WorldWideScience

Sample records for drug development highlighted

  1. Cardiovascular safety and hemodynamic considerations in oncology drug development - webinar highlights October 10th 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, Martin; Heilbraun, Jeff; Mendzelevski, Boaz

    2013-09-01

    Development of new drugs in oncology may have implications for cardiovascular risk. This report describes some aspects of our growing knowledge in the area of evaluating benefit-risk and may be of direct importance to scientists working in drug discovery and development. This report of webinar highlights entitled "Trends in CardiOncology: the evolution of blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) Markers" covers the current state of pharmacology of selected drugs which induce blood pressure elevation and best practices in employing the measurement of blood pressure elevation and cardiac safety parameters for drug development in oncology. Oncology drug-induced cardiotoxicity has recently been recognised as an important drug development and clinical issue. The recognition of the risks and opportunities has prompted intensive research into mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity and potential prevention strategies. Drug-induced blood pressure elevation has emerged as a key area of interest, both as a marker of efficacy of vascular targeted chemotherapies as well as a target for early intervention strategies. While further research is ongoing, current data strongly suggest that early intervention strategies may provide significant short- and long-term clinical benefits to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  2. Research Highlights: Helping Adolescents Resist Drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    Project ALERT departs boldly from prevention models of the 196Os and 197Os, which emphasized informing adolescents about the long-term consequences of drug use or building their decisionmaking skills...

  3. Highlights in antiviral drug research: antivirals at the horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-01

    This review highlights ten "hot topics" in current antiviral research: (i) new nucleoside derivatives (i.e., PSI-352938) showing high potential as a direct antiviral against hepatitis C virus (HCV); (ii) cyclopropavir, which should be further pursued for treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections; (iii) North-methanocarbathymidine (N-MCT), with a N-locked conformation, showing promising activity against both α- and γ-herpesviruses; (iv) CMX001, an orally bioavailable prodrug of cidofovir with broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including polyoma, adeno, herpes, and pox; (v) favipiravir, which is primarily pursued for the treatment of influenza virus infections, but also inhibits the replication of other RNA viruses, particularly (-)RNA viruses such as arena, bunya, and hanta; (vi) newly emerging antiarenaviral compounds which should be more effective (and less toxic) than the ubiquitously used ribavirin; (vii) antipicornavirus agents in clinical development (pleconaril, BTA-798, and V-073); (viii) natural products receiving increased attention as potential antiviral drugs; (ix) antivirals such as U0126 targeted at specific cellular kinase pathways [i.e., mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)], showing activity against influenza and other viruses; and (x) two structurally unrelated compounds (i.e., LJ-001 and dUY11) with broad-spectrum activity against virtually all enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Highlights of the SSC Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the Site Development Plan for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. The Plan, sometimes called a Master Plan, was prepared by the architectural and engineering firm for the Laboratory: Parsons Brinckerhoff/Morrison Knudsen (PB/MK) working in association with CRSS. Their task was to interpret the SSC project needs in the context of the Ellis County, Texas site. The team effort was under the direction of Lewis May from CRSS, guided by Robert Sims from the SSC Laboratory. Conceptual drawings are presented in this report

  5. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  6. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  7. Drug Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  8. Some highlights of research and development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, W.J.; Rae, H.K.

    1980-06-01

    The research and development programs of AECL have as their goal the strengthening of the knowledge and ability necessary to achieve national objectives in the field of nuclear energy. These objectives include a nuclear reactor system appropriate to Canada's industrial capabilities, now realized, and the extension of that system, through scientific and technological development, to serve the nation's needs for the forseeable future. The Company's programs are carefully integrated and focused to use the available funding to maximum advantage. The research facilities on which the program depends are among the best in the world, and support a full spectrum of research from fundamental nuclear physics to full-scale power reactor component irradiation and testing. In this report it has only been possible to high-light some important facets of the programs in each of the principal areas currently employing our energies. (auth)

  9. A staged screening of registered drugs highlights remyelinating drug candidates for clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleuteri, C.; Olla, S.; Veroni, C.; Umeton, R.; Mechelli, R.; Romano, S.; Buscarinu, Mc.; Ferrari, F.; Calò, G.; Ristori, G.; Salvetti, M.; Agresti, C.

