccentric contraction (ECC) frequently induces severe muscle damage. However, it is not known whether and to what extent muscle damage occurs following ECC + BFR due to the difficulty of conducting definitive invasive studies. The purpose of this study was to examine muscle fiber damage following ECC + BFR at the cellular level. High-intensity ECC was purposefully selected to maximize the opportunity for muscle damage and hypertrophic signaling in our novel in vivo animal model. Male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to the following groups: ECC and ECC + BFR at varying levels of occlusion pressure (140, 160, and 200 Torr). In all conditions, electrical stimulation was applied to the dorsiflexor muscles simultaneously with electromotor-induced plantar flexion. We observed severe histochemical muscle fiber damage (area of damaged fibers/total fiber area analyzed) following ECC (26.4 ± 4.0%). Surprisingly, however, muscle damage was negligible following ECC + BFR140 (2.6 ± 1.2%), ECC+BFR160 (3.0 ± 0.5%), and ECC + BFR200 (0.2 ± 0.1%). Ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, a downstream target of rapamycin (mTOR)-phosphorylation kinase, increased following ECC + BFR200 as well as ECC. In contrast, S6K1 phosphorylation was not altered by BFR alone. The present findings suggest that ECC combined with BFR, even at high exercise intensities, may enhance muscle protein synthesis without appreciable muscle fiber damage.

  8. Genetic deletion of myostatin from the heart prevents skeletal muscle atrophy in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Joerg; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Xu, Jian; Sargent, Michelle; York, Allen; Welle, Stephen; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2010-01-26

    Cardiac cachexia is characterized by an exaggerated loss of skeletal muscle, weakness, and exercise intolerance, although the cause of these effects remains unknown. Here, we hypothesized that the heart functions as an endocrine organ in promoting systemic cachexia by secreting peptide factors such as myostatin. Myostatin is a cytokine of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily that is known to control muscle wasting. We used a Cre/loxP system to ablate myostatin (Mstn gene) expression in a cell type-specific manner. As expected, elimination of Mstn selectively in skeletal muscle with a myosin light chain 1f (MLC1f)-cre allele induced robust hypertrophy in all skeletal muscle. However, heart-specific deletion of Mstn with an Nkx2.5-cre allele did not alter baseline heart size or secondarily affect skeletal muscle size, but the characteristic wasting and atrophy of skeletal muscle that typify heart failure were not observed in these heart-specific null mice, indicating that myocardial myostatin expression controls muscle atrophy in heart failure. Indeed, myostatin levels in the plasma were significantly increased in wild-type mice subjected to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy but not in Mstn heart-specific deleted mice. Moreover, cardiac-specific overexpression of myostatin, which increased circulating levels of myostatin by 3- to 4-fold, caused a reduction in weight of the quadriceps, gastrocnemius, soleus, and even the heart itself. Finally, to investigate myostatin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of muscle wasting in heart failure, we infused a myostatin blocking antibody (JA-16), which promoted greater maintenance of muscle mass in heart failure. Myostatin released from cardiomyocytes induces skeletal muscle wasting in heart failure. Targeted inhibition of myostatin in cardiac cachexia might be a therapeutic option in the future.

  9. Maternal Creatine Supplementation during Pregnancy Prevents Long-Term Changes in Diaphragm Muscle Structure and Function after Birth Asphyxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenic A LaRosa

    Full Text Available Using a model of birth asphyxia, we previously reported significant structural and functional deficits in the diaphragm muscle in spiny mice, deficits that are prevented by supplementing the maternal diet with 5% creatine from mid-pregnancy. The long-term effects of this exposure are unknown. Pregnant spiny mice were fed control or 5% creatine-supplemented diet for the second half of pregnancy, and fetuses were delivered by caesarean section with or without 7.5 min of in-utero asphyxia. Surviving pups were raised by a cross-foster dam until 33±2 days of age when they were euthanized to obtain the diaphragm muscle for ex-vivo study of twitch tension and muscle fatigue, and for structural and enzymatic analyses. Functional analysis of the diaphragm revealed no differences in single twitch contractile parameters between any groups. However, muscle fatigue, induced by stimulation of diaphragm strips with a train of pulses (330 ms train/sec, 40 Hz for 300 sec, was significantly greater for asphyxia pups compared with controls (p<0.05, and this did not occur in diaphragms of creatine + asphyxia pups. Birth asphyxia resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of glycolytic, fast-twitch fibres and a reduction in oxidative capacity of Type I and IIb fibres in male offspring, as well as reduced cross-sectional area of all muscle fibre types (Type I, IIa, IIb/d in both males and females at 33 days of age. None of these changes were observed in creatine + asphyxia animals. Thus, the changes in diaphragm fatigue and structure induced by birth asphyxia persist long-term but are prevented by maternal creatine supplementation.

  10. 28 CFR 0.177 - Applications for orders under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. 0.177 Section 0.177 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF... the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. Notwithstanding the delegation of functions... authorized to exercise the authority vested in the Attorney General by section 514 of the Comprehensive...

  11. The HAWK2 program: a computer-based drug prevention intervention for Native American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Shobana; Forth, April Lea Go

    2012-09-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) have some of the highest rates of substance use compared with other ethnic groups. Native American youth start experimenting with drugs at younger ages, continue to use them after initial experimentation, and thus seem to mirror the same drug use patterns as their older peers. Despite the seriousness of the problem, there is a lack of evidence-based drug prevention interventions for AI/AN youth. This review article describes the process by which an existing evidence-based, culturally relevant drug prevention intervention was transformed into a low-cost, computerized intervention digitized in order to extend its reach to Native American youth in reservations and rural locations. The intervention, titled HAWK(2) (Honoring Ancient Wisdom and Knowledge(2): Prevention and Cessation) is aimed at young Native children in elementary school settings (grades 4 and 5) and uses engaging multimedia features such as games, animations, and video clips to impart substance abuse prevention knowledge and skills training. The development of this intervention was a collaborative process involving the participation of community experts, research scientists, school teachers, and practitioners, as well as Native youth. Specific examples are provided to illustrate the development processes. Initial feedback from practitioners and youth suggest the feasibility and acceptability of computer-based interventions by Native youth and practitioners. Computer-based interventions are a cost-effective way of engaging youth in prevention programming. Future studies of HAWK(2) will provide an important means of testing the long-term effectiveness of self-administered, computer-based interventions for AI/AN youth.

  12. Applying Fear Appeals Theory for Preventing Drug Abuse among Male High School Students in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Witte

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Drug abuse is one of the complicated phenomenons in the human communities that it produces health problems. The effect of applying fear appeal message on attitudes and intention against drug abuse, drug resistance skills, knowledge about side effect of drugs and drug abuse related behaviors among male high school students was studied based on applying extended parallel process model as a theoretical framework. Materials & Methods: Two high schools were chosen from six state high schools as an intervention (n=86 and control (n=97 groups. Educational curriculum, that was designed, based on students’ educational needs, appealed students’ fear and recommended messages developed students' ability for resisting against drugs. Before intervention 5-6 students who were known as a favourite and leader of students, were selected by student’s opinion in each class as students' leaders. The each leader of the group had a coordinator and mediate role between his group and health educators. Henceforth a favourite teacher was chosen by students’ vote for helping health educators and participated in the educational intervention program.Results: The result showed that educational manipulation had significant effect on intervention group’s average response for intention (t= -4.03, p<0.000 and attitude against drug abuse (t= -6.19, p<0.000, peer resistance skills (t=-0.82, p<0.000, and knowledge (t= -10.88, p<0.000. In addition, it was not found positive urinary rapid immune-chromatography test for opium and marijuana in the intervention group whereas 6.3% in the control groups.Conclusion: This findings suggest that applying fear appeals theories and effective health risk message would be an efficient tool for preventing drug abuse education programs but further studies are needed to define function of EPPM as a effective model for creating social inoculation against drug abuse among non- drug expose adolescents.

  13. Risk prevention evaluation in the incorporation of new drugs for healthcare practices: a methodological proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sánchez-Rubio Ferrández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Submit a preventive assessment methodology for the risk of medication errors when incorporating new drugs in clinical practice as well as a description of the types of actions arising from such action. Materials and methods: A Standard Operating Procedure was established which defines and plans the process of assessing the risks of new drugs purchased by the Pharmacy Services before being incorporated into the distribution and dispensation channels. The pharmacist responsible for each area fills the Risk Assessment Form, a questionnaire that facilitates the analysis of the product characteristics and provides guidance on safety measures to be taken depending on the results of that assessment. If it is confirmed that the drug requires some additional security measures to be taken, all professionals and technical staff of the Pharmacy Services shall be informed of measures to be taken. Results: Between 2011 and 2013, 64 drugs were assessed. 35 of them (54.6% required some additional security measure to be applied before being incorporated into clinical practice. Conclusions: The implementation of the method of preventive risk assessment for new drugs purchased by the Pharmacy Services can be a very useful tool when taking the measures deemed necessary to minimize the likelihood of a medication error occurring before they are incorporated into the distribution/dispensing channels put in place by the Pharmacy Services.

  14. PGC-1alpha is required for training-induced prevention of age-associated decline in mitochondrial enzymes in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Lyngby, Stine Secher; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training prevents an age-associated decline in skeletal muscle mitochondrial enzymes through a PGC-1alpha dependent mechanism. Whole body PGC-1alpha knock-out (KO) and littermate wildtype (WT) mice were submitted to long term r...... indicate that PGC-1alpha is required for training-induced prevention of an age-associated decline in CS activity and SOD2 protein expression in skeletal muscle....

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome: A Potential Tool for the Prevention of Muscle Degenerative Changes Associated With Chronic Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevivas, Nuno; Teixeira, Fábio Gabriel; Portugal, Raquel; Araújo, Luís; Carriço, Luís Filipe; Ferreira, Nuno; Vieira da Silva, Manuel; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Anjo, Sandra; Manadas, Bruno; Sousa, Nuno; Salgado, António J

    2016-08-08

    Massive rotator cuff tears (MRCTs) are usually chronic lesions with pronounced degenerative changes, where advanced fatty degeneration and atrophy can make the tear irreparable. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) secrete a range of growth factors and vesicular systems, known as secretome, that mediates regenerative processes in tissues undergoing degeneration. To study the effect of hMSC secretome on muscular degenerative changes and shoulder function on a rat MRCT model. Controlled laboratory study. A bilateral 2-tendon (supraspinatus and infraspinatus) section was performed to create an MRCT in a rat model. Forty-four Wistar-Han rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups: control group (sham surgery), lesion control group (MRCT), and 4 treated-lesion groups according to the site and periodicity of hMSC secretome injection: single local injection, multiple local injections, single systemic injection, and multiple systemic injections. Forelimb function was analyzed with the staircase test. Atrophy and fatty degeneration of the muscle were evaluated at 8 and 16 weeks after injury. A proteomic analysis was conducted to identify the molecules present in the hMSC secretome that can be associated with muscular degeneration prevention. When untreated for 8 weeks, the MRCT rats exhibited a significantly higher fat content (0.73% ± 0.19%) compared with rats treated with a single local injection (0.21% ± 0.04%; P muscle atrophy, 8 weeks after injury, only the single local injection group (0.0993% ± 0.0036%) presented a significantly higher muscle mass than that of the untreated MRCT group (0.0794% ± 0.0047%; P muscle regeneration, namely, pigment epithelium-derived factor and follistatin. The study data suggest that hMSC secretome effectively decreases the fatty degeneration and atrophy of the rotator cuff muscles. We describe a new approach for decreasing the characteristic muscle degeneration associated with chronic rotator cuff tears. This strategy is particularly

  16. Robustness testing in the determination of seven drugs in animal muscle by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Oca Casado, Mª Leticia; Rubio Martínez, Laura; Ortiz Fernández, Mª Cruz; Sarabia Peinador, Luis Antonio; García, I.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the robustness of the sample preparation procedure for the determination of six tranquilizers (xylazine, azaperone, propionylpromazine, chlorpromazine, haloperidol, and azaperol) and a beta-blocker (carazolol) in animal muscle by LC/MS–MS was assessed through the experimental design methodology. A 2III7 − 4 fractional factorial design was performed to evaluate the influence of seven variables on the final concentration of the seven drugs in the samples, in accordance with what i...

  17. Previniendo el Uso de Drogas entre Ninos y Adolescentes: Una Guia Basada en Investigaciones (Preventing Drug Use among Children and Adolescents: A Research-Based Guide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Zili; David, Susan L.

    This question and answer guide provides an overview of the research on the origins and pathways of drug abuse, the basic principles derived from effective drug abuse prevention research, and the application of research results to the prevention of drug use among young people. The basic principles derived from drug abuse prevention research are…

  18. MINERAL AND PLANT ORIGIN DRUGS FOR THE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF UROLITHIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Kochkarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review points out the reasons and mechanisms of urolithiasis appearance, methods of its prevention, surgery, distant and contact lithotripsy, and drug treatment of urolithiasis with the use of thiazide diuretics, citric blend, magnesium drugs, vitamin B6, and phytodrugs. On the basis of the literature data analysis there is a conclusion about the possibility of usage of several systems of impact: citric complex, phytocomponents, and the complex of magnesium ions with pyridoxine hydrochloride.

  19. Assessing the effectiveness of Malaysia's drug prevention education and rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, J F

    1988-01-01

    The multifaceted drug prevention education and rehabilitation system of Malaysia appears to have contributed to the steady decrease of the number of identified drug abusers in the country. In this article, those components of the Malaysian system that would be most applicable to the American effort were examined. In the same manner, because the fastest growing minority group in the United States are Asian Americans, in which a significant proportion involve persons from Southeast Asia, those components in the Malaysian system that are applicable to Southeast Asian Americans were examined.

  20. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warin Krityakiarana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated (CG, n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14. Method: Before inducing DOMS, the range of motion (ROM and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC were measured. The dynamic stretching was performed before inducing DOMS. Subjects performed biceps eccentric exercise at 110% of the predicted one-repetition maximum (1-RM, for each subject, to induce muscle soreness. Pain, ROM and MVC were assessed at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after induction of DOMS. Results: These non-significant results for mode of treatment and time interaction showed that combined treatment, ice bag, or dynamic stretching alone is not effective at significantly reducing the symptoms of DOMS. Conclusion: These results are non-significant, the pattern of the data showed that the combined treatment may be contraindicated in the prevention of DOMS and ice bag or dynamic stretching might be the best choice of treatment. Further investigation is strongly recommended.

  1. Testing whether drugs that weaken norepinephrine signaling prevent or treat various types of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Fitzgerald

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H. Snyder, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Recently, I put forth the hypothesis that the signaling molecule, norepinephrine (NE, is an etiological factor in a number of types of cancer. In this brief commentary, I summarize evidence that NE plays a role in cancer and describe details involved in testing the hypothesis in humans through epidemiological investigation of existing medical records of persons who have taken pharmaceutical drugs that affect NE. If NE plays an etiological role in cancers of a number of organs, then taking a single pharmaceutical drug (such as clonidine, prazosin, or propranolol that weakens NE signaling systemically, may simultaneously prevent or treat many different types of cancer, and this may represent a breakthrough in pharmaceutical prevention and possibly treatment of cancer.Keywords: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, cancer, clonidine, prazosin, propranolol

  2. Parent Engagement in Youth Drug Prevention in Chinese Families: Advancement in Program Development and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra K. M. Tsang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating youth drug abuse problem in Hong Kong has attracted intense attention from the government, schools, and youth service professionals. Most preventive efforts have focused directly on positive youth development, very often through school programs delivered to secondary school students. There have been limited efforts to engage parents even though it is obvious that the family is actually the primary context of children and youth development. This paper will assert the importance of parental engagement in youth drug-prevention work, discuss some barriers in such parental involvement, present some promising local attempts and their strengths and limitations, and propose that sustained efforts are needed to build up theory-driven and evidence-based resources for Chinese communities on the subject.

  3. Parent engagement in youth drug prevention in Chinese families: advancement in program development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sandra K M

    2011-01-01

    The escalating youth drug abuse problem in Hong Kong has attracted intense attention from the government, schools, and youth service professionals. Most preventive efforts have focused directly on positive youth development, very often through school programs delivered to secondary school students. There have been limited efforts to engage parents even though it is obvious that the family is actually the primary context of children and youth development. This paper will assert the importance of parental engagement in youth drug-prevention work, discuss some barriers in such parental involvement, present some promising local attempts and their strengths and limitations, and propose that sustained efforts are needed to build up theory-driven and evidence-based resources for Chinese communities on the subject.

  4. Quasi-Drugs Developed in Japan for the Prevention or Treatment of Hyperpigmentary Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Ando

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Excess production of melanin or its abnormal distribution, or both, can cause irregular hyperpigmentation of the skin, leading to melasma and age spots. To date, various quasi-drugs that prevent or improve hyperpigmentary disorders have been developed and officially approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. Many of these inhibit the activity of tyrosinase, an enzyme required for melanin synthesis, for example, by competitive or non-competitive inhibition of its catalytic activity, by inhibiting its maturation, or by accelerating its degradation. In this review, we categorize the quasi-drugs developed in Japan to prevent or treat hyperpigmentary disorders, or both, and discuss perspectives for future development.

  5. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastroduodenal Bleeding: Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely prescribed medications in the World. A frequent complication of NSAID use is gastroduodenal bleeding. Risk factors for gastroduodenal bleeding while on NSAID therapy are age, prior peptic ulcer and co-medication with anti-platelet agents, anticoagulants, glucocorticosteroids and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Prevention strategies for at-risk patients include the use of the lowest effective dose of NSAIDs, co-t...

  6. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan Abigail A; Mihalic Sharon F; Argamaso Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. Methods This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST) drug preventio...

  7. DRUG ADMINISTRATION: A SYSTEMIC VIEW FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICATION ERROR PREVENTIVE ACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena De Bortoli Cassiani

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The drug administration is a very frequent activity of a hospital routine in general, as well as of itsnursing team. However studies have shown the need to implement strategies to prevent or to mitigate errors foundin this pratice. To look at the medication process thru a systemic view allows to identify its weak points and todevelop procedures to assure the safety of the customers and the professionals.

  8. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator Treatment Improves Muscle Strength and Body Composition and Prevents Bone Loss in Orchidectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Reiser, Peter J.; Coss, Christopher C.; Phelps, Mitch A.; Kearbey, Jeffrey D.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The partial agonist activity of a selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) in the prostate was demonstrated in orchidectomized rats. In the current study, we characterized the full agonist activity of S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide (a structurally related SARM referred to in other publications and hereafter as S-4) in skeletal muscle, bone, and pituitary of castrated male rats. Twelve weeks after castration, animals were treated with S-4 (3 or 10 mg/kg), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) (3 mg/kg), or vehicle for 8 wk. S-4 (3 and 10 mg/kg) restored soleus muscle mass and strength and levator ani muscle mass to that seen in intact animals. Similar changes were also observed in DHT-treated (3 mg/kg) animals. Compared with the anabolic effects observed in muscle, DHT (3 mg/kg) stimulated prostate and seminal vesicle weights moire than 2-fold greater than that observed in intact controls, whereas S-4 (3 mg/kg) returned these androgenic organs to only 16 and 17%, respectively, of the control levels. S-4 (3 and 10 mg/kg) and DHT (3 mg/kg) restored castration-induced loss in lean body mass. Furthermore, S-4 treatment caused a significantly larger increase in total body bone mineral density than DHT. S-4 (3 and 10 mg/kg) also demonstrated agonist activity in the pituitary and significantly decreased plasma LH and FSH levels in castrated animals in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, the strong anabolic effects of S-4 in skeletal muscle, bone, and pituitary were achieved with minimal pharmacologic effect in the prostate. The tissue-selective pharmacologic activity of SARMs provides obvious advantages over steroidal androgen therapy and demonstrates the promising therapeutic utility that this new class of drugs may hold. PMID:16099859

  9. Nitrotyrosylation of Ca2+ channels prevents c-Src kinase regulation of colonic smooth muscle contractility in experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Gracious R; Kang, Minho; Shirwany, Najeeb; Malykhina, Anna P; Drozd, Mary; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2007-09-01

    Basal levels of c-Src kinase are known to regulate smooth muscle Ca(2+) channels. Colonic inflammation results in attenuated Ca(2+) currents and muscle contraction. Here, we examined the regulation of calcium influx-dependent contractility by c-Src kinase in experimental colitis. Ca(2+)-influx induced contractions were measured by isometric tension recordings of mouse colonic longitudinal muscle strips depolarized by high K(+). The E(max) to CaCl(2) was significantly less in inflamed tissues (38.4 +/- 7.6%) than controls, indicative of reduced Ca(2+) influx. PP2 [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine], a selective Src kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced the contractile amplitude and shifted the pD(2) from 3.88 to 2.44 in controls, whereas it was ineffective in inflamed tissues (3.66 versus 3.43). After pretreatment with a SIN-1 (3-morpholinosydnonimine)/peroxynitrite combination, the maximal contraction to CaCl(2) was reduced by 46 +/- 7% in controls but unaffected in inflamed tissues (13 +/- 11%). Peroxynitrite also prevented the inhibitory effect of PP2 in control tissues. In colonic single smooth muscle cells, PP2 inhibited Ca(2+) currents by 84.1 +/- 3.9% in normal but only 36.2 +/- 13% in inflamed tissues. Neither the Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.2b, gene expression, nor the c-Src kinase activity was altered by inflammation. Western blot analysis showed no change in the Ca(2+) channel protein expression but increased nitrotyrosylated-Ca(2+) channel proteins during inflammation. These data suggest that post-translational modification of Ca(2+) channels during inflammation, possibly nitrotyrosylation, prevents c-Src kinase regulation resulting in decreased Ca(2+) influx.

  10. Illicit drugs, testing, prevention and work in France: ethical and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni-Quinton, Sophie; Bossu, Bernard; Morgenroth, Thomas; Frimat, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The use of illicit drugs in the workplace raises issues pertaining to prevention and safety and the responsibility of the various members of staff. It also brings into question the interface between work and private life. If employees are in theory responsible for their own safety and risk heavy penalties in the event of the consumption of illicit drugs in the workplace, such behaviour has to be proved. In reality, the worker can only be partially and marginally held liable, given the fact that the employer is prohibited from infringing on their rights and liberties (restrictions on the searching of their personal belongings and lockers as well as on the carrying out of breath testing and saliva testing under restrictive conditions). Employers have for their part a broader range of responsibilities and, above all, an absolute obligation to achieve specific goals in terms of health and safety resulting in the need to take action. In accordance with the International Labour Organization recommendations, European and national legislation, the employer has to implement a suitable preventive policy. However, where is the balance between prevention and repression? Very few studies have raised these issues and our aim is to precisely situate the place of drug testing in the employer's repressive arsenal in France and to try to answer the legal and ethical issues raised. Thus, for example, repression can only be acceptable when it deals with moderate and non-addicted users, or it could be tantamount to discrimination.

  11. HIV Prevention for Juvenile Drug Court Offenders: A Randomized Controlled Trial Focusing on Affect Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher D.; Conrad, Selby M.; Tarantino, Nicholas; Stein, L.A.R.; Brown, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Juvenile drug court offenders have benefited from evidence-based interventions addressing antisocial behavior, mental health and/or substance use; however, interventions addressing HIV risk behavior are lacking. This study presents pilot findings and lessons learned from a group-based HIV prevention intervention delivered to juvenile drug court offenders. Methods Participants were randomized to a 5-session HIV Prevention (n =29) or Health Promotion (n=28) condition and completed measures of sexual risk taking and substance use at baseline and 3 month post-intervention. Results No between-group differences by time emerged on measures of sexual risk-taking or other HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Both groups improved their rates of HIV testing and decreased their substance use during sex over time. Conclusions Delivering an HIV prevention intervention to drug court offenders is feasible; however, more intensive interventions that incorporate multiple systems and address co-occurring mental health difficulties may be needed to affect sexual behavioral change among these high-risk court-involved youth. PMID:21474529

  12. Angiotensin receptor blockers improve insulin signaling and prevent microvascular rarefaction in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Pasini, Evasio; Flati, Vincenzo; Rodella, Luigi F; Paiardi, Silvia; Assanelli, Deodato; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Boari, Gianluca Em; Rezzani, Rita; Speca, Silvia; Favero, Gaia; Martinotti, Stefano; Toniato, Elena; Platto, Caterina; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico

    2008-08-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats are an example of an animal model of genetic hypertension with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate insulin signaling in the heart and in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats, as well as to evaluate the effects of renin-angiotensin system blockade. We investigated eight untreated spontaneously hypertensive rats of 12 weeks of age and eight age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto controls. In addition, eight spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated for 8 weeks with the angiotensin receptor blocker olmesartan, and eight spontaneously hypertensive rats with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril. The heart and a skeletal muscle (quadriceps femoris) were promptly dissected and frozen. Insulin signaling was evaluated by Western blot analysis of involved proteins; in addition, microvessel density was indirectly evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Blood pressure values were normalized by both olmesartan and enalapril. In the heart, no statistically significant difference in the expression of proteins involved in insulin signaling was observed between untreated spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto controls. On the contrary, in the skeletal muscle of untreated spontaneously hypertensive rats, we noted a significant reduction of insulin receptors, of insulin-receptor substrate-1, and of phosphorylated-mammalian target of rapamycin. The treatment with olmesartan normalized insulin signaling, including expression of glucose transporter-4, whereas the treatment with enalapril was ineffective for the insulin receptor and less effective than olmesartan on the insulin-receptor substrate-1, phosphorylated-mammalian target of rapamycin and glucose transporter-4. There was a significant reduction in microvessel density in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with Wistar-Kyoto controls, and this was completely prevented by both olmesartan and enalapril

  13. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    /pADE incidence, (2) clinical outcomes, (3) associated drug groups, and/or (4) underlying medication errors were included. Study country, year and design, sample size, follow-up time, ADE/pADE identification method, proportion of ADEs/pADEs and ADEs/pADEs requiring hospital admission, and frequency distribution......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and describe characteristics of preventable adverse drug events (pADEs) in ambulatory care. DATA SOURCES: Studies were searched in PubMed (1966-March 2007), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-December 2006), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews...... (1993-March 2007), EMBASE (1980-February 2007), and Web of Science (1945-March 2007). Key words included medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease, outpatient, ambulatory care, primary health care, general practice, patient admission, hospitalization, observational study, retrospective...

  14. Prefrontal cortex and drug abuse vulnerability: translation to prevention and treatment interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jennifer L; Joseph, Jane E; Jiang, Yang; Zimmerman, Rick S; Kelly, Thomas H; Darna, Mahesh; Huettl, Peter; Dwoskin, Linda P; Bardo, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Vulnerability to drug abuse is related to both reward seeking and impulsivity, two constructs thought to have a biological basis in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review addresses similarities and differences in neuroanatomy, neurochemistry and behavior associated with PFC function in rodents and humans. Emphasis is placed on monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitter systems located in anatomically distinct subregions: medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC); anterior cingulate cortex (ACC); and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). While there are complex interconnections and overlapping functions among these regions, each is thought to be involved in various functions related to health-related risk behaviors and drug abuse vulnerability. Among the various functions implicated, evidence suggests that mPFC is involved in reward processing, attention and drug reinstatement; lPFC is involved in decision-making, behavioral inhibition and attentional gating; ACC is involved in attention, emotional processing and self-monitoring; and OFC is involved in behavioral inhibition, signaling of expected outcomes and reward/punishment sensitivity. Individual differences (e.g., age and sex) influence functioning of these regions, which, in turn, impacts drug abuse vulnerability. Implications for the development of drug abuse prevention and treatment strategies aimed at engaging PFC inhibitory processes that may reduce risk-related behaviors are discussed, including the design of effective public service announcements, cognitive exercises, physical activity, direct current stimulation, feedback control training and pharmacotherapies. A major challenge in drug abuse prevention and treatment rests with improving intervention strategies aimed at strengthening PFC inhibitory systems among at-risk individuals.

  15. Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Preventive Health Care Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daysal, N. Meltem; Orsini, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We examine how new medical information on drug safety impacts preventive health care use. We exploit the release of the findings of the Women’s Health Initiative Study (WHIS) – the largest randomized controlled trial of women’s health – which demonstrated in 2002 the health risks associated...... comparing changes in preventive care use among 60 to 69 year-old women (who have high rates of HRT use) with the change among women aged 75 and above (who have much lower rates of HRT use). Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for the period 1998–2007, we find that women aged 60...... with the long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We first show that, after the release of the WHIS findings, HRT use dropped sharply among post-menopausal women. We then estimate the spillover effects of the WHIS findings on preventive care by means of a difference-in-differences methodology...

  16. Prior Exercise Training Prevent Hyperglycemia in STZ Mice by Increasing Hepatic Glycogen and Mitochondrial Function on Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Afonso Kopczynski; da Silva, Sabrina; Serafini, Edenir; de Souza, Daniela Roxo; Farias, Hemelin Resende; de Bem Silveira, Gustavo; Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Portela, Luis Valmor; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. We investigated the effect of a prior 30 days voluntary exercise protocol on STZ-diabetic CF1 mice. Glycemia, and the liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, mitochondrial function, and redox status were analyzed up to 5 days after STZ injection. Animals were engaged in the following groups: Sedentary vehicle (Sed Veh), Sedentary STZ (Sed STZ), Exercise Vehicle (Ex Veh), and Exercise STZ (Ex STZ). Exercise prevented fasting hyperglycemia in the Ex STZ group. In the liver, there was decreased on glycogen level in Sed STZ group but not in EX STZ group. STZ groups showed decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared to vehicle groups, whereas mitochondrial H2 O2 production was not different between groups. Addition of ADP to the medium did not decrease H2 O2 production in Sed STZ mice. Exercise increased GSH level. Sed STZ group increased nitrite levels compared to other groups. In quadriceps muscle, glycogen level was similar between groups. The Sed STZ group displayed decreased O2 consumption, and exercise prevented this reduction. The H2 O2 production was higher in Ex STZ when compared to other groups. Also, GSH level decreased whereas nitrite levels increased in the Sed STZ compared to other groups. The PGC1 α levels increased in Sed STZ, Ex Veh, and Ex STZ groups. In summary, prior exercise training prevents hyperglycemia in STZ-mice diabetic associated with increased liver glycogen storage, and oxygen consumption by the mitochondria of skeletal muscle implying in increased oxidative/biogenesis capacity, and improved redox status of both tissues. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 678-685, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A rare case of aberrant quadriceps muscle anatomy preventing anterolateral thigh flap harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Omakobia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The anterolateral thigh (ALT flap is now widely established as a versatile flap which can provide ample amounts of skin, muscle and fascia to construct a variety of defects following major head and neck surgery. However, its use remains cautious due to well documented variations in its vascular anatomy for which this flap is notorious. What is less well known is the effect of variations in quadriceps muscle anatomy on the success of flap harvest. Here, we report a unique case in which fusion of the vastus intermedius (V.I and vastus lateralis (V.L muscles precluded ALT flap harvest. We also advise on appropriate management should similar cases be encountered. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of its kind in the English language literature.

  18. Presynaptic and postsynaptic regulation of muscle contractions in the ascarid nematode Ascaris suum: a target for drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trailović, S M; Zurovac, Z; Gruborović, S; Marjanović, D S; Nedeljković-Trailović, J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role in contractions of postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, in the bag region of Ascaris suum muscle cells, as well as the role of synaptic receptors between interneurons and motor neurons in the dorsal and ventral nerve cord. We have measured the isometric contractions of isolated segments of A. suum, with or without the nerve cord (dorsal or ventral). Contractions were caused by increasing concentrations of ACh or by electrical field stimulation (EFS). Based on our results, the presence of the nerve cord is essential for the contractile effects of ACh. The EC50 value of ACh for innervated muscle strips was 10.88 μm. Unlike intact (innervated) preparations, there was no contraction of the muscle flaps when the nerve cord was mechanically removed. Furthermore, continuous EFS produced stable contractions of innervated muscle strips, but they are not sensitive to mecamylamine (100 μm). However, GABA (30 μm) significantly inhibited the EFS-induced contractions. EFS with the same characteristics did not cause muscle contractions of denervated muscle strips, but EFS with a wider pulse induced the increasing of tone and irregular contractions. These contractions were completely insensitive to the effect of GABA. The EC50 for ACh did not differ between the dorsal and ventral segments (9.83 μm and 9.45 μm), while GABA exhibited features of competitive and non-competitive antagonists, regardless of whether it acted on the dorsal or ventral segments of A. suum. It is obvious that drugs will be more effective if they act on both the synaptic and extrasynaptic nACh and GABA receptors.

  19. The Social Construction of "Evidence-Based" Drug Prevention Programs: A Reanalysis of Data from the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Dennis M.; Huber, J. Charles, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the possibility that any drug prevention program might be considered "evidence-based" given the use of data analysis procedures that optimize the chance of producing statistically significant results by reanalyzing data from a Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program evaluation. The analysis produced a number of…

  20. Potential impact of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT on spread of drug-resistant malaria.

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    Wendy Prudhomme O'Meara

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment of asymptomatic individuals, regardless of their malaria infection status, with regularly spaced therapeutic doses of antimalarial drugs has been proposed as a method for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality. This strategy, called intermittent preventive treatment (IPT, is currently employed for pregnant women and is being studied for infants (IPTi as well. As with any drug-based intervention strategy, it is important to understand how implementation may affect the spread of drug-resistant parasites. This is a difficult issue to address experimentally because of the limited size and duration of IPTi trials as well as the intractability of distinguishing the spread of resistance due to conventional treatment of malaria episodes versus that due to IPTi when the same drug is used in both contexts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a mathematical model, we evaluated the possible impact of treating individuals with antimalarial drugs at regular intervals regardless of their infection status. We translated individual treatment strategies and drug pharmacokinetics into parasite population dynamic effects and show that immunity, treatment rate, drug decay kinetics, and presumptive treatment rate are important factors in the spread of drug-resistant parasites. Our model predicts that partially resistant parasites are more likely to spread in low-transmission areas, but fully resistant parasites are more likely to spread under conditions of high transmission, which is consistent with some epidemiological observations. We were also able to distinguish between spread of resistance due to treatment of symptomatic infections and that due to IPTi. We showed that IPTi could accelerate the spread of resistant parasites, but this effect was only likely to be significant in areas of low or unstable transmission. CONCLUSIONS: The results presented here demonstrate the importance of considering both the half-life of a drug and the existing level

  1. Effects of resveratrol on drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes, implications for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Ariane R; Chow, H-H Sherry; Martinez, Jessica A

    2017-02-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in grape skins and peanuts that has demonstrated many health benefits including protection against aging, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, neurological decline, and cancer. The anticancer properties of resveratrol have been attributed to a variety of mechanisms, including its general inhibition of phase I metabolism and induction of phase II metabolism. The effects of resveratrol on these enzymes, however, are still unclear, as in vitro evidence often contrasts with animal studies and clinical trials. Reasons for these variances could include the low bioavailability of resveratrol and the effects of resveratrol metabolites. Due to resveratrol's interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, individuals concurrently taking pharmacological doses of resveratrol with other supplements or medications could potentially experience nutrient-drug interactions. This review summarizes the known effects of resveratrol and its main metabolites on drug metabolism in order to help characterize which populations might benefit from resveratrol for the prevention of cancer, as well as those that may need to avoid supplementation due to potential drug interactions.

  2. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Fjelbye, Jonas; Zerahn, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight...

  3. Melatonin is as effective as testosterone in the prevention of soleus muscle atrophy induced by castration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, Jale; Oner, Hakan; Sahin, Zeliha; Demir, Ramazan; Ustünel, Ismail

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to compare the weight, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) expression, and ultrastructure of the soleus muscle in growing castrated rats treated with testosterone or melatonin. In this study, adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The groups were arranged as sham, castrated, and testosterone- or melatonin-injected groups after castration. The soleus muscle samples were fixed in Bouin's solution for immunohistochemistry, and in 2.5% gluteraldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Whereas castration reduced the soleus weight and fiber diameter, testosterone and melatonin administration increased them. IGF-I immunostaining observed in the satellite cells and periphery of the myofibers was least intense in the castrated group. Strong staining of IGF-I was observed in the testosterone- and melatonin-administered groups. The ultrastructure of the soleus muscle in castrated animals showed the important ultrastructural modifications related to degeneration. In these groups, degenerative mitochondria, glycogen clusters under the sarcolemma, irregular Z lines, and loss of lamina externa were observed. The ultrastructure of myofibrils in the testosterone- and melatonin-injected groups was similar to that in sham groups in view of structure. In conclusion, we suggest that melatonin is as effective as testosterone in the prevention of atrophy induced by castration through the IGF-I axis.

  4. Drosophila UNC-45 prevents heat-induced aggregation of skeletal muscle myosin and facilitates refolding of citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melkani, Girish C.; Lee, Chi F.; Cammarato, Anthony [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States); Bernstein, Sanford I., E-mail: sbernst@sciences.sdsu.edu [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States)

    2010-05-28

    UNC-45 belongs to the UCS (UNC-45, CRO1, She4p) domain protein family, whose members interact with various classes of myosin. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that Escherichia coli-expressed Drosophila UNC-45 (DUNC-45) maintains the integrity of several substrates during heat-induced stress in vitro. DUNC-45 displays chaperone function in suppressing aggregation of the muscle myosin heavy meromyosin fragment, the myosin S-1 motor domain, {alpha}-lactalbumin and citrate synthase. Biochemical evidence is supported by electron microscopy, which reveals the first structural evidence that DUNC-45 prevents inter- or intra-molecular aggregates of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin caused by elevated temperatures. We also demonstrate for the first time that UNC-45 is able to refold a denatured substrate, urea-unfolded citrate synthase. Overall, this in vitro study provides insight into the fate of muscle myosin under stress conditions and suggests that UNC-45 protects and maintains the contractile machinery during in vivo stress.

