WorldWideScience

Sample records for drug metabolising enzymes

  1. An overview of the relations between polymorphisms in drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and survival after cancer drug treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, Corine; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Smits, Paul H. M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.

    2009-01-01

    A wide interindividual variability in survival after cancer treatment is observed. This is attributable to many factors, including tumour and patient related factors. Genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters may be one of these factors. Drug metabolising enzymes are

  2. Interaction Potential of the Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib with Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolising Enzymes Assessed in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Weiss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dovitinib (TKI-258 is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1 inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2 by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 μM. Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions.

  3. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs Changed the Protein Expressions and Activities of Drug-Metabolising Enzymes in the Liver of Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Sheweita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is a major health problem and is mainly associated with the persistent inability of men to maintain sufficient erection for satisfactory sexual performance. Millions of men are using sildenafil, vardenafil, and/or tadalafil for ED treatment. Cytochrome P450s (CYPs play a central role in the metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics as well as endogenous compounds. Susceptibility of individuals to the adverse effects of different drugs is mainly dependent on the expression of CYPs proteins. Therefore, changes in activities of phase I drug-metabolising enzymes [arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH, dimethylnitrosamine N-demethylase (DMN-dI, 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD, and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase ((EROD] and the protein expression of different CYPs isozymes (CYP1A2, CYP2E1, CYP2B1/2, CYP3A4, CYP2C23, and CYP2C6 were determined after treatment of male rats with either low or high doses of sildenafil (Viagra, tadalafil (Cialis, and/or vardenafil (Levitra for 3 weeks. The present study showed that low doses of tadalafil and vardenafil increased DMN-dI activity by 32 and 23%, respectively. On the other hand, high doses of tadalafil, vardenafil, and sildenafil decreased such activity by 50, 56, and 52%, respectively. In addition, low doses of tadalafil and vardenafil induced the protein expression of CYP2E1. On the other hand, high doses of either tadalafil or sildenafil were more potent inhibitors to CYP2E1 expression than vardenafil. Moreover, low doses of both vardenafil and sildenafil markedly increased AHH activity by 162 and 247%, respectively, whereas high doses of tadalafil, vardenafil, and sildenafil inhibited such activity by 36, 49, and 57% and inhibited the EROD activity by 39, 49, and 33%, respectively. Low and high doses of tadalafil, vardenafil, and sildenafil inhibited the activity of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase as well as its protein expression. In addition, such drugs inhibited the expression of CYP

  4. Effects of dibutyl phthalate on lipid metabolism and drug metabolising enzyme system in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakaki, Mitsuo; Ariyoshi, Toshihiko.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on the liver constituents and the drug metabolizing enzyme system were investigated in rats. 1. In the experiments at a single oral dose of DBP (630 or 1260 mg/kg), the glycogen content was decreased only at the high dose, but no effects were observed on the contents of glycogen, triglyceride, microsomal protein and cytochromes, and on the activities of drug metabolizing enzymes. 2. In the repeated oral dose of DBP (630 or 1260 mg/kg/day) for 5 days, the ratio of liver weight to body weight was increased in both female and male rats, whereas the increases of cytochrome P-450 content and aniline hydroxylase activity were noted only in male rats. However, the contents of liver triglyceride, phospholipids, and cholesterol were unchanged. On the other hand, serum cholesterol content which showed the tendency to be decreased at the low dose was significantly decreased at the high dose. 3. In the incorporation of 1- 14 C-acetate into liver and serum lipids after repeated oral dose of DBP (630 mg/kg/day) for 5 days in male rats, the incorporation into triglyceride showed tendency to be increased, whereas the incorporation into cholesterol and cholesterol ester remained unchanged in vivo and in vitro. (auth.)

  5. Novel variants of major drug-metabolising enzyme genes in diverse African populations and their predicted functional effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matimba Alice

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmacogenetics enables personalised therapy based on genetic profiling and is increasingly applied in drug discovery. Medicines are developed and used together with pharmacodiagnostic tools to achieve desired drug efficacy and safety margins. Genetic polymorphism of drug-metabolising enzymes such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs and N-acetyltransferases (NATs has been widely studied in Caucasian and Asian populations, yet studies on African variants have been less extensive. The aim of the present study was to search for novel variants of CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and NAT2 genes in Africans, with a particular focus on their prevalence in different populations, their relevance to enzyme functionality and their potential for personalised therapy. Blood samples from various ethnic groups were obtained from the AiBST Biobank of African Populations. The nine exons and exon-intron junctions of the CYP genes and exon 2 of NAT2 were analysed by direct DNA sequencing. Computational tools were used for the identification, haplotype analysis and prediction of functional effects of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Novel SNPs were discovered in all four genes, grouped to existing haplotypes or assigned new allele names, if possible. The functional effects of non-synonymous SNPs were predicted and known African-specific variants were confirmed, but no significant differences were found in the frequencies of SNPs between African ethnicities. The low prevalence of our novel variants and most known functional alleles is consistent with the generally high level of diversity in gene loci of African populations. This indicates that profiles of rare variants reflecting interindividual variability might become the most relevant pharmacodiagnostic tools explaining Africans' diversity in drug response.

  6. Can the genotype or phenotype of two polymorphic drug metabolising cytochrome P450-enzymes identify oral lichenoid drug eruptions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Hansen, Claus; Reibel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Lichenoid drug eruptions (LDE) in the oral cavity are adverse drug reactions (ADR) that are impossible to differentiate from oral lichen planus (OLP) as no phenotypic criteria exist. Impaired function of polymorphic cytochrome 450-enzymes (CYPs) may cause increased plasma concentration of some...

  7. Effect of turmeric on xenobiotic metabolising enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goud, V K; Polasa, K; Krishnaswamy, K

    1993-07-01

    Diet contains several substances capable of inhibiting chemical carcinogenesis. It is known that such inhibitors may either act directly by scavenging the reactive substances or indirectly by promoting mechanisms which enhance detoxification. Turmeric which contains curcumin both in vitro and in vivo is an active antimutagen. Studies were therefore conducted to evaluate the effects of turmeric on xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in hepatic tissue of rats fed turmeric ranging from 0.5-10% in the diet. Enzymes such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, UDP glucuronyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase were assayed after four weeks of turmeric fed diets. No significant differences were seen in the activating enzyme AHH. However, UDPGT was significantly elevated in rats fed 10% turmeric while GSHT registered a significant increase in 5 and 10% turmeric fed diet as compared to controls and 0.5-1.0% turmeric fed animals. The results suggest that turmeric may increase detoxification systems in addition to its anti-oxidant properties. Curcumin perhaps is the active principle in turmeric. Turmeric used widely as a spice would probably mitigate the effects of several dietary carcinogens.

  8. Comparison of hepatic and renal drug-metabolising enzyme activities in sheep given single or two-fold challenge infections with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calléja, C; Bigot, K; Eeckhoutte, C; Sibille, P; Boulard, C; Galtier, P

    2000-07-01

    The activity of drug-metabolising enzymes was compared in liver and kidneys of adult sheep given single or two-fold fluke infection. Fascioliasis was induced by oral administration of 200 metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica to female sheep either 10 or 20 weeks (mono-infections) or 10 and 20 weeks (bi-infection) before killing. The parasitic pathology was ascertained at autopsy and by clinical observation of animals. In the liver of both mono- and bi-infected animals, significant decreases (P<0.05) (17-44%) were observed in the microsomal content of cytochrome P450 and in the two measured P450-dependent monooxygenase activities, benzphetamine and ethylmorphine N-demethylations. Moreover, Western blot analysis of microsomes demonstrated a decrease in the expression of cytochrome P4503A subfamily correlative with that of its presumed corresponding activity ethylmorphine N-demethylase. By contrast, the conjugation of chloro-dinitrobenzene to glutathione remained unchanged in liver cytosolic fractions prepared from all these animals. In kidneys, a significant decrease (P<0.05) (30%) in microsomal cytochrome P450 level of 10-week mono-infected sheep was observed whereas there was no change in the other groups of animals. The inflammatory origin and the consequences in terms of pathology and animal productivity of the fascioliasis-induced decreases in tissue-oxidative drug metabolism are discussed, particularly in the case of adult sheep suffering repetitive infections.

  9. Effect of thiabendazole on some rat hepatic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, R.J.; Scott, M.P.; Walters, D.G.; Stierum, R.H.; Groten, J.P.; Meredith, C.; Lake, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of thiabendazole (TB) on some rat hepatic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes has been investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed control diet or diets containing 102-5188 ppm TB for 28 days. As a positive control for induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolism, rats were also fed diets

  10. Genetic polymorphism of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, diet and cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reszka, Edyta; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Gromadzinska, Jolanta

    2006-10-01

    There is increasing evidence identifying the crucial role of numerous dietary components in modifying the process of carcinogenesis. The varied effects exerted by nutrient and non-nutrient dietary compounds on human health and cancer risk are one of the new challenges for nutritional sciences. In the present paper, an attempt is made to review the most recent epidemiological data on interactions between dietary factors and metabolic gene variants in terms of cancer risk. The majority of case-control studies indicate the significant relationship between cancer risk and polymorphic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in relation to dietary components. The risk of colorectal cancer is associated not only with CYP2E1 high-activity alleles, but also GSTA1 low-activity alleles, among consumers of red or processed meat. Genetic polymorphisms of NAT1 and NAT2 may be also a breast-cancer susceptibility factor among postmenopausal women with a high intake of well-done meat. On the other hand, phytochemicals, especially isothiocyanates, have a protective effect against colorectal and lung cancers in individuals lacking GST genes. Moreover, polymorphism of GSTM1 seems to be involved in the dietary regulation of DNA damage. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study shows a significant inverse association between the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct level and dietary antioxidants only among GSTM1-null individuals. However, the absence of a modulatory effect of polymorphic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes and diet on the development of cancer has been indicated by some epidemiological investigations. Studies of interactions between nutrients and genes may have great potential for exploring mechanisms, identifying susceptible populations/individuals and making practical use of study results to develop preventive strategies beneficial to human health.

  11. Heterotropic and homotropic cooperativity by a drug-metabolising mutant of cytochrome P450 BM3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt-Lussenburg, B.M.A.; Damsten, M.C.; Maasdijk, D.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Commandeur, J.N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we described a triple mutant of the bacterial cytochrome P450 BM3 as the first mutant with affinity for drug-like compounds. In this paper, we show that this mutant, but not wild-type BM3, is able to metabolise testosterone and several drug-like molecules such as amodiaquine,

  12. Effects of a Brussels sprouts extract on oxidative DNA damage and metabolising enzymes in rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Jensen, B.R.; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2001-01-01

    in the liver. Oral administration of an aqueous Brussels sprouts extract for 4 days was found to induce the expression of GST 1.3-fold (P antioxidant......The apparent anticarcinogenic effect of cruciferous vegetables found in numerous epidemiological and experimental studies has been associated with their influence on phase I and phase II metabolising enzymes as well as on the antioxidant status. In the present study we investigated the effect...... of administration of a Brussels sprouts extract on the expression at the mRNA level and/or catalytic activity in rat liver of three phase I enzymes [cytochrome P450-1A2 (CYP1A2),-2B1/2 (CYP2B1/2) and-2E1 (CYP2E1)] and two phase II enzyme [NADPH:quinone reductase (QR) and glutathione S-transferase pi 7 (GSTpi)], all...

  13. The expression and prognostic significance of retinoic acid metabolising enzymes in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon T Brown

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer with over fifty percent of patients presenting at an advanced stage. Retinoic acid is a metabolite of vitamin A and is essential for normal cell growth and aberrant retinoic acid metabolism is implicated in tumourigenesis. This study has profiled the expression of retinoic acid metabolising enzymes using a well characterised colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing 650 primary colorectal cancers, 285 lymph node metastasis and 50 normal colonic mucosal samples. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the tissue microarray using monoclonal antibodies which we have developed to the retinoic acid metabolising enzymes CYP26A1, CYP26B1, CYP26C1 and lecithin retinol acyl transferase (LRAT using a semi-quantitative scoring scheme to assess expression. Moderate or strong expression of CYP26A1was observed in 32.5% of cancers compared to 10% of normal colonic epithelium samples (p<0.001. CYP26B1 was moderately or strongly expressed in 25.2% of tumours and was significantly less expressed in normal colonic epithelium (p<0.001. CYP26C1 was not expressed in any sample. LRAT also showed significantly increased expression in primary colorectal cancers compared with normal colonic epithelium (p<0.001. Strong CYP26B1 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis (HR = 1.239, 95%CI = 1.104-1.390, χ(2 = 15.063, p = 0.002. Strong LRAT was also associated with poorer outcome (HR = 1.321, 95%CI = 1.034-1.688, χ(2 = 5.039, p = 0.025. In mismatch repair proficient tumours strong CYP26B1 (HR = 1.330, 95%CI = 1.173-1.509, χ(2= 21.493, p<0.001 and strong LRAT (HR = 1.464, 95%CI = 1.110-1.930, χ(2 = 7.425, p = 0.006 were also associated with poorer prognosis. This study has shown that the retinoic acid metabolising enzymes CYP26A1, CYP26B1 and LRAT are significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer and that CYP26B1 and LRAT are significantly associated with prognosis both in the total

  14. Oxidative Stress and Genetic Variants of Xenobiotic-Metabolising Enzymes Associated with COPD Development and Severity in Serbian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Zivka; Topic, Aleksandra; Francuski, Djordje; Stankovic, Marija; Nagorni-Obradovic, Ljudmila; Markovic, Bojan; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2017-02-01

    The genetic and non-genetic factors that contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still poorly understood. We investigated the potential role of genetic variants of xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase M1, GSTM1; glutathione-S-transferase T1, GSTT1; microsomal epoxide hydrolase, mEH), oxidative stress (assessed by urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-oxodG/creatinine), sex, ageing and smoking habits on susceptibility to development of COPD and its severity in Serbian population. The investigated population consisted of 153 healthy subjects (85 males and 68 females) and 71 patients with COPD (33 males and 38 females). Detection of GSTM1*null, GSTT1*null, mEH Tyr113His and mEH His139Arg gene variants was performed by PCR/RFLP method. Urinary 8-oxodG was determined using HPLC-MS/MS, and expressed as 8-oxodG/creatinine. We revealed that increased urinary 8-oxodG/creatinine and leucocytosis are the strongest independent predictors for COPD development. Increased level of oxidative stress increased the risk for COPD in males [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.42, 2.26-31.28], more than in females (OR, 95% CI: 3.60, 1.37-9.45). Additionally, independent predictors for COPD were ageing in males (OR, 95% CI: 1.29, 1.12-1.48), while in females they were at least one GSTM1 or GSTT1 gene deletion in combination (OR, 95% CI: 23.67, 2.62-213.46), and increased cumulative cigarette consumption (OR, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.01-1.16). Severity of COPD was associated with the combined effect of low mEH activity phenotype, high level of oxidative stress and heavy smoking. In conclusion, early identification of GSTM1*null or GSTT1*null genotypes in females, low mEH activity phenotype in heavy smokers and monitoring of oxidative stress level can be useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  15. Association between two polymorphisms of histamine-metabolising enzymes and the severity of allergic rhinitis in a group of Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Velázquez, R; López-Márquez, F; Espinosa-Padilla, S; Rivera-Guillen, M; Gutíerrez-Díaz, N; Pérez-Armendáriz, L; Rosales-González, M

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that polymorphisms of histamine metabolising enzymes can be a risk factor for developing histamine-involving diseases. The aim of the present study is to research the possible association between two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): C314T in the Histamine-N-Methyl Transferase gene and C2029G in the Diamine Oxidase gene, with the severity of allergic rhinitis and the number of allergic diseases, in a group of allergic Mexican children. We studied 154 unrelated allergic children. SNPs were analysed by RT-PCR. The total serum IgE was measured by chemiluminescence and the serum histamine by ELISA. We used logistic regression analysis to determine OR. Patients carrying the mutant allele for any SNP had more risk to develop higher rhinitis severity or a bigger number of allergic diseases. Haplotype analysis revealed that this effect is synergistic. In patients carrying one or two mutant alleles, serum histamine levels were higher than those of patients carrying only wild alleles. Serum IgE levels were not associated with the presence of mutant alleles. The presence of these SNPs in patients with allergic rhinitis can lead to higher serum histamine, therefore to a higher risk of developing more severe symptoms or more associated allergic diseases, even if the serum IgE remains low. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Phytochemical screening of Nepeta cataria extracts and their in vitro inhibitory effects on free radicals and carbohydrate-metabolising enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Abdel Moneam Mohamed; Ebrahim, Mohamed Elsayed; Aly, Hanan Farouk; Metawaa, Hemaia Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahlam Hosni; Mahmoud, Ebtissam A; Ebrahim, Faten Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    This research was performed to investigate in vitro the biological activities of successive as well as 70% ethanol extracts of Nepeta cataria on some biochemical parameters including oxidative markers and carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzyme activities (α-amylase, β-galactosidase and α-glucosidase). Powdered N. cataria and its successive extracts were screened for their phytochemical constituents. Tests for tannins, carbohydrates, glycosides and flavonoids were positive in ethanolic extract, but those for steroids and terpenoids were positive in petroleum ether and chloroform extracts. Also, different extracts were chromatographically investigated. The results obtained demonstrated that different successive extracts of N. cataria exhibited an inhibitory effect on oxidative stress indices and carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzymes. It is observed that 70% ethanol, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts showed, respectively, the most potent inhibitory activities, while ethyl acetate and ethanol successive extracts appeared with moderate or low reducing activities.

  17. Drug transport proteins in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Muller, M.; Jansen, P.LM

    2003-01-01

    Together with drug metabolising enzymes, transmembrane transporters are important determinants of drug metabolism and drug clearance by the liver. Hepatic uptake of organic anions, cations, prostaglandins and bile salts is supported by dedicated transporter proteins in the basolateral (sinusoidal)

  18. Fondaparinux sodium is not metabolised in mammalian liver fractions and does not inhibit cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of concomitant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Carolyne; Shi, Juan; Donat, François; Van Horn, Robert; Brian, William; Newton, John; Delbressine, Leon; Vos, Ria

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro metabolism of the antithrombotic agent fondaparinux sodium in mammalian liver fractions and to evaluate its potential inhibitory effect on human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism of other drugs. Metabolism was evaluated by incubating radioisotope-labelled fondaparinux sodium with postmitochondrial liver fractions of rat, rabbit, monkey or human origin (three subjects). Human liver microsomal preparations and an NADPH-generating system were incubated with phenacetin, coumarin, tolbutamide, S-mephenytoin, bufuralol, chlorzoxazone or nifedipine. These are selectively metabolised by CYP isoforms: CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 or CYP3A4, respectively. Experiments were designed to determine apparent K(i) (inhibitory constant) values for fondaparinux sodium against each CYP isoform, by varying concentrations of fondaparinux sodium and the selective substrate. Each experiment included control reaction mixtures containing an isoform-selective inhibitor. After incubation, the mixtures were analysed by LC-MS/MS or with fluorometric detection. All liver fractions were enzymatically active, as demonstrated by degradation of [(14)C]testosterone. No metabolism of fondaparinux sodium was detectable in postmitochondrial liver fractions. Apparent K(i) values for fondaparinux sodium against the CYP isoforms could not be determined because the oxidative metabolism of the isoform-selective CYP substrates was not significantly inhibited in pooled microsomal reaction mixtures. In the presence of selective CYP inhibitors, metabolism of each substrate was significantly reduced, confirming that inhibition could be observed in these assays. The demonstrated lack of mammalian hepatic metabolism of fondaparinux sodium is consistent with animal and human studies. The absence of inhibition of the human CYP isoforms commonly involved in the metabolism of drugs suggests that clinical treatment with fondaparinux sodium is unlikely to interfere

  19. Inhibitory properties of 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-arabinitol (DAB) derivatives acting on glycogen metabolising enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Concia, Alda Lisa; Gómez, Livia; Clapés, Pere; Fita, Ignacio; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C

    2016-09-26

    Glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are the key enzymes that control, respectively, the synthesis and degradation of glycogen, a multi-branched glucose polymer that serves as a form of energy storage in bacteria, fungi and animals. An abnormal glycogen metabolism is associated with several human diseases. Thus, GS and GP constitute adequate pharmacological targets to modulate cellular glycogen levels by means of their selective inhibition. The compound 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-arabinitol (DAB) is a known potent inhibitor of GP. We studied the inhibitory effect of DAB, its enantiomer LAB, and 29 DAB derivatives on the activity of rat muscle glycogen phosphorylase (RMGP) and E. coli glycogen synthase (EcGS). The isoform 4 of sucrose synthase (SuSy4) from Solanum tuberosum L. was also included in the study for comparative purposes. Although these three enzymes possess highly conserved catalytic site architectures, the DAB derivatives analysed showed extremely diverse inhibitory potential. Subtle changes in the positions of crucial residues in their active sites are sufficient to discriminate among the structural differences of the tested inhibitors. For the two Leloir-type enzymes, EcGS and SuSy4, which use sugar nucleotides as donors, the inhibitory potency of the compounds analysed was synergistically enhanced by more than three orders of magnitude in the presence of ADP and UDP, respectively. Our results are consistent with a model in which these compounds bind to the subsite in the active centre of the enzymes that is normally occupied by the glucosyl residue which is transferred between donor and acceptor substrates. The ability to selectively inhibit the catalytic activity of the key enzymes of the glycogen metabolism may represent a new approach for the treatment of disorders of the glycogen metabolism.

  20. Modulation of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes by anticarcinogens-focus on glutathione S-transferases and their role as targets of dietary chemoprevention in colorectal carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool-Zobel, Beatrice; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Boehmer, Frank-D.

    2005-01-01

    There is evidence that consumption of certain dietary ingredients may favourably modulate biotransformation of carcinogens. Associated with this is the hypothesis that the risk for developing colorectal cancer could be reduced, since its incidence is related to diet. Two main groups of biotransformation enzymes metabolize carcinogens, namely Phase I enzymes, which convert hydrophobic compounds to more water-soluble moieties, and Phase II enzymes (e.g. glutathione S-transferases [GST]), which primarily catalyze conjugation reactions. The conjugation of electrophilic Phase I intermediates with glutathione, for instance, frequently results in detoxification. Several possible colon carcinogens may serve as substrates for GST isoenzymes that can have marked substrate specificity. The conjugated products could be less toxic/genotoxic if GSTs are induced, thereby reducing exposure. Thus, numerous studies have shown that the induction of GSTs by antioxidants enables experimental animals to tolerate exposure to carcinogens. One important mechanism of GST induction involves an antioxidant-responsive response element (ARE) and the transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is bound to the Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) in the cytoplasm. Antioxidants may disrupt the Keap-Nrf2 complex, allowing Nrf2 to translocate to the nucleus and mediate expression of Phase II genes via interaction with the ARE. GSTs are also induced by butyrate, a product of gut flora-derived fermentation of plant foods, which may act via different mechanisms, e.g. by increasing histone acetylation. GSTs are expressed with high inter-individual variability in human colonocytes, which points to large differences in cellular susceptibility to xenobiotics. Enhancing expression of GSTs in human colon tissue could therefore contribute to reducing cancer risks. However, it has not been demonstrated in humans that this mechanism is associated with cancer prevention. In the

  1. Modulation of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes by anticarcinogens-focus on glutathione S-transferases and their role as targets of dietary chemoprevention in colorectal carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool-Zobel, Beatrice [Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute for Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)]. E-mail: b8pobe@uni-jena.de; Veeriah, Selvaraju [Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute for Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Boehmer, Frank-D. [Institute of Molecular Cell Biology, University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2005-12-11

    There is evidence that consumption of certain dietary ingredients may favourably modulate biotransformation of carcinogens. Associated with this is the hypothesis that the risk for developing colorectal cancer could be reduced, since its incidence is related to diet. Two main groups of biotransformation enzymes metabolize carcinogens, namely Phase I enzymes, which convert hydrophobic compounds to more water-soluble moieties, and Phase II enzymes (e.g. glutathione S-transferases [GST]), which primarily catalyze conjugation reactions. The conjugation of electrophilic Phase I intermediates with glutathione, for instance, frequently results in detoxification. Several possible colon carcinogens may serve as substrates for GST isoenzymes that can have marked substrate specificity. The conjugated products could be less toxic/genotoxic if GSTs are induced, thereby reducing exposure. Thus, numerous studies have shown that the induction of GSTs by antioxidants enables experimental animals to tolerate exposure to carcinogens. One important mechanism of GST induction involves an antioxidant-responsive response element (ARE) and the transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is bound to the Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) in the cytoplasm. Antioxidants may disrupt the Keap-Nrf2 complex, allowing Nrf2 to translocate to the nucleus and mediate expression of Phase II genes via interaction with the ARE. GSTs are also induced by butyrate, a product of gut flora-derived fermentation of plant foods, which may act via different mechanisms, e.g. by increasing histone acetylation. GSTs are expressed with high inter-individual variability in human colonocytes, which points to large differences in cellular susceptibility to xenobiotics. Enhancing expression of GSTs in human colon tissue could therefore contribute to reducing cancer risks. However, it has not been demonstrated in humans that this mechanism is associated with cancer prevention. In the

  2. The activity of the endocannabinoid metabolising enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase in subcutaneous adipocytes correlates with BMI in metabolically healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Stephen PH

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endocannabinoid system (ECS is a ubiquitously expressed signalling system, with involvement in lipid metabolism and obesity. There are reported changes in obesity of blood concentrations of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglcyerol (2-AG, and of adipose tissue expression levels of the two key catabolic enzymes of the ECS, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL. Surprisingly, however, the activities of these enzymes have not been assayed in conditions of increasing adiposity. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether FAAH and MGL activities in human subcutaneous adipocytes are affected by body mass index (BMI, or other markers of adiposity and metabolism. Methods Subcutaneous abdominal mature adipocytes, fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements were obtained from 28 metabolically healthy subjects representing a range of BMIs. FAAH and MGL activities were assayed in mature adipocytes using radiolabelled substrates. Serum glucose, insulin and adipokines were determined using ELISAs. Results MGL activity showed no relationship with BMI or other adiposity indices, metabolic markers (fasting serum insulin or glucose or serum adipokine levels (adiponectin, leptin or resistin. In contrast, FAAH activity in subcutaneous adipocytes correlated positively with BMI and waist circumference, but not with skinfold thickness, metabolic markers or serum adipokine levels. Conclusions In this study, novel evidence is provided that FAAH activity in subcutaneous mature adipocytes increases with BMI, whereas MGL activity does not. These findings support the hypothesis that some components of the ECS are upregulated with increasing adiposity in humans, and that AEA and 2-AG may be regulated differently.

  3. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch

    2016-01-01

    -associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole...... antifungal agents such as itraconazole and posaconazole. If antifungal treatment is indicated in a patient using a CYP3A4-metabolised statin, we recommend (1) topical administration of the antifungal agent if possible, (2) the use of a non-CYP3A4-inhibiting antifungal drug such as terbinafine or (3...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....3360 Section 862.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA...

  5. Telomerase – future drug target enzyme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Langerholc

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Eucaryotic chromosome endings (telomeres replication problem was solved in the 1980’s by discovery of the telomerase enzyme. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 2009 for the discovery of telomerase. Altered telomerase expression in cancer, and human dream of eternal youth have accelerated the development of pharmacological telomerase inhibitors and activators. However, after 15 years of development they are still not available on the market. In the present article we reviewed pharmacological agents that target telomerase activity, which have entered clinical trials. Current drugs in development are mostly not intended to be used alone, as telomerase inhibitors under clinical trials are used in combination with the existing chemotherapeutics and anti-telomerase vaccines in combination with immuno-stimulants. Apart from cancer and aging, there are other diseases linked to deregulated activity of telomerase/telomeres and we also discuss technical and legal problems that researchers encounter in developing anti-telomerase therapy. Given the pace of development, first anti-telomerase drugs might appear on the market in the next 5 years.

  6. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  7. Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and amino acid availability of grain legumes for poultry. TS Brand, DA Brandt, CW Cruywagen. Abstract. South African Journal of Animal Science Vol.34(2) 2004: Samples of sweet yellow lupins (Lupinus luteus; n = 4), broad leaf lupins (Lupinus albus; n = 12), ...

  8. Systemic uptake of miconazole during vaginal suppository use and effect on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 associated enzyme activities in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Nielsen, Flemming; Nøhr-Jensen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    To investigate if the ordinary use of a vaginal suppository containing miconazole results in systemic absorption that is sufficient to affect the activities of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, which are major drug- and steroid-metabolising enzymes.......To investigate if the ordinary use of a vaginal suppository containing miconazole results in systemic absorption that is sufficient to affect the activities of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, which are major drug- and steroid-metabolising enzymes....

  9. Sex Differences in the Expression of Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, David J.; Holloway, Minita G.

    2009-01-01

    Sex differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics characterize many drugs and contribute to individual differences in drug efficacy and toxicity. Sex-based differences in drug metabolism are the primary cause of sex-dependent pharmacokinetics and reflect underlying sex differences in the expression of hepatic enzymes active in the metabolism of drugs, steroids, fatty acids and environmental chemicals, including cytochromes P450 (P450s), sulfotransferases, glutat...

  10. Drug and enzyme targeting. Methods in enzymology. Volume 112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widder, K.J.; Green, R.

    1985-01-01

    In evaluating methods of drug and enzyme targeting, studies are included which discuss microencapsulation techniques and the preparation and purification of various drug conjugates and radiopharmaceuticals, which can be used as a carrier that either releases the drug more slowly or targets the drug more selectively on the desired tissue. Separate abstracts have been prepared for five chapters of this volume for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  11. Flavonoids as modulators of metabolic enzymes and drug transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Anca; Aprotosoaie, Ana Clara; Trifan, Adriana; Xiao, Jianbo

    2017-06-01

    Flavonoids, natural compounds found in plants and in plant-derived foods and beverages, have been extensively studied with regard to their capacity to modulate metabolic enzymes and drug transporters. In vitro, flavonoids predominantly inhibit the major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP450 3A4 and the enzymes responsible for the bioactivation of procarcinogens (CYP1 enzymes) and upregulate the enzymes involved in carcinogen detoxification (UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs)). Flavonoids have been reported to inhibit ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated proteins, breast cancer-resistance protein) that contribute to the development of MDR. P-glycoprotein, an ABC transporter that limits drug bioavailability and also induces MDR, was differently modulated by flavonoids. Flavonoids and their phase II metabolites (sulfates, glucuronides) inhibit organic anion transporters involved in the tubular uptake of nephrotoxic compounds. In vivo studies have partially confirmed in vitro findings, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of flavonoids are complex and difficult to predict in vivo. Data summarized in this review strongly support the view that flavonoids are promising candidates for the enhancement of oral drug bioavailability, chemoprevention, and reversal of MDR. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that herbal supplements or herbal medicines are now commonly used. As many patients taking prescription medications are concomitantly using herbal supplements, there is considerable risk for adverse herbal drug interactions. Such interactions can enhance the risk for an individual patient, especially with regard to drugs with a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin, cyclosporine A and digoxin. Herbal drug interactions can alter pharmacokinetic or/and pharmacodynamic properties of administered drugs. The most common pharmacokinetic interactions usually involve either the inhibition or induction of the metabolism of drugs catalyzed by the important enzymes, cytochrome P450 (CYP). The aim of the present article is to provide an updated review of clinically relevant metabolic CYP-mediated drug interactions between selected herbal supplements and prescription drugs. The commonly used herbal supplements selected include Echinacea, Ginkgo biloba, garlic, St. John's wort, goldenseal, and milk thistle. To date, several significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of CYP enzyme activity by various phytochemicals. Numerous herbal drug interactions have been reported. Although the significance of many interactions is uncertain but several interactions, especially those with St. John’s wort, may have critical clinical consequences. St. John’s wort is a source of hyperforin, an active ingredient that has a strong affinity for the pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR). As a PXR ligand, hyperforin promotes expression of CYP3A4 enzymes in the small intestine and liver. This in turn causes induction of CYP3A4 and can reduce the oral bioavailability of many drugs making them less effective. The available evidence indicates that, at commonly recommended doses, other selected herbs including Echinacea, Ginkgo biloba, garlic, goldenseal and milk thistle do not act as potent or moderate inhibitors or inducers of CYP enzymes. A good

  13. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-05-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (A549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment.

  14. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. This review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  15. Enzyme induction in neonates after fetal exposure to antiepileptic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rating, D.; Jaeger-Roman, E.; Nau, H.; Kuhnz, W.; Helge, H.

    1983-01-01

    The 13 C-AP breath test is shown to be a convenient, noninvasive method to monitor velocity and capacity of P450-dependent AP N-demethylation in infancy and childhood. According to 13 C-AP breath tests, neonates have a very low capacity to eliminate 13 CO 2 , which is only 15 to 21% of the activity in adults. During the first year of life AP N-demethylation increases to reach its maximum at about 2 years; afterwards a slight decrease occurs. In 25 neonates exposed prenatally to different antiepileptic drugs 13 C-AP breath test was efficiently used to prove that cytochrome AP N-demethylation was considerably stimulated. After primidone/phenobarbitone, especially in combination with phenytoin, 13 C elimination reaches and even surpasses the range for older children. Valproate exposure during fetal life is not consistently followed by a significant increase in AP N-demethylation. The enzyme induction demonstrated by 13 C-AP breath test was often accompanied by accelerated metabolic clearance and shortened half-life times of transplacentally acquired antiepileptic drugs. There was good agreement between 13 C-AP breath tests and pharmacokinetic data for primidone/phenobarbitone but not for phenytoin. In contrast, in the case of phenytoin exposure during pregnancy the pharmacokinetic parameters and the 13 C breath test data will transport very different informations about enzyme induction in these neonates

  16. Enzyme induction in neonates after fetal exposure to antiepileptic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rating, D.; Jaeger-Roman, E.; Nau, H.; Kuhnz, W.; Helge, H.

    1983-01-01

    The /sup 13/C-AP breath test is shown to be a convenient, noninvasive method to monitor velocity and capacity of P450-dependent AP N-demethylation in infancy and childhood. According to /sup 13/C-AP breath tests, neonates have a very low capacity to eliminate /sup 13/CO/sub 2/, which is only 15 to 21% of the activity in adults. During the first year of life AP N-demethylation increases to reach its maximum at about 2 years; afterwards a slight decrease occurs. In 25 neonates exposed prenatally to different antiepileptic drugs /sup 13/C-AP breath test was efficiently used to prove that cytochrome AP N-demethylation was considerably stimulated. After primidone/phenobarbitone, especially in combination with phenytoin, /sup 13/C elimination reaches and even surpasses the range for older children. Valproate exposure during fetal life is not consistently followed by a significant increase in AP N-demethylation. The enzyme induction demonstrated by /sup 13/C-AP breath test was often accompanied by accelerated metabolic clearance and shortened half-life times of transplacentally acquired antiepileptic drugs. There was good agreement between /sup 13/C-AP breath tests and pharmacokinetic data for primidone/phenobarbitone but not for phenytoin. In contrast, in the case of phenytoin exposure during pregnancy the pharmacokinetic parameters and the /sup 13/C breath test data will transport very different informations about enzyme induction in these neonates.

  17. Prediction of metabolisable energy of poultry feeds by estimating in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... The aim of this study was to develop equations to predict the in vivo apparent metabolisable energy. (AME) of poultry feeds using an in vitro method for estimation of organic matter digestibility. In this study, a total of 57 samples of feedstuffs and 23 samples complete diets for poultry were used. Dry.

  18. Metabolisable energy values of whole palm kernel and palm kernel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4.12 Kcal/kg DM. 4.36 and 4.13 Kcal/kg DM, respectively were the corresponding values for broiler chickens. No interaction between ingredients and birds was found but there were interactions among the bioavailable energy systems and the bird types. Keywords: Metabolisable energy, palm kernel layers, broilers.

  19. Prediction of metabolisable energy of poultry feeds by estimating in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop equations to predict the in vivo apparent metabolisable energy (AME) of poultry feeds using an in vitro method for estimation of organic matter digestibility. In this study, a total of 57 samples of feedstuffs and 23 samples complete diets for poultry were used. Dry matter (DM), crude protein ...

  20. Kinetics of enzyme action: essential principles for drug hunters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Ross L

    2011-01-01

    ... field. Beginning with the most basic principles pertaining to simple, one-substrate enzyme reactions and their inhibitors, and progressing to a thorough treatment of two-substrate enzymes, Kinetics of Enzyme Action...

  1. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  2. Drug repositioning for enzyme modulator based on human metabolite-likeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Hyeok; Choi, Hojae; Park, Seongyong; Lee, Boah; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2017-05-31

    Recently, the metabolite-likeness of the drug space has emerged and has opened a new possibility for exploring human metabolite-like candidates in drug discovery. However, the applicability of metabolite-likeness in drug discovery has been largely unexplored. Moreover, there are no reports on its applications for the repositioning of drugs to possible enzyme modulators, although enzyme-drug relations could be directly inferred from the similarity relationships between enzyme's metabolites and drugs. We constructed a drug-metabolite structural similarity matrix, which contains 1,861 FDA-approved drugs and 1,110 human intermediary metabolites scored with the Tanimoto similarity. To verify the metabolite-likeness measure for drug repositioning, we analyzed 17 known antimetabolite drugs that resemble the innate metabolites of their eleven target enzymes as the gold standard positives. Highly scored drugs were selected as possible modulators of enzymes for their corresponding metabolites. Then, we assessed the performance of metabolite-likeness with a receiver operating characteristic analysis and compared it with other drug-target prediction methods. We set the similarity threshold for drug repositioning candidates of new enzyme modulators based on maximization of the Youden's index. We also carried out literature surveys for supporting the drug repositioning results based on the metabolite-likeness. In this paper, we applied metabolite-likeness to repurpose FDA-approved drugs to disease-associated enzyme modulators that resemble human innate metabolites. All antimetabolite drugs were mapped with their known 11 target enzymes with statistically significant similarity values to the corresponding metabolites. The comparison with other drug-target prediction methods showed the higher performance of metabolite-likeness for predicting enzyme modulators. After that, the drugs scored higher than similarity score of 0.654 were selected as possible modulators of enzymes for

  3. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  4. Tea consumption modulates hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliakal, P P; Coville, P F; Wanwimolruk, S

    2001-04-01

    The antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities of green tea and its polyphenols have been reported. As bioactivation of the precarcinogens and detoxification of ultimate carcinogens are mainly carried out by hepatic metabolizing enzymes, we have investigated the modulation of these enzyme activities subsequent to tea consumption in rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into eight groups (n = 5). Six groups were given aqueous solutions (2%, w/v) of six different teas (New Zealand green tea, Australian green tea, Java green tea, Dragon green tea, Gunpowder green tea or English Breakfast black tea) as the sole source of fluid. One group was given a standard green tea extract (0.5%, w/v) while the control group had free access to water. At the end of four-weeks treatment, different cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform and phase II enzyme activities were determined by incubation of the liver microsomes or cytosols with appropriate substrates. CYP 1A2 activity was markedly increased in all the tea treatment groups (P Java green tea-treatment groups. Cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase activity was significantly increased (PJava green tea-treatment groups. The microsomal UDP-glucuronosyl transferase activity remained unchanged or was moderately increased in most of the groups. The balance between the phase I carcinogen-activating enzymes and the phase II detoxifying enzymes could be important in determining the risk of developing chemically-induced cancer.