    2017-04-01

    There is no treatment for the myelin loss in multiple sclerosis, ultimately resulting in the axonal degeneration that leads to the progressive phase of the disease. We established a multi-tiered platform for the sequential screening of drugs that could be repurposed as remyelinating agents. We screened a library of 2,000 compounds (mainly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds and natural products) for cellular metabolic activity on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPC), identifying 42 molecules with significant stimulating effects. We then characterized the effects of these compounds on OPC proliferation and differentiation in mouse glial cultures, and on myelination and remyelination in organotypic cultures. Three molecules, edaravone, 5-methyl-7-methoxyisoflavone and lovastatin, gave positive results in all screening tiers. We validated the results by retesting independent stocks of the compounds, analyzing their purity, and performing dose-response curves. To identify the chemical features that may be modified to enhance the compounds’ activity, we tested chemical analogs and identified, for edaravone, the functional groups that may be essential for its activity. Among the selected remyelinating candidates, edaravone appears to be of strong interest, also considering that this drug has been approved as a neuroprotective agent for acute ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Japan.

  10. Metallomics in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi Nhu Tam; Ostergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for separation of free cisplatin from liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and protein-bound cisplatin was developed. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin based on PEGylated liposomes was used as model drug formulation...... to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before...... and will improve characterization of liposomal drugs during drug development and in studies on kinetics....

  11. Preclinical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodniewicz, Teresa; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Life sciences provide reasonably sound prognosis for a number and nature of therapeutic targets on which drug design could be based, and search for new chemical entities--future new drugs, is now more than ever based on scientific principles. Nevertheless, current very long and incredibly costly drug discovery and development process is very inefficient, with attrition rate spanning from many thousands of new chemical structures, through a handful of validated drug leads, to single successful new drug launches, achieved in average after 13 years, with compounded cost estimates from hundreds of thousands to over one billion US dollars. Since radical pharmaceutical innovation is critically needed, number of new research projects concerning this area is steeply rising outside of big pharma industry--both in academic environment and in small private companies. Their prospective success will critically depend on project management, which requires combined knowledge of scientific, technical and legal matters, comprising regulations concerning admission of new drug candidates to be subjects of clinical studies. This paper attempts to explain basic rules and requirements of drug development within preclinical study period, in case of new chemical entities of natural or synthetic origin, which belong to low molecular weight category.

  12. Nuclear platform research and development - 2008-09 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhankar, R.R.

    2009-08-01

    The Nuclear Platform R and D Program has lead responsibility for the maintenance and further development of the CANDU intellectual property covering the safety, licensing and design basis for nuclear facilities. The Nuclear Platform R and D Program is part of the Research and Technology Operation (RTO) unit of AECL and is managed through the Research and Development division, which has responsibility for maintaining and enhancing the knowledge and technology base. The RTO is also responsible for managing AECL's nuclear facilities and infrastructure (including laboratories and R and D facilities), the nuclear waste management program and other legacy liabilities (e.g., decommissioning) to demonstrate and grow shareholder value. The Nuclear Platform also provides the technology base from which new products and services can be developed to meet customer needs (including ACR and commercial products and services). (author)

  13. Highlight: IDRC at COP21 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-13

    Apr 13, 2016 ... “Climate change is a key part of IDRC's programming,” said IDRC President Jean Lebel. “We support innovative research that is advancing key policies and practical solutions to climate challenges in more than 70 developing countries. We look forward to continue working with the Government of Canada ...

  14. OECD's Development Co-Operation Report highlights critical role of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-02-14

    Feb 14, 2018 ... Big data has been a driving force in Canada's innovative business sector, but its use in developing countries is only emerging now. However, just as M-Pesa, a mobile banking application created in Kenya in 2007, enabled the African continent to address financial inclusion, a mobile phone powered data ...