  5. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

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    Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

  6. Effects of Community Based Educational Prevention Program of Drug Abuse in Reduction of High Risk Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aranpour

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Overcoming social problems requires a participatory approach. This study was performed in order to determine the effect of community based educational prevention program of drug abuse in reduction of high risk behavior. Methods: This study was a community based participatory research. According to planned approach to community health model, "the health companion group" was established with participation of public representatives of villages, researchers, and managers of health sectors. Need assessment and priority setting of health problems was done. Drug abuse was selected as the topmost priority of health problems. By interviewing 10 year olds and older members of households, the questionnaires were completed. By conducting workshops, distributing educational pamphlets and face to face training for six months, the educational program was carried out. After this period, the study population was interviewed again. Data was analyzed by SPSS software, X2, and T tests. Results: The mean score of drug abuse related high risk behavior was 26.8 +/- 2.05 before educational program and 25.2 ±2.3 after the program. The mean score of psychological health was 26.2±5.8 before educational program and 26.4±5.7 after the program. The rate of negative drug abusing related behavior decreased and positive behavior increased after the educational program. Conclusion: The community based participatory research with participation of the public can be a proper pattern to prevent drug abuse and related high risk behaviors and as a result reduce costs and complications of this problem.

  7. "Drugs and AIDS--reaching for help": a videotape on AIDS and drug abuse prevention for criminal justice populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M; DeJong, W; Lamb, D; Enos, T; Mason, T; Weitzman, E

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the development of a videotape targeted at persons under supervision of the criminal justice system. The videotape seeks to encourage those who use illicit drugs to enter drug treatment and to motivate those at risk for exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to alter behaviors that may transmit infection. The criminal justice system presents an important opportunity to deliver such messages, particularly to a large population of persons briefly detained in a jail or lockup and released without subsequent incarceration. Evidence suggests that, even in this audience, knowledge of how to prevent exposure to HIV is widespread, yet those at risk often fail to take appropriate precautions: motivating behavior change demands more than imparting information. In order to shape this videotape, we analyzed the target audience and developed a drama-based approach that applies the framework of social learning theory, the health belief model, and principles of social marketing. This article describes the integration of that theoretical framework into the production process, content, and strategy of the videotape.

  8. Short-term, daily exposure to cold temperature may be an efficient way to prevent muscle atrophy and bone loss in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Claudia; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    Microgravity induces less pressure on muscle/bone, which is a major reason for muscle atrophy as well as bone loss. Currently, physical exercise is the only countermeasure used consistently in the U.S. human space program to counteract the microgravity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and bone loss. However, the routinely almost daily time commitment is significant and represents a potential risk to the accomplishment of other mission operational tasks. Therefore, development of more efficient exercise programs (with less time) to prevent astronauts from muscle atrophy and bone loss are needed. Consider the two types of muscle contraction: exercising forces muscle contraction and prevents microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss, which is a voluntary response through the motor nervous system; and cold temperature exposure-induced muscle contraction is an involuntary response through the vegetative nervous system, we formed a new hypothesis. The main purpose of this pilot study was to test our hypothesis that exercise at 4 °C is more efficient than at room temperature to prevent microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss and, consequently reduces physical exercise time. Twenty mice were divided into two groups with or without daily short-term (10 min × 2, at 12 h interval) cold temperature (4 °C) exposure for 30 days. The whole bodyweight, muscle strength and bone density were measured after terminating the experiments. The results from the one-month pilot study support our hypothesis and suggest that it would be reasonable to use more mice, in a microgravity environment and observe for a longer period to obtain a conclusion. We believe that the results from such a study will help to develop efficient exercise, which will finally benefit astronauts' heath and NASA's missions.

  9. Patient participation in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drugs - resistance as agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Josabeth; Rudebeck, Carl Edvard

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and explore patient agency through resistance in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drugs in primary care. Six general practitioners from the southeast of Sweden audiorecorded 80 consultations. From these, 28 consultations with proposals from GPs for cardiovascular preventive drug treatments were chosen for theme-oriented discourse analysis. The study shows how patients participate in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drug treatments through resistance in response to treatment proposals. Passive modes of resistance were withheld responses and minimal unmarked acknowledgements. Active modes were to ask questions, contest the address of an inclusive we, present an identity as a non-drugtaker, disclose non-adherence to drug treatments, and to present counterproposals. The active forms were also found in anticipation to treatment proposals from the GPs. Patients and GPs sometimes displayed mutual renouncement of responsibility for decision-making. The decision-making process appeared to expand both beyond a particular phase in the consultations and beyond the single consultation. The recognition of active and passive resistance from patients as one way of exerting agency may prove valuable when working for patient participation in clinical practice, education and research about patient-doctor communication about cardiovascular preventive medication. We propose particular attentiveness to patient agency through anticipatory resistance, patients' disclosures of non-adherence and presentations of themselves as non-drugtakers. The expansion of the decision-making process beyond single encounters points to the importance of continuity of care. KEY POINTS Guidelines recommend shared decision-making about cardiovascular preventive treatment. We need an understanding of how this is accomplished in actual consultations.This paper describes how patient agency in decision-making is displayed through different forms

  10. Nipping cue reactivity in the bud: baclofen prevents limbic activation elicited by subliminal drug cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kimberly A; Franklin, Teresa R; Roberts, David C S; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Suh, Jesse J; Wetherill, Reagan R; Wang, Ze; Kampman, Kyle M; O'Brien, Charles P; Childress, Anna Rose

    2014-04-02

    Relapse is a widely recognized and difficult to treat feature of the addictions. Substantial evidence implicates cue-triggered activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system as an important contributing factor. Even drug cues presented outside of conscious awareness (i.e., subliminally) produce robust activation within this circuitry, indicating the sensitivity and vulnerability of the brain to potentially problematic reward signals. Because pharmacological agents that prevent these early cue-induced responses could play an important role in relapse prevention, we examined whether baclofen-a GABAB receptor agonist that reduces mesolimbic dopamine release and conditioned drug responses in laboratory animals-could inhibit mesolimbic activation elicited by subliminal cocaine cues in cocaine-dependent individuals. Twenty cocaine-dependent participants were randomized to receive baclofen (60 mg/d; 20 mg t.i.d.) or placebo. Event-related BOLD fMRI and a backward-masking paradigm were used to examine the effects of baclofen on subliminal cocaine (vs neutral) cues. Sexual and aversive cues were included to examine specificity. We observed that baclofen-treated participants displayed significantly less activation in response to subliminal cocaine (vs neutral) cues, but not sexual or aversive (vs neutral) cues, than placebo-treated participants in a large interconnected bilateral cluster spanning the ventral striatum, ventral pallidum, amygdala, midbrain, and orbitofrontal cortex (voxel threshold p baclofen may inhibit the earliest type of drug cue-induced motivational processing-that which occurs outside of awareness-before it evolves into a less manageable state.

  11. Prevention of form-deprivation myopia with pirenzepine: a study of drug delivery and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottriall, C L; McBrien, N A; Annies, R; Leech, E M

    1999-07-01

    The present study investigated the drug distribution and elimination profiles in ocular tissues of pirenzepine, a selective M1 muscarinic antagonist known to inhibit myopia. Results demonstrate that (1) Intravitreal injections of the M1 selective antagonist pirenzepine were more effective at preventing form-deprivation myopia than subconjunctival injections. (2) Maximum drug levels were reached within 1 hr for both retina and sclera following intravitreal (28 and 11 nanomole) and subconjunctival (0.25 and 1 nanomole) injection. Intravitreal injection proved a more effective route of drug delivery to all ocular tissues compared to subconjunctival injection. (3) Elimination times of pirenzepine from ocular tissues were much shorter than those reported for blood plasma. (4) Histological examination revealed no evidence of gross toxic effects at doses effective in inhibiting induced axial myopia. In conclusion, pirenzepine was effective at reducing form-deprivation myopia in a dose-dependent manner with no evidence of disruption to the retina. However, results were not conclusive as to where pirenzepine may have its site of action in preventing form-deprivation myopia.

  12. Prevention of Renal Complications Induced by Non- Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ković, Sonja Vuč; Vujović, Katarina Savić; Srebro, Dragana; Medić, Branislava; Ilic-Mostic, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for the treatment of pain, inflamation and fever. They are usually well tolerated in healthy persons, but in patients with risk factors (advanced age, renal impairment, heart failure, liver disease, concurrent medications with antihypertensive drugs), NSAIDs can induce serious renal adverse effects. They include sodium and water retention with edema, worsening of heart failure, hypertension, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal papillary necrosis and acute interstitial nephritis. The majority of these adverse effects are due to the inhibition of prostaglandins synthesis and they are dose and duration-dependent. Acute forms of kidney injuries are transient and often reversible upon drug withdrawal. Chronic use of NSAIDs in some patients may result in chronic kidney disease. It is recommended that patients at risk should have preventative strategies in place, including the use of the "lowest effective dose" of NSAID for the "shortest possible time" and monitoring renal function, fluid retention and electrolyte abnormalities. Patients who are taking antihypertensive medications should be monitored for high blood pressure and the doses of antihypertensive medications should be adjusted if needed. In general, the combination of NSAIDs and angiotensin inhibitors should be avoided. Some other preventive measures are dietary salt restriction, use of topical NSAIDs/non-pharmacological therapies and use of calcium channel blockers for treating hypertension.

  13. HIV prevention for juvenile drug court offenders: a randomized controlled trial focusing on affect management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher; Conrad, Selby M; Tarantino, Nicholas; Stein, L A R; Brown, Larry K

    2011-07-01

    Juvenile drug court (JDC) offenders have benefited from evidence-based interventions addressing antisocial behavior, mental health, and substance use; however, interventions addressing HIV risk behavior are lacking. This study presents pilot findings and lessons learned from a group-based HIV prevention intervention delivered to JDC offenders. Participants were randomized to a five-session HIV prevention (n = 29) or health promotion (n = 28) condition and completed measures of sexual risk taking and substance use at baseline and 3 months postintervention. No between-group differences by time emerged on measures of sexual risk taking or other HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Both groups improved their rates of HIV testing and decreased their substance use during sex over time. Delivering an HIV prevention intervention to drug court offenders is feasible; however, more intensive interventions that incorporate multiple systems and address co-occurring mental health difficulties may be needed to effect sexual behavioral change among these high-risk court-involved youth.

  14. Pharmacoepidemiological analysis of the drugs used for secondary prevention of brain infarction on dispensary stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miheyeva N.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The secondary prevention of cerebral infarction on dispensary stage to current clinical guidelines was analyzed. Adherence of patients to prescribe medications was evaluated. Material and methods. 106 patients of hospital neurologic department with brain infarction were included in prospective pharmacoepidemiological study of the drugs used for secondary prevention of brain infarction on dispensary stage since 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009. Duration of outpatient observation was 3 years. Results. All of the patients were of 64,9 ± 10,3 years old. Hypertension was diagnosed in 102 of them (96.2%, atrial fibrillation — in 33 (31.1% patients. 39 (36.8% patients died during 3 years after discharge from the hospital. ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor antagonist were prescribed for 83 (78.3% patients, antiplatelet- 76 (71,7%, statins — 16 (15,1% patients in discharge from hospital. Warfarin was prescribed only for 1 (3.05% patient with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.consumption of drugs with evidence efficiency were diminished already after one year of observation in outpatient clinics. Conclusion.Therapy for secondary stroke prevention is not fully comply with current clinical guidelines

  15. Prevention of downhill walking-induced muscle damage by non-damaging downhill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    Mountain trekking involves level, uphill, and downhill walking (DW). Prolonged DW induces damage to leg muscles, reducing force generating ability and muscle coordination. These increase risks for more serious injuries and accidents in mountain trekking, thus a strategy to minimize muscle damage is warranted. It has been shown that low-intensity eccentric contractions confer protective effect on muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric contractions. This study tested the hypothesis that 5-min non-damaging DW would attenuate muscle damage induced by 40-min DW, but 5-min level walking (LW) would not. Untrained young men were allocated (n = 12/group) to either a control or one of the two preconditioning groups (PRE-DW or PRE-LW). The PRE-DW and PRE-LW groups performed 5-min DW (-28%) and 5-min LW, respectively, at 5 km/h with a load of 10% body mass, 1 week before 40-min DW (-28%, 5 km/h, 10% load). The control group performed 40-min DW only. Maximal knee extension strength, plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity, and muscle soreness (0-100 mm visual analogue scale) were measured before and 24 h after 5-min DW and 5-min LW, and before and 24, 48, and 72 h after 40-min DW. No significant changes in any variables were evident after 5-min DW and 5-min LW. After 40-min DW, the control and PRE-LW groups showed significant (P<0.05) changes in the variables without significant differences between groups (control vs. PRE-LW; peak strength reduction: -19.2 ± 6.9% vs. -18.7 ± 11.0%, peak CK: 635.5 ± 306.0 vs. 639.6 ± 405.4 U/L, peak soreness: 81.4 ± 14.8 vs. 72.0 ± 29.2 mm). These changes were significantly (P<0.05) attenuated (47-64%) for the PRE-DW group (-9.9 ± 9.6%, 339.3 ± 148.4 U/L, 27.8 ± 16.8 mm). The results supported the hypothesis and suggest that performing small volume of downhill walking is crucial in preparation for trekking.

  16. The Role of Physical Activities with Rub ber Tubes in Preventing Football Players’ Muscle Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Bezugolov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the results of 120 male football players, aged 16-17 (average age is 16,0±0,4 monitoring. Average sporting experience is 9,4±1,2. Depending on trauma preventive measures 2 groups were singled out. The I group was comprised of 60 football players for 2009–2010 seasons, using standard trauma preventive measures. The II group was comprised of 60 football players for 2010–2011 seasons, using the new trauma preventive program. The offered trauma preventive program proved to be the most efficient in hamstring traumas prevention, which often arise as a result of sprints and jumps, typical for football matches.

  17. Australian governments' spending on preventing and responding to drug abuse should target the main sources of drug-related harm and the most cost-effective interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, David

    2011-01-01

    A notable feature of Australian drug policy is the limited public and professional attention given to the financial costs of drug abuse and to the levels and patterns of government expenditures incurred in preventing and responding to this. Since 1991, Collins and Lapsley have published scholarly reports documenting the social costs of drug abuse in Australia and their reports also contain estimates of governments' drug budgets: revenue and expenditures. They show that, in 2004-2005, Australian governments expended at least $5288 million on drug abuse, with 50% of the expenditure directed to preventing and dealing with alcohol-related problems, 45% to illicit drugs and just 5% to tobacco. Some 60% of the expenditure was directed at drug crime and 37% at health interventions. This pattern of resource allocation does not adequately reflect an evidence-informed policy orientation in that it largely fails to focus on the drug types that are the sources of the most harm (tobacco and alcohol rather than illicit drugs), and the sectors for which we have the strongest evidence of the cost-effectiveness of the available interventions (treatment and harm reduction rather than legislation and law enforcement). The 2010-2014 phase of Australia's National Drug Strategy should include incremental changes to the resource allocation mix, and not simply maintain the historical resource allocation formulae.

  18. Experience in resistance training does not prevent reduction in muscle strength evoked by passive static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Andrey J; Silva, José A; Marcolongo, Alessandra A; Manchini, Martha T; Oliveira, João V A; Santos, Luis F N; Rica, Roberta L; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2013-08-01

    This study examined whether passive static stretching reduces the maximum muscle strength achieved by different body segments in untrained and resistance-trained subjects. Twenty adult men were assigned to 1 of the following groups: untrained (UT, N = 9) and resistance-trained (RT, N = 11) groups. The subjects performed six 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load tests of the following exercises: horizontal bench press, lat pull-downs, bicep curls, and 45° leg press. The results achieved in the last two 1RM tests were used for statistical analyses. A passive static stretching program was incorporated before the sixth 1RM test. The body fat content was significantly higher in the UT group compared with the RT group (p stretching (p stretching program was detrimental to upper- and lower-body maximal muscle strength performance in several body segments. The negative effects of stretching were similar for subjects participating in resistance training regimens.

  19. Electromechanical delay of abdominal muscles is modified by low back pain prevention exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpala, Agnieszka; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja; Drapala, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to assess the effect of a 4-week-long training program on selected parameters: electromechanical delay (EMD) and amplitude of electromyographic signal (EMG). Fourteen female students of the University School of Physical Education participated in the study. Torques and surface electromyography were evaluated under static conditions. Surface electrodes were glued to both sides of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles. The 4-week-long program was aimed at strengthening the abdominal muscles and resulted in increased EMD during maximum torque production by flexors of the trunk, increased amplitudes of the signals of the erector spinae ( p = 0.005), and increased EMG amplitude asymmetry of the lower ( p = 0.013) and upper part ( p = 0.006) of the rectus abdominis muscle. In a training program composed of a large number of repetitions of strength exercises, in which the training person uses their own weight as the load (like in exercises such as curl-ups), the process of recruitment of motor units is similar to that found during fatiguing exercises and plyometric training.

  20. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Dai; Wei-Hong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors,are potential agents for the chemoprevention of gastric cancer. Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that NSAID use is associated with a reduced risk of gastric cancer although many questions remain unanswered such as the optimal dose and duration of treatment. The possible mechanisms for the suppressor effect of NSAIDs on carcinogenesis are the ability to induce apoptosis in epithelial cells and regulation of angiogenesis. Both COX-dependent and COX-independent pathways have a role in the biological activity of NSAIDs. Knowledge of how NSAIDs prevent neoplastic growth will greatly aid the design of better chemopreventive drugs and novel treatments for gastric cancer.

  2. A prospective three-step intervention study to prevent medication errors in drug handling in paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Dorothee; Bertsche, Astrid; Meyrath, David; Koepf, Ellen D; Traiser, Carolin; Seebald, Katja; Schmitt, Claus P; Hoffmann, Georg F; Haefeli, Walter E; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    To prevent medication errors in drug handling in a paediatric ward. One in five preventable adverse drug events in hospitalised children is caused by medication errors. Errors in drug prescription have been studied frequently, but data regarding drug handling, including drug preparation and administration, are scarce. A three-step intervention study including monitoring procedure was used to detect and prevent medication errors in drug handling. After approval by the ethics committee, pharmacists monitored drug handling by nurses on an 18-bed paediatric ward in a university hospital prior to and following each intervention step. They also conducted a questionnaire survey aimed at identifying knowledge deficits. Each intervention step targeted different causes of errors. The handout mainly addressed knowledge deficits, the training course addressed errors caused by rule violations and slips, and the reference book addressed knowledge-, memory- and rule-based errors. The number of patients who were subjected to at least one medication error in drug handling decreased from 38/43 (88%) to 25/51 (49%) following the third intervention, and the overall frequency of errors decreased from 527 errors in 581 processes (91%) to 116/441 (26%). The issue of the handout reduced medication errors caused by knowledge deficits regarding, for instance, the correct 'volume of solvent for IV drugs' from 49-25%. Paediatric drug handling is prone to errors. A three-step intervention effectively decreased the high frequency of medication errors by addressing the diversity of their causes. Worldwide, nurses are in charge of drug handling, which constitutes an error-prone but often-neglected step in drug therapy. Detection and prevention of errors in daily routine is necessary for a safe and effective drug therapy. Our three-step intervention reduced errors and is suitable to be tested in other wards and settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Performing Drug Safety Research During Pregnancy and Lactation: Biomedical HIV Prevention Research as a Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Richard H; Noguchi, Lisa; Brown, Gina; Piper, Jeanna; Watts, D Heather

    2016-07-01

    Evidence-based guidance regarding use of nearly all pharmaceuticals by pregnant and lactating women is limited. Models for performing research may assist in filling these knowledge gaps. Internationally, reproductive age women are at high risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Susceptibility to HIV infection may be increased during pregnancy, and risk of maternal-child transmission is increased with incident HIV infection during pregnancy and lactation. A multidisciplinary meeting of experts was convened at the United States National Institutes of Health to consider paradigms for drug research in pregnancy and lactation applicable to HIV prevention. This report summarizes the meeting proceedings and describes a framework for research on candidate HIV prevention agent use during pregnancy and lactation that may also have broader applications to other pharmaceutical products.

  4. Prepsychotic treatment for schizophrenia: preventive medicine, social control, or drug marketing strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, R

    1999-01-01

    The definition of schizophrenia is currently being extended to include a "prepsychotic" phase. Prepsychosis detection and intervention programs have already been established in Australia. These are intended to identify people "at-risk" for schizophrenia and treat them to prevent their transition into psychosis. However, analysis of leading research in this field shows high levels of arbitrariness in the selection of diagnostic indicators and a lack of convincing evidence about the efficacy of treatments. The favored prophylactic treatment is atypical neuroleptic medication, and sponsorship of research is providing manufacturers of these drugs with a ubiquitous presence in the field. Many risks are associated with atypical neuroleptics and adverse reactions include psychosis. Taken together these factors suggest that prepsychotic intervention may be more concerned with expanding the market for atypical neuroleptics than with preventing schizophrenia.

  5. Constructing Clinical Decision Support Systems for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: A Knowledge-based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Collyda, Chrysa; Chazard, Emmanuel; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Regis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-11-13

    A knowledge-based approach is proposed that is employed for the construction of a framework suitable for the management and effective use of knowledge on Adverse Drug Event (ADE) prevention. The framework has as its core part a Knowledge Base (KB) comprised of rule-based knowledge sources, that is accompanied by the necessary inference and query mechanisms to provide healthcare professionals and patients with decision support services in clinical practice, in terms of alerts and recommendations on preventable ADEs. The relevant Knowledge Based System (KBS) is developed in the context of the EU-funded research project PSIP (Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in Medication). In the current paper, we present the foundations of the framework, its knowledge model and KB structure, as well as recent progress as regards the population of the KB, the implementation of the KBS, and results on the KBS verification in decision support operation.

  6. Utility of NBD-Cl for the spectrophotometric determination of some skeletal muscle relaxant and antihistaminic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Hanaa M.; EL-Henawee, Magda M.; Ragab, Gamal H.; El-Hay, Soad S. Abd

    2007-08-01

    A simple, accurate, precise and sensitive colorimetric method for the determination of some skeletal muscle relaxant drugs, namely orphenadrine citrate ( I), baclofen ( II), antihistaminic drugs as acrivastine ( III) and fexofenadine hydrochloride ( IV) is described. This method is based on the formation of charge transfer complex with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) in non-aqueous medium. The orange color products were measured at 472, 465, 475 and 469 nm for drugs I, II, III and IV, respectively. The optimization of various experimental conditions was described. Beer's Law was obeyed in the range (2.5-17.5), (5-70), (2.5-25) and (10-50) μg/ml for drugs I, II, III and IV, respectively. The molar absorptivity ( ɛ), sandell sensitivity, detection (LOD) and quantitation limits (LOQ) are calculated. The procedure was favorably applied for determination of certain pharmaceutical dosage forms containing the studied drugs. The obtained results were compared with the official and reported methods. There were no significant differences between proposed, reported and the official methods.

  7. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pyelonephritis with sepsis, renal damage in young children, pre-term birth, and complications of frequent antimicrobial use including high-level antibiotic resistance and Clostridium difficile colitis. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of UTI, but less common pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis and other enterococci frequently take advantage of an abnormal or catheterized urinary tract to cause opportunistic infections. While antibiotic therapy has historically been very successful in controlling UTI, the high rate of recurrence remains a major problem, and many individuals suffer from chronically recurring UTI, requiring long-term prophylactic antibiotic regimens to prevent recurrent UTI. Furthermore, the global emergence of multi-drug resistant UPEC in the past ten years spotlights the need for alternative therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat UTI, including anti-infective drug therapies and vaccines. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the identification of promising drug and vaccine targets. We then discuss the development of new UTI drugs and vaccines, highlighting the challenges these approaches face and the need for a greater understanding of urinary tract mucosal immunity. PMID:26999391

  8. Low muscle glycogen and elevated plasma free fatty acid modify but do not prevent exercise-induced PDH activation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Gudmundsson, Mikkel; Birk, Jesper Bratz;

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Test the hypothesis that FFA and muscle glycogen modify exercise-induced regulation of PDH in human skeletal muscle through regulation of PDK4 expression. Research Design and Methods: On two occasions, healthy male subjects lowered (by exercise) muscle glycogen in one leg (LOW) relativ...

  9. Assessing the availability of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin outside the pregnancy prevention programme : a survey of e-pharmacies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagan, Briege M.; Dolk, Helen; White, Bronagh; Uges, Donald R. A.; Sinclair, M.

    2014-01-01

    PurposeThe increase in online purchasing of medications raises safety concerns regarding teratogenic drugs. The use of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin' for women of childbearing age requires strict adherence to the Pregnancy Prevention Programme (PPP), a risk minimisation measure imposed on prescr

  10. Expanding Urban American Indian Youths' Repertoire of Drug Resistance Skills: Pilot Results from a Culturally Adapted Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Stephen; Dustman, Patricia A.; Brown, Eddie F.; Martinez, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    This article examines changes in the drug resistance strategies used by urban American Indian (UAI) middle school students during a pilot test of a substance use prevention curriculum designed specifically for UAI youth, "Living in 2 Worlds" (L2W). L2W teaches four drug resistance strategies (refuse, explain, avoid, leave [R-E-A-L]) in…

  11. [Mydeton: a centrally acting muscle relaxant drug from Gedeon Richter LTD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Pál; Tarnawa, István; Kovács, Gyula; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Farkas, Sándor

    2002-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1959 tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydeton) is still one of the leading products of Gedeon Richter Ltd. It has been successfully applied for treating different painful muscle spasms. The compound is successfully marketed also by several foreign, mostly Japanese, pharmaceutical companies, as a central muscle relaxant agent. The present summary overviews the pharmacology of tolperisone, with special emphasize on its still partly understood way of action. Data from the scientific literature as well as our own experimental results strongly support the hypothesis that inhibition of voltage gated sodium channels is a major component of the mechanism of action of tolperisone. The paper also summarizes the clinical results with tolperisone and the perspectives of the therapeutic use of centrally acting muscle relaxants.

  12. Overexpression of Galgt2 in skeletal muscle prevents injury resulting from eccentric contractions in both mdx and wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul T; Xu, Rui; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Oglesbay, Elaine; Camboni, Marybeth; Montgomery, Chrystal L; Shontz, Kim; Chicoine, Louis G; Clark, K Reed; Sahenk, Zarife; Mendell, Jerry R; Janssen, Paul M L

    2009-03-01

    The cytotoxic T cell (CT) GalNAc transferase, or Galgt2, is a UDP-GalNAc:beta1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase that is localized to the neuromuscular synapse in adult skeletal muscle, where it creates the synaptic CT carbohydrate antigen {GalNAcbeta1,4[NeuAc(orGc)alpha2, 3]Galbeta1,4GlcNAcbeta-}. Overexpression of Galgt2 in the skeletal muscles of transgenic mice inhibits the development of muscular dystrophy in mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we provide physiological evidence as to how Galgt2 may inhibit the development of muscle pathology in mdx animals. Both Galgt2 transgenic wild-type and mdx skeletal muscles showed a marked improvement in normalized isometric force during repetitive eccentric contractions relative to nontransgenic littermates, even using a paradigm where nontransgenic muscles had force reductions of 95% or more. Muscles from Galgt2 transgenic mice, however, showed a significant decrement in normalized specific force and in hindlimb and forelimb grip strength at some ages. Overexpression of Galgt2 in muscles of young adult mdx mice, where Galgt2 has no effect on muscle size, also caused a significant decrease in force drop during eccentric contractions and increased normalized specific force. A comparison of Galgt2 and microdystrophin overexpression using a therapeutically relevant intravascular gene delivery protocol showed Galgt2 was as effective as microdystrophin at preventing loss of force during eccentric contractions. These experiments provide a mechanism to explain why Galgt2 overexpression inhibits muscular dystrophy in mdx muscles. That overexpression also prevents loss of force in nondystrophic muscles suggests that Galgt2 is a therapeutic target with broad potential applications.

  13. Injection drug use and HIV/AIDS in China: Review of current situation, prevention and policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huey T

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Illicit drug abuse and HIV/AIDS have increased rapidly in the past 10 to 20 years in China. This paper reviews drug abuse in China, the HIV/AIDS epidemic and its association with injection drug use (IDU, and Chinese policies on illicit drug abuse and prevention of HIV/AIDS based on published literature and unpublished official data. As a major drug trans-shipment country with source drugs from the "Golden Triangle" and "Gold Crescent" areas in Asia, China has also become an increasingly important drug consuming market. About half of China's 1.14 million documented drug users inject, and many share needles. IDU has contributed to 42% of cumulatively reported HIV/AIDS cases thus far. Drug trafficking is illegal in China and can lead to the death penalty. The public security departments adopt "zero tolerance" approach to drug use, which conflict with harm reduction policies of the public health departments. Past experience in China suggests that cracking down on drug smuggling and prohibiting drug use alone can not prevent or solve all illicit drug related problems in the era of globalization. In recent years, the central government has outlined a series of pragmatic policies to encourage harm reduction programs; meanwhile, some local governments have not fully mobilized to deal with drug abuse and HIV/AIDS problems seriously. Strengthening government leadership at both central and local levels; scaling up methadone substitution and needle exchange programs; making HIV voluntary counseling and testing available and affordable to both urban and rural drug users; and increasing utilization of outreach and nongovernmental organizations are offered as additional strategies to help cope with China's HIV and drug abuse problem.

  14. Efficacy and safety of polaprezinc as a preventive drug for radiation-induced stomatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Tsuboi, Keita; Nakao, Norio [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Irie, Miwa [Takarazuka Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Izumi, Masayuki [Minamiosaka Total Health Care Center, Osaka (Japan); Irie, Toshihiko; Fujisawa, Hiromi; Muro, Chikaaki [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan). Hospital

    2002-03-01

    Radiation-induced stomatitis is one of the adverse effects of total body irradiation (TBI). We examined the usefulness of oral polaprezinc as a preventive drug for stomatitis. The present study was conducted with 19 patients who were diagnosed with hematologic malignancy and who underwent TBI as pretreatment for bone marrow transplantation, peripheral blood stem transplantation, or cord blood stem cell transplantation. Eleven patients ingested the suspension of polaprezinc and 2% carmellose sodium (carboxymethylcellulose sodium: CMC) beginning the day before TBI (P-CMC group), while the other eight patients did not ingest P-CMC (control group). The severity of stomatitis was assessed in each group during a four-weeks period. Stomatitis (Grade:{>=}3) developed in one of 11 patients in the polaprezinc group and in 4 of 8 patients in the control group (P=0.046). The times at which stomatitis development ranged between weeks 1 and 2 after the onset of TBI in the two groups. No adverse reaction owing to the ingestion of P-CMC was observed. These results suggested the efficacy and safety of polaprezinc as a preventive drug for radiation-induced stomatitis. (author)

  15. Pathogenesis of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Gastropathy: Clues to Preventative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim MA Bastaki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulceration and bleeding are major impediments to the chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The development of effective therapies for prevention of these adverse effects requires better understanding of their pathogenesis. Several features of NSAIDs contribute to the development of damage in the stomach, including the topical irritant effects of these drugs on the epithelium, impairment of the barrier properties of the mucosa, suppression of gastric prostaglandin synthesis, reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow and interference with the repair of superficial injury. The presence of acid in the lumen of the stomach also contributes to the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced ulcers and bleeding in a number of ways. Acid impairs the restitution process, interferes with hemostasis and can inactivate several growth factors that are important in mucosal integrity and repair. Profound suppression of gastric acid secretion has been shown to be effective in preventing NSAID-induced ulceration. There is a strong possibility that new NSAIDs entering the market will have greatly reduced toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Targeting skeletal muscle mitochondria to prevent type 2 diabetes in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Joseph W; Dolinsky, Vernon W; Mughal, Wajihah; Gordon, Grant R J; McGavock, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has increased dramatically over the past two decades, not only among adults but also among adolescents. T2D is a systemic disorder affecting every organ system and is especially damaging to the cardiovascular system, predisposing individuals to severe cardiac and vascular complications. The precise mechanisms that cause T2D are an area of active research. Most current theories suggest that the process begins with peripheral insulin resistance that precedes failure of the pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient insulin to maintain normoglycemia. A growing body of literature has highlighted multiple aspects of mitochondrial function, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid homeostasis, and mitochondrial quality control in the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Whether the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance in adults are comparable to that in adolescents remains unclear. This review will summarize both clinical and basic studies that shed light on how alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial function contribute to whole body insulin resistance and will discuss the evidence supporting high-intensity exercise training as a therapy to circumvent skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction to restore insulin sensitivity in both adults and adolescents.

  17. WHO guidance on the prevention of viral hepatitis B and C among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nick; Verster, Annette; Rodolph, Michelle; Akl, Elie A

    2014-05-01

    Viral hepatitis B and C (HBV, HCV) disproportionately affect people who inject drugs (PWID) across the world. To date there has been little global action focusing on prevention, care and treatment of HBV and HCV among PWID. Here we report on the development process and discuss the implications of evidence informed WHO Guidelines for the Prevention of HBV and HCV in PWID. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Guideline Development Panel to develop recommendations on the prevention of HBV and HCV among PWID. The process followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. It included the development of PICO (Population, Interventions, Comparator, Outcomes) questions and conducting systematic reviews. Quality of evidence was classified into 4 levels: high, moderate, low, and very low. In the process of moving from evidence to recommendations, the following were considered: quality of evidence, balance of benefits and harms, community values and preferences and resource use. The WHO recommendations include the following for working with PWID: offer the rapid HBV vaccination regimen; offer incentives to increase uptake and completion of the HBV vaccine schedule; needle and syringe programs should also provide low dead-space syringes for distribution; and offer peer interventions to reduce the incidence of viral hepatitis. This guideline complements other WHO documents regarding PWID, including HIV prevention initiatives such as needle and syringe programs and opioid substitution therapy. This guidance offers a first step in the prevention of HBV and HCV among PWID. However, the lack of high quality evidence in this area necessitates further research and resources for implementation.

  18. Actovegin, a non-prohibited drug increases oxidative capacity in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Stine D; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn W

    2016-01-01

    skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial adaptations like this are also seen after a training program in human subjects. Whether this improvement translates into an ergogenic effect in athletes and thus reiterates the need to include Actovegin on the World Anti-Doping Agency's active list remains to be investigated....

  19. Drug Checking: A prevention measure for a heterogeneous group with high consumption frequency and polydrug use - evaluation of zurich's drug checking services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaub Michael

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing party culture in Zurich presents new challenges, especially regarding the consumption of alcohol and so-called party drugs. Streetwork, the youth advisory service of the city of Zurich, has provided onsite and stationary Drug Checking facilities since 2001 and 2006, respectively. Drug Checking always involves filling out an anonymous questionnaire, which allows the collection of important information about a largely unknown group of users and their consumption patterns. Methods The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, consumption patterns, Drug Checking experiences, information behavior and social support. The collected data were statistically analyzed by the Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction (RIPHA. Results The majority of Drug Checking service patrons were male and between 20 and 35 years old. These patrons reported high lifetime prevalences and high consumption frequencies of legal and illegal substances, and they often reported polydrug use. Aside from tobacco and alcohol, the most consumed drugs during typical party nights were ecstasy, amphetamines, cannabis and cocaine. Party drug consumers using Drug Checking services form a heterogeneous group with respect to sociodemographic characteristics and consumption patterns. Users of the onsite Drug Checking facilities were significantly younger, were less experienced with drug testing, and reported more polydrug use than users of the stationary Drug Checking service. Conclusions Drug Checking combined with a consultation appears to be an important harm reduction and prevention measure that reaches a group of consumers with high consumption frequency and polydrug use. Because of the heterogeneity of the target group, different prevention measures must be offered and embedded in an overall local concept.

  20. Genetic ablation of cyclophilin D rescues mitochondrial defects and prevents muscle apoptosis in collagen VI myopathic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elena; Tiepolo, Tania; Angelin, Alessia; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Maraldi, Nadir M; Basso, Emy; Forte, Michael A; Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy are inherited muscle disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI (ColVI). Mice lacking ColVI (Col6a1(-/-)) display a myopathic phenotype associated with ultrastructural alterations of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial dysfunction with abnormal opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and increased apoptosis of muscle fibers. Treatment with cyclosporin (Cs) A, a drug that desensitizes the PTP by binding to cyclophilin (Cyp)-D, was shown to rescue myofiber alterations in Col6a1(-/-) mice and in UCMD patients, suggesting a correlation between PTP opening and pathogenesis of ColVI muscular dystrophies. Here, we show that inactivation of the gene encoding for Cyp-D rescues the disease phenotype of ColVI deficiency. In the absence of Cyp-D, Col6a1(-/-) mice show negligible myofiber degeneration, rescue from mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural defects, and normalized incidence of apoptosis. These findings (i) demonstrate that lack of Cyp-D is equivalent to its inhibition with CsA at curing the mouse dystrophic phenotype; (ii) establish a cause-effect relationship between Cyp-D-dependent PTP regulation and pathogenesis of the ColVI muscular dystrophy and (iii) validate Cyp-D and the PTP as pharmacological targets for the therapy of human ColVI myopathies.