  5. Enzyme Triggered Drug Delivery for Graft Targeted Immunosupression and Neuroregeneration after VCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 6MAY2016 1. Your paper, entitled Enzyme Triggered Drug Delivery for Graft Targeted...6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Enzyme Triggered Drug Deli very for Graft Targeted Immunosupprcssion and Ncuroregenerat ion...NO 9. IS THIS MATERIAL CLASSIFIED? 0 YES 181 NO 10. IS THIS MATERIAL SUBJECT TO ANY LEGAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PUBLICATION OR PRESENTATION THROUGH A

  6. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes. Update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers are very productive. The review on Drugs interacting with Enzymes was accepted in August 2012. However, this field is very dynamic. New potential targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. This update describes drugs interacting with 60 enzymes versus 43 enzymes in the first paper. Some compounds progressed in their development, while many others were discontinued. The present review covers the evolution of research in this field through April 2014.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy modeling of a drug in molecular solvents and enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Christian J.; Fulfer, Kristen D.; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2017-09-01

    Modeling of drugs in enzymes is of immensurable value to many areas of science. We present a theoretical study on the vibrational spectroscopy of Rilpivirine, a HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, in conventional solvents and in clinically relevant enzymes. The study is based on vibrational spectroscopy modeling of the drug using molecular dynamics simulations, DFT frequency maps, and theory. The modeling of the infrared lineshape shows good agreement with experimental data for the drug in molecular solvents where the local environment motions define the vibrational band lineshape. On the other hand, the theoretical description of the drug in the different enzymes does not match previous experimental findings indicating that the utilized methodology might not apply to heterogeneous environments. Our findings show that the lack of reproducibility might be associated with the development of the frequency map which does not contain all of the possible interactions observed in such systems.

  8. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. Disease-modifying drugs. Update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers, are very productive. The review "Drugs interacting with Targets other than Receptors or Enzymes. Disease-modifying Drugs" was accepted in October 2012. In the last 20 months, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. Enormous progress was realized in the pharmacological characterization of natural products with cognitive enhancing properties. This review covers the evolution of research in this field through May 2014.

  9. Differential effects of dietary flavonoids on drug metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in female rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, V.; Lauridsen, S.T.; Dragsted, L.O.

    1999-01-01

    1. Gavage administration of the natural flavonoids tangeretin, chrysin, apigenin, naringenin, genistein and quercetin for 2 consecutive weeks to the female rat resulted in differential effects on selected phase 1 and 2 enzymes in liver, colon and heart as well as antioxidant enzymes in red brood......, genistein, tangeretin and BNF. 5. The observed effects of chrysin, quercetin and genistein on antioxidant enzymes, concurrently with a protection against oxidative stress, suggest a feedback mechanism on the antioxidant enzymes triggered by the flavonoid antioxidants. 6. Despite the use of high flavonoid...... doses, which by far exceed the human exposure levels, the effect on drug metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes was still very minor. The role of singly administered flavonoids in the protection against cancer and heart disease is thus expected to be limited....

  10. Nerve agent hydrolysis activity designed into a human drug metabolism enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Hemmert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus (OP nerve agents are potent suicide inhibitors of the essential neurotransmitter-regulating enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Due to their acute toxicity, there is significant interest in developing effective countermeasures to OP poisoning. Here we impart nerve agent hydrolysis activity into the human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1. Using crystal structures of the target enzyme in complex with nerve agent as a guide, a pair of histidine and glutamic acid residues were designed proximal to the enzyme's native catalytic triad. The resultant variant protein demonstrated significantly increased rates of reactivation following exposure to sarin, soman, and cyclosarin. Importantly, the addition of these residues did not alter the high affinity binding of nerve agents to this protein. Thus, using two amino acid substitutions, a novel enzyme was created that efficiently converted a group of hemisubstrates, compounds that can start but not complete a reaction cycle, into bona fide substrates. Such approaches may lead to novel countermeasures for nerve agent poisoning.

  11. Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor and Other Drug-associated Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Cosby; Brown, Nancy J

    2017-08-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, β-lactam antibiotics, non-β lactam antibiotics, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are the most common classes of drugs that cause angioedema. Drug-induced angioedema is known to occur via mechanisms mediated by histamine, bradykinin, or leukotriene, and an understanding of these mechanisms is crucial in guiding therapeutic decisions. Nonallergic angioedema occurs in patients with genetic variants that affect metabolism or synthesis of bradykinin, substance P, prostaglandins, or leukotrienes, or when patients are taking drugs that have synergistic mechanisms. The mainstay in treatment of nonallergic drug-induced angioedema is cessation of the offending agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lipid conjugated prodrugs for enzyme-triggered liposomal drug delivery to tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2011-01-01

    For some time we have been developing novel enzyme-triggered prodrugs for drug delivery targeting cancer. The liposomal prodrugs take advantage of the EPR effect to localize to tumors and of the local over-expression of secretory phospholipase A2 in tumors. Compared to conventional liposomal drug...... delivery systems, our prodrug-lipid conjugates have two main advantages: 1) the drugs are covalently linked to the lipids and thus leakage is circumvented and 2) the lipophilic bilayer of the formulated liposomes effectively shields the drugs from the aqueous environment in vivo. Consequently, the strategy...

  13. Reactions and enzymes in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Bernard; Pedretti, Alessandro; Vistoli, Giulio

    2012-06-01

    In this article, we offer an overview of the compared quantitative importance of biotransformation reactions in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics, based on a meta-analysis of current research interests. Also, we assess the relative significance the enzyme (super)families or categories catalysing these reactions. We put the facts unveiled by the analysis into a drug discovery context and draw some implications. The results confirm the primary role of cytochrome P450-catalysed oxidations and UDP-glucuronosyl-catalysed glucuronidations, but they also document the marked significance of several other reactions. Thus, there is a need for several drug discovery scientists to better grasp the variety of drug metabolism reactions and enzymes and their consequences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enzyme decorated drug carriers: Targeted swords to cleave and overcome the mucus barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Claudia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2018-01-15

    The use of mucus permeating drug carrier systems being able to overcome the mucus barrier can lead to a remarkable enhancement in bioavailability. One promising approach is the design of mucolytic enzyme decorated carrier systems (MECS). These systems include micro- and nanoparticles as well as self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) decorated with mucin cleaving enzymes such as papain (PAP) or bromelain (BRO). MECS are able to cross the mucus barrier in a comparatively efficient manner by cleaving mucus substructures in front of them on their way to the epithelium. Thereby these enzymes hydrolyze peptide bonds of mucus glycoproteins forming tiny holes or passages through the mucus. In various in vitro and in vivo studies MECS proved to be superior in their mucus permeating properties over nanocarriers without enzyme decoration. PAP decorated nanoparticles, for instance, remained 3h after oral administration to an even 2.5-fold higher extend in rat small intestine than the corresponding undecorated nanoparticles permeating the intestinal mucus gel layer to a much lower degree. As MECS break up the mucus network only locally without destroying its overall protective barrier function, even long term treatments with such systems seem feasible. Within this review article we address different drug carrier systems decorated with various types of enzymes, their particular pros and cons and potential applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of drug-metabolizing enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We believe that this is the first work that reports these variants among those populations. The cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) are a subfamily of hemoproteins, playing a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs. Several genetic polymorphisms which depend on ethnic groups can alter CYP activity and then affect the.

  16. Hepatic transporter drug-drug interactions: an evaluation of approaches and methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Beth; Riley, Robert J

    2017-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) continue to account for 5% of hospital admissions and therefore remain a major regulatory concern. Effective, quantitative prediction of DDIs will reduce unexpected clinical findings and encourage projects to frontload DDI investigations rather than concentrating on risk management ('manage the baggage') later in drug development. A key challenge in DDI prediction is the discrepancies between reported models. Areas covered: The current synopsis focuses on four recent influential publications on hepatic drug transporter DDIs using static models that tackle interactions with individual transporters and in combination with other drug transporters and metabolising enzymes. These models vary in their assumptions (including input parameters), transparency, reproducibility and complexity. In this review, these facets are compared and contrasted with recommendations made as to their application. Expert opinion: Over the past decade, static models have evolved from simple [I]/k i models to incorporate victim and perpetrator disposition mechanisms including the absorption rate constant, the fraction of the drug metabolised/eliminated and/or clearance concepts. Nonetheless, models that comprise additional parameters and complexity do not necessarily out-perform simpler models with fewer inputs. Further, consideration of the property space to exploit some drug target classes has also highlighted the fine balance required between frontloading and back-loading studies to design out or 'manage the baggage'.

  17. Mechanistic and structural insight into promiscuity based metabolism of cardiac drug digoxin by gut microbial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kundan; Jaiswal, Shubham K; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Srivastava, Gopal N; Sharma, Ashok K; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-12-23

    The recent advances in microbiome studies have revealed the role of gut microbiota in altering the pharmacological properties of oral drugs, which contributes to patient-response variation and undesired effect of the drug molecule. These studies are essential to guide us for achieving the desired efficacy and pharmacological activity of the existing drug molecule or for discovering novel and more effective therapeutics. However, one of the main limitations is the lack of atomistic details on the binding and metabolism of these drug molecules by gut-microbial enzymes. Therefore, in this study, for a well-known and important FDA-approved cardiac glycoside drug, digoxin, we report the atomistic details and energy economics for its binding and metabolism by the Cgr2 protein of Eggerthela lenta DSM 2243. It was observed that the binding pocket of digoxin to Cgr2 primarily involved the negatively charged polar amino acids and a few non-polar hydrophobic residues. The drug digoxin was found to bind Cgr2 at the same binding site as that of fumarate, which is the proposed natural substrate. However, digoxin showed a much lower binding energy (17.75 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) than the binding energy (42.17 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) of fumarate. This study provides mechanistic insights into the structural and promiscuity-based metabolism of widely used cardiac drug digoxin and presents a methodology, which could be useful to confirm the promiscuity-based metabolism of other orally administrated drugs by gut microbial enzymes and also help in designing strategies for improving the efficacy of the drugs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. disease-modifying drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs, meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  19. Effects of resveratrol on drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes, implications for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Ariane R; Chow, H-H Sherry; Martinez, Jessica A

    2017-02-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in grape skins and peanuts that has demonstrated many health benefits including protection against aging, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, neurological decline, and cancer. The anticancer properties of resveratrol have been attributed to a variety of mechanisms, including its general inhibition of phase I metabolism and induction of phase II metabolism. The effects of resveratrol on these enzymes, however, are still unclear, as in vitro evidence often contrasts with animal studies and clinical trials. Reasons for these variances could include the low bioavailability of resveratrol and the effects of resveratrol metabolites. Due to resveratrol's interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, individuals concurrently taking pharmacological doses of resveratrol with other supplements or medications could potentially experience nutrient-drug interactions. This review summarizes the known effects of resveratrol and its main metabolites on drug metabolism in order to help characterize which populations might benefit from resveratrol for the prevention of cancer, as well as those that may need to avoid supplementation due to potential drug interactions.

  20. Quantum mechanical approaches to in silico enzyme characterization and drug design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilmeier, J P; Fattebert, J L; Jacobson, M P; Kalyanaraman, C

    2012-01-17

    The astonishing, exponentially increasing rates of genome sequencing has led to one of the most significant challenges for the biological and computational sciences in the 21st century: assigning the likely functions of the encoded proteins. Enzymes represent a particular challenge, and a critical one, because the universe of enzymes is likely to contain many novel functions that may be useful for synthetic biology, or as drug targets. Current approaches to protein annotation are largely based on bioinformatics. At the simplest level, this annotation involves transferring the annotations of characterized enzymes to related sequences. In practice, however, there is no simple, sequence based criterion for transferring annotations, and bioinformatics alone cannot propose new enzymatic functions. Structure-based computational methods have the potential to address these limitations, by identifying potential substrates of enzymes, as we and others have shown. One successful approach has used in silico 'docking' methods, more commonly applied in structure-based drug design, to identify possible metabolite substrates. A major limitation of this approach is that it only considers substrate binding, and does not directly assess the potential of the enzyme to catalyze a particular reaction using a particular substrate. That is, substrate binding affinity is necessary but not sufficient to assign function. A reaction profile is ultimately what is needed for a more complete quantitative description of function. To address this rather fundamental limitation, they propose to use quantum mechanical methods to explicitly compute transition state barriers that govern the rates of catalysis. Although quantum mechanical, and mixed quantum/classical (QM/MM), methods have been used extensively to investigate enzymatic reactions, the focus has been primarily on elucidating complex reaction mechanisms. Here, the key catalytic steps are known, and they use these methods quantify

  1. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  2. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    Full Text Available A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞ required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞. The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  3. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-01-01

    A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC) value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞)) required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE) can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞). The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  4. The Role of Drug Metabolites in the Inhibition of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikov, Momir; Đanić, Maja; Pavlović, Nebojša; Stanimirov, Bojan; Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Stankov, Karmen; Al-Salami, Hani

    2017-12-01

    Following the drug administration, patients are exposed not only to the parent drug itself, but also to the metabolites generated by drug-metabolizing enzymes. The role of drug metabolites in cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition and subsequent drug-drug interactions (DDIs) have recently become a topic of considerable interest and scientific debate. The list of metabolites that were found to significantly contribute to clinically relevant DDIs is constantly being expanded and reported in the literature. New strategies have been developed for better understanding how different metabolites of a drug candidate contribute to its pharmacokinetic properties and pharmacological as well as its toxicological effects. However, the testing of the role of metabolites in CYP inhibition is still not routinely performed during the process of drug development, although the evaluation of time-dependent CYP inhibition during the clinical candidate selection process may provide information on possible effects of metabolites in CYP inhibition. Due to large number of compounds to be tested in the early stages of drug discovery, the experimental approaches for assessment of CYP-mediated metabolic profiles are particularly resource demanding. Consequently, a large number of in silico or computational tools have been developed as useful complement to experimental approaches. In summary, circulating metabolites may be recognized as significant CYP inhibitors. Current data may suggest the need for an optimized effort to characterize the inhibitory potential of parent drugs metabolites on CYP, as well as the necessity to develop the advanced in vitro models that would allow a better quantitative predictive value of in vivo studies.

  5. The many consequences of chemical- and genetic-based modulation of drug metabolizing enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, M; Biagi, G L; Cantelli-Forti, G

    1999-01-01

    The induction or inhibition of the metabolizing enzyme activities by a great deal of substances (including drugs) influence their toxicological or pharmacological outcomes as well as that of other xenobiotics or drugs to which human is simultaneously exposed. The dual bioactivating/detoxificating nature of both phase I and phase II enzymes poses such modulation as an unavoidable unhealthy phenomenon. Therefore, the proposed strategies in preventive medicine which foresee boosting or depressing enzymatic effects such as those in the field of cancer chemoprevention, should be carefully reconsidered before their credibility would be compromised. As the phenotypic features, genetic polymorphisms leading to the occurrence of high or low metabolizers in the population, each at high risk to certain forms of toxicity, behave as a sort of "constitutive" enzymatic modulation. Thus, considering the double-edged sword nature (detoxi-toxicant) of these catalysts towards ubiquitous environmental pollutants, the search for individual susceptibility by means of the genotypic analysis represents a very intriguing problem. However, the knowledge of the "overall" metabolic fingerprint associated to the phenotypic analysis in a single person could offer an interesting way to (partially) control human risk by making suitable (well aimed) modifications of determined life-styles (e.g. stop smoking or drinking) or particular dietetic practices (e.g. stop eating high cooked meat or fish) as well as selecting personalised drug adjustments by physicians either in terms of dosage or fitting drug.

  6. Gene expression variability in human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications.

  7. Microbial P450 Enzymes in Bioremediation and Drug Discovery: Emerging Potentials and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sukanta S; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2018-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are a structurally conserved but functionally diverse group of heme-containing mixed function oxidases found across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms of the microbial world. Microbial P450s are known to perform diverse functions ranging from the synthesis of cell wall components to xenobiotic/drug metabolism to biodegradation of environmental chemicals. Conventionally, many microbial systems have been reported to mimic mammalian P450-like activation of drugs and were proposed as the in-vitro models of mammalian drug metabolism. Recent reports suggest that native or engineered forms of specific microbial P450s from these and other microbial systems could be employed for desired specific biotransformation reactions toward natural and synthetic (drug) compounds underscoring their emerging potential in drug improvement and discovery. On the other hand, microorganisms particularly fungi and actinomycetes have been shown to possess catabolic P450s with unusual potential to degrade toxic environmental chemicals including persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Wood-rotting basidiomycete fungi in particular have revealed the presence of exceptionally large P450 repertoire (P450ome) in their genomes, majority of which are however orphan (with no known function). Our pre- and post-genomic studies have led to functional characterization of several fungal P450s inducible in response to exposure to several environmental toxicants and demonstration of their potential in bioremediation of these chemicals. This review is an attempt to summarize the postgenomic unveiling of this versatile enzyme superfamily in microbial systems and investigation of their potential to synthesize new drugs and degrade persistent pollutants, among other biotechnological applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. [Involvement of microRNA in the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs of about 20 nucleotides in length and participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA binds to 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs and thereby destabilizes the transcripts or suppresses the translation. It is expected that miRNAs could have diverse functions and therefore play a role in the gene expression caused by the drug treatment, which have yet to be determined. Demonstration of the participation of specific miRNA in the drug-mediated gene expression would make it a biomarker for the toxicological assessment and help an understanding of molecular machinery of the drug-drug interaction. Under these backgrounds, we investigated the change of miRNAs in the liver of mice treated with phenobarbital, a typical inducer for drug-metabolizing enzymes, and demonstrate the participation of miRNAs in the phenobarbital-regulated gene expression. We investigated the relationship between phenobarbital-mediated changes in miRNA and mRNA by using Agilent miRNA microarray and DNA microarray, followed by real time RT-PCR. From these experiments, it was suggested that the phenobarbital-induced changes in cyp2c29 and mrp3 are regulated by miR-30a and miR-29b, respectively. In addition, we obtained evidence that indicates a phenobarbital-mediated decrease in miR-122, a highly abundant liver-specific miRNA, leads to the activation of the transcription factor CAR and thereby induces drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  9. Schisandra chinensis regulates drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters via activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He JL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Lian He,1 Zhi-Wei Zhou,2,3 Juan-Juan Yin,2 Chang-Qiang He,1 Shu-Feng Zhou,2,3 Yang Yu1 1College of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs and drug transporters are regulated via epigenetic, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational and posttranslational modifications. Phase I and II DMEs and drug transporters play an important role in the disposition and detoxification of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 is a critical regulator of a variety of important cytoprotective genes that are involved in disposition and detoxification of xenobiotics. Schisandra chinensis (SC is a commonly used traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been primarily used to protect the liver because of its potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. SC can modulate some DMEs and drug transporters, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of Nrf2 in the regulatory effect of SC extract (SCE on selected DMEs and drug transporters in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2 cells. The results showed that SCE, schisandrin A, and schisandrin B significantly increased the expression of NAD(PH: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-oxidase or:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase-1, glutamate–cysteine ligase, and glutathione S-transferase A4 at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Incubation of HepG2 cells with SCE resulted in a significant

  10. Drug Delivery by an Enzyme-Mediated Cyclization of a Lipid Prodrug with Unique Bilayer-Formation Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Lars; Peters, Günther H.j.; Madsen, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Special delivery: Liposomal drug-delivery systems in which prodrugs are activated specifically by disease-associated enzymes have great potential for the treatment of severe diseases, such as cancer. A new type of phospholipid-based prodrug has the ability to form stable small unilamellar vesicle...... (see picture). Activation of the prodrug vesicles by the enzyme sPLA2 initiates a cyclization reaction, which leads to the release of the drug....

  11. Metabolisable energy of Canola acid oil and Famarol acid oil for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Acid oils are one of the by-products of the chemical refining of crude oils and have a high free fatty acid content. It was the objective of the current study to determine the metabolisable energy value of Canola acid oil (CAO) and a South. African commercial feed acid oil (Famarol -FAO). Materials and Methods. Both the CAO ...

  12. Comparison of metabolisable energy values of different foodstuffs determined in ostriches and poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilliers, S C; Sales, J; Hayes, J P

    1999-01-01

    Apparent (AMEn) and true (TMEn) metabolisable energy values, corrected for nitrogen retention, of wheat bran, saltbush (Atriplex nummularia), common reed (Phragmites australis), lupins, soyabean oil cake meal (SBOCM), sunflower oil cake meal (SFOCM) and fishmeal were compared in 7 successive trials...

  13. Comparison of metabolisable energy values of different foodstuffs determined in ostriches and poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilliers, S C; Sales, J; Hayes, J P

    1999-01-01

    Apparent (AMEn) and true (TMEn) metabolisable energy values, corrected for nitrogen retention, of wheat bran, saltbush (Atriplex nummularia), common reed (Phragmites australis), lupins, soyabean oil cake meal (SBOCM), sunflower oil cake meal (SFOCM) and fishmeal were compared in 7 successive tria...

  14. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho YY

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Yeon Cho,1 Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Jeong-Han Kim,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea; 2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT, and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1, were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 µM increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 µM did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1 in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. Keywords: honokiol, human hepatocytes, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  15. Factors that influencing veterinary drug’s metabolisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina, Romeo T.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper wants to make a recall for the vet practitioners, of the main veterinary drug's metabolism rate influencing factors. Among the most important physiological factors (pharmacokinetics, sanguine flow and urinary ones, plasmatic proteins binding, enzymatic induction and inhibition are essential. Between the animal’s bounded factors more important are: species, individuality, age, sex, pregnancy, alimentation, genetic factors, and health status and from exogenous factors, daily rhythm, influences of chemical compounds and of the stress are presented.

  16. Cholestasis and regulation of genes related to drug metabolism and biliary transport in rat liver following treatment with cyclosporine A and sirolimus (Rapamycin)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, S; Ott, P; Thomsen Nielsen, F

    2001-01-01

    Cyclosporine A and sirolimus are used alone or in combination as immunosuppressants in organ transplantation. To elucidate hepatic side effects, we examined hepatic mRNA of proteins involved in biliary and hepatocellular transport of drugs, formation of glutathione (GSH) and drug metabolising...... then analysed as were hepatic mRNA levels of canalicular transport proteins (Mrp2, Bsep, Mdr1b and Mdr2), sinusoidal transport proteins (Ntcp, Oatp1 and Oatp2), GSH related enzymes (gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase light (GCSlc) and heavy (GCShc) chain subunits and glutathione-S-transferase) and CYPs (CYP3A9...

  17. Fieldable, real-time enzyme immunoassay kits for drugs on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Michele W.; Wendel, Gregory J.; Duquette, Peter H.; Hamilton, Martha J.; Chudzik, Stephen J.; Chappa, Ralph A.

    1994-03-01

    Immunoassays (e.g., RIA, EIA) have been demonstrated to be useful for rapid, convenient detection and semiquantitative analysis of drugs. Thermedics Detection, Inc. manufactures a rapid, sensitive, self-contained, disposable, EIA device, developed by Bio-Metric Systems, Inc., designed to allow untrained personnel to perform in field situations. This format has been developed for drugs in biological fluids and on surfaces. The analyte in the test sample competes with an enzyme-analyte conjugate for a limited number of immobilized antibody sites. The AccuPRESS Test format can detect analytes at 10 ppb in biological fluids, water, and soil, and on surfaces, such as suitcases, vehicles, tables and hands, with positive results indicated by clearly visible color development within 5 minutes. This format is designed to have all dry components and to have an ambient shelf life of greater than one year. The format is available for cocaine and opiate derivatives, including heroin, and is readily adaptable for use with numerous other drugs, explosives, and environmental pollutants.

  18. Action of some drugs on enzymes involved in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawra, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Weniger, P.

    1975-07-01

    Different antirheumatic and cytostatic drugs had been tested by measurement of the thymidine incorporation into DNA of spleen cells under conditions, under which either DNA-synthesis or repair after gamma- or UV-irradiation takes place. There are substances, which inhibit either only the semiconservative DNA-synthesis (vinblastine, isonicotinic acid hydracide) or only DNA-repair after gamma-irradiation (mixture of penicillin-G and procaine-penicillin-G) or both (cyclophosphamide, phenylbutazone, procarbazine, nalidixic acid). Vincristine shows no effect on the thymidine incorporation in DNA, but by density gradient centrifugation it has been found that it influences the ligase reaction. Two DNA polymerases had been isolated from spleen cells, one of the low molecular and one of the high molecular weight type. The influences of the described drugs on these enzymes and on a deoxyribonuclease I from beef pancreas have been tested in ''in vitro'' systems. In all cases, it has been found that there is no effect or only a very small one, compared with the action of well known inhibitors as e.g. ethidium bromide and p-chloromercuribenzoate, and this cannot be responsible for the suppressions found in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis. (author)

  19. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  20. Carboxymefloquine, the major metabolite of the antimalarial drug mefloquine, induces drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter expression by activation of pregnane X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Rita; Traub, Stefanie; Bitter, Andreas; Nüssler, Andreas K; Gil, José P; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Malaria patients are frequently coinfected with HIV and mycobacteria causing tuberculosis, which increases the use of coadministered drugs and thereby enhances the risk of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) by xenobiotics, which include many drugs, induces drug metabolism and transport, thereby resulting in possible attenuation or loss of the therapeutic responses to the drugs being coadministered. While several artemisinin-type antimalarial drugs have been shown to activate PXR, data on nonartemisinin-type antimalarials are still missing. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the potential of nonartemisinin antimalarial drugs and drug metabolites to activate PXR. We screened 16 clinically used antimalarial drugs and six major drug metabolites for binding to PXR using the two-hybrid PXR ligand binding domain assembly assay; this identified carboxymefloquine, the major and pharmacologically inactive metabolite of the antimalarial drug mefloquine, as a potential PXR ligand. Two-hybrid PXR-coactivator and -corepressor interaction assays and PXR-dependent promoter reporter gene assays confirmed carboxymefloquine to be a novel PXR agonist which specifically activated the human receptor. In the PXR-expressing intestinal LS174T cells and in primary human hepatocytes, carboxymefloquine induced the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters on the mRNA and protein levels. The crucial role of PXR for the carboxymefloquine-dependent induction of gene expression was confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the receptor. Thus, the clinical use of mefloquine may result in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions by means of its metabolite carboxymefloquine. Whether these in vitro findings are of in vivo relevance has to be addressed in future clinical drug-drug interaction studies. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies.

  2. Prediction of interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo from individual enzyme kinetic data and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Hissink, E.M.; Briggs, M.; Weaver, R.; Jochemsen, R.; Jackson, P.; Bertrand, M.; Bladeren, P. van

    2000-01-01

    A strategy is presented to predict interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo by the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and human in vitro metabolic parameters, obtained through the combined use of microsomes containing single cytochrome P450 enzymes and a human liver

  3. Synthesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug analogues for selective studies on the COX-II enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.A.; Ridges, M.D.; Jensen, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis of the azido substituted non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug 2-(2,6-dichloroanilino)phenylacetic acid and isotope labeling of this compound have been performed and are described. Initial evaluation of the binding ability and photoreactivity indicates that this compound has potential for photoaffinity labeling as well as enzyme selectivity studies. (author)

  4. Dose-response effects of lycopene on selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, V.; Lauridsen, S. T.; Daneshvar, B.

    2000-01-01

    enzymes involved in the protection against oxidative stress and cancer. The fact that these enzymatic activities are induced at all of these very low plasma levels, could be taken to suggest that modulation of antioxidant and drug-metabolizing enzymes map indeed be relevant to humans, which in general......The administration of lycopene to female rats at doses ranging from 0.001 to 0.1 g/kg b.w, per day for 2 weeks was found to alter the drug-metabolizing capacity and antioxidant status of the exposed animals. An investigation of four cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes revealed that benzyloxyresorufin...... is barely within the lower range of the mean human plasma concentration of lycopene, which ranges from 70-1790 nM. Oxidative stress induced by the heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), and investigated by analyzing for malondialdehyde in plasma, was not found...

  5. Sex- and age-dependent gene expression in human liver: An implication for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Takata, Ryo; Kito, Go; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2017-02-01

    Sex and age differences in hepatic expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes could cause variations in drug metabolism, but has not been fully elucidated, especially in Asian population. In this study, the global expression of human hepatic genes was analyzed by microarrays in 40 Japanese subjects (27 males and 13 females). Thirty-five sex-biased genes were identified (P age-biased genes in two age groups, age-biased genes were related to transcription regulation and cell death. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed the female-biased expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes BChE, CYP4X1, and SULT1E1 (≥1.5-fold, P drug-metabolizing enzyme genes indicated that expression of CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 in females in the ≥70 age group was less than in the age group (≥1.5-fold, P drug metabolism, with respect to sex and age. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatic drug-oxidizing enzyme systems and urinary D-glucaric acid excretion in patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokola, O; Pelkonen, O; Karki, N T; Luoma, P

    1975-10-01

    Drug-oxidizing enzyme systems in liver biopsy samples and the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid were studied in two different groups of patients with cardiac insufficiency. 2. In one group of six patients, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes had decreased considerably as compared with the control values, but in four liver samples from patients treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents for their diabetes, activities were higher than in control samples from ten patients. 3. In the other group of seven patients, the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (isolated by ion-exchange chromatography) was 60% lower than in the control group of nine humans, whereas in four patients taking antiepileptic agents excretion rate was higher than control values. 4. Because the age distribution was markedly different between cardiac insufficiency and control groups, it is difficult to conclude, if the impairment of drug metabolism was a consequence of the old age or of the disease process. However, drug-oxidizing enzyme systems seem to be inducible also in old age. 5. The results support further the opinion that the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid may be one useful index in assessing an individual's capacity to metabolize foreign compounds especially in the patients with lowered drug metabolizing capacity.

  7. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártíková, Hana; Skálová, Lenka; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Vokřál, Ivan; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-08-01

    Many various xenobiotics permanently enter plants and represent potential danger for their organism. For that reason, plants have evolved extremely sophisticated detoxification systems including a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Some of them are similar to those in humans and animals, but there are several plant-specific ones. This review briefly introduces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and summarizes present information about their action toward veterinary drugs. Veterinary drugs are used worldwide to treat diseases and protect animal health. However, veterinary drugs are also unwantedly introduced into environment mostly via animal excrements, they persist in the environment for a long time and may impact on the non-target organisms. Plants are able to uptake, transform the veterinary drugs to non- or less-toxic compounds and store them in the vacuoles and cell walls. This ability may protect not only plant themselves but also other organisms, predominantly invertebrates and wild herbivores. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of plants in detoxification of veterinary drugs in the environment. The results of studies, which dealt with transport and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in plants, are summarized and evaluated. In conclusion, the risks and consequences of veterinary drugs in the environment and the possibilities of phytoremediation technologies are considered and future perspectives are outlined.

  8. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Andrew W.; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z. X.; Baurley, James W.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Hall, Sharon M.; Baker, Timothy B.; Conti, David V.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Swan, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3’-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  9. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Bergen

    Full Text Available The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine, has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3. Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  10. Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations featured similar genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters: a DMET Plus microarray assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, SoJeong; An, Hyungmi; Lee, Howard; Lee, Sangin; Ieiri, Ichiro; Lee, Youngjo; Cho, Joo-Youn; Hirota, Takeshi; Fukae, Masato; Yoshida, Kenji; Nagatsuka, Shinichiro; Kimura, Miyuki; Irie, Shin; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Shin, Dong Wan; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Chung, Jae-Yong; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin

    2014-10-01

    Interethnic differences in genetic polymorphism in genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters are one of the major factors that cause ethnic differences in drug response. This study aimed to investigate genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in drug metabolism, transport, and excretion among Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations, the three major East Asian ethnic groups. The frequencies of 1936 variants representing 225 genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters were determined from 786 healthy participants (448 Korean, 208 Japanese, and 130 Chinese) using the Affymetrix Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters Plus microarray. To compare allele or genotype frequencies in the high-dimensional data among the three East Asian ethnic groups, multiple testing, principal component analysis (PCA), and regularized multinomial logit model through least absolute shrinkage and selection operator were used. On microarray analysis, 1071 of 1936 variants (>50% of markers) were found to be monomorphic. In a large number of genetic variants, the fixation index and Pearson's correlation coefficient of minor allele frequencies were less than 0.034 and greater than 0.95, respectively, among the three ethnic groups. PCA identified 47 genetic variants with multiple testing, but was unable to discriminate ethnic groups by the first three components. Multinomial least absolute shrinkage and selection operator analysis identified 269 genetic variants that showed different frequencies among the three ethnic groups. However, none of those variants distinguished between the three ethnic groups during subsequent PCA. Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations are not pharmacogenetically distant from one another, at least with regard to drug disposition, metabolism, and elimination.

  11. Enzyme-triggered nanomedicine: Drug release strategies in cancer therapy (Invited Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Thompson, David H.; Kaasgaard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Nanomedicine as a field has emerged from the early success of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, in particular for treatment of cancer, and the advances made in nano- and biotechnology over the past decade. A prerequisite for nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems to be effective...... is that the drug payload is released at the target site. A large number of drug release strategies have been proposed that can be classified into certain areas. The simplest and most successful strategy so far, probably due to relative simplicity, is based on utilizing certain physico-chemical characteristics...... of drugs to obtain a slow drug leakage from the formulations after accumulation in the cancerous site. However, this strategy is only applicable to a relatively small range of drugs and cannot be applied to biologicals. Many advanced drug release strategies have therefore been investigated. Such strategies...

  12. Oxidative drug metabolizing enzymes in North Sea dab (Limanda limanda). Biological effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vobach, M.; Kellermann, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Increasing environmental pollution is regarded as an anthropogenic stress factor in general. As a consequence, this may have several detrimental impacts on organisms, including aquatic species. The ability of organisms to tolerate stress from chemical pollutants depends on the availability of a variety of protection mechanisms. One important mechanism to protect cells from lipophilic xenobiotics is based on enzymes or enzyme systems converting the chemicals into more polar metabolites which can be excreted

  13. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed. © 2013 FEBS.

  14. 5-Hydroxydecanoate is metabolised in mitochondria and creates a rate-limiting bottleneck for beta-oxidation of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Peter J; Dröse, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich; Lareau, Rachel A; Banerjee, Abir L; Srivastava, D K; Banaszak, Leonard J; Barycki, Joseph J; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Daut, Jürgen

    2005-01-15

    5-Hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) blocks pharmacological and ischaemic preconditioning, and has been postulated to be a specific inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels. However, recent work has shown that 5-HD is activated to 5-hydroxydecanoyl-CoA (5-HD-CoA), which is a substrate for the first step of beta-oxidation. We have now analysed the complete beta-oxidation of 5-HD-CoA using specially synthesised (and purified) substrates and enzymes, as well as isolated rat liver and heart mitochondria, and compared it with the metabolism of the physiological substrate decanoyl-CoA. At the second step of beta-oxidation, catalysed by enoyl-CoA hydratase, enzyme kinetics were similar using either decenoyl-CoA or 5-hydroxydecenoyl-CoA as substrate. The last two steps were investigated using l-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) coupled to 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. V(max) for the metabolite of 5-HD (3,5-dihydroxydecanoyl-CoA) was fivefold slower than for the corresponding metabolite of decanoate (l-3-hydroxydecanoyl-CoA). The slower kinetics were not due to accumulation of d-3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA since this enantiomer did not inhibit HAD. Molecular modelling of HAD complexed with 3,5-dihydroxydecanoyl-CoA suggested that the 5-hydroxyl group could decrease HAD turnover rate by interacting with critical side chains. Consistent with the kinetic data, 5-hydroxydecanoyl-CoA alone acted as a weak substrate in isolated mitochondria, whereas addition of 100 mum 5-HD-CoA inhibited the metabolism of decanoyl-CoA or lauryl-carnitine. In conclusion, 5-HD is activated, transported into mitochondria and metabolised via beta-oxidation, albeit with rate-limiting kinetics at the penultimate step. This creates a bottleneck for beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The complex metabolic effects of 5-HD invalidate the use of 5-HD as a blocker of mitochondrial K(ATP) channels in studies of preconditioning.

  15. Effect of Various Diets on the Expression of Phase-I Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Livers of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Cui, Julia Yue; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that diets can alter the metabolism of drugs; however, it is difficult to compare the effects of multiple diets on drug metabolism among different experimental settings. Phase-I related genes play a major role in the biotransformation of pro-drugs and drugs.In the current study, effects of nine diets on the mRNA expression of phase-I drug-metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice were simultaneously investigated. Compared to the AIN-93M purified diet (control), 73 of the 132 critical phase-I drug metabolizing genes were differentially regulated by at least one diet. Diet restriction produced the most number of changed genes (51), followed by the atherogenic diet (27), high-fat diet (25), standard rodent chow (21), western diet (20), high-fructose diet (5), EFA deficient diet (3), and low n-3 FA diet (1). The mRNAs of the Fmo family changed most, followed by Cyp2b and 4a subfamilies, as well as Por (From 1121 to 21-fold increase of theses mRNAs). There were 59 genes not altered by any of these diets.The present results may improve the interpretation of studies with mice and aid in determining effective and safe doses for individuals with different nutritional diets. PMID:25733028

  16. Dose-response effects of lycopene on selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, V.; Lauridsen, S. T.; Daneshvar, B.

    2000-01-01

    detoxification enzymes provided evidence that lycopene was capable of inducing hepatic quinone reductase, approximately two-fold, at doses between 0.001 and 0.05 g/kg b.w, per day, whereas no effect was observed at the remaining doses tested. Glutathione transferase, using the two substrates, 2......,4-dichloronitrobenzene and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, was significantly induced at the 0.1 g/kg b.w. per day dose, whereas no effect was observed at the remaining lycopene doses. Analysis of the antioxidant status of thr blood compartment revealed that three out of four antioxidant enzymes were affected by lycopene...... to be affected by prior. lycopene exposure. The level of PhIP-DNA adducts in the liver or colon was likewise not affected by lycopene at any dose. Overall, the present study provides evidence that lycopene administered in the diet of young female rats exerts minor modifying effects toward antioxidant and drug...

  17. Genetic analysis of drug metabolizing phase-I enzymes CYP3A4 in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIJUN LIU

    CYP3A4*5 and CYP3A4*18 are the predominant mutations affecting the metabolism of certain drugs in Chinese people. Tibetans are minority in China and have huge differences in the genetic structure, physiology, diet and lifestyle com- pared with the Han population. These variable factors may affect the drug metabolism.

  18. Polyphenols of Salix aegyptiaca modulate the activities of drug metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes, and level of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauman, Mohd; Kale, R K; Singh, Rana P

    2018-03-07

    Salix aegyptiaca is known for its medicinal properties mainly due to the presence of salicylate compounds. However, it also contains other beneficial phytochemicals such as gallic acid, quercetin, rutin and vanillin. The aim of the study was to examine the redox potential, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of these phytochemicals along with acetylsalicylic acid. The redox potential and antioxidant activity of gallic acid, quercetin, rutin, vanillin and acetylsalicylic acid were determined by oxidation-reduction potential electrode method and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, respectively. In ex vivo studies, antioxidant activity of these phytochemicals was determined by lipid peroxidation and carbonyl content assay in the liver of mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined by protein denaturation method. Six-week old C57BL/6 mice treated with gallic acid (100 mg/kg body weight) and acetylsalicylic acid (25 and 50 mg/kg body weight) to investigate their in vivo modulatory effects on the specific activities of drug metabolizing phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes and level of lipid peroxidation in liver. The order of ability to donate electron and antioxidant activity was found to be: gallic acid > quercetin > rutin > vanillin > acetylsalicylic acid. In ex vivo studies, the similar pattern and magnitude of inhibitory effects of these phytochemicals against peroxidative damage in microsomes and protein carbonyl in cytosolic fraction were observed. In in vivo studies, gallic acid and acetylsalicylic acid alone or in combination, enhanced the specific activities of drug metabolizing phase I and phase II enzymes as well as antioxidant enzymes and also inhibited lipid peroxidation in liver. These findings show a close link between the electron donation and antioxidation potential of these phytochemicals, and in turn their biological activity. Gallic acid, quercetin, rutin and vanillin were found to be better electron donors and

  19. Regional expression levels of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes along the pig and human intestinal tract and comparison with Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, S.F.C.; Lipzig, M.M.H. van; Pieters, R.H.H.; Krul, C.A.M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Steeg, E. van de

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal transporter proteins and metabolizing enzymes play a crucial role in the oral absorption of a wide variety of drugs. The aim of the current study was to characterize better available intestinal in vitro models by comparing expression levels of these proteins and enzymes between porcine

  20. Regional expression levels of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes along the pig and human intestinal tract and comparison with Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, Stefan F C; van Lipzig, Marola M H; Pieters, Raymond H H; Krul, Cyrille A M; Wortelboer, Heleen M; van de Steeg, Evita

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal transporter proteins and metabolizing enzymes play a crucial role in the oral absorption of a wide variety of drugs. The aim of the current study was to better characterize available intestinal in vitro models by comparing expression levels of these proteins and enzymes between porcine

  1. Interception of Cocaine by Enzyme or Antibody Delivered with Viral Gene Transfer: A Novel Strategy for Preventing Relapse in Recovering Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Brimijoin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in enzyme engineering has led to versions of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that hydrolyze cocaine efficiently in plasma, reduce concentrations reaching reward neurocircuity in the brain, and weaken behavioral responses to this drug. Along with enzyme advances, increasingly avid anti-cocaine antibodies and potent anti-cocaine vaccines have also been developed. Here we review these developments and consider the potential advantages along with the risks of delivering drug-in...