  15. Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs

  16. Hydro-Quebec: research and development highlights 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    1998 confirmed once again that any planning in R and D must take into consideration unforeseen events. Actions are measured against their profitability, and R and D must contribute to increasing a company's competitive edge by providing it with new sources of revenue, by ensuring that it benefits from real savings and coming up with the best possible solutions to its technological problems. Hydro-Quebec's results attest to the fact that R and D is an investment that contributes to the utility's profitability. Whether trying to reduce maintenance costs through robot systems or cameras, improving injection methods for repairing dams, developing monitoring systems or new devices aimed at increasing the availability of equipment or reducing the environmental impact of its installations, the company's R and D projects have helped maintain its position as a world leader in the generation and transmission of hydroelectric power. The company is counting on technological innovation to boost the revenues of th e utility's business units. Examples include the work done to optimize the management of energy reserves, increase the network's load-flow capacity and flexibility, generate an electrical supply that meets international standards, and offer alternative distribution system solutions. Other projects involve improving turbine efficiency by modelling fluid flow, devising methods for forecasting natural inflows, analyzing losses in saturation transformers, developing the intelligent power system, and studying transient stability in real time, load frequency control, and customized power quality. Further projects are aimed at developing technologies and services that increase client loyalty and expand the client base such as research into energy management for low income clients, use of geothermal energy, new applications for electrotechnologies, electromagnetic compatibility, drive power and applications of lignin

  17. Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs.

  18. 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Highlights. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) is the primary source of information on the prevalence, patterns, and consequences of substance abuse among people age 12 and older. The survey is conducted every year by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The 2009 NSDUH, released September 16, 2010, shows…

  19. Quantitative decisions in drug development

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang-Stein, Christy

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a high-level treatise of evidence-based decisions in drug development. Because of the inseparable relationship between designs and decisions, a good portion of this book is devoted to the design of clinical trials. The book begins with an overview of product development and regulatory approval pathways. It then discusses how to incorporate prior knowledge into study design and decision making at different stages of drug development. The latter include selecting appropriate metrics to formulate decisions criteria, determining go/no-go decisions for progressing a drug candidate to the next stage and predicting the effectiveness of a product. Lastly, it points out common mistakes made by drug developers under the current drug-development paradigm. The book offers useful insights to statisticians, clinicians, regulatory affairs managers and decision-makers in the pharmaceutical industry who have a basic understanding of the drug-development process and the clinical trials conducted to support dru...

  20. Drug development and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  1. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  2. BBG Highlights

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — BBG Highlights is a monthly summary of the BBG's accomplishments and news and developments affecting the Agency's work. Now, for the first time, this monthly update...

  3. Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughns, Janelle D; Conklin, Laurie S; Long, Ying; Zheng, Panli; Faruque, Fahim; Green, Dionna J; van den Anker, John N; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2018-05-01

    There is a lack of dosing guidelines for use in obese children. Moreover, the impact of obesity on drug safety and clinical outcomes is poorly defined. The paucity of information needed for the safe and effective use of drugs in obese patients remains a problem, even after drug approval. To assess the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development, the pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 were reviewed for obesity studies. FDA labels were also reviewed for statements addressing obesity in pediatric patients. Forty-five drugs studied in pediatric patients under the FDA Amendments Act were found to have statements and key words in the medical and clinical pharmacology reviews and labels related to obesity. Forty-four products were identified similarly with pediatric studies under FDASIA. Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only 4 labels. We conclude that there is little information presently available to provide guidance related to dosing in obese pediatric patients. Moving forward, regulators, clinicians, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider situations in drug development in which the inclusion of obese patients in pediatric trials is necessary to facilitate the safe and effective use of new drug products in the obese pediatric population. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Highlights from SelectBio 2015: Academic Drug Discovery Conference, Cambridge, UK, 19-20 May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John; Coaker, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The SelectBio 2015: Academic Drug Discovery Conference was held in Cambridge, UK, on 19-20 May 2015. Building on the success of academic drug discovery events in the USA, this conference aimed to showcase the exciting new research emerging from academic drug discovery and to help bridge the gap between basic research and commercial application. At the event the authors heard from a number of speakers on a broad array of topics, from partnering models for academia and industry to novel drug discovery approaches across various therapeutic areas, with a few talks, such as those by Susanne Muller-Knapp (Structure Genomics Consortium, Oxford University, Oxford, UK) and Julian Blagg (Institute of Cancer Research, UK), covering both remits, by highlighting a number of such partnerships and then delving into some case studies. The conference concluded with a heated debate on whether phenotypic discovery should be favored over targeted discovery in academia and pharma, in a panel discussion chaired by Roland Wolkowicz (San Diego State University, USA).