  1. Did we get our money's worth? Bridging economic and behavioral measures of program success in adolescent drug prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kevin N; Scheier, Lawrence M

    2013-11-08

    The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been paralleled by increased interest in demonstrating that drug prevention programs net tangible benefits to society. One pressing concern is precisely how to integrate traditional scientific methods of program evaluation with economic measures of "cost efficiency". The languages and methods of each respective discipline don't necessarily converge on how to establish the true benefits of drug prevention. This article serves as a primer for conducting economic analyses of school-based drug prevention programs. The article provides the reader with a foundation in the relevant principles, methodologies, and benefits related to conducting economic analysis. Discussion revolves around how economists value the potential costs and benefits, both financial and personal, from implementing school-based drug prevention programs targeting youth. Application of heterogeneous costing methods coupled with widely divergent program evaluation findings influences the feasibility of these techniques and may hinder utilization of these practices. Determination of cost-efficiency should undoubtedly become one of several markers of program success and contribute to the ongoing debate over health policy.

  2. Did We Get Our Money’s Worth? Bridging Economic and Behavioral Measures of Program Success in Adolescent Drug Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M. Scheier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been paralleled by increased interest in demonstrating that drug prevention programs net tangible benefits to society. One pressing concern is precisely how to integrate traditional scientific methods of program evaluation with economic measures of “cost efficiency”. The languages and methods of each respective discipline don’t necessarily converge on how to establish the true benefits of drug prevention. This article serves as a primer for conducting economic analyses of school-based drug prevention programs. The article provides the reader with a foundation in the relevant principles, methodologies, and benefits related to conducting economic analysis. Discussion revolves around how economists value the potential costs and benefits, both financial and personal, from implementing school-based drug prevention programs targeting youth. Application of heterogeneous costing methods coupled with widely divergent program evaluation findings influences the feasibility of these techniques and may hinder utilization of these practices. Determination of cost-efficiency should undoubtedly become one of several markers of program success and contribute to the ongoing debate over health policy.

  3. Cinnamomum cassia Prevents High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice through the Increase of Muscle Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi Young; Kang, Seok Yong; Kang, Anna; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Yong-Ki; Jung, Hyo Won

    2017-01-01

    The cortex of Cinnamomum cassia Presl (Cinnamomi Cortex: CC) has commonly been used for weight control in traditional medicines, but without a scientific basis. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the anti-obesity effect of CC extract in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mouse model and in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD for 16 consecutive weeks, and orally administered CC extract (100 or 300[Formula: see text]mg/kg) or metformin (250[Formula: see text]mg/kg; positive control) daily for 16 weeks. CC extract administration significantly decreased body weights, food intakes, and serum levels of glucose, insulin, total cholesterol and ALT levels, prevented oral glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, inhibited the protein expressions of MyHC and PGC1[Formula: see text] and the phosphorylation of AMPK, suppressed lipid accumulation in liver, decreased adipocyte size and increased muscle mass in obese mice. For this in vitro study, C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into the myotubes for five days, and then treated with CC extract (0.1 or 0.2[Formula: see text]mg/ml) for 24[Formula: see text]h. CC extract significantly increased ATP levels by increasing the mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis-related factors, such as, PGC1[Formula: see text], NRF-1, and Tfam, and the phosphorylations of AMPK and ACC. Our results suggest CC extract controls weight gain in obese mice by inhibiting lipid accumulation and increasing energy expenditure, and that its action mechanism involves the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle cells.

  4. Diapocynin, a dimer of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, reduces ROS production and prevents force loss in eccentrically contracting dystrophic muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M Ismail

    Full Text Available Elevation of intracellular Ca2+, excessive ROS production and increased phospholipase A2 activity contribute to the pathology in dystrophin-deficient muscle. Moreover, Ca2+, ROS and phospholipase A2, in particular iPLA2, are thought to potentiate each other in positive feedback loops. NADPH oxidases (NOX have been considered as a major source of ROS in muscle and have been reported to be overexpressed in muscles of mdx mice. We report here on our investigations regarding the effect of diapocynin, a dimer of the commonly used NOX inhibitor apocynin, on the activity of iPLA2, Ca2+ handling and ROS generation in dystrophic myotubes. We also examined the effects of diapocynin on force production and recovery ability of isolated EDL muscles exposed to eccentric contractions in vitro, a damaging procedure to which dystrophic muscle is extremely sensitive. In dystrophic myotubes, diapocynin inhibited ROS production, abolished iPLA2 activity and reduced Ca2+ influx through stretch-activated and store-operated channels, two major pathways responsible for excessive Ca2+ entry in dystrophic muscle. Diapocynin also prevented force loss induced by eccentric contractions of mdx muscle close to the value of wild-type muscle and reduced membrane damage as seen by Procion orange dye uptake. These findings support the central role played by NOX-ROS in the pathogenic cascade leading to muscular dystrophy and suggest diapocynin as an effective NOX inhibitor that might be helpful for future therapeutic approaches.

  5. Economic impact of prescribing error prevention with computerized physician order entry of injectable antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerich, V; Borg, C; Villanueva, C; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Helias, P; Rohrlich, P-S; Demarchi, M; Pivot, X; Limat, S

    2013-03-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was carried out to determine the potential economic costs and benefits of pharmaceutical analysis in preventing prescribing errors for full standardized injectable antineoplastic drugs computerized physician order entry, in a pharmaceutical unit (University teaching hospital), compared with theoretical setting with no pharmaceutical analysis. The viewpoint is that of the payer or the French national Public Health Insurance system, and is limited to hospital cost (only direct medical costs related to net cost and net benefit. A decision analysis model was performed to compare two strategies: with pharmaceutical analysis (± pharmacy intervention) and without pharmaceutical analysis. are expressed in terms of benefit-to-cost ratio and total benefit. The robustness of the results was assessed through a series of one-way sensitivity analyses. Over 1 year, prescribing error incidence was estimated at 1.5% [1.3-1.7], i.e. 218 avoided prescribing errors. Potential avoidance of hospital stay was estimated at 419 days or 1.9 ± 0.3 days per prescribing error. Cost-benefit analysis could estimate a net benefit-to-cost ratio of 33.3 (€17.34/€0.52) and a total benefit at €16.82 per pharmaceutical analysis or €249,844 per year. The sensitivity analysis showed robustness of results. Our study shows a substantial economic benefit of pharmaceutical analysis and intervention in the prevention of prescribing errors. The clinical pharmacist adds both value and economic benefit, making it possible to avoid additional use of expensive antineoplastic drugs and hospitalization. Computerized physician order entry of antineoplastic drugs improves the relevance of clinical pharmacist interventions, expanding pharmaceutical analysis and also the role of the pharmacist.

  6. HIV Prevention Intervention Outcome among Minority Adolescents in Court Mandated Drug Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy Devieux

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Delinquent adolescents with substance abuse disorders frequently engage in behaviors that elevate their risk of contracting HIV. Although effective risk reduction interventions are urgently needed, there is uncertainty about the nature of interventions required to produce change. Approach:This study evaluated whether Modified version of Becoming A Responsible Teen (M-BART produced greater reductions in drug use and sexual risk behaviors than an Anger Management (AM condition among a mixed gender, culturally diverse sample of adolescents in court-ordered substance dependence treatment. Results: No significant differences were found between M-BART (n = 70 and AM (n = 59 groups in degree of change between intake and outcome in HIV sex risk or drug use behaviors. However, across groups, meaningful reductions were found in total number of sex partners and in proportions of total unprotected sex acts, unprotected vaginal sex, unprotected oral giving sex acts and unprotected oral receiving sex acts from baseline to follow-up (all p’s Conclusion: Factors that accounted for meaningful changes across groups and no change between intervention outcomes were discussed. While the M-BART intervention impacted the adolescents directly by teaching skills about how to reduce risky sex, the AM intervention and also impacted higher order factor, impulsivity, linked to risky sex and drug use. Implications for HIV prevention among minority adolescents were discussed.

  7. Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph T; Baker, Philip R A; Minett, Geoffrey M; Bieuzen, Francois; Stewart, Ian B; Bleakley, Chris

    2015-09-18

    Recovery strategies are often used with the intention of preventing or minimising muscle soreness after exercise. Whole-body cryotherapy, which involves a single or repeated exposure(s) to extremely cold dry air (below -100 °C) in a specialised chamber or cabin for two to four minutes per exposure, is currently being advocated as an effective intervention to reduce muscle soreness after exercise. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the British Nursing Index and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. We also searched the reference lists of articles, trial registers and conference proceedings, handsearched journals and contacted experts.The searches were run in August 2015. We aimed to include randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compared the use of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) versus a passive or control intervention (rest, no treatment or placebo treatment) or active interventions including cold or contrast water immersion, active recovery and infrared therapy for preventing or treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We also aimed to include randomised trials that compared different durations or dosages of WBC. Our prespecified primary outcomes were muscle soreness, subjective recovery (e.g. tiredness, well-being) and adverse effects. Two review authors independently screened search results, selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted and cross-checked data. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials. The random-effects model was used for pooling where there was substantial heterogeneity. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Four laboratory-based randomised controlled trials were included. These reported results for 64

  8. Superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-134 prevents diaphragm muscle weakness in monocrotalin-induced pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebayashi, Daisuke; Lee, Jaesik; Westerblad, Håkan; Lanner, Johanna T.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) suffer from inspiratory insufficiency, which has been associated with intrinsic contractile dysfunction in diaphragm muscle. Here, we examined the role of redox stress in PH-induced diaphragm weakness by using the novel antioxidant, EUK-134. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CNT), CNT + EUK-134 (CNT + EUK), monocrotaline-induced PH (PH), and PH + EUK groups. PH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg body weight). EUK-134 (3 mg/kg body weight/day), a cell permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, was daily intraperitoneally administered starting one day after induction of PH. After four weeks, diaphragm muscles were excised for mechanical and biochemical analyses. There was a decrease in specific tetanic force in diaphragm bundles from the PH group, which was accompanied by increases in: protein expression of NADPH oxidase 2/gp91phox, SOD2, and catalase; 3-nitrotyrosine content and aggregation of actin; glutathione oxidation. Treatment with EUK-134 prevented the force decrease and the actin modifications in PH diaphragm bundles. These data show that redox stress plays a pivotal role in PH-induced diaphragm weakness. Thus, antioxidant treatment can be a promising strategy for PH patients with inspiratory failure. PMID:28152009

  9. Focal muscle vibration as a possible intervention to prevent falls in elderly women: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Fattorini, Luigi; Camerota, Filippo; Ricciardi, Diego; La Torre, Giuseppe; Landi, Francesco; Filippi, Guido Maria

    2015-12-01

    Different and new approaches have been proposed to prevent the risk of falling of elderly people, particularly women. This study investigates the possibility that a new protocol based on the focal mechanical muscle vibration may reduce the risk of falling of elderly women. A pragmatic randomized controlled triple-blind trial with a 6-month follow-up after intervention randomized 350 women (mean age 73.4 years + 3.11), members of local senior citizen centers in Rome, into two groups: vibrated group (VG) and control group (CG). For VG participants a mechanical vibration (lasting 10 min) was focally applied on voluntary contracted quadriceps muscles, three times a day during three consecutive days. CG subjects received a placebo vibratory stimulation. Subjects were tested immediately before (T0) and 30 (T1) and 180 (T2) days after the intervention with the Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA) test. All subjects were asked not to change their lifestyle during the study. CG underwent sham vibratory treatment. While CG did not show any statistically significant change of POMA at T1 and T2, VG revealed significant differences. At T2, ≈47% of the subjects who completed the study obtained the full score on the POMA test and ≈59% reached the full POMA score. The new protocol seems to be promising in reducing the risk of falling of elderly subjects.

  10. The Design and Screening of Drugs to Prevent Acquired Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Sheehan, Kelly E; Kaur, Tejbeer; Ramkumar, Vickram; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheth, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sensorineural hearing loss affects a high percentage of the population. Ototoxicity is a serious and pervasive problem in patients treated with cisplatin. Strategies to ameliorate ototoxicity without compromising on antitumor activity of treatments are urgently needed. Similar problems occur with aminoglycoside antibiotic therapy for infections. Noise-induced hearing loss affects a large number of people. The use of ear protection is not always possible or effective. The prevention of hearing loss with drug therapy would have a huge impact in reducing the number of persons with hearing loss from these major causes. Areas covered This review discusses significant research findings dealing with the use of protective agents against hearing loss caused by cisplatin, aminoglycoside antibiotics and noise trauma. The efficacy in animal studies and the application of these protective agents in clinical trials that are ongoing are presented. Expert opinion The reader will gain new insights into current and projected future strategies to prevent sensorineural hearing loss from cisplatin chemotherapy, aminoglycoside antibiotic therapy and noise exposure. The future appears to offer numerous agents to prevent hearing loss caused by cisplatin, aminoglycoside antibiotics and noise. Novel delivery systems will provide ways to guide these protective agents to the desired target areas in the inner ear and will circumvent problems with therapeutic interference of anti-tumor and antibiotics agents and will minimize undesired side effects. PMID:22646075

  11. Temporalis Muscle Transfer for the Treatment of Lagophthalmos in Patients With Leprosy: Refinement in Surgical Techniques to Prevent Postoperative Ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Yul; Park, Hyang Joon; Kim, Jong Pill; Park, Tae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Facial paralysis resulting from leprosy has a serious impact on the entire face especially in the areas innervated by the facial nerves. In particular, lagophthalmos in patients with leprosy causes exposure keratitis, corneal, and conjunctival dryness, which can progress to blindness and disfigurement. Recently, we conducted 4 different temporalis muscle transfer (TMT) methods over the last 4 years to reduce ptosis. The methods used included Brown-McDowell, McCord-Codner, modified Gillies-Anderson, and modified Gillies. Seventy-five TMT operations in 60 patients were performed between 2011 and 2014. The mean age was 70.1. Fifteen patients had bilateral TMT procedures. As a result, ptosis appeared in 14(18.7%) of 75 TMT procedures for 4 years. To prevent or correct this complication, the following 4 technical refinements have simplified the surgery and yield better surgical outcomes. First, an increase in the length of the temporalis muscle flap to approximately 8 cm with a parallel course to the lateral canthus will reduce oblique pull. Second, the width of the fascia sling in the upper eyelid is narrowed (3-4 mm) to reduce weight on the eyelid. Third, the fascia sling in the upper lid should not be located along the full length of the upper lid but terminate 3.5 cm medial to lateral canthal tendon and in other words, should not be tied at the medial canthal tendon to reduce tension and weight. Lastly, the fascia sling in the eyelid should be located shallow (probably in subdermal layer) and as near as possible to the lid margin to prevent any functional disturbance in levator aponeurosis.

  12. In vascular smooth muscle cells paricalcitol prevents phosphate-induced Wnt/β-catenin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Herencia, Carmen; Oca, Addy Montes de; Estepa, Jose C; Canalejo, Rocio; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodríguez, Mariano; Almadén, Yolanda

    2012-10-15

    The present study investigates the differential effect of two vitamin D receptor agonists, calcitriol and paricalcitol, on human aortic smooth muscle cells calcification in vitro. Human vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated in a high phosphate (HP) medium alone or supplemented with either calcitriol 10(-8)M (HP + CTR) or paricalcitol 3·10(-8) M (HP + PC). HP medium induced calcification, which was associated with the upregulation of mRNA expression of osteogenic factors such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), Runx2/Cbfa1, Msx2, and osteocalcin. In these cells, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was evidenced by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus and the increase in the expression of direct target genes as cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN/versican. Addition of calcitriol to HP medium (HP + CTR) further increased calcification and also enhanced the expression of osteogenic factors together with a significant elevation of nuclear β-catenin levels and the expression of cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN. By contrast, the addition of paricalcitol (HP + PC) not only reduced calcification but also downregulated the expression of BMP2 and other osteoblastic phenotype markers as well as the levels of nuclear β-catenin and the expression of its target genes. The role of Wnt/β-catenin on phosphate- and calcitriol-induced calcification was further demonstrated by the inhibition of calcification after addition of Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1), a specific natural antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the differential effect of calcitriol and paricalcitol on vascular calcification appears to be mediated by a distinct regulation of the BMP and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use Hurts Kids Drug Use Hurts Unborn Children Drug Use Hurts Your Health Drug Use Hurts ... Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Prevent Drug Use Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids ...

  14. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  15. Prevention des Toxicomanies Aupres des Filles avec des Problemes de Comportement: Effets a Court Terme (Prevention of Drug Addiction in Girls with Behavior Problems: Short-Term Effects).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaro, Frank; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This article, written in French, describes and evaluates the first phase of a program to prevent drug addiction among 110 fifth-grade girls with behavior problems in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). Evaluation of the instructional program showed positive results for student knowledge level, attitudes, and behaviors and supported program continuation…

  16. Prevention des Toxicomanies Aupres des Filles avec des Problemes de Comportement: Effets a Court Terme (Prevention of Drug Addiction in Girls with Behavior Problems: Short-Term Effects).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaro, Frank; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This article, written in French, describes and evaluates the first phase of a program to prevent drug addiction among 110 fifth-grade girls with behavior problems in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). Evaluation of the instructional program showed positive results for student knowledge level, attitudes, and behaviors and supported program continuation…

  17. To Compare the Effect of Vibration Therapy and Massage in Prevention of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiyaz, Shagufta; Veqar, Zubia; Shareef, M Y

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effects of vibration therapy and massage in prevention of DOMS. Pre-test and Post-test Control-Group Design was used, 45 healthy female non athletic Subjects were recruited and randomly distributed to the three groups (15 subject in each group). After the subject's initial status was measured experimental groups received vibration therapy (50 Hz vibration for five minutes) or massage therapy (15 minutes) intervention and control group received no treatment, just prior to the eccentric exercise. Subjects were undergoing the following measurements to evaluate the changes in the muscle condition: muscle soreness (pain perception), Range of Motion (ROM), Maximum Isometric Force (MIF), Repetition maximum (RM), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and Cretain Kinase (CK) level. All the parameters except LDH, CK and 1RM were measured before, immediately post intervention, immediately post exercise, 24 hours post exercise, 48 hours post exercise and 72 hours post exercise. LDH, CK and 1 RM were measured before and 48 hours post exercise. Muscle soreness was reported to be significantly less for experimental (vibration and massage) group (p=0.000) as compared to control group at 24, 48, and 72 hours of post-exercise. Experimental and control group did not show any significant difference in MIF immediate (p=0.2898), 24 hours (p=0.4173), 48 hours (p=0.752) and 72 hours (p=0.5297) of post-exercise. Range of motion demonstrated significant recovery in experimental groups in 48 hours (p=0.0016) and 72 hours (p=0.0463). Massage therapy showed significant recovery in 1RM (p=0.000) compared to control group and vibration therapy shows significantly less LDH level (p=0.000) 48 hours of post exercise compare to control group. CK at 48 hours of post exercise in vibration group (p=0.000) and massage group showed (p=0.002) significant difference as compared to control group. Vibration therapy and massage are equally effective in prevention of DOMS. Massage is effective in

  18. The attitudes of young people to the non-use or use of drugs and to drugs education and prevention strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Twigg, Barry

    1995-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The study explores the attitudes of young people in the later years of their secondary education to the non-use or use of drugs and to the drugs education and prevention strategies that they have experienced. It takes particular account of the views of the majority of young people who do not use drugs other than the occasional use of alcohol. It highlights the problems experienced by some you...

  19. [Student's use of illicit drugs: a survey in a preventive health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Y; Rouvier, J; Olié, J-P; Lôo, H; Krebs, M-O

    2009-12-01

    The use of illicit drugs by students and the possible psychological repercussions in this population of young adults is an important public health issue. While some data in the literature suggest a relationship between cannabis and the occurrence of mental health disorders, and in particular psychotic illnesses, epidemiologic surveys have shown that cannabis is the most consumed illicit drug in France. To carry out a quantitative and qualitative epidemiological investigation of substance use within a student population seen during their mandatory preventive health visit at the University medical facility. Students were asked to take part in an investigation of their substance consumption and their individual experiences with cannabis in particular. Personality autoquestionnaires were performed and the psychotomimetic effects of cannabis were investigated with substance use within a student population seen during their mandatory preventive health visit at the University medical facility. A total of 3,807 students took part in the survey with a response rate of approximately 50%. Preliminary results relating to a subsample of this study are presented here (n = 880, mean age 20 years, 65% women). 44% of the students consumed cannabis at least once in their life. The prevalence of regular consumption in students (at least once a week) was of 18%, 11% had periods of daily or close to daily consumptions, and 13% used cannabis in the last month. For each of the drugs cocaine, ecstasy (MDMA), and mushrooms (psilocybin) the prevalence of experimentation (at least once) was 5% for cocaine, 4% for ecstasy and mushrooms, and for LSD the rate was 1,5%. Other evaluated substances had a prevalence of consumption lower than 1%. For the first cannabis consumptions, a majority of students state to felt "pleasant" effects: relaxation (71%) and euphoria (53%). 13% state to have felt effects of anxiety or sadness. 25% admit having had difficulties of expression, 24% memory deficits, 35

  20. Static Stretching of the Hamstring Muscle for Injury Prevention in Football Codes: a Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rogan, Slavko; Wüst, Dirk; Schwitter, Thomas; Schmidtbleicher, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hamstring injuries are common among football players. There is still disagreement regarding prevention. The aim of this review is to determine whether static stretching reduces hamstring injuries in football codes. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted on the online databases PubMed, PEDro, Cochrane, Web of Science, Bisp and Clinical Trial register. Study results were presented descriptively and the quality of the studies assessed were based on Cochrane’s ‘risk of ...

  1. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastroduodenal Bleeding: Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wex

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the most widely prescribed medications in the World. A frequent complication of NSAID use is gastroduodenal bleeding. Risk factors for gastroduodenal bleeding while on NSAID therapy are age, prior peptic ulcer and co-medication with anti-platelet agents, anticoagulants, glucocorticosteroids and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI. Prevention strategies for at-risk patients include the use of the lowest effective dose of NSAIDs, co-therapy with proton-pump inhibitors and/or the use of a COX-2 selective agent. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection is beneficial for primary prophylaxis of NSAID-induced gastroduodenal bleeding in NSAID-naive patients. For patients with cardiovascular risk factors requiring NSAIDs, naproxen should be selected. In very high risk patients for both gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complications NSAID therapy should be avoided altogether.

  2. Catalase overexpression in aortic smooth muscle prevents pathological mechanical changes underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiellaro-Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Wan, William; Gleason, Rudolph L; Taylor, W Robert

    2011-08-01

    The causality of the associations between cellular and mechanical mechanisms of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation has not been completely defined. Because reactive oxygen species are established mediators of AAA growth and remodeling, our objective was to investigate oxidative stress-induced alterations in aortic biomechanics and microstructure during subclinical AAA development. We investigated the mechanisms of AAA in an angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion model of AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice that overexpress catalase in vascular smooth muscle cells (apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat)). At baseline, aortas from apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat) exhibited increased stiffness and the microstructure was characterized by 50% more collagen content and less elastin fragmentation. ANG II treatment for 7 days in apoE(-/-) mice altered the transmural distribution of suprarenal aortic circumferential strain (quantified by opening angle, which increased from 130 ± 1° at baseline to 198 ± 8° after 7 days of ANG II treatment) without obvious changes in the aortic microstructure. No differences in aortic mechanical behavior or suprarenal opening angle were observed in apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat) after 7 days of ANG II treatment. These data suggest that at the earliest stages of AAA development H(2)O(2) is functionally important and is involved in the control of local variations in remodeling across the vessel wall. They further suggest that reduced elastin integrity at baseline may predispose the abdominal aorta to aneurysmal mechanical remodeling.

  3. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira Dos; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Daré, Letícia Rossi; Rosa, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the animals were euthanized and histological and morphometric analyses were performed. Data were submitted to statistical analysis with a significance level of pmorfologia do músculo tibial cranial de ratos desnervados experimentalmente. Foram utilizados 36 ratos Wistar, distribuídos em quatro grupos: Grupo Controle Inicial, Grupo Controle Final, Grupo Experimental Desnervado Tratado, Grupo Experimental Desnervado. A eletroestimulação foi realizada com um protocolo de corrente russa aplicada três vezes por semanas, durante 45 dias. Ao final, os animais foram eutanasiados e, em seguida, foram realizadas as análises histológica e morfométrica. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística, com nível de significância de pmorfologia do músculo tibial cranial desnervado experimentalmente, minimizando a atrofia muscular.

  4. Use and Perceived Benefits of Mobile Devices by Physicians in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M.; Boyce, Richard D.; Ligons, Frank; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A.; Hochheiser, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point-of-care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. Design/Setting/Participants We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 the AMDA Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. Results The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with ≤15 years clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared to those with >15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio=1.68; 95% confidence interval=1.17-2.41; p=0.005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of one or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1-2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least one potential ADE in the preceding four-week period. Conclusions The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, while significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. PMID:24094901

  5. Effects of Topiramate in the Prevention of Drug Resistant Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction & objective: Migraine is the most common cause of headache. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of topiramate (TPM in the prevention of drug-resistant migraine headache. Materials & Methods: This is a double-blind clinical trial conducted on 70 patients between ages 15 to 45 years referred to the Bu Ali Sina Hospital in Sari with a history of migraine attacks based on International Headache Society criteria for a period of more than one years with a minimum incidence of 1 to 6 attacks per month. The drug rate performance was assessed by response rate to treatment, mean changes in the number and severity of migraine attacks compared with the placebo group for 3 months. Collected data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA, Newman-Keuls and Spearman’s Coefficient Rank Correlation as the post hoc tests. GRAPHPAD software was used for analysis of the data. Results: 66 of 70 patients completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 30.33±7.9 years. A significant reduction in the severity and frequency of migraine attacks was seen in all months (P < 0.0001 for topiramate treated group in compare to placebo group. Responder rate for patients treated with TPM was significantly higher than placebo group (63.6%, P<0.0001 in the 3rd month of the treatment Side effects of treatment were transient and well tolerated. Conclusion: Low dose of TPM showed significant efficacy in prevention of migraine attacks within the first, second, and third month of treatment. Low dose of TPM seems to be a good therapeutic option for the patients with refractory migraine.

  6. Study on the preventive effects of different drugs on reflux esophagitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao; GONG Jun; CHEN Jie; CHENG Peng; CHANG Yin; WANG Jin-hai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the damage of mixed reflux to the rat esophageal mucosa, and investigate the preventive effects of cisapride, nabumetone and hydrotalcite on the damaged esophageal mucosa. Methods: Three hundred sixty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were treated as esophagoduodenostomy and divided into four groups in random. Group Y: operation + saline as positive controls; Group P: operation + cisapride; Group R: operation + nabumetone; Group D: operation + hydrotalcite. Different drugs were perfused in the 1 st week after operation. The lesions of esophageal mucosa were observed in the 5th, 9th, 13th, 17th, 22nd, 28th, 35th and 40th week respectively, and evaluated the preventive effects of these drugs. Results: The lesions of esophageal mucosa in group Y were more severe than other three groups in different time (P < 0.05), and the incidence of Barrett's esophagus(BE), severe atypical hyperplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in group Y were higher than others. After 22 weeks, the lesions in group P were more severe than group R and D, and there were obvious differences in different time ( P < 0.05); but the incidence of BE, severe atypical hyperplasia and EAC in group P had no significant difference with group R and group D( P > 0.05). Conclusion: BE, severe atypical hyperplasia and EAC could occur because of severe reflux esophagitis for a long term. Cisapride, nabumetone and hydrotalcite could reduce mucosa injury in reflux esophagitis and resist the development of BE, severe atypical hyperplasia and EAC.In addition, the curative effects of nabumetone and hydrotalcite were better than cisapride.

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7 Prevents Skeletal Muscle Atrophy Induced by Transforming Growth Factor Type Beta (TGF-β via Mas Receptor Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Ábrigo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transforming growth factor type beta 1 (TGF-β1 produces skeletal muscle atrophy. Angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7, through the Mas receptor, prevents the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by sepsis, immobilization, or angiotensin II (Ang-II. However, the effect of Ang-(1-7 on muscle wasting induced by TGF-β1 is unknown. Aim: To evaluate whether Ang-(1-7/Mas receptor axis could prevent the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by TGF-β1. Methods: This study assessed the atrophic effect of TGF-β1 in C2C12 myotubes and mice in absence or presence of Ang-(1-7, and the receptor participation using A779, an antagonist of the Mas receptor. The levels of myosin heavy chain (MHC, polyubiquitination, and MuRF-1 were detected by western blot. Myotube diameter was also evaluated. In vivo analysis included the muscle strength, fibre diameter, MHC and MuRF-1 levels by western blot, and ROS levels by DCF probe detection. Results: The results showed that Ang-(1-7 prevented the increase in MuRF-1 and polyubiquitined protein levels, the decrease of MHC levels, the myotubes/fibre diameter diminution, and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by TGF-β1. Utilizing A779 inhibited the anti-atrophic effect of Ang-(1-7. Conclusion: The preventive effect of Ang-(1-7 on skeletal muscle atrophy induced by TGF-β1 is produced through inhibition of ROS production and proteasomal degradation of MHC.

  8. Impulsive Delayed Reward Discounting as a Genetically-Influenced Target for Drug Abuse Prevention: A Critical Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C. Gray

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the viability of delayed reward discounting (DRD, an index of how much an individual devalues a future reward based on its delay in time, for genetically-informed drug abuse prevention. A review of the literature suggests that impulsive DRD is robustly associated with drug addiction and meets most of the criteria for being an endophenotype, albeit with mixed findings for specific molecular genetic influences. Several modes of experimental manipulation have been demonstrated to reduce DRD acutely. These include behavioral strategies, such as mindfulness, reward bundling, and episodic future thinking; pharmacological interventions, including noradrengic agonists, adrenergic agonists, and multiple monoamine agonists; and neuromodulatory interventions, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. However, the generalization of these interventions to positive clinical outcomes remains unclear and no studies to date have examined interventions on DRD in the context of prevention. Collectively, these findings suggest it would be premature to target DRD for genetically-informed prevention. Indeed, given the evidence of environmental contributions such as early life adversity to impulsive DRD, whether genetically-informed secondary prevention would ever be warranted is debatable. However, progress in identifying polymorphisms associated with DRD preference could further clarify the underlying biological systems implicated in impulsive DRD for further progress in pharmacological and neuromodulatory interventions. Furthermore, independent of genetically-informed prevention, impulsive DRD is a qualitatively different risk factor from existing prevention programs and is generally worthy of investigation as a novel and promising drug abuse prevention target.

  9. A genetic strategy to identify targets for the development of drugs that prevent bacterial persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee-Hyun; O'Brien, Kathryn M; Sharma, Ritu; Boshoff, Helena I M; Rehren, German; Chakraborty, Sumit; Wallach, Joshua B; Monteleone, Mercedes; Wilson, Daniel J; Aldrich, Courtney C; Barry, Clifton E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2013-11-19

    Antibacterial drug development suffers from a paucity of targets whose inhibition kills replicating and nonreplicating bacteria. The latter include phenotypically dormant cells, known as persisters, which are tolerant to many antibiotics and often contribute to failure in the treatment of chronic infections. This is nowhere more apparent than in tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a pathogen that tolerates many antibiotics once it ceases to replicate. We developed a strategy to identify proteins that Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires to both grow and persist and whose inhibition has the potential to prevent drug tolerance and persister formation. This strategy is based on a tunable dual-control genetic switch that provides a regulatory range spanning three orders of magnitude, quickly depletes proteins in both replicating and nonreplicating mycobacteria, and exhibits increased robustness to phenotypic reversion. Using this switch, we demonstrated that depletion of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase (NadE) rapidly killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis under conditions of standard growth and nonreplicative persistence induced by oxygen and nutrient limitation as well as during the acute and chronic phases of infection in mice. These findings establish the dual-control switch as a robust tool with which to probe the essentiality of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins under different conditions, including those that induce antibiotic tolerance, and NadE as a target with the potential to shorten current tuberculosis chemotherapies.

  10. e-Prescription: An e-Health System for Preventing Adverse Drug Events in Community Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma M. Puspitasari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes development activities of an e-health system for community health center (Puskesmas with integrated adverse drug events e-prescription module, consist of system design and development, human resource development, e-health system realization, laboratory and implementation test of e-health system. Some e-readiness evaluations were conducted, through a number of field visits and questionnaires. The results had been used in the e-health system design and development, installation of the internet access infrastructure, and implementation of the education and hands-on training for the medical and administrative staff of the healthcare units. After completing the e-health system design and development as well as system realization and laboratory tests stages, a series of field implementation and experiments have been successfully conducted at Puskesmas Babakansari in Bandung. A number of users feed back have been obtained and used for further improvements on both of the software and hardware modules. The e-health system with integrated e-prescription module has successfully developed and shown its expected functions in: patient registration, medical record, paperless prescription, producing the required reports and preventing possible adverse drug events.

  11. Dopamine is a safe antiangiogenic drug which can also prevent 5-fluorouracil induced neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Chandrani; Chakroborty, Debanjan; Dasgupta, Partha Sarathi; Basu, Sujit

    2015-08-01

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in tumor angiogenesis is well established and accordingly, molecules targeting VEGFA or its receptors are being presently used in the clinics for treatment of several types of cancer. However, these antiangiogenic agents are expensive and have serious side effects. Thus identification of newer drugs with manageable systemic side effects or toxicities is of immense clinical importance. Since we have reported earlier that dopamine (DA) inhibits VEGFA induced angiogenesis in experimental tumor models, we therefore sought to investigate whether DA treatment results in similar toxicities like other antiangiogenic agents. Our results indicated that unlike sunitinib, another commonly used antiangiogenic agent in the clinics which targets VEGF receptors, DA [50 mg/kg/days × 7days intraperitoneally (i.p.)] not only could inhibit tumor angiogenesis and growth of HT29 human colon cancer and LLC (Lewis lung carcinoma) in mice, it also did not cause hypertension, hematological, renal and hepatic toxicities in normal, HT29 and LLC tumor bearing animals. Furthermore and interestingly, in contrast to the currently used antiangiogenic agents, DA also prevented 5-fluorouracil (5FU) induced neutropenia in HT29 colon cancer bearing mice. This action of DA was through inhibition of 5FU mediated suppression of colony forming unit-granulocyte macrophage colony forming units in the bone marrow. Thus our results indicate that DA may be safely used as an antiangiogenic drug for the treatment of malignant tumors.

  12. [Indicated prevention of problematic drug consumption in adolescents of barcelona, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Anna M; Bartroli, Montse; Villalbí, Joan R; Guilañá, Elvira; Castellano, Yolanda; Espelt, Albert; Brugal, M Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The Drugs Advice Service (SOD in its Catalan acronym) in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) provides an Information and Guidance Program (IGP) for teenagers, and an Alternative Measures Program (AMP) targeting minors fined for consumption / possession of illegal drugs in public spaces. This study describes these programs and compares the profiles of their users. Cross-sectional descriptive study of 1,010 people discharged from the two SOD programs in 2008-10 after screening for psychiatric disorders and addiction and an extended brief intervention for subjects without pathology. The profiles of the users were compared, and age-specific rates of AMP use were calculated. Cannabis causes 89.9% of entries in the SOD. The proportion of IGP users with high risk criteria for cannabis is 13.3% and with risk for alcohol 11.3%, while in AMP it is 8.9%, and 4%. Criteria for substance dependence or abuse or another psychiatric disorder caused referral of 6% of AMP users and 38% of IGP users. Adolescents in the AMP had a pattern of cannabis use (and often of alcohol) of low or moderate risk, compared to IGP. Beyond the value of the indicated prevention intervention, the programmes facilitate the early detection and referral of problematic substance use and mental disorders in early stages.

  13. Study Design and Rationale for the Phase 3 Clinical Development Program of Enobosarm, a Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, for the Prevention and Treatment of Muscle Wasting in Cancer Patients (POWER Trials).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeffrey; Prado, Carla M M; Johnston, Mary Ann; Gralla, Richard J; Taylor, Ryan P; Hancock, Michael L; Dalton, James T

    2016-06-01

    Muscle wasting in cancer is a common and often occult condition that can occur prior to overt signs of weight loss and before a clinical diagnosis of cachexia can be made. Muscle wasting in cancer is an important and independent predictor of progressive functional impairment, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Although several therapeutic agents are currently in development for the treatment of muscle wasting or cachexia in cancer, the majority of these agents do not directly inhibit muscle loss. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have the potential to increase lean body mass (LBM) and hence muscle mass, without the untoward side effects seen with traditional anabolic agents. Enobosarm, a nonsteroidal SARM, is an agent in clinical development for prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with cancer (POWER 1 and 2 trials). The POWER trials are two identically designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, and multinational phase 3 trials to assess the efficacy of enobosarm for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in subjects initiating first-line chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess enobosarm's effect on both prevention and treatment of muscle wasting, no minimum weight loss is required. These pivotal trials have pioneered the methodological and regulatory fields exploring a therapeutic agent for cancer-associated muscle wasting, a process hereby described. In each POWER trial, subjects will receive placebo (n = 150) or enobosarm 3 mg (n = 150) orally once daily for 147 days. Physical function, assessed as stair climb power (SCP), and LBM, assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), are the co-primary efficacy endpoints in both trials assessed at day 84. Based on extensive feedback from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the co-primary endpoints will be analyzed as a responder analysis. To be considered a physical function responder, a

  14. 30 Years on Selected Issues in the Prevention of HIV among Persons Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Des Jarlais

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After 30 years of extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV among persons who inject drugs (PWID, we now have a good understanding of the critical issues involved. Following the discovery of HIV in 1981, epidemics among PWID were noted in many countries, and consensus recommendations for interventions for reducing injection related HIV transmission have been developed. While high-income countries have continued to develop and implement new Harm Reduction programs, most low-/middle-income countries have implemented Harm Reduction at very low levels. Modeling of combined prevention programming including needle exchange (NSP and antiretroviral therapy (ARV suggests that NSP be given the highest priority. Future HIV prevention programming should continue to provide Harm Reduction programs for PWID coupled with interventions aimed at reducing sexual transmission. As HIV continues to spread in low- and middle-income countries, it is important to achieve and maintain high coverage of Harm Reduction programs in these locations. As PWID almost always experience multiple health problems, it will be important to address these multiple problems within a comprehensive approach grounded in a human rights perspective.