  2. Expression of two drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450-enzymes in human salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Hansen, C; Torpet, L A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The oral cavity is constantly lubricated by saliva and even small amounts of xenobiotics and / or their metabolites in the saliva may affect the oral mucosa. Our aim was therefore to clarify if xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 are expressed in salivary glands. METHODS...

  3. An overview of aldehyde oxidase: an enzyme of emerging importance in novel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-03-01

    Given the rising trend in medicinal chemistry strategy to reduce cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism, aldehyde oxidase (AOX) has recently gained increased attention in drug discovery programs and the number of drug candidates that are metabolized by AOX is steadily growing. Areas covered: Despite the emerging importance of AOX in drug discovery, there are certain major recognized problems associated with AOX-mediated metabolism of drugs. Intra- and inter-species variations in AOX activity, the lack of reliable and predictive animal models using the common experimental animals, and failure in the predictions of in vivo metabolic activity of AOX using traditional in vitro methods are among these issues that are covered in this article. A comprehensive review of computational human AOX (hAOX) related studies are also provided. Expert opinion: Following the recent progress in the stem cell field, the authors recommend the application of organoids technology as an effective tool to solve the fundamental problems associated with the evaluation of AOX in drug discovery. The recent success in resolving the hAOX crystal structure can too be another valuable data source for the study of AOX-catalyzed metabolism of new drug candidates, using computer-aided drug discovery methods.

  4. Effects of resveratrol on drug? and carcinogen?metabolizing enzymes, implications for cancer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Guthrie, Ariane R.; Chow, H?H. Sherry; Martinez, Jessica A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in grape skins and peanuts that has demonstrated many health benefits including protection against aging, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, neurological decline, and cancer. The anticancer properties of resveratrol have been attributed to a variety of mechanisms, including its general inhibition of phase I metabolism and induction of phase II metabolism. The effects of resveratrol on these enzymes, however, are still unclear, as in?vitro evidence...

  5. A Polyamine Oxidizing Enzyme as a Drug to Treat Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    T Maeda H. Tumor-targeting chemotherapy by a xanthine oxidase -polymer t generates oxygen-free radicals in tumor tissue. Cancer Res (2000) 60:666-71...serum amine oxidase (SAO) as effective treatments for breast cancer using a mouse model. Hopefully, this approach, or a variation thereof, could be...pure enzyme, it is proposed that freshly prepared oxidase is required. In the future, will carry out smaller scale purifications, and only use the

  6. Interaction of ibuprofen and probenecid with drug metabolizing enzyme phenotyping procedures using caffeine as the probe drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtic, Fatima; Haefeli, Walter E; Drewe, Jürgen; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Wenk, Markus

    2003-01-01

    Aim To examine the suspected inhibitory potential of the over-the-counter (OTC) drug ibuprofen on N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) in vitro and in vivo and the possible implications for phenotyping procedures using caffeine as probe drug. Methods We first studied the inhibitory effect of ibuprofen on NAT2 in vitro, using human liver cytosol and sulfamethazine as substrate. In vivo 15 fast and 15 slow acetylating healthy volunteers were treated with a single dose of ibuprofen (800 mg) orally and phenotyped for NAT2, CYP1A2, and xanthine oxidase (XO) with caffeine as probe drug before and during drug treatment. Because of unexpected in vivo results with ibuprofen this study was repeated in 20 healthy volunteers with probenecid, a model substrate of renal organic anion transport (OAT). For phenotyping tests a urine sample was collected 6 h after caffeine (200 mg) intake. The caffeine metabolites acetyl-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil (AFMU), 1-methylxanthine (1MX), 1-methyluric acid (1MU), and 1,7-dimethyluric acid (17MU) were quantified by HPLC, and the corresponding metabolic ratios for CYP1A2, NAT2, and XO were then calculated. Genotyping for NAT2 was performed with standard PCR-RFLP methods. Results In vitro, with human liver cytosol an inhibition by ibuprofen of the acetylation of sulfamethazine with Ki values between 2.2 and 3.1 mm was observed. Surprisingly, in vivo a significant (P probenecid, a model substrate of the renal OAT system. Again, a prominent elevation of the AFMU/1MX ratio from 0.97 ± 0.21 to 1.53 ± 0.35 was found (P < 0.002; 95% CI on the difference 0.237, 0.876), but also the XO ratio 1MU/1MX was significantly (P < 0.0001) increased from 1.34 ± 0.09 to 2.24 ± 0.14 (95% CI on difference 0.735, 1.059) due to a reduction of 1MX excretion. Conclusions Substrates of OAT interact with renal excretion of caffeine metabolites and may falsify NAT2 and XO phenotyping results. Other phenotyping procedures, which are based on urinary metabolic ratios, should

  7. Attenuation of stress induced memory deficits by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats: Role of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Shaista; Qadeer, Sara; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira

    2017-04-01

    Repeated stress paradigms have been shown to cause devastating alterations on memory functions. Stress is linked with inflammation. Psychological and certain physical stressors could lead to neuroinflammation. Inflammatory process may occur by release of mediators and stimulate the production of prostaglandins through cyclooxygenase (COX). Treatment with COX inhibitors, which restrain prostaglandin production, has enhanced memory in a number of neuroinflammatory states showing a potential function for raised prostaglandins in these memory shortfalls. In the present study, potential therapeutic effects of indomethacin and diclofenac sodium on memory in both unrestraint and restraint rats were observed. Two components, long term memory and short term memory were examined by Morris water maze (MWM) and elevated plus maze (EPM) respectively. The present study also demonstrated the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of antioxidant enzymes along with the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Results of MWM and EPM showed significant effects of drugs in both unrestraint and restraint rats as escape latency and transfer latency, in respective behavioral models were decreased as compared to that of control. This study also showed NSAIDs administration decreased LPO and increased antioxidant enzymes activity and decreased AChE activity in rats exposed to repeated stress. In conclusion this study suggests a therapeutic potential of indomethacin and diclofenac against repeated stress-induced memory deficits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  8. Polymorphisms in genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes and their influence on the outcome of children with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Lesley J; Murray, Jayne E; Haber, Michelle; Marshall, Glenn M; Ashley, David M; Norris, Murray D

    2007-09-01

    Although several studies have shown that drug metabolizing enzyme gene polymorphisms may influence the impact of therapy in childhood leukemia, no comprehensive investigations have been carried out in children with neuroblastoma. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms in the genes encoding phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes associated with the risk of relapse or death in a cohort of 209 children with neuroblastoma. Real-time PCR allelic discrimination was used to characterize the presence of polymorphisms in DNA from children with neuroblastoma. Three broad gene categories were examined: cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase and N-acetyltransferase. Cumulative event-free survival was computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The influence of selected factors on event-free survival was tested using the Cox proportional hazards model. As previously reported, amplification of MYCN (hazards ratio=4.25, 95% confidence interval=2.76-6.56, Pchildren who were GSTM1 null were more likely to relapse or die during follow-up after adjusting for MYCN amplification, stage and age at diagnosis (hazard ratio=1.6, 95% confidence interval=1.02-2.9, P=0.04). These observations suggest that the NAT1*11 variant and the GSTM1 wild-type genotype contribute to a more favorable outcome in patients treated for neuroblastoma and are the first to demonstrate a relationship between NAT1 and GSTM1 genotypes in childhood neuroblastoma.

  9. Genetic analysis of drug metabolizing phase-I enzymes CYP3A4 in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIJUN LIU

    5Xi'an Tiangen Precision Medical Institute, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710075, People's Republic of China. Abstract ... nant, and (iv) smoking, drug/alcohol addiction. The purpose .... 96. Table 2. Frequency distribution of CYP3A4 polymorphisms in 96 Tibetan subjects. Nucleotide change. Position. Region. SNP. Allele. Amino acid effect.

  10. Effect of antiretroviral drug (arved) on hepatic enzymes in albino rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the rush to put as many patients as possible on a potent ART, with very little or no laboratory monitory, limited attention has been given to side effects. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of antiretroviral drugs arved® , on aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and ...

  11. Genetic analysis of drug metabolizing phase-I enzymes CYP3A4 in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIJUN LIU1

    nant, and (iv) smoking, drug/alcohol addiction. The purpose of exclusion was to minimize some factors that may have influenced genetic variation in the ..... 81560516), Major science and technology research projects of Xizang (Tibet) Autonomous Region (2015XZ01G23), Natural. Science Foundation of Tibet Autonomous ...

  12. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  13. Microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in the olive baboon (papio anabis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Thurlow, Brenda J.; Wakhisi, Johnston

    1975-01-01

    1.1. The activity of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes—azo reductase, nitroreductase, p-hydroxylation, N-demethylation, O-demethylation, NADPH cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P P-450—in the olive baboon are lower than in other animal species, e.g. mouse, rat, guinea-pig. 2. 2. The level...

  14. alpha-Naphthylisothiocyanate induced alterations in hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and liver morphology: implications concerning anticarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, T B; Popp, J A; Graichen, M E; Dent, J G

    1981-01-01

    Alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is a biliary toxin with anticarcinogenic properties. The studies described were designed to investigate the effects of continuous ANIT feeding on liver function. Male F-344 rats were fed ANIT at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% of the diet for 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Microscopic evaluation of liver sections revealed time- and dose- dependent bile duct proliferation, bile duct cell hypertrophy, and focal hepatocytic necrosis. Liver derived serum enzyme activity and serum bilirubin concentrations were increased in a fashion which correlated closely with the histological observations. A dose dependent decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 content, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity, and benzphetamine-N-demethylase activity was observed after 2 and 4 weeks of feeding ANIT. However, these enzyme activities returned to control values at 6 weeks in all except the 0.1% group. ANIT increased microsomal epoxide hydrolase and cytosolic DT-diaphorase activity (200-6005 of control). The enhancement was dose related and peaked at 2 and 4 weeks for epoxide hydrolase and DT-diaphorase, respectively. Both epoxide hydrolase and DT-diaphorase activity remained elevated at 6 weeks. These results suggest that ANIT mediated anticarcinogenesis, previously hypothesized to be the result of reduced mixed function oxidase activity, also may be accounted for by enhanced epoxide hydrolase and DT-diaphorase activity.

  15. [Metformin and AMPK: an old drug and a new enzyme in the context of metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santomauro Júnior, Augusto Cézar; Ugolini, Michelle Remião; Santomauro, Ana Teresa; Souto, Ricardo Peres do

    2008-02-01

    Metformin is one of the most commonly prescribed oral antidiabetic agents worldwide. However, its mechanism of action remains unknown. The Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group studies have shown that metformin administration and lifestyle-intervention (diet and exercise) reduce the incidence of Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2). A possible biochemical connection between both therapies may be the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). This enzyme was originally described as a sensor of cellular energy status, being activated in exercise. On the other hand, several experimental evidences indicate that AMPK may be an important target of metformin action. This paper discusses various ways for AMPK regulation, suggesting a possible mechanism for its activation by metformin that involves the production of reactive nitrogen species. AMPK activation determines a wide variety of physiological effects, including enhanced glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and enhanced lipid catabolism. Thus, it may be a key player not only in the prevention and treatment of DM2, but also in the development of new treatments for obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The finding of AMPK activation by metformin draws attention to this enzyme as an important pharmacological target.

  16. Ability of Intestinal Lactic Acid Bacteria to Bind and/or Metabolise Indole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisława Libudzisz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal microbiota can contribute to the development of colon cancer by the production of many substances playing a role in carcinogenesis. Metabolites of protein fermentation in the colon, such as ammonia, amines, indole, phenol, skatole and their derivatives are toxic. On the other hand, lactic acid bacteria (LAB existing in the colon may exert an anticarcinogenic action, but the mechanism is still poorly understood. In the present study, the aim is to determine the ability of intestinal lactobacilli to adsorb or metabolise indole in vitro. Lactobacillus strains were cultivated in MRS and a modified MRS broth with reduced concentrations of nitrogen and carbon. Indole concentration in the media was from 2 to 20 μg/mL. The decrease in indole concentration was from 1 to 10 μg/mL after cultivation in MRS broth, and from 4.3 to 6.7 μg/mL after cultivation in a modified MRS broth. It was shown that the higher concentration of indole in the medium, the higher reduction of its level. Killed bacteria displayed slight binding capacity. After the interaction of alive lactobacilli with 10 μg/mL of indole, it displayed a lower genotoxicity, as evaluated by the alkaline comet assay. The phenomenon did not depend on the decrease of indole concentration, but on the culture medium and the strain of LAB and ranged from 7 to 96 %.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys and common marmosets in preclinical studies for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-12-23

    Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, Old World Monkeys) and common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus, New World Monkeys) have been widely, and expectedly, used as non-human primate models in drug development studies. Major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes information is now available that supports these primate species as animal models, and it is established that multiple forms of cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset P450 enzymes have generally similar substrate recognition functionality to human P450 enzymes. This research update provides information on genetic polymorphisms of P450 enzymes in cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset like human P450 enzymes. Information on rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), another macaque species used in drug metabolism studies, is also included for comparison. Among a variety of cynomolgus monkey P450 variants investigated, typical examples include individual pharmacokinetic data for efavirenz and R-warfarin associated with cynomolgus monkey P450 2C9 (formerly 2C43) and 2C19 (2C75) variants, respectively, and for R-omeprazole and S-warfarin associated with marmoset P450 2C19 variants. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the individual pharmacokinetic and toxicological results in non-human primates as preclinical models and will help to further support understanding of molecular mechanisms of human P450 function. In addition to these polymorphic P450 enzymes, effects of aging on some drug clearances mediated by cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset P450 enzymes were found in elder animals or animals pretreated with rifampicin. This review describes genetic and acquired individual differences in cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset P450 enzymes involved in drug oxidation associated with pharmacological and/or toxicological effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds Liberated and Metabolised by Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Mochalski, Pawe?; Theurl, Markus; Sponring, Andreas; Unterkofler, Karl; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Amann, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection combined with head-space needle trap extraction as the pre-concentration technique was applied to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds released or metabolised by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Amongst the consumed species there were eight aldehydes (2-methyl 2-propenal, 2-methyl propanal, 2-methyl butanal, 3-methyl butanal, n-hexanal, benzaldehyde, n-octanal and n-nonanal) and n-butyl acetate. Further eight compounds (e...

  19. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  20. Comparison of true metabolisable energy and true amino acid availability between normal maize and quality protein maize (Shandan 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A precision-fed assay was conducted to determine true metabolisable energy and true amino acid digestibility in Chinese quality protein maize (QPM compared with normal maize (NM. Thirty adult roosters, kept in individual cages, were made to fast for 48h and then tub-fed 50g QPM or NM per bird and their excreta was colleted for the subsequent 48h. Additional fifteen roosters were made to fast in order to estimate endogenous losses of energy and amino acids (AA in excreta. Gross energy of the two types of maize were similar; the lysine content in NM and QPM were 0.27% and 0.41% (DM basis, respectively. True metabolisable energy (TME and true metabolisable energy nitrogen corrected (TMEn values of QPM and NM were not significantly different (P>0.05. Digestibility of some AA, including lysine and methionine, in QPM were higher than those in NM (P<0.05. The results of this study indicated that the nutritive value of QPM might be higher than that of NM.

  1. Thin-layer chromatography of several antihypertensive drugs from the group of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZIVOSLAV LJ. TESIC

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and simple method for the chromatographic separation of pharmacologically active components contained in some antihypertensive drugs has been developed employing thin-layers of silica gel and polyacrylonitrile sorbent (PANS. The active compounds of Captopril – (S-1-(3-mercapto-2-methyl-1-oxopropyl-L-proline, Enalapril – (S-1-[N- [1-(ethoxycarbonyl-3-phenylpropyl]-L-alanyl]-L-proline, Lisinopril – (S -1-[N2-(carboxy-3-phenylpropyl-L-lysyl]-L-proline, Quinapril – [3S-[2[R*(R*],3R*

  2. The biochemistry of drug metabolism--an introduction: part 4. reactions of conjugation and their enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Bernard; Krämer, Stefanie D

    2008-11-01

    This review continues a general presentation of the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics begun in three recent issues of Chemistry & Biodiversity. The present Part is dedicated to reactions of conjugation, namely methylation, sulfonation, and phosphorylation, glucuronidation and other glycosidations, acetylation and other acylations, the formation and fate of coenzyme A conjugates, glutathione conjugation, and the reaction of amines with carbonyl compounds. It presents the many transferases involved, their nomenclature, relevant biochemical properties, catalytic mechanisms, and the reactions they catalyze. Nonenzymatic reactions, mainly of glutathione conjugation, also receive due attention. A number of medicinally, environmentally, and toxicologically relevant examples are presented and discussed.

  3. Targeting the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D4 for cancer drug discovery-a structure-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramatenki, Vishwanath; Dumpati, Ramakrishna; Vadija, Rajender; Vellanki, Santhiprada; Potlapally, Sarita Rajender; Rondla, Rohini; Vuruputuri, Uma

    2017-04-01

    Cancer progression is a global burden. The incidence and mortality now reach 30 million deaths per year. Several pathways of cancer are under investigation for the discovery of effective therapeutics. The present study highlights the structural details of the ubiquitin protein 'Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D4' (UBE2D4) for the novel lead structure identification in cancer drug discovery process. The evaluation of 3D structure of UBE2D4 was carried out using homology modelling techniques. The optimized structure was validated by standard computational protocols. The active site region of the UBE2D4 was identified using computational tools like CASTp, Q-site Finder and SiteMap. The hydrophobic pocket which is responsible for binding with its natural receptor ubiquitin ligase CHIP (C-terminal of Hsp 70 interacting protein) was identified through protein-protein docking study. Corroborating the results obtained from active site prediction tools and protein-protein docking study, the domain of UBE2D4 which is responsible for cancer cell progression is sorted out for further docking study. Virtual screening with large structural database like CB_Div Set and Asinex BioDesign small molecular structural database was carried out. The obtained new ligand molecules that have shown affinity towards UBE2D4 were considered for ADME prediction studies. The identified new ligand molecules with acceptable parameters of docking, ADME are considered as potent UBE2D4 enzyme inhibitors for cancer therapy.

  4. Studies on entrapping of enzymes and drugs in matrices by radiation-induced polymerization at low temperatures and their capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaru

    1980-03-01

    The author has studied a immobilization method for enzymes and drugs by means of radiation-induced polymerization at low temperatures in a supercooled state using glass-forming monomers. The proposed technique using glass-forming monomer has features as follows. (1) Inactivation of the bio-component by heat and radiation is almost eliminated due to the low temperature treatment. (2) Moulding or shaping of the mixture of monomer and bio-component in difference forms and sizes of polymerized composite is easy due to high viscosity of the supercooled monomer. (3) The carrier matrix may be selected from a wide range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic vinyl monomers and polymers. (4) No impurities such as a polymerization catalyst are introduced in the system. (5) A bio-component can be easily distributed in high stability, either concentrated on surface of the monomer or homogeneously within the monomer, due to large viscosity of the monomer. Furthermore, the author attempted practical usage of the technique in such as enzyme fixation for long continuous or repeated application (PART I) and controlled slow release of medicine in efficient and durable without secondary reaction (PART II). (author)

  5. Effects of lemongrass oil and citral on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from a lemongrass variety of Cymbopogon flexuosus [lemongrass oil (LO] is used in various food and aroma industry products and exhibits biological activities, such as anticancer and antimicrobial activities. To investigate the effects of 200 LO (200 mg/kg and 400 LO (400 mg/kg and its major component, citral (240 mg/kg, on drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in the liver, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a pelleted diet and administered LO or citral by gavage for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks of feeding, the effects of LO and citral on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen were determined. The results showed that rats treated with 400 LO or citral had significantly reduced hepatic testosterone 6β-hydroxylation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activities. In addition, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity was significantly increased by citral, and Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP glucurosyltransferase activity was significantly increased by 400 LO in the rat liver. Treatment with 400 LO or citral reduced lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species levels in the liver. After acetaminophen treatment, however, LO and citral treatment resulted in little or no change in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity and acetaminophen-protein adducts content in the liver. Our results indicate that LO and citral may change the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes and reduce oxidative stress in the liver. However, LO and citral may not affect the detoxification of acetaminophen.

  6. New poly(ester urea) derived from L-leucine: Electrospun scaffolds loaded with antibacterial drugs and enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Angélica; Valle, Luis J. del [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Tugushi, David; Katsarava, Ramaz [Institute of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Agricultural University of Georgia, 13 km. David Aghmashenebeli Alley, Tblisi 0131, Georgia (United States); Puiggalí, Jordi, E-mail: Jordi.Puiggali@upc.edu [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds from an amino acid containing poly(ester urea) (PEU) were developed as promising materials in the biomedical field and specifically in tissue engineering applications. The selected poly(ester urea) was obtained with a high yield and molecular weight by reaction of phosgene with a bis(α-aminoacyl)-α,ω-diol-diester monomer. The polymer having L-leucine, 1,6-hexanediol and carbonic acid units had a semicrystalline character and relatively high glass transition and melting temperatures. Furthermore it was highly soluble in most organic solvents, an interesting feature that facilitated the electrospinning process and the effective incorporation of drugs with bactericidal activity (e.g. biguanide derivatives such as clorhexidine and polyhexamethylenebiguanide) and enzymes (e.g. α-chymotrypsin) that accelerated the degradation process. Continuous micro/nanofibers were obtained under a wide range of processing conditions, being diameters of electrospun fibers dependent on the drug and solvent used. Poly(ester urea) samples were degradable in media containing lipases and proteinases but the degradation rate was highly dependent on the surface area, being specifically greater for scaffolds with respect to films. The high hydrophobicity of new scaffolds had repercussions on enzymatic degradability since different weight loss rates were found depending on how samples were exposed to the medium (e.g. forced or non-forced immersion). New scaffolds were biocompatible, as demonstrated by adhesion and proliferation assays performed with fibroblast and epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Electrospun scaffolds from a biodegradable poly(ester urea) have been prepared. • Scaffolds were effectively loaded with bactericide agents. • Enzymatic degradability of the L-leucine derived poly(ester urea) was demonstrated. • Enzymes that accelerate degradation were incorporated in the electrospun fibers. • Cell adhesion/proliferation assays demonstrated

  7. Multiple Conformations of Phosphodiesterase-5: Implications for Enzyme Function and Drug Developement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang,H.; Liu, Y.; Huai, Q.; Cai, J.; Zoraghi, R.; Francis, S.; Corbin, J.; Robinson, H.; Xin, Z.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is the target for sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, which are drugs for treatment of erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. We report here the crystal structures of a fully active catalytic domain of unliganded PDE5A1 and its complexes with sildenafil or icarisid II. These structures together with the PDE5A1-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine complex show that the H-loop (residues 660-683) at the active site of PDE5A1 has four different conformations and migrates 7 to 35 Angstroms upon inhibitor binding. In addition, the conformation of sildenafil reported herein differs significantly from those in the previous structures of chimerically hybridized or almost inactive PDE5. Mutagenesis and kinetic analyses confirm that the H-loop is particularly important for substrate recognition and that invariant Gly659 which immediately precedes the H-loop is critical for optimal substrate affinity and catalytic activity.

  8. DMET™ (Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters) microarray analysis of colorectal cancer patients with severe 5-fluorouracil-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiato, Enrica; Boldrin, Elisa; Amadori, Alberto; Saggioro, Daniela

    2013-08-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been widely used since the 1980s, and it remains the backbone of many chemotherapeutic combination regimens. However, its use is often limited by the occurrence of severe toxicity. Although several reports have shown the detrimental effect of some dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) and thymidylate synthase (TYMS) gene polymorphisms in patients undergoing 5-FU-based treatment, they account for only a minority of toxicities. Looking for new candidate genetic variants associated with 5-FU-induced toxicity, we used the innovative genotyping microarray Affymetrix Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET)™ Plus GeneChip that interrogates 1,936 genetic variants distributed in 231 genes involved in drug metabolism, excretion, and transport. To reduce variability, we analyzed samples from colorectal cancer patients who underwent fairly homogenous treatments (i.e., Machover or Folfox) and experienced G3 or G4 toxicity; control patients were matched for therapy and selected from those who did not disclose toxicity (G0-G1). Pharmacogenetic genotyping showed no significant difference in DPYD and TYMS genetic variants distribution between cases and controls. However, other polymorphisms could account for 5-FU-induced toxicity, with the CHST1 rs9787901 and GSTM3 rs1799735 having the strongest association. Although exploratory, this study suggests that genetic polymorphisms not directly related to 5-FU pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are involved in 5-FU-induced toxicity. Our data also indicates DMET™ microarray as a valid approach to discover new genetic determinants influencing chemotherapy-induced toxicity.

  9. Interception of cocaine by enzyme or antibody delivered with viral gene transfer: a novel strategy for preventing relapse in recovering drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimijoin, Stephen

    2011-12-01

    Recent progress in enzyme engineering has led to versions of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that hydrolyze cocaine efficiently in plasma, reduce concentrations reaching reward neurocircuity in the brain, and weaken behavioral responses to this drug. Along with enzyme advances, increasingly avid anti-cocaine antibodies and potent anti-cocaine vaccines have also been developed. Here we review these developments and consider the potential advantages along with the risks of delivering drug-intercepting proteins via gene transfer approaches to treat cocaine addiction.

  10. Evaluation of various feedstuffs of ruminants in terms of chemical composition and metabolisable energy content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Datt, Chander; Das, L K; Kundu, S S

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to determine the chemical composition and metabolisable energy (ME) content of feedstuffs used in ruminant animals using in vitro method. A total of 18 feedstuffs used for ruminant feeding including cultivated non-leguminous fodders like maize, sorghum, pearl millet, and oat; leguminous fodders like cowpea and berseem; agro-industrial by-products such as wheat bran, deoiled rice bran, rice polish, wheat straw, and concentrates such as mustard oil cake, groundnut cake, soybean meal, cotton seed cake, grains like maize, oat, wheat, and barley were taken for this study. Chemical compositions and cell wall constituents of test feeds were determined in triplicate. The crude protein (CP) content was calculated as nitrogen (N) × 6.25. True dry matter digestibility (TDMD), true organic matter digestibility (TOMD), ME, and partitioning factor (PF) values were determined by in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT). The CP content of non-leguminous fodders varied from 7.29% (sorghum) to 9.51% (maize), but leguminous fodders had less variation in CP. Oilseed cakes/meals had high CP and ether extract (EE) content than other feedstuffs except rice polish, which had 12.80% EE. Wheat straw contained highest fiber fractions than the other ingredients. ME content was highest in grains (wheat-12.02 MJ/kg) and lowest in wheat straw (4.65 MJ/kg) and other roughages. TDMD of grains and oilseed cakes/meals were higher than the fodders and agro-industrial by-products. The same trend was observed for TOMD. It was concluded that the energy feeds showed a great variation in chemical composition and ME content. The results of this study demonstrated that the kinetics of gas production of energy feed sources differed among themselves. Evaluation of various feedstuffs is helpful in balanced ration formulation for field animals and under farm conditions for better utilization of these commonly available feed resources.

  11. Evaluation of various feedstuffs of ruminants in terms of chemical composition and metabolisable energy content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to determine the chemical composition and metabolisable energy (ME content of feedstuffs used in ruminant animals using in vitro method. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 feedstuffs used for ruminant feeding including cultivated non-leguminous fodders like maize, sorghum, pearl millet, and oat; leguminous fodders like cowpea and berseem; agro-industrial by-products such as wheat bran, deoiled rice bran, rice polish, wheat straw, and concentrates such as mustard oil cake, groundnut cake, soybean meal, cotton seed cake, grains like maize, oat, wheat, and barley were taken for this study. Chemical compositions and cell wall constituents of test feeds were determined in triplicate. The crude protein (CP content was calculated as nitrogen (N × 6.25. True dry matter digestibility (TDMD, true organic matter digestibility (TOMD, ME, and partitioning factor (PF values were determined by in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT. Results: The CP content of non-leguminous fodders varied from 7.29% (sorghum to 9.51% (maize, but leguminous fodders had less variation in CP. Oilseed cakes/meals had high CP and ether extract (EE content than other feedstuffs except rice polish, which had 12.80% EE. Wheat straw contained highest fiber fractions than the other ingredients. ME content was highest in grains (wheat-12.02 MJ/kg and lowest in wheat straw (4.65 MJ/kg and other roughages. TDMD of grains and oilseed cakes/meals were higher than the fodders and agro-industrial by-products. The same trend was observed for TOMD. Conclusions: It was concluded that the energy feeds showed a great variation in chemical composition and ME content. The results of this study demonstrated that the kinetics of gas production of energy feed sources differed among themselves. Evaluation of various feedstuffs is helpful in balanced ration formulation for field animals and under farm conditions for better utilization of these commonly available feed resources.

  12. Important role of proinflammatory cytokines/other endogenous substances in drug-induced hepatotoxicity: depression of drug metabolism during infections/inflammation states, and genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes/cytokines may markedly contribute to this pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of literature data on drug-induced hepatotoxicity reveals that often upper respiratory febrile illnesses and/or inflammation states precede liver injury/diseases related to administration of drugs or hepatotoxicity associated with administration of therapeutic doses of acetaminophen in some genetically predisposed subjects. The goals of this paper are to review the potential role of alterations in the balance between TH1 cells producing cytokines associated with a cell-mediated response and TH2 cells associated with an antibody response, as well as other endogenous substances, eg, growth factors, leading to a shift in immune response to one that may participate in the liver cells injury during administration of certain drugs, especially in subjects with genetic polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes. The papers cited in this review were selected to illustrate specific issue related to how profuse and dysregulated production of cytokines, growth factors, and/or other endogenous substances during viral/bacterial infections and inflammation states play a role in the development of drug-induced liver injury. Several cases of liver injury related to administration of drugs appear to be initiated or intensified by upper respiratory febrile illnesses and/or inflammation states, which stimulate sometimes dysregulated production of interferon gamma and/or other proinflammatory cytokines/growth factors. This, in turn, results in down-regulation of various induced and constitutive isoforms of cytochromes P-450, and other enzymes involved in the metabolism of several exogenous (eg, drugs) and endogenous lipophilic (eg, steroids) substances, thus having an important impact on the alterations in bioactivation and detoxication processes in the body and on the balance between production, utilization, and elimination of endogenous bioproducts of these reactions. Activation of systemic host defense mechanisms results in down-regulation of various enzymes involved in

  13. Pharmacogenetics of adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, I; Jung-Cook, H; LLerena, A; López-López, M

    2018-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In the case of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ADRs constitute a barrier to successful treatment since they decrease treatment adherence and impact patients' quality of life of patients. Pharmacogenetics aims to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with drug safety. This article presents a review of genes coding for drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters, and HLA system genes that have been linked to AED-induced ADRs. To date, several genetic variations associated with drug safety have been reported: CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles, which code for enzymes with decreased activity, have been linked to phenytoin (PHT)-induced neurotoxicity; GSTM1 null alleles with hepatotoxicity induced by carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproic acid (VPA); EPHX1 polymorphisms with teratogenesis; ABCC2 genetic variations with CBZ- and VPA-induced neurological ADRs; and HLA alleles (e.g. HLA-B*15:02, -A*31:01, -B*15:11, -C*08:01) with cutaneous ADRs. Published findings show that there are ADRs with a pharmacogenetic basis and a high interethnic variability, which indicates a need for future studies in different populations to gather more useful results for larger number of patients. The search for biomarkers that would allow predicting ADRs to AEDs could improve pharmacotherapy for epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The majority of hepatitis C patients treated with direct acting antivirals are at risk for relevant drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Elise J; Berden, Floor Ac; de Kanter, Clara Tmm; Kievit, Wietske; Drenth, Joost Ph; Burger, David M

    2017-08-01

    Direct-acting antivirals have improved treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection significantly. Direct-acting antivirals inhibit/induce and can also be substrates of drug-metabolising enzymes and transporters. This increases the risk for drug-drug interactions. The purpose of this study was to predict drug-drug interactions with co-medication used by hepatitis C virus-infected patients. We assembled a nationwide cohort of hepatitis C patients and collected cross-sectional data on co-medication use. We compiled a list of currently available direct-acting antiviral regimens and cross-checked for potential drug-drug interactions with used co-medication. The cohort included 461 patients of which 77% used co-medication. We identified 260 drugs used as co-medication. Antidepressants (7.4%), proton pump inhibitors (7.1%) and benzodiazepines (7.1%) were most frequently used. Of the patients, 60% were at risk for a clinically relevant drug-drug interaction with at least one of the direct-acting antiviral regimens. Interactions were most common with paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir and least interactions were predicted with grazoprevir/elbasvir. Co-medication use is rich in frequency and diversity in chronic hepatitis C patients. The majority of patients are at risk for drug-drug interactions which may affect efficacy or toxicity of direct-acting antivirals or co-medication. The most recently introduced direct-acting antivirals are associated with a lower risk of drug-drug interactions.

  15. Toxicity of Xanthene Food Dyes by Inhibition of Human Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in a Noncompetitive Manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, T.

    2010-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC50 values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC50 values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the non inhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of O 12 originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by O 12 quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin.

  16. Toxicity of xanthene food dyes by inhibition of human drug-metabolizing enzymes in a noncompetitive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC(50) values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC(50) values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of (1)O(2) originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by (1)O(2) quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin.

  17. Toxicity of Xanthene Food Dyes by Inhibition of Human Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in a Noncompetitive Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC50 values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC50 values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of 1O2 originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by 1O2 quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin. PMID:20041016

  18. Evaluation of the synergistic effect of Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum and Psidium guajav on hepatic and intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Background: Present study investigated the synergistic effect of polyherbal formulations (PHF of Allium sativum L Eugenia jambolana Lam., Momordica charantia L., Ocimum sanctum Linn and Psidium guajava L. in the inhibition/induction of hepatic and intestinal CYPs and Phase-II conjugated drug metabolizing enzymes. Consumption of these herbal remedy has been extensively documented for diabetes treatment in Auyureda. Methodology: PHF of these five herbs was prepared and different doses were orally administered to Sprague Dawley rats of different groups except control group. Expression of mRNA and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes were examined by RT-PCR and HPLC in isolated liver and intestine microsomes in PHF pretreated rats. Results: Activities of hepatic and intestinal Phase-II enzyme levels increased along with mRNA levels except CYP3A mRNA level. PHF administration increases the activity of hepatic and intestinal UDPGT and GST in response to dose and time; however, activity of hepatic SULT increased at higher doses. Conclusions: CYPs and Phase-II conjugated enzymes levels can be modulated in dose and time dependent manner. Observations suggest that poly herbal formulation might be a possible cause of herb-drug interaction, due to changes in pharmacokinetic of crucial CYPs and Phase-II substrate drug. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(4.000: 372-382

  19. Swine torque teno virus detection in pig commercial vaccines, enzymes for laboratory use and human drugs containing components of porcine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekarainen, Tuija; Martínez-Guinó, Laura; Segalés, Joaquim

    2009-03-01

    Torque teno viruses (TTVs) are vertebrate infecting, single-stranded circular DNA viruses. Two genetically distinct TTV genogroups (TTV1 and TTV2) infect swine worldwide with high prevalence. Currently, swine TTVs are considered non-pathogenic, although TTV2 has been linked to post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, a porcine circovirus disease. On the other hand, pig materials are an important source of components used in porcine vaccine manufacturing, human drugs and commercial enzyme products. However, there is little information about the possible existence of extraneous viruses in products containing porcine-derived components. In the present study, 26 commercial swine vaccines, seven human drugs and three enzyme products from porcine origin were tested for the presence of TTV1 and TTV2 genomes by PCR. Four vaccines against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were positive for TTV2 by PCR. Three M. hyopneumoniae, one porcine parvovirus and one porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccines were PCR positive for TTV1. One human drug contained TTV1 DNA as well as a trypsin enzyme; a porcine-derived elastase product was positive for both TTV genogroups. These results show that swine TTVs are contaminants not only of swine vaccines but also of human drugs containing porcine components and enzymes for laboratory use.

  20. Metabolisable protein supply to lactating dairy cows increased with increasing dry matter concentration in grass-clover silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Marianne; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of increased dry matter (DM) concentration in grass-clover silage, obtained by extending the pre-wilting period before ensiling, on the amount of metabolisable protein (MP) supplied to lactating dairy cows. Spring growth and first regrowth of grass...... can be improved by pre-wilting to a higher DM concentration before ensiling. Abbreviations AA, amino acids; AA-N, amino acid nitrogen; ADL, acid detergent lignin; aNDFom, neutral detergent fibre assayed with heat stable amylase and expressed exclusive of residual ash; CP, crude protein; CH4, methane...

  1. Effect of the Antihypertensive Drug Enalapril on Oxidative Stress Markers and Antioxidant Enzymes in Kidney of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been suggested to play a role in hypertension and hypertension induced organ damage. This study examined the effect of enalapril, an antihypertensive drug, on oxidative stress markers and antioxidant enzymes in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR and Nω -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME administered SHR. Male rats were divided into four groups (SHR, SHR+enalapril, SHR+L-NAME, and SHR+enalapril+L-NAME. Enalapril (30 mg kg−1 day−1 was administered from week 4 to week 28 and L-NAME (25 mg kg−1 day−1 was administered from week 16 to week 28 in drinking water. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was measured during the experimental period. At the end of experimental periods, rats were sacrificed; urine, blood, and kidneys were collected for the assessment of creatinine clearance, total protein, total antioxidant status (TAS, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT, as well as histopathological examination. Enalapril treatment significantly enhanced the renal TAS level (P<0.001 and SOD activity (P<0.001, reduced the TBARS levels (P<0.001, and also prevented the renal dysfunction and histopathological changes. The results indicate that, besides its hypotensive and renoprotective effects, enalapril treatment also diminishes oxidative stress in the kidneys of both the SHR and SHR+L-NAME groups.

  2. Sickle Cell Anemia Patients in Use of Hydroxyurea: Association between Polymorphisms in Genes Encoding Metabolizing Drug Enzymes and Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sètondji Cocou Modeste Alexandre Yahouédéhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated associations between SNPs in genes encoding metabolizing drug enzymes and laboratory parameters in sickle cell anemia patients under hydroxyurea (SCA-HU+. We evaluated hematologic and biochemical parameters by electronic methods and SNPs by PCR-RFLP and multiplex PCR in 35 SCA-HU+ patients and 67 SCA-HU− patients. The HbS, total cholesterol, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and fractions levels, and leukocyte, eosinophil, monocyte, and erythroblast counts were reduced in SCA-HU+ patients (pA and c1c2 + c2c2 of CYP2E1 −1293G>C/−1053C>T were higher in SCA-HU+ patients (pA, CYP2E1 −1293G>C/−1053C>T, and GSTT1 can be associated with alterations in lipid, inflammatory, renal, hemolytic, and hepatic profiles. However, further studies are needed to elucidate these associations.