  5. Research Ethics and Commercial Drug Development: When Integrity Threatens Profitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bélisle Pipon, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This case, based on personal experiences and on those found in the literature, highlights the delicate tension faced by drug development companies having to balance research integrity and their profitability.

  6. Pediatric drug development: formulation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Areeg Anwer; Charoo, Naseem Ahmad; Abdallah, Daud Baraka

    2014-10-01

    Absence of safe, effective and appropriate treatment is one of the main causes of high mortality and morbidity rates among the pediatric group. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic differences between pediatric and adult population and their implications in pharmaceutical development. Different pediatric dosage forms, their merits and demerits are discussed. Food and Drug Administration Act of 1997 and the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act 2002 added 6 months patent extension and exclusivity incentives to pharmaceutical companies for evaluation of medicinal products in children. Prescription Drug User Fee Act and Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 made it mandatory for pharmaceutical companies to perform pediatric clinical studies on new drug products. Drug development program should include additional clinical bridge studies to evaluate differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adult and child populations. Additionally, pharmaceutical development should consider ease of administration, palatability, appropriate excipients, stability and therapeutic equivalency of pediatric dosage forms. Pediatric population is diverse with individual preferences and demand for custom made dosage formulations. Practically it is not feasible to have different pharmaceutical dosage forms for each group. Hence, an appropriate dosage form that can be administered across pediatric population is warranted.

  7. Low cost labeling with highlighter ink efficiently visualizes developing blood vessels in avian and mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Yuta; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2013-12-01

    To understand how blood vessels form to establish the intricate network during vertebrate development, it is helpful if one can visualize the vasculature in embryos. We here describe a novel labeling method using highlighter ink, easily obtained in stationery stores with a low cost, to visualize embryo-wide vasculatures in avian and mice. We tested 50 different highlighters for fluorescent microscopy with filter sets equipped in a standard fluorescent microscope. The yellow and violet inks yielded fluorescent signals specifically detected by the filters used for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) detections, respectively. When the ink solution was infused into chicken/quail and mouse embryos, vasculatures including large vessels and capillaries were labeled both in living and fixed embryos. Ink-infused embryos were further subjected to histological sections, and double stained with antibodies including QH-1 (quail), α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and PECAM-1 (mouse), revealing that the endothelial cells were specifically labeled by the infused highlighter ink. Highlighter-labeled signals were detected with a resolution comparable to or higher than signals of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-lectin and Rhodamine-dextran, conventionally used for angiography. Furthermore, macroconfocal microscopic analyses with ink-infused embryos visualized fine vascular structures of both embryo proper and extra-embryonic plexus in a Z-stack image of 2400 μm thick with a markedly high resolution. Together, the low cost highlighter ink serves as an alternative reagent useful for visualization of blood vessels in developing avian and mouse embryos and possibly in other animals. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  8. Research highlights: modelling to assess climate change impacts and promote development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxem, Katja E; Lin, Vivian S

    2015-08-01

    We highlight four recent articles on biophysical modelling for the Ecosystem Services and Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) Deltas project in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta system. These publications are part of a themed collection in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts and contribute to a larger body of collaborative work that aims to assess the impacts of changing climate, policy, and development efforts on vulnerable populations in the GBM delta.