  15. Characteristics of drug users who witness many overdoses: implications for overdose prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy S B; Tracy, Melissa; Galea, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Programs to improve response of drug users when witnessing an overdose can reduce overdose mortality. Characteristics of drug users may be associated with the number of overdoses ever witnessed. This information could inform overdose prevention programs. Participants in New York City, who were age 18 and older with heroin and/or cocaine use in the past two months, were administered structured interviews (n=1184). Survey topics included overdose response, drug use behavior, treatment history, and demographic information. In a multivariable negative binomial regression model, those persons who were male (IRR [Incidence Rate Ratio]=1.7, CI [95% Confidence Interval]=1.4,2.2), had experienced homelessness (IRR=1.9, CI=1.4,2.6), had used heroin (IRR=2.0, CI=1.3,3.2), had overdosed themselves (IRR=1.9, CI=1.6,2.4), or had attended Narcotics Anonymous (IRR=1.3, CI=1.1,1.6) witnessed a greater count of overdoses in their lifetime. Those persons who have witnessed more overdoses were less likely to have sought medical assistance (OR [Odds Ratio]=0.7) and more likely to report counter-productive or ineffective actions (ORs between 1.9 and 2.4) at the last overdose they witnessed compared to persons who had only ever witnessed one or two overdoses. Persons at high risk for overdose are likely to witness more overdoses. Persons who had witnessed more overdoses were more likely to report taking ineffective action at the last overdose witnessed. Individuals who have witnessed many overdoses are likely key targets of overdose response training. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Definition and outcome of a curriculum to prevent disordered eating and body-shaping drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L; Moe, Esther L; Goldberg, Linn; DeFrancesco, Carol A; Durham, Melissa B; Hix-Small, Hollie

    2006-02-01

    Almost one half of male and female students participate in high school-sponsored athletics, and high school also is a time when classroom health promotion curricula are less effective. The Athletes Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids is a sport team-centered drug-use prevention program for male high school athletes, which has been shown to reduce alcohol and illicit drug use. Just as anabolic steroid use is associated with male athletes, female sport participants may be at a greater risk for disordered eating and body-shaping drug use. Extending sport team-centered programs to young women athletes required defining and ranking factors related to developing those harmful behaviors. Survey results from a cross-sectional cohort of female middle and high school student athletes were used to identify and prioritize potential curriculum components, including mood and self-esteem, norms of behavior, perceptions of healthy body weight, effects of media depictions of women, and societal pressures to be thin. The derived sport team-centered program was prospectively assessed among a second group of female student athletes from 18 high schools, randomized to receive the intervention or the usual care control condition. The Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Alternatives (ATHENA) intervention is a scripted, coach-facilitated, peer-led 8-session program, which was incorporated into a team's usual training activities. The ATHENA program significantly altered the targeted risk factors and reduced ongoing and new use of diet pills and body-shaping substances (amphetamines, anabolic steroids, and sport supplements). These findings illustrate the utility of a structured process to define curriculum content, and the program's positive results also confirm the sport team's potential as a vehicle to effectively deter health-harming behaviors.

  17. Oral fluoroquinolone therapy results in drug adsorption on ureteral stents and prevention of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, G; Habash, M; Vachon, D; Denstedt, J; Riddell, J; Beheshti, M

    2001-04-01

    The oral administration of ciprofloxacin (250mg bid) and ofloxacin (300mg bid) in 40 patients with ureteral stents, led to drug levels on all the device surfaces that were higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Escherichia coli (0.004--0.015 mg/l), the most common uropathogen. The drug levels in the film were higher than the MIC of other common pathogens, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.25--1.0 mg/l), Enterococcus faecalis (0.25--2.0 mg/l) and Staphylococcus aureus (0.12--0.5 mg/l) in a few cases (six, three and 14 cases out of 40, respectively). For both antibiotics, the concentrations were greater than the MIC of many uropathogens on the film surrounding the devices (0.89 vs 0.31 mg/l respectively, P=0.05), and on the devices themselves (0.22 vs. 0.12 mg/l, P=0.207). Adsorption of the antibiotics was higher to the film than to the stent (PCiprofloxacin concentration on the film surrounding the stents was significantly higher than that of ofloxacin (P=0.05), while there was no statistical concentration difference between the two antibiotics adsorbed onto the actual devices (P=0.207). No bacteria were found in patients' urine and no biofilms were detected. This is the first report of an oral antibiotic being adsorbed onto medical devices. It potentially provides a new approach of preventing infection, and avoids the need to pre-coat devices with agents whose use will be restricted once bacteria develop resistance to them. If biomaterial properties can be enhanced to increase further the adsorptive concentration of drug, the risk of infections and recalcitrant biofilm formation could be significantly reduced in a highly susceptible patient population.

  18. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  19. London audit of drug-related overdose deaths: characteristics and typology, and implications for prevention and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Matthew; Carrivick, Sandra; Paterson, Susan; Hunt, Neil; Zador, Deborah; Cusick, Linda; Henry, John

    2007-02-01

    To describe the circumstances and draft a typology of drug-related overdose deaths. London, 2003. An audit of 148 drug overdose deaths (involving heroin, methadone, dihydrocodeine, cocaine, amphetamine or MDMA) investigated by coroners during 2003. Information extracted on toxicology, pathology and circumstances were used to identify drug(s) implicated in the death. Poly- or multiple drug use was detected in the majority of deaths with at least 69 different combinations, including 66% for heroin and 42% for cocaine. Six categories of death were identified involving an opiate (100, 68%); cocaine (14, 9%); other controlled drug (five, 3%); mixed drug overdose (18, 12%); other prescribed drug (five, 3%); and other causes (seven, 5%). A witness was present and the death was not instantaneous in 92 (61%) cases, although evidence in the coronial file suggested that in the majority of cases the overdose went unnoticed until too late to intervene. In all, 15 (one in 10) of the deceased were released from prison within 3 months of death; and 37 (one in four) were reported as in receipt of a methadone prescription. Perhaps for the first time in the United Kingdom cocaine was detected in more drug overdose deaths than methadone. However, reducing heroin use is central to the prevention of drug-related deaths. We recommend that overdose prevention encompasses strategies to encourage a 'mutual duty of care' among problem drug users, and in the United Kingdom further investigation of the relationship of methadone treatment failures on overall trends in drug-related deaths is merited.

  20. Factors associated with the implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Paula Dias; Paes, Ângela Tavares; Sanchez, Zila M

    2016-08-04

    To analyze if characteristics of managers, schools, and curriculum are associated with the implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in elementary and high schools. Cross-sectional study, with random sample of 263 school managers. Data were collected between 2012 and 2013 by a program that sends forms via internet. A closed self-filling questionnaire was applied online. Statistical analysis included Chi-square tests and logistic regression models. The outcome variable was the presence of program for drug abuse prevention inserted in the daily life and educational program of the school. The explanatory variables were divided into: demographic data of the manager; characteristics of the school and of the curriculum; health education; and drug use in the school. We found that 42.5% (95%CI 36.1-49.1) of the evaluated schools had programs for drug abuse prevention. With the multiple logistic regression model, we observed that the more time the manager has worked with education, the chance of the school having a program increased at about 4.0%. Experimenting with innovative teaching techniques also increased at about six times the chance of the school developing a program for drug abuse prevention. The difficulties in the implementation of the programs were more present in state and municipal schools, when compared with private schools, due to, for instance: lack of teaching materials, lack of money, and competing demands for teaching other subjects. The implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in the city of Sao Paulo is associated with the experience of the manager in education and with the teaching strategies of the school. Analisar se características dos dirigentes, das escolas e do currículo escolar estão associadas à implantação de programas de prevenção ao uso de drogas nas escolas do ciclo fundamental II e médio. Estudo transversal, com amostra aleatória sistemática de 263 dirigentes escolares. Os dados foram coletados nos anos

  1. Compression garments to prevent delayed onset muscle soreness in soccer players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Xavier; Til, Lluís; Drobnic, Franchek; Turmo, Antonio; Montoro, José Bruno; Valero, Oliver; Artells, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a compression garment as DOMS prevention. This was accomplished by provoking a DOMS in 15 athletes, running on a treadmill at 73% of their maximal aerobic velocity, during 40 minutes with a 10% negative slope; wearing the compression garments on one thigh, protected thigh (PT), and not in the contralateral thigh, control thigh (CT). A clinical and MRI diagnosis of DOMS was performed. Biopsies in both vastus lateralis were done, and the amount and severity of the DOMS was estimated by measuring intracellular albumin, and lymphocytes CD3+ and neutrophils intra/interfibrilar infiltrates, 48h after the induced damaging exercise. There was less total injury in the PT than in the CT, a 26.7% average. These data indicate that this compression garment is an effective method to reduce the histological injury in DOMS. PMID:24596693

  2. Compression garments to prevent delayed onset muscle soreness in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Xavier; Til, Lluís; Drobnic, Franchek; Turmo, Antonio; Montoro, José Bruno; Valero, Oliver; Artells, Rosa

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a compression garment as DOMS prevention. This was accomplished by provoking a DOMS in 15 athletes, running on a treadmill at 73% of their maximal aerobic velocity, during 40 minutes with a 10% negative slope; wearing the compression garments on one thigh, protected thigh (PT), and not in the contralateral thigh, control thigh (CT). A clinical and MRI diagnosis of DOMS was performed. Biopsies in both vastus lateralis were done, and the amount and severity of the DOMS was estimated by measuring intracellular albumin, and lymphocytes CD3+ and neutrophils intra/interfibrilar infiltrates, 48h after the induced damaging exercise. There was less total injury in the PT than in the CT, a 26.7% average. These data indicate that this compression garment is an effective method to reduce the histological injury in DOMS.

  3. The Antimuscarinic Effects of Anticholinesterase Drugs on Electrical Field Stimulation-Induced Contractile Responses in Rat Gastric Fundus and Ileum Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasympathetic component of autonomic nervous system is known as involving in majority of intestinal smooth muscle contractions and motility. Acetylcholine can be released from parasympathetic nerve terminals by an excitation which is formed by a physiological or an electrical stimulation in order to elicit smooth muscle contractions. Anticholinesterase drugs are expected to increase the levels of acetylcholine in cholinergic synapses via inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. In recent studies, it has been shown that anticholinesterase drugs may cause an antimuscarinic effect on the contrary of their usual effects such as amplifying of cholinergic transmission. In this study, we investigated the antimuscarinic effects of neostigmine, edrophonium and piridostigmine on gastric fundus and ileum smooth muscle preparations isolated from Wistar albino rats. The contactions were induced by using electrical field stimulation (EFS which is a direct stimulation technique. Both neostigmine and piridostigmine increased the E max values of contractile responses for EFS at their first three concentrations; but only the changes in gastric fundus strips has found significant as statistically. At their highest concentration such as 1000 M, both neostigmine and piridostigmine attenuated the EFS induced smooth muscle contractions and caused an antimuscarinic effect (p  0,05; paired samples Student’s t test. In contrast, edrophonium had no effect on EFS induced smooth muscle contractions, at none of its four concentrations as statistically. Our results suggest that larger doses of neostigmine and piridostigmine, but not edrophonium, may evoke antimuscarinic effects on intestinal smooth muscle contractions.

  4. Suppression of Eosinophil Integrins Prevents Remodeling of Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januskevicius, Andrius; Gosens, Reinoud; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Vaitkiene, Simona; Janulaityte, Ieva; Halayko, Andrew J.; Hoppenot, Deimante; Malakauskas, Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is an important component of the structural changes to airways seen in asthma. Eosinophils are the prominent inflammatory cells in asthma, and there is some evidence that they contribute to ASM remodeling via released mediators and direct contact through integrin–ligand interactions. Eosinophils express several types of outer membrane integrin, which are responsible for cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. In our previous study we demonstrated that asthmatic eosinophils show increased adhesion to ASM cells and it may be important factor contributing to ASM remodeling in asthma. According to these findings, in the present study we investigated the effects of suppression of eosinophil integrin on eosinophil-induced ASM remodeling in asthma. Materials and Methods: Individual combined cell cultures of immortalized human ASM cells and eosinophils from peripheral blood of 22 asthmatic patients and 17 healthy controls were prepared. Eosinophil adhesion was evaluated using eosinophil peroxidase activity assay. Genes expression levels in ASM cells and eosinophils were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. ASM cell proliferation was measured using alamarBlue® solution. Eosinophil integrins were blocked by incubating with Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. Results: Eosinophils from the asthma group showed increased outer membrane α4β1 and αMβ2 integrin expression, increased adhesion to ASM cells, and overexpression of TGF-β1 compared with eosinophils from the healthy control group. Blockade of eosinophil RGD-binding integrins by Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide significantly reduced adhesion of eosinophils to ASM cells in both groups. Integrin-blocking decreased the effects of eosinophils on TGF-β1, WNT-5a, and extracellular matrix protein gene expression in ASM cells and ASM cell proliferation in both groups. These effects were more pronounced in the asthma group compared with the control group. Conclusion

  5. Evaluating Early Preventive Antipsychotic and Antidepressant Drug Treatment in an Infection-Based Neurodevelopmental Mouse Model of Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Urs; Spoerri, Erica; Yee, Benjamin K.; Schwarz, Markus J; Feldon, Joram

    2008-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia remains unsatisfactory with little hope for complete functional restoration in patients once the disease has developed. A preventive approach based on intervention in the prodromal stage of the disease aiming to preserve functional integrity by halting the progress of the disease is therefore extremely attractive. Here, we investigated the effects of preventive antipsychotic or antidepressant drug treatment in a well-established neurodevelopmental mous...

  6. Secondary Prevention Services for Clients Who Are Low Risk in Drug Court: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, David S.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The drug court model assumes that most drug offenders are addicts, and that drug use fuels other criminal activity. As a result, drug court clients must satisfy an intensive regimen of treatment and supervisory obligations. However, research suggests that roughly one third of drug court clients do not have a clinically significant substance use…

  7. Construction of an Integrated Positive Youth Development Conceptual Framework for the Prevention of the Use of Psychotropic Drugs among Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a theoretical paper with an aim to construct an integrated conceptual framework for the prevention of adolescents' use and abuse of psychotropic drugs. This paper first reports the subjective reasons for adolescents' drug use and abuse in Hong Kong and reviews the theoretical underpinnings. Theories of drug use and abuse, including neurological, pharmacological, genetic predisposition, psychological, and sociological theories, were reviewed. It provides a critical re-examination of crucial factors that support the construction of a conceptual framework for primary prevention of adolescents' drug use and abuse building on, with minor revision, the model of victimization and substance abuse among women presented by Logan et al. This revised model provides a comprehensive and coherent framework synthesized from theories of drug abuse. This paper then provides empirical support for integrating a positive youth development perspective in the revised model. It further explains how the 15 empirically sound constructs identified by Catalano et al. and used in a positive youth development program, the Project P.A.T.H.S., relate generally to the components of the revised model to formulate an integrated positive youth development conceptual framework for primary prevention of adolescent drug use. Theoretical and practical implications as well as limitations and recommendations are discussed.

  8. Preventive efficacy and safety of rebamipide in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mucosal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Soo-Heon; Cho, Chul-Soo; Lee, Soo Teik; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Kim, Sung Kook; Kang, Young Mo; Rew, Jong Sun; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Won; Lee, Don-Haeng

    2014-07-01

    The use of proton pump inhibitors or misoprostol is known to prevent the gastrointestinal complications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rebamipide is known to increase the mucosal generation of prostaglandins and to eliminate free oxygen radicals, thus enhancing the protective function of the gastric mucosa. However, it is unknown whether rebamipide plays a role in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rebamipide compared to misoprostol in preventing NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications in patients requiring continuous NSAID treatment. We studied 479 patients who required continuous NSAID treatment. The patients were randomly assigned to groups that received 100 mg of rebamipide three times per day or 200 μg of misoprostol three times per day for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint of the analysis was the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers, as determined by endoscopy after 12 weeks of therapy. Of the 479 patients in the study, 242 received rebamipide, and 237 received misoprostol. Ultimately, 44 patients (18.6%) withdrew from the misoprostol group and 25 patients (10.3%) withdrew from the rebamipide group. There was a significant difference in withdrawal rate between the two groups (p=0.0103). The per protocol analysis set was not valid because of the dropout rate of the misoprostol group; thus, the intention to treat (ITT) analysis set is the main set for the efficacy analysis in this study. After 12 weeks, the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (20.3% vs 21.9%, p=0.6497) according to ITT analysis. In addition, the therapeutic failure rate was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (13.6% vs 13.1%, p=0.8580). The total severity score of the gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly lower in the rebamipide group than in the misoprostol group (p=0.0002). The amount of antacid used was significantly lower in the rebamipide

  9. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or glucosamine reduced pain and improved muscle strength with resistance training in a randomized controlled trial of knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Susanne G; Beyer, Nina; Hansen, Mette Rud;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of 12 weeks of strength training in combination with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), glucosamine, or placebo on muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), strength (primary outcome parameters), and function, power, pain, and satellite cell number (secondary outcome...

  10. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  11. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission: potential role for people who inject drugs in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairy, Margaret L; Deryabina, Anna; Hoos, David; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2013-11-01

    Interest in the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention stems from mounting evidence from research studies demonstrating that ART is associated with a decrease in sexual HIV transmission among serodiscordant couples and, perhaps, in other populations at risk. There is paucity of data on the efficacy of ART for prevention in key populations, including persons who inject drugs (PWID). In this paper, we examine the current status of HIV services for PWID in Central Asia, the use of ART by this population and explore ART for prevention for PWID in this context. We also discuss research and implementation questions with relevance to such a strategy in the region.

  12. MARKETING STUDIES OF LOCAL MARKET OF DRUGS WHICH ARE APPLIED FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ORAL CAVITY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Tsarakhov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological market has actively developed recent years. Domestic experts received an access to contemporary technologies of dental diseases treatment in the world. This conditioned the appearance of new drugs and parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice on the pharmaceutical market. In this connection, study of these drugs market, their price policy, demand and supply. Assortment of parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice for oral cavity hygiene is represented mainly by liquid forms, such as mouth rinse, balms, elixirs, and a special place is occupied by toothpastes. Their assortment amounts to more than 700 types. Drugs, applied in dental practice are represented by the following groups: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiallergenic, anesthetics, drugs which stimulate tissues regeneration, fluoric drugs. The purpose of this study was the analysis of regional pharmaceutical market assortment, which offers parapharmaceutical goods and drugs for prevention and treatment of oral cavity diseases to the stomatological establishments. Pharmaceutical market of the Republic of North Ossetia – Alania is represented by a wide range of drugs for dental diseases treatment. This group is represented in the assortment of practically all distributors. The drugs for dental diseases treatment is not only supplied by domestic producers but also go from pharmaceutical companies of 29 foreign countries, which influences positively on the state of drug therapy of paradontum in the region.

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Recovery & Treatment Drug Treatment Facts Does Drug Treatment Work? ... and Family Can Help Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Prevent Drug Use Help Children and Teens Stay Drug- ...

  14. Effectiveness of the universal prevention program 'Healthy School and Drugs': study protocol of a randomized clustered trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Malmberg; G.J. Overbeek; M. Kleinjan; A. Vermulst; K. Monshouwer; J. Lammers; W.A.M. Vollebergh; R.C.M.E. Engels

    2010-01-01

    Background: Substance use is highly prevalent among Dutch adolescents. The Healthy School and Drugs program is a nationally implemented school-based prevention program aimed at reducing early and excessive substance use among adolescents. Although the program's effectiveness was tested in a quasi-ex

  15. Analysis of Drug Policy in the Republic of Slovenia and in the EU Context: A Platform for Prevention in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaternik, Ines; Rihter, Liljana

    2012-01-01

    Aims: This article presents an overview of the strategies and measures used in the context of school-based prevention in Slovenia, both on a declaratory and on a practical level. Methods: A review of the Resolution on the National Programme on Drugs in the Republic of Slovenia [ReNPPD (2004). Resolucija o nacionalnem programu na podrocju drog…

  16. Why Reports of Outcome Evaluations Are Often Biased or Uninterpretable: Examples from Evaluations of Drug Abuse Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    Why conclusions of many outcome evaluations do not stand up to scrutiny is discussed, drawing on examples from evaluations of drug abuse prevention programs. Factors that undermine these studies are largely the result of social-structural problems that influence the design and implementation of the research. (SLD)

  17. Research-to-policy translation for prevention of disordered weight and shape control behaviors: A case example targeting dietary supplements sold for weight loss and muscle building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn; Yu, Kimberly; Tran, Alvin; Mayer, Beth

    2017-04-01

    New approaches to universal eating disorders prevention and interventions targeting macro-environmental change are greatly needed, and research-to-policy translation efforts hold promise for advancing both of these goals. This paper describes as a policy-translation case example an academic-community-government partnership of the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders, Multi-Service Eating Disorders Association, and the office of Massachusetts Representative Kay Khan, all based in Massachusetts, USA. The partnership's research-to-policy translation project focused on dietary supplements sold for weight loss and muscle building, which have been linked with serious injury and death in consumers. Youth and people of all ages with eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorder may be especially vulnerable to use these products due to deceptive promises of fast and safe weight loss and muscle gain. The research-to-policy translation project was informed by a triggers-to-action framework to establish the evidentiary base of harm to consumers, operationalize policy solutions to mitigate harm through legislation, and generate political will to support action through legislation introduced in the Massachusetts legislature to restrict sales of weight-loss and muscle-building dietary supplements. The paper concludes with lessons learned from this unique policy translation effort for the prevention of disordered weight and shape control behaviors and offers recommendations for next steps for the field to advance research and practice for universal, macro-environmentally targeted prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention and treatment in prison law: women prisoners drug dependence in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José del Pozo Serrano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The penitentiary drug dependence treatment for women has been traditionally generic (applied for most masculine penitentiary and with few differentiating empiric studies in an spanish level.Based on a regulatory framework, this research focuses on the study of the main elements of risk and protection implied in the relation between the drug dependant female prisoners and the treatment programs, as well as the recovery processes, in order to propose specific actions.The research has a multimethod approach, inserted within the Project I+D+I named “Mujeres reclusas drogodependientes y su reinserción social. Estudio socioeducativo y propuestas de acción” [EDU2009-13408], with a national sample of second and third degree (Central Government and Community of Catalonia, corresponding to an estimate of 15% of the female prisoners nationally. 538 valid questionnaires, 61 semi-structured interviews has been obtained, in which informatic analytical methods, specific programs for quantitative data (SPSS, V. 15 y 20, and analytical content methods for qualitative data has been applied. The analysis has been developed before and after the internment, including four profiles of female prisioners (AA: Active addicted (8'20%, EX: ex addicted (EX: 67'21%, NA: non addicted (NA: 14.75% and PMM (9.84% addicted within methadone maintenance programs .Among the main results found, it is relevant to mention the elements of risk related to the absence of participation of ex addicted women in relapse prevention programs. In fact, this is a relevant issue since 70% of the women are ex addicted. There is a large number of women not receiving any treatment in prision and not participating in any program due to lack of information, mistrust and overlap with other activities. Aditionally, theres is a perception of gender discrimination towards the access and permanece of women in the programs, compared with men.  Also, within the main elements of protection, it has been

  19. Prevention interventions for human immunodeficiency virus in drug-using women with a history of partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockman JK

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jamila K Stockman1, Natasha Ludwig-Barron1, Monica A Hoffman2, Monica D Ulibarri3, Typhanye V Penniman Dyer41Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine; 2Department of Communication and Science Studies; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA; 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD, USAAbstract: The intersecting epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and partner violence disproportionately affect women who use drugs. Despite accumulating evidence throughout the world linking these epidemics, HIV prevention efforts focused on these synergistic issues as well as underlying determinants that contribute to the HIV risk environment (eg, housing instability, incarceration, policing practices, survival sex are lacking. This article highlights selected behavior change theories and biomedical approaches that have been used or could be applied in HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women with histories of partner violence and in existing HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women that have been gender-focused while integrating histories of partner violence and/or relationship power dynamics. To date, there is a paucity of HIV prevention interventions designed for drug-using women (both in and outside of drug treatment programs with histories of partner violence. Of the few that exist, they have been theory-driven, culture-specific, and address certain aspects of gender-based inequalities (eg, gender-specific norms, relationship power and control, partner violence through assessment of personal risk and safety planning. However, no single intervention has addressed all of these issues. Moreover, HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women with histories of partner violence are not widespread and do not address multiple components of the risk environment. Efficacious interventions should target individuals

  20. The Current Status of Drug Intervention and Prevention in College Athletic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Raymond; Cook, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I universities concerning existence, nature, and effect of drug testing and drug education programs upon college athletes. Findings from 43 head athletic trainers indicated that the trainers believed drug testing helped reduce incidence of drug abuse in college sports programs.…

  1. On the origin and specificity of antibodies to neuromuscular blocking (muscle relaxant) drugs: an immunochemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, B A; Fisher, M M; Pham, N H

    2009-03-01

    Following the demonstration 25 years ago that substituted ammonium groups on neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBDs) are the main allergenic structures recognized by IgE antibodies in the sera of some patients who experience anaphylaxis during anaesthesia, immunoassays for these drugs were quickly applied to supplement skin tests in the diagnostic assessment of suspected adverse reactions to anaesthetic agents. Many subjects who react to an NMBD do so on first exposure and this led to the speculation that the origin of allergic sensitization is an environmental agent(s) or another drug containing an ammonium ion. Direct antibody binding and hapten inhibition studies revealed that morphine, which contains a tertiary amino group, was strongly recognized by IgE in sera from anaphylactic patients and a morphine-solid phase immunoassay was found to be superior to NMBD-based assays for the detection of NMBD-reactive IgE antibodies. Extensive inhibition experiments indicate the likelihood of antibody combining site heterogeneity with recognition at the fine structural level of features additional, and adjacent to, ammonium ions. Further quantitative investigations are needed to identify these neighbouring groups on different NMBDs. Recent work has implicated the morphine analogue pholcodine as the sensitizing agent in Norway where, unlike Sweden, anaphylactic reactions to NMBDs are not uncommon and the medicament is available over-the-counter. This has led to the suggestion that allergenic sensitization to the ammonium group of pholcodine may account for the different incidences of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia in the two countries. This work is subjected to critical review and some alternative speculations on the nature and origin of the sensitizing agent(s) are presented.

  2. Effects of several Chinese crude drugs on 45Ca transmembrane influx in vascular smooth muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenHeng-Liu; MoShang-Wu; 等

    1997-01-01

    The effects of several Chinese crude druge including Crocus sativus,Carthamus tinctorius and Ginkgo biloba on Ca2+ transmembrane influx in rat aorta rings were studied.Resting 45Ca uptake was not markedly altered by these drugs,whereas the 45 Ca influxes evoked by norepinephrine(1.2umol/L)and KCl(100mmol/L) in rat aorta rings were significantly inhibited by Crocus and Carthamus in a concentration-dependent manner,not by Ginkgo.The results indicate that extracellular Ca2+ tansmembrane influx through receptor-operated Ca2+ channels and potential-dependent Ca2+ channels can be blocked by crocus and Carthamus.

  3. Exploit the Developed Countries Experiences of Primary School Education to Prevent Drug Addiction and Implications for Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Ali; Zamani, Eshrat; Hedayati, Nassim

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate various educations in primary schools to prevent drug addiction. Methods: In this qualitative study, data included the experiences of those who been students in the developed countries for some years as well as their parents. The data were collected by semi-structured and unstructured interviews as well as documents. Findings: The results showed that education for prevention of drug addiction begins in primary schools in the developed countries using various methods. These educations are not occasional but constant and infused in all curriculum subjects and grades. Students become familiar with various drugs and learn about their effects. Conclusion: Our findings showed that social problems are discussed openly in schools of the developed countries and students try to find solutions which are considered by authorities. PMID:24494082

  4. The Promises and Pitfalls of Retrieval-Extinction Procedures in Preventing Relapse to Drug Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, Gavan P.; Kathryn Elizabeth Hutton-Bedbrook

    2013-01-01

    Relapse to drug seeking after treatment or a period of abstinence remains a fundamental challenge for drug users. The retrieval – extinction procedure offers promise in augmenting the efficacy of exposure based treatment for drug use and for protecting against relapse to drug seeking. Preceding extinction training with a brief retrieval or reminder trial, retrieval – extinction training, has been shown to reduce reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking in animal models and also to produce p...

  5. Information contextualization in decision support modules for adverse drug event prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Julie; Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Guillot, Bertrand; Maglaveras, Nicos; Pedersen, Henrik Gliese; Berg, Anna-Lis; Skjoet, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of hospitals' organization and Hospital Information Systems' features which can contribute in contextualization of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) for Adverse Drug Event (ADE) prevention. We identified four categories of contextualization: ENVIRONMENT, TASKS, USERS and TEMPORAL ASPECTS. Based on this analysis, we studied the technical possibilities at the architectural level to determine which component(s) of a standalone knowledge platform could technically handle contextualization. The results impact three types of components of this platform: (1) a CDSS providing decision support based on ADE signals mined in large data repositories; (2) a Connectivity Platform providing transformation and routing services (enabling any application to connect to the CDSS); (3) three prototype applications for accessing the decision support services realized within an industrial Computerized Physician Order Entry, an industrial Electronic Health Record and in an independent Web prototype, respectively. In each of the above components we present the dimension(s) of contextualization that has/have been determined to cope with and the design followed in the implementation phase.

  6. Sex, drugs and prisons: HIV prevention strategies for over 190 000 clients in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyrnov, P.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Achanta, S.; Boyko, K.; Khogali, M.; Naik, B.; Zachariah, R.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: One hundred and forty non-governmental organisations implementing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention programmes among clients, including people who inject drugs, prisoners, female sex workers, men who have sex with men and street children in Ukraine, 2010–2011. Objective: Among enrolled clients, to assess factors associated with HIV testing, HIV retesting within a year of initial testing and HIV seroconversion. Design: Retrospective cohort study involving record reviews. Results: Of 192 487 clients, 42 109 (22%) underwent an initial HIV test (22% were positive). Among HIV-negative clients at baseline, 10 858 (27%) were retested within a year: 317 (3%) of these were HIV-positive. HIV testing and retesting rates were lower among prisoners (0.3%) and others (street children and partners of those in risk groups, 6%), and those who did not receive counselling or services such as condom and needle distribution. Individuals who were not counselled were more likely to seroconvert. Conclusions: In this large cohort of high-risk groups from Eastern Europe, HIV testing was low and HIV sero-conversion was high. This is of public health concern, bringing into question the overall quality of counselling and how well it is tailored to the specific needs of various risk groups. Qualitative studies to understand the reasons for non-testing are urgently required for designing client-specific interventions. PMID:26399206

  7. An Overview of HIV Prevention Interventions for People Who Inject Drugs in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Ratliff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Tanzania has seen a rapid rise in the number of people who inject drugs (PWID, specifically heroin. While the overall HIV prevalence in Tanzania has declined recently to 5.6%, in 2009, the HIV prevalence among PWID remains alarmingly high at 35%. In this paper, we describe how the Tanzania AIDS Prevention Program (TAPP, Médecins du Monde France (MdM-F, and other organisations have been at the forefront of addressing this public health issue in Africa, implementing a wide array of harm reduction interventions including medication-assisted treatment (MAT, needle and syringe programs (NSP, and “sober houses” for residential treatment in the capital, Dar es Salaam, and in Zanzibar. Looking toward the future, we discuss the need to (1 extend existing services and programs to reach more PWID and others at risk for HIV, (2 develop additional programs to strengthen existing programs, and (3 expand activities to include structural interventions to address vulnerabilities that increase HIV risk for all Tanzanians.

  8. BAFF blockade prevents anti-drug antibody formation in a mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Morel, Laurence; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies formed against the therapeutic protein are a life-threatening complication that arises during enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency; GAA). To provide an effective alternative to current practices, we investigated the capacity of anti-B-cell activating factor (BAFF) as a novel drug candidate to prevent antibody formation in a Pompe disease mouse model. A BAFF-neutralizing antibody was administered prophylactically and with maintenance doses in association with enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human GAA in Gaa(-/-) mice. BAFF blockade delayed antibody production and increased GAA activity within tissues with protection from anaphylaxis. Anti-BAFF also resolved antibody formation during an immune response and precluded the maturation of antibody secreting cells from entering the bone marrow compartment. This treatment modality may therefore be a viable alternative for the clinical management of antibody formation for Pompe disease and has potential use against antibody formation in other protein replacement therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Usefulness of anti-ulcer drugs for the prevention and treatment of peptic ulcers induced by low doses of aspirin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sayaka Nakashima; Shinichi Ota; Shin Arai; Kiyoko Yoshino; Mie Inao; Keiko Ishikawa; Nobuaki Nakayama; Yukinori Imai; Sumiko Nagoshi; Satoshi Mochida

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of anti-ulcer drugs for the prevention and treatment of low-dose aspirininduced peptic ulcer. METHODS: Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in 68 patients receiving daily low-dose aspirin (81 or 100 mg/day). The endoscopic findings were classified according to the Lanza score, and the scores were compared between groups categorized according to the concomitant use of anti-ulcer drugs and the types of drugs used. In another study, 31 hemorrhagic peptic ulcer patients who had been receiving low-dose aspirin were enrolled. The patients were randomly classified into the proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-treated group and the H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA)-treated group. The administration of low-dose aspirin was continued concomitantly, and endoscopic examinations were performed 8 wk later. ``RESULTS: The Lanza scores (mean ± SD) of the gastro-mucosal lesions were 1.0 ± 1.9 and 1.9 ± 2.3 in 8 and 16 patients receiving prevention therapy with a PPI and an H2RA, respectively. Both scores were significantly smaller than the scores in 34 patients who were not receiving prevention therapy (4.7 ± 1.0) and in 10 patients receiving cytoprotective anti-ulcer drugs (4.3 ± 1.6). In the prospective study, 18 and 13 patients received a PPI and an H2RA, respectively. Endoscopic examinations revealed that the tissue in the region of the gastro-mucosal lesions had reverted to normal in all patients in the PPI-treated group and in 12 patients (92%) in the H2RA-treated group; no significant differences were observed between the groups. CONCLUSION: H2RA therapy was effective for both the prevention and treatment of low-dose aspirininduced peptic ulcer, similar to the effects of PPIs, while cytoprotective anti-ulcer drugs were ineffective in preventing ulceration.

  10. 药源性青光眼的防治%Prevention & treatment of drug-induced glaucoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红利; 李世洋

    2015-01-01

    药源性青光眼系局部或全身用药而诱发的继发性开角或闭角青光眼。为提高临床医师对该病的认识,注意药物的不良反应,预防药源性青光眼的发生,本文就临床上可能诱发该病的常见药物、作用机制及防治作了综述。%Drug-induced glaucoma include secondary open-angle glaucoma or angle-closure glaucoma which were induced by patient's administering drugs locally or systematisally. In order to enhance physician's understanding this eye disease,and notice them to pay attention to the adverse-reaction of drugs,so that prevent drug-induced glaucoma occurence,authors review the related issures about common drugs inducing glaucoma,their action mechanism,as well as the prevention & treatment of drug-induced glaucoma in this paper.

  11. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  12. Prevention and Treatment of Vaginal Bleeding after Drug-induced Abortion by Yaoliuan Capsule and Its Effects on Menses Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Zhichun; HUANG Guangying

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore the effect of Yaoliuan capsule in the prevention and treatment of vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion and menses recovery after drug-induced abortion, 323 cases of gestation period ≤ 49 days and without contraindication, were divided randomly into study group (168 cases, taking Yaoliuan capsule) and control group (155 cases, taking placebo capsule). The results showed that in the study group, there were 161 cases (95.8 %) of complete abortion, 7 cases (4.2 %) of incomplete abortion; In the control group, there were 146 cases (94.2 %) of complete abortion, 6 cases (3.9 %) of incomplete abortion, 3 cases (1.9 %) of abortion failure. The vaginal bleeding time was 5-25 days (mean 10.8 days) in study group, while that was 6-62 days (mean 19.1 days) in control group. The menstrual cycle was 30.5±5.2 days and 33.8 d±8.6 days respectively in study and control groups. The menstrual period was 6.1±3.5 days and 9.9±5.1 days respectively in study and control groups. Yaoliuan capsule is an effective drug to prevent and treat vaginal bleeding following drug-induced abortion, promote menstruation recovery and prevent pelvic infection.