  3. Drug interactions with solid tumour-targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Schoemann, Audrey; Blanchet, Benoit; Bardin, Christophe; Noé, Gaëlle; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Vidal, Michel; Goldwasser, François

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are an on-going concern in the treatment of cancer, especially when targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, are being used. The emergence of elderly patients and/or patients with both cancer and other chronic co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy. Therefore, the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDI) becomes a clinically relevant issue, all the more so as TKIs and mTOR inhibitors are essentially metabolised by cytochrome P450 enzymes. These DDIs can result in variability in anticancer drug exposure, thus favouring the selection of resistant cellular clones or the occurrence of toxicity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of DDIs that involve targeted therapies approved by the FDA for the treatment of solid tumours for more than 3 years (sorafenib, sunitinib, erlotinib, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, everolimus, temsirolimus) and medicinal herb or drugs. This review also provides some guidelines to help oncologists and pharmacists in their clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with {sup 99m}Tc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.J.; Chester, K.; Sharma, S.K.; Bhatia, J.; Pedley, R.B.; Green, A.J.; Begent, R.H.J. [Cancer Research Targeting and Imaging Group, Royal Free Campus of Royal Free and University College Medical School, NW3 2PF, London (United Kingdom); Mather, S.J. [Cancer Research Dept. Nuclear Medicine, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, EC1A 7BE, London (United Kingdom); Waibel, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Science, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2004-08-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was {sup 99m}Tc-carbonyl [{sup 99m}Tc(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of {sup 99m}Tc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins. (orig.)

  5. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, R.J.; Chester, K.; Sharma, S.K.; Bhatia, J.; Pedley, R.B.; Green, A.J.; Begent, R.H.J.; Mather, S.J.; Waibel, R.

    2004-01-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99m Tc-carbonyl [ 99m Tc(H 2 O) 3 (CO) 3 ] + (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99m Tc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins. (orig.)

  6. Phthalates Are Metabolised by Primary Thyroid Cell Cultures but Have Limited Influence on Selected Thyroid Cell Functions In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Frohnert Hansen

    Full Text Available Phthalates are plasticisers added to a wide variety of products, resulting in measurable exposure of humans. They are suspected to disrupt the thyroid axis as epidemiological studies suggest an influence on the peripheral thyroid hormone concentration. The mechanism is still unknown as only few in vitro studies within this area exist. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of three phthalate diesters (di-ethyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP, di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP and two monoesters (mono-n-butyl phthalate and mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP on the differentiated function of primary human thyroid cell cultures. Also, the kinetics of phthalate metabolism were investigated. DEHP and its monoester, MEHP, both had an inhibitory influence on 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate secretion from the cells, and MEHP also on thyroglobulin (Tg secretion from the cells. Results of the lactate dehydrogenase-measurements indicated that the MEHP-mediated influence was caused by cell death. No influence on gene expression of thyroid specific genes (Tg, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodine symporter and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor by any of the investigated diesters could be demonstrated. All phthalate diesters were metabolised to the respective monoester, however with a fall in efficiency for high concentrations of the larger diesters DnBP and DEHP. In conclusion, human thyroid cells were able to metabolise phthalates but this phthalate-exposure did not appear to substantially influence selected functions of these cells.

  7. Evaluation of herb-drug interaction of a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation through high throughput cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Subrata; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Awasthi, Anshumali; Chaudhary, Anika; Banerjee, Dipankar; Bhatt, B N; Narwaria, Avinash; Singh, Rahul; Dutta, Kakoli; Jaggi, Manu; Singh, Anu T; Sharma, Neena; Katiyar, Chandra Kant

    2017-02-02

    Arishtas are Ayurvedic formulation made with decoction of herbs. Arjunarishta formulation is being used in Ayurveda for cardio-protective activity. Ashwagandharishta formulation possesses antioxidant, anti-atherosclerotic and anti-stress properties. Ridayarishta, a novel empirical formulation was prepared using combination of selected ingredients from these two formulations to support healthy heart functions and to reduce stress. Aim of the Study was to investigate herb-drug interaction (HDI) of Ridayarishta formulation through human hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme inhibition assay. Ridayarishta formulation was phyto-chemically standardized against arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis. The formulation was standardized with respect to ethanol by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. HDI was evaluated with Ridayarishta formulation and amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide glimepiride cocktail using high throughput CYP450 enzyme inhibition assay; against CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 isozymes. Contents of arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A in Ridayarishta formulation were found to be 1.76±0.12, 1.51±0.09, 1.85±0.05, 3.2±0.12, 1.21±0.08, and 2.16±0.09ppm, respectively. Quantity of ethanol in Ridayarishta was found to be 7.95±0.023% (V/V). Ridayarishta showed significantly higher (Pdrugs showed significantly (P<0.001and P<0.01) less or negligible HDI. Ridayarishta formulation alone and cocktail with amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide, glimepiride had negligible or insignificant effect on CYP450 inhibition. It may be concluded that consumption of Ridayarishta along with selective cardio protective, antihypertensive and anti-diabetic conventional medicine is safe with negligible or without any significant CYP450 (CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) inhibition mediated

  8. Summary of information on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cytochrome P450 and other drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F Peter

    2012-07-01

    The present paper is an update of data on the effects of ionizing radiation (γ-rays, X-rays, high energy UV, fast neutron) caused by environmental pollution or clinical treatments and the effects of non-ionizing radiation (low energy UV) on the expression and/or activity of drug metabolism (e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP), glutathione transferase (GST)), enzymes involved in oxidative stress (e.g., peroxidases, catalase (CAT), aconitase (ACO), superoxide dismutase (SOD)), and transporters. The data are presented in tabular form (Tables 1-3) and are a continuation of previously published summaries on the effects of drugs and other chemicals on cytochrome P450 enzymes (Rendic, S.; Di Carlo, F. Drug Metab. Rev., 1997, 29 (1-2), 413-580, Rendic, S. Drug Metab. Rev., 2002, 34 (1-2), 83- 448) and of the data on the effects of diseases and environmental factors on the expression and/or activity of human cytochrome P450 enzymes and transporters (Guengerich, F.P.; Rendic, S. Curr. Drug Metab., 2010, 11(1), 1-3, Rendic, S.; Guengerich, F.P. Curr. Drug Metab., 2010, 11 (1), 4-84). The collective information is as presented by the cited author(s) in cases where several references are cited the latest published information is included. Remarks and conclusions suggesting clinically important impacts are highlighted, followed by discussion of the major findings. The searchable database is available as an Excel file (for information about file availability contact the corresponding author).

  9. Gene-gene-environment interactions between drugs, transporters, receptors, and metabolizing enzymes: Statins, SLCO1B1, and CYP3A4 as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadee, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacogenetic biomarker tests include mostly specific single gene-drug pairs, capable of accounting for a portion of interindividual variability in drug response and toxicity. However, multiple genes are likely to contribute, either acting independently or epistatically, with the CYP2C9-VKORC1-warfarin test panel, an example of a clinically used gene-gene-dug interaction. I discuss here further instances of gene-gene-drug interactions, including a proposed dynamic effect on statin therapy by genetic variants in both a transporter (SLCO1B1) and a metabolizing enzyme (CYP3A4) in liver cells, the main target site where statins block cholesterol synthesis. These examples set a conceptual framework for developing diagnostic panels involving multiple gene-drug combinations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nonallergic hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, volume substitutes and medications used in general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurakić Toncić, Ruzica; Marinović, Branka; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria and angioedema are common allergic manifestations and medications are one of common triggering factors. The most severe immediate drug reaction is anaphylaxis. Apart from the well established IgE-mediated immediate type hypersensitivity reactions, the pathogenesis of drug-induced urticaria, angioedema and anaphylaxis often remains obscure. In this article, emphasis is put on nonallergic reactions to the most commonly used drug groups of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, radiocontrast media, volume expanders and drugs used in general anesthesia. Urticaria is the second most common drug eruption after maculopapular exanthema. The mechanisms of acute urticarial reactions are multiple, mostly IgE mediated, but some drugs can induce immune complex reactions and activate complement cascade, while others can induce direct activation of mast cells and degranulation or activation of complement by non-immune mechanisms. With different types of medications different pathomechanisms are involved. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are thought to cause reaction due to cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition and overproduction of leukotrienes, blamed for cutaneous and respiratory symptoms. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can cause fatal angioedema, which is partially explained with bradykinin excess and impairment of aminopeptidase P and dipeptidyl peptidase IV that are involved in the metabolism of substance P and bradykinin. It remains unknown what additional mechanisms are involved. Radiocontrast media and local anesthetics mostly cause nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction, but in rare cases true allergic reaction can occur. Dextran is known to cause IgG mediated, immune complex anaphylaxis and it is recommended to use human serum albumin as the safest colloid.

  11. Metabolisable protein supply to lactating dairy cows increased with increasing dry matter concentration in grass-clover silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Marianne; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of increased dry matter (DM) concentration in grass-clover silage, obtained by extending the pre-wilting period before ensiling, on the amount of metabolisable protein (MP) supplied to lactating dairy cows. Spring growth and first regrowth of grass....... Methane (CH4) production was measured the last two days in each period in open-circuit respiration chambers. Results were analysed using a linear random regression model with DM concentration as fixed effect, cow and cut number x farmer as random intercepts and with a cut number x farmer random slope...... can be improved by pre-wilting to a higher DM concentration before ensiling. Abbreviations AA, amino acids; AA-N, amino acid nitrogen; ADL, acid detergent lignin; aNDFom, neutral detergent fibre assayed with heat stable amylase and expressed exclusive of residual ash; CP, crude protein; CH4, methane...

  12. Amino acid profile of metabolisable protein in lactating dairy cows is affected by dry matter concentration in grass-clover silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Marianne; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2018-01-01

    Our previous study showed that supply of metabolisable protein (MP) to lactating dairy cows increased with increasing dry matter (DM) concentration in grass-clover silage. The aim of this study was to examine how amino acid (AA) profile of MP was affected by silage DM concentration. Eight grass-c...

  13. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  14. Validation of in vitro cell models used in drug metabolism and transport studies; genotyping of cytochrome P450, phase II enzymes and drug transporter polymorphisms in the human hepatoma (HepG2), ovarian carcinoma (IGROV-1) and colon carcinoma (CaCo-2, LS180) cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandon, Esther F.A.; Bosch, Tessa M.; Deenen, Maarten J.; Levink, Rianne; Wal, Everdina van der; Meerveld, Joyce B.M. van; Bijl, Monique; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Meijerman, Irma

    2006-01-01

    Human cell lines are often used for in vitro biotransformation and transport studies of drugs. In vivo, genetic polymorphisms have been identified in drug-metabolizing enzymes and ABC-drug transporters leading to altered enzyme activity, or a change in the inducibility of these enzymes. These genetic polymorphisms could also influence the outcome of studies using human cell lines. Therefore, the aim of our study was to pharmacogenotype four cell lines frequently used in drug metabolism and transport studies, HepG2, IGROV-1, CaCo-2 and LS180, for genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes and drug transporters. The results indicate that, despite the presence of some genetic polymorphisms, no real effects influencing the activity of metabolizing enzymes or drug transporters in the investigated cell lines are expected. However, this characterization will be an aid in the interpretation of the results of biotransformation and transport studies using these in vitro cell models

  15. Metabolisable energy consumption in the exclusively breast-fed infant aged 3--6 months from the developed world: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John J; Ashworth, Susan; Wells, Jonathan C K

    2005-07-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate evidence on metabolisable energy consumption and pattern of consumption with age in infants in the developed world who were exclusively breast-fed, at around the time of introducing complementary feeding. We carried out a systematic review aimed at answering three questions: how much milk is transferred from mother to infant?; does transfer increase with the age of the infant?; and what is the metabolisable energy content of breast milk? Thirty-three eligible studies of 1041 mother--infant pairs reported transfer at 3--4 months of age, the weighted mean transfer being 779 (SD 40) g/d. Six studies (99 pairs) measured transfer at 5 months, with a weighted mean transfer of 827 (SD 39) g/d. Five studies (72 pairs) measured milk transfer at 6 months, reporting a weighted mean transfer of 894 (SD 87) g/d. Nine longitudinal studies reported no significant increases in milk transfer after 2--4 months. Twenty-five studies on breast-milk energy content were based on 777 mother--infant pairs. The weighted mean metabolisable energy content was 2.6 (SD 0.2) kJ/g. Breast-milk metabolisable energy content is probably lower, and breast-milk transfer slightly higher, than is usually assumed. Longitudinal studies do not support the hypothesis that breast-milk transfer increases markedly with age. More research on energy intake in 5--6-month-old exclusively breast-fed infants is necessary, and information on the metabolisability of breast milk in mid-infancy is desirable. This evidence should inform future recommendations on infant feeding and help to identify research needs in infant energy balance.

  16. Rational optimization of drug-target residence time: Insights from inhibitor binding to the S. aureus FabI enzyme-product complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew; Schiebel, Johannes; Yu, Weixuan; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Pan, Pan; Baxter, Michael V.; Khanna, Avinash; Sotriffer, Christoph A.; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-target kinetics has recently emerged as an especially important facet of the drug discovery process. In particular, prolonged drug-target residence times may confer enhanced efficacy and selectivity in the open in vivo system. However, the lack of accurate kinetic and structural data for series of congeneric compounds hinders the rational design of inhibitors with decreased off-rates. Therefore, we chose the Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) - an important target for the development of new anti-staphylococcal drugs - as a model system to rationalize and optimize the drug-target residence time on a structural basis. Using our new, efficient and widely applicable mechanistically informed kinetic approach, we obtained a full characterization of saFabI inhibition by a series of 20 diphenyl ethers complemented by a collection of 9 saFabI-inhibitor crystal structures. We identified a strong correlation between the affinities of the investigated saFabI diphenyl ether inhibitors and their corresponding residence times, which can be rationalized on a structural basis. Due to its favorable interactions with the enzyme, the residence time of our most potent compound exceeds 10 hours. In addition, we found that affinity and residence time in this system can be significantly enhanced by modifications predictable by a careful consideration of catalysis. Our study provides a blueprint for investigating and prolonging drug-target kinetics and may aid in the rational design of long-residence-time inhibitors targeting the essential saFabI enzyme. PMID:23697754

  17. Significant inhibitory impact of dibenzyl trisulfide and extracts of Petiveria alliacea on the activities of major drug-metabolizing enzymes in vitro: An assessment of the potential for medicinal plant-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J; Picking, D; Lamm, A; McKenzie, J; Hartley, S; Watson, C; Williams, L; Lowe, H; Delgoda, R

    2016-06-01

    Dibenzyl trisulfide (DTS) is the major active ingredient expressed in Petiveria alliacea L., a shrub widely used for a range of conditions, such as, arthritis, asthma and cancer. Given its use alone and concomitantly with prescription medicines, we undertook to investigate its impact on the activities of important drug metabolizing enzymes, the cytochromes P450 (CYP), a key family of enzymes involved in many adverse drug reactions. DTS and seven standardized extracts from the plant were assessed for their impact on the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4 on a fluorometric assay. DTS revealed significant impact against the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4 with IC50 values of 1.9, 4.0 and 3.2μM, respectively, which are equivalent to known standard inhibitors of these enzymes (furafylline, and tranylcypromine), and the most potent interaction with CYP1A2 displayed irreversible enzyme kinetics. The root extract, drawn with 96% ethanol (containing 2.4% DTS), displayed IC50 values of 5.6, 3.9 and 4.2μg/mL respectively, against the same isoforms, CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4. These investigations identify DTS as a valuable CYP inhibitor and P. alliacea as a candidate plant worthy of clinical trials to confirm the conclusions that extracts yielding high DTS may lead to clinically relevant drug interactions, whilst extracts yielding low levels of DTS, such as aqueous extracts, are unlikely to cause adverse herb-drug interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of drug price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shiou-Huei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous study has suggested that drug price adjustments allow physicians in Taiwan to gain greater profit by prescribing generic drugs. To better understand the effect of price adjustments on physician choice, this study used renin-angiotensin drugs (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] and angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs] to examine the impact of price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on patented and off-patent drugs with the same therapeutic indication. Methods Using the Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (2005, we identified 147,157 patients received ACEIs and/or ARBs between 1997 and 2008. The annual incident and prevalent users of ACEIs, ARBs and overall renin-angiotensin drugs were examined. Box-Tiao intervention analysis was applied to assess the impact of price adjustments on monthly utilization of and expenditures on these drugs. ACEIs were divided into patented and off-patent drugs, off-patent ACEIs were further divided into original brands and generics, and subgroup analyses were performed. Results The number of incident renin-angiotensin drug users decreased over the study period. The number of prevalent ARB users increased and exceeded the cumulative number of first-time renin-angiotensin drug users starting on ARBs, implying that some patients switched from ACEIs to ARBs. After price adjustments, long term trend increases in utilization were observed for patented ACEIs and ARBs; a long-term trend decrease was observed for off-patent ACEIs; long-term trend change was not significant for overall renin-angiotensin drugs. Significant long-term trend increases in expenditures were observed for patented ACEIs after price adjustment in 2007 (200.9%, p = 0.0088 and in ARBs after price adjustments in 2001 (173.4%, p  Conclusions Price adjustments did not achieve long-term cost savings for overall renin-angiotensin drugs. Possible switching from ACEIs to ARBs

  19. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  20. The conduct of in vitro studies to address time-dependent inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes: a perspective of the pharmaceutical research and manufacturers of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Scott W; Einolf, Heidi J; Hall, Steven D; He, Kan; Lim, Heng-Keang; Ling, Kah-Hiing John; Lu, Chuang; Nomeir, Amin A; Seibert, Eleanore; Skordos, Konstantine W; Tonn, George R; Van Horn, Robert; Wang, Regina W; Wong, Y Nancy; Yang, Tian J; Obach, R Scott

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes caused by new molecular entities (NMEs) is of concern because such compounds can be responsible for clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDI). Although the biochemistry underlying mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of P450 enzymes has been generally understood for several years, significant advances have been made only in the past few years regarding how in vitro time-dependent inhibition data can be used to understand and predict clinical DDI. In this article, a team of scientists from 16 pharmaceutical research organizations that are member companies of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America offer a discussion of the phenomenon of TDI with emphasis on the laboratory methods used in its measurement. Results of an anonymous survey regarding pharmaceutical industry practices and strategies around TDI are reported. Specific topics that still possess a high degree of uncertainty are raised, such as parameter estimates needed to make predictions of DDI magnitude from in vitro inactivation parameters. A description of follow-up mechanistic experiments that can be done to characterize TDI are described. A consensus recommendation regarding common practices to address TDI is included, the salient points of which include the use of a tiered approach wherein abbreviated assays are first used to determine whether NMEs demonstrate TDI or not, followed by more thorough inactivation studies for those that do to define the parameters needed for prediction of DDI.

  1. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  2. Prediction of digestible and metabolisable energy in soybean meals produced from soybeans of different origins fed to growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongchao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Guo, Panpan; Liu, Ling; Piao, Xiangshu; Stein, Hans H; Li, Defa; Lai, Changhua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the digestible energy (DE) and metabolisable energy (ME) in 22 sources of soybean meal (SBM) produced from soybeans from different countries and subsequently to establish equations for predicting the DE and ME in SBM based on their chemical composition. The 22 sources of SBM were all processed in Chinese crushing plants, but the soybeans used originated from China (n=6), the US (n=6), Brazil (n=7) or Argentina (n=3). The basal diet was a corn-based diet and 22 additional diets were formulated by mixing corn and 24.3% of each source of SBM. The average DE and ME in SBM from China, the US, Brazil and Argentina were 15.73, 15.93, 15.64 and 15.90 MJ/kg and 15.10, 15.31, 14.97 and 15.42 MJ/kg, respectively, and no differences among countries were observed. From a stepwise regression analysis, a series of DE and ME prediction equations were generated. The best-fit equations for SBM were DE=38.44-0.43 crude fibre -0.98 gross energy +0.11 acid detergent fibre (R2=0.67, pprotein (R2=0.79, psoybean sources used in this experiment. The DE and ME of SBM of different origin can be predicted based on their chemical composition when fed to growing pigs.

  3. Frequent epigenetic silencing of the folate-metabolising gene cystathionine-beta-synthase in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhao

    Full Text Available Both gastric and colorectal cancers (CRC are the most frequently occurring malignancies worldwide with the overall survival of these patients remains unsatisfied. Identification of tumor suppressor genes (TSG silenced by promoter CpG methylation uncovers mechanisms of tumorigenesis and identifies new epigenetic biomarkers for early cancer detection and prognosis assessment. Cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS functions in the folate metabolism pathway, which is intricately linked to methylation of genomic DNA. Dysregulation of DNA methylation contributes substantially to cancer development.To identify potential TSGs silenced by aberrant promoter methylation in CRC, we analyzed tumor and adjacent tissues from CRC cases using the Illumina Human Methylation45 BeadChip. We identified hypermethylation of the CBS gene in CRC samples, compared to adjacent tissues. Methylation and decreased mRNA expression of CBS were detected in most CRC cell lines by methylation-specific PCR and semiquantitative RT-PCR, as well as in gastric cancer. Treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or trichostatin A reversed methylation and restored CBS mRNA expression indicating a direct effect. Aberrant methylation was further detected in 31% of primary CRCs (29 of 96 and 55% of gastric tumors (11 of 20. In contrast, methylation was seldom found in normal tissues adjacent to the tumor. CBS methylation was associated with KRAS mutations in primary CRCs (P = 0.04, by χ(2-test. However, no association was found between CBS methylation or KRAS mutations with cancer relapse/metastasis in Stage II CRC patients.A novel finding from this study is that the folate metabolism enzyme CBS mRNA levels are frequently downregulated through CpG methylation of the CBS gene in gastric cancer and CRC, suggesting that CBS functions as a tumor suppressor gene. These findings warrant further study of CBS as an epigenetic biomarker for molecular diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers.

  4. Compared effect of immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporine A and rapamycin on cholesterol homeostasis key enzymes CYP27A1 and HMG-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Yann; Ferrari, Luc; Souidi, Maâmar; Batt, Anne-Marie; Lutton, Claude; Siest, Gérard; Visvikis, Sophie

    2007-06-01

    Hyperlipidaemia, i.e. increase in total cholesterol and triglycerides, is a common side-effect of the immunosuppressive drugs rapamycin (RAPA) and cyclosporine A (CsA), and is probably related to inhibition of the 27-hydroxylation of cholesterol (acid pathway of bile acid biosynthesis). This might be one of the causes for the increase in plasma cholesterol, as 27-hydroxycholesterol is a potent suppressor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), a key enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. As the sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) inhibition by CsA is well known, we evaluated the effect of another immunosuppressive drug, RAPA, on this enzyme in HepG2 mitochondria, which confirmed the dose-dependent inhibition of mitochondrial CYP27A1 by cyclosporine (10-20 microM), while the inhibition by RAPA required a higher dose (50-100 microM). Corresponding K(i) was 10 microM for CsA (non-competitive inhibition) and 110 microM for RAPA (competitive inhibition). Cotreatment with both immunosuppressive drugs showed an additive inhibitory effect on CYP27A1 activity. Later, we analysed the effect of these immunosuppressants on HMGR expression in HepG2 cells, and a dose-dependent up-regulation of HMGR gene expression was observed. The results suggest that RAPA and CsA are both inhibitors of CYP27A1 activity with slightly different mechanisms and that they may accordingly increase HMGR expression.

  5. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártíková, H.; Skálová, L.; Stuchlíková, L.; Vokřál, I.; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2015), s. 374-387 ISSN 0360-2532 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05325S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Pollutants * phytoremediation * drug phytotoxicity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.526, year: 2015 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/03602532.2015.1076437

  6. The EBI enzyme portal

    OpenAIRE

    Alc?ntara, Rafael; Onwubiko, Joseph; Cao, Hong; de Matos, Paula; Cham, Jennifer A.; Jacobsen, Jules; Holliday, Gemma L.; Fischer, Julia D.; Rahman, Syed Asad; Jassal, Bijay; Goujon, Mikael; Rowland, Francis; Velankar, Sameer; L?pez, Rodrigo; Overington, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of comprehensive information about enzymes plays an important role in answering questions relevant to interdisciplinary fields such as biochemistry, enzymology, biofuels, bioengineering and drug discovery. At the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute, we have developed an enzyme portal (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/enzymeportal) to provide this wealth of information on enzymes from multiple in-house resources addressing particular data classes: protein sequence and structure, reacti...

  7. Consumption of poisonous plants (Senecio jacobaea, Symphytum officinale, Pteridium aquilinum, Hypericum perforatum) by rats: chronic toxicity, mineral metabolism, and hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, B J; Cheeke, P R; Miranda, C L; Goeger, D E; Buhler, D R

    1982-02-01

    Effect of dietary tancy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea), comfrey (Symphytum officinale), bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes in rats were measured. Tansy ragwort and bracken increased (P less than 0.05) the activity of glutathione transferase and epoxide hydrolase. Comfrey and alfalfa increased (P less than 0.05) the activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase. Feeding bracken or St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in conjunction with tansy ragwort did not influence chronic toxicity of tansy ragwort as assessed by rat survival time. Dietary tansy ragwort resulted in increased (P less than 0.05) hepatic copper levels; the other plants did not affect copper levels. The results do not suggest any major interaction in the toxicity of tansy ragwort with bracken or St. John's wort.

  8. Old Yellow Enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi Exhibits In Vivo Prostaglandin F2α Synthase Activity and Has a Key Role in Parasite Infection and Drug Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Díaz-Viraqué

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that trypanosomatids, unicellular organisms of the order Kinetoplastida, are capable of synthesizing prostaglandins raised questions about the role of these molecules during parasitic infections. Multiple studies indicate that prostaglandins could be related to the infection processes and pathogenesis in trypanosomatids. This work aimed to unveil the role of the prostaglandin F2α synthase TcOYE in the establishment of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, the causative agent of Chagas disease. This chronic disease affects several million people in Latin America causing high morbidity and mortality. Here, we propose a prokaryotic evolutionary origin for TcOYE, and then we used in vitro and in vivo experiments to show that T. cruzi prostaglandin F2α synthase plays an important role in modulating the infection process. TcOYE overexpressing parasites were less able to complete the infective cycle in cell culture infections and increased cardiac tissue parasitic load in infected mice. Additionally, parasites overexpressing the enzyme increased PGF2α synthesis from arachidonic acid. Finally, an increase in benznidazole and nifurtimox susceptibility in TcOYE overexpressing parasites showed its participation in activating the currently anti-chagasic drugs, which added to its observed ability to confer resistance to hydrogen peroxide, highlights the relevance of this enzyme in multiple events including host–parasite interaction.

  9. Drug-Induced Inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme and Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Results in Nearly Therapy Resistant Bradykinin Induced Angioedema: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Janina; Trainotti, Susanne; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Greve, Jens

    2017-05-25

    BACKGROUND Bradykinin is an underestimated mediator of angioedema. One subgroup of bradykinin induced angioedema is angioedema triggered by treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Due to its localization in the head and neck region and its unpredictable course, it is a possibly life-threatening condition. There is not an officially approved treatment for ACE inhibitor induced angioedema. CASE REPORT We present a case of an 83-year-old woman, who presented to our ENT department because of acute swelling of the tongue. On admission, there was no pharyngeal or laryngeal edema and no dyspnea. Treatment with glucocorticoids and antihistamines had no response. The patient had ramipril as regular medication, so we assumed ACE inhibitor induced angioedema and treated consequently with C1-inhibitor (human) 1,500 IU. Nevertheless, swelling was progressive and required intubation. Even after the second specific treatment with icatibant, her angioedema subsided extremely slowly. The patient also had regular treatment with saxagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, so we assumed that the simultaneous inhibition of two bradykinin degrading enzymes led to a treatment-refractory course of angioedema. CONCLUSIONS General awareness for bradykinin induced angioedema due to regular medication is limited. Our case demonstrated the importance of improving awareness and knowledge about this side effect. We need a better understanding of the pathomechanism to aid in more precise clinical diagnosis. Securing the patient's airway as well as administration of an officially approved therapy is of utmost importance. As the number of patients simultaneously treated with antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs is likely to increase, the incidence of bradykinin mediated drug induced angioedema is likely to increase as well.

  10. X-ray Crystallographic Study of the Drug Target Phosphoglycerate Mutase from Leishmania mexicana, A Cobalt-dependent Enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poolpem, Buabal; Fortergill-gillmor, Linda; Michel, Poul; Wallkinchow, Malcolm

    2005-10-01

    Crystal structures of Leishmania mexicana iPGAM show a mixture of substrate (3PGA) and product (2PGA) in the active sites which occupy essentially the same position. Lm iPGAM requires Co 2 + ions as cofactors, but not Mn 2 + or Zn 2 +. Comparison of Lm iPGAM and the well-defined structure of Bacillus stearothermophilus iPGAM that requires Mn 2 + shows that the metal requirement of iPGAMs can be discriminated by the existence of an extra residue at Tyr210 (Lm) that causes His360 to adopt a position where it can form a H-bond with the phospho group of the substrate/product. These changes in active site structure cause differences in the active site preferences of each of the iPGAMs from both organisms for particular metals. Metal reactivation experiments show that manganese inhibits Lm iPGAM, whereas the zinc inhibitory effect is unclear. Manganese or zinc substitutions in both metal sites cause changes in metal geometry leading to loss of enzyme activity

  11. Antithyroid drug detection using an enzyme cascade blocking in a nanoparticle-based lab-on-a-chip system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Rivas, Lourdes; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-05-15

    A methimazole (MT) biosensor based on a nanocomposite of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with iridium oxide nanoparticles (IrOx NPs) and tyrosinase (Tyr) immobilized onto screen printed electrode (SPE) by using a permanent magnet is presented. This system is evaluated in batch mode via chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and in flow mode by thioquinone formation. The MT detection in flow mode is achieved using a hybrid polydimethylsiloxane/polyester amperometric lab-on-a-chip (LOC) microsystem with an integrated SPE. Both systems are very sensitive with low limit of detection (LOD): 0.006 μM and 0.004 μM for batch and flow modes, respectively. Nevertheless, the flow mode has advantages such as its reusability, automation, low sample volume (6 μL), and fast response (20 s). Optimization and validation parameters such as enzyme-substrate amount, flow rate, inhibition conditions, repeatability and reproducibility of the biosensor have been performed. The proposed methods have been applied in MT detection in spiked human serum and pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of cigarette smoking and liver enzymes polymorphisms in anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; Monteiro, Sérgio P; El-Jaick, Kênia B; Rosadas, Leonardo A; Costa, Marli J M; Quintana, Marcel S B; de Castro, Liane

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major health concern and side-effects related to the treatment, especially drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH), should be better investigated. In the present study, a possible association between anti-TB DIH and cigarette smoking, N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2), Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) genotypes was studied in 131 TB Brazilian patients. The NAT2 and CYP3A4 genetic polymorphisms were determined using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) direct sequencing approach and genetic polymorphisms of CYP2E1 gene were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The risk of anti-TB DIH was lower in rapid/intermediate acetylators when compared to slow acetylators (OR: 0.34, CI 95: 0.16-0.71; p < 0.01). A decreased risk of developing anti-TB DIH was also observed in active smokers when compared to non-smokers (OR: 0.28, 95 CI: 0.11-0.64; p < 0.01). Significant association between CYP3A4 genotypes and hepatotoxicity was not observed, as well as between CYP2E1 genotype and hepatotoxicity, whose frequency of patients with wild homozygous was more prevalent. The anti-TB drugs interactions with smoking on hepatotoxicity, as well as the NAT2 phenotype, may require to adjust therapeutic regimen dosages or alarm in case of adverse event developments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and Validation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Binding Anti-Drug Antibodies against Interferon Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Ingenhoven

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo develop and validate a method for the detection of binding anti-drug antibodies (ADAs against interferon beta (IFN-β in human serum as part of a European initiative (ABIRISK aimed at the prediction and analysis of clinical relevance of anti-biopharmaceutical immunization to minimize the risk.MethodA two-tiered bridging enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format was selected and validated according to current recommendations. Screening assay: ADA in serum samples form complexes with immobilized IFN-β and biotinylated IFN-β, which are then detected using HRP labeled Streptavidin and TMB substrate. Confirmation assay: Screen “putative positive” samples are tested in the presence of excess drug (preincubation of sera with 0.3 µg/mL of soluble IFN-β and percentage of inhibition is calculated.ResultsThe assay is precise, and the sensitivity of the assay was confirmed to be 26 ng/mL using commercially available polyclonal rabbit antihuman IFN-β in human sera as the positive control.ConclusionAn ultrasensitive ELISA for IFN-β-binding ADA testing has been validated. This will form the basis to assess anti-biopharmaceutical immunization toward IFN-β with regards to its clinical relevance and may allow for the development of predictive tools, key aims within the ABIRISK consortium.

  14. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Drug metabolism may be defined as the biochemical modifica- tion of one chemical form to another, occurring usually through ..... Endogenous. Enzyme. Drugs. Cofactor. Glucuronidation. UDP glucoronic. UDP-. Chloramphenicol, acid glucuronosyltransferase morphine, paracetamol, salicylic acid, fenoprofen, desipramine,.

  15. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  16. Twice-daily dosing of esomeprazole effectively inhibits acid secretion in CYP2C19 rapid metabolisers compared with twice-daily omeprazole, rabeprazole or lansoprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, S; Sugimoto, M; Uotani, T; Ichikawa, H; Yamade, M; Iwaizumi, M; Yamada, T; Osawa, S; Sugimoto, K; Umemura, K; Miyajima, H; Furuta, T

    2013-11-01

    Twice-daily dosing of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is used to treat Helicobacter pylori or acid-related diseases, such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) refractory to standard dose of a PPI. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C19 are involved to different extents in the metabolism of four kinds of PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole) available in Japan. To compare acid-inhibitory effects of the four PPIs dosed twice daily in relation to CYP2C19 genotype. We performed 24-h pH monitoring studies on Day 7 of PPI treatment for 40 Japanese H. pylori-negative volunteers [15 CYP2C19 rapid metabolisers (RMs), 15 intermediate metabolisers (IMs) and 10 poor metabolisers (PMs)] using a randomised four-way crossover design: omeprazole 20 mg, esomeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg and rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily. Although median pH values with esomeprazole, omeprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole were 5.7 (3.5-7.2), 5.5 (2.4-7.2), 5.5 (3.7-7.3) and 5.2 (2.5-7.3), respectively (no statistically significant differences), CYP2C19 genotype-dependent differences were smaller for esomeprazole and rabeprazole compared with values for omeprazole and lansoprazole. In CYP2C19 RMs, the median pH with esomeprazole [5.4 (3.5-6.8)] was significantly higher than those with omeprazole [5.0 (2.4-5.9), P = 0.018], lansoprazole [4.7 (3.7-5.5), P = 0.017] or rabeprazole [4.8 (2.5-6.4), P = 0.002]. In IMs and PMs, the median pH was >5.0 independent of the PPI. In intermediate and rapid metabolisers of CYP2C19, PPIs dosed twice daily could attain sufficient acid suppression, while in CYP2C19 RMs, esomeprazole 20 mg twice daily caused the strongest inhibition of the four PPIs. Therefore, esomeprazole may be effective in Japanese population when dosed twice daily. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Complex Drug-Drug Interactions Between Repaglinide and Cyclosporin A/Gemfibrozil Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models With In Vitro Transporter/Enzyme Inhibition Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Toshimoto, Kota; Yao, Yoshiaki; Yoshikado, Takashi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of transporter- and enzyme-mediated complex drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is challenging. Repaglinide (RPG) is transported into the liver by OATP1B1 and then is metabolized by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4. The purpose of this study was to describe the complex DDIs of RPG quantitatively based on unified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models using in vitro K i values for OATP1B1, CYP3A4, and CYP2C8. Cyclosporin A (CsA) or gemfibrozil (GEM) increased the blood concentrations of RPG. The time profiles of RPG and the inhibitors were analyzed by PBPK models, considering the inhibition of OATP1B1 and CYP3A4 by CsA or OATP1B1 inhibition by GEM and its glucuronide and the mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8 by GEM glucuronide. RPG-CsA interaction was closely predicted using a reported in vitro K i,OATP1B1 value in the presence of CsA preincubation. RPG-GEM interaction was underestimated compared with observed data, but the simulation was improved with the increase of f m,CYP2C8 . These results based on in vitro K i values for transport and metabolism suggest the possibility of a bottom-up approach with in vitro inhibition data for the prediction of complex DDIs using unified PBPK models and in vitro f m value of a substrate for multiple enzymes should be considered carefully for the prediction. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Chemistry of Drug Metabolism. Drug metabolism is a chemical process, where enzymes play a crucial role in the conversion of one chemical species to another. The major family of enzymes associated with these metabolic reactions is the cytochrome P450 family. The structural features and functional activity of these ...

  19. Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR) Analysis of Drug-Metabolizing Enzyme-Encoding Gene Polymorphisms may Predict Treatment Outcomes in Indian Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Gaurav; Tulsyan, Sonam; Lal, Punita; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of response and toxicity of chemotherapy can help personalize the treatment and choose effective yet non-toxic treatment regimen for a breast cancer patient. Interplay of variations in various drug-metabolizing enzyme (DME)-encoding genes results in variable response and toxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. Generalized multi-analytical (GMDR) approach was used to determine the influence of the combination of variants of genes encoding phase 0 (SLC22A16); phase I (CYP450, NQO1); phase II (GSTs, MTHFR, UGT2B15); and phase III (ABCB1) DMEs along with confounding factors on the response and toxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs in breast cancer patients. In an Indian breast cancer patient cohort (n = 234), response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 111) and grade 2-4 toxicity to chemotherapy were recorded. Patients were genotyped for 19 polymorphisms selected in four phases of DMEs by PCR or PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Binary logistic regression and GMDR analysis was performed. Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons was applied, and p value was considered to be significant at T polymorphism, CT genotype was found to be significantly associated with response to NACT in uni-variate and multi-variate analysis (p = 0.018; p = 0.013). The TT genotype of NQO1 609C>T had a significant association with (absence of) grade 2-4 toxicity in uni-variate analysis (p = 0.021), but a non-significant correlation in multi-variate analysis. In GMDR analysis, interaction of CYP3A5*3, NQO1 609C>T, and ABCB1 1236C>T polymorphisms yielded the highest testing accuracy for response to NACT (CVT = 0.62). However, for grade 2-4 toxicity, CYP2C19*2 and ABCB1 3435C>T polymorphisms yielded the best interaction model (CVT = 0.57). This pharmacogenetic study suggests a role of higher order gene-gene interaction of DME-encoding genes, along with confounding factors, in determination of treatment outcomes and toxicity in breast cancer patients. This can be

  20. Concurrent subacute exposure to arsenic through drinking water and malathion via diet in male rats: effects on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naraharisetti, Suresh Babu [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh (India); University of Washington, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Seattle, WA (United States); Aggarwal, Manoj [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh (India); Institut fuer Arbeitsphysiologie an der Universitaet Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Sarkar, S.N.; Malik, J.K. [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2008-08-15

    Arsenic is a known global groundwater contaminant, while malathion is one of the most widely used pesticides in agriculture and public health practices in the world. Here, we investigated whether repeated exposure to arsenic at the groundwater contamination levels and to malathion at sublethal levels exerts adverse effects on the hepatic drug-metabolizing system in rats, and whether concurrent exposure is more hazardous than the single agent. Male Wistar rats were exposed daily to 4 or 40 ppm of arsenic via drinking water, 50 or 500 ppm of malathion-mixed feed and in a similar fashion co-exposed to 4 ppm of arsenic and 50 ppm of malathion or 40 ppm of arsenic and 500 ppm of malathion for 28 days. At term, toxicity was assessed by evaluating changes in body weight, liver weight, levels of cytochrome P{sub 450} (CYP), cytochrome b{sub 5} and microsomal and cytosolic proteins, and activities of aminopyrine-N-demethylase (ANDM), aniline-P-hydroxylase (APH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) in liver. Arsenic and malathion alone did not alter body weight and liver weight, but these were significantly decreased in both the co-exposed groups. These treatments decreased the activities of ANDM and APH and the levels of liver microsomal and cytosolic proteins, increased GST activity and had no effect on UGT activity. The effects of exposure to low-dose and high-dose combinations on the activities of either phase I or phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes and protein content were mostly similar to that produced by the respective low and high dose of either arsenic or malathion, except APH activity. The effect of arsenic (40 ppm) on APH activity was partially, but significantly, inhibited by malathion (500 ppm). Results indicate that the body or liver weights and the biochemical parameters were differentially affected in male rats following concurrent subacute exposure to arsenic and malathion, with the co-exposure appearing

  1. Carbon dots for fluorescent detection of α-glucosidase activity using enzyme activated inner filter effect and its application to anti-diabetic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiheng [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Di [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xia, Lian [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Chen, Xuefeng [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Li, Guoliang, E-mail: 61254368@163.com [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Qiu, Nannan [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Recently, α-glucosidase inhibitor has been widely used in clinic for diabetic therapy. In the present study, a facile and sensitive fluorescent assay based on enzyme activated inner filter effect (IFE) on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) was first developed for the detection of α-glucosidase. The N-doped CDs with green emission were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 30%, which were used as the signal output. Through α-glucosidase catalysis, 4-nitrophenol was released from 4-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (NGP). Interestingly, the absorption of 4-nitrophenol and the excitation of CDs were completely overlapping. Due to its great molar absorptivity, 4-nitrophenol was capable of acting as a powerful absorber to affect the fluorescent signal of CDs (i.e. IFE). By converting the absorption signals into fluorescence signals, the facile fluorescence assay strategy could be realized for α-glucosidase activity sensing, which effectively avoided the complex modification of the surface of CDs or construction of the nanoprobes. The established IFE-based sensing platform offered a low detection limit of 0.01 U/mL (S/N = 3). This proposed sensing approach has also been expanded to the inhibitor screening and showed excellent applicability. As a typical α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose was investigated with a low detection limit of 10{sup −8} M. This developed method enjoyed many merits including simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and excellent selectivity, which also provided a new insight on the application of CDs to develop the facile and sensitive biosensor. - Highlights: • Green N-doped CDs were first prepared by a facile synthesis process. • IFE-based sensor without covalent linking or surface modifications was developed. • The method was successfully applied to α-glucosidase detection. • The method can be employed for sensitive screening of anti-diabetes drugs.