  9. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  10. Capping Drugs: Development of Prodrugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 2. Capping Drugs: Development of Prodrugs. H Surya Prakash Rao. General Article Volume 8 Issue 2 February 2003 pp 19-27. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/02/0019-0027 ...

  11. Roles of Clinical Research Networks in Pediatric Drug Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, M.A.; Attar, S.; Wildt, S.N. de; Vassal, G.; Mangiarini, L.; Giaquinto, C.

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of drugs that are used in children has been neglected historically but is now well established as an essential part of clinical drug development. The increase in pediatric activity among industry, and other sectors, has highlighted the importance of joint working. All participants in

  12. Variation in drug sensitivity of malignant mesothelioma cell lines with substantial effects of selenite and bortezomib, highlights need for individualized therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szulkin

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma cells have an epithelioid or sarcomatoid morphology, both of which may be present in the same tumor. The sarcomatoid phenotype is associated with worse prognosis and heterogeneity of mesothelioma cells may contribute to therapy resistance, which is often seen in mesothelioma. This study aimed to investigate differences in sensitivity between mesothelioma cell lines to anti-cancer drugs. We studied two novel drugs, selenite and bortezomib and compared their effect to four conventional drugs. We also investigated the immunoreactivity of potential predictive markers for drug sensitivity; Pgp, MRP-1, ERCC1, RRM1, TS, xCT and proteasome 20S subunit.We treated six mesothelioma cell lines with selenite, bortezomib, carboplatin, pemetrexed, doxorubicin or gemcitabine as single agents and in combinations. Viability was measured after 24 and 48 hours. Immunocytochemistry was used to detect predictive markers.As a single agent, selenite was effective on four out of six cell lines, and in combination with bortezomib yielded the greatest response in the studied mesothelioma cell lines. Cells with an epithelioid phenotype were generally more sensitive to the different drugs than the sarcomatoid cells. Extensive S-phase arrest was seen in pemetrexed-sensitive cell lines. MRP-1 predicted sensitivity of cell lines to treatment with carboplatin and xCT predicted pemetrexed effect.The observed heterogeneity in sensitivity of mesothelioma cell lines with different morphology highlights the need for more individualized therapy, requiring development of methods to predict drug sensitivity of individual tumors. Selenite and bortezomib showed a superior effect compared to conventional drugs, motivating clinical testing of these agents as future treatment regime components for patients with malignant mesothelioma.

  13. Drug discovery and developments in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Infectious and parasitic diseases continue to threaten the health of million of people throughout the world, with the major burden being in developing countries. Many of the currently available drugs for the treatment of these diseases face setbacks such as insufficient efficacy, increasing loss of effectiveness due to ...

  14. Drug discovery and developments in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infectious and parasitic diseases continue to threaten the health of million of people throughout the world, with the major burden being in developing countries. Many of the currently available drugs for the treatment of these diseases face setbacks such as insufficient efficacy, increasing loss of effectiveness due to ...

  15. Instrument developments and recent scientific highlights at the J-NSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Oxana; Pasini, Stefano; Monkenbusch, Michael; Holderer, Olaf

    2017-06-01

    The J-NSE neutron spin echo spectrometer faces now 10 years of successful user operation at the FRM II research reactor at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ). We present scientific highlights and instrumental developments of the last decade, for example the development of grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy (GINSES) at the J-NSE and investigations of the dynamics at solid-liquid interfaces with this new option. Polymers in confinement have been a prominent topic, as well as the internal dynamics of proteins. The scientific questions also triggered instrumental developments such as a new polarizer and a new neutron guide concept. Finally, the future of the J-NSE will be addressed with a short presentation of the current upgrade program with superconducting main coils with reduced intrinsic field integral inhomogeneity.

  16. Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1992 and 1993 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Westinghouse Hanford Company to design and test an earthen cover system that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company provided engineering design support for the program. Work on barrier design has been under way at Hanford for nearly 10 years. The comprehensive development of a long-term barrier, formerly the