  13. Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes Mellitus Outpatient: Focusing on Antiplatelet, Statins and Irrational Antihypertensive Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri G. C. E. Lie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease complication is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes mellitus (DM patients and all at once is an addition to economic burden to both the patient and government in the era of universal coverage (UC. As one of strategies to prevent and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease complication, American Diabetes Associaton (ADA recommends the use of statins, antiplatelet, dan antihipertensive agents in DM patients. This study aimed to describe the profile of cardiovascular disease preventive drugs used in DM outpatients. This was non-experimental and cross-sectional study included 100 DM outpatients during the period of November–December 2014. This study found that only 25 out of 100 patients who met-statin criteria were on statins. Antiplatelet agents were only prescribed in 23 (30.67% out of 75 DM patients who met criteria. Antihypertensive agents were used in 42 (87.50% out of 48 DM patients who were hypertensive, however angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs or angiotensin-converting blockers (ARBs were not used as an agent of choice as recommended by various guidelines. Overall, the use of cardiovascular disease preventive drugs in DM patients has yet to be optimal. Further research was needed to identify factors which confine the use of cardiovascular disease primary and secondary preventive drugs in DM patients.

  14. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagan Abigail A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. Methods This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST drug prevention program with fidelity. Regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing four dimensions of fidelity: adherence, dosage, quality of delivery, and student responsiveness. Results Although most sites faced common barriers, such as finding room in the school schedule for the program, gaining full support from key participants (i.e., site coordinators, principals, and LST teachers, ensuring teacher participation in training workshops, and classroom management difficulties, most schools involved in the project implemented LST with very high levels of fidelity. Across sites, 86% of program objectives and activities required in the three-year curriculum were delivered to students. Moreover, teachers were observed using all four recommended teaching practices, and 71% of instructors taught all the required LST lessons. Multivariate analyses found that highly rated LST program characteristics and better student behavior were significantly related to a greater proportion of material taught by teachers (adherence. Instructors who rated the LST program characteristics as ideal were more likely to teach all lessons (dosage. Student behavior and use of interactive teaching techniques (quality of delivery were positively related. No variables were related to student participation (student responsiveness. Conclusion Although difficult, high implementation fidelity by community-based organizations can be achieved. This study suggests some important factors that

  15. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalic, Sharon F; Fagan, Abigail A; Argamaso, Susanne

    2008-01-18

    Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST) drug prevention program with fidelity. Regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing four dimensions of fidelity: adherence, dosage, quality of delivery, and student responsiveness. Although most sites faced common barriers, such as finding room in the school schedule for the program, gaining full support from key participants (i.e., site coordinators, principals, and LST teachers), ensuring teacher participation in training workshops, and classroom management difficulties, most schools involved in the project implemented LST with very high levels of fidelity. Across sites, 86% of program objectives and activities required in the three-year curriculum were delivered to students. Moreover, teachers were observed using all four recommended teaching practices, and 71% of instructors taught all the required LST lessons. Multivariate analyses found that highly rated LST program characteristics and better student behavior were significantly related to a greater proportion of material taught by teachers (adherence). Instructors who rated the LST program characteristics as ideal were more likely to teach all lessons (dosage). Student behavior and use of interactive teaching techniques (quality of delivery) were positively related. No variables were related to student participation (student responsiveness). Although difficult, high implementation fidelity by community-based organizations can be achieved. This study suggests some important factors that organizations should consider to ensure fidelity, such as

  16. The effectiveness of workplace drug prevention policies: does 'zero tolerance' work?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehay, Stephan L.; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo

    1999-01-01

    Workplace drug testing programs are becoming increasingly more common although there is little research demonstrating that they have any effect on drug use by employees. This paper analyzes the deterrence effect of a particularly aggressive workplace drug-testing policy implemented by the military in 1981. The military's policy incorporates random drug testing of current employees and zero tolerance. Using data from various years of the Department of Defense's Worldwide Survey of Health Re...

  17. Economic evaluation of 3-drug antiretroviral regimens for the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werayingyong, Pitsaphun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkunya; Tantivess, Sripen; Kullert, Nareeluk; Tosanguan, Kakanang; Butchon, Rukmanee; Voramongkol, Nipunporn; Boonsuk, Sarawut; Pilasant, Songyot; Kulpeng, Wantanee; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-03-01

    The current program for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Thailand recommends a 2-drugs regimen for HIV-infected pregnant women with a CD4 count >200 cells/mm(3). This study assesses the value for money of 3 antiretroviral drugs compared with zidovudine (AZT)+single-dose nevirapine (sd-NVP). A decision tree was constructed to predict costs and outcomes using the governmental perspective for assessing cost-effectiveness of 3-drug regimens: (1) AZT, lamivudine, and efavirenz and (2) AZT, 3TC, and lopinavir/ritonavir, in comparison with the current protocol, AZT+sd-NVP. The 3-drug antiretroviral regimens yield lower costs and better health outcomes compared with AZT+sd-NVP. Although these 3-drug regimens offer higher program costs and health care costs for premature birth, they save money significantly in regard to pediatric HIV treatment and treatment costs for drug resistance in mothers. The 3-drug regimens are cost-saving interventions. The findings from this study were used to support a policy change in the national recommendation. © 2013 APJPH.

  18. Acoustic Correlates of Fatigue in Laryngeal Muscles: Findings for a Criterion-Based Prevention of Acquired Voice Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to identify acoustic correlates of laryngeal muscle fatigue in conditions of vocal effort. Method: In a previous study, a technique of electromyography (EMG) served to define physiological signs of "voice fatigue" in laryngeal muscles involved in voicing. These signs correspond to spectral changes in contraction…

  19. Prioritizing Alcohol Prevention: Establishing Alcohol as the Gateway Drug and Linking Age of First Drink with Illicit Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E.; King, Jessica; Sears, Cynthia; Harville, Cedric; Bondoc, Irina; Joseph, Kessy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Given ever-reducing budgets of community and school substance use prevention programs, there is a call for identifying the first substance in the sequence leading to polydrug use. Methods: Examining data from a nationally representative sample of 2835 United States 12th graders, we sought to determine (1) the first substance…

  20. Drug abuse, relapse, and prevention education in malaysia: perspective of university students through a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Wong, Chee Piau; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing accounts of illegal substance abuse among university students and professional groups in Malaysia. This study looks at university students' perceptions about this phenomenon. Students from Malaysian universities were asked for their impressions about drug availability and abuse, as well as factors contributing to drug abuse and relapse. The questionnaire also inquired into their knowledge and views regarding government versus private rehabilitation centers, as well as their exposure to, and views about, school-based drug-prevention education. Participants were 460 university students from five Malaysian states: Penang, Selangor, Kuala Lumpur, Sabah, and Sarawak. Results showed gender differences in perceptions of relapse prevention strategies, as well as factors leading to drug abuse and relapse. Students also believed that drug education would be more effective if initiated between the ages of 11 and 12 years, which is slightly older than the common age of first exposure, and provided suggestions for improving existing programs. Implications of student perceptions for the improvement of current interventions and educational programs are discussed.

  1. Drug abuse, relapse and prevention education in Malaysia: perspective of university students through a mixed methods approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Lian eTam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been increasing accounts of illegal substance abuse among university students and professional groups in Malaysia. This study looks at university students’ perceptions about this phenomenon. Students from Malaysian universities were asked for their impressions about drug availability and abuse, as well as factors contributing to drug abuse and relapse. The questionnaire also inquired into their knowledge and views regarding government versus private rehabilitation centres, as well as their exposure to, and views about, school-based drug-prevention education. Participants were 460 university students from five Malaysian states: Penang, Selangor, Kuala Lumpur, Sabah, and Sarawak. Results showed gender differences in perceptions of relapse prevention strategies, as well as factors leading to drug abuse and relapse. Students also believed that drug education would be more effective if initiated between the ages of 11 to 12 years, which is slightly older than the common age of first exposure, and provided suggestions for improving existing programs. Implications of student perceptions for the improvement of current interventions and educational programs are discussed.

  2. Drugs and herbs given to prevent hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis therapy: systematic review of ingredients and evaluation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Binghua

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs to protect the liver are frequently prescribed in some countries as part of treatment for tuberculosis. The biological rationale is not clear, they are expensive and may do harm. We conducted a systematic review to a describe the ingredients of "liver protection drugs"; and b compare the evidence base for the policy against international standards. Methods We searched international medical databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the specialised register of the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group and Chinese language databases (CNKI, VIP and WanFang to April 2007. Our inclusion criteria were research papers that reported evaluating any liver protection drug or drugs for preventing liver damage in people taking anti-tuberculosis treatment. Two authors independently categorised and extracted data, and appraised the stated methods of evaluating their effectiveness. Results Eighty five research articles met our inclusion criteria, carried out in China (77, India (2, Russia (4, Ukraine (2. These articles evaluated 30 distinct types of liver protection compounds categorised as herbal preparations, manufactured herbal products, combinations of vitamins and other non-herbal substances and manufactured pharmaceutical preparations. Critical appraisal of these articles showed that all were small, poorly conducted studies, measuring intermediate outcomes. Four trials that were described as randomised controlled trials were small, had short follow up, and did not meet international standards. Conclusion There is no reliable evidence to support prescription of drugs or herbs to prevent liver damage in people on tuberculosis treatment.

  3. Non-Drug Therapy and Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus by Dalk (Massage)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Davood; Vakilinia, Seyed Reza; Asghari, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: According to WHO estimation, the number of diabetic patients would reach about 591.9 million people in 2035. The tendency towards other kinds of treatment is increasing because of the high therapeutic expenditures and current medical complications. Positive results of massage in recent articles and the prominent role of dalk in Iranian traditional medicine led us to the present study review. Methods: Studying Iranian traditional medicine textbooks, such as Canon of Ibn Sina, Kholasat Al Hekma of Aghili, Zakhireh-ye Khwarazm shahi of Jorjani, Alhavi of Razes and Kamel-al-sanaat of Ibn Abas were done on the topic of dalk discussion. Additionally, a search on “massage and diabetes mellitus” articles was done in motor search engines of PubMed, Google Scholars and the site of “Farhangestane Oloume Pezeshki”. The data were eventually compared and evaluated. Results: In Iranian traditional medicine, dalk means kneading or massage of the body. Depending on the quality and quantity of the performance, it was divided into different kinds. The mechanism of dalk is to increase the blood supply in organs and subsequently increasing organ’s warmness and metabolism that lead to increased residues expulsion. Therefore, it could be advised to healthcare system as a means of treatment. On the other hand, for different diseases such as asthma, arthritis, insomnia, paralysis, DM, and constipation the effect of massage was evaluated and its positive results were confirmed. For example, in DM, its effects in decreasing FBS and HBA1C are shown. Conclusion: According to Iranian traditional medicine and latest articles, dalk as a non-drug therapy and prevention manner is recommended. PMID:27840511

  4. Drug action of benzocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase from fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Croce, D; Trinks, P W; Grifo, M B; Takara, D; Sánchez, G A

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the local anesthetic benzocaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from fast-twitch muscles was tested. The effects on Ca-ATPase activity, calcium binding and uptake, phosphoenzyme accumulation and decomposition were assessed using radioisotopic methods. The calcium binding to the Ca-ATPase was noncompetitively inhibited, and the enzymatic activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 47.1 mM). The inhibition of the activity depended on the presence of the calcium ionophore calcimycin and the membrane protein concentration. The pre-exposure of the membranes to benzocaine enhanced the enzymatic activity in the absence of calcimycin, supporting the benzocaine permeabilizing effect, which was prevented by calcium. Benzocaine also interfered with the calcium transport capability by decreasing the maximal uptake (IC50 40.3 mM) without modification of the calcium affinity for the ATPase. It inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme, and at high benzocaine concentration, the dephosphorylation step became rate-limiting as suggested by the biphasic profile of phosphoenzyme accumulation at different benzocaine concentrations. The data reported in this paper revealed a complex pattern of inhibition involving two sites for interaction with low and high benzocaine concentrations. It is concluded that benzocaine not only exerts an indirect action on the membrane permeability to calcium but also affects key steps of the Ca-ATPase enzymatic cycle.

  5. Sesamin prevents decline in exercise capacity and impairment of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shingo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Matsushima, Shouji; Takemoto, Daisuke; Furihata, Takaaki; Mizushima, Wataru; Fukushima, Arata; Yokota, Takashi; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    What is the central question of this study? Our aim was to examine whether sesamin can prevent a decline in exercise capacity in high-fat diet-induced diabetic mice. Our hypothesis was that maintenance of mitochondrial function and attenuation of oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle would contribute to this result. What is the main finding and its importance? The new findings are that sesamin prevents the diabetes-induced decrease in exercise capacity and impairment of mitochondrial function through the inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle. Sesamin may be useful as a novel agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. We previously reported that exercise capacity and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in diabetic mice were impaired, in association with the activation of NAD(P)H oxidase. It has been reported that sesamin inhibits NAD(P)H oxidase-induced superoxide production. Therefore, we examined whether the antioxidant sesamin could prevent a decline in exercise capacity in mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or HFD, then treated or not with sesamin (0.2%) to yield the following four groups: ND, ND+Sesamin, HFD and HFD+Sesamin (n = 10 each). After 8 weeks, body weight, fat weight, blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol and fatty acid were significantly increased in HFD compared with ND mice. Sesamin prevented the increases in blood insulin and lipid levels in HFD-fed mice, but did not affect the plasma glucose. Exercise capacity determined by treadmill tests was significantly reduced in HFD mice, but almost completely recovered in HFD+Sesamin mice. Citrate synthase activity was significantly decreased in the skeletal muscle of HFD mice, and these decreases were also inhibited by sesamin. Superoxide anion and NAD(P)H oxidase activity were significantly increased in HFD mice compared with the ND mice and were ameliorated by sesamin. Sesamin

  6. CHIP buffers heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels to prevent augmentation of anticancer drug-resistant cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, M; Nakajima, Y; Waku, T; Hiyoshi, H; Morishita, T; Furumai, R; Hayashi, Y; Kishimoto, H; Kimura, K; Yanagisawa, J

    2015-08-27

    Many types of cancer display heterogeneity in various features, including gene expression and malignant potential. This heterogeneity is associated with drug resistance and cancer progression. Recent studies have shown that the expression of a major protein quality control ubiquitin ligase, carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), is negatively correlated with breast cancer clinicopathological stages and poor overall survival. Here we show that CHIP acts as a capacitor of heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents an increase in the anticancer drug-resistant population in breast cancer cells. CHIP knockdown in breast cancer cells increased variation in Bcl-2 expression levels, an antiapoptotic protein, among the cells. Our results also showed that CHIP knockdown increased the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. These findings suggest that CHIP buffers variation in gene expression levels, affecting resistance to anticancer drugs. In single-cell clones derived from breast cancer cell lines, CHIP knockdown did not alter the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. In contrast, when clonal cells were treated with a mutagen, the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells were altered by CHIP knockdown. These results suggest that CHIP masks genetic variations to suppress heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents augmentation of the anticancer drug-resistant population of breast cancer cells. Because genetic variation is a major driver of heterogeneity, our results suggest that the degree of heterogeneity in expression levels is decided by a balance between genetic variation and the buffering capacity of CHIP.

  7. TRAINING COMMUNITY VOLUTEERS IN PREVENTING ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG ADDICTION : A BASIC PROGRAMME AND ITS IMPACT ON CERTAIN VARIABLES

    OpenAIRE

    Manickam, L. S. S.

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted on 19 community volunteers and the training module they underwent is presented. The subjects were given 7 days in-training with the objectives of imparting knowledge ana skill to identify and motivate alcohol and drug dependent person, to motivate them and their family to seek treatment to provide social support to them and to organise prevention programmes in the community. Their knowledge, skills and attitudes have shown significant improvement and change as a result t...

  8. Evaluating early preventive antipsychotic and antidepressant drug treatment in an infection-based neurodevelopmental mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Urs; Spoerri, Erica; Yee, Benjamin K; Schwarz, Markus J; Feldon, Joram

    2010-05-01

    Current pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia remains unsatisfactory with little hope for complete functional restoration in patients once the disease has developed. A preventive approach based on intervention in the prodromal stage of the disease aiming to preserve functional integrity by halting the progress of the disease is therefore extremely attractive. Here, we investigated the effects of preventive antipsychotic or antidepressant drug treatment in a well-established neurodevelopmental mouse model of multiple schizophrenia-related abnormalities. Pregnant mice on gestation day 9 were exposed to the viral mimic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (2 mg/kg, intravenously) or corresponding vehicle treatment, and the resulting offspring from both prenatal treatment conditions were subjected to chronic antipsychotic (haloperidol or clozapine), antidepressant (fluoxetine), or placebo treatment during the periadolescent stage of development. The effects of the preventive pharmacotherapy on behavioral and pharmacological functions were then investigated in adulthood using paradigms relevant to schizophrenia, namely prepulse inhibition, latent inhibition, and sensitivity to psychostimulant drugs. We show that periadolescent treatment with the reference antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs can successfully block the emergence of multiple psychosis-related behavioral and pharmacological abnormalities in subjects predisposed to adult brain pathology by exposure to prenatal immune challenge. At the same time, however, our study reveals numerous negative influences of the early pharmacological intervention on normal behavioral development in control subjects. Hence, even though preventive pharmacotherapy may be beneficial in individuals with predisposition to psychosis-related brain dysfunctions, chronic antipsychotic or antidepressant drug treatment in false-positive subjects is associated with substantial risk for long-term behavioral disturbances in adulthood.

  9. Experimental study on cyclosporine A drug delivery system in prevention of posterior capsule opacification after intraocular lens implantation in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of cyclosporine A drug delivery system (CsA-DDS) on the prevention of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) after experimental intraocular lens implantation in rabbit eyes. Methods Twenty healthy New Zealand white rabbits, whose left eyes and right eyes were used respectively as experiment eyes and controls, were subjected to extracapsular lens extraction and artificial lens implantation. During the operation, CsA-DDS with poly (lactideco-glycolide) as carriers or empty DDS was...

  10. Secreted Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 of Proliferating Smooth Muscle Cells as a Trigger for Drug Release from Stent Surface Polymers in Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliesche, Daniel G; Hussner, Janine; Witzigmann, Dominik; Porta, Fabiola; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Huwyler, Jörg; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in industrialized countries. Atherosclerotic coronary arteries are commonly treated with percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention followed by stent deployment. This treatment has significantly improved the clinical outcome. However, triggered vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation leads to in-stent restenosis in bare metal stents. In addition, stent thrombosis is a severe side effect of drug eluting stents due to inhibition of endothelialization. The aim of this study was to develop and test a stent surface polymer, where cytotoxic drugs are covalently conjugated to the surface and released by proteases selectively secreted by proliferating smooth muscle cells. Resting and proliferating human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC) and endothelial cells (HCAEC) were screened to identify an enzyme exclusively released by proliferating HCASMC. Expression analyses and enzyme activity assays verified selective and exclusive activity of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in proliferating HCASMC. The principle of drug release exclusively triggered by proliferating HCASMC was tested using the biodegradable stent surface polymer poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) and the MMP-9 cleavable peptide linkers named SRL and AVR. The specific peptide cleavage by MMP-9 was verified by attachment of the model compound fluorescein. Fluorescein release was observed in the presence of MMP-9 secreting HCASMC but not of proliferating HCAEC. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic drug conjugated polymers can be designed to selectively release the attached compound triggered by MMP-9 secreting smooth muscle cells. This novel concept may be beneficial for stent endothelialization thereby reducing the risk of restenosis and thrombosis.

  11. [Counterfeit and contraband drugs in Brazil: overview and prospects for preventing their use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Renato Lopes; Lasmar, Marcelo Carvalho

    2014-04-01

    The problem of counterfeit medicines is increasing rapidly, aggravated by globalization and the lure of profit from this illegal activity. Various types of drugs have been counterfeited, posing a serious public health and safety problem. The current article provides an overview of the issue in Brazil and the resulting measures taken by the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in collaboration with the Federal Police from 2007 to March 2011. The study analyzed seizures of counterfeit drugs, arrests, and other factors. No professional pharmacist was present in 90% of the establishments were some type of crime occurred (sale of counterfeit drugs and lack of control of narcotics and other drugs). Among the products seized, most were drugs for erectile dysfunction. The study showed the importance of inter-agency collaboration for combatting this type of irregular drug sales.

  12. A Review of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastrointestinal Injury: Focus on Prevention of Small Intestinal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Fujimori

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Capsule endoscopy and balloon endoscopy, advanced modalities that allow full investigation of the entire small intestine, have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs can cause a variety of abnormalities in the small intestine. Recently, several reports show that traditional NSAIDs (tNSAIDs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA can induce small intestinal injuries. These reports have shown that the preventive effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs does not extend to the small intestine, suggesting that concomitant therapy may be required to prevent small intestinal side effects associated with tNSAID/ASA use. Recently, several randomized controlled trials used capsule endoscopy to evaluate the preventive effect of mucoprotective drugs against tNSAID/ASA-induced small intestinal injury. These studies show that misoprostol and rebamipide reduce the number and types of tNSAID-induced small intestinal mucosal injuries. However, those studies were limited to a small number of subjects and tested short-term tNSAID/ ASA treatment. Therefore, further extensive studies are clearly required to ascertain the beneficial effect of these drugs.

  13. Recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs to treat or prevent sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    PURPOSE: Sarcopenia is an age related muscle condition which is frequently a precursor of frailty, mobility disability and premature death. It has a high prevalence in older populations and presents a considerable social and economic burden. Potential treatments are under development but, as yet, no...

  14. Febrile seizures Familial risk factors, outcome and preventive use of antipyretic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Esch (Adrianus)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractFebrile seizures (FS) occur in early childhood during a febrile illness. A typical or simple FS is characterized by a sudden loss of consciousness with either stiffening and myoclonic jerking or total loss of muscle tone. During a short initial tonic phase of the seizure, the child may

  15. The role of non-governmental organizations in the prevention and reduction of drug abuse: the Philippine experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quejas, S Q

    1983-01-01

    A wide range of non-governmental organizations are involved in the prevention and reduction of drug abuse in the Philippines. The numerous activities and substantive achievements of non-governmental organizations in combating the problems of drug abuse are manifestations of their commitment to and involvement in an avowed partnership with the Government to promote care for young people and quality of life in general. The Dangerous Drugs Board, the Government's policy-making and co-ordinating body, has facilitated and encouraged the development of existing approaches and strategies and, in co-operation with non-governmental organizations, has made drug-abuse prevention programmes more viable and relevant. This co-operation strengthened agency relationships, encouraged resource-sharing and generated a more balanced approach towards programme planning and implementation. The various government services, in co-operation with non-governmental organizations, have adopted the models and strategies that are action-oriented activities, primarily intended to promote positive values, attitudes, self-development, creative productivity and skills of young people.

  16. KNOWLEDGE AND AWARENESS OF NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS AND DRUG INTERACTIONS AND THE ROLE OF PHARMACIST IN THE PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELA BEBEÇI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people today use nutritional supplements along with prescription and non prescription medications. Although many consumers believe that nutritional supplements are safe, the adverse drug reactions which derive from them, especially from their interactions with drugs, are not always widely understood or known by patients.Objectives: 1. To evaluate the knowledge regarding the common drug– nutritional supplements interactions among the patients 2. To evaluate the role of pharmacists in preventing these interactions. Materials and Methods: The survey included randomly selected 200 patients who visited different community pharmacies located in the city of Tirana, Albania between December 2013 and May 2014. Results: Among 71 % of the patients who used nutritional supplements, 39.5 % were aware that nutritional supplements can interact with medications. Patients who were more informed for these interactions, were mainly 18-25 and 26-40 years old. About 23.86 % of patients claimed that pharmacists always asked them about medications or nutritional supplements administered simultaneously, while approximately 28% of pharmacists affirmed that they always informed their patients about interactions nutritional supplements- medicaments. Conclusions: Nutritional supplements are often considered safe and natural and people are unaware of possible adverse effects associated to their use, especially when they are combined with drugs. The role of the pharmacist in preventing adverse effects resulting by the interactions drugs-nutritional supplements is essential in preserving the patient's life.

  17. Tanning Shade Gradations of Models in Mainstream Fitness and Muscle Enthusiast Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention in Men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Ethan, Danna; Berdnik, Alyssa; Basch, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    .... This study evaluated and compared tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images in mainstream fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Sixty-nine U.S. magazine issues...

  18. Role of calf muscle stimulation in the prevention of DVT in Indian patients undergoing surgeries for fractures around the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The role of peroperative calf muscle electrostimulation for DVT prophylaxis remains controversial. The risk of developing DVT in patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint is very less in patients analysed in our series.

  19. The omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, prevents the damaging effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha during murine skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Stephen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA is a ώ-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with anti-inflammatory and anti-cachetic properties that may have potential benefits with regards to skeletal muscle atrophy conditions where inflammation is present. It is also reported that pathologic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α are associated with muscle wasting, exerted through inhibition of myogenic differentiation and enhanced apoptosis. These findings led us to hypothesize that EPA may have a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage induced by the actions of TNF-α. Results The deleterious effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis were completely inhibited by co-treatment with EPA. Thus, EPA prevented the TNF-mediated loss of MyHC expression and significantly increased myogenic fusion (p p p p p p Conclusion In conclusion, EPA has a protective action against the damaging effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis. These findings support further investigations of EPA as a potential therapeutic agent during skeletal muscle regeneration following injury.

  20. Moving evidence-based drug abuse prevention programs from basic science to practice: "bridging the efficacy-effectiveness interface".

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Gerald J; Winters, Ken C; Realmuto, George M; Tarter, Ralph; Perry, Cheryl; Hektner, Joel M

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the challenges faced by developers of youth drug abuse prevention programs in transporting scientifically proven or evidence-based programs into natural community practice systems. Models for research on the transfer of prevention technology are described with specific emphasis given to the relationship between efficacy and effectiveness studies. Barriers that impede the successful integration of efficacy methods within effectiveness studies (e.g., client factors, practitioner factors, intervention structure characteristics, and environmental and organizational factors) are discussed. We present a modified model for program development and evaluation that includes a new type of research design, the hybrid efficacy-effectiveness study that addresses program transportability. The utility of the hybrid study is illustrated in the evaluation of the Early Risers "Skills for Success" prevention program.

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by Ciclopirox and Deferiprone, drugs that prevent hypusination of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Deepti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A has been implicated in HIV-1 replication. This protein contains the apparently unique amino acid hypusine that is formed by the post-translational modification of a lysine residue catalyzed by deoxyhypusine synthase and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH. DOHH activity is inhibited by two clinically used drugs, the topical fungicide ciclopirox and the systemic medicinal iron chelator deferiprone. Deferiprone has been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. Results Ciclopirox and deferiprone blocked HIV-1 replication in PBMCs. To examine the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the action of the drugs on eIF5A modification and HIV-1 gene expression in model systems. At early times after drug exposure, both drugs inhibited substrate binding to DOHH and prevented the formation of mature eIF5A. Viral gene expression from HIV-1 molecular clones was suppressed at the RNA level independently of all viral genes. The inhibition was specific for the viral promoter and occurred at the level of HIV-1 transcription initiation. Partial knockdown of eIF5A-1 by siRNA led to inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression that was non-additive with drug action. These data support the importance of eIF5A and hypusine formation in HIV-1 gene expression. Conclusion At clinically relevant concentrations, two widely used drugs blocked HIV-1 replication ex vivo. They specifically inhibited expression from the HIV-1 promoter at the level of transcription initiation. Both drugs interfered with the hydroxylation step in the hypusine modification of eIF5A. These results have profound implications for the potential therapeutic use of these drugs as antiretrovirals and for the development of optimized analogs.

  2. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by Ciclopirox and Deferiprone, drugs that prevent hypusination of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Mainul; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M; Palumbo, Paul; Saxena, Deepti; D'Alliessi Gandolfi, Darlene; Park, Myung Hee; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2009-10-13

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A has been implicated in HIV-1 replication. This protein contains the apparently unique amino acid hypusine that is formed by the post-translational modification of a lysine residue catalyzed by deoxyhypusine synthase and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). DOHH activity is inhibited by two clinically used drugs, the topical fungicide ciclopirox and the systemic medicinal iron chelator deferiprone. Deferiprone has been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. Ciclopirox and deferiprone blocked HIV-1 replication in PBMCs. To examine the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the action of the drugs on eIF5A modification and HIV-1 gene expression in model systems. At early times after drug exposure, both drugs inhibited substrate binding to DOHH and prevented the formation of mature eIF5A. Viral gene expression from HIV-1 molecular clones was suppressed at the RNA level independently of all viral genes. The inhibition was specific for the viral promoter and occurred at the level of HIV-1 transcription initiation. Partial knockdown of eIF5A-1 by siRNA led to inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression that was non-additive with drug action. These data support the importance of eIF5A and hypusine formation in HIV-1 gene expression. At clinically relevant concentrations, two widely used drugs blocked HIV-1 replication ex vivo. They specifically inhibited expression from the HIV-1 promoter at the level of transcription initiation. Both drugs interfered with the hydroxylation step in the hypusine modification of eIF5A. These results have profound implications for the potential therapeutic use of these drugs as antiretrovirals and for the development of optimized analogs.

  3. Effects of a Fall Prevention Exercise Program on Muscle Strength and Balance of the Old-old Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Il; An, Duk-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week balance exercise and elastic-resistance exercise program on muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly (over the age of 75). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five elderly persons were recruited from the community and assigned to three groups for convenience: balance exercise (intervention group 1; INT 1), resistance exercise (intervention group 2; INT 2), and control (CON) groups. The intervention was performed twice a week at a senior center and three times a week at home for 8 weeks. Muscle strength and balance were evaluated before and at the end of the trial, using a PowertrackIIand Tetrax. [Results] There were significant improvements in the strength of all seven muscle groups and balance in the INT 2 group. In the INT 1 group, there were significant improvements in the strength of all muscle groups except for the knee flexor and ankle plantar flexor muscle groups. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that an intervention using balance exercises or elastic-resistance exercises is effective at improving the muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly. These type of exercises should be appropriate for the physical characteristics of the subjects. PMID:25435697

  4. Public Service Advertising and Social Problems: the Case of Drug Abuse Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, William J.; Hanneman, Gerhard J.

    This paper explores certain findings of a DAIR (Drug Abuse Information Research) project undertaken at the University of Connecticut which is investigating the dissemination and impact of drug abuse information. Specifically, findings regarding audience response to persuasive antidrug abuse messages on television are discussed. On the basis of the…

  5. Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Active-Duty Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    actions, includ- ing courts martial or administrative separation for drug use. Prior to 1981, random drug testing existed but with the primary purpose...Life Course,” Epidemiology Research International, Vol. 2012, January 2012, art . 520894. Paulozzi, Leonard J., Christopher M. Jones, Karin A. Mack

  6. Toward an Ecstasy and Other Club Drug (EOCD) Prevention Intervention for Rave Attendees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Miller, Sarah; Pianim, Selwyn; Kunz, Michael; Orrick, Erin; Link, Tanja; Palacios, Wilson R.; Peters, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    A growing body of recent research has identified that "rave" attendees are at high risk for the use of "club drugs," such as 3,4-methylenedioxymeth-amphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). Rave attendees, however, comprise only one of several club-going populations. In the current study, we explore the prevalence of ecstasy and other club drug (EOCD) use…

  7. Drug Prevention in Junior High: A Multi-Site Longitudinal Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.; Bell, Robert M.

    Although concern about adolescent drug use has grown over the past two decades, strategies for controlling use have not kept pace. Project ALERT (Adolescent Learning Experiences in Resistance Training), a school-based program, specifically targets cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana, the so-called gateway drugs. It is based on the social influence…

  8. Depression, Anxiety, and Alcohol or Other Drug Use among College Students. Prevention Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Virginia

    2004-01-01

    Community studies and reports from clinicians reveal that significant numbers of students on U.S. college campuses suffer from depression and/or anxiety and use alcohol or other drugs (AOD). Counselors in both the drug abuse and mental health fields confirm that students who seek mental health treatment often report symptoms of substance abuse,…

  9. The promises and pitfalls of retrieval-extinction procedures in preventing relapse to drug seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavan P McNally

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Relapse to drug seeking after treatment or a period of abstinence remains a fundamental challenge for drug users. The retrieval – extinction procedure offers promise in augmenting the efficacy of exposure based treatment for drug use and for protecting against relapse to drug seeking. Preceding extinction training with a brief retrieval or reminder trial, retrieval – extinction training, has been shown to reduce reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking in animal models and also to produce profound and long lasting decrements in cue-induced craving in human heroin users. However, the mechanisms that mediate these effects of retrieval - extinction training are unclear. Moreover, under some circumstances, the retrieval – extinction procedure can significantly increase vulnerability to reinstatement in animal models.

  10. 'Pharyngocise': Randomized Controlled Trial of Preventative Exercises to Maintain Muscle Structure and Swallowing Function During Head-and-Neck Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle, E-mail: gmann@phhp.ufl.edu [Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Crary, Michael A. [Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Schmalfuss, Ilona [Department of Radiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL (Georgia); Amdur, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is common. The present randomized clinical trial studied the effectiveness of preventative behavioral intervention for dysphagia compared with the 'usual care.' Methods and Materials: A total of 58 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy were randomly assigned to usual care, sham swallowing intervention, or active swallowing exercises (pharyngocise). The intervention arms were treated daily during chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was muscle size and composition (determined by T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary outcomes included functional swallowing ability, dietary intake, chemosensory function, salivation, nutritional status, and the occurrence of dysphagia-related complications. Results: The swallowing musculature (genioglossus, hyoglossuss, and mylohyoid) demonstrated less structural deterioration in the active treatment arm. The functional swallowing, mouth opening, chemosensory acuity, and salivation rate deteriorated less in the pharyngocise group. Conclusion: Patients completing a program of swallowing exercises during cancer treatment demonstrated superior muscle maintenance and functional swallowing ability.

  11. 浅谈延迟性肌肉酸痛的原因及预防%The Cause and Prevention of Delayed-type Muscle Soreness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于华荣

    2012-01-01

    超过习惯强度的运动练习会产生延迟性肌肉酸痛,其致痛原因有损伤假说、痉挛假说和自由基假说。根据以上假说,采取相应的预防和减轻肌肉酸痛的措施,对于学校体育教育来说,具有现实的意义。%The exercise of more than habit strength may produce delayed-type muscle soreness, the cause of its induced pain include damage hypothesis, spasm hypothesis and the free radical hypothesis. According to the above hypothesis, the corresponding preventive measures are taken and can reduce muscle soreness. For school physical education, it has very practical significance.

  12. Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Marlatt, Alan G.

    2004-01-01

    Relapse prevention, based on the cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, has become an adjunct to the treatment of numerous psychological problems, including (but not limited to) substance abuse, depression, sexual offending, and schizophrenia. This article provides an overview of the efficacy and effectiveness of relapse prevention in the…

  13. Dietary enrichment with fish oil prevents high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Lisa K; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Janovska, Alena; Wittert, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    High saturated fat (HF-S) diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO) diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus) and white (extensor digitorum longus) muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group). Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic and gene

  14. Dietary enrichment with fish oil prevents high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K Philp

    Full Text Available High saturated fat (HF-S diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus and white (extensor digitorum longus muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group. Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic

  15. Developing Core Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Prescription Drug Misuse: A Medical Education Collaboration in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Karen H; Berman, Harris A; Flotte, Terence R; Flier, Jeffrey; Dimitri, Dennis M; Bharel, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury death in the United States. More than half of those deaths involve prescription drugs, specifically opioids. A key component of addressing this national epidemic is improving prescriber practices.A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that, although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse. To fill this gap, the governor and the secretary of health and human services invited the deans of the state's four medical schools to convene to develop a common educational strategy for teaching safe and effective opioid-prescribing practices. With leadership from the Department of Public Health and Massachusetts Medical Society, the deans formed the Medical Education Working Group in 2015. This group reviewed the relevant literature and current standards for treating substance use disorders and defined 10 core competencies for the prevention and management of prescription drug misuse.The medical schools have incorporated these competencies into their curricula and have committed to assessing students' competence in these areas. The members of the Medical Education Working Group have agreed to continue to work together on key next steps, including connecting these competencies to those for residents, equipping interprofessional teams to address prescription drug misuse, and developing materials in pain management and opioid misuse for practicing physicians. This first-in-the-nation partnership has yielded cross-institutional competencies that aim to address a public health emergency in real time.