  2. An investigation of the concomitant use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucsa, C; Moga, D C; Farcas, A; Mogosan, C; Dumitrascu, D L

    2015-08-01

    To determine in retrospective data the prevalence at hospital discharge of co-prescribing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and ACE-I/NSAIDs and diuretics and to identify factors associated with the co-prescription. Secondary, we evaluated the extent of serum creatinine and potassium monitoring in patients treated with ACE-I and these associations and determined the prevalence of values above the upper normal limit (UNL) in monitored patients. Hospitalized patients with ACE-I in their therapy at discharge were included in 3 groups as follows: ACE-I, DT (double therapy with ACE-I and NSAIDs) and TT (triple therapy with ACE-I, NSAIDs and diuretics) groups. We evaluated differences on demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, medications, laboratory monitoring and quantified the patients with serum creatinine and potassium levels above the UNL using descriptive statistics. Logistic regression analysis with backward elimination was performed to identify significant predictors of combination therapy. Of 9960 admitted patients, 1214 were prescribed ACE-I, 40 were prescribed ACE-I/NSAIDs and 22 were prescribed ACE-I/NSAIDs/diuretics (3.13% and 1.72%, respectively, of the patients prescribed with ACE-I). Serum creatinine and potassium were monitored for the great majority of patients from all groups. The highest percentage of hyperkalemia was found in the DT group (10% of the patients) and of serum creatinine above UNL in the TT group (45.45%). The logistic regression final model showed that younger patients and monitoring for potassium were significantly associated with combination therapy. The prevalence of patients receiving DT/TT was relatively low and their monitoring during hospitalization was high. Factors associated with the combinations were younger patients and patients not tested for serum potassium.

  3. Dietary diacetylene falcarindiol induces phase 2 drug-metabolizing enzymes and blocks carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice through suppression of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Anan, Eisaburo; Hoashi, Rika; Takeda, Yuika; Nishiyama, Takahito; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Falcarindiol is a diacetylenic natural product containing unique carbon-carbon triple bonds. Mice were orally administrated falcarindiol (100 mg/kg), and drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes were monitored in several tissues of mice. Treatment with falcarindiol was found to increase glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 activities in liver, small intestine, kidney, and lung. No changes were observed in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A known to activate procarcinogens. Western blot analysis revealed that various GST subunits including GSTA4, which plays an important role in the detoxification of alkenals produced from lipid peroxides, were induced in liver, small intestine, and kidney of falcarindiol-treated mice. Additionally, we investigated the protective effects of falcarindiol against hepatotoxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and the mechanism of its hepatoprotective effect. Pretreatment with falcarindiol prior to the administration of CCl(4) significantly suppressed both an increase in serum alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase (ALT/AST) activity and an increase in hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels without affecting CCl(4)-mediated degradation of CYP2E1. Formation of hexanoyl-lysine and 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal-histidine adducts, lipid peroxidation biomarkers, in homogenates from the liver of CCl(4)-treated mice was decreased in the group of mice pretreated with falcarindiol. These results suggest that the protective effects of falcarindiol against CCl(4) toxicity might, in part, be explained by anti-lipid peroxidation activity associated with the induction of the GSTs including GSTA4.

  4. Continuous-Flow Applications of Silica-Encapsulated Enzymes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luckarift, Heather R; Johnson, Glenn R; Tomczak, Melanie M; Naik, Rajesh R; Spain, Jim C

    2006-01-01

    .... The enzyme/inorganic nanocomposites exhibit excellent mechanical stability and provide an effective method for developing immobilized enzyme reactors, applicable to biocatalysis, biosensors and drug discovery...

  5. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), other catecholamine-related enzymes, and their human genes in relation to the drug and gene therapies of Parkinson's disease (PD): historical overview and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Nagatsu, Ikuko

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which was discovered at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1964, is a tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-requiring monooxygenase that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamines (CAs), such as dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline. Since deficiencies of dopamine and noradrenaline in the brain stem, caused by neurodegeneration of dopamine and noradrenaline neurons, are mainly related to non-motor and motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), we have studied human CA-synthesizing enzymes [TH; BH4-related enzymes, especially GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GCH1); aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC); dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH); and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)] and their genes in relation to PD in postmortem brains from PD patients, patients with CA-related genetic diseases, mice with genetically engineered CA neurons, and animal models of PD. We purified all human CA-synthesizing enzymes, produced their antibodies for immunohistochemistry and immunoassay, and cloned all human genes, especially the human TH gene and the human gene for GCH1, which synthesizes BH4 as a cofactor of TH. This review discusses the historical overview of TH, BH4-, and other CA-related enzymes and their genes in relation to the pathophysiology of PD, the development of drugs, such as L-DOPA, and future prospects for drug and gene therapy for PD, especially the potential of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  6. Concurrent use of diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of acute kidney injury: nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Francesco; Azoulay, Laurent; Yin, Hui; Nessim, Sharon J; Suissa, Samy

    2013-01-08

    To assess whether a double therapy combination consisting of diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers with addition of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the triple therapy combination of two of the aforementioned antihypertensive drugs to which NSAIDs are added are associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury. Retrospective cohort study using nested case-control analysis. General practices contributing data to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Hospital Episodes Statistics database. A cohort of 487,372 users of antihypertensive drugs. Rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals of acute kidney injury associated with current use of double and triple therapy combinations of antihypertensive drugs with NSAIDs. During a mean follow-up of 5.9 (SD 3.4) years, 2215 cases of acute kidney injury were identified (incidence rate 7/10,000 person years). Overall, current use of a double therapy combination containing either diuretics or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers with NSAIDs was not associated with an increased rate of acute kidney injury. In contrast, current use of a triple therapy combination was associated with an increased rate of acute kidney injury (rate ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.53). In secondary analyses, the highest risk was observed in the first 30 days of use (rate ratio 1.82, 1.35 to 2.46). A triple therapy combination consisting of diuretics with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury. The risk was greatest at the start of treatment. Although antihypertensive drugs have cardiovascular benefits, vigilance may be warranted when they are used concurrently with NSAIDs.

  7. Effects of the K65R and K65R/M184V reverse transcriptase mutations in subtype C HIV on enzyme function and drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutsinos Dimitrios

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of mutations K65R and K65R plus M184V on enzymatic function and mechanisms of drug resistance in subtype C reverse transcriptase (RT. Methods Recombinant subtype C HIV-1 RTs containing K65R or K65R+M184V were purified from Escherichia coli. Enzyme activities and tenofovir (TFV incorporation efficiency by wild-type (WT and mutant RTs of both subtypes were determined in cell-free assays. Efficiency of (- ssDNA synthesis and initiation by subtype C RTs was measured using gel-based assays with HIV-1 PBS RNA template and tRNA3Lys as primer. Single-cycle processivity was assayed under variable dNTP concentrations. Steady-state analysis was performed to measure the relative inhibitory capacity (ki/km of TFV-disphosphate (TFV-DP. ATP-dependent excision and rescue of TFV-or ZDV-terminated DNA synthesis was monitored in time-course experiments. Results The efficiency of tRNA-primed (-ssDNA synthesis by subtype C RTs was: WT > K65R > K65R+M184V RT. At low dNTP concentration, K65R RT exhibited lower activity in single-cycle processivity assays while the K65R+M184V mutant showed diminished processivity independent of dNTP concentration. ATP-mediated excision of TFV-or ZDV-terminated primer was decreased for K65R and for K65R+M184V RT compared to WT RT. K65R and K65R+M184V displayed 9.8-and 5-fold increases in IC50 for TFV-DP compared to WT RT. The Ki/Km of TFV was increased by 4.1-and 7.2-fold, respectively, for K65R and K65R+M184V compared to WT RT. Conclusion The diminished initiation efficiency of K65R-containing RTs at low dNTP concentrations have been confirmed for subtype C as well as subtype B. Despite decreased excision, this decreased binding/incorporation results in diminished susceptibility of K65R and K65R+M184 RT to TFV-DP.

  8. Effects of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate on serum lipids in patients with partial-onset seizures: Impact of concomitant statins and enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzer, Scott; Wechsler, Robert T; Rogin, Joanne B; Gidal, Barry E; Schwab, Matthias; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Carreño, Mar; da Silva, Patrício Soares; Moreira, Joana; Li, Yan; Blum, David; Grinnell, Todd

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) on lipid metabolism and to determine whether reduced statin exposure during ESL therapy has clinical consequences. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of pooled data for serum lipids (laboratory values) from three phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive ESL therapy (400, 800, or 1200 mg once daily) in patients with treatment-refractory partial-onset seizures. Changes from baseline in serum lipid levels were analyzed according to use of statins and/or enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) during the baseline period. In total, 426 and 1021 placebo- and ESL-treated patients, respectively, were included in the analysis. With regard to the changes from baseline in serum concentrations, there were statistically significant differences between the placebo and ESL 1200 mg QD groups, for both total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), but the effect sizes were small (+4.1 mg/dL and +1.8 mg/dL, respectively). A small but significant difference in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; -5.0 mg/dL) was observed between the ESL 400 mg QD group and the placebo group. In patients not taking a concomitant EIAED, there were no changes with ESL 400 mg QD, but modest and statistically significant increases in cholesterol fractions (TC, LDL-C and HDL-C) with ESL 800 mg QD (ESL 1200 mg QD (ESL had no consistent effect on lipids in patients taking a concomitant EIAED. In patients taking statins during baseline, there were no clinically relevant changes in serum lipids during use of ESL, although the subgroups were small. These results suggest that ESL does not appear to have clinically significant effects on serum lipids, nor does the pharmacokinetic interaction between ESL and statins have an impact on serum lipid concentrations. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  10. Hydrochlorothiazide increases plasma or tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor drug levels in rats with myocardial infarction : Differential effects on lisinopril and zofenopril

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, B; Schoemaker, RG; van Gilst, WH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Buikema, H

    2005-01-01

    Sodium depletion with diuretics augments the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor therapy for hypertension and renal dysfunction, and possibly for left ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction. Underlying mechanisms may involve altered angiotensin-converting

  11. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodelius, P E

    1991-02-01

    The past year or so has seen the development of new enzyme assays, as well as the improvement of existing ones. Assays are becoming more rapid and sensitive as a result of modifications such as amplification of the enzyme product(s). Recombinant DNA technology is now being recognized as a particularly useful tool in the search for improved assay systems.

  12. Induction of antioxidant and phase 2 drug-metabolizing enzymes by falcarindiol isolated from Notopterygium incisum extract, which activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway, leads to cytoprotection against oxidative and electrophilic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Komatsu, Takao; Nakayama, Shinji; Nishiyama, Takahito; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2009-08-01

    In the present study, we isolated falcarindiol from Notopterygium incisum and investigated the effect of falcarindiol on the expression of antioxidant enzymes (AOEs), such as catalase, and phase 2 drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), such as glutathione S-transferase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, in a cultured cell line from normal rat liver, Clone 9 cells. Exposure of Clone 9 cells to falcarindiol resulted in the significant induction of AOEs and phase 2 DMEs. Western blot analysis and transfection studies using a luciferase reporter construct demonstrated that the induction of AOEs and phase 2 DMEs by falcarindiol was caused through the Nrf2/ARE (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element) pathway. Pretreatment of cells with falcarindiol accelerated the detoxification of a potentially toxic quinone (menadione) and mitigated menadione-induced cytotoxicity. We found that falcarindiol was a novel inducer of AOEs and phase 2 DMEs and falcarindiol might exhibit chemopreventive activity.

  13. Megazol and its bioisostere 4H-1,2,4-triazole: comparing the trypanocidal, cytotoxic and genotoxic activities and their in vitro and in silico interactions with the Trypanosoma brucei nitroreductase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Silva de Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Megazol (7 is a 5-nitroimidazole that is highly active against Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, as well as drug-resistant forms of trypanosomiasis. Compound 7 is not used clinically due to its mutagenic and genotoxic properties, but has been largely used as a lead compound. Here, we compared the activity of 7 with its 4H-1,2,4-triazole bioisostere (8 in bloodstream forms of T. brucei and T. cruzi and evaluated their activation by T. brucei type I nitroreductase (TbNTR enzyme. We also analysed the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these compounds in whole human blood using Comet and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide assays. Although the only difference between 7 and 8 is the substitution of sulphur (in the thiadiazole in 7 for nitrogen (in the triazole in 8, the results indicated that 8 had poorer antiparasitic activity than 7 and was not genotoxic, whereas 7 presented this effect. The determination of Vmax indicated that although 8 was metabolised more rapidly than 7, it bounds to the TbNTR with better affinity, resulting in equivalent kcat/KM values. Docking assays of 7 and 8 performed within the active site of a homology model of the TbNTR indicating that 8 had greater affinity than 7.

  14. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme defects...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are prepared...

  17. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme preparations. (a) Identification. Enzyme preparations are products that are used in the histopathology...

  18. Stabilization of the autoproteolysis of TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) results in a novel crystal form suitable for structure-based drug design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Richard N; Orth, Peter; Strickland, Corey L; Le, Hung V; Madison, Vincent; Beyer, Brian M

    2006-04-01

    The crystallization of TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) has been useful in understanding the structure-activity relationships of new chemical entities. However, the propensity of TACE to undergo autoproteolysis has made enzyme handling difficult and impeded the identification of inhibitor soakable crystal forms. The autoproteolysis of TACE was found to be specific (Y352-V353) and occurred within a flexible loop that is in close proximity to the P-side of the active site. The rate of autoproteolysis was found to be proportional to the concentration of TACE, suggesting a bimolecular reaction mechanism. A limited specificity study of the S(1)' subsite was conducted using surrogate peptides and suggested substitutions that would stabilize the proteolysis of the loop at positions Y352-V353. Two mutant proteases (V353G and V353S) were generated and proved to be highly resistant to autoproteolysis. The kinetics of the more resistant mutant (V353G) and wild-type TACE were compared and demonstrated virtually identical IC(50) values for a panel of competitive inhibitors. However, the k(cat)/K(m) of the mutant for a larger substrate (P6 - P(6)') was approximately 5-fold lower than that for the wild-type enzyme. Comparison of the complexed wild-type and mutant structures indicated a subtle shift in a peripheral P-side loop (comprising the mutation site) that may be involved in substrate binding/turnover and might explain the mild kinetic difference. The characterization of this stabilized form of TACE has yielded an enzyme with similar native kinetic properties and identified a novel crystal form that is suitable for inhibitor soaking and structure determination.

  19. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure-based drug design studies of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphosrylase, a key enzyme for the control of witches' broom disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Manoelito C Santos; de Assis, Sandra Aparecida; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; Duarte, Angelo Amâncio; Alves, Ricardo José; Junior, Moacyr Comar; Taranto, Alex Gutterres

    2013-03-05

    The witches' broom disease is a plague caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa in the Theobroma cacao, which has been reducing the cocoa production since 1989. This issue motivated a genome project that has showing several new molecular targets, which can be developed inhibitors in order to control the plague. Among the molecular targets obtained, the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UNAcP) is a key enzyme to construct the fungal cell wall. The inhibition of this enzyme results in the fungal cell death. The results show that the molecular recognition of the enzyme with the substrates occurs mainly by hydrogen bonds between ligands and Arg116, Arg383, Gly381, and Lys408 amino acids; and few hydrophobic interactions with Tyr382 and Lys123 residues. Among the compounds analyzed, the NAG5 showed the best binding energy (-95.2 kcal/mol). The next steps for the control of witches' broom plague involve the synthesis and biological evaluation of these compounds, which are in progress.

  1. Structure-based drug design studies of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphosrylase, a key enzyme for the control of witches’ broom disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The witches’ broom disease is a plague caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa in the Theobroma cacao, which has been reducing the cocoa production since 1989. This issue motivated a genome project that has showing several new molecular targets, which can be developed inhibitors in order to control the plague. Among the molecular targets obtained, the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UNAcP) is a key enzyme to construct the fungal cell wall. The inhibition of this enzyme results in the fungal cell death. Results The results show that the molecular recognition of the enzyme with the substrates occurs mainly by hydrogen bonds between ligands and Arg116, Arg383, Gly381, and Lys408 amino acids; and few hydrophobic interactions with Tyr382 and Lys123 residues. Conclusions Among the compounds analyzed, the NAG5 showed the best binding energy (−95.2 kcal/mol). The next steps for the control of witches’ broom plague involve the synthesis and biological evaluation of these compounds, which are in progress. PMID:23497581

  2. Success of tardive electroconvulsive therapy sessions after loxapine-induced malignant syndrome in the context of very poor metabolisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoeur, Juliette; Philibert, Laurent; Chalard, Kevin; Attal, Jérôme; Petit, Pierre; Klouche, Kada; Olivier, Mathieu

    2017-12-01

    We report the success of tardive electroconvulsive therapy in a case of loxapine malignant syndrome with catatonia. Loxapine and its metabolites were measured in biological samples by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Genes were studied by sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasmatic drug concentrations showed a supratherapeutic concentration of loxapine with a very low 8-hydroxyloxapine/loxapine ratio (range from 0.32 to 0.66, normal value>2 for 100mg) and a very long elimination half-life of loxapine (half-life>140h, normal value from 1 to 4hours). We tried to explain this kinetics by exploring the main pharmacogenes implicated in the metabolism of loxapine. No genetic abnormality for CYP1A2 was observed. The study of associated treatments showed the potential contribution of valproate. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics investigations revealed a blockade of the CYP1A2 metabolic pathway without genetic abnormalities, probably due to valproate co-medication. Toxicological monitoring of loxapine and its metabolites helped to explain the persistence of symptoms and to adapt the therapeutic management. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Zidong Donna [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: cklaasse@kumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. - Highlights: • Utilized a graded CR model in male mice • The mRNA profiles of xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in liver were investigated. • CR up-regulates many phase-II enzymes. • CR tends to feminize the mRNA profiles of XPGs.

  4. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. - Highlights: • Utilized a graded CR model in male mice • The mRNA profiles of xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in liver were investigated. • CR up-regulates many phase-II enzymes. • CR tends to feminize the mRNA profiles of XPGs

  5. Enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Dinesen, B; Deckert, M

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay for urinary albumin using commercially available reagents is described. The assay range is 2.5-120 micrograms/l. When samples are analysed in two standard dilutions, the assayable albumin concentration range is 2.5-240 mg/l, covering the clinical range from...

  6. Lack of dynamics in the MabA active site kills the enzyme activity: practical consequences for drug-design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Ducasse-Cabanot, Stephanie; Quemard, Annaick; Labesse, Gilles; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin

    2007-08-01

    The MabA protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a validated drug target. Previous structural studies of this protein showed dynamic behaviour in the catalytic site and described motion between an open 'active' holo form (with NADP) and a closed 'inactive' apo form (without NADP). Here, a mutation (G139A) is reported that leads to complete protein inactivation and freezes the catalytic site into its closed form, even in the presence of the cofactor. This observation suggests a new way to develop anti-MabA drugs via protein stabilization of the 'inactive' form.

  7. Visualizing Drug Efficacy In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisheng Zhang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Many enzymes are therapeutic targets for drug discovery, whereas other enzymes are important for understanding drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics during compound testing in animals. Testing of drug efficacy and metabolism in an animal model requires the measurement of disease endpoints as well as assays of enzyme activity in specific tissues at selected time points during treatment. This requires the removal of tissue and biochemical assays. Techniques to noninvasively assess drug effects on enzyme activity using imaging technology would facilitate understanding of drug efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and drug metabolism. Using a commercially available cytochrome P−450 3A substrate whose oxidized product is a luciferase substrate, we show for the first time that cytochrome P−450 enzyme activity can be measured in vivo in real time by bioluminescent imaging. This imaging approach could be applicable to study drug effects on therapeutic target enzymes, as well as drug metabolism enzymes.

  8. Development and Validation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Binding Anti-Drug Antibodies against Interferon Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingenhoven, Kathleen; Kramer, Daniel; Jensen, Poul Erik Hyldgaard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a method for the detection of binding anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) against interferon beta (IFN-β) in human serum as part of a European initiative (ABIRISK) aimed at the prediction and analysis of clinical relevance of anti-biopharmaceutical immunization to minim...

  9. Allosteric regulation of epigenetic modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Beth E; Cole, Philip A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic enzymes including histone modifying enzymes are key regulators of gene expression in normal and disease processes. Many drug development strategies to target histone modifying enzymes have focused on ligands that bind to enzyme active sites, but allosteric pockets offer potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. Recent biochemical studies have revealed roles for small molecule and peptide ligands binding outside of the active sites in modulating the catalytic activities of histone modifying enzymes. Here we highlight several examples of allosteric regulation of epigenetic enzymes and discuss the biological significance of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of the leafy vegetable Solanum nigrum on the activities of some liver drug-metabolizing enzymes after aflatoxin B1 treatment in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moundipa, P F; Domngang, F M

    1991-01-01

    Wistar albino female rats were maintained for 10 d on diets containing various levels of the vegetable Solanum nigrum. Simultaneously, they received daily intraperitoneal injections of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (either 0.2 or 0.4 mg/kg body-weight) diluted in propylene glycol. At the end of the experiment, all animals were killed and their serum and hepatic microsomes were prepared for assay of enzymes. Results showed that aminopyrine N-demethylase activity increased 2.5-fold with 200 (S200) and 600 (S600) g S. nigrum/kg diets. Activity of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) (EC 2.4.1.17) also increased twofold. Similar results were obtained with glutathione S-transferase (EC 2.5.1.18) activity which increased by 60% with diet S600. After AFB1 treatment, a general increase in the activities of the above enzymes was found, except for UDPGT in the group fed on diet S600. When rats were fed on the diet without S. nigrum, AFB1 induced an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (EC 3.1.3.1), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (EC 2.6.1.1) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (gamma-GT) (EC 2.3.2.2) levels in the serum. AFB1 also induced increases in serum ALP and gamma-GT levels when rats were fed on diet S600.

  11. Quantitative Rationalization of Gemfibrozil Drug Interactions: Consideration of Transporters-Enzyme Interplay and the Role of Circulating Metabolite Gemfibrozil 1-O-β-Glucuronide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Manthena V S; Lin, Jian; Bi, Yi-an; Kimoto, Emi; Rodrigues, A David

    2015-07-01

    Gemfibrozil has been suggested as a sensitive cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) inhibitor for clinical investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. However, gemfibrozil drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are complex; its major circulating metabolite, gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide (Gem-Glu), exhibits time-dependent inhibition of CYP2C8, and both parent and metabolite also behave as moderate inhibitors of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) in vitro. Additionally, parent and metabolite also inhibit renal transport mediated by OAT3. Here, in vitro inhibition data for gemfibrozil and Gem-Glu were used to assess their impact on the pharmacokinetics of several victim drugs (including rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, cerivastatin, and repaglinide) by employing both static mechanistic and dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. Of the 48 cases evaluated using the static models, about 75% and 98% of the DDIs were predicted within 1.5- and 2-fold of the observed values, respectively, when incorporating the interaction potential of both gemfibrozil and its 1-O-β-glucuronide. Moreover, the PBPK model was able to recover the plasma profiles of rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, cerivastatin, and repaglinide under control and gemfibrozil treatment conditions. Analyses suggest that Gem-Glu is the major contributor to the DDIs, and its exposure needed to bring about complete inactivation of CYP2C8 is only a fraction of that achieved in the clinic after a therapeutic gemfibrozil dose. Overall, the complex interactions of gemfibrozil can be quantitatively rationalized, and the learnings from this analysis can be applied in support of future predictions of gemfibrozil DDIs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Reynel; Silvestri, Romano; Ragno, Rino; Artico, Marino; De Martino, Gabriella; La Regina, Giuseppe; Crespan, Emmanuele; Zanoli, Samantha; Hübscher, Ulrich; Spadari, Silvio; Maga, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfone (IAS) nonnucleoside inhibitors have been shown to potently inhibit the growth of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but their exact mechanism of action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we describe the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by selected IAS derivatives. Our results showed that, depending on the substitutions introduced in the IAS common pharmacophore, these compounds can be made selective for different enzyme-substrate complexes. Moreover, we showed that the molecular basis for this selectivity was a different association rate of the drug to a particular enzymatic form along the reaction pathway. By comparing the activities of the different compounds against wild-type RT and the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutant Lys103Asn, it was possible to hypothesize, on the basis of their mechanism of action, a rationale for the design of drugs which could overcome the steric barrier imposed by the Lys103Asn mutation. PMID:16251294

  13. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of aging on mRNA profiles for drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Csanaky, Iván L; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Aging is a physiological process characterized by progressive functional decline in various organs over time. To reveal possible molecular mechanisms of altered xenobiotic disposition and toxicity in elderly individuals, age-dependent mRNA profiles for 101 xenobiotic-processing genes (XPGs), including seven uptake transporters, 41 phase I enzymes, 36 phase II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and seven transcription factors, were characterized in livers of male and female mice from 3 to 27 months of age. Gender differences across the lifespan (significant at five ages or more) were observed for 52 XPGs, including 15 male-predominant genes (e.g., Oatp1a1, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a6a, Comt, and Bcrp) and 37 female-predominant genes (e.g., Oatp1a4, Cyp2b10, Sult1a1, Ugt1a1, and Mrp3). During aging, the mRNA levels for 44% of the 101 XPGs changed in male mice and 63% changed in female mice. In male mice, mRNA levels for 40 XPGs (e.g., Oatp1a1, Ces2c, Gstm4, Gstp1, and Ces1e) were lower in aged mice (more than 21 months of age), whereas mRNA levels for four XPGs (e.g., Oat2 and Gstm2) were higher in aged mice. In female mice, mRNA levels for 43 XPGs (e.g., Oatp1a1, Cyp1a2, Ces1f, Sult3a1, Gstt2, Comt, Ent1, Fmo3, and Mrp6) were lower in aged mice, whereas mRNA levels for 21 XPGs (e.g., Oatp1a4, Nqo1, Adh7, Sult2a1/2, Gsta1, and Mrp4) were higher in aged mice. In conclusion, 51% of the 101 XPGs exhibited gender differences in liver mRNA levels across the lifespan of mice; the mRNA levels for 40% of the XPGs were lower in aged male mice and 43% were lower in aged female mice.

  15. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  16. Pathophysiological response to hypoxia - from the molecular mechanisms of malady to drug discovery: epigenetic regulation of the hypoxic response via hypoxia-inducible factor and histone modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Imari; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Wada, Youichiro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2011-01-01

    The hypoxia response regulated primarily by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) influences metabolism, cell survival, and angiogenesis to maintain biological homeostasis. In addition to the traditional transcriptional regulation by HIF, recent studies have shown that epigenetic modulation such as histone methylation, acetylation, and DNA methylation could change the regulation of the response to hypoxia. Eukaryotic chromatin is known to be modified by multiple post-translational histone methylation and demethylation, which result in the chromatin conformation change to adapt to hypoxic stimuli. Interestingly, some of the histone demethylase enzymes, which have the Jumonji domain-containing family, require oxygen to function and are induced by hypoxia in an HIF-1-dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that histone modifiers play important roles in the hypoxic environment such as that in cancer cells and that they may become new therapeutic targets for cancer patients. It may lead to finding a new therapy for cancer to clarify a new epigenetic mechanism by HIF and histone demethylase such as JMJD1A (KDM3A) under hypoxia.

  17. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  18. Influence of high dose of phytase and an emulsifier on performance, apparent metabolisable energy and nitrogen retention in broilers fed on diets containing soy oil or tallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaefarian, F; Romero, L F; Ravindran, V

    2015-01-01

    The effects of high dose of microbial phytase and an emulsifier on the performance, apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and nitrogen (N) retention in broilers fed on diets containing different fat sources were examined in a 5-week trial. Two fat sources (soy oil and tallow), two inclusion levels of E. coli phytase (500 or 1000 phytase units (FTU)/kg diet) and two inclusion levels of lysolecithin emulsifier (0 or 3.5 g/kg of diet) were evaluated in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Throughout the 5-week trial, soy oil supplementation improved weight gain and feed per gain compared with tallow, but had no effect on feed intake. The high dose of phytase increased the weight gain and feed intake and lowered the feed per gain during d 1-21, but had no effect on performance parameters over the whole trial period. An effect of emulsifier was observed for feed intake during d 1-21 and over the whole trial period. Addition of emulsifier increased feed intake compared with diets without emulsifier. During weeks 1, 2, 3 and 5, birds fed on soy oil-based diets had higher nitrogen-corrected AME (AMEN) compared with those fed on tallow-based diets. During weeks 2, 3 and 5, the effect of phytase was significant for AMEN, with the high dose increasing the AMEN. During week 2, AMEN was increased with emulsifier addition. During weeks 1, 2, 3 and 5, birds fed on soy oil-based diets had higher fat retention compared with those fed on tallow-based diets. The high dose of phytase improved the retention of fat during week 5 and the addition of emulsifier resulted in higher fat retention during week 1. During weeks 2, 3 and 5, an interaction between fat source × phytase × emulsifier was observed for N retention. In soy oil-based diets, emulsifier plus 1000 FTU/kg phytase increased N retention compared with other groups, while in tallow-based diets, emulsifier addition increased N retention in diets with 500 FTU/kg, but not in 1000 FTU/kg diet. Overall, the

  19. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1063 - Enzyme-modified lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Enzyme-modified lecithin. 184.1063 Section 184.1063... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1063 Enzyme-modified lecithin. (a) Enzyme-modified... Lysolecithin Content of Enzyme-Modified Lecithin: Method I,” dated 1985, which is incorporated by reference in...

  1. 21 CFR 864.9400 - Stabilized enzyme solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stabilized enzyme solution. 864.9400 Section 864... and Blood Products § 864.9400 Stabilized enzyme solution. (a) Identification. A stabilized enzyme... enzyme solutions include papain, bromelin, ficin, and trypsin. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1372 - Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations... enzyme preparations. (a) Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations are used in the production of... additional requirements for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 107, which is...

  3. 21 CFR 862.2500 - Enzyme analyzer for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme analyzer for clinical use. 862.2500 Section... Instruments § 862.2500 Enzyme analyzer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An enzyme analyzer for clinical use is a device intended to measure enzymes in plasma or serum by nonkinetic or kinetic measurement of...

  4. Probe substrate and enzyme source-dependent inhibition of UDP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) inhibition based drug-drug interaction and herb-drug interaction severely challenge the R&D process of drugs or herbal ingredients. Objective: To evaluate the inhibition potential of wogonin (an important flavonoid isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis) towards ...

  5. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  6. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, GSTM1, and NAT2), drinking habits, histological subtypes, and p53 gene point mutations in Japanese patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shioto; Muroishi, Youko; Nakanishi, Isao; Oda, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes have recently been shown to affect susceptibility to chemical carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of individual susceptibility to gastric cancer have not been fully understood. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes, drinking habits, histological subtypes, and p53 gene point mutations in Japanese patients with gastric cancer. The genotypes of cytochromes P450 ( CYP) 1A1 and 2E1, glutathione S-transferase ( GST) M1, and N-acetyltransferase ( NAT) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), allele-specific PCR, or restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) following PCR in 146 Japanese patients with gastric cancer (67 intestinal-type and 79 diffuse-type carcinomas) and 177 autopsied controls. In addition, p53 gene point mutations of exons 5 through 9 in gastric cancer tissues were determined. The frequency of either being a habitual drinker or having a CYP2E1(*) 1A/(*) 1A genotype was significantly higher in patients with intestinal-type gastric cancer than in control subjects. The difference between the frequencies of habitual drinkers with the CYP2E1(*) 1A/(*) 1A genotype and non-drinkers with the CYP2E1(*) 5B allele was much more significant in the intestinal-type cancer versus the control group. Among intestinal-type cancer patients with the CYP2E1(*) 1A/(*) 1A genotype, p53 point mutations were significantly more frequent in the group of habitual drinkers than in that of non-drinkers. On the other hand, the combination of GSTM1 null and CYP2E1(*) 1A/(*) 1A genotypes increased the risk for diffuse-type gastric cancer, but had no influence on the frequency of p53 gene mutations. The present study suggests that individuals with both the CYP2E1(*) 1A/(*) 1A genotype and a history of habitual drinking have an increased risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer with a high frequency of p53 gene point mutations in the gastric

  7. Enzyme and biochemical producing fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Lübeck, Mette; Nilsson, Lena

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a biorefinery concept for biological production of chemicals, drugs, feed and fuels using plant biomass as raw material in well-defined cell-factories. Among the important goals is the discovery of new biocatalysts for production of enzymes, biochemicals and fuels and already our...... screening of a large collection of fungal strains isolated from natural habitats have resulted in identification of strains with high production of hydrolytic enzymes and excretion of organic acids. Our research focuses on creating a fungal platform based on synthetic biology for developing new cell...

  8. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  9. Understanding the Catalytic Mechanism and the Nature of the Transition State of an Attractive Drug-Target Enzyme (Shikimate Kinase) by Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Wang, Xia; Luo, Haixia; Gu, Pengfei

    2017-11-16

    Shikimate kinase (SK) is the fifth bacterial enzyme involved in the shikimate pathway for biosynthesis of life-indispensable components, such as aromatic amino acids. The absence of the shikimate pathway in humans makes SK an attractive target for the rational design of drugs aimed at pathogenesis bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori. However, an effective inhibitor of SK (e.g., a transition-state analogue) is still not available on the market due, at least in part, to a lack of knowledge on the catalytic mechanism and the nature of the rate-limiting transition state. Herein, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) reaction coordinate, molecular dynamics (MD), and free-energy simulations have been performed to answer these questions. The results presented herein demonstrate that the phosphoryl-transfer process, which is the rate-limiting step of SK-catalyzed phosphorylation of shikimic acid (SKM), is a concerted one-step reaction proceeding through a loose transition state. The computational results agree well with those of experimental studies, specifically NMR results, X-ray crystal structure observation, and activation free-energy barrier. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Direct comparison of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests in Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Tyner, Stuart D; Lon, Chanthap; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Ruttvisutinunt, Wiriya; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Sai-gnam, Piyaporn; Johnson, Jacob D; Walsh, Douglas S; Saunders, David L; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2013-07-12

    Performance of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR Green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests were directly compared using Plasmodium falciparum reference strains and fresh ex vivo isolates from Cambodia against a panel of standard anti-malarials. The objective was to determine which of these two common assays is more appropriate for studying drug susceptibility of "immediate ex vivo" (IEV) isolates, analysed without culture adaption, in a region of relatively low malaria transmission. Using the HRP-2 and MSF methods, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against a panel of malaria drugs were determined for P. falciparum reference clones (W2, D6, 3D7 and K1) and 41 IEV clinical isolates from an area of multidrug resistance in Cambodia. Comparison of the IC50 values from the two methods was made using Wilcoxon matched pair tests and Pearson's correlation. The lower limit of parasitaemia detection for both methods was determined for reference clones and IEV isolates. Since human white blood cell (WBC) DNA in clinical samples is known to reduce MSF assay sensitivity, SYBR Green I fluorescence linearity of P. falciparum samples spiked with WBCs was evaluated to assess the relative degree to which MSF sensitivity is reduced in clinical samples. IC50 values correlated well between the HRP-2 and MSF methods when testing either P. falciparum reference clones or IEV isolates against 4-aminoquinolines (chloroquine, piperaquine and quinine) and the quinoline methanol mefloquine (Pearson r = 0.85-0.99 for reference clones and 0.56-0.84 for IEV isolates), whereas a weaker IC50 value correlation between methods was noted when testing artemisinins against reference clones and lack of correlation when testing IEV isolates. The HRP-2 ELISA produced a higher overall success rate (90% for producing IC50 best-fit sigmoidal curves), relative to only a 40% success rate for the MSF assay, when evaluating ex

  11. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  12. [Drug-Drug Interactions with Consideration of Pharmacogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shogo

    2018-01-01

     Elderly patients often suffer from a variety of diseases and therefore may be prescribed several kinds of drugs. Interactions between these drugs may cause problems in some patients. Guidelines for drug interactions were released on July 8, 2014 "Drug Interaction Guideline for Drug Development and Labeling Recommendations (Final Draft)". These guidelines include the theoretical basis for evaluating the mechanisms of drug interaction, the possible extent of drug interactions, and take into consideration special populations (e.g., infants, children, elderly patients, patients with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and subjects with minor deficient alleles for drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters). In this symposium article, I discuss this last special population: altered drug metabolism and drug interactions in subjects with minor alleles of genes encoding deficient drug metabolizing enzymes. I further discuss a drug label for eliglustat (Cerdelga) with instructions for patients with ultra-rapid, extensive, intermediate, and poor metabolizer phenotypes that arise from different CYP2D6 gene alleles.