  16. Overdose prevention for injection drug users: Lessons learned from naloxone training and distribution programs in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandi Vijay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatal heroin overdose is a significant cause of mortality for injection drug users (IDUs. Many of these deaths are preventable because opiate overdoses can be quickly and safely reversed through the injection of Naloxone [brand name Narcan], a prescription drug used to revive persons who have overdosed on heroin or other opioids. Currently, in several cities in the United States, drug users are being trained in naloxone administration and given naloxone for immediate and successful reversals of opiate overdoses. There has been very little formal description of the challenges faced in the development and implementation of large-scale IDU naloxone administration training and distribution programs and the lessons learned during this process. Methods During a one year period, over 1,000 participants were trained in SKOOP (Skills and Knowledge on Opiate Prevention and received a prescription for naloxone by a medical doctor on site at a syringe exchange program (SEP in New York City. Participants in SKOOP were over the age of 18, current participants of SEPs, and current or former drug users. We present details about program design and lessons learned during the development and implementation of SKOOP. Lessons learned described in the manuscript are collectively articulated by the evaluators and implementers of the project. Results There were six primary challenges and lessons learned in developing, implementing, and evaluating SKOOP. These include a political climate surrounding naloxone distribution; b extant prescription drug laws; c initial low levels of recruitment into the program; d development of participant appropriate training methodology; e challenges in the design of a suitable formal evaluation; and f evolution of program response to naloxone. Conclusion Other naloxone distribution programs may anticipate similar challenges to SKOOP and we identify mechanisms to address them. Strategies include being flexible in

  17. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  18. Formulation of two-drug controlled release non-biodegradable microparticles for potential treatment of muscles pain and spasm and their simultaneous spectrophotometeric estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shujaat A; Ahmad, Mahmood; Murtaza, Ghulam; Aamir, Muhammad N; Akhtar, Naveed; Kousar, Rozina

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate stable and controlled release microparticles for simultaneous delivery and UV spectrophotometric detection in combined dosage of an non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (nimesulide, NMS) and a spasmolytic agent (tizanidine, TZN) to maintain plasma concentration that may increase patients compliance, improved therapeutic efficacy, The aim was also to reduce severity of upper GI side effects of NMS because of alteration in delivery pattern via slow release of drug from microparticles and to increase the benefits of spasticity and disability for spastic patients by administering TZN in a modified release formulation as these two drugs are often prescribed in combination for the management of pain associated with muscles spasm. Ethyl cellulose was used as a retardant polymer. Drug-polymer and drug-drug compatibility study were conducted by different analytical tests. Microparticles were prepared by coacervation thermal change method. The prepared microparticles were characterized for their micromeritics and drug loading. The prepared microparticles were light yellow, free flowing and spherical in shape. The drug-loaded microparticles showed 87% and 91% entrapment efficiency of NMS and TZN, respectively, and release was extended up to 10 h. The infrared spectra, differential scanning calorimetry thermograms and XRD spectra showed the stable character of both the drugs in the drug-loaded microparticles. The in vitro release study of microparticles was performed in phosphate buffer pH 6.8. Linearity was observed in the concentration range of 5.0-30.0 microg/mL of NMS and 0.5-3.0 microg/mL of TZN. The microparticles have a potential for the prolongation and simultaneous delivery of the NIM and TIZ. The proposed UV method for simultaneous detection can be used for routine analysis of combined dosage form.

  19. The NARCONON™ drug education curriculum for high school students: A non-randomized, controlled prevention trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cecchini Marie A; Lennox Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background An estimated 13 million youths aged 12 to 17 become involved with alcohol, tobacco and other drugs annually. The number of 12- to 17-year olds abusing controlled prescription drugs increased an alarming 212 percent between 1992 and 2003. For many youths, substance abuse precedes academic and health problems including lower grades, higher truancy, drop out decisions, delayed or damaged physical, cognitive, and emotional development, or a variety of other costly consequences...

  20. Drug resistance of bacterial dental biofilm and the potential use of natural compounds as alternative for prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouidhi, Bochra; Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Chaieb, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease are directly linked with the ability of bacteria to form biofilm. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria colonizing the supragingival biofilm (Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria forming a subgingival plaque (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Cells embedded in biofilm are up to 1000-fold more resistant to antibiotics compared to their planctonic ones. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain biofilms drug resistance. Given the increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics currently used in dentistry, a great importance is given to natural compounds for the prevention of oral bacterial growth, adhesion and colonization. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. It has been well documented that medicinal plants and natural compounds confer considerable antibacterial activity against various microorganisms including cariogenic and periodontal pathogens. This paper provides a review of the literature focusing on the studies on (i) biofilm in the oral cavity, (ii) drug resistance of bacterial biofilm and (iii) the potential use of plant extracts, essential oils and natural compounds as biofilm preventive agents in dentistry, involving their origin and their mechanism of biofilm inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Addressing the Needs of Sexual Partners of People Who Inject Drugs through Peer Prevention Programs in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karamouzian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that HIV epidemic is mainly driven by injection drug use in Iran, partners of People Who Inject Drugs (PWID have been seriously neglected in terms of effective preventive interventions. Currently, sexual partners of PWID might have access to some harm reduction services at Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT centers; however, their needs have not been effectively targeted and met. Unfortunately, the current programs implemented by the Ministry of Health have overlooked the importance of this population in the course of the HIV epidemic throughout the country. In this policy brief, we are trying to draw the health policy-makers’ attention to this overlooked population and while reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of some of the readily available options on the table, come up with a recommended action to tackle this problem. Our recommended action that seems to have had promising results elsewhere in Asia would try to implement preventive interventions targeting this particular population through peer prevention programs.

  2. Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms Drugs, Procedures & ...

  3. Mechanisms of termination and prevention of atrial fibrillation by drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, A J; Smith, G L; Rankin, A C

    2011-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disorder of the rhythm of electrical activation of the cardiac atria. It is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, has multiple aetiologies, and increases the risk of death from stroke. Pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of treatment for AF, but currently available anti-arrhythmic drugs have limited efficacy and safety. An improved understanding of how anti-arrhythmic drugs affect the electrophysiological mechanisms of AF initiation and maintenance, in the setting of the different cardiac diseases that predispose to AF, is therefore required. A variety of animal models of AF has been developed, to represent and control the pathophysiological causes and risk factors of AF, and to permit the measurement of detailed and invasive parameters relating to the associated electrophysiological mechanisms of AF. The purpose of this review is to examine, consolidate and compare available relevant data on in-vivo electrophysiological mechanisms of AF suppression by currently approved and investigational anti-arrhythmic drugs in such models. These include the Vaughan Williams class I-IV drugs, namely Na(+) channel blockers, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, action potential prolonging drugs, and Ca(2+) channel blockers; the "upstream therapies", e.g., angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and fish oils; and a variety of investigational drugs such as "atrial-selective" multiple ion channel blockers, gap junction-enhancers, and intracellular Ca(2+)-handling modulators. It is hoped that this will help to clarify the main electrophysiological mechanisms of action of different and related drug types in different disease settings, and the likely clinical significance and potential future exploitation of such mechanisms.

  4. Unilateral hindlimb casting induced a delayed generalized muscle atrophy during rehabilitation that is prevented by a whey or a high protein diet but not a free leucine-enriched diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Magne

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated that the primary effect of immobilization was atrophy in the casted leg, but was also surprisingly associated with a retarded atrophy in the non-casted leg during rehabilitation. In search of mechanisms involved in this generalized atrophy, we demonstrated in the present study that contrary to pair-fed non-immobilized control animals, muscle protein synthesis in the non-immobilized limb was unable to adapt and to respond positively to food intake. Because pair-fed control rats did not lose muscle mass, this defect in muscle protein synthesis may represent one of the explanation for the muscle mass loss observed in the non-immobilized rats. Nevertheless, in order to stimulate protein turn over and generate a positive nitrogen balance required to maintain the whole muscle mass in immobilized rats, we tested a dietary free leucine supplementation (an amino acid known for its stimulatory effect on protein metabolism during the rehabilitation period. Leucine supplementation was able to overcome the anabolic resistance in the non-immobilized limb. A greater muscle protein synthesis up-regulation associated with a stimulation of the mTOR signalling pathway was indeed recorded but it remained inefficient to prevent the loss of muscle in the non-immobilized limb. By contrast, we demonstrated here that whey protein or high protein diets were able to prevent the muscle mass loss of the non-immobilized limb by sustaining muscle protein synthesis during the entire rehabilitation period.

  5. Preventing Prescription Drug Misuse in Work Settings: Efficacy of a Brief Intervention in Health Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Gale; Neeper, Michael; Linde, Brittany; Bennett, Joel

    2017-07-06

    It is becoming more commonplace for employees to use prescription medication outside of intended use. Opioid and other prescription misuse has implications for the health and productivity of workers. Easy-to-access webinars that help employees learn about alternatives to prescription use may decrease risk. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of an interactive but brief health consciousness and prescription drug intervention for a diverse sample of employees and show effectiveness via both Internet-delivered webinar and classroom delivery. Employees from a variety of workplaces filled out pre- and post-questionnaires upon completion of a one-hour long intervention. A total of 114 participants completed the pre- and post-questionnaires. Results showed that, compared with before the training, participants reported significantly more knowledge about prescription drug misuse and alternatives to prescription drug use after the training (t113=7.91, P<.001). Moreover, the medium of presentation (ie, face-to-face vs webinar) did not significantly impact effectiveness of the training (F1,98=1.15, P=.29). In both webinar and classroom formats, participants gained knowledge about alternatives to prescription drug use. This intervention appears to be beneficial to employees and assists in the awareness of prescription drug use in general and in the workplace.

  6. Drug-induced liver toxicity and prevention by herbal antioxidants: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya eSingh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is the center for drug and xenobiotic metabolism, which is influenced most with medication/xenobiotic-mediated toxic activity. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is common and its actual frequency is hard to determine due to underreporting, difficulties in detection or diagnosis, and incomplete observation of exposure. The death rate is high, up to about 10% for medication instigated liver danger. Endorsed medications (counting acetaminophen represented >50% of instances of intense liver failure in a study from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG of the patients admitted in 17 US healing facilities. Albeit different studies are accessible uncovering the mechanistic aspects of medication prompted hepatotoxicity, we are in the dilemma about the virtual story. The expanding prevalence and effectiveness of Ayurveda and herbal products in the treatment of various disorders led the investigators to look into their potential in countering drug-induced liver toxicity. Several plant products have been reported to date to mitigate the drug-induced toxicity. The dietary nature and less side reactions of the herbs provide them an extra edge over other candidates of supplementary medication. In this paper, we have discussed on the mechanism involved in drug-induced liver toxicity and the potential of herbal antioxidants as supplementary medication.

  7. Astaxanthin Supplementation Delays Physical Exhaustion and Prevents Redox Imbalances in Plasma and Soleus Muscles of Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana G. Polotow

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ASTA is a pinkish-orange carotenoid commonly found in marine organisms, especially salmon. ASTA is a powerful antioxidant and suggested to provide benefits for human health, including the inhibition of LDL oxidation, UV-photoprotection, and prophylaxis of bacterial stomach ulcers. Exercise is associated to overproduction of free radicals in muscles and plasma, with pivotal participation of iron ions and glutathione (GSH. Thus, ASTA was studied here as an auxiliary supplement to improve antioxidant defenses in soleus muscles and plasma against oxidative damage induced by exhaustive exercise. Long-term 1 mg ASTA/kg body weight (BW supplementation in Wistar rats (for 45 days significantly delayed time to exhaustion by 29% in a swimming test. ASTA supplementation increased scavenging/iron-chelating capacities (TEAC/FRAP and limited exercise-induced iron overload and its related pro-oxidant effects in plasma of exercising animals. On the other hand, ASTA induced significant mitochondrial Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase and cytosolic glutathione peroxidase antioxidant responses in soleus muscles that, in turn, increased GSH content during exercise, limited oxidative stress, and delayed exhaustion. We also provided significant discussion about a putative “mitochondrial-targeted” action of ASTA based on previous publications and on the positive results found in the highly mitochondrial populated (oxidative-type soleus muscles here.

  8. The Importance of Trunk Muscle Strength for Balance, Functional Performance, and Fall Prevention in Seniors : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Kressig, Reto W.; Muehlbauer, Thomas

    Background The aging process results in a number of functional (e.g., deficits in balance and strength/power performance), neural (e.g., loss of sensory/motor neurons), muscular (e.g., atrophy of type-II muscle fibers in particular), and bone-related (e.g., osteoporosis) deteriorations.

  9. Cochrane review: Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph T; Baker, Philip Ra; Minett, Geoffrey M; Bieuzen, Francois; Stewart, Ian B; Bleakley, Chris

    2016-01-14

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness, or 'DOMS', affects many people after exercise and can impair future performance. It usually peaks one to four days after exercise and several strategies are used to overcome it. The effectiveness and safety of many of these strategies applied and promoted is unknown. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. The Importance of Trunk Muscle Strength for Balance, Functional Performance, and Fall Prevention in Seniors : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Kressig, Reto W.; Muehlbauer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background The aging process results in a number of functional (e.g., deficits in balance and strength/power performance), neural (e.g., loss of sensory/motor neurons), muscular (e.g., atrophy of type-II muscle fibers in particular), and bone-related (e.g., osteoporosis) deteriorations. Traditionall

  11. Test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program “Study without Drugs”: pre- and post-testing for effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Ishaak, Fariel; de Vries, Nanne Karel; Wolf, Kees van der

    2014-01-01

    Background In this article, the test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program “Study without Drugs” is discussed. The aims of this study were to determine the results of the process evaluation and to determine whether the proposed school-oriented drug prevention program during a pilot project was effective for the participating pupils. Methods Sixty second-grade pupils at a junior high school in Paramaribo, Suriname participated in the test implementation. They were divided...

  12. HIV drug resistance in adults failing early antiretroviral treatment: results from the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi Cindy; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Santos, Breno Riegel; Godbole, Sheela V.; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Chen, Ying Q.; Cohen, Myron S.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2016-01-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HPTN 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350–550 cells/mm3 and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7/8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts. PMID:26859828

  13. The role of nutritional supplements in the prevention and treatment of resistance exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The topic of exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury has received considerable attention in recent years. Likewise, strategies to minimise the injury resulting from heavy resistance exercise have been studied. Over the past 15 years, several investigations have been performed focused on the role of nutritional supplements to attenuate signs and symptoms of muscle injury. Of these, some have reported favourable results, while many others have reported no benefit of the selected nutrient. Despite these mixed findings, recommendations for the use of nutritional supplements for the purposes of attenuating muscle injury are rampant within the popular fitness media and athletic world, largely without scientific support. Those nutrients include the antioxidant vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and vitamin E (tocopherol), N-acetyl-cysteine, flavonoids, L-carnitine, astaxanthin, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, creatine monohydrate, essential fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, bromelain, proteins and carbohydrates. A discussion of all published peer-reviewed articles in reference to these nutrients and their impact on resistance exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury is presented, in addition to a brief view into the potential mechanism of action for each nutrient.Based on the current state of knowledge, the following conclusions can be made with regard to nutritional supplements and their role in attenuating signs and symptoms of skeletal muscle injury occurring as a consequence of heavy resistance exercise: (i) there appears to be a potential role for certain supplements (vitamin C, vitamin E, flavonoids, and L-carnitine); (ii) these supplements cannot effectively eliminate muscle injury, only attenuate certain signs and symptoms; (iii) it is presently unclear what the optimal dosage of these nutrients is (whether used alone or in combination); (iv) it is unclear what the optimal pretreatment period is; and (v) the effectiveness is largely specific to non

  14. Status of drug development for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    supplementation. Several new medications for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis are in the pipeline. AREAS COVERED: The authors present the most recent studies on new and current antiresorptive as well as anabolic drugs. Specifically, the authors present the current knowledge on drugs directed against...... and romosozumab and these are both promising new medications based on bone mineral density results, safety profile and administration. Theoretically, romosozumab may hold the potential to be a drug to 'cure' even advanced stages of osteoporosis with short-term treatment. However, safety, fracture data and cost......INTRODUCTION: The metabolic bone disease osteoporosis is a growing health and health-economic problem worldwide. Bisphosphonates are the most widely used antiresorptive medication and the de facto gold standard in fracture prophylaxis all over the world, in conjunction with calcium and vitamin D...

  15. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  16. Experimental hyperlipidemia prevents the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on the contractility and responsiveness to phenylephrine of rat-isolated stunned papillary muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocić, I; Konstański, Z; Kaminski, M; Dworakowska, D; Dworakowski, R

    1999-09-01

    This study was designed to establish a hyperlipidemic diet (significant increase in the cholesterol and triglycerides blood levels, but without atherogenic changes in heart muscle and coronary vessels) and to investigate the influence of experimental hyperlipidemia on the effects of ischemic preconditioning (PC) of rat-isolated papillary muscle on the time course of contractility during simulated ischemia and reperfusion and responsiveness to phenylephrine under such a condition. The animals were divided in four experimental groups: standard diet-fed control group (SD), SD underwent ischemic preconditioning (SD-PC), hyperlipidemic diet-fed group (HLD) and HLD underOFFt PC (HLD-PC). Force of contraction (Fc), velocity of contraction (+dF/dt), and velocity of relaxation (-dF/dt) were measured. HLD preparations were more sensitive to ischemia then SD ones. PC, performed by 5-min perfusion with no-substrate solution gassing with 95% N2/5% CO2 in the presence of fast electrical stimulation, and 10 min of reperfusion with normal solution and rate of stimulation, significantly increased the resistance of isolated cardiac tissues to simulated ischemia in SD-PC group, but not in HLD-PC group. Negative inotropic action of phenylephrine occured in SD group of preparations after simulated-ischemia/reperfusion period was also prevented by PC. Therefore, we conclude that experimental hyperlipidemia significantly influenced the function of rat heart muscle including the higher sensitivity to ischemia and different reaction to the same PC procedure.

  17. Ingestion of glucose or sucrose prevents liver but not muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier T; Fuchs, Cas J; Smith, Fiona E; Thelwall, Pete E; Taylor, Roy; Stevenson, Emma J; Trenell, Michael I; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to define the effect of glucose ingestion compared with sucrose ingestion on liver and muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Fourteen cyclists completed two 3-h bouts of cycling at 50% of peak power output while ingesting either glucose or sucrose at a rate of 1.7 g/min (102 g/h). Four cyclists performed an additional third test for reference in which only water was consumed. We employed (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine liver and muscle glycogen concentrations before and after exercise. Expired breath was sampled during exercise to estimate whole body substrate use. After glucose and sucrose ingestion, liver glycogen levels did not show a significant decline after exercise (from 325 ± 168 to 345 ± 205 and 321 ± 177 to 348 ± 170 mmol/l, respectively; P > 0.05), with no differences between treatments. Muscle glycogen concentrations declined (from 101 ± 49 to 60 ± 34 and 114 ± 48 to 67 ± 34 mmol/l, respectively; P sucrose (2.03 ± 0.43 g/min) vs. glucose (1.66 ± 0.36 g/min; P sucrose ingestion prevent liver glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Sucrose ingestion does not preserve liver glycogen concentrations more than glucose ingestion. However, sucrose ingestion does increase whole body carbohydrate utilization compared with glucose ingestion. This trial was registered at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02110836.

  18. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  19. Preventing school failure, drug use, and delinquency among low-income children: long-term intervention in elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J; Hawkins, J D; Catalano, R F; Abbott, R D; Day, L E

    1995-01-01

    A six-year, school-based prevention program, which modified classroom teacher practices, offered parent training, and provided child social skills training, was evaluated for its effects on school failure, drug abuse, and delinquency among low-income urban children. Compared to a low-income control group, children in the intervention group showed enhanced school commitment and class participation. The girls in the group also evidenced lower rates of substance use initiation, while the boys exhibited increased social and school work skills.

  20. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  1. Seriousness, preventability, and burden impact of reported adverse drug reactions in Lombardy emergency departments: a retrospective 2-year characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrone V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Valentina Perrone,1,* Valentino Conti,2,* Mauro Venegoni,2 Stefania Scotto,2 Luca Degli Esposti,3 Diego Sangiorgi,3 Lucia Prestini,4 Sonia Radice,1 Emilio Clementi,5,6 Giuseppe Vighi,2,4 1Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University Hospital Luigi Sacco, Università di Milano, Milan, Italy; 2Regional Centre for Pharmacovigilance, Lombardy, Milan, Italy; 3CliCon Srl, Health, Economics and Outcomes Research, Ravenna, Italy; 4Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacovigilance, Niguarda Ca’Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, CNR Institute of Neuroscience, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University Hospital Luigi Sacco, Università di Milano, Milan, Italy; 6Scientific Institute, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Lecco, Italy *These authors contributed equally to the work Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs reported in emergency departments (EDs and carry out a thorough characterization of these to assess preventability, seriousness that required hospitalization, subsequent 30-day mortality, and economic burden. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of data from an active pharmacovigilance project at 32 EDs in the Lombardy region collected between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011. Demographic, clinical, and pharmacological data on patients admitted to EDs were collected by trained and qualified monitors, and deterministic record linkage was performed to estimate hospitalizations. Pharmacoeconomic analyses were based on Diagnosis-Related Group reimbursement. Results: 8,862 ADRs collected with an overall prevalence rate of 3.5 per 1,000 visits. Of all ADRs, 42% were probably/definitely preventable and 46.4% were serious, 15% required hospitalization, and 1.5% resulted in death. The System Organ Classes most frequently associated with ADRs were: skin and subcutaneous tissue, gastrointestinal

  2. Exercise-induced muscle cramp. Proposed mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, S

    1996-06-01

    Muscle cramp is a common, painful, physiological disturbance of skeletal muscle. Many athletes are regularly frustrated by exercise-induced muscle cramp yet the pathogenesis remains speculative with little scientific research on the subject. This has resulted in a perpetuation of myths as to the cause and treatment of it. There is a need for scientifically based protocols for the management of athletes who suffer exercise-related muscle cramp. This article reviews the literature and neurophysiology of muscle cramp occurring during exercise. Disturbances at various levels of the central and peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle are likely to be involved in the mechanism of cramp and may explain the diverse range of conditions in which cramp occurs. The activity of the motor neuron is subject to a multitude of influences including peripheral receptor sensory input, spinal reflexes, inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord, synaptic and neurotransmitter modulation and descending CNS input. The muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ proprioceptors are fundamental to the control of muscle length and tone and the maintenance of posture. Disturbance in the activity of these receptors may occur through faulty posture, shortened muscle length, intense exercise and exercise to fatigue, resulting in increased motor neuron activity and motor unit recruitment. The relaxation phase of muscle contraction is prolonged in a fatigued muscle, raising the likelihood of fused summation of action potentials if motor neuron activity delivers a sustained high firing frequency. Treatment of cramp is directed at reducing muscle spindle and motor neuron activity by reflex inhibition and afferent stimulation. There are no proven strategies for the prevention of exercise-induced muscle cramp but regular muscle stretching using post-isometric relaxation techniques, correction of muscle balance and posture, adequate conditioning for the activity, mental preparation for competition and

  3. Simultaneous determination of multi-class veterinary drugs in chicken processed foods and muscle using solid-supported liquid extraction clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Souichi; Nagano, Chieko; Kanda, Maki; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Matsushima, Yoko; Nakajima, Takayuki; Tsuruoka, Yumi; Nagata, Marie; Koike, Hiroshi; Sekimura, Kotaro; Hashimoto, Tsuneo; Takano, Ichiro; Shindo, Tetsuya

    2017-07-01

    We developed a simultaneous determination method for 37 veterinary drugs in two chicken processed foods (deep-fried chicken and non-fried chicken cutlet) and muscle via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The veterinary drugs belong to 7 different classes, including 4 antifolics, 4 benzimidazoles, 5 macrolides, 7 polyethers, 2 quinolones, 7 sulfonamides, and 8 other classes. The samples were extracted with ethyl acetate followed by acetonitrile with salt and buffers extraction. The two-step extraction enabled analyte extraction from highly lipid samples. The clean-up procedure, a solid-supported liquid extraction clean-up using a diatomaceous earth mini-cartridge, eliminated lipid co-extraction. The prepared sample matrix did not have an effect on the 36 analytes. The method was validated in accordance with the requirements of Japanese validation guidelines. Almost all targeted veterinary drugs successfully satisfied the guideline criteria in the three types of food matrices. The method exhibited recoveries of 70-105%, and the precision of repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility ranged from 1 to 11% and 1 to 15%, respectively. The limits of quantification were estimated to range from 0.2 to 1.0μg/kg. Applying this method to samples commercially available in Tokyo, residues were detected in 3 out of 26 deep-fried chickens, 5 out of 20 non-fried chicken cutlets, and 17 out of 39 chicken muscles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. D-TRP(8-γMSH Prevents the Effects of Endotoxin in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cells through TNFα/NF-KB Signalling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Gómez-SanMiguel

    Full Text Available Sepsis induces anorexia and muscle wasting secondary to an increase in muscle proteolysis. Melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH is a family of peptides that have potent anti-inflammatory effects. Melanocortin receptor-3 (MC3-R has been reported as the predominant anti-inflammatory receptor for melanocortins. The aim of this work was to analyse whether activation of MC3-R, by administration of its agonist D-Trp(8-γMSH, is able to modify the response of skeletal muscle to inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide endotoxin (LPS or TNFα. Adult male rats were injected with 250 μg/kg LPS and/or 500 μg/kg D-Trp(8-γMSH 17:00 h and at 8:00 h the following day, and euthanized 4 hours afterwards. D-Trp(8-γMSH decreased LPS-induced anorexia and prevented the stimulatory effect of LPS on hypothalamic IL-1β, COX-2 and CRH as well as on serum ACTH and corticosterone. Serum IGF-I and its expression in liver and gastrocnemius were decreased in rats injected with LPS, but not in those that also received D-Trp(8-γMSH. However, D-Trp(8-γMSH was unable to modify the effect of LPS on IGFBP-3. In the gastrocnemius D-Trp(8-γMSH blocked LPS-induced decrease in pAkt, pmTOR, MHC I and MCH II, as well as the increase in pNF-κB(p65, FoxO1, FoxO3, LC3b, Bnip-3, Gabarap1, atrogin-1, MuRF1 and in LC3a/b lipidation. In L6 myotube cultures, D-Trp(8-γMSH was able to prevent TNFα-induced increase of NF-κB(p65 phosphorylation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation as well as of IGF-I and MHC I expression. These data suggest that MC3-R activation prevents the effect of endotoxin on skeletal wasting by modifying inflammation, corticosterone and IGF-I responses and also by directly acting on muscle cells through the TNFα/NF-κB(p65 pathway.

  5. Faculty Member's Handbook. Strategies for Preventing Alcohol and Other Drug Problems. The College Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook for higher education faculty is designed to inform them of the nature and extent of alcohol and other drug abuse on the nation's campuses and to enlist their involvement in responding to these problems. Based on the premise that each individual can make a difference, the faculty member is encouraged to help shape the campus…

  6. An Assessment of Alcohol and Drug Education/Prevention Programs in the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-12-01

    hazards of an overdose , the consequences of arrest and conviction on career aspirations, dangers of hepatitis, and many other factors. If there is a...drug-related (heroin, other narcotics, cocaine ) arrests to cannabis arrests increased from 1,9 in CY 1968 to 3.4 in CY 1973 (through March). Ii7 1 ln

  7. Preventing drug-related adverse events following hospital discharge: the role of the pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholls J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Nicholls,1 Craig MacKenzie,1 Rhiannon Braund2 1Dunedin Hospital Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: Transition of care (ToC points, and in particular hospital admission and discharge, can be associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs and other drug-related problems (DRPs. The growing recognition of the pharmacist as an expert in medication management, patient education and communication makes them well placed to intervene. There is evidence to indicate that the inclusion of pharmacists in the health care team at ToC points reduces ADEs and DRPs and improves patient outcomes. The objectives of this paper are to outline the following using current literature: 1 the increased risk of medication-related problems at ToC points; 2 to highlight some strategies that have been successful in reducing these problems; and 3 to illustrate how the role of the pharmacist across all facets of care can contribute to the reduction of ADEs, particularly for patients at ToC points. Keywords: pharmacist, adverse drug events, drug-related problems, transitions of care, hospital discharge

  8. The Challenge of Counterfeit Drugs: A Comprehensive Review on Prevalence, Detection and Preventive Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bharat; Baldi, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Counterfeit drugs are a worldwide concern. This organized crime has deterrent effect on public health and on pharmaceutical business across the globe. Lack of comprehensive standardized definition of counterfeit drugs with global acceptance, higher benefits of cost ratio and intercomplexity of market and globalized network are the major reasons behind this. Unawareness among the stakeholders lack of intellectual property protection and social-economic factor also resulted in flourished market of fake drugs. Despite of several attempts made by global regulatory agencies, inefficient regulations, lax enforcement of existing legislation and lack of commitment by involved authorities still remain major loopholes, aggravating the serious problem of counterfeiting. Although use of techniques based on interference pattern, encryption, spectroscopy and chromatographic principles by pharmaceutical industries to authenticate genuine products has curtailed the problem to a limited extent. In order to efficiently control the organized crime of medicine counterfeiting, collective efforts of 'National Counterfeit Control Agencies', pharmaceutical industries, law regulatory agencies and public are essential. Strict legal enforcement, applications of comprehensive database, interlinked network and technological advancement are need of the hour. The purpose of this article is to overview all aspects of drug counterfeiting including current status and magnitude, effectiveness and limitation of existing technologies available to counter with particular attention to suggest possible roadmap to overcome the problem through uni-directional and focus global co-operation.

  9. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1–7) prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Aravena, Javier; Simon, Felipe; Pacheco, Nicolás; González-Nilo, Fernando Danilo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin (1–7) (Ang-(1–7)) is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues – among them, skeletal muscle – by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-OH) dendrimer as an Ang-(1–7) carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1–7)-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1–7) and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1–7) alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally injected were similar to the results obtained when Ang-(1–7) was systemically administered through mini-osmotic pumps. Together, the results suggest that Ang-(1–7) can be protected for PAMAM-OH when this complex is intraperitoneally injected. Therefore, the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex is an efficient delivery method for Ang-(1–7), since it improves the anti-atrophic activity of this peptide in skeletal muscle. PMID:28331320

  10. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1-7) prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Aravena, Javier; Simon, Felipe; Pacheco, Nicolás; González-Nilo, Fernando Danilo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin (1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues - among them, skeletal muscle - by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-OH) dendrimer as an Ang-(1-7) carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1-7)-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1-7) and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1-7)/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1-7) alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1-7)/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally injected were similar to the results obtained when Ang-(1-7) was systemically administered through mini-osmotic pumps. Together, the results suggest that Ang-(1-7) can be protected for PAMAM-OH when this complex is intraperitoneally injected. Therefore, the Ang-(1-7)/PAMAM-OH complex is an efficient delivery method for Ang-(1-7), since it improves the anti-atrophic activity of this peptide in skeletal muscle.

  11. Using PANDA (Preventing the Abuse of Tobacco, Narcotics, Drugs, and Alcohol) in a Baltimore City Head Start Setting: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Harolyn M. E.; Lockhart, Paula J.; Perkins-Parks, Susan; McNally, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    Describes an evaluation of a substance abuse prevention curriculum, Preventing the Abuse of Tobacco, Narcotics, Drugs, and Alcohol (PANDA), taught to African American Head Start preschool students, examining changes in children's self-concept following participation. Overall, students demonstrated significantly improved self-concept, and PANDA…

  12. Environmental Management Approach to Improve College Student and Community Relations to Reduce Binge and High-Risk Alcohol Use and Other Drug Problems. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A central feature of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention is the promotion of multiple prevention strategies that affect campus and surrounding community environments as a whole and can, thereby, have a large-scale effect on the entire campus community. In outlining the…

  13. Effect of Dementia on the Use of Drugs for Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R. Fowler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dementia and cardiovascular disease (CVD are frequently comorbid. The presence of dementia may have an effect on how CVD is treated. Objective. To examine the effect of dementia on the use of four medications recommended for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease (IHD: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, lipid-lowering medications, and antiplatelet medications. Design. Retrospective analysis of data from the Cardiovascular Health Study: Cognition Study. Setting and Subjects. 1,087 older adults in four US states who had or developed IHD between 1989 and 1998. Methods. Generalized estimating equations to explore the association between dementia and the use of guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD. Results. The length of follow-up for the cohort was 8.7 years and 265 (24% had or developed dementia during the study. Use of medications for the secondary prevention of IHD for patients with and without dementia increased during the study period. In models, subjects with dementia were not less likely to use any one particular class of medication but were less likely to use two or more classes of medications as a group (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99. Conclusions. Subjects with dementia used fewer guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD than those without dementia.

  14. Baseline albuminuria predicts the efficacy of blood pressure-lowering drugs in preventing cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, C.; Postma, M.J.; Visser, S.T.; Atthobari, J.; de Jong, P.E.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Gansevoort, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS Albuminuria has been proven to be associated with cardiovascular (CV) events in specific patient populations, but also in the general population. This study aimed to investigate whether the efficacy of blood pressure-lowering agents in preventing CV events depends on baseline urinary albumin ex

  15. Methodology for Evaluating an Adaptation of Evidence-Based Drug Abuse Prevention in Alternative Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, Laura M.; Steiker, Lori K. H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to set forth an innovative methodological protocol for culturally grounding interventions with high-risk youths in alternative schools. This study used mixed methods to evaluate original and adapted versions of a culturally grounded substance abuse prevention program. The qualitative and quantitative methods…

  16. GHB Abuse Trends and Use in Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has become increasingly popular on the campuses of American colleges and universities. In this paper, the characteristics of GHB and the effects of both voluntary and involuntary abuse are described. Further, implications for prevention efforts related to involuntary GHB ingestion and GHB-facilitated rape are…

  17. Histone H3 Methyltransferase Suv39h1 Prevents Myogenic Terminal Differentiation by Repressing MEF2 Activity in Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs and myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors have been extensively studied as key transcription factors that regulate myogenic gene expression. However, few reports on the molecular mechanism that modulates chromatin remodeling during skeletal muscle differentiation are available. We reported here that the expression of the H3-K9 methyltransferase Suv39h1 was decreased during myoblast differentiation. Ectopic expression of Suv39h1 could inhibit myoblast differentiation, increasing H3-K9 methylation levels, whereas knockdown of Suv39h1 stimulated myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, Suv39h1 interacted with MEF2C directly and inhibited MEF2 transcription activity in a dose-dependent manner. Together, our studies revealed a molecular mechanism wherein Suv39h1 modulated myogenic gene expression and activation during skeletal muscle differentiation.

  18. New technique using ( sup 125 I)labeled rose bengal for the quantification in blood samples of pipecuronium bromide, a muscle relaxant drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schopfer, C.; Benakis, A.; Pittet, J.-F.; Tassonyi, E. (Centre Medical Universitaire, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    A new technique involving the use of ({sup 125}I)labeled rose bengal for the quantification of pipecuronium bromide (a muscle relaxant drug) is presented. This technique, which is based on the ability of rose bengal to react with pipecuronium and then form a complex which can be extracted into an organic solvent, involves two steps: the purification and labeling of rose bengal with {sup 125}I, and the quantification of pipecuronium. The specific activity of the compound (106 {mu}Ci/mg) allows for the quantification of pipecuronium in biological samples at concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml. (author).

  19. Ethylcellulose film coating of guaifenesin-loaded pellets: A comprehensive evaluation of the manufacturing process to prevent drug migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melegari, Cecilia; Bertoni, Serena; Genovesi, Alberto; Hughes, Kevin; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; Passerini, Nadia; Albertini, Beatrice

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the complete process of pellet production in a Wurster fluidized bed coater in order to determine the main factors affecting the migration phenomenon of a soluble API through the ethycellulose film coating (Surelease®) and hence the long-term stability of the controlled release pellets. Guaifenesin (GFN), as BCS class I model drug, was layered on sugar spheres using a binder-polymer solution containing the dissolved GFN. The drug loaded pellets were then coated with Surelease®. The influence of drug loading (4.5-20.0% w/w), curing conditions (40-60°C and dynamic-static equipment), coating level (12-20% theoretical weight gain) and composition of the binder-layering solution (hypromellose versus Na alginate) on process efficiency (RSDW%), GFN content uniformity (RSDC%), GFN solid state (DSC and XRD) and pellet release profiles was evaluated. The effectiveness of the Surelease film was strongly affected by the ability of GFN to cross the coating layer and to recrystallize on the pellet surface. Results indicated that this behaviour was dependent on the polymer used in the binder-layering solution. Using hypromellose as polymer, GFN recrystallized on the coated pellet surface at both drug loadings. The curing step was necessary to stabilize the film effectiveness at the higher drug loading. Increasing the coating level delayed but did not prevent the GFN diffusion. Replacing hypromellose with Na alginate, reduced the migration of GFN through the film to a negligible amount even after six months of storage and the curing step was not necessary to achieve stable controlled release profiles over storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Angiopoietin-1 prevents severe bleeding complications induced by heparin-like drugs and fibroblast growth factor-2 in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Das, Jharna R.; Tang, Pingtao; Wong, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Critically ill children can develop bleeding complications when treated with heparin-like drugs. These events are usually attributed to the anticoagulant activity of these drugs. However, previous studies showed that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a heparin-binding growth factor released in the circulation of these patients, could precipitate intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with the heparin-like drug pentosan polysulfate (PPS). Yet very little is known about how FGF-2 induces bleeding complications in combination with heparin-like drugs. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which circulating FGF-2 induces intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with PPS. We used a well-characterized mouse model of intestinal hemorrhages induced by FGF-2 plus PPS. Adult FVB/N mice were infected with adenovirus carrying Lac-Z or a secreted form of recombinant human FGF-2, and injected with PPS, at doses that do not induce bleeding complications per se. Mice treated with FGF-2 in combination with PPS developed an intestinal inflammatory reaction that increased the permeability and disrupted the integrity of submucosal intestinal vessels. These changes, together with the anticoagulant activity of PPS, induced lethal hemorrhages. Moreover, a genetically modified form of the endothelial ligand angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1*), which has powerful antipermeability and anti-inflammatory activity, prevented the lethal bleeding complications without correcting the anticoagulant status of these mice. These findings define new mechanisms through which FGF-2 and Ang-1* modulate the outcome of intestinal bleeding complications induced by PPS in mice and may have wider clinical implications for critically ill children treated with heparin-like drugs. PMID:26276817

  1. Testosterone therapy prevents gain in visceral adipose tissue and loss of skeletal muscle in nonobese aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, C A; Strauss, B J G; Burger, H G; Forbes, E A; McLachlan, R I

    2008-01-01

    Trials of testosterone therapy in aging men have demonstrated increases in fat-free mass (FFM) and skeletal muscle and decreases in fat mass (FM) but have not reported the impact of baseline body composition. The objective of the study was to determine the effect, in nonobese aging men with symptoms of androgen deficiency and low-normal serum testosterone levels, of testosterone therapy on total and regional body composition and hormonal and metabolic indices. Sixty healthy but symptomatic, nonobese men aged 55 yr or older with total testosterone (TT) levels less than 15 nm were randomized to transdermal testosterone patches or placebo for 52 wk. Body composition, by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (FM, FFM, skeletal muscle) and magnetic resonance imaging (abdominal sc and visceral adipose tissue, thigh skeletal muscle, and intermuscular fat) and hormonal and metabolic parameters were measured at wk 0 and 52. Serum TT increased by 30% (P = 0.01), and LH decreased by 50% (P fat accumulation decreased (P = 0.001) without change in total body or abdominal sc FM; change in visceral fat was correlated with change in TT levels (r2 = 0.36; P = 0.014). There was a trend to increasing total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with placebo. Testosterone therapy, relative to placebo, selectively lessened visceral fat accumulation without change in total body FM and increased total body FFM and total body and thigh skeletal muscle mass. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of these body compositional changes on markers of metabolic and cardiovascular risk.

  2. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  3. e-Prescription: An e-Health System for Preventing Adverse Drug Events in Community Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Puspitasari, Irma M.; Soegijardjo Soegijoko

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes development activities of an e-health system for community health center (Puskesmas) with integrated adverse drug events e-prescription module, consist of system design and development, human resource development, e-health system realization, laboratory and implementation test of e-health system. Some e-readiness evaluations were conducted, through a number of field visits and questionnaires. The results had been used in the e-health system design and development, installa...

  4. Scopolamine induces disruption of latent inhibition which is prevented by antipsychotic drugs and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Segev; Weiner, Ina

    2007-05-01

    The fact that muscarinic antagonists may evoke a psychotic state ('antimuscarinic psychosis'), along with findings of cholinergic alterations in schizophrenia, have kindled an interest in the involvement of the cholinergic system in this disorder. Latent inhibition (LI) is a cross-species phenomenon manifested as a poorer conditioning of a stimulus seen when the stage of conditioning is preceded by a stage of repeated nonreinforced pre-exposure to that stimulus, and is considered to index the capacity to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Amphetamine-induced LI disruption and its reversal by antipsychotic drugs (APDs) is a well-established model of positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Here, we tested whether the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine would disrupt LI and whether such disruption would be reversed by APDs and by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. The results showed that scopolamine at doses of 0.15 and 0.5 mg/kg disrupted LI, and that this effect was due to the action of the drug in the pre-exposure stage, suggesting a role of muscarinic transmission in attentional processes underlying LI. Both the typical and the atypical APDs, haloperidol and clozapine, reversed scopolamine-induced LI disruption when given in conditioning or in both stages, but not in pre-exposure, indicating that the mechanism of antipsychotic action in this model is independent of the mechanism of action of the propsychotic drug. Scopolamine-induced LI disruption was reversed by physostigmine (0.05 and 0.15 mg/kg), which was ineffective in reversing amphetamine-induced LI disruption, pointing to distinct mechanisms underlying LI disruption by these two propsychotic drugs. The latter was further supported by the finding that unlike amphetamine, the LI-disrupting doses of scopolamine did not affect activity levels. We propose scopolamine-induced LI disruption as a model of cholinergic-related positive symptoms in schizophrenia.

  5. Indicadores de riesgo de morbilidad prevenible causada por medicamentos Risk indicators of preventable morbidity related to drug utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Dago Martínez

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Seleccionar y estudiar la aceptabilidad, en términos de relevancia y pertinencia, de ciertas situaciones clínicas que puedan usarse como indicadores de riesgo de morbilidad prevenible causada por medicamentos y que sean utilizables en las farmacias comunitarias. Método: Método Delphi, en 2 rondas, con un panel de 14 expertos médicos y farmacéuticos que valoraron la relevancia y pertinencia de 68 tipos de situaciones clínicas como indicadores de morbilidad potencial relacionada con medicamentos, detectable por el profesional en su medio, con evidencia científica de resultado adverso previsible, frecuentes en el medio ambulatorio y con causa y resultado controlables. Resultados: Se consideraron utilizables y pertinentes 43 de los 68 indicadores estudiados, que se referían a 3 ámbitos: tipo de medicamento (medicamentos de estrecho margen terapéutico, con dosis individualizada y con reacciones adversas frecuentes y graves, problema de salud (problemas crónicos, especialmente asma, enfermedad cardíaca, tiroidea, prostática y dolor y tipo de paciente (ancianos y/o polimedicados. Los farmacéuticos sobrevaloraron sistemáticamente ciertos indicadores en relación con los médicos, aunque las diferencias no fueron significativas. Conclusiones: Se identificaron 43 indicadores de morbilidad potencial relacionada con los medicamentos e identificables por los profesionales en su entorno.Objective: To select clinical situations that can be used as risk indicators of preventable morbidity caused by drugs at the community pharmacies, and to study their acceptability, in terms of pertinence and relevance. Methods: We used the Delphi technique, in 2 rounds, by a panel of 14 medical doctors and pharmacists experts, to study the relevance of 68 types of clinical situations as risk indicators of preventable morbidity related to drug utilization used by health professionals in community pharmacies, with scientific evidence of foreseeable

  6. Viral fitness cost prevents HIV-1 from evading dolutegravir drug pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Osman, Nathan; Han, Yingshan; Singhroy, Diane N; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J; Huang, Wei; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-02-22

    Clinical studies have shown that integrase strand transfer inhibitors can be used to treat HIV-1 infection. Although the first-generation integrase inhibitors are susceptible to the emergence of resistance mutations that impair their efficacy in therapy, such resistance has not been identified to date in drug-naïve patients who have been treated with the second-generation inhibitor dolutegravir. During previous in vitro selection study, we identified a R263K mutation as the most common substitution to arise in the presence of dolutegravir with H51Y arising as a secondary mutation. Additional experiments reported here provide a plausible explanation for the absence of reported dolutegravir resistance among integrase inhibitor-naïve patients to date. We now show that H51Y in combination with R263K increases resistance to dolutegravir but is accompanied by dramatic decreases in both enzymatic activity and viral replication. Since H51Y and R263K may define a unique resistance pathway to dolutegravir, our results are consistent with the absence of resistance mutations in antiretroviral drug-naive patients treated with this drug.

  7. Efficacy of a group-based multimedia HIV prevention intervention for drug-involved women under community supervision: project WORTH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila El-Bassel

    Full Text Available IMPORTANCE: This study is designed to address the need for evidence-based HIV/STI prevention approaches for drug-involved women under criminal justice community supervision. OBJECTIVE: We tested the efficacy of a group-based traditional and multimedia HIV/STI prevention intervention (Project WORTH: Women on the Road to Health among drug-involved women under community supervision. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND INTERVENTION: We randomized 306 women recruited from community supervision settings to receive either: (1 a four-session traditional group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention (traditional WORTH; (2 a four-session multimedia group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention that covered the same content as traditional WORTH but was delivered in a computerized format; or (3 a four-session group-based Wellness Promotion intervention that served as an attention control condition. The study examined whether the traditional or multimedia WORTH intervention was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to Wellness Promotion; and whether multimedia WORTH was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to traditional WORTH. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomes were assessed over the 12-month post-intervention period and included the number of unprotected sex acts, the proportion of protected sex acts, and consistent condom use. At baseline, 77% of participants reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex (n = 237 and 63% (n = 194 had multiple sex partners. RESULTS: Women assigned to traditional or multimedia WORTH were significantly more likely than women assigned to the control condition to report an increase in the proportion of protected sex acts (β = 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.18 and a decrease in the number of unprotected sex acts (IRR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.57-0.90. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: The promising effects of traditional and multimedia WORTH on increasing condom use and high participation rates suggest

  8. Efficacy of a group-based multimedia HIV prevention intervention for drug-involved women under community supervision: project WORTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Goddard-Eckrich, Dawn; Chang, Mingway; Wu, Elwin; Hunt, Tim; Epperson, Matt; Shaw, Stacey A; Rowe, Jessica; Almonte, Maria; Witte, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study is designed to address the need for evidence-based HIV/STI prevention approaches for drug-involved women under criminal justice community supervision. We tested the efficacy of a group-based traditional and multimedia HIV/STI prevention intervention (Project WORTH: Women on the Road to Health) among drug-involved women under community supervision. We randomized 306 women recruited from community supervision settings to receive either: (1) a four-session traditional group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention (traditional WORTH); (2) a four-session multimedia group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention that covered the same content as traditional WORTH but was delivered in a computerized format; or (3) a four-session group-based Wellness Promotion intervention that served as an attention control condition. The study examined whether the traditional or multimedia WORTH intervention was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to Wellness Promotion; and whether multimedia WORTH was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to traditional WORTH. Primary outcomes were assessed over the 12-month post-intervention period and included the number of unprotected sex acts, the proportion of protected sex acts, and consistent condom use. At baseline, 77% of participants reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex (n = 237) and 63% (n = 194) had multiple sex partners. Women assigned to traditional or multimedia WORTH were significantly more likely than women assigned to the control condition to report an increase in the proportion of protected sex acts (β = 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.18) and a decrease in the number of unprotected sex acts (IRR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.57-0.90). The promising effects of traditional and multimedia WORTH on increasing condom use and high participation rates suggest that WORTH may be scaled up to redress the concentrated epidemics of HIV/STIs among drug-involved women in the criminal justice system. Clinical

  9. Developing the climate schools: ecstasy module--a universal Internet-based drug prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Nicola C; Teesson, Maree; Newton, Kathyrn L

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Schools: Ecstasy module is a universal harm-minimisation school-based prevention program for adolescents aged 14 to 16 years. The program was developed to address the need for Ecstasy prevention given the increasing use of Ecstasy use among young Australians. The core content of the program is delivered over the Internet using cartoon storylines to engage students, and the teacher-driven activities reinforce the core information. The three-lesson program is embedded within the school health curriculum and is easy to implement with minimal teacher training required. The program was developed in 2010 through extensive collaboration with students (n = 8), teachers (n = 10) and health professionals (n = 10) in Sydney, Australia. This article describes the formative research and process of planning that formed the development of the program and the evidence base underpinning the approach.

  10. Drugs and lifestyle for the treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease: comparative analysis of the scientific basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. da Luz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we compare two strategies for atherosclerosis treatment: drugs and healthy lifestyle. Statins are the principal drugs used for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Several secondary prevention studies have demonstrated that statins can significantly reduce cardiovascular events including coronary death, the need for surgical revascularization, stroke, total mortality, as well as fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. These results were observed in both men and women, the elderly, smokers and non-smokers, diabetics and hypertensives. Primary prevention studies yielded similar results, although total mortality was not affected. Statins also induce atheroma regression and do not cause cancer. However, many unresolved issues remain, such as partial risk reduction, costs, several potential side effects, and long-term use by young patients. Statins act mainly as lipid-lowering drugs but pleiotropic actions are also present. Healthy lifestyle, on the other hand, is effective and inexpensive and has no harmful effects. Five items are associated with lower cardiac risk: non-smoking, BMI ≤25, regular exercise (30 min/day, healthy diet (fruits, vegetables, low-saturated fat, and 5-30 g alcohol/day. Nevertheless, there are difficulties in implementing these measures both at the individual and population levels. Changes in behavior require multidisciplinary care, including medical, nutritional, and psychological counseling. Participation of the entire society is required for such implementation, i.e., universities, schools, media, government, and medical societies. Although these efforts represent a major challenge, such a task must be faced in order to halt the atherosclerosis epidemic that threatens the world.

  11. Drugs and lifestyle for the treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease: comparative analysis of the scientific basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, P L da; Nishiyama, M; Chagas, A C P

    2011-10-01

    In this article, we compare two strategies for atherosclerosis treatment: drugs and healthy lifestyle. Statins are the principal drugs used for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Several secondary prevention studies have demonstrated that statins can significantly reduce cardiovascular events including coronary death, the need for surgical revascularization, stroke, total mortality, as well as fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. These results were observed in both men and women, the elderly, smokers and non-smokers, diabetics and hypertensives. Primary prevention studies yielded similar results, although total mortality was not affected. Statins also induce atheroma regression and do not cause cancer. However, many unresolved issues remain, such as partial risk reduction, costs, several potential side effects, and long-term use by young patients. Statins act mainly as lipid-lowering drugs but pleiotropic actions are also present. Healthy lifestyle, on the other hand, is effective and inexpensive and has no harmful effects. Five items are associated with lower cardiac risk: non-smoking, BMI ≤25, regular exercise (30 min/day), healthy diet (fruits, vegetables, low-saturated fat, and 5-30 g alcohol/day). Nevertheless, there are difficulties in implementing these measures both at the individual and population levels. Changes in behavior require multidisciplinary care, including medical, nutritional, and psychological counseling. Participation of the entire society is required for such implementation, i.e., universities, schools, media, government, and medical societies. Although these efforts represent a major challenge, such a task must be faced in order to halt the atherosclerosis epidemic that threatens the world.

  12. EXPANDING URBAN AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTHS’ REPERTOIRE OF DRUG RESISTANCE SKILLS: PILOT RESULTS FROM A CULTURALLY ADAPTED PREVENTION PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Stephen; Dustman, Patricia A.; Brown, Eddie F.; Martinez, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    This article examines changes in the drug resistance strategies used by urban American Indian (UAI) middle school students during a pilot test of a substance use prevention curriculum designed specifically for UAI youth, Living in 2 Worlds (L2W). L2W teaches four drug resistance strategies (refuse, explain, avoid, leave [R-E-A-L]) in culturally appropriate ways. Data come from 57 UAI students (53% female; mean age = 12.5 years) who participated in L2W during an academic enrichment class for Native youth at two Phoenix schools. Students completed a pre-test questionnaire before the L2W lessons and a post-test 7 months later. Questions assessed the use of R-E-A-L and alternative strategies commonly reported by UAI youth (change the subject, use humor). Tests of mean differences from pre-test to post-test showed significant increases in use of refuse, R-E-A-L repertoire. Use of more passive strategies (avoid, use humor) did not change significantly, except for change the subject, which increased. Changes in the use of strategies did not differ significantly by gender, age, school grades, parental education, or length of urban residence. The L2W curriculum appears effective in teaching culturally relevant communication strategies that expand UAI youths’ repertoire of drug resistance skills. PMID:23529769

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, prevents indometacin-induced gastric damage via inhibition of neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Yoshiro; Okamoto, Masayuki; Yokochi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyachi, Atsushi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2003-02-01

    Nabumetone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works as a prodrug and is extensively metabolized to an active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA). It is well known that neutrophil infiltration and activation are critical in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric injury, and nabumetone shows less incidence of gastrointestinal irritancy. We examined the effects of nabumetone on neutrophil activation and on indometacin-induced gastric damage. In the indometacin-induced gastric mucosal injury, rats were treated with indometacin and then nabumetone or 6MNA was orally administered. Nabumetone prevented gastric damage accompanied by the reduction of neutrophil infiltration into gastric mucosa, but such an effect was not observed with 6MNA. Nabumetone reduced the formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils to 30% of the control level in-vitro, but 6MNA did not. In addition, nabumetone prevented the fMLP-induced migration of neutrophils. Nabumetone did not inhibit O2- generation in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. These results suggest that nabumetone prevents gastric damage induced by the active metabolite, 6MNA, via the suppression of neutrophil activation in gastric mucosa.

  15. Increased cholinergic contractions of jejunal smooth muscle caused by a high cholesterol diet are prevented by the 5-HT4 agonist – tegaserod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Eldon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excess cholesterol in bile and in blood is a major risk factor for the respective development of gallbladder disease and atherosclerosis. This lipid in excess negatively impacts the functioning of other smooth muscles, including the intestine. Serotonin is an important mediator of the contractile responses of the small intestine. Drugs targeting the serotonin receptor are used as prokinetic agents to manage intestinal motor disorders, in particular irritable bowel syndrome. Thus, tegaserod, acting on 5-HT4 receptor, ideally should obviate detrimental effects of excessive cholesterol on gastrointestinal smooth muscle. In this study we examined the effect of tegaserod on cholesterol-induced changes in the contractile responses of intestinal smooth muscle. Methods The effects of a high cholesterol (1% diet on the in vitro contractile responses of jejunal longitudinal smooth muscle from Richardson ground squirrels to the cholinergic agonist carbachol were examined in the presence or absence of tetrodrodotoxin (TTX. Two groups of animals, fed either low (0.03% or high cholesterol rat chow diet, were further divided into two subgroups and treated for 28 days with either vehicle or tegaserod. Results The high cholesterol diet increased, by nearly 2-fold, contractions of the jejunal longitudinal smooth muscle elicited by carbachol. These cholinergic contractions were mediated by muscarinic receptors since they were blocked by scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, but not by the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium. Tegaserod treatment, which did not affect cholinergic contractions of tissues from low cholesterol fed animals, abrogated the increase caused by the high cholesterol diet. With low cholesterol diet TTX enhanced carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas this action potential blocker did not affect the augmented cholinergic contractions seen with tissues from animals on the high cholesterol diet. Tegaserod

  16. [Carcinogenicity of antineoplastic drugs: classification, protection and prevention, use and evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Bergonzi, Roberto; Galloni, Carla; Minguzzi, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Many antineoplastic agents have been shown to be mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic in experimental studies and secondary malignant neoplasms are known to be associated with several specific therapeutic treatments. However, the occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs in health care workers has different routes of exposure, dose and duration compared to patients undergoing treatment protocols. The aims of this review are to analyze and to update the National and International Classification, and deepening the topics of occupational exposure, current operating conditions, the technical and operational progress to reducing the exposure, the epidemiological evidence and exposure measurement data available. Finally, we illustrate the dispersion in the environment as a real risk for the general population.

  17. Effects of Preventative Ankle Taping on Planned Change-of-Direction and Reactive Agility Performance and Ankle Muscle Activity in Basketballers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Jeffriess, Adrian B. Schultz, Tye S. McGann, Samuel J. Callaghan, Robert G. Lockie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of preventative ankle taping on planned change-of-direction and reactive agility performance and peak ankle muscle activity in basketballers. Twenty male basketballers (age = 22.30 ± 3.97 years; height = 1.84 ± 0.09 meters; body mass = 85.96 ± 11.88 kilograms with no ankle pathologies attended two testing sessions. Within each session, subjects completed six planned and six reactive randomized trials (three to the left and three to the right for each condition of the Y-shaped agility test, which was recorded by timing lights. In one session, subjects had both ankles un-taped. In the other, both ankles were taped using a modified subtalar sling. Peak tibialis anterior, peroneus longus (PL, peroneus brevis (PB, and soleus muscle activity was recorded for both the inside and outside legs across stance phase during the directional change, which was normalized against 10-meter sprint muscle activity (nEMG. Both the inside and outside cut legs during the change-of-direction step were investigated. Repeated measures ANOVA determined performance time and nEMG differences between un-taped and taped conditions. There were no differences in planned change-of-direction or reactive agility times between the conditions. Inside cut leg PL nEMG decreased when taped for the planned left, reactive left, and reactive right cuts (p = 0.01. Outside leg PB and soleus nEMG increased during the taped planned left cut (p = 0.02. There were no other nEMG changes during the cuts with taping. Taping did not affect change-of-direction or agility performance. Inside leg PL activity was decreased, possibly due to the tape following the line of muscle action. This may reduce the kinetic demand for the PL during cuts. In conclusion, ankle taping did not significantly affect planned change-of-direction or reactive agility performance, and did not demonstrate large changes in activity of the muscle complex in healthy basketballers.

  18. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1–7 prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márquez-Miranda V

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Valeria Márquez-Miranda,1,2,* Johanna Abrigo,3,4,* Juan Carlos Rivera,3,4 Ingrid Araya-Durán,1 Javier Aravena,3,4 Felipe Simon,3,4 Nicolás Pacheco,1 Fernando Danilo González-Nilo,1,2,5 Claudio Cabello-Verrugio3,4 1Center for Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology (CBIB, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, 2Fundación Fraunhofer Chile Research, Las Condes, 3Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas & Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Andres Bello, 4Millennium Institute on Immunology and Immunotherapy, Santiago, 5Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencia de Valparaíso, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Angiotensin (1–7 (Ang-(1–7 is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues – among them, skeletal muscle – by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine (PAMAM-OH dendrimer as an Ang-(1–7 carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1–7-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1–7 and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1–7/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1–7 alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1–7/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally

  19. Prevention and Treatment of KSHV-associated Diseases with Antiviral Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-rong TIAN; Qing-jiao LIAO; Xulin CHEN

    2008-01-01

    s Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was first identified as the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in 1994.KSHV infection is necessary,but not sufficient for the development of Kaposi sarcoma (KS),primary effusion lymphoma (PEL),and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD).Advances in the prevention and treatment of KSHV-associated Diseases have been achieved,even though current treatment options are ineffective,or toxic to many affected persons.The identification of new targets for potential future therapies and the randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of new antivirals are required.

  20. EGFR inhibition evokes innate drug resistance in lung cancer cells by preventing Akt activity and thus inactivating Ets-1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuchareon, Janyaporn; McCormick, Frank; Eisele, David W; Tetsu, Osamu

    2015-07-21

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About 14% of NSCLCs harbor mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite remarkable progress in treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), only 5% of patients achieve tumor reduction >90%. The limited primary responses are attributed partly to drug resistance inherent in the tumor cells before therapy begins. Recent reports showed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is an important determinant of this innate drug resistance. In contrast, we demonstrate that EGFR inhibition promotes innate drug resistance despite blockade of RTK activity in NSCLC cells. EGFR TKIs decrease both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt protein kinase pathways for a short time, after which the Ras/MAPK pathway becomes reactivated. Akt inhibition selectively blocks the transcriptional activation of Ets-1, which inhibits its target gene, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), a negative regulator specific for ERK1/2. As a result, ERK1/2 is activated. Furthermore, elevated c-Src stimulates Ras GTP-loading and activates Raf and MEK kinases. These observations suggest that not only ERK1/2 but also Akt activity is essential to maintain Ets-1 in an active state. Therefore, despite high levels of ERK1/2, Ets-1 target genes including DUSP6 and cyclins D1, D3, and E2 remain suppressed by Akt inhibition. Reduction of DUSP6 in combination with elevated c-Src renews activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which enhances cell survival by accelerating Bim protein turnover. Thus, EGFR TKIs evoke innate drug resistance by preventing Akt activity and inactivating Ets-1 function in NSCLC cells.

  1. Effects of the above the influence brand on adolescent drug use prevention normative beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; Holtz, Kristen; White, Tanya; Snider, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Health brands are based on the relations between individuals and health behaviors and lifestyles. Brands can be measured by the brand equity construct validated in previous studies. The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign brands alternative, non-drug use behaviors as a behavior change strategy. This study goes beyond previous campaign evaluations, which did not include specific brand equity measurements. Using data from a nationally representative media tracking, this study examined the relation between antidrug campaign brand equity and adoption of targeted attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Data were gathered before the relaunch of the campaign, and follow-up data collected 3 months later. On the basis of factor analysis, the authors developed a higher order antidrug brand equity factor and regressed campaign outcomes on that factor in multivariable models. The authors observed significant effects of higher brand equity on higher levels of targeted antidrug attitudes and normative beliefs at follow-up. The authors also observed some counterintuitive relations (i.e., less positive attitudes at follow-up). They interpreted these results in light of the changing messages and campaign strategy. The authors conclude that antidrug brand equity is an important construct for understanding campaign effectiveness. The present campaign shows signs of changing targeted antidrug attitudes and beliefs among youth with brand equity.

  2. Progestogens for preterm birth prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis by drug route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez Edwards, Digna R; Likis, Frances E; Andrews, Jeffrey C; Woodworth, Alison L; Jerome, Rebecca N; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J; Nikki McKoy, J; Hartmann, Katherine E

    2013-06-01

    Progestogen has been investigated as a preventive intervention among women with increased preterm birth risk. Our objective was to systematically review the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM), vaginal, and oral progestogens for preterm birth and neonatal death prevention. We included articles published from January 1966 to January 2013 and found 27 randomized trials with data for Bayesian meta-analysis. Across all studies, only vaginal and oral routes were effective at reducing preterm births (IM risk ratio [RR] 0.95, 95 % Bayesian credible interval [BCI]: 0.88-1.03; vaginal RR 0.87, 95 % BCI: 0.80-0.94; oral RR 0.64, 95 % BCI: 0.49-0.85). However, when analyses were limited to only single births all routes were effective at reducing preterm birth (IM RR 0.77, 95 % BCI: 0.69-0.87; vaginal RR 0.80, 95 % BCI: 0.69-0.91; oral RR 0.66, 95 % BCI: 0.47-0.84). Only IM progestogen was effective at reducing neonatal deaths (IM RR 0.78, 95 % BCI: 0.56-0.99; vaginal RR 0.75, 95 % BCI: 0.45-1.09; oral RR 0.72, 95 % BCI: 0.09-1.74). Vaginal progestogen was effective in reducing neonatal deaths when limited to singletons births. All progestogen routes reduce preterm births but not neonatal deaths. Future studies are needed that directly compare progestogen delivery routes.

  3. Emerging drugs for prevention of graft failure after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servais, Sophie; Beguin, Yves; Baron, Frédéric

    2013-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the treatment of choice for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies, severe hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failures or severe primary immunodeficiencies. Graft rejection/failure (GF) is a life-threatening complication following allo-HSCT that is most commonly caused by the reactivity of recipient T cells, natural killer (NK) cells or antibodies against donor grafted hematopoietic cells. The increasing use of allo-HSCT following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and the increasing use of alternative donors (unrelated cord blood and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched donor) have resulted in higher frequency of GF. This review describes the pathogenesis and current prevention and treatment of GF as well as agents in development for GF prevention or treatment. The risk of GF may be reduced in the future by optimizing the conditioning regimens and post-grafting immunosuppression, increasing the number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and/or immune cells transplanted, optimizing HSC homing and better detecting patients at high risk of GF by searching for pre-transplant donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in patients given grafts from HLA-mismatched donors, or by closely monitoring donor T- and/or NK-cell chimerism after allo-HSCT following RIC.

  4. CGP 41251, a new potential anticancer drug, improves contractility of rat isolated cardiac muscle subjected to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, I; Dworakowska, D; Dworakowski, R; Petrusewicz, J

    2001-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine the effects of 4'-N-benzoyl staurosporine (CGP 41251), a protein kinase C inhibitor with broad antiproliferative activity in many cell lines, on the rat isolated heart contractility under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Additionally, we examined the effects of CGP 41251, WB-4101 (alpha1a -adrenoceptor antagonist), chloroethylclonidine (CEC) (alpha1b-adrenoceptor antagonist) and selective damage of endocardial endothelium by Triton X-100 on the protection against hypoxia induced by preconditioning of rat heart tissue. Experiments were performed on rat isolated left ventricular papillary muscle. The following parameters were measured: force of contraction (Fc), velocity of contraction (+dF/dt) and velocity of relaxation (-dF/dt). The temperature of the bath solution was 37 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, and rate of electrical stimulation was 0.5 Hz. At concentrations less than 1 microM CGP 41251 did not cause any changes in contractility of rat heart. At 1 and 3 microM, significant positive inotropic action was observed. Treatment of rat papillary muscle by CGP 41251 at 3 microM reduced decreasing of contractility by simulated hypoxia and reperfusion. Moreover, protective effects of preconditioning was not affected by addition of CGP 41251 neither at 1 nor at 3 microM. Pretreatment with CEC at 3 microM, and selective damage of endocardial endothelium induced by fast (1-s) immersion of papillary muscle in 0.5% Triton X-100, but not pretreatment with WB-4101, abolished the protective effects of preconditioning. The results imply that CGP 41251 improves contractility of heart muscle under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and does not alter hypoxic preconditioning in rat isolated cardiac tissue. Moreover, it was shown that alpha1b-adrenoceptors and endocardial endothelium are involved in triggering of preconditioning in rat isolated heart muscle.

  5. Aldose reductase inhibitor prevents hyperproliferation and hypertrophy of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells induced by high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1995-12-01

    Vascular remodeling is a key process in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that high glucose levels may function as a vascular smooth muscle growth and proliferation-promoting substance. To explore the role of the polyol pathway in this process, we examined the effect of an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI), epalrestat, on the growth characteristics of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Epalrestat (10 nmol/L, 1 mumol/L) significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced proliferative effect as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation by 67% and 82% in cell number, suggesting ARI as an antimitogenic factor. In VSMCs, epalrestat (10 nmol/L, 1 mumol/L) significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced incorporation of [3H]leucine by 45% and 58% with the concomitant reduction of the cell size estimated by flowcytometry. Epalrestat (1 mumol/L) also suppressed high glucose-induced intracellular NADH/NAD+ increase and membrane-bound protein kinase C activation. These results indicate that this ARI possesses an antiproliferative and antihypertrophic action on VSMCs induced by high glucose possibly through protein kinase C suppression.

  6. A Community-Engaged Approach to Developing an mHealth HIV/STI and Drug Abuse Preventive Intervention for Primary Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, David; Bauermeister, Jose A; Fessler, Kathryn; Delva, Jorge; Nelson, Annabelle; Nurenberg, Rachel; Mendoza Lua, Frania; Alers-Rojas, Francheska; Salas-Wright, Christopher P

    2015-12-18

    Despite ongoing prevention efforts, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (HIV/STIs) and drug use remain public health concerns. Urban adolescents, many of whom are underserved and racial minorities, are disproportionately affected. Recent changes in policy, including the Affordable Care Act, and advances in technology provide HIV/STI and drug abuse prevention scientists with unique opportunities to deliver mobile health (mHealth) preventive interventions in primary care. The purpose of this community-engaged study was to develop an mHealth version of the Storytelling for Empowerment preventive intervention for primary care (hereinafter referred to as "S4E"). A total of 29 adolescents were recruited from a youth-centered primary care clinic in Southeast, Michigan, to participate in qualitative interviews. Participants were predominantly African American (n=19, 65.5%) and female (n=21, 72.4%) with a mean age of 16.23 (SD 2.09). The principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR), in conjunction with agile software development and the recommended core prevention principles of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) were employed during S4E development. CBPR principles are aimed at improving the effectiveness of research by addressing locally relevant health problems, working with community strengths, and translating basic science into applied research. Complementing this approach, the NIDA prevention principles are derived from decades of drug abuse prevention research aimed at increasing the effectiveness and uptake of programs, through the development of culturally specific interventions and ensuring the structure, content, and delivery of the intervention fit the needs of the community. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. A total of 5 themes emerged from the data: (1) acceptability of the mHealth app to adolescents in primary care, (2) inclusion of a risk assessment to improve clinician-adolescent HIV/STI and drug use communication

  7. The future of cancer research: prevention, screening, vaccines, and tumor-specific drug combos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, George

    2014-01-01

    New cancer research strategies have developed very rapidly over the past five years, including extensive DNA sequencing of tumor and normal cells; use of highly sensitive cancer cell detection methods; vaccine development and tumor-specific (designer) drugs. These developments have raised questions about where to concentrate efforts in the near future when establishing clinical trials, particularly important in an age of diminishing resources and during a period when competing strategies for cancer control are likely to overwhelm the opportunities for establishing large, effective clinical trials. In particular, it behooves the research community to be mindful of the inevitable, challenging obligation to responsibly choose between clinical trials that offer the credible hope of incremental advances vs. trials that are less traditional but may have revolutionary outcomes.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition prevents activity-induced calcineurin–NFATc1 signalling and fast-to-slow skeletal muscle fibre type conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Karen J B; St-Louis, Mathieu; Murdoch, Gordon K; MacLean, Ian M; McDonald, Pamela; Dixon, Walter T; Putman, Charles T; Michel, Robin N

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin–NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) signalling pathway is involved in the regulation of activity-dependent skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform type expression. Emerging evidence indicates that nitric oxide (NO) may play a critical role in this regulatory pathway. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of NO in activity-induced calcineurin–NFATc1 signalling leading to skeletal muscle faster-to-slower fibre type transformations in vivo. Endogenous NO production was blocked by administering l-NAME (0.75 mg ml−1) in drinking water throughout 0, 1, 2, 5 or 10 days of chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS; 10 Hz, 12 h day−1) of rat fast-twitch muscles (L+Stim; n= 30) and outcomes were compared with control rats receiving only CLFS (Stim; n= 30). Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that CLFS induced an increase in NFATc1 dephosphorylation and nuclear localisation, sustained by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation in Stim, which were all abolished in L+Stim. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR revealed that CLFS induced an increased expression of MHC-I, -IIa and -IId(x) mRNAs in Stim that was abolished in L+Stim. SDS-PAGE and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that CLFS induced faster-to-slower MHC protein and fibre type transformations, respectively, within the fast fibre population of both Stim and L+Stim groups. The final fast type IIA to slow type I transformation, however, was prevented in L+Stim. It is concluded that NO regulates activity-induced MHC-based faster-to-slower fibre type transformations at the transcriptional level via inhibitory GSK-3β-induced facilitation of calcineurin–NFATc1 nuclear accumulation in vivo, whereas transformations within the fast fibre population may also involve translational control mechanisms independent of NO signalling. PMID:22219342

  9. l-glutamine Improves Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation and Prevents Myotube Atrophy After Cytokine (TNF-α) Stress Via Reduced p38 MAPK Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girven, Matthew; Dugdale, Hannah F; Owens, Daniel J; Hughes, David C; Stewart, Claire E; Sharples, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF-α) is chronically elevated in conditions where skeletal muscle loss occurs. As l-glutamine can dampen the effects of inflamed environments, we investigated the role of l-glutamine in both differentiating C2C12 myoblasts and existing myotubes in the absence/presence of TNF-α (20 ng · ml(-1) ) ± l-glutamine (20 mM). TNF-α reduced the proportion of cells in G1 phase, as well as biochemical (CK activity) and morphological differentiation (myotube number), with corresponding reductions in transcript expression of: Myogenin, Igf-I, and Igfbp5. Furthermore, when administered to mature myotubes, TNF-α induced myotube loss and atrophy underpinned by reductions in Myogenin, Igf-I, Igfbp2, and glutamine synthetase and parallel increases in Fox03, Cfos, p53, and Bid gene expression. Investigation of signaling activity suggested that Akt and ERK1/2 were unchanged, JNK increased (non-significantly) whereas P38 MAPK substantially and significantly increased in both myoblasts and myotubes in the presence of TNF-α. Importantly, 20 mM l-glutamine reduced p38 MAPK activity in TNF-α conditions back to control levels, with a corresponding rescue of myoblast differentiation and a reversal of atrophy in myotubes. l-glutamine resulted in upregulation of genes associated with growth and survival including; Myogenin, Igf-Ir, Myhc2 & 7, Tnfsfr1b, Adra1d, and restored atrophic gene expression of Fox03 back to baseline in TNF-α conditions. In conclusion, l-glutamine supplementation rescued suppressed muscle cell differentiation and prevented myotube atrophy in an inflamed environment via regulation of p38 MAPK. l-glutamine administration could represent an important therapeutic strategy for reducing muscle loss in catabolic diseases and inflamed ageing. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 231: 2720-2732, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prevention of alcohol and other drug use using motivational interviewing among young adults in the Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Polshkova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Health Organization data shows alarming rates of alcohol consumption among those ages 15 and older in the Ukraine. This study examined the feasibility and initial efficacy of a brief intervention to reduce risky drinking among emerging adults (ages 18-25 in the Ukraine. Methods: Emerging adults presenting to two settings were screened for risky drinking (Railway Clinical Hospital and Bogomolets National Medical University, with those screening positive on the AUDIT-C (>5 enrolled in the study: 59 participants from the hospital setting (mean age = 22.6 (2.1, 55.9%% male and 61 participants from the university setting (mean age = 20.1(2.3, 55.7% male.  After self-administering a computerized baseline assessment, participants were randomized to receive an in-person brief intervention with telephone booster or to a control condition; participants self-administered a computerized follow-up at 3 months. Results: Regression analyses were conducted, separately for each setting, predicting alcohol outcomes (alcohol consumption and consequences; models controlled for baseline alcohol levels and condition assignment (brief intervention or control. In both settings, the brief intervention group showed significantly less alcohol consumption and consequences at 3-months as compared to the control group (p<.001; however, the groups did not significantly differ  on other drug use (DAST-10 score. Conclusions: Findings suggest that brief motivational interventions are promising for reducing risky drinking among emerging adults in the Ukraine in both inpatient hospital and university settings. Future studies are needed to replicate these findings and extend these effects to reduce other drug use among young people in the Ukraine.