  13. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, prevents the hyperactivity and impulsivity of neurokinin-1 receptor gene 'knockout' mice: sex differences and implications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ashley J; Pillidge, Katharine; Grabowska, Ewelina M; Stanford, S Clare

    2015-04-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R-/-) display behavioural abnormalities resembling attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): locomotor hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness. The preferred ligand for NK1R, substance P, is metabolised by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), which forms part of the brain renin angiotensin system (BRAS). In view of evidence that the BRAS modulates locomotor activity and cognitive performance, we tested the effects of drugs that target the BRAS on these behaviours in NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. We first tested the effects of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, on locomotor activity. Because there are well-established sex differences in both ADHD and ACE activity, we compared the effects of captopril in both male and female mice. Locomotor hyperactivity was evident in male NK1R-/- mice, only, and this was abolished by treatment with captopril. By contrast, male wildtypes and females of both genotypes were unaffected by ACE inhibition. We then investigated the effects of angiotensin AT1 (losartan) and AT2 (PD 123319) receptor antagonists on the locomotor activity of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. Both antagonists increased the locomotor activity of NK1R-/- mice, but neither affected the wildtypes. Finally, we tested the effects of captopril on the performance of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice in the 5-choice serial reaction-time task (5-CSRTT) and found that ACE inhibition prevented the impulsivity of NK1R-/- mice. These results indicate that certain behaviours, disrupted in ADHD, are influenced by an interaction between the BRAS and NK1R, and suggest that ACE inhibitors could provide a novel treatment for this disorder. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, prevents the hyperactivity and impulsivity of neurokinin-1 receptor gene ‘knockout’ mice: Sex differences and implications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ashley J.; Pillidge, Katharine; Grabowska, Ewelina M.; Stanford, S. Clare

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R−/−) display behavioural abnormalities resembling attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): locomotor hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness. The preferred ligand for NK1R, substance P, is metabolised by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), which forms part of the brain renin angiotensin system (BRAS). In view of evidence that the BRAS modulates locomotor activity and cognitive performance, we tested the effects of drugs that target the BRAS on these behaviours in NK1R−/− and wildtype mice. We first tested the effects of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, on locomotor activity. Because there are well-established sex differences in both ADHD and ACE activity, we compared the effects of captopril in both male and female mice. Locomotor hyperactivity was evident in male NK1R−/− mice, only, and this was abolished by treatment with captopril. By contrast, male wildtypes and females of both genotypes were unaffected by ACE inhibition. We then investigated the effects of angiotensin AT1 (losartan) and AT2 (PD 123319) receptor antagonists on the locomotor activity of male NK1R−/− and wildtype mice. Both antagonists increased the locomotor activity of NK1R−/− mice, but neither affected the wildtypes. Finally, we tested the effects of captopril on the performance of male NK1R−/− and wildtype mice in the 5-choice serial reaction-time task (5-CSRTT) and found that ACE inhibition prevented the impulsivity of NK1R−/− mice. These results indicate that certain behaviours, disrupted in ADHD, are influenced by an interaction between the BRAS and NK1R, and suggest that ACE inhibitors could provide a novel treatment for this disorder. PMID:25703442

  15. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. 184... enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes... current good manufacturing practice conditions of use: (1) The ingredient is used as an enzyme, as defined...

  16. Effect of long term selenium yeast intervention on activity and gene expression of antioxidant and xenbiotic metabolising enzymes in healthy elderly volunteers from the Danish Prevention of Cancer by Intervention by Selenium (PRECISE) Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Krath, Britta; Overvad, Kim

    2008-01-01

    ) in different blood compartments, and expression of selected phase 1 and phase 2 genes in leucocytes (GPX1, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), AP-1 transcription factor Fos-related antigen I (Fral), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (Ah...

  17. Effects of Aspergillus spp. exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on in vitro fermentation of tropical forages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Fernanda D A; Reis, Victor R A; Roth, Anna Paula; Magalhães, Karla A; Peixoto-Nogueira, Simone C; Casagrande, Daniel R; Reis, Ricardo A; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M

    2012-09-01

    Cellulose and hemicellulose are quantitatively the most important structural carbohydrates present in ruminant diets. Rumen micro-organisms produce enzymes that catalyse their hydrolysis, but the complex network formed by structural carbohydrates and lignin reduces their digestibility and restricts efficient utilisation of feeds by ruminants. This study aimed to produce two enzymatic extracts, apply them in ruminant diets to determine the best levels for ruminal digestibility and evaluate their effects on in vitro digestibility. In experiment 1 a two-stage in vitro technique was used to examine the effects of different enzymatic levels of Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus terricola on tropical forages. Enzyme addition had minor effects on corn silage at the highest enzymatic level. In experiment 2 an in vitro gas production (GP) technique was applied to determine apparent in vitro organic matter digestibility and metabolisable energy. The addition of enzymes in GP showed interesting results. Good data were obtained using sugar cane and Tifton-85 hay supplemented with extracts of A. japonicus and A. terricola respectively. Overall, the study suggests that addition of crude extracts containing exogenous fibrolytic enzymes to ruminant diets enhances the effective utilisation of ruminant feedstuffs such as forages. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Can vaccines interact with drug metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Clementi, Emilio; Capuano, Annalisa; Radice, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    Vaccines are safe and efficacious in reducing the burden of several serious infections affecting children and adults. Due to their efficacy, vaccines are often administered in patients with chronic diseases, likely to be under poly-therapy. Because of several case reports indicating changes in drug metabolism after vaccination, the hypothesis of an interaction between vaccines and specific drugs has been put forward. These interactions are conceivably of great concern, especially in patients treated with molecules characterised by a narrow therapeutic index. Herein, we review and systematise the available evidence on vaccine-drug interactions. The picture that emerges indicates that reduction in the activity of specific CYPs following vaccination may occur, most likely via interferon γ overproduction, and for specific drugs such as anticonvulsivant and theophylline may have significant clinical relevance. Clinical interaction between vaccines and drugs that are metabolised by cytochromes uninfluenced by INFγ levels, such as warfarin, are instead unlikely to happen. Further studies are however needed to gain a complete picture of vaccine-drug interactions and define their relevance in terms of possible negative clinical impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differences in genotype and allele frequency distributions of polymorphic drug metabolizing enzymes CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 in mainland Chinese Mongolian, Hui and Han populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, S-J; Ni, Y-B; Wang, S-M; Wang, X; Lou, Y-Q; Zhang, G-L

    2012-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) and CYP2D6 are important xenobiotic metabolic enzymes and both show considerable genetic variability between Orientals and Caucasians. There are known marked heterogeneity in susceptibility to various cancers and hypertension among Chinese Mongolian, Hui and Han ethnic groups, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Our objective was to investigate the patterns of distribution of CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 polymorphisms among healthy Chinese subjects to determine whether any observed inter-ethnic variability might be worth further investigation as possible contributors to the known differences in disease prevalence. Blood samples were collected from 454 unrelated Chinese healthy subjects (214 Han, 111 Hui, 129 Mongolian) for genotyping analysis. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) CYP2C19*2 (681G>A in exon 5), CYP2C19*3 (636G>A in exon 4) and CYP2D6*10 (188C>T in exon 1) were determined by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Significantly higher frequencies of the CYP2C19 poor metabolic genotypes were observed in Chinese Han (18·7%), Chinese Hui (25·0%) and Chinese Mongolian (10·9%) subjects than has been reported for Caucasians (1·7-3·0%, P Hui (32·4%) and Han (29·7%) than in Chinese Mongolian (18·2%, P Hui ethnic groups than have been reported for Caucasians (11·1-16·3% and 0-0·2%, P Hui (40·6% and 30·7%) and Mongolian subjects (31·3% and 9·6%, both P Hui and Han populations. These differences may be important in explaining reported inter-ethnic differences in disease prevalence and response to drugs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Biocatalytic Single Enzyme Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kim, Jungbae

    2004-03-31

    As an innovative way of enzyme stabilization, we recently developed a new enzyme composite of nano-meter scale that we call "single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs)" (9). Each enzyme molecule is surrounded with a porous composite organic/inorganic network of less than a few nanometers think. This approach represents a new type of enzyme-containing nanostructure. In experiments with perotease (chymotrypsin, CT), the activity of single enzyme nanoparticle form of the enzyme was greatly stabilized compared to the free form, without imposing a serious mass transfer limitation of substrates. In this chapter we will describe the synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of the new SENs.

  1. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  2. Improving nutrient values of palm kernel cake (PKC by reducing shell contamination and enzymes supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinurat AP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion of palm kernel cake (PKC in poultry feed is limited due to shell contamination and its low nutritive values, despite the increase of PKC production. Therefore, a series of experiment was conducted in order to improve nutritive values of palm kernel cake (PKC by sieving and enzyme supplementation. First experiment was designed to reduce shell content using shiever with different diameters (1, 2 and 4 mm. Shell content was measured manually to determine the effect of the sieving. The second experiment was carried out by blowing the after sieving at 2 mm shieve PKC, to produced heavy, medium and light fractions. The shell content and nutrient contents of the medium and light fractions were compared to those of unsieved PKC. In the third experiment, the sieved PKC was supplemented with 2 enzymes with different concentrations, i.e., BS4 at 10, 15 and 20 ml/kg PKC and a commercial multi enzymes at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg PKC. Digestibility of nutrients (dry matter, crude protein and TME were measured by force feeding method with six replications for each sample. Results of the study showed that sieving with 2 mm diameter siever without blowing was effective in reducing about 50% of PKC shell and improved crude protein, ether extract and amino acids, contents and reduced the crude fiber content of the PKC. Supplementation of enzymes improved the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein and the true metabolisable energy (TME of the PKC. Optimum improvement was obtained when PKC was supplemented with 20 ml BS4 enzymes/kg PKC. Similar improvement was obtained by supplementation of commercial multi enzymes at 2 g/kg PKC. Therefore, in order to improve the nutritive values of PKC, it is suggested to sieve the PKC followed by supplementation of enzyme prior to feeding.

  3. The ENZYME data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairoch, A

    1994-09-01

    The ENZYME data bank is a repository of information relative to the nomenclature of enzymes. It is primarily based on the recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB) and it contains the following data for each type of characterized enzyme for which an EC (Enzyme Commission) number has been provided: EC number Recommended name Alternative names (if any) Catalytic activity Cofactors (if any) Pointers to the SWISS-PROT protein sequence entrie(s) that correspond to the enzyme (if any) Pointers to human disease(s) associated with a deficiency of the enzyme (if any).

  4. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  5. Effects of dietary inulin, statin, and their co-treatment on hyperlipidemia, hepatic steatosis and changes in drug-metabolizing enzymes in rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugatani Junko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose (HF diet develop hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia. There are several reports that a change in nutritional status affects hepatic levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Synthetic inulin is a dietary component that completely evades glucide digestion. Supplementing a HF diet with inulin ameliorates hypertriglycemia and hepatic steatosis, but not hypercholesterolemia. This study aimed at distinguishing the effects of synthetic inulin and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. Methods We examined effects of co-treatment with synthetic inulin (5% and fluvastatin (0, 4, and 8 mg/kg, per os on body weight, epidydimal white adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, and hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP mRNA and protein profiles in rats fed a standard diet or a HF diet for 3 weeks. Results Treatment with the synthetic inulin (5% or fluvastatin at 4 mg/kg (lethal dose in rats fed the HF diet, 8 mg/kg ameliorated the elevation in hepatic triacylglycerol and total cholesterol levels in rats fed the HF diet. Whereas co-treatment with the inulin (5% and fluvastatin (4 mg/kg had a tendency to more strongly suppress the elevation in serum levels of very low density lipoprotein triacylglycerol than either treatment alone, no additive or synergistic effect was found in decrease in hepatic lipid levels. Hepatic levels of CYP1A1/2 and CYP2E1 mRNA and protein and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were reduced in rats fed the HF diet. The synthetic inulin alleviated the reduction in hepatic levels of CYP1A1/2 and CYP2E1 mRNA and protein more strongly than fluvastatin, and no synergistic effects were observed on co-treatment. Furthermore, hepatic levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor mRNA were decreased in rats fed the HF diet and recovered to near normal values with the intake of dietary inulin

  6. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  7. 21 CFR 173.357 - Materials used as fixing agents in the immobilization of enzyme preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immobilization of enzyme preparations. 173.357 Section 173.357 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... used as fixing agents in the immobilization of enzyme preparations. Fixing agents may be safely used in the immobilization of enzyme preparations in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The...

  8. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section 173.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... classified as follows: Class, Ascomycetes; order, Sphaeriales; family, Diaporthacesae; genus, Endothia...

  9. New Antioxidant Drugs for Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Tataranno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain injury concept covers a lot of heterogeneity in terms of aetiology involving multiple factors, genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, endocrinological, toxic, and infectious mechanisms, acting in antenatal or postnatal period. Increased vulnerability of the immature brain to oxidative stress is documented because of the limited capacity of antioxidant enzymes and the high free radicals (FRs generation in rapidly growing tissue. FRs impair transmembrane enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase activity resulting in persistent membrane depolarization and excessive release of FR and excitatory aminoacid glutamate. Besides being neurotoxic, glutamate is also toxic to oligodendroglia, via FR effects. Neuronal cells die of oxidative stress. Excess of free iron and deficient iron/binding metabolising capacity are additional features favouring oxidative stress in newborn. Each step in the oxidative injury cascade has become a potential target for neuroprotective intervention. The administration of antioxidants for suspected or proven brain injury is still not accepted for clinical use due to uncertain beneficial effects when treatments are started after resuscitation of an asphyxiated newborn. The challenge for the future is the early identification of high-risk babies to target a safe and not toxic antioxidant therapy in combination with standard therapies to prevent brain injury and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1148 - Bacterially-derived carbohydrase enzyme preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bacterially-derived carbohydrase enzyme preparation... carbohydrase enzyme preparation. (a) Bacterially-derived carbohydrase enzyme preparation is obtained from the... Bacillus subtilis or B. amyloliquefaciens. The preparation is characterized by the presence of the enzymes...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1150 - Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation... enzyme preparation. (a) Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation is obtained from the culture... subtilis or B. amyloliquefaciens. The preparation is characterized by the presence of the enzymes...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1250 - Cellulase enzyme preparation derived from Trichoderma longibrachiatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cellulase enzyme preparation derived from....1250 Cellulase enzyme preparation derived from Trichoderma longibrachiatum. (a) Cellulase enzyme.... reesei). The enzyme, cellulase, catalyzes the endohydrolysis of 1,4-beta-glycosidic linkages in cellulose...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1420 - Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1420 Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus. (a) Lipase enzyme preparation contains lipase enzyme (CAS Reg. No...

  14. Osteomalacia in an HIV-infected man receiving rifabutin, a cytochrome P450 enzyme inducer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horne Anne M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction People infected with human immunodeficiency virus are frequently treated with medications that can induce or inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Case presentation A 59 year old man treated with zidovudine, lamivudine, indinavir, and ritonavir for infection with human immunodeficiency virus volunteered to take part in a study of bone loss. He was found to have vitamin D insufficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism and received vitamin D and calcium supplementation. He suffered a recurrence of infection with Mycobacterium avium intracellulare for which he received treatment with ciprofloxacin, rifabutin, and ethambutol. Subsequently, he developed worsening vitamin D deficiency with hypocalcaemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and elevated markers of bone turnover culminating in an osteomalacic vertebral fracture. Correction of the vitamin D deficiency required 100,000 IU of cholecalciferol monthly. Rifabutin is a cytochrome P450 inducer, and vitamin D and its metabolites are catabolised by cytochrome P450 enzymes. We therefore propose that treatment with rifabutin led to the induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes catabolising vitamin D, thereby causing vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia. This process might be mediated through the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR. Conclusion Treatment with rifabutin induces the cytochrome P450 enzymes that metabolise vitamin D and patients treated with rifabutin might be at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. In complex medication regimens involving agents that induce or inhibit cytochrome P450 enzmyes, consultation with a clinical pharmacist or pharmacologist may be helpful in predicting and/or preventing potentially harmful interactions.

  15. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  16. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  17. Enzymes in animal nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Scientific Committee on Animal Nutrition

    2011-01-01

    This report brings overview of endogenous as well as exogenous enzymes and their role and importance in animal nutrition. Enzymes for animal nutrition have been systematically developed since 1980´s. Phytase, xylanase and β-glucanase are used in poultry-rising, pig breeding, aquaculture and begin to push to the ruminant nutrition. Phytase increase availability of P, Ca, Zn, digestibility of proteins and fats. Its positive effect on the environment is well described – enzymes decrease the cont...

  18. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  19. Enzyme catalysed tandem reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Oroz-Guinea, Isabel; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    To transfer to the laboratory, the excellent efficiency shown by enzymes in Nature, biocatalysis, had to mimic several synthetic strategies used by the living organisms. Biosynthetic pathways are examples of tandem catalysis and may be assimilated in the biocatalysis field for the use of isolated multi-enzyme systems in the homogeneous phase. The concurrent action of several enzymes that work sequentially presents extraordinary advantages from the synthetic point of view, since it permits a r...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices used...

  1. Enzymes from extremophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, D C; Morís-Varas, F; Cassidy, C S

    2001-04-01

    The industrial application of enzymes that can withstand harsh conditions has greatly increased over the past decade. This is mainly a result of the discovery of novel enzymes from extremophilic microorganisms. Recent advances in the study of extremozymes point to the acceleration of this trend. In particular, enzymes from thermophilic organisms have found the most practical commercial use to date because of their overall inherent stability. This has also led to a greater understanding of stability factors involved in adaptation of these enzymes to their unusual environments.

  2. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...

  3. Metabolic Enzymes of Cocaine Metabolite Benzoylecgonine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiabin; Zheng, Xirong; Zhan, Max; Zhou, Ziyuan; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2016-08-19

    Cocaine is one of the most addictive drugs without a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication. Enzyme therapy using an efficient cocaine-metabolizing enzyme is recognized as the most promising approach to cocaine overdose treatment. The actual enzyme, known as RBP-8000, under current clinical development for cocaine overdose treatment is our previously designed T172R/G173Q mutant of bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE). The T172R/G173Q mutant is effective in hydrolyzing cocaine but inactive against benzoylecgonine (a major, biologically active metabolite of cocaine). Unlike cocaine itself, benzoylecgonine has an unusually stable zwitterion structure resistant to further hydrolysis in the body and environment. In fact, benzoylecgonine can last in the body for a very long time (a few days) and, thus, is responsible for the long-term toxicity of cocaine and a commonly used marker for drug addiction diagnosis in pre-employment drug tests. Because CocE and its mutants are all active against cocaine and inactive against benzoylecgonine, one might simply assume that other enzymes that are active against cocaine are also inactive against benzoylecgonine. Here, through combined computational modeling and experimental studies, we demonstrate for the first time that human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is actually active against benzoylecgonine, and that a rationally designed BChE mutant can not only more efficiently accelerate cocaine hydrolysis but also significantly hydrolyze benzoylecgonine in vitro and in vivo. This sets the stage for advanced studies to design more efficient mutant enzymes valuable for the development of an ideal cocaine overdose enzyme therapy and for benzoylecgonine detoxification in the environment.

  4. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:26494981

  5. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Littlechild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  6. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  7. [Drug promiscuity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zong-ru

    2011-04-01

    It is essential for a successful drug to possess two basic characteristics: satisfactory pharmacological action with sufficient potency and selectivity; good druggability with eligible physicochemical, pharmacokinetic and safety profiles, as well as structural novelty. Promiscuity is defined as the property of a drug to act with multiple molecular targets and exhibit distinct pharmacological effects. Promiscuous drugs are the basis of polypharmacology and the causes for side effects and unsuitable DMPK. Drug promiscuity originates from protein promiscuity. In order to accommodate, metabolize and excrete various endo- and exogenous substances, protein acquired the capability during evolution to adapt a wide range of structural diversity, and it is unnecessary to reserve a specific protein for every single ligand. The structures of target proteins are integration of conservativity and diversity. The former is represented by the relatively conservative domains for secondary structures folding, which leads to overlapping in ligand-binding and consequent cross-reactivity of ligands. Diversity, however, embodies the subtle difference in structures. Similar structural domain may demonstrate different functions due to alteration of amino acid sequences. The phenomenon of promiscuity may facilitate the "design in" of multi-target ligands for the treatment of complicated diseases, whereas it should be appropriately handled to improve druggability. Therefore, one of the primary goals in drug design is to scrutinize and manipulate the "merits and faults" of promiscuity. This review discusses the application of promiscuity in drug design for receptors, enzymes, ion channels and cytochrome P450. It also briefly describes the methods to predict ligand promiscuity based on either target or ligand structures.

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug ... Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug ...

  9. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  10. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction

  11. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme. What Makes Extremozymes Function Under Harsh Conditions? Santosh Kumar is ... extremozymes to high temperature or pH so that enzymes from mesophiles can be engineered to behave .... alkalinity (above pH 10, soda lake) from which extremozymes have been isolated. F C Lowyer of the ...

  13. Industrial Enzymes and Biocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Joseph C.; Aehle, Wolfgang; Whited, Gregory M.; Ward, Donald E.

    All life processes are the result of enzyme activity. In fact, life itself, whether plant or animal, involves a complex network of enzymatic reactions. An enzyme is a protein that is synthesized in a living cell. It catalyzes a thermodynamically possible reaction so that the rate of the reaction is compatible with the numerous biochemical processes essential for the growth and maintenance of a cell. The synthesis of an enzyme thus is under tight metabolic regulations and controls that can be genetically or environmentally manipulated sometimes to cause the overproduction of an enzyme by the cell. An enzyme, like chemical catalysts, in no way modifies the equilibrium constant or the free energy change of a reaction.

  14. The Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme-Induced Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant is effective in angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema. The drug is not approved officially for this indication and has to be administered in an emergency situation off-label. Corticosteroids or antihistamines do not seem to work in this condition. The effectiveness of C1-esterase-inhibitor in angiotensin-converting enzyme-induced angioedema must be verified in a double-blind study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of detoxifying enzymes in the resistance of the cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch to thiamethoxam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ibrahim Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch is considered a serious insect pest attacking several crops. We carried out biochemical studies to elucidate the role of the metabolising enzymes in conferring resistance to thiamethoxam, in two strains (resistant and susceptible of the cowpea aphid. Bioassay experiments showed that the thiamethoxam selected strain developed a 48 fold resistance after consecutive selection with thiamethoxam for 12 generations. This resistant strain also exhibited cross-resistance to the tested carbamates; pirimicarb and carbosulfan, organophosphorus (malathion, fenitrothion, and chlorpyrifos-methyl, and the neonicotinoid (acetamiprid. Synergism studies have indicated that S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF, a known inhibitor for esterases, increased thiamethoxam toxicity 5.58 times in the resistant strain compared with the susceptible strain. Moreover, the biochemical determination revealed that carboxylestersae activity was 30 times greater in the resistant strain than in the susceptible strain. In addition, the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST and mixed function oxidases (mfo increased only in the resistant strain 3.7 and 2.7 times, respectively, in relation to the susceptible (the control. Generally, our results suggest that the higher activity of the detoxifying enzymes, particularly carboxylesterase, in the resistant strain of the cowpea aphid, apparently have a significant role in endowing resistance to thiamethoxam, although additional mechanisms may contribute.

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, ... Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and ... Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used ...

  19. Cytochromes P450 and drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doehmer, J.; Goeptar, A R; Vermeulen, N P

    1993-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 are the key enzymes for activating and inactivating many drugs, in particular anticancer drugs. Therefore, individual expression levels of cytochromes P450 may play a crucial role in drug safety and drug efficacy. Overexpression of cytochrome P450 may yield rapid turnover and

  20. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  1. Enzymic lactose hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.J.; Brand, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Acid or enzymic hydrolysis can be used to hydrolyze lactose. Advantages of both are compared and details of enzymic hydrolysis using yeast or fungal enzymes given. The new scheme outlined involves recycling lactase. Because lactose and lactase react to ultrafiltration (UF) membranes differently separation is possible. Milk or milk products are ultrafiltered to separate a concentrate from a lactose-rich permeate which is treated with lactase in a reactor until hydrolysis reaches a required level. The lactase can be removed by UF as it does not permeate the membrane, and it is recycled back to the reactor. Permeate from the second UF stage may or may not be recombined with the concentrate from the first stage to produce a low lactose product (analysis of a typical low-lactose dried whole milk is given). Batch or continuous processes are explained and a batch process without enzyme recovery is discussed. (Refs. 4).

  2. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  3. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  4. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme. What Makes Extremozymes Function Under Harsh Conditions? Santosh Kumar is doing his Ph D at Biotechnology. Centre, Indian Institute of. Technology, Bombay. His research interests include: enzymology, metabolism, metabolic regulation and metabolic engineering of a filamentous fungi,.

  5. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    . In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...... fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric field...... on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone (PS) MF membrane...

  6. Advances in enzyme immobilisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brady, D

    2009-07-10

    Full Text Available improved protein binding capacity. Novel methods of enzyme self immobilisation have been developed (CLEC, CLEA, Spherezyme), as well as carrier materials (Dendrispheres), encapsulation (PEI Microspheres), and entrapment. Apart from retention, recovery...

  7. Enzyme catalysed tandem reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroz-Guinea, Isabel; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    To transfer to the laboratory, the excellent efficiency shown by enzymes in Nature, biocatalysis, had to mimic several synthetic strategies used by the living organisms. Biosynthetic pathways are examples of tandem catalysis and may be assimilated in the biocatalysis field for the use of isolated multi-enzyme systems in the homogeneous phase. The concurrent action of several enzymes that work sequentially presents extraordinary advantages from the synthetic point of view, since it permits a reversible process to become irreversible, to shift the equilibrium reaction in such a way that enantiopure compounds can be obtained from prochiral or racemic substrates, reduce or eliminate problems due to product inhibition or prevent the shortage of substrates by dilution or degradation in the bulk media, etc. In this review we want to illustrate the developments of recent studies involving in vitro multi-enzyme reactions for the synthesis of different classes of organic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  9. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  10. Effects of enzyme supplementation on diets of medium-heavy laying hens at 28 to 40 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina de Souza Resende

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to verify the effect of the addition of an enzyme complex on performance (feed intake, egg production, egg weight and egg mass, feed conversion per egg mass, and feed conversion per dozen eggs, and on egg quality (% of shell, albumen and yolk, shell thickness, specific gravity, Haugh unit, yolk index, and albumen index, in medium-heavy laying hens at 28 to 40 weeks of age. A total of 240 Hy-Line Brown laying hens were used in a randomised block design with 10 replications of six birds per lot and four treatments: positive control (basal feed, negative control (with a reduction in metabolisable energy, crude protein, calcium and phosphorus, negative control + enzymes, and positive control + enzymes. The enzyme complex, composed of β-glucanases, β-xylanase, cellulase and phytase, was added to the feed at a ratio of 50 g t-1. The data were submitted to analysis of variance with the mean values compared by Tukey's test at 5%. There was no difference in feed intake or egg weight between treatments. However, the addition of the enzyme complex to the negative control diet gave results similar to the remaining performance variables when compared to the positive control group. For the external and internal quality of the eggs, there was no difference between treatments for the variables under evaluation, except for the albumin index. It was concluded that use of the enzyme complex in the diet of medium-heavy laying hens gives a reduction in nutritional density without compromising production performance or egg quality.

  11. The effects of the continuous administration of N,N-dimethyl-4-phenylazoaniline (DAB) on the activities and the inducibilities of some drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Thurlow, Brenda J.; Warwick, Gerald P.

    1975-01-01

    (1) The effect of feeding a relatively low-protein diet containing 0.06% DAB for 29 weeks on the activity of DAB-azoreductase, nitroreductase (p-nitrobenzoic acid), N-oxidase (N,N-dimethylaniline), N-demethylase (DAB), cytochrome P-450, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, beta-glucuronidase and arylsul......(1) The effect of feeding a relatively low-protein diet containing 0.06% DAB for 29 weeks on the activity of DAB-azoreductase, nitroreductase (p-nitrobenzoic acid), N-oxidase (N,N-dimethylaniline), N-demethylase (DAB), cytochrome P-450, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, beta......-glucuronidase and arylsulphatase A were studied. Rapid decreases occurred in the activities of the first six enzymes, reaching minimal values at between 4 and 8 weeks. Activities then increased in all cases to control or nearly control levels. This rate of increase was least for cytochrome P-450. At 4 weeks azoreductase activity...... of dye feeding on some of the enzyme activities in the two major liver lobes and differences were found. (3) The effect of phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment on the DAB-fed rats was studied at 4-week intervals. The activities of DAB-azoreductase and of nitroreductase increased throughout the whole period...

  12. Fomivirsen: clinical pharmacology and potential drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Grillone, Lisa R

    2002-01-01

    Fomivirsen sodium is a 21-base phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the messenger RNA of the major immediate-early region proteins of human cytomegalovirus, and is a potent and selective antiviral agent for cytomegalovirus retinitis. Following intravitreal administration, fomivirsen is slowly cleared from vitreous with a half-life of approximately 55 hours in humans. Preclinical studies show that fomivirsen distributes to retina and is slowly metabolised by exonuclease digestion. Clearance from retina was shown to be similarly slow following loading from the vitreous. The estimated half-life for clearance of fomivirsen from retina was 78 hours in monkeys following a 115-microg dose. Because of the low doses coupled with slow disposition from the eye, measurable concentrations of drug are not detected in the systemic circulation following intravitreal administration. Systemically administered phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides are highly bound to albumin and alpha2-macroglobulin in blood plasma. Because fomivirsen does not compete for oxidative metabolic processes involved in clearance of many xenobiotics, the most likely mechanism for drug interactions may be altered protein binding of a coadministered drug. The extremely low systemic exposure to this oligodeoxynucleotide following intravitreal administration largely negates its potential ability to interact with systemically administered drugs. Even if fomivirsen were able to access the blood, protein binding assays indicate that drugs that are site I and site II binders of albumin (warfarin, ibuprofen, salicylic acid) are not displaced in the presence of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides of various sequences at concentrations orders of magnitude higher than that seen for fomivirsen. Administration of fomivirsen with numerous systemically administered antiretrovirals (for example zidovudine and zalcitabine) as well as systemically administered anticytomegalovirus agents such as foscarnet

  13. Mutations within folate metabolising genes of Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... 6Institute for Medical and Medicinal Plant Research (IMPM), Ministry of Scientific Research and innovation, Yaounde,. Cameroon. ... Filter paper blood sample were collected prior to treatment and on clinical failure days to .... EDTA solution and unincorporated isotopes removed by brief cen- trifugation in a ...

  14. Estimation Organic Matter Digestibility, Metabolisable Energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... OMD values. However, studies have not been done on antioxidant activity, and total phenolic and flavonoid concentrations of the stems and seeds of the J. acutus plant. The objectives of this study were to estimate and compare the nutritive value, antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid ...

  15. Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aneldavh

    The need for protein in human and animal diets is increasing all over the world. Protein, especially for use in animal feed, is becoming scarcer and more expensive. This is ... Grain legumes that are cultivated in the Mediterranean rainfall area of South Africa include lupins (Lupinus spp), faba beans (Vicia faba), field peas ( ...

  16. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  17. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  18. Direct Comparison of the Histidine-rich Protein-2 Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and Malaria SYBR Green I Fluorescence (MSF) Drug Sensitivity Tests in Plasmodium falciparum Reference Clones and Fresh ex vivo Field Isolates from Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    mefloquine (Pearson r = 0.85-0.99 for reference clones and 0.56-0.84 for IEV isolates), whereas a weaker IC50 value correlation between methods was noted...strains with varying drug susceptibility profiles: W2 and K1 (susceptible to mefloquine , and resistant to chloroquine), D6 (susceptible to chloroquine, and...resistant to mefloquine ), and 3D7 (susceptible to chloroquine, but less susceptible to mefloquine than W2). From the IC50 profiles of all parasite

  19. Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare X-linked disease caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase that leads to the accumulation of abnormal glycolipid. Untreated patients develop potentially lethal complications by age 30 to 50 years. Enzyme replacement therapy is the current standard of therapy for Fabry disease. Two formulations of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (agalsidase are available in most markets: agalsidase-α and agalsidase-β, allowing a choice of therapy. However, the US Food and Drug Administration rejected the application for commercialization of agalsidase-α. The main difference between the 2 enzymes is the dose. The label dose for agalsidase-α is 0.2 mg/kg/2 weeks, while the dose for agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks. Recent evidence suggests a dose-dependent effect of enzyme replacement therapy and agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks, which has been shown to reduce the occurrence of hard end points (severe renal and cardiac events, stroke, and death. In addition, patients with Fabry disease who have developed tissue injury should receive coadjuvant tissue protective therapy, together with enzyme replacement therapy, to limit nonspecific progression of the tissue injury. It is likely that in the near future, additional oral drugs become available to treat Fabry disease, such as chaperones or substrate reduction therapy.

  20. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...... for efficient hydrolysis, enzyme stability, and the detrimental interaction between enzyme and lignin. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the various methods for enzyme recovery and recycling, for example recycling of free enzymes, readsorption to fresh material, recycling of solids, membrane...

  1. Enzyme encapsulated hollow silica nanospheres for intracellular biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Peng; Hung, Yann; Chang, Jen-Hsuan; Lin, Chen-Han; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2014-05-14

    Hollow silica nanospheres (HSN) with low densities, large interior spaces and permeable silica shells are suitable for loading enzymes in the cavity to carry out intracellular biocatalysis. The porous shell can protect the encapsulated enzymes against proteolysis and attenuate immunological response. We developed a microemulsion-templating method for confining horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the cavity of HSN. This simple one-pot enzyme encapsulation method allows entrapping of the enzyme, which retains high catalytic activity. Compared with HRP supported on solid silica spheres, HRP@HSN with thin porous silica shells displayed better enzyme activity. The small HRP@HSN (∼50 nm in diameter), giving satisfactory catalytic activity, can act as an intracellular catalyst for the oxidation of the prodrug indole-3-acetic acid to produce toxic free radicals for killing cancer cells. We envision this kind of hollow nanosystem could encapsulate multiple enzymes or other synergistic drugs and function as therapeutic nanoreactors.

  2. Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attempt to stop taking the drug Recognizing unhealthy drug use in family members Sometimes it's difficult to ... sold to support drug use Recognizing signs of drug use or intoxication Signs and symptoms of drug ...

  3. Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seizure Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days ... reaction the first time you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can ...

  4. Preliminary survey on some detoxication and toxication enzymes in fishes from the MUDA area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmijah Surif; Heng Phaik Heok; Jelin Nioi; Juzu Hayati Arshad

    2002-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, specifically the mixed function oxidase (mfo), UDP-glucuronyl transferase (UDP-GT) and glutathione S?transferase (GST) in fishes have been used in this study as indicators of pesticide pollution in the ricefields. Activities of these enzymes were assayed in four fish species namely snakehead or haruan (Channa striata), climbing perch or puyu (Anabas testudineus), snakeskin gouramy or sepat siam (Trichogasterpectoralis) and walking catfish or keli (Clarias spp.) taken from six different locations within the Muda Irrigation Scheme on two different occasions. These areas are namely ACRBD4, Alor Gunung, Tanah Merah, Block 14, Sungai Sala in Kedah and Kampung Jelempok in Arau, Perlis. The last site, which practises biological and nonchemical pest control methods was taken as the control plot. Results from this study show no significant difference between the GST levels in Channa striata and Anabas testudineus taken from areas where pesticides are routinely used and that of the control area, suggesting that the level of pollution is not significant enough to cause elevated GST levels in these fishes. It was also interesting to note that there were species related differences in the levels of this enzyme in fishes from the same sites. The UDP-GT activities were higher in fishes exposed to pesticides compared to control fish. Esterase however appeared to be repressed in fishes from areas in which pesticides are freely used. Due to inconsistent number of catches at the two sampling times, these initial observations need to be treated with caution until substantiated with more samples and replicates in the future. (Author)

  5. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1924 Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1387 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Candida pseudotropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactase enzyme preparation from Candida... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1387 Lactase enzyme preparation from Candida pseudotropicalis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus. (a) α-Amylase enzyme preparation is obtained from the culture...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of angiotensin...

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P G; Rømer, F K; Cortes, D

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical or radiolog......In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... lactococcus lactis. 184.1985 Section 184.1985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named...

  12. The ENZYME database in 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairoch, A

    2000-01-01

    The ENZYME database is a repository of information related to the nomenclature of enzymes. In recent years it has became an indispensable resource for the development of metabolic databases. The current version contains information on 3705 enzymes. It is available through the ExPASy WWW server (http://www.expasy.ch/enzyme/ ).

  13. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  14. Comparative gene expression of intestinal metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Lee, Dong-Goo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Jin-Suk; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the intestine of mouse, rat and human. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the mRNA expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays. Detected genes from the intestine of mouse, rat and human were ca. 60% of 22690 sequences, 40% of 8739 and 47% of 12559, respectively. Total genes of metabolizing enzymes subjected in this study were 95, 33 and 68 genes in mouse, rat and human, respectively. Of phase I enzymes, the mouse exhibited abundant gene expressions for Cyp3a25, Cyp4v3, Cyp2d26, followed by Cyp2b20, Cyp2c65 and Cyp4f14, whereas, the rat showed higher expression profiles of Cyp3a9, Cyp2b19, Cyp4f1, Cyp17a1, Cyp2d18, Cyp27a1 and Cyp4f6. However, the highly expressed P450 enzymes were CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F3, CYP2C18, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A7, CYP11B1 and CYP2B6 in the human. For phase II enzymes, glucuronosyltransferase Ugt1a6, glutathione S-transferases Gstp1, Gstm3 and Gsta2, sulfotransferase Sult1b1 and acyltransferase Dgat1 were highly expressed in the mouse. The rat revealed predominant expression of glucuronosyltransferases Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a7, sulfotransferase Sult1b1, acetyltransferase Dlat and acyltransferase Dgat1. On the other hand, in human, glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, glutathione S-transferases MGST3, GSTP1, GSTA2 and GSTM4, sulfotransferases ST1A3 and SULT1A2, acetyltransferases SAT1 and CRAT, and acyltransferase AGPAT2 were dominantly detected. Therefore, current data indicated substantial interspecies differences in the pattern of intestinal gene expression both for P450 enzymes and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. This genomic database is expected to improve our understanding of interspecies variations in estimating intestinal prehepatic clearance of oral drugs.

  15. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  16. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  17. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  18. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  19. Modulation of the endogenous antioxidants paraoxonase-1 and urate by pesticide exposure and genetic variants of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Antonio F; Gil, Fernando; Lacasaña, Marina; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Gómez-Martin, Antonio; Lozano, David; Pla, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the association between pesticide exposure in farmworkers and plasma levels of the endogenous antioxidants urate and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) enzyme activities (paraoxonase, arylesterase and diazoxonase, three substrate-specific assays for measuring PON1 function) by using generalized estimating equations (GEEs). Decreases in plasma and erythrocyte cholinesterases (BChE and AChE, respectively) were used as biomarkers of pesticide exposure. We also assessed the contribution of genetic polymorphisms of the pesticide-metabolising enzymes PON1, glutathione S-transferases (GST) and cholinesterase variants (BCHE) on plasma levels of endogenous antioxidants and potential gene-environment interactions. A dual effect was observed on paraoxonase depending on the pattern of pesticide exposure. Thus, exposure to anticholinesterase pesticides was associated with decreased paraoxonase activity and urate levels whereas long-term pesticide exposure showed an association with increased paraoxonase activity. Significant interactions were observed between BChE activity and PON1 regulatory region polymorphisms on arylesterase and diazoxonase activities, and between AChE activity (a biomarker for long-term pesticide exposure) and PON1192RR genotype on arylesterase activity. These findings suggest that pesticide exposure may affect plasma antioxidant potential and that relevant gene-pesticide interactions may play a mechanistic role in oxidative stress-induced diseases following pesticide exposure. Nonetheless, more studies are needed to better characterise these interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biophysical tools to monitor enzyme-ligand interactions of enzymes involved in vitamin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulli, A; Abell, C

    2005-08-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular interactions is of importance to our understanding of biological processes such as enzyme catalysis and inhibition. Biophysical techniques enable sensitive detection and accurate characterization of binding and are therefore powerful tools in enzymology and rational drug design. The applications of NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry to study enzyme-ligand interactions will be discussed. Recent work on ketopantoate reductase, which catalyses an important step on the biosynthetic pathway to vitamin B5, is used to illustrate the potential of this approach.

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely ... So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug ...