  11. Metformin: A Novel but Controversial Drug in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xinbing; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Xian; Han, Weidong; Pan, Hongming; Xiao, Mang

    2015-11-02

    Metformin, a biguanide derivative that is widely used for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus, has recently been shown to exert potential anticancer effects. Many retrospective data and laboratory studies suggest the idea that metformin has antineoplastic activity, but some other studies reach conflicting conclusions. Although the precise molecular mechanisms by which metformin affects various cancers have not been fully elucidated, activation of AMPK-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways along with energy metabolism aberration, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis or autophagy induction have emerged as crucial regulators in this process. In this Review, we describe the role of metformin in the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancers and summarize the molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of metformin as an anticancer agent. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of metformin in cancer will be discussed.

  12. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  13. Recreational football for disease prevention and treatment in untrained men: a narrative review examining cardiovascular health, lipid profile, body composition, muscle strength and functional capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter Riis; Dvorak, Jiri; Krustrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, researchers have studied the effects of recreational football training as a health-promoting activity for participants across the lifespan. This has important public health implications as over 400 million people play football annually. Results from the first randomised controlled trial, published in the BJSM in January 2009, showed that football increased maximal oxygen uptake and muscle and bone mass, and lowered fat percentage and blood pressure, in untrained men, and since then more than 70 articles about football for health have been published, including publications in two supplements of the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports in 2010 and 2014, prior to the FIFA World Cup tournaments in South Africa and Brazil. While studies of football training effects have also been performed in women and children, this article reviews the current evidence linking recreational football training with favourable effects in the prevention and treatment of disease in adult men. PMID:25878072

  14. Recreational football for disease prevention and treatment in untrained men: a narrative review examining cardiovascular health, lipid profile, body composition, muscle strength and functional capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Hansen, Peter Riis; Dvorak, Jiri; Krustrup, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, researchers have studied the effects of recreational football training as a health-promoting activity for participants across the lifespan. This has important public health implications as over 400 million people play football annually. Results from the first randomised controlled trial, published in the BJSM in January 2009, showed that football increased maximal oxygen uptake and muscle and bone mass, and lowered fat percentage and blood pressure, in untrained men, and since then more than 70 articles about football for health have been published, including publications in two supplements of the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports in 2010 and 2014, prior to the FIFA World Cup tournaments in South Africa and Brazil. While studies of football training effects have also been performed in women and children, this article reviews the current evidence linking recreational football training with favourable effects in the prevention and treatment of disease in adult men.

  15. Selection of antimalarial drug resistance after intermittent preventive treatment of infants and children (IPTi/c) in Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar

    2013-01-01

    Senegal has since 2003 used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) of malaria in risk groups. However, the large-scale IPT strategy may result in increasing drug resistance. Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children...... on the prevalence of SP-resistant haplotypes in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, comparing sites with and without IPTi/c. P. falciparum positives samples (n=352) were collected from children under 5years of age during two cross-sectional surveys in 2010 and 2011 in three health districts (two...... on IPTi/c and one without IPTi/c intervention) located in the southern part of Senegal. The prevalence of SP-resistance-related haplotypes in Pfdhfr and Pfdhps was determined by nested PCR followed by sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP)-ELISA. The prevalence of the Pfdhfr double mutant...

  16. Melatonin Restores White Blood Cell Count, Diminishes Glycated Haemoglobin Level and Prevents Liver, Kidney and Muscle Oxidative Stress in Mice Exposed to Acute Ethanol Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhaluk, Natalia; Sliuta, Alina; Kyriienko, Svitlana; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of melatonin impact on changes in haematological profile, biomarkers of oxidative stress (dienes conjugates, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidatively modified protein levels, total antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzyme activity) in liver, muscle, kidney and erythrocytes, and glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c) in mice during acute ethanol stress. Assays were carried out in quadruplicate: control, melatonin (10 mg/kg, 10 days), acute ethanol stress (0.75 g/kg/day, 10 days) and acute ethanol stress plus melatonin groups. Acute ethanol stress caused a significant increase in the total number of white blood cells (WBC), especially neutrophils in the blood, and HBA1c levels vs. control mice. The correlation between lipid peroxidation and the glycated haemoglobin level was shown (r = 0.93, P = 0.007). Ethanol reduced the antioxidant capacity by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the level of oxidatively modified protein content, diene conjugates and MDA. Melatonin administration in animals during acute ethanol stress reduced antioxidant stress biomarkers, WBC, HBA1c levels and ROS production. Melatonin had protective effects on liver, kidney and muscle tissues by preventing the intensive lipid peroxidation processes in initial (diene conjugation production) and late stages (MDA level), and significantly reduced the level of aldehyde and ketone protein derivatives. Furthermore, melatonin restored elevated WBC count and HBA1c level and diminished ROS production. Ethanol reduces antioxidant capacity and leads to exaggerated reactive oxygen species production and consequent increases in oxidatively modified proteins. Melatonin exerts protective effects by preventing the intensive lipid peroxidation processes. Melatonin significantly reduces the level of aldehyde and ketone protein derivatives, restores glycated haemoglobin level and white blood cell count.

  17. Conflict of interest in the evaluation and dissemination of "model" school-based drug and violence prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Dennis M; Conde, Eugenia

    2007-11-01

    Conflict of interest refers to a set of conditions in which professional judgment concerning the validity of research might be influenced by a secondary competing interest. The competing interest that has received most attention in the literature addressing the prevalence and effects of such conflicts on the practice of empirical research has been that of financial relationships between investigators and research sponsors. The potential for conflicts of interest to arise in the evaluation of drug prevention programs was raised by Moskowitz in this journal in 1993, but to date there has been no attempt made to estimate the scope of this problem. The present study addressed this issue using a sample of "model" school-based drug and violence prevention interventions by first, identifying the types or relationships that exist between program developers and program distributors, and, second, by assessing how many of the evaluations of these programs published in peer-reviewed journals had been conducted by the developers of the programs compared to independent evaluation teams. The data presented indicate that there are relatively few published evaluations that do not involve program developers and that there are few instances in which there is complete separation between the program developer and program distributor. Using the open systems model of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Research Integrity as a framework, it is argued that the culture and norms of the program developer and those of the program evaluator are fundamentally distinct and therefore failure to separate these roles produces high potential for conflict of interest to arise.

  18. Perceived barriers to pharmacist engagement in adverse drug event prevention activities in Ghana using semi-structured interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheampong, Franklin; Anto, Berko Panyin

    2015-09-07

    Pharmacist involvement in the prevention of medication errors is well documented. One such method, the process by which hospital pharmacists undertake these clinical interventions needs to be described and documented. The perceived barriers to pharmacists succeeding in getting their recommendations accepted could inform future safety strategy development. This study was therefore to trace the typical process involved and explore the perceived barriers to pharmacists' medication safety efforts. This study involved a retrospective evaluation of routine clinical interventions collected at a tertiary hospital in Ghana over 23 months. A sample of pharmacists who had submitted these reports were then interviewed. The interventions made related to drug therapy changes (76.0%), monitoring (13.0%), communication (5.4%), counselling (5.0%) and adverse drug events (0.6%). More than 90% of interventions were accepted. The results also showed that undertaking clinical interventions by pharmacists followed a sequential order with two interlinked subprocesses: Problem Identification and Problem Handling. In identifying the problem, as much information needed to be gathered, clinical issues identified and then the problems prioritised. During the problem handling stage, detailed assessment was made which led to the development of a pharmaceutical plan. The plan was then implemented and monitored to ensure appropriateness of desired outcomes. The main barrier mentioned by pharmacist related to the discrepant attitudes of doctors/nurses. The other barriers encountered during these tasks related to workload, and inadequate clinical knowledge. The attitudes were characterised by conflicts and egos resulting from differences in status/authority, responsibilities, and training. Though the majority of recommendations from pharmacists were accepted, the main barrier to hospital pharmacist engagement in medication error prevention activities related to discrepant attitudes of doctors and

  19. State of the art in hereditary muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat-Rott, K; Lehmann-Horn, F

    2010-10-01

    A combination of electrophysiological and genetic studies has resulted in the identification of several skeletal muscle disorders to be caused by pathologically functioning ion channels and has led to the term channelopathies. Typical hereditary muscle channelopa thies are congenital myasthenic syndromes, non-dystrophic myotonias, periodic paralyses, malignant hyperthermia, and central core disease. Most muscle channelopathies are commonly considered to be benign diseases. However, life-threatening weakness episodes or progressive permanent weakness may make these diseases severe, particularly the periodic paralyses (PP). Even in the typical PP forms characterized by episodic occurrence of weakness, up to 60% of the patients suffer from permanent weakness and myopathy with age. In addition, some PP patients present with a predominant progressive muscle weakness phenotype. The weakness can be explained by strongly depolarized fibers that take up sodium and water and that are electrically inexcitable. Drugs that repolarize the fiber membrane can restore muscle strength and may prevent progression.

  20. Novel approach to meta-analysis of microarray datasets reveals muscle remodeling-related drug targets and biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kotelnikova

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of new biomarkers and potential drug targets from high-throughput profiling data is a challenging task due to a limited number of available biological samples and questionable reproducibility of differential changes in cross-dataset comparisons. In this paper we propose a novel computational approach for drug and biomarkers discovery using comprehensive analysis of multiple expression profiling datasets.The new method relies on aggregation of individual profiling experiments combined with leave-one-dataset-out validation approach. Aggregated datasets were studied using Sub-Network Enrichment Analysis algorithm (SNEA to find consistent statistically significant key regulators within the global literature-extracted expression regulation network. These regulators were linked to the consistent differentially expressed genes.We have applied our approach to several publicly available human muscle gene expression profiling datasets related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. In order to detect both enhanced and repressed processes we considered up- and down-regulated genes separately. Applying the proposed approach to the regulators search we discovered the disturbance in the activity of several muscle-related transcription factors (e.g. MYOG and MYOD1, regulators of inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis. Almost all SNEA-derived regulators of down-regulated genes (e.g. AMPK, TORC2, PPARGC1A correspond to a single common pathway important for fast-to-slow twitch fiber type transition. We hypothesize that this process can affect the severity of DMD symptoms, making corresponding regulators and downstream genes valuable candidates for being potential drug targets and exploratory biomarkers.

  1. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance associated with cholesterol-induced activation of macrophages is prevented by high density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Carey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that high density lipoprotein (HDL may modulate glucose metabolism through multiple mechanisms including pancreatic insulin secretion as well as insulin-independent glucose uptake into muscle. We hypothesized that HDL may also increase skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via cholesterol removal and anti-inflammatory actions in macrophages associated with excess adiposity and ectopic lipid deposition. METHODS: Human primary and THP-1 macrophages were treated with vehicle (PBS or acetylated low density lipoprotein (acLDL with or without HDL for 18 hours. Treatments were then removed, and macrophages were incubated with fresh media for 4 hours. This conditioned media was then applied to primary human skeletal myotubes derived from vastus lateralis biopsies taken from patients with type 2 diabetes to examine insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. RESULTS: Conditioned media from acLDL-treated primary and THP-1 macrophages reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary human skeletal myotubes compared with vehicle (primary macrophages, 168±21% of basal uptake to 104±19%; THP-1 macrophages, 142±8% of basal uptake to 108±6%; P<0.05. This was restored by co-treatment of macrophages with HDL. While acLDL increased total intracellular cholesterol content, phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase and secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages, none were altered by co-incubation with HDL. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in human skeletal myotubes exposed to conditioned media was unaltered by either treatment condition. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary human skeletal myotubes by conditioned media from macrophages pre-incubated with acLDL was restored by co-treatment with HDL. However, these actions were not linked to modulation of common pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators or insulin signaling via Akt.

  2. Nonvolatile buffer coating of titanium to prevent its biological aging and for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Kubo, Katsutoshi; Hori, Norio; Yamada, Masahiro; Kojima, Norinaga; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-06-01

    The osseointegration capability of titanium decreases over time. This phenomenon, defined as biological aging of titanium, is associated with the disappearance of hydrophilicity and the progressive accumulation of hydrocarbons on titanium surfaces. The objective of this study was to examine whether coating of titanium surfaces with 4-(2-Hydroxylethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer, a nonvolatile zwitterionic chemical buffering agent, could prevent the time-dependent degradation of the bioactivity of titanium. Commercially pure titanium samples, prepared as disks and cylinders, were acid-etched with H(2)SO(4). A third of the samples were used for experiments immediately after processing (new surfaces), while another third were stored under dark ambient conditions for 3 months (3-month-old surfaces). The remaining third were coated with HEPES after acid-etching and were stored for 3 months (HEPES-coated 3-month-old surfaces). The 3-month-old surfaces were hydrophobic, while new and HEPES-coated 3-month-old surfaces were superhydrophilic. Protein adsorption and the number of osteoblasts attached during an initial culture period were substantially lower for 3-month-old surfaces than for new and HEPES-coated 3-month-old surfaces. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition in osteoblast cultures were reduced by more than 50% on 3-month-old surfaces compared to new surfaces, whereas such degradation was not found on HEPES-coated 3-month-old surfaces. The strength of in vivo bone-implant integration for 3-month-old implants, evaluated by the push-in test, was 60% lower than that for new implants. The push-in value of HEPES-coated 3-month-old implants was equivalent to that of new implants. Coating titanium surfaces with HEPES containing an antioxidant amino acid derivative, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), further enhanced osteoblast attachment to the surfaces, along with the increase level of intracellular glutathione reserves as a result of cellular

  3. HIV/AIDS prevention among female sexual partners of injection drug users in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Pinto, J B; Ramos, R

    1995-01-01

    A participatory community project in the US-Mexico border town of Ciudad Juarez, aimed at helping women who are sex partners of male injection drug users to reduce behaviours which increase their risk for HIV infection, is described and evaluated. The design and implementation of the project were influenced by Paulo Freire's pedagogy in the Latin American tradition of 'popular' education, by Bandura's self-efficacy concepts, and by David Warner's 'barefoot doctor' community health care methodology. Using these approaches the participants were directly involved in the development of teaching materials, and curriculum content and implementation of the project. The programme was evaluated quantitatively using NIDA's AIDS Intake and Follow-up Assessment (AIA/AFA) questionnaires, and qualitatively using open ended interviews. While the AIA/AFA questionnaires detected small changes in the frequency of condom use among the participants, ethnographic interviews detected significant changes in the nature of the behaviours which were placing the women at risk. The changes seem to stem from an increase in the degree of self-esteem, self-efficacy and awareness of the social, economic, and political constraints of their lives. These results demonstrate the need for qualitative measures to be incorporated in the evaluation of community based health education programmes. A series of recommendations is presented to facilitate further development and replication of the programme in similar populations.

  4. Prevention and optimal management of sarcopenia: a review of combined exercise and nutrition interventions to improve muscle outcomes in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denison HJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hayley J Denison,1 Cyrus Cooper,1,2 Avan Aihie Sayer,1,2 Sian M Robinson1,2 1MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK; 2National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Abstract: The growing recognition of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, has highlighted the need to understand more about its etiology. Declines in muscle mass and strength are expected aspects of aging, but there is significant variability between individuals in rates of loss. Although some of these differences can be explained by fixed factors, such as sex, much of the remaining variation is unexplained. This has led to increasing interest in the influence of adult lifestyle, particularly in the effects of modifiable factors such as physical activity and diet, and in identifying intervention opportunities both to prevent and manage sarcopenia. A number of trials have examined the separate effects of increased exercise or dietary supplementation on muscle mass and physical performance of older adults, but less is known about the extent to which benefits of exercise training could be enhanced when these interventions are combined. In a comprehensive review of the literature, we consider 17 studies of older adults (≥65 years in which combined nutrition and exercise interventions were used to increase muscle strength and/or mass, and achieve improvements in physical performance. The studies were diverse in terms of the participants included (nutritional status, degree of physical frailty, supplementation strategies (differences in nutrients, doses, exercise training (type, frequency, as well as design (duration, setting. The main message is that enhanced benefits of exercise training, when combined with dietary supplementation, have been shown in some

  5. Development of novel drug-eluting biodegradable nano-fiber for prevention of postoperative pulmonary venous obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsuga, Masato; Narita, Yuji; Yamawaki, Aika; Satake, Makoto; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Usui, Akihiko; Ueda, Yuichi

    2009-04-01

    Pulmonary venous obstruction (PVO) after correction of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) frequently occurs due to intimal-hyperplasia and the required re-operation. We have developed a novel sustained-release drug delivery system, using Tacrolimus-eluting biodegradable nano-fiber (TEBN). It consists of nano-scale fiber composed of biodegradable polymer and Tacrolimus. This study evaluated the effects of TEBN for prevention of venous anastomotic stricture in a rat model to apply to PVO operation. Tacrolimus was incorporated into poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide). The venous stricture model was made by rat inferior vena cava anastomosis. The IVC anastomosis was covered with TEBN with 1.0 wt% Tacrolimus (n=12) or without TEBN as a control (n=12), and evaluated histologically at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after operation. The ratio of intimal area was significantly reduced in the TEBN group compared with the control group (ratio; 1 week: 0.43+/-0.26 vs. 0.07+/-0.04, P=0.04, 2 weeks: 0.39+/-0.19 vs. 0.05+/-0.02, P=0.01, 4 weeks: 0.31+/-0.15 vs. 0.09+/-0.04, P=0.03, control vs. TEBN, respectively). Histological findings showed endothelialization along the inner surface of the vein even in TEBN. The TEBN reduced intimal hyperplasia and preserved endothelialization even in a venous stricture. These results suggested that this strategy might be useful for prevention of recurrent PVO after TAPVC correction.

  6. Diversion of drugs within health care facilities, a multiple-victim crime: patterns of diversion, scope, consequences, detection, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Keith H; Dillon, Kevin R; Sikkink, Karen M; Taylor, Timothy K; Lanier, William L

    2012-07-01

    Mayo Clinic has been involved in an ongoing effort to prevent the diversion of controlled substances from the workplace and to rapidly identify and respond when such diversion is detected. These efforts have found that diversion of controlled substances is not uncommon and can result in substantial risk not only to the individual who is diverting the drugs but also to patients, co-workers, and employers. We believe that all health care facilities should have systems in place to deter controlled substance diversion and to promptly identify diversion and intervene when it is occurring. Such systems are multifaceted and require close cooperation between multiple stakeholders including, but not limited to, departments of pharmacy, safety and security, anesthesiology, nursing, legal counsel, and human resources. Ideally, there should be a broad-based appreciation of the dangers that diversion creates not only for patients but also for all employees of health care facilities, because diversion can occur at any point along a long supply chain. All health care workers must be vigilant for signs of possible diversion and must be aware of how to engage a preexisting group with expertise in investigating possible diversions. In addition, clear policies and procedures should be in place for dealing with such investigations and for managing the many possible outcomes of a confirmed diversion. This article provides an overview of the multiple types of risk that result from drug diversion from health care facilities. Further, we describe a system developed at Mayo Clinic for evaluating episodes of potential drug diversion and for taking action once diversion is confirmed.

  7. New evidence on the HIV epidemic in Libya: why countries must implement prevention programs among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Lusine; Berendes, Sima; Jeffery, Caroline; Thomson, Joanna; Ben Othman, Hussain; Danon, Leon; Turki, Abdullah A; Saffialden, Rabea; Valadez, Joseph J

    2013-04-15

    Libya had one of the world's largest nosocomial HIV outbreaks in the late 1990 s leading to the detention of 6 foreign medical workers. They were released in 2007 after the Libyan Government and the European Union agreed to humanitarian cooperation that included the development of Libya's first National HIV Strategy and the research reported in this article. Despite the absence of sound evidence on the status and dynamics of Libya's HIV epidemic, some officials posited that injecting drug use was the main mode of transmission. We therefore sought to assess HIV prevalence and related risk factors among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tripoli. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 328 PWID in Tripoli using respondent-driven sampling. We collected behavioral data and blood samples for HIV, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus testing. We estimate an HIV prevalence of 87%, hepatitis C virus prevalence of 94%, and hepatitis B virus prevalence of 5%. We detected injecting drug use-related and sexual risk factors in the context of poor access to comprehensive services for HIV prevention and mitigation. For example, most respondents (85%) reported having shared needles. In this first biobehavioral survey among PWID in Libya, we detected one of the highest (or even the highest) levels of HIV infection worldwide in the absence of a comprehensive harm-reduction program. There is an urgent need to implement an effective National HIV Strategy informed by the results of this research, especially because recent military events and related sociopolitical disruption and migration might lead to a further expansion of the epidemic.

  8. BIOPHARMACEUTICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE SOLVENT IN THE COMPOSITION OF THE IMMUNOBIOLOGICAL DRUG FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF CANDIDAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybalkin М. V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today diseases caused by potentially pathogenic microorganisms become increasingly important. This phenomenon is connected with increase of power of influence of the environment: chemical pollution, radiation, irrational use of antibiotics and hormone therapy; it leads to decrease of the immune response and human nonspecific resistance. For the last years one of the indicators of failure of the human body immune protection is chronic and local candidiases caused by potentially pathogenic fungi of Candida genus. Prevalence and risk of candidal infections determine the need for searching new medicines with a high efficiency and safety for human. Development of a vaccine for prevention and treatment of candidal infection is being actively conducted in many countries of the world. It should be noted that currently no domestic vaccine is produced in Ukraine and no candidiasis vaccines have been registered. Therefore, development of such vaccine is the topical issue of modern pharmacy and medicine. In our previous studies it was found that the immunobiological drug based on the antigens of fungi of C. albicans with the protein concentration of 3 mg/ml and C. tropicalis with the protein concentration of 5 mg/ml in the ratio of 1:1 possesses the protective and therapeutic effect. At the current stage of research it is necessary to substantiate the solvent in the composition of the immunobiological drug. The aim of this work is the experimental substantiation of the solvent in the composition of the immunobiological drug based on the antigens of C. albicans and C. tropicalis fungi. Materials and Methods. The immunobiological drug with the protein concentration of 4 mg/ml was investigated using various solvents. The following solvents was studied: water for injections, 0.9 % isotonic saline solution, phosphate buffer solution. To determine the protective and therapeutic activity of the immunobiological drug based on the antigens of C. albicans and C

  9. Economic evaluation of an alternative drug to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Sicuri

    Full Text Available Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended in HIV-negative women to avert malaria, while this relies on cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp in HIV-positive women. Alternative antimalarials are required in areas where parasite resistance to antifolate drugs is high. The cost-effectiveness of IPTp with alternative drugs is needed to inform policy.The cost-effectiveness of 2-dose IPTp-mefloquine (MQ was compared with IPTp-SP in HIV-negative women (Benin, Gabon, Mozambique and Tanzania. In HIV-positive women the cost-effectiveness of 3-dose IPTp-MQ added to CTXp was compared with CTXp alone (Kenya, Mozambique and Tanzania. The outcomes used were maternal clinical malaria, anaemia at delivery and non-obstetric hospital admissions. The poor tolerability to MQ was included as the value of women's loss of working days. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs were calculated and threshold analysis undertaken.For HIV-negative women, the ICER for IPTp-MQ versus IPTp-SP was 136.30 US$ (2012 US$ (95%CI 131.41; 141.18 per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY averted, or 237.78 US$ (95%CI 230.99; 244.57, depending on whether estimates from Gabon were included or not. For HIV-positive women, the ICER per DALY averted for IPTp-MQ added to CTXp, versus CTXp alone was 6.96 US$ (95%CI 4.22; 9.70. In HIV-negative women, moderate shifts of variables such as malaria incidence, drug cost, and IPTp efficacy increased the ICERs above the cost-effectiveness threshold. In HIV-positive women the intervention remained cost-effective for a substantial (up to 21 times increase in cost per tablet.Addition of IPTp with an effective antimalarial to CTXp was very cost-effective in HIV-positive women. IPTp with an efficacious antimalarial was more cost-effective than IPTp-SP in HIV-negative women. However, the poor tolerability of MQ does not favour its use as IPTp. Regardless of HIV status, prevention of malaria in

  10. Levosimendan: a cardiovascular drug to prevent liver ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Onody

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Temporary occlusion of the hepatoduodenal ligament leads to an ischemic-reperfusion (IR injury in the liver. Levosimendan is a new positive inotropic drug, which induces preconditioning-like adaptive mechanisms due to opening of mitochondrial KATP channels. The aim of this study was to examine possible protective effects of levosimendan in a rat model of hepatic IR injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Levosimendan was administered to male Wistar rats 1 hour (early pretreatment or 24 hours (late pretreatment before induction of 60-minute segmental liver ischemia. Microcirculation of the liver was monitored by laser Doppler flowmeter. After 24 hours of reperfusion, liver and blood samples were taken for histology, immuno- and enzyme-histochemistry (TUNEL; PARP; NADH-TR as well as for laboratory tests. Furthermore, liver antioxidant status was assessed and HSP72 expression was measured. RESULTS: In both groups pretreated with levosimendan, significantly better hepatic microcirculation was observed compared to respective IR control groups. Similarly, histological damage was also reduced after levosimendan administration. This observation was supported by significantly lower activities of serum ALT (p early = 0.02; p late = 0.005, AST (p early = 0.02; p late = 0.004 and less DNA damage by TUNEL test (p early = 0.05; p late = 0.034 and PAR positivity (p early = 0.02; p late = 0.04. Levosimendan pretreatment resulted in significant improvement of liver redox homeostasis. Further, significantly better mitochondrial function was detected in animals receiving late pretreatment. Finally, HSP72 expression was increased by IR injury, but it was not affected by levosimendan pretreatment. CONCLUSION: Levosimendan pretreatment can be hepatoprotective and it could be useful before extensive liver resection.

  11. [An alarming threat to secondary prevention: low compliance (lifestyle) and poor adherence (drugs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentín

    2012-07-01

    The deteriorating health of the general population and the increasing prevalence of chronic disease combine to present a problem of global proportions whose causes are both multifactorial and complex. The consumer society we live in does not encourage healthy living, and the consequences are even most devastating when social inequalities, the economic situation and the population explosion in recent decades are taken into account. The growth of poor eating habits, obesity, and hypertension are relentlessly contributing to the development of an epidemic of cardiovascular disease. In this context, the ability of national and international bodies and regulatory agencies to have an effect on commercial interests is very limited and alternative ways of reducing the disease burden are needed. Recent studies on patient compliance with lifestyle changes and on adherence to prescribed medication have produced alarming findings. Over 50% of patients, on average, choose to abandon the treatment they have been prescribed, and the percentage that achieve the targets proposed for improving habitual behaviors (e.g. quitting smoking, losing weight or increasing physical activity) is similar or lower. It is essential that solutions to these problems are found because, in addition to their implications for the health of the individual, poor compliance and adherence threaten to undermine the relevance of clinical study findings and are associated with substantial economic costs, given that they result in the failure to achieve therapeutic goals and increase rates of hospitalization and death. Improved communication between doctors and patients, the active participation of other health professionals and the development of combination drug formulations (e.g. the polypill) appear to be the most promising strategies for improving patient adherence to treatment and reducing the economic burden. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  12. Effects of photobiomodulation therapy and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on skeletal muscle injury induced by contusion in rats-part 2: biochemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Frigo, Lúcio; Dos Reis Ferreira, Tereza Cristina; Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; Teixeira, Simone; de Almeida, Patrícia; Muscara, Marcelo Nicolas; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Serra, Andrey Jorge; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto

    2017-08-09

    Muscle injuries trigger an inflammatory process, releasing important biochemical markers for tissue regeneration. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is the treatment of choice to promote pain relief due to muscle injury. NSAIDs exhibit several adverse effects and their efficacy is questionable. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been demonstrated to effectively modulate inflammation induced from musculoskeletal disorders and may be used as an alternative to NSAIDs. Here, we assessed and compared the effects of different doses of PBMT and topical NSAIDs on biochemical parameters during an acute inflammatory process triggered by a controlled model of contusion-induced musculoskeletal injury in rats. Muscle injury was induced by trauma to the anterior tibial muscle of rats. After 1 h, rats were treated with PBMT (830 nm, continuous mode, 100 mW of power, 35.71 W/cm(2); 1, 3, and 9 J; 10, 30, and 90 s) or diclofenac sodium (1 g). Our results demonstrated that PBMT, 1 J (35.7 J/cm(2)), 3 J (107.1 J/cm(2)), and 9 J (321.4 J/cm(2)) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) genes at all assessed times as compared to the injury and diclofenac groups (p < 0.05). The diclofenac group showed reduced levels of COX-2 only in relation to the injury group (p < 0.05). COX-2 protein expression remained unchanged with all therapies except with PBMT at a 3-J dose at 12 h (p < 0.05 compared to the injury group). In addition, PBMT (1, 3, and 9 J) effectively reduced levels of cytokines TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 at all assessed times as compared to the injury and diclofenac groups (p < 0.05). Thus, PBMT at a 3-J dose was more effective than other doses of PBMT and topical NSAIDs in the modulation of the inflammatory process caused by muscle contusion injuries.

  13. Prevention of Fetal Congenital Malformations with Allowance for the Pharmacogenetic Features of the Metabolism of Antiepileptic Drugs and Hereditary Abnormalities in the Folate Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Dmitrenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal congenital malformations are among the most dangerous complications of pregnancy in women with epilepsy taking antiepileptic drugs. Valproic acid and phenobarbital have the greatest risk of teratogenic effects. Insights into the current mechanisms of teratogenic effect of antiepileptic drugs, pharmacogenetic features of the metabolism of valproates and hereditary abnormalities in the folate cycle enables prevention of fetal congenital malformations. 

  14. Hypoglycaemic therapy in type 2 diabetes. Part I. Metformin is the only glucose-lowering drug known to prevent complications of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Metformin monotherapy appears to reduce mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes, with generally acceptable adverse effects. To determine whether any other glucose-lowering drugs have been shown to prevent or delay the onset of long-term clinical complications of diabetes, we conducted a systematic review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. We identified only six randomised controlled trials, versus placebo or no treatment, that were designed to evaluate the efficacy of glucose-lowering drugs in preventing the clinical complications of type 2 diabetes. Three trials of various insulins failed to demonstrate a tangible benefit for patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate hyperglycaemia. In one trial, cardiovascular mortality appeared to be higher in the group treated with tolbutamide, a glucose-lowering sulphonylurea. In a trial lasting 11 years, another sulphonylurea, glibenclamide, appeared to reduce the incidence of diabetes complications, but it had no impact on mortality. The results of this trial are undermined by methodological flaws. In trials lasting up to 3 years, pioglitazone, alogliptin and saxagliptin had no effect in preventing the clinical complications of diabetes in patients with relatively high blood glucose levels. * In 2014, metformin is the only hypo- glycaemic drug that appears to reduce mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes in comparative trials. Compa- rative data suggesting that gliben- clamide prevents some complications of diabetes are rather unconvincing. No other glucose-lowering drugs have been shown to prevent the complica- tions of diabetes, but their evaluation is inadequate.

  15. Alter Ego. Drug and brain--information to prevent. Compared analysis of opinions, knowledge and habits among a multicentric sample of secondary school students about drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, M; Gentile, A; Langiano, E; De Vito, E; La Torre, G; Ricciardi, G

    2006-03-01

    Repression and control have been shown to be inadequate for drug addiction issues. Recent history, however has proved that information is one of the most effective measures against the spread of drugs. The wide range of drug circulation and the need for the spread of correct information on the effects of drugs in man, especially his brain, have led the Center for Scientific Culture Diffusion of Cassino University, to widen the scope of "Alter Ego. Drugs and the brain", a touring educational exhibition, which opened in 1994, by dedicating more attention to socially accepted drugs, such as alcohol and tobacco, and to new substances like ecstasy and similar drugs. Concurrently with the Alter Ego touring exhibition, a study was undertaken to obtain information on public awareness of the dangers of psychotropic drug abuse and to assess the effectiveness of the exhibition as an instrument of scientific information about drug addiction among its visitors, during its tour of over 60 Italian towns.

  16. A Comparison of Maternal Outcomes from an Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention Program for Mothers Choosing an Intervention versus Being Randomized

    OpenAIRE

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Laborde, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Self-determination theory and substantial research findings suggest that more desirable outcomes may occur when participants are able to choose their prevention or treatment interventions, as having a choice may lead to greater motivation and feelings of self-efficacy. The present study examined the influence of having a choice of family-based prevention programs for youth alcohol, tobacco, and drug use on mothers’ communication outcomes. Families (N=496) were those with an 11–12 year old enr...

  17. Emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants after triple antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

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    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO-guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend complex maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis comprising antenatal zidovudine (AZT, nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD at labor onset and AZT/lamivudine (3TC during labor and one week postpartum. Data on resistance development selected by this regimen is not available. We therefore analyzed the emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Tanzanian women following complex prophylaxis. METHOD: 1395 pregnant women were tested for HIV-1 at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. 87/202 HIV-positive women started complex prophylaxis. Blood samples were collected before start of prophylaxis, at birth and 1-2, 4-6 and 12-16 weeks postpartum. Allele-specific real-time PCR assays specific for HIV-1 subtypes A, C and D were developed and applied on samples of mothers and their vertically infected infants to quantify key resistance mutations of AZT (K70R/T215Y/T215F, NVP (K103N/Y181C and 3TC (M184V at detection limits of <1%. RESULTS: 50/87 HIV-infected women having started complex prophylaxis were eligible for the study. All women took AZT with a median duration of 53 days (IQR 39-64; all women ingested NVP-SD, 86% took 3TC. HIV-1 resistance mutations were detected in 20/50 (40% women, of which 70% displayed minority species. Variants with AZT-resistance mutations were found in 11/50 (22%, NVP-resistant variants in 9/50 (18% and 3TC-resistant variants in 4/50 women (8%. Three women harbored resistant HIV-1 against more than one drug. 49/50 infants, including the seven vertically HIV-infected were breastfed, 3/7 infants exhibited drug-resistant virus. CONCLUSION: Complex prophylaxis resulted in lower levels of NVP-selected resistance as compared to NVP-SD, but AZT-resistant HIV-1 emerged in a substantial proportion of women. Starting AZT in pregnancy week 14 instead of 28 as recommended by the current WHO-guidelines may further increase

  18. A randomised trial to compare the safety, tolerability and efficacy of three drug combinations for intermittent preventive treatment in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalifa Bojang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Results from trials of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT in infants and children have shown that IPT provides significant protection against clinical malaria. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP given alone or in combination with other drugs has been used for most IPT programmes. However, SP resistance is increasing in many parts of Africa. Thus, we have investigated whether SP plus AQ, SP plus piperaquine (PQ and dihydroartemisinin (DHA plus PQ might be equally safe and effective when used for IPT in children in an area of seasonal transmission. METHODS: During the 2007 malaria transmission season, 1008 Gambian children were individually randomized to receive SP plus amodiaquine (AQ, SP plus piperaquine (PQ or dihydroartemisinin (DHA plus PQ at monthly intervals on three occasions during the peak malaria transmission season. To determine the risk of side effects following drug administration, participants in each treatment group were visited at home three days after the start of each round of drug administration and a side effects questionnaire completed. To help establish whether adverse events were drug related, the same questionnaire was administered to 286 age matched control children recruited from adjacent villages. Morbidity was monitored throughout the malaria transmission season and study children were seen at the end of the malaria transmission season. RESULTS: All three treatment regimens showed good safety profiles. No severe adverse event related to IPT was reported. The most frequent adverse events reported were coughing, diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. Cough was present in 15.2%, 15.4% and 18.7% of study subjects who received SP plus AQ, DHA plus PQ or SP plus PQ respectively, compared to 19.2% in a control group. The incidence of malaria in the DHA plus PQ, SP plus AQ and SP plus PQ groups were 0.10 cases per child year (95% CI: 0.05, 0.22, 0.06 (95% CI: 0.022, 0.16 and 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02, 0

  19. The Prevention and Control of the Risk on Drug Procurement Probity in Our Hospital%医院药品采购廉洁风险防控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰莉琳

    2014-01-01

    Strictly implementing the system of drug purchase and implementing the prevention and control of the risk of probity is the key point in ensuring the quality of drug, the clinical efficacy and Patients with drug safety. So the hospital must standardize the management of this part.%严格执行药品采购制度,实行廉洁风险防控,是保证医院药品质量,确保临床疗效及患者用药安全的关键环节,所以医院必须规范这方面工作管理。

  20. Possible role for cryostabilizers in preventing protein and lipid alterations in frozen-stored minced muscle of Atlantic mackerel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Herrera, Juan J; Bernárdez, Marta; Sampedro, Gabriel; Cabo, Marta L; Pastoriza, Laura

    2006-05-03

    Adding DE 18 maltodextrin (80 g kg(-1)) to high-fat minced mackerel was highly effective against lipid oxidation and protein and color changes during frozen storage. It increased the temperature of ice-melting onset (Tm') and decreased freeze concentration of solutes in the unfrozen water (UFW) phase, which would have allowed it to effectively slow such perturbations. This maltodextrin showed a higher effectiveness against lipid oxidation, but was slightly less effective in preventing the loss of protein solubility than common cryoprotectants, that is, an equiproportional mixture of sucrose and sorbitol. Such differences in effectiveness were much higher in low-fat minces, in which lipid oxidation proceeded to a much lower extent. Consequently, prior to replacing traditional cryoprotectants with maltodextrins, it should be known which processes limit the shelf life of the food. Decreasing (from 80 to 50 g kg(-1)) the proportion of maltodextrin added to high-fat minced mackerel showed that although it affected only slightly the effectiveness against lipid oxidation, it did notably affect the effectiveness in preventing the loss of protein solubility and color changes. Therefore, such a decrease could be accepted only if lipid oxidation is the most limiting process of shelf life, but does not seem appropriate when protein changes are important.