  2. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  3. Enzyme Immobilization: An Overview on Methods, Support Material, and Applications of Immobilized Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisha, V L; Jain, Ankita; Jain, Amita

    Immobilized enzymes can be used in a wide range of processes. In recent years, a variety of new approaches have emerged for the immobilization of enzymes that have greater efficiency and wider usage. During the course of the last two decades, this area has rapidly expanded into a multidisciplinary field. This current study is a comprehensive review of a variety of literature produced on the different enzymes that have been immobilized on various supporting materials. These immobilized enzymes have a wide range of applications. These include applications in the sugar, fish, and wine industries, where they are used for removing organic compounds from waste water. This study also reviews their use in sophisticated biosensors for metabolite control and in situ measurements of environmental pollutants. Immobilized enzymes also find significant application in drug metabolism, biodiesel and antibiotic production, bioremediation, and the food industry. The widespread usage of immobilized enzymes is largely due to the fact that they are cheaper, environment friendly, and much easier to use when compared to equivalent technologies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uronic polysaccharide degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garron, Marie-Line; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2014-10-01

    In the past several years progress has been made in the field of structure and function of polysaccharide lyases (PLs). The number of classified polysaccharide lyase families has increased to 23 and more detailed analysis has allowed the identification of more closely related subfamilies, leading to stronger correlation between each subfamily and a unique substrate. The number of as yet unclassified polysaccharide lyases has also increased and we expect that sequencing projects will allow many of these unclassified sequences to emerge as new families. The progress in structural analysis of PLs has led to having at least one representative structure for each of the families and for two unclassified enzymes. The newly determined structures have folds observed previously in other PL families and their catalytic mechanisms follow either metal-assisted or Tyr/His mechanisms characteristic for other PL enzymes. Comparison of PLs with glycoside hydrolases (GHs) shows several folds common to both classes but only for the β-helix fold is there strong indication of divergent evolution from a common ancestor. Analysis of bacterial genomes identified gene clusters containing multiple polysaccharide cleaving enzymes, the Polysaccharides Utilization Loci (PULs), and their gene complement suggests that they are organized to process completely a specific polysaccharide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on ... Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & ...

  7. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug ...

  8. Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ... Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use ...

  10. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Flavouring Group Evaluation 46, Revision 1 (FGE.46Rev1): Ammonia and three ammonium salts from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... that the substance does not induce tumours. Ammonia is a substance that is readily absorbed in the gut. It is produced endogenously in amounts that far exceed those that are to be ingested as flavourings. The three ammonium salts are expected to give rise to ammonium ion and chloride or hydrogen sulphide. Ammonia...... is expected to be transported by the portal circulation to the liver and metabolised to urea by the Krebs urea cycle and subsequently excreted by the kidneys. Hydrogen sulphide is a substance that is produced endogenously. The major pathway for sulphide metabolism is oxidation to sulphate and excretion...

  11. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  12. Enzymes: An integrated view of structure, dynamics and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Pratul K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbes utilize enzymes to perform a variety of functions. Enzymes are biocatalysts working as highly efficient machines at the molecular level. In the past, enzymes have been viewed as static entities and their function has been explained on the basis of direct structural interactions between the enzyme and the substrate. A variety of experimental and computational techniques, however, continue to reveal that proteins are dynamically active machines, with various parts exhibiting internal motions at a wide range of time-scales. Increasing evidence also indicates that these internal protein motions play a role in promoting protein function such as enzyme catalysis. Moreover, the thermodynamical fluctuations of the solvent, surrounding the protein, have an impact on internal protein motions and, therefore, on enzyme function. In this review, we describe recent biochemical and theoretical investigations of internal protein dynamics linked to enzyme catalysis. In the enzyme cyclophilin A, investigations have lead to the discovery of a network of protein vibrations promoting catalysis. Cyclophilin A catalyzes peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization in a variety of peptide and protein substrates. Recent studies of cyclophilin A are discussed in detail and other enzymes (dihydrofolate reductase and liver alcohol dehydrogenase where similar discoveries have been reported are also briefly discussed. The detailed characterization of the discovered networks indicates that protein dynamics plays a role in rate-enhancement achieved by enzymes. An integrated view of enzyme structure, dynamics and function have wide implications in understanding allosteric and co-operative effects, as well as protein engineering of more efficient enzymes and novel drug design.

  13. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  14. Enzymes as Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Maria; Pennacchio, Angela; Varriale, Antonio; Capo, Alessandro; Majoli, Adelia; Capacchione, Clotilde; D'Auria, Sabato

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few decades the development of new technologies, the fabrication of new materials, and the introduction of nanotechnologies created new trends in a series of advances that produced innovations in biological sensing devices with a wide range of application from health, security, defense, food, and medicine, to the environment. Specificity, low cost, rapidity, sensitivity, and multiplicity are some of the reasons for their growth, and their commercial success is expected to increase in the next future. Biosensors are devices in which the recognition part of the target molecule is accomplished by biological macromolecules such as proteins, enzymes, antibodies, aptamers, etc. These biomolecules are able to bind to the target molecules with high selectivity and specificity. The interaction between the target molecule and the specific biomolecule is reflected as a change of the biomolecule structural features. The extent of this change is strictly related to the biosensor response. Fluorescence spectroscopy, due to its sensitivity, is often used as the principal technique to monitor biological interactions, and thus the biosensor response as well. Both the intrinsic ultraviolet fluorescence of protein, arising from aromatic amino acids (tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine), and extrinsic fluorescent labels emitting in the visible region of the spectrum together allow for very flexible transduction of the analyte recognition, suitable for many different applications. This chapter focuses special attention on enzymes as practically unmatched recognition elements for biosensors and emphasizes the potential advantages of customized biosensor devices using apo- or holo forms of enzymes also isolated from thermophile sources. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zhenxing; Liu Rutao; Zhang Hao

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K 293K = 7.09 x 10 4 L mol -1 and K 311K = 3.31 x 10 4 L mol -1 . The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o , ΔG o and ΔS o ) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  16. Relevance of the ancestry for the variability of the Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 polymorphisms in a multiethnic Costa Rican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Jiménez-Arce, Gerardo; Naranjo, María-Eugenia G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Fariñas, Humberto; Barrantes, Ramiro; Llerena, Adrián

    2016-09-01

    CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 metabolize around 40% of drugs and their genes vary across populations. The Costa Rican population has a trihybrid ancestry and its key geographic location turns it into a suitable scenario to evaluate interethnic differences across populations. This study aims to describe the diversity of CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 polymorphisms in Costa Rican populations in the context of their ancestry. A total of 448 healthy individuals were included in the study: Bribri (n= 47), Cabécar (n= 27), Maleku (n= 16), Guaymí (n= 30), Huetar (n= 48), Chorotega (n= 41), Admixed/Mestizos from the Central Valley/Guanacaste (n= 189), and Afro-Caribbeans (n= 50) from Limón. CYP2C9 (alleles *2, *3, *6) and CYP2C19 (*2, *3, *4, *5, *17) genotypes were determined by Real-Time PCR. African, European and Native American ancestry were inferred using 87 ancestry informative markers. The frequency of the decreased activity allele CYP2C9*2 is lower in the self-reported Amerindian groups compared to the admixed population, and the highest frequencies of CYP2C19*2 (null activity) and the CYP2C19*17 (increased activity) were found in the self-reported Afro-Caribbean population. Moreover, a frequency of 0.7 % CYP2C9 gPMs in the Admixed population and a variable frequency of CYP2C19 gUMs (0.0-32.6 %, more prevalent in Afro-Caribbeans) in Costa Rican populations, was found. Finally, the following alleles were positively correlated with genomic African ancestry and negatively correlated with genomic Native American ancestry: CYP2D6*5 (null activity), CYP2D6*17 (decreased activity), CYP2D6*29 (decreased activity) and CYP2C19*17 (increased activity). No correlation for CYP2C9 polymorphisms and genomic ancestry was found. Further studies assessing the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 sequence in these populations, preferentially by sequencing these genes, are warranted.

  17. Identification of novel cytochrome P450s in the Acari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytochrome P450s are the major phase I drug metabolising enzymes found in most organisms, including arthropods. Much of the work within the area of xenobiotic metabolism in this group of animals has centered around mosquito species, e.g. Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus, due to their rol...

  18. WAJM 29(4) corrected.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    de contrôle. Ce commentaire vise à examiner les défis et les limites de la pharmacovigilance en cours de médicaments. ACT au Nigeria et proposer des .... reduction in incidence of Reye's syndrome. The development of the organ systems and the enzymes systems within children, which metabolise and eliminate drugs ...

  19. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What ... Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency ...

  1. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  2. SKPDB: a structural database of shikimate pathway enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Azevedo Walter F

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional and structural characterisation of enzymes that belong to microbial metabolic pathways is very important for structure-based drug design. The main interest in studying shikimate pathway enzymes involves the fact that they are essential for bacteria but do not occur in humans, making them selective targets for design of drugs that do not directly impact humans. Description The ShiKimate Pathway DataBase (SKPDB is a relational database applied to the study of shikimate pathway enzymes in microorganisms and plants. The current database is updated regularly with the addition of new data; there are currently 8902 enzymes of the shikimate pathway from different sources. The database contains extensive information on each enzyme, including detailed descriptions about sequence, references, and structural and functional studies. All files (primary sequence, atomic coordinates and quality scores are available for downloading. The modeled structures can be viewed using the Jmol program. Conclusions The SKPDB provides a large number of structural models to be used in docking simulations, virtual screening initiatives and drug design. It is freely accessible at http://lsbzix.rc.unesp.br/skpdb/.

  3. Design and Synthesis of Epigenetic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    of histone- and DNA-modifying enzymes can lead to the development of diseases such as cancer. The histone demethylases of the KDM4 family have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, and are hence important drug targets. KDM4s belong to the bigger family of 2-OG oxygenases, an enzyme class sharing high...

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Where Can Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking ... You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English ...

  5. Hazardous Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and hazardous drugs in the workplace. Pharmacy . OSHA Hospital eTool. Reviews safety and health topics related to hazardous drugs including drug handling, administration, storage, and disposal. OSHA has identified worker exposure ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment ...

  7. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as ginkgo and blood thinners ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to ...

  9. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... regarding prevention and treatment of MDMA. ( September 2017 ) View all related publications Related NIDA Notes Articles Narrative ...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen ... to prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What Are the Treatment Options? What Is Recovery? ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her ...

  13. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  14. Enzyme changes associated with mitochondrial malic enzyme deficiency in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Erickson, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    A genetically determined absence of mitochondrial malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) in c/sup 3H//c/sup 6H/ mice is accompanied by a four-fold increase in liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and a two-fold increase for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Smaller increases in the activity of serine dehydratase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase are observed while the level of glutamic pyruvate transaminase activity is reduced in the liver of deficient mice. Unexpectedly, the level of activity of total malic enzyme in the livers of mitochrondrial malic enzyme-deficient mice is increased approximately 50% compared to littermate controls. No similar increase in solublle malic enzyme activity is observed in heart of kidney tissue of mutant mice and the levels of total malic enzyme in these tissues are in accord with expected levels of activity in mitochondrial malic enzyme-deficient mice. The divergence in levels of enzyme activity between mutant and wild-type mice begins at 19 to 21 days of age. Immunoinactivation experiments with monospecific antisera to the soluble malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase demonstrate that the activity increases represent increases in the amount of enzyme protein. The alterations are not consistent with a single hormonal response.

  15. Technological advances and applications of hydrolytic enzymes for valorization of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisha; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are indispensable tools in the production of various foodstuffs, drugs, and consumables owing to their applications in almost every industrial process nowadays. One of the foremost areas of interest involving the use of hydrolytic enzymes is in the transformation of lignocellulosic biomass into value added products. However, limitations of the processes due to inadequate enzyme activity and stability with a narrow range of pH and temperature optima often limit their effective usage. The innovative technologies, involving manipulation of enzyme activity and stability through mutagenesis, genetic engineering and metagenomics lead to a major leap in all the fields using hydrolytic enzymes. This article provides recent advancement towards the isolation and use of microbes for lignocellulosic biomass utilisation, microbes producing the hydrolytic enzymes, the modern age technologies used to manipulate and enhance the hydrolytic enzyme activity and the applications of such enzymes in value added products development from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. the use of proteolytic enzymes (chymoral) in sporting injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results lined showed a statistically significant improvement he patients taking the active drug, reducing the time. :esolution of inflammatory oedema by 50%. 10nstein3 was able to show considerable improvement boxers who used proteolytic enzymes both prophy-. icaUy and therapeutically. In this trial the double-blind.

  17. Is there a difference between an angiotensin-converting enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modulation of the RAS by the two most widely used inhibitors of the system, i.e. angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin-specific receptor blockers (ARBs) plays a crucial role in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. These drugs both target angiotensin II, but in different.

  18. Natural and Synthetic Macrocyclic Inhibitors of the Histone Deacetylase Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maolanon, Alex; Kristensen, Helle; Leman, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes has emerged as a target for development of cancer chemotherapy. Four compounds have gained approval for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, and several are currently in clinical trials. However, none of these compounds...

  19. The evolution of substrate discrimination in macrolide antibiotic resistance enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Andrew C; Stogios, Peter J; Koteva, Kalinka; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2018-01-09

    The production of antibiotics by microbes in the environment and their use in medicine and agriculture select for existing and emerging resistance. To address this inevitability, prudent development of antibiotic drugs requires careful consideration of resistance evolution. Here, we identify the molecular basis for expanded substrate specificity in MphI, a macrolide kinase (Mph) that does not confer resistance to erythromycin, in contrast to other known Mphs. Using a combination of phylogenetics, drug-resistance phenotypes, and in vitro enzyme assays, we find that MphI and MphK phosphorylate erythromycin poorly resulting in an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. Using likelihood reconstruction of ancestral sequences and site-saturation combinatorial mutagenesis, supported by Mph crystal structures, we determine that two non-obvious mutations in combination expand the substrate range. This approach should be applicable for studying the functional evolution of any antibiotic resistance enzyme and for evaluating the evolvability of resistance enzymes to new generations of antibiotic scaffolds.

  20. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  1. Penetration Enzymes of Schistosome Cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-12

    schistosomules; *: (4) differences in intraspecific geographical strains of Schistosoma mansoni; and (5) snail -parasite relationships. (1) Cercarial Enzymes...3) Skin surface lipid can be used to stimulate cercarial secretion which can be collected in vitro. (4) Since postacetabular gland mucus is not water...enzyme activity throughout the patency of infection in snails exposed to 8 to 10 or to I miracidium, required recording cercarial harvests and enzyme

  2. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Enzymes From Rare Actinobacterial Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriya, J; Bharathiraja, S; Manivasagan, P; Kim, S-K

    Actinobacteria constitute rich sources of novel biocatalysts and novel natural products for medical and industrial utilization. Although actinobacteria are potential source of economically important enzymes, the isolation and culturing are somewhat tough because of its extreme habitats. But now-a-days, the rate of discovery of novel compounds producing actinomycetes from soil, freshwater, and marine ecosystem has increased much through the developed culturing and genetic engineering techniques. Actinobacteria are well-known source of their bioactive compounds and they are the promising source of broad range of industrially important enzymes. The bacteria have the capability to degrade a range of pesticides, hydrocarbons, aromatic, and aliphatic compounds (Sambasiva Rao, Tripathy, Mahalaxmi, & Prakasham, 2012). Most of the enzymes are mainly derived from microorganisms because of their easy of growth, minimal nutritional requirements, and low-cost for downstream processing. The focus of this review is about the new, commercially useful enzymes from rare actinobacterial strains. Industrial requirements are now fulfilled by the novel actinobacterial enzymes which assist the effective production. Oxidative enzymes, lignocellulolytic enzymes, extremozymes, and clinically useful enzymes are often utilized in many industrial processes because of their ability to catalyze numerous reactions. Novel, extremophilic, oxidative, lignocellulolytic, and industrially important enzymes from rare Actinobacterial population are discussed in this chapter. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzyme therapeutics for systemic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Lu, Yunfeng

    2015-08-01

    Life relies on numerous biochemical processes working synergistically and correctly. Certain substances disrupt these processes, inducing living organism into an abnormal state termed intoxication. Managing intoxication usually requires interventions, which is referred as detoxification. Decades of development on detoxification reveals the potential of enzymes as ideal therapeutics and antidotes, because their high substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are essential for clearing intoxicating substances without adverse effects. However, intrinsic shortcomings of enzymes including low stability and high immunogenicity are major hurdles, which could be overcome by delivering enzymes with specially designed nanocarriers. Extensive investigations on protein delivery indicate three types of enzyme-nanocarrier architectures that show more promise than others for systemic detoxification, including liposome-wrapped enzymes, polymer-enzyme conjugates, and polymer-encapsulated enzymes. This review highlights recent advances in these nano-architectures and discusses their applications in systemic detoxifications. Therapeutic potential of various enzymes as well as associated challenges in achieving effective delivery of therapeutic enzymes will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of enzymes involved in oxidation of phenylbutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palir, Neža; Ruiter, Jos P N; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houtkooper, Riekelt H

    2017-05-01

    In recent years the short-chain fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (PB), has emerged as a promising drug for various clinical conditions. In fact, PB has been Food and Drug Administration-approved for urea cycle disorders since 1996. PB is more potent and less toxic than its metabolite, phenylacetate (PA), and is not just a pro-drug for PA, as was initially assumed. The metabolic pathway of PB, however, has remained unclear. Therefore, we set out to identify the enzymes involved in the β-oxidation of PB. We used cells deficient in specific steps of fatty acid β-oxidation and ultra-HPLC to measure which enzymes were able to convert PB or its downstream products. We show that the first step in PB oxidation is catalyzed solely by the enzyme, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The second (hydration) step can be catalyzed by all three mitochondrial enoyl-CoA hydratase enzymes, i.e., short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase. Enzymes involved in the third step include both short- and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The oxidation of PB is completed by only one enzyme, i.e., long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. Taken together, the enzymatic characteristics of the PB degradative pathway may lead to better dose finding and limiting the toxicity of this drug. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Direct comparison of enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to localize an enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2002-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes is compared directly with localization of enzyme activity with (catalytic) enzyme histochemical methods. The two approaches demonstrate principally different aspects of an enzyme. The immunohistochemical method localizes the enzyme protein whether it is

  7. Pancreatic enzyme products: digesting the changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Christopher A; Dehoorne-Smith, Michelle L; Kale-Pradhan, Pramodini B

    2011-05-01

    To review the pharmacology, dosage regimens, efficacy, and safety of currently marketed pancreatic enzyme products (PEPs). Studies were identified by PubMed (1966-January 2011), clinicaltrials.gov, fda.gov, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. Search terms included pancreatic enzyme, lipase, Creon, Zenpep, Pancreaze, and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). All human studies evaluating the efficacy of currently approved or potential PEPs were reviewed. PEPs are composed of porcine lipase, amylase, and protease and are used in patients with EPI secondary to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatectomy. In 1938, PEPs were exempted from the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 and never underwent a formal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review process. In response to reports of treatment failures during product interchange, the FDA conducted a review of available PEP products. This review found a large variability of response between the unapproved PEP products, which resulted in the FDA requiring approval of all PEP products by April 2010. The 3 delayed-release, enteric-coated PEPs currently approved by the FDA (Creon, Zenpep, and Pancreaze) have demonstrated efficacy and safety in EPI secondary to cystic fibrosis. Creon has also demonstrated safety and efficacy in EPI secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatectomy. Cost difference between the 3 products is minimal. Treatment-related adverse events in clinical studies for all PEPs were less than or similar to those with placebo. At this time, Creon is an appropriate first-line agent, as it has been approved for chronic pancreatitis, pancreatectomy, and cystic fibrosis.

  8. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  9. Use of SPring-8 in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Kazumi

    2006-01-01

    Protein structure analysis consortium was established by 21 drug companies and has analyzed protein structures using the beam line BL32B2 of SPring-8 since September in 2002. Outline of the protein structure analysis consortium, contribution of SPring-8 to drug development, and the present status and future of use of SPring-8 are stated. For examples of structure analysis, the human nuclear enzyme (PARP-1) fragment complex crystal structure, human ISG20, human dipeptidine peptidase IV, human cMDH, chromatin binding human nuclear enzyme complex, change of structure of each step of tyrosine activation of bacteria tyrosine tRNA synthetase are described. Contribution of analysis of protein structure and functions to drug development, development process of new drug, drug screening using compounds database on the basis of the three dimensional structure of receptor active site, genome drug development, and the effects of a target drug on the market are explained. (S.Y.)

  10. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  11. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath ... Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from drugs. But she's afraid ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use ... Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the text to you. This website talks ...

  15. Identifying Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Affect Teens The Negative Health Effects of Marijuana Use State and Federal Drug Laws Treatment and Recovery Federal Student Aid and Consequences of a Drug Conviction School Failure VIDEO: Taking Prescription Drugs to Get High—A Bad Idea Drugged Driving—What You Should Know How ...

  16. Drug disposition and drug-drug interaction data in 2013 FDA new drug applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to perform a systematic review of drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the NDAs approved by the FDA in 2013, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight significant findings. Among 27 NMEs approved, 22 (81%) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, or organ impairment, in accordance with the FDA drug interaction guidance (2012) and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. However, in vivo, only half (n = 11) showed clinically relevant drug interactions, with most related to the NMEs as victim drugs and CYP3A being the most affected enzyme. As perpetrators, the overall effects for NMEs were much less pronounced, compared with when they served as victims. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluation in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful information for further understanding of the drugs' disposition. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Drug metabolizing enzyme systems and their relationship to toxic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, M.R.; Ravindranath, V.; Burka, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism and toxicity of 3-methylfuran (3-MF) are described. The major product of metabolic activation of 3-MF appears to be disemicarbazones. Cursory description of toxic effects of 3-MF on lung and kidneys are provided. 18 refs

  18. Drug: D05681 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 22A2 [HSA:6582] Genomic biomarker: G6PD [HSA:2539] CAS: 146-40-7 PubChem: 47207342 DrugBank: DB00468 LigandBox: D05681 ... ...noline ... Enzyme: CYP3A4 [HSA:1576], CYP3A5 [HSA:1577], CYP3A7 [HSA:1551] Transporter: SLC22A1 [HSA:6580], SLC

  19. Drug: D01772 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available agent ... DG02030 ... Anesthetics ... DG02027 ... General anesthetics ... DG02028 ... Inhalational anaesthetics ... DG02027 ... General anesthetics... ... DG02028 ... Inhalational anaesthetics Same as: C13240 ATC code: N01AA01 ... Enzyme: CYP2E... D01772 Drug Ether (JP17/USP); Diethyl ether ... C4H10O D01772.gif ... Neuropsychiatric

  20. Drug: D00383 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00383 Drug Trandolapril (JAN/INN); Mavik (TN) ... C24H34N2O5 D00383.gif ... Cardiovas... DG01501 ... Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Therapeutic category: 2144 ATC code: C09AA10 ... Active form of prodrug: Trandolap

  1. Digestive enzymes of some earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P C; Dash, M C

    1980-10-15

    4 species of tropical earthworms differed with regard to enzyme activity. The maximum activity of protease and of cellulase occurred in the posterior region of the gut of the earthworms. On the average Octochaetona surensis shows maximum activity and Drawida calebi shows minimum activity for all the enzymes studied.

  2. Enzyme Kinetics? Elementary, my dear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In addition, enzymes usually exhibit a remarkable specificity for the reactants and reactions, including the ability to distinguish between optical isomers 1. The Principle of Catalysis. An enzyme, like a catalyst, only increases the rate of a reaction without altering itself at the end of the reaction. Consider the interconversion of ...

  3. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome due to drug interaction between glucocorticoids and the ritonavir or cobicistat containing HIV therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Emilie R; Theodoraki, Aikaterini; Jain, Lakshmi R; Marshall, Neal J; Boffito, Marta; Baldeweg, Stephanie E; Waters, Laura J

    2016-10-01

    Ritonavir and cobicistat, used as pharmacokinetic enhancers in combination with some antiretrovirals (ARVs) for the treatment of HIV, are potent inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Most glucocorticoids are metabolised via the CYP3A4 pathway and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (ICS), with possible secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI), is a recognised complication following co-administration with ritonavir or cobicistat. A structured approach for identifying and managing potentially affected individuals has not been established.We systematically identified patients with ICS/SAI and found substantial heterogeneity in clinical practice across three large London HIV centres. While this significant drug interaction and its complications are now well-recognised, it is apparent that there is no standardised approach to management or guidance for the general physician. Here we describe the management of ICS/SAI in our current practice, review the available evidence and suggest practice recommendations. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative determination of phenytoin by spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, enzyme immunoassay, and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.; Ibanez, J.; DiCesare, J.L.; Adams, R.F.; Malkus, H.

    1978-01-01

    Sera from patients being treated with phenytoin were analyzed for the drug by spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, radioimmunoasay, enzyme immunoassay, and liquid chromatography. The assay values obtained were intercompared statistically. Enzyme immunoassay and liquid chromatography appear to be attractive alternatives to the more traditional methods of spectrophotometry and gas chromatography. Our radioimmunoassay data correlated poorly with results by the four other methods

  5. Enzyme-carrying electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongfei

    2011-01-01

    Compared to other nanomaterials as supports for enzyme immobilization, nanofibers provide a promising configuration in balancing the key factors governing the catalytic performance of the immobilized enzymes including surface area-to-volume ratio, mass transfer resistance, effective loading, and the easiness to recycle. Synthetic and natural polymers can be fabricated into nanofibers via a physical process called electrospinning. The process requires only simple apparatus to operate, yet has proved to be very flexible in the selection of feedstock materials and also effective to control and manipulate the properties of the resulting nanofibers such as size and surface morphology, which are typically important parameters for enzyme immobilization supports. This chapter describes a protocol for the preparation of nanofibrous enzyme, involving the synthesis and end-group functionalization of polystyrene, production of electrospun nanofibers, and surface immobilization of enzyme via covalent attachment.

  6. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  7. Glucuronidation of Drugs and Drug-Induced Toxicity in Humanized UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1 Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kutsuno, Yuki; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H.; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze glucuronidation of various drugs. Although experimental rodents are used in preclinical studies to predict glucuronidation and toxicity of drugs in humans, species differences in glucuronidation and drug-induced toxicity have been reported. Humanized UGT1 mice in which the original Ugt1 locus was disrupted and replaced with the human UGT1 locus (hUGT1 mice) were recently developed. In this study, acyl-glu...

  8. Regulation of phase II biotransformation enzymes by steroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohalmy, Krisztina; Vrzal, Radim

    2011-02-01

    Phase II biotransformation enzymes conjugate xenobiotics using small, organic donor molecules, such as glutathione, UDP-glucuronic acid, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, acetyl coenzyme A and amino acids (primarily glycine). These reactions generally resulted in detoxification by the loss of pharmacological activity and by quickening the elimination of xenobiotics from the body, however Bioactivation is also known to be occurred. Historically, it was placed more emphasis on research of phase I than of phase II enzymes. Nevertheless, it is well known that conjugation enzymes play an important role in drug and toxicant disposition since they can dramatically alter pharmacokinetics and therefore therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of drugs. In this context surprisingly, the exact regulation mechanism of phase II conjugation enzymes expression is not fully understood. However, available experimental data suggest that several transcriptional factors are involved in this process. In the current review, we characterize and summarize our knowledge about regulation of the most important phase II enzymes, such as UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), sulfotransferases (SULTs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs), catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) and thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) by different steroid hormones.

  9. Predicting potential drug-drug interactions by integrating chemical, biological, phenotypic and network data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Liu, Feng; Luo, Fei; Tian, Gang; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-01-05

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major concerns in drug discovery. Accurate prediction of potential DDIs can help to reduce unexpected interactions in the entire lifecycle of drugs, and are important for the drug safety surveillance. Since many DDIs are not detected or observed in clinical trials, this work is aimed to predict unobserved or undetected DDIs. In this paper, we collect a variety of drug data that may influence drug-drug interactions, i.e., drug substructure data, drug target data, drug enzyme data, drug transporter data, drug pathway data, drug indication data, drug side effect data, drug off side effect data and known drug-drug interactions. We adopt three representative methods: the neighbor recommender method, the random walk method and the matrix perturbation method to build prediction models based on different data. Thus, we evaluate the usefulness of different information sources for the DDI prediction. Further, we present flexible frames of integrating different models with suitable ensemble rules, including weighted average ensemble rule and classifier ensemble rule, and develop ensemble models to achieve better performances. The experiments demonstrate that different data sources provide diverse information, and the DDI network based on known DDIs is one of most important information for DDI prediction. The ensemble methods can produce better performances than individual methods, and outperform existing state-of-the-art methods. The datasets and source codes are available at https://github.com/zw9977129/drug-drug-interaction/ .

  10. Substance use - prescription drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance use disorder - prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs; Narcotics - substance use; Opioid - substance use; Sedative - substance ...

  11. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Arnò

    Full Text Available A human/plasmodial hybrid enzyme, generated by swapping the human topoisomerase IB linker domain with the corresponding domain of the Plasmodium falciparum enzyme, has been produced and characterized. The hybrid enzyme displays a relaxation activity comparable to the human enzyme, but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples a conformational space much larger than the corresponding domain in the human enzyme. The large linker conformational variability is then linked to important functional properties such as an increased religation rate and a low drug reactivity, demonstrating that the linker domain has a crucial role in the modulation of the topoisomerase IB activity.

  12. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia; Zuccaro, Laura; Ottaviani, Alessio; Knudsen, Birgitta; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    A human/plasmodial hybrid enzyme, generated by swapping the human topoisomerase IB linker domain with the corresponding domain of the Plasmodium falciparum enzyme, has been produced and characterized. The hybrid enzyme displays a relaxation activity comparable to the human enzyme, but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples a conformational space much larger than the corresponding domain in the human enzyme. The large linker conformational variability is then linked to important functional properties such as an increased religation rate and a low drug reactivity, demonstrating that the linker domain has a crucial role in the modulation of the topoisomerase IB activity.

  13. BAKERY ENZYMES IN CEREAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Koman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE Bread is the most common and traditional food in the world. For years, enzymes such as malt and fungal alpha-amylase have been used in bread making. Due to the changes in the baking industry and the ever-increasing demand for more natural products, enzymes have gained real importance in bread-making. If an enzyme is added, it is often destroyed by the heat during the baking process. For generations, enzymes have been used for the improvement of texture and appearance, enhancement of nutritional values and generation of appealing flavours and aromas. Enzymes used in bakery industry constitute nearly one third of the market. The bakery products have undergone radical improvements in quality over the past years in terms of flavour, texture and shelf-life. The the biggest contributor for these improvementsis the usage of enzymes. Present work seeks to systematically describe bakery enzymes, their classification, benefits, usage and chemical reactions in the bread making process.doi:10.5219/193

  14. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    Enzymes have long been of interest to the detergent industry due to their ability to improve the cleaning efficiency of synthetic detergents, contribute to shortening washing times, and reduce energy and water consumption, provision of environmentally friendlier wash water effluents and fabric care....... However, incorporating enzymes in detergent formulations gives rise to numerous practical problems due to their incompatibility with and stability against various detergent components. In powdered detergent formulations, these issues can be partly overcome by physically isolating the enzymes in separate...... of enzymes, high local pH in granule, oxygen, defects in granulate structure and the effect of other detergent components. However, the actual mechanism of inactivation is not known yet. It is believed that a combination of the factors mentioned above plays a role in the activity loss, and is the focus...

  15. Novel enzyme formulations for improved pharmacokinetic properties and anti-inflammatory efficacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan; Yan, Shenglei; Zhang, Yonghong; Hu, Xueyuan; Guo, Qi; Yuan, Yuming; Zhang, Jingqing

    2018-02-15

    Anti-inflammatory enzymes promote the dissolution and excretion of sticky phlegm, clean the wound surface and accelerate drug diffusion to the lesion. They play important roles in treating different types of inflammation and pain. Currently, various formulations of anti-inflammatory enzymes are successfully prepared to improve the enzymatic characteristics, pharmacokinetic properties and anti-inflammatory efficacies. The work was performed by systematically searching all available literature. An overall summary of current research about various anti-inflammatory enzymes and their novel formulations is presented. The original and improved enzymatic characteristics, pharmacokinetic properties, action mechanisms, clinical information, storage and shelf life, treatment efficacies of anti-inflammatory enzymes and their different formulations are summarized. The influencing factors such as enzyme type, source, excipient, pharmaceutical technique, administration route and dosage are analyzed. The combined application of enzymes and other drugs are included in this paper. Anti-inflammatory enzymes were widely applied in treating different types of inflammation and diseases with accompanying edema. Their novel formulations increased enzymatic stabilities, improved pharmacokinetic properties, provided different administration routes, and enhanced anti-inflammatory efficacies of anti-inflammatory enzymes but decreased side effects and toxicity. Novel enzyme formulations improve and expand the usage of anti-inflammatory enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting drug-drug interactions through drug structural similarities and interaction networks incorporating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takako; Hao, Ming; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may lead to adverse effects and potentially result in drug withdrawal from the market. Predicting DDIs during drug development would help reduce development costs and time by rigorous evaluation of drug candidates. The primary mechanisms of DDIs are based on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This study examines the effects of 2D structural similarities of drugs on DDI prediction through interaction networks including both PD and PK knowledge. Our assumption was that a query drug (Dq) and a drug to be examined (De) likely have DDI if the drugs in the interaction network of De are structurally similar to Dq. A network of De describes the associations between the drugs and the proteins relating to PK and PD for De. These include target proteins, proteins interacting with target proteins, enzymes, and transporters for De. We constructed logistic regression models for DDI prediction using only 2D structural similarities between each Dq and the drugs in the network of De. The results indicated that our models could effectively predict DDIs. It was found that integrating structural similarity scores of the drugs relating to both PK and PD of De was crucial for model performance. In particular, the combination of the target- and enzyme-related scores provided the largest increase of the predictive power.Graphical abstract.

  17. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  18. Tyndtarmens laegemiddelomsaetning--betydning for biotilgaengelighed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V C; Sonne, J

    2000-01-01

    The gut contains drug metabolizing enzymes and drug export proteins, of which the most important are CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein. P-glycoprotein is localised to the apical membrane and CYP3A4 in the subapical cytoplasmic membranes in the enterocytes. The substrate and modulator specificity overlap...... between the two systems. The function of the two systems may be integrated. The intestinal first pass effect is the fraction of a drug which is metabolised or excreted during the absorption from the lumen. The significance of the intestinal first pass effect for the bioavailability of the three model...... drugs, midazolam, cyclosporin and digoxin, has been reviewed. The impact of different disease states in the gastrointestinal tract on the function of intestinal drug metabolising enzymes and P-glycoprotein is far from elucidated. Further insight into the function of these systems may lead...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone with ... problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to ...

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ...

  1. Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that ... about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice ( ...

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes ... Options? What Is Recovery? What Is a Relapse? How Can Friends and Family Help? Where Can Someone ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) ... Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted ...

  7. Study Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are Study Drugs? Doctors prescribe medicines like Adderall and Ritalin to treat conditions like attention deficit ... stimulants are used as study drugs: amphetamines like Adderall, Dexedrine, or Vyvanse methylphenidates like Ritalin or Concerta ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth ... 662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter ...

  11. Orphan drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojša; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of ...

  12. High-Throughput Cytochrome P450 Cocktail Inhibition Assay for Assessing Drug-Drug and Drug-Botanical Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    Detection of drug-drug interactions is essential during the early stages of drug discovery and development, and the understanding of drug-botanical interactions is important for the safe use of botanical dietary supplements. Among the different forms of drug interactions that are known, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is the most common cause of drug-drug or drug-botanical interactions. Therefore, a rapid and comprehensive mass spectrometry-based in vitro high-throughput P450 cocktail inhibition assay was developed that uses 10 substrates simultaneously against nine CYP isoforms. Including probe substrates for CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and two probes targeting different binding sites of CYP3A4/5, this cocktail simultaneously assesses at least as many P450 enzymes as previous assays while remaining among the fastest due to short incubation times and rapid analysis using ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated using known inhibitors of each P450 enzyme and then shown to be useful not only for single-compound testing but also for the evaluation of potential drug-botanical interactions using the botanical dietary supplement licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) as an example. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. A High-Throughput (HTS) Assay for Enzyme Reaction Phenotyping in Human Recombinant P450 Enzymes Using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Suhar, Tom; Glass, Lateca; Rajaraman, Ganesh

    2014-03-03

    Enzyme reaction phenotyping is employed extensively during the early stages of drug discovery to identify the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of new chemical entities (NCEs). Early identification of metabolic pathways facilitates prediction of potential drug-drug interactions associated with enzyme polymorphism, induction, or inhibition, and aids in the design of clinical trials. Incubation of NCEs with human recombinant enzymes is a popular method for such work because of the specificity, simplicity, and high-throughput nature of this approach for phenotyping studies. The availability of a relative abundance factor and calculated intersystem extrapolation factor for the expressed recombinant enzymes facilitates easy scaling of in vitro data, enabling in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Described in this unit is a high-throughput screen for identifying enzymes involved in the metabolism of NCEs. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the human recombinant enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4, including the calculation of the intrinsic clearance for each. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs ... adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | Contact ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts ... Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the computer will read the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from ...

  19. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV. Drug-resistance testing results are used to decide which HIV medicines to include in a person’s first HIV regimen. After treatment is started, drug-resistance testing is repeated if ...

  20. Improving Activity of Salt-Lyophilized Enzymes in Organic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borole, Abhijeet P.; Davison, Brian H.

    Lyophilization with salts has been identified as an important method of activating enzymes in organic media. Using salt-activated enzymes to transform molecules tethered to solid surfaces in organic phase requires solubilization of enzymes in the solvents. Methods of improving performance of salt-lyophilized enzymes, further, via chemical modification, and use of surfactants and surfactants to create fine emulsions prior to lyophilization are investigated. The reaction system used is transesterification of N-acetyl phenylalanine ethyl ester with methanol or propanol. Initial rate of formation of amino acid esters by subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) was studied and found to increase two to sevenfold by either chemical modification or addition of surfactants in certain solvents, relative to the salt (only)-lyophilized enzyme. The method to prepare highly dispersed enzymes in a salt-surfactant milieu also improved activity by two to threefold. To test the effect of chemical modification on derivatization of drug molecules, acylation of bergenin was investigated using chemically modified SC.

  1. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  2. PIXE analysis of Zn enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L.; Romero, I.; Celis, H.

    1999-01-01

    Zinc is a necessary component in the action and structural stability of many enzymes. Some of them are well characterized, but in others, Zn stoichiometry and its association is not known. PIXE has been proven to be a suitable technique for analyzing metallic proteins embedded in electrophoresis gels. In this study, PIXE has been used to investigate the Zn content of enzymes that are known to carry Zn atoms. These include the carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme well characterized by other methods and the cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum that is known to require Zn to be stable but not how many metal ions are involved or how they are bound to the enzyme. Native proteins have been purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and direct identification and quantification of Zn in the gel bands was performed with an external proton beam of 3.7 MeV energy

  3. Drug cocktail optimization in chemotherapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Preissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP. Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy.

  4. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed. PMID:26504249

  5. Computational prediction of drug-drug interactions based on drugs functional similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdousi, Reza; Safdari, Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Therapeutic activities of drugs are often influenced by co-administration of drugs that may cause inevitable drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and inadvertent side effects. Prediction and identification of DDIs are extremely vital for the patient safety and success of treatment modalities. A number of computational methods have been employed for the prediction of DDIs based on drugs structures and/or functions. Here, we report on a computational method for DDIs prediction based on functional similarity of drugs. The model was set based on key biological elements including carriers, transporters, enzymes and targets (CTET). The model was applied for 2189 approved drugs. For each drug, all the associated CTETs were collected, and the corresponding binary vectors were constructed to determine the DDIs. Various similarity measures were conducted to detect DDIs. Of the examined similarity methods, the inner product-based similarity measures (IPSMs) were found to provide improved prediction values. Altogether, 2,394,766 potential drug pairs interactions were studied. The model was able to predict over 250,000 unknown potential DDIs. Upon our findings, we propose the current method as a robust, yet simple and fast, universal in silico approach for identification of DDIs. We envision that this proposed method can be used as a practical technique for the detection of possible DDIs based on the functional similarities of drugs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Drug allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrington Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  7. Species differences in drug glucuronidation: Humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 mice and their application for predicting drug glucuronidation and drug-induced toxicity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Yoda, Emiko; Tukey, Robert H

    2018-02-01

    More than 20% of clinically used drugs are glucuronidated by a microsomal enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Inhibition or induction of UGT can result in an increase or decrease in blood drug concentration. To avoid drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in individuals, therefore, it is important to understand whether UGTs are involved in metabolism of drugs and drug candidates. While most of glucuronides are inactive metabolites, acyl-glucuronides that are formed from compounds with a carboxylic acid group can be highly toxic. Animals such as mice and rats are widely used to predict drug metabolism and drug-induced toxicity in humans. However, there are marked species differences in the expression and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes including UGTs. To overcome the species differences, mice in which certain drug-metabolizing enzymes are humanized have been recently developed. Humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice were created in 2010 by crossing Ugt1-null mice with human UGT1 transgenic mice in a C57BL/6 background. hUGT1 mice can be promising tools to predict human drug glucuronidation and acyl-glucuronide-associated toxicity. In this review article, studies of drug metabolism and toxicity in the hUGT1 mice are summarized. We further discuss research and strategic directions to advance the understanding of drug glucuronidation in humans. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  9. WAr on DrugS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-12

    Apr 12, 2009 ... tion of drugs, especially hemp (Cannabis. Sativa), became entrenched. Oloruntoba. (2006) explained that the vigour and sus- tained efforts to legislate against drugs in contemporary Nigeria was because of the growing notoriety of the country as a transit point or centre for recruitment of drug couriers, and a ...

  10. Structural studies of the Trypanosoma cruzi Old Yellow Enzyme: insights into enzyme dynamics and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mário T; Rodrigues, Nathalia C; Gava, Lisandra M; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Canduri, Fernanda; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Oliva, Glaucius; Borges, Júlio C

    2013-12-31

    The flavoprotein old yellow enzyme of Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOYE) is an oxidoreductase that uses NAD(P)H as cofactor. This enzyme is clinically relevant due to its role in the action mechanism of some trypanocidal drugs used in the treatment of Chagas' disease by producing reactive oxygen species. In this work, the recombinant enzyme TcOYE was produced and collectively, X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular dynamics provided a detailed description of its structure, specificity and hydrodynamic behavior. The crystallographic structure at 1.27Å showed a classical (α/β)8 fold with the FMN prosthetic group buried at the positively-charged active-site cleft. In solution, TcOYE behaved as a globular monomer, but it exhibited a molecular envelope larger than that observed in the crystal structure, suggesting intrinsic protein flexibility. Moreover, the binding mode of β-lapachone, a trypanocidal agent, and other naphthoquinones was investigated by molecular docking and dynamics suggesting that their binding to TcOYE are stabilized mainly by interactions with the isoalloxazine ring from FMN and residues from the active-site pocket. © 2013.

  11. Targeting of captopril to the kidney reduces renal angiotensin-converting enzyme activity without affecting systemic blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, RJ; Haverdings, Rene; Grijpstra, F; Koiter, J.; Moolenaar, F; De Zeeuw, D; Meijer, DKF

    We have synthesized a prodrug of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril by coupling this drug covalently to the low molecular weight protein (LMWP) lysozyme. Such drug-LMWP conjugates can be used for renal drug delivery, since LMWPs accumulate specifically in the proximal

  12. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  13. Elucidating Substrate Promiscuity within the FabI Enzyme Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Gabriel S; O'Brien, Terrence E; Vinson, Logan; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Yao, Andrew; Mak, Wai Shun; Tagkopoulos, Ilias; Facciotti, Marc T; Tantillo, Dean J; Siegel, Justin B

    2017-09-15

    The rapidly growing appreciation of enzymes' catalytic and substrate promiscuity may lead to their expanded use in the fields of chemical synthesis and industrial biotechnology. Here, we explore the substrate promiscuity of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (commonly known as FabI) and how that promiscuity is a function of inherent reactivity and the geometric demands of the enzyme's active site. We demonstrate that these enzymes catalyze the reduction of a wide range of substrates, particularly α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of quantum mechanical hydride affinity calculations and molecular docking can be used to rapidly categorize compounds that FabI can use as substrates. The results here provide new insight into the determinants of catalysis for FabI and set the stage for the development of a new assay for drug discovery, organic synthesis, and novel biocatalysts.

  14. Recent advances in biosensors based on enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, A; Arduini, F; Moscone, D; Palleschi, G

    2016-02-15

    Enzyme inhibitors like drugs and pollutants are closely correlated to human and environmental health, thus their monitoring is of paramount importance in analytical chemistry. Enzymatic biosensors represent cost-effective, miniaturized and easy to use devices; particularly biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening and monitoring of inhibitors. The present review will highlight the research carried out in the last 9 years (2006-2014) on biosensors based on enzyme inhibition. We underpin the recent advances focused on the investigation in new theoretical approachs and in the evaluation of biosensor performances for reversible and irreversible inhibitors. The use of nanomaterials and microfluidic systems as well as the applications of the various biosensors in real samples is critically reviewed, demonstrating that such biosensors allow the development of useful devices for a fast and reliable alarm system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzyme promiscuity in earthworm serine protease: substrate versatility and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra Kumar; Pulicherla, K K

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes are the most versatile molecules in the biological world. These amazing molecules play an integral role in the regulation of various metabolic pathways and physiology subsequently. Promiscuity of an enzyme is the capacity to catalyze additional biochemical reactions besides their native one. Catalytic promiscuity has shown great impact in enzyme engineering for commercial enzyme and therapeutics with natural or engineered catalytic promiscuity. The earthworm serine protease (ESP) is a classic example of enzyme promiscuity and studied for its therapeutic potential over the last few decades. The ESP was reported for several therapeutic properties and fibrinolytic activity has been much explored. ESP, a complex enzyme exists as several isoforms of molecular weight ranging from 14 to 33 kDa. The fibrinolytic capacity of the enzyme has been studied in different species of earthworm and molecular mechanism is quite different from conventional thrombolytics. Cytotoxic and anti-tumor activities of ESP were evaluated using several cancer cell lines. Enzyme had shown tremendous scope in fighting against plant viruses and microbes. ESP is also reported for anti-inflammatory activity and anti-oxidant property. Apart from these, recently, ESP is reported for DNase activity. The daunting challenge for researchers is to understand the molecular mechanism for such diverse properties and possibility of enzyme promiscuity. This review emphasizes molecular mechanism of ESP governing various biochemical reactions. Further, the concept of enzyme promiscuity in ESP towards development of novel enzyme based drugs has been reviewed in this study.

  16. Bystander or No Bystander for Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam V. Patterson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT of cancer aims to improve the selectivity of chemotherapy by gene transfer, thus enabling target cells to convert nontoxic prodrugs to cytotoxic drugs. A zone of cell kill around gene-modified cells due to transfer of toxic metabolites, known as the bystander effect, leads to tumour regression. Here we discuss the implications of either striving for a strong bystander effect to overcome poor gene transfer, or avoiding the bystander effect to reduce potential systemic effects, with the aid of three successful GDEPT systems. This review concentrates on bystander effects and drug development with regard to these enzyme prodrug combinations, namely herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK with ganciclovir (GCV, cytosine deaminase (CD from bacteria or yeast with 5-fluorocytodine (5-FC, and bacterial nitroreductase (NfsB with 5-(azaridin-1-yl-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954, and their respective derivatives.

  17. Rethinking fundamentals of enzyme action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, D B

    1999-01-01

    Despite certain limitations, investigators continue to gainfully employ concepts rooted in steady-state kinetics in efforts to draw mechanistically relevant inferences about enzyme catalysis. By reconsidering steady-state enzyme kinetic behavior, this review develops ideas that allow one to arrive at the following new definitions: (a) V/K, the ratio of the maximal initial velocity divided by the Michaelis-Menten constant, is the apparent rate constant for the capture of substrate into enzyme complexes that are destined to yield product(s) at some later point in time; (b) the maximal velocity V is the apparent rate constant for the release of substrate from captured complexes in the form of free product(s); and (c) the Michaelis-Menten constant K is the ratio of the apparent rate constants for release and capture. The physiologic significance of V/K is also explored to illuminate aspects of antibiotic resistance, the concept of "perfection" in enzyme catalysis, and catalytic proficiency. The conceptual basis of congruent thermodynamic cycles is also considered in an attempt to achieve an unambiguous way for comparing an enzyme-catalyzed reaction with its uncatalyzed reference reaction. Such efforts promise a deeper understanding of the origins of catalytic power, as it relates to stabilization of the reactant ground state, stabilization of the transition state, and reciprocal stabilizations of ground and transition states.

  18. Drug-induced liver injury associated with HIV medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K

    2007-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection frequently has been associated with elevated liver enzyme levels. Determining the cause of elevated liver enzyme levels in patients who have HIV is difficult because ART usually consists of three different drugs, patients may be taking additional hepatotoxic medications and patients who have HIV often suffer from other liver diseases. Several agents, however, are recognized as having noteworthy and specific patterns of toxicity. This article reviews the different HIV drug classes, incidence of elevated liver enzyme values by class and by individual drug, risk factors, specific toxicities, and possible mechanisms of injury.

  19. Enzyme enhancement therapy through non-competitive pharmacological chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Aymami Bofarull, Juan; Barril, Xavier; Delgado, Aida; Reves, Marc; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Higaki, Katsumi; García-Collazo, Anan Maria; Rodríguez-Pascau, Laura; Cubero, Elena; Pizcueta, Pilar; Martinell, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological chaperones, Chemical chaperones , Enzyme e n- hancement therapy, GM1, Gangliosidosis, Morqui B, Lysosomal Storage Disease, Lysosomal Storage Disorders Most Pharmacological chaperones (PC’s) described until now are substrate analogues which bind to the active site of the target protein. C ons e- quently, such PC’s also inhibit the target protein at higher concentrations thus rendering a narrow therapeutic window and have poor drug-like proper...

  20. Nonclassical Kinetics of Clonal yet Heterogeneous Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Jun; Song, Sanggeun; Jeong, In-Chun; Koh, Hye Ran; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Sung, Jaeyoung

    2017-07-06

    Enzyme-to-enzyme variation in the catalytic rate is ubiquitous among single enzymes created from the same genetic information, which persists over the lifetimes of living cells. Despite advances in single-enzyme technologies, the lack of an enzyme reaction model accounting for the heterogeneous activity of single enzymes has hindered a quantitative understanding of the nonclassical stochastic outcome of single enzyme systems. Here we present a new statistical kinetics and exactly solvable models for clonal yet heterogeneous enzymes with possibly nonergodic state dynamics and state-dependent reactivity, which enable a quantitative understanding of modern single-enzyme experimental results for the mean and fluctuation in the number of product molecules created by single enzymes. We also propose a new experimental measure of the heterogeneity and nonergodicity for a system of enzymes.

  1. [NEPHROTOXIC DRUGS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, B; Šutić, I; Marković, N Bašić

    2016-12-01

    Renal tissue is sensitive to the effect of potentially nephrotoxic drugs and other substances that are available over-the-counter or can be purchased at healthy food stores or elsewhere, and harmful substances from the environment. The harmful effects of these substances lead to the development of recognizable clinical syndromes, including acute or chronic renal failure, tubulopathy, and proteinuria. Risk factors that influence the development of kidney disease induced by drugs are divided into those related to patient characteristics, drug characteristics, and renal function. Drugs that commonly exhibit nephrotoxic effects are analgesics, antimicrobials, chemotherapeutics, contrast agents, immunosuppressants, herbal preparations and substances containing heavy metals. Family physician must carefully observe their patients, nurturing individual approach to drug selection and determining the dose. Renal function can quickly return to normal if the damage is recognized on time. Recent research yields insights into the identification of new biomarkers that will contribute to early detection of drug induced kidney damage.

  2. COPD - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  3. [Orphan drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojsa; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in "adopting" them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. THE BEGINNING OF ORPHAN DRUGS DEVELOPMENT: This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the "Orphan Drug Act" was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs.

  4. Enzyme-Powered Pumps: From Fundamentals to Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar

    , covering also the effect of the thermodynamics of the enzymatic reaction in the pumping behavior, and (3) the applicability of enzyme pumps as fluid flow-based inhibitor assays and as drug delivery devices. Our findings in each of these areas, gets us closer to our ultimate goal, where we aim to identify the optimal conditions needed for enzyme micropump operation, and construct a general model that could accurately predict enzyme micropump behavior for any enzyme-substrate combination. The information aforementioned has been divided in four chapters. Chapter 1 gives a quick glance into the development of enzyme-powered micropumps: from the systems and observed behaviors inspiring this work, to the first systems that were developed. The stability, duration, and extent of fluid pumping of enzyme pumps in general, are also discussed, along with the optimization of the enzyme-pump design. This chapter aims to provide a general idea of the motivation behind the concept of "enzyme-powered pumps", what are "enzyme-powered pumps", and which are the key features that characterize these systems. Chapter 2 is an extensive analysis of the mechanisms of actuation proposed for enzyme-powered micropumps. This chapter not only covers the first attempts to understand how enzyme pumps work, but also explores further the behavior of urease-powered pumps, which fluid flow patterns cannot be completely predicted only by considering thermal or solutal gradients. The findings of these studies could allow us to rationally control fluid flow for the directed delivery of payloads at designated locations. In Chapters 3 and 4, our focus was to highlight the potential application of enzyme-powered pumps for sensing and delivery. Chapter 3 explores the use of enzyme pumps as fluid flow-based inhibitor assays. At fixed concentrations of an enzyme and its substrate, the presence of an inhibitor can be detected by monitoring the decrease in fluid flow speed. Using this principle, sensors for toxic

  5. Electric Fields and Enzyme Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2017-06-20

    What happens inside an enzyme's active site to allow slow and difficult chemical reactions to occur so rapidly? This question has occupied biochemists' attention for a long time. Computer models of increasing sophistication have predicted an important role for electrostatic interactions in enzymatic reactions, yet this hypothesis has proved vexingly difficult to test experimentally. Recent experiments utilizing the vibrational Stark effect make it possible to measure the electric field a substrate molecule experiences when bound inside its enzyme's active site. These experiments have provided compelling evidence supporting a major electrostatic contribution to enzymatic catalysis. Here, we review these results and develop a simple model for electrostatic catalysis that enables us to incorporate disparate concepts introduced by many investigators to describe how enzymes work into a more unified framework stressing the importance of electric fields at the active site.

  6. Enzyme-Based Listericidal Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Kusum; Grover, Navdeep; Downs, Patrick; Paskaleva, Elena E.; Mehta, Krunal K.; Lee, Lillian; Schadler, Linda S.; Kane, Ravi S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cell lytic enzymes represent an alternative to chemical decontamination or use of antibiotics to kill pathogenic bacteria, such as listeria. A number of phage cell lytic enzymes against listeria have been isolated and possess listericidal activity; however, there has been no attempt to incorporate these enzymes onto surfaces. We report three facile routes for the surface incorporation of the listeria bacteriophage endolysin Ply500: covalent attachment onto FDA approved silica nanoparticles (SNPs), incorporation of SNP-Ply500 conjugates into a thin poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film; and affinity binding to edible crosslinked starch nanoparticles via construction of a maltose binding protein fusion. These Ply500 formulations were effective in killing L. innocua (a reduced pathogenic surrogate) at challenges up to 105 CFU/ml both in non-growth sustaining PBS as well as under growth conditions on lettuce. This strategy represents a new route toward achieving highly selective and efficient pathogen decontamination and prevention in public infrastructure. PMID:23545700

  7. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  8. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    Plants, cyanobacteria, and algae generate a surplus of redox power through photosynthesis, which makes them attractive for biotechnological exploitations. While central metabolism consumes most of the energy, pathways introduced through metabolic engineering can also tap into this source of reduc......Plants, cyanobacteria, and algae generate a surplus of redox power through photosynthesis, which makes them attractive for biotechnological exploitations. While central metabolism consumes most of the energy, pathways introduced through metabolic engineering can also tap into this source...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  9. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content Drugs Home Drugs Find information on FDA-approved HIV/ ... infection drugs and investigational HIV/AIDS drugs. Search Drugs Search drug Search Icon What's this? Close Popup ...

  10. Internal friction in enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Anna; Derényi, Imre; Gráf, László; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2013-01-01

    The empirical concept of internal friction was introduced 20 years ago. This review summarizes the results of experimental and theoretical studies that help to uncover the nature of internal friction. After the history of the concept, we describe the experimental challenges in measuring and interpreting internal friction based on the viscosity dependence of enzyme reactions. We also present speculations about the structural background of this viscosity dependence. Finally, some models about the relationship between the energy landscape and internal friction are outlined. Alternative concepts regarding the viscosity dependence of enzyme reactions are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Immunomodulatory Effects of Chitotriosidase Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Elmonem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitotriosidase enzyme (EC: 3.2.1.14 is the major active chitinase in the human body. It is produced mainly by activated macrophages, in which its expression is regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Chitotriosidase was confirmed as essential element in the innate immunity against chitin containing organisms such as fungi and protozoa; however, its immunomodulatory effects extend far beyond innate immunity. In the current review, we will try to explore the expanding spectrum of immunological roles played by chitotriosidase enzyme in human health and disease and will discuss its up-to-date clinical value.

  12. Biomaterials for drug delivery patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lúcia F; Correia, Ilídio J; Silva, A Sofia; Mano, João F

    2018-06-15

    The limited efficiency of conventional drugs has been instigated the development of new and more effective drug delivery systems (DDS). Transdermal DDS, are associated with numerous advantages such its painless application and less frequent replacement and greater flexibility of dosing, features that triggered the research and development of such devices. Such systems have been produced using either biopolymer; or synthetic polymers. Although the first ones are safer, biocompatible and present a controlled degradation by human enzymes or water, the second ones are the most currently available in the market due to their greater mechanical resistance and flexibility, and non-degradation over time. This review highlights the most recent advances (mainly in the last five years) of patches aimed for transdermal drug delivery, focusing on the different materials (natural, synthetic and blends) and latest designs for the development of such devices, emphasizing also their combination with drug carriers that enable enhanced drug solubility and a more controlled release of the drug over the time. The benefits and limitations of different patches formulations are considered with reference to their appliance to transdermal drug delivery. Furthermore, a record of the currently available patches on the market is given, featuring their most relevant characteristics. Finally, a list of most recent/ongoing clinical trials regarding the use of patches for skin disorders is detailed and critical insights on the current state of patches for transdermal drug delivery are also provided. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? ... Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  14. Antineoplastic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the ... Videos Information About ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often ... NIH is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  18. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Survey Results Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Unpredictable Danger Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2016 Monitoring the Future 2016 Survey Results Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2015 View All NIDA Home ...

  19. Capping Drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the process of treatment, drugs are also used for medical diagnosis and for ... ing cells. Since cancer cells grow at a faster rate than the normal .... ity characteristics. After intake, the N-methyl group is cleaved in the liver to release the physiologically active drug. Similarly, membrane transportation characteristics of the neu-.

  20. [Incretin mimetic drugs: therapeutic positioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Simarro, F

    2014-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic and complex disease, due to the differences among affected individuals, which affect choice of treatment. The number of drug families has increased in the last few years, and these families have widely differing mechanisms of action, which contributes greatly to the individualization of treatment according to the patient's characteristics and comorbidities. The present article discusses incretin mimetic drugs. Their development has been based on knowledge of the effects of natural incretin hormones: GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1), GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide) and dipeptidyl peptidase enzyme 4 (DPP4), which rapidly degrade them in the systemic circulation. This group is composed of 2 different types of molecules: GLP-1 analogs and DPP4 enzyme inhibitors. The benefits of these molecules include a reduction in plasma glucose without the risk of hypoglycemias or weight gain. There are a series of questions that require new studies to establish a possible association between the use of these drugs and notification of cases of pancreatitis, as well as their relationship with pancreatic and thyroid cancer. Also awaited is the publication of several studies that will provide information on the relationship between these drugs and cardiovascular risk in people with diabetes. All these questions will probably be progressively elucidated with greater experience in the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  1. Global (Q)SAR models on substrates for human Cytochrome P450 3A4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Tine; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Jensen, Gunde Egeskov

    domain. Domain coverage of EINECS chemicals and number of predicted substrates are discussed. Reference: C.W. Yap and Y.Z. Chen, Prediction of cytochrome p450 3A4, 2D6, and 2C9 inhibitors and substrates by using support vector machines, J. Chem. Inf. Model. 45 (2005), pp. 982–992.......The Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a superfamily of enzymes which catalyze the metabolism of a wide range of endobiotics and xenobiotics. The latter category comprises drugs and about 75% of marketed drugs are metabolised by CYP enzymes. Besides drugs, CYP enzymes detoxify environmental compounds...

  2. Phage lytic enzymes targeting streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcal pathogens contribute to a wide variety of human and livestock diseases. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Bacteriophage (viruses that infect bacteria) endolysins (enzymes that help degrade the bacterial cell wall) are ideal candidat...

  3. Enzyme recovery using reversed micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery of extracellular enzymes. The potentials of reaching this goal by using reversed micelles in an organic solvent have been investigated.

    Reversed micelles are aggregates of surfactant

  4. Kathepsine C : Een allosterisch enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, Jeannette

    1969-01-01

    In chapter I an introduction into allosteric systems is given. In chapter II is a detailed method is described for the applica of Gly-Phe--p. nitroanilide (GPNA) as a substrate for the activity assay of the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin C. It is an allosteric which is activated by Cl-, Br-, 1-, CNS-,

  5. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  6. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  7. Heavy enzymes--experimental and computational insights in enzyme dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-08-01

    The role of protein motions in the chemical step of enzyme-catalyzed reactions is the subject of an open debate in the scientific literature. The systematic use of isotopically substituted enzymes has been revealed as a useful tool to quantify the role of these motions. According to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, changing the mass of the protein does not change the forces acting on the system but alters the frequencies of the protein motions, which in turn can affect the rate constant. Experimental and theoretical studies carried out in this field are presented in this article and discussed in the framework of Transition State Theory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ping; Kong, De-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Given the high risk and lengthy procedure of traditional drug development, drug repurposing is gaining more and more attention. Although many types of drug information have been used to repurpose drugs, drug-drug interaction data, which imply possible physiological effects or targets of drugs, remain unexploited. In this work, similarity of drug interaction was employed to infer similarity of the physiological effects or targets for the drugs. We collected 10,835 drug-drug interactions concerning 1074 drugs, and for 700 of them, drug similarity scores based on drug interaction profiles were computed and rendered using a drug association network with 589 nodes (drugs) and 2375 edges (drug similarity scores). The 589 drugs were clustered into 98 groups with Markov Clustering Algorithm, most of which were significantly correlated with certain drug functions. This indicates that the network can be used to infer the physiological effects of drugs. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of this drug association network to predict drug targets. The results show that the method is effective for 317 of 561 drugs that have known targets. Comparison of this method with the structure-based approach shows that they are complementary. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Predicting drug disposition via application of a Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Leslie Z

    2010-03-01

    A Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) was proposed to serve as a basis for predicting the importance of transporters in determining drug bioavailability and disposition. BDDCS may be useful in predicting: routes of drug elimination; efflux and absorptive transporters effects on oral absorption; when transporter-enzyme interplay will yield clinically significant effects (e.g. low drug bioavailability and drug-drug interactions); and transporter effects on post-absorptive systemic drug levels following oral and i.v. dosing. For highly soluble, highly permeable Class 1 compounds, metabolism is the major route of elimination and transporter effects on drug bioavailability and hepatic disposition are negligible. In contrast for the poorly permeable Class 3 and 4 compounds, metabolism only plays a minor role in drug elimination. Uptake transporters are major determinants of drug bioavailability for these poorly permeable drugs and both uptake and efflux transporters could be important for drug elimination. Highly permeable, poorly soluble, extensively metabolized Class 2 compounds present the most complicated relationship in defining the impact of transporters due to a marked transporter-enzyme interplay. Uptake transporters are unimportant for Class 2 drug bioavailability, (ensure space after,) but can play a major role in hepatic and renal elimination. Efflux transporters have major effects on drug bioavailability, absorption, metabolism and elimination of Class 2 drugs. It is difficult to accurately characterize drugs in terms of the high permeability criteria, i.e. > or =90% absorbed. We suggest that extensive metabolism may substitute for the high permeability characteristic, and that BDDCS using elimination criteria may provide predictability in characterizing drug disposition profiles for all classes of compounds.

  10. Enzyme technology: Key to selective biorefining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    to the reaction is a unique trait of enzyme catalysis. Since enzyme selectivity means that a specific reaction is catalysed between particular species to produce definite products, enzymes are particularly fit for converting specific compounds in mixed biomass streams. Since enzymes are protein molecules...... their rational use in biorefinery processes requires an understanding of the basic features of enzymes and reaction traits with respect to specificity, kinetics, reaction optima, stability and structure-function relations – we are now at a stage where it is possible to use nature’s enzyme structures as starting...... point and then improve the functional traits by targeted mutation of the protein. The talk will display some of our recent hypotheses related to enzyme action, recently obtained results within knowledge-based enzyme improvements as well as cast light on research methods used in optimizing enzyme...

  11. Consumer attitudes to enzymes in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The use of enzymes in food production has potential benefits for both food manufacturers and consumers. A central question is how consumers react to new ways of producing foods with enzymes. This study investigates the formation of consumer attitudes to different enzyme production methods in thre...... to technological progress are the socio-political attitudes that have the highest predictive value regarding attitudes to enzyme production methods.......The use of enzymes in food production has potential benefits for both food manufacturers and consumers. A central question is how consumers react to new ways of producing foods with enzymes. This study investigates the formation of consumer attitudes to different enzyme production methods in three...... European countries. Results show that consumers are most positive towards non-GM enzyme production methods. The enzyme production method is by far the most important factor for the formation of buying intentions compared to price and benefits. Results also show that environmental concern and attitudes...

  12. Drug Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  13. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco ... Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth ( ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain ... About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other ...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who don't use marijuana. Haga ...

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? ... of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency of the United States Government. NIH is ...

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ... marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and ... Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  4. Localization of enzymes within microbodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A H; Beevers, H

    1973-08-01

    Microbodies from rat liver and a variety of plant tissues were osmotically shocked and subsequently centrifuged at 40,000 g for 30 min to yield supernatant and pellet fractions. From rat liver microbodies, all of the uricase activity but little glycolate oxidase or catalase activity were recovered in the pellet, which probably contained the crystalline cores as many other reports had shown. All the measured enzymes in spinach leaf microbodies were solubilized. With microbodies from potato tuber, further sucrose gradient centrifugation of the pellet yielded a fraction at density 1.28 g/cm(3) which, presumably representing the crystalline cores, contained 7% of the total catalase activity but no uricase or glycolate oxidase activity. Using microbodies from castor bean endosperm (glyoxysomes), 50-60% of the malate dehydrogenase, fatty acyl CoA dehydrogenase, and crotonase and 90% of the malate synthetase and citrate synthetase were recovered in the pellet, which also contained 96% of the radioactivity when lecithin in the glyoxysomal membrane had been labeled by previous treatment of the tissue with [(14)C]choline. When the labeled pellet was centrifuged to equilibrium on a sucrose gradient, all the radioactivity, protein, and enzyme activities were recovered together at peak density 1.21-1.22 g/cm(3), whereas the original glyoxysomes appeared at density 1.24 g/cm(3). Electron microscopy showed that the fraction at 1.21-1.22 g/cm(3) was comprised of intact glyoxysomal membranes. All of the membrane-bound enzymes were stripped off with 0.15 M KCl, leaving the "ghosts" still intact as revealed by electron microscopy and sucrose gradient centrifugation. It is concluded that the crystalline cores of plant microbodies contain no uricase and are not particularly enriched with catalase. Some of the enzymes in glyoxysomes are associated with the membranes and this probably has functional significance.

  5. Malolactic enzyme from Oenococcus oeni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, Christina; Michlmayr, Herbert; del Hierro, Andrés M.; Kulbe, Klaus D.; Jiranek, Vladimir; Eder, Reinhard; Nguyen, Thu-Ha

    2013-01-01

    Malolactic enzymes (MLE) are known to directly convert L-malic acid into L-lactic acid with a catalytical requirement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and Mn2+; however, the reaction mechanism is still unclear. To study a MLE, the structural gene from Oenococcus oeni strain DSM 20255 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, yielding 22.9 kU l−1 fermentation broth. After affinity chromatography and removal of apparently inactive protein by precipitation, purified recombinant MLE had a specific activity of 280 U mg−1 protein with a recovery of approximately 61%. The enzyme appears to be a homodimer with a molecular mass of 128 kDa consisting of two 64 kDa subunits. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 6.0 and 45°C, and Km, Vmax and kcat values of 4.9 mM, 427 U mg−1 and 456 sec−1 for L-malic acid, 91.4 µM, 295 U mg−1 and 315 sec−1 for NAD+ and 4.6 µM, 229 U mg−1 and 244 sec−1 for Mn2+, respectively. The recombinant MLE retained 95% of its activity after 3 mo at room temperature and 7 mo at 4°C. When using pyruvic acid as substrate, the enzyme showed the conversion of pyruvic acid with detectable L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) activity and oxidation of NADH. This interesting observation might explain that MLE catalyzes a redox reaction and hence, the requirements for NAD+ and Mn2+ during the conversion of L-malic to L-lactic acid. PMID:23196745

  6. Electrochemical and enzymatic synthesis of oxidative drug metabolites for metabolism studies : Exploring selectivity and yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, Turan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolism studies of drug molecules play a crucial role in drug discovery and development since the early detection of possibly toxic drug metabolites can save time and money. During the metabolic biotransformation process, oxidation of a drug molecule is catalyzed by specific enzymes which can

  7. Lignin-degrading enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ru; Sarkanen, Simo; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the activities of four kinds of enzyme have been purported to furnish the mechanistic foundations for macromolecular lignin depolymerization in decaying plant cell walls. The pertinent fungal enzymes comprise lignin peroxidase (with a relatively high redox potential), manganese peroxidase, an alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase. The peroxidases and laccase, but not the etherase, are expressed extracellularly by white-rot fungi. A number of these microorganisms exhibit a marked preference toward lignin in their degradation of lignocellulose. Interestingly, some white-rot fungi secrete both kinds of peroxidase but no laccase, while others that are equally effective express extracellular laccase activity but no peroxidases. Actually, none of these enzymes has been reported to possess significant depolymerase activity toward macromolecular lignin substrates that are derived with little chemical modification from the native biopolymer. Here, the assays commonly employed for monitoring the traditional fungal peroxidases, alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase are described in their respective contexts. A soluble native polymeric substrate that can be isolated directly from a conventional milled-wood lignin preparation is characterized in relation to its utility in next-generation lignin-depolymerase assays.

  8. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewables production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Maurice C R; Steunenberg, Peter; Scott, Elinor L; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M

    2013-08-07

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, such as the production of High-Fructose Corn Syrup, but these are still rather rare. Fortunately, there is a rapid expansion in the research efforts that try to improve this, driven by a combination of economic and ecological reasons. This review focusses on those efforts, by looking at attempts to use fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins and lignin (and their building blocks), as substrates in the synthesis of biorenewables using immobilised enzymes. Therefore, many examples (390 references) from the recent literature are discussed, in which we look both at the specific reactions as well as to the methods of immobilisation of the enzymes, as the latter are shown to be a crucial factor with respect to stability and reuse. The applications of the renewables produced in this way range from building blocks for the pharmaceutical and polymer industry, transport fuels, to additives for the food industry. A critical evaluation of the relevant factors that need to be improved for large-scale use of these examples is presented in the outlook of this review.

  9. Integration of Genome Scale Metabolic Networks and Gene Regulation of Metabolic Enzymes With Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Elaina M.; Leoncikas, Vytautas; Fisher, Ciarán P.; Moore, J. Bernadette; Plant, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    The scope of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can be expanded by assimilation of the mechanistic models of intracellular processes from systems biology field. The genome scale metabolic networks (GSMNs) represent a whole set of metabolic enzymes expressed in human tissues. Dynamic models of the gene regulation of key drug metabolism enzymes are available. Here, we introduce GSMNs and review ongoing work on integration of PBPK, GSMNs, and metabolic gene regulation. We demonstrate example models. PMID:28782239

  10. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF CHITOSAN NANOPARTICLES AS NOVEL SUPPORT IN ENZYME IMMOBILIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Hoda Jafarizadeh Malmiri; Mohammad Ali Ghaz Jahanian; Aydin Berenjian

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Due to the good biocompatibility of chitosan, it can be used in magnetic-field assisted drug delivery, enzyme or cell immobilization and many other industrial applications. In the past decade, nanotechnology has been a considerable research interest in the area of preparation of immobilized enzyme carriers. This study looks at characteristi...

  11. The Dimerization Domain in DapE Enzymes Is required for Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Starus, Anna; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gutierrez, Blanca; Sanchez, Stephen; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Mack, Jamey C.; Olsen, Kenneth W.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Holz, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains underscores the importance of identifying new drug targets and developing new antimicrobial compounds. Lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid are essential for protein production and bacterial peptidoglycan cell wall remodeling and are synthesized in bacteria by enzymes encoded within dap operon. Therefore dap enzymes may serve as excellent targets for developing a new class of antimicrobial agents. The dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopi...

  12. Chemical and protein structural basis for biological crosstalk between PPAR α and COX enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2015-02-01

    We have previously validated a probabilistic framework that combined computational approaches for predicting the biological activities of small molecule drugs. Molecule comparison methods included molecular structural similarity metrics and similarity computed from lexical analysis of text in drug package inserts. Here we present an analysis of novel drug/target predictions, focusing on those that were not obvious based on known pharmacological crosstalk. Considering those cases where the predicted target was an enzyme with known 3D structure allowed incorporation of information from molecular docking and protein binding pocket similarity in addition to ligand-based comparisons. Taken together, the combination of orthogonal information sources led to investigation of a surprising predicted relationship between a transcription factor and an enzyme, specifically, PPAR α and the cyclooxygenase enzymes. These predictions were confirmed by direct biochemical experiments which validate the approach and show for the first time that PPAR α agonists are cyclooxygenase inhibitors.

  13. Structure-based redesign of lysostaphin yields potent antistaphylococcal enzymes that evade immune cell surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Blazanovic

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infections exert a tremendous burden on the health-care system, and the threat of drug-resistant strains continues to grow. The bacteriolytic enzyme lysostaphin is a potent antistaphylococcal agent with proven efficacy against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains; however, the enzyme's own bacterial origins cause undesirable immunogenicity and pose a barrier to clinical translation. Here, we deimmunized lysostaphin using a computationally guided process that optimizes sets of mutations to delete immunogenic T cell epitopes without disrupting protein function. In vitro analyses showed the methods to be both efficient and effective, producing seven different deimmunized designs exhibiting high function and reduced immunogenic potential. Two deimmunized candidates elicited greatly suppressed proliferative responses in splenocytes from humanized mice, while at the same time the variants maintained wild-type efficacy in a staphylococcal pneumonia model. Overall, the deimmunized enzymes represent promising leads in the battle against S. aureus.

  14. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belgin Alaşehirli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The beneficial effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor drugs on migraine attack frequency have been shown. We aimed to study the relationship between the angiotensin converting enzyme gene and migraine pathophysiology. METHODS: In the present study, to assess whether the angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion (I/D gene polymorphisms have an effect on migraine attacks, we studied the angiotensin converting enzyme genotypes of 102 migraine patients (35 cases of migraine with aura and 67 of migraine without aura and 75 age-and sex-matched normal volunteers. Frequency and age of onset of migraine attacks were also assessed according to angiotensin converting enzyme genotypes. RESULTS: Patients with migraine with and without aura were comparable with each other and the control group with respect to angiotensin converting enzyme genotypes (respectively; p= 0.88 and p= 0.76, p= 0.624. We could not determine a relationship between angiotensin converting enzyme genotypes and attack frequency (p= 0.125, but cases with angiotensin converting enzyme-II genotype showed a significantly younger age for onset of migraine attacks in comparison with the I/D genotype patients (p= 0.021. CONCLUSION: We believe that further angiotensin converting enzyme gene studies are warranted in younger age groups of patients with migraine and also in different populations

  15. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  16. Prodrug converting enzyme gene delivery by L. monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilgrim Sabine

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is a highly versatile bacterial carrier system for introducing protein, DNA and RNA into mammalian cells. The delivery of tumor antigens with the help of this carrier into tumor-bearing animals has been successfully carried out previously and it was recently reported that L. monocytogenes is able to colonize and replicate within solid tumors after local or even systemic injection. Methods Here we report on the delivery of two prodrug converting enzymes, purine-deoxynucleoside phosphorylase (PNP and a fusion protein consisting of yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (FCU1 into cancer cells in culture by L. monocytogenes. Transfer of the prodrug converting enzymes was achieved by bacterium mediated transfer of eukaryotic expression plasmids or by secretion of the proteins directly into the host cell cytosol by the infecting bacteria. Results The results indicate that conversion of appropriate prodrugs to toxic drugs in the cancer cells occured after both procedures although L. monocytogenes-mediated bactofection proved to be more efficient than enzyme secretion 4T1, B16 and COS-1 tumor cells. Exchanging the constitutively PCMV-promoter with the melanoma specific P4xTETP-promoter resulted in melanoma cell-specific expression of the prodrug converting enzymes but reduced the efficiencies. Conclusion These experiments open the way for bacterium mediated tumor specific activation of prodrugs in live animals with tumors.

  17. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    , but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples...... a conformational space much larger than the corresponding domain in the human enzyme. The large linker conformational variability is then linked to important functional properties such as an increased religation rate and a low drug reactivity, demonstrating that the linker domain has a crucial role...

  18. Biomedical Applications of Enzymes From Marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, K; Sivaperumal, P

    Marine microbial enzyme technologies have progressed significantly in the last few decades for different applications. Among the various microorganisms, marine actinobacterial enzymes have significant active properties, which could allow them to be biocatalysts with tremendous bioactive metabolites. Moreover, marine actinobacteria have been considered as biofactories, since their enzymes fulfill biomedical and industrial needs. In this chapter, the marine actinobacteria and their enzymes' uses in biological activities and biomedical applications are described. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-01-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful., but often misinterpreted, tool. yielding information on potential. hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tis...

  20. Serum angiotensin converting enzyme in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza M Robati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering skin disease with unknown etiology. Drugs such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors may contribute in the pathogenesis of pemphigus. Objective: We plan this essay to evaluate the serum ACE level in pemphigus vulgaris patients in comparison with healthy controls to recognize its possible role in disease pathogenesis or activity. Methods: This study was planned and performed in the dermatology clinics of Shahid Beheshti University of MedicalSciences′ Hospitals between July 2010 and June 2011. Patients with new onset of pemphigus vulgaris were enrolled in our study. Control subjects were frequency-matched to cases by sex and age. Serum ACE was determined by the spectrophotometric method. Results: Thirty-four patients with pemphigus vulgaris and 35 healthy individuals were recruited in the study. No statistical significant difference was detected in the mean level of serum ACE of the two groups (t-test, P = 0.11. The mean ACE level was significantly lower in male patients compared with male controls (P = 0.04. Moreover, a significant higher serum ACE level of patients with cutaneous involvement was observed compared to patients with mucosal involvement (P = 0.02. Conclusions: Despite lack of any significant difference of serum ACE level between pemphigus and control group, the serum ACE level was considerably lower in male pemphigus vulgaris patients compared with male controls. Therefore, ACE might have some association with pemphigus vulgaris especially in male patients; however, further studies are required to confirm this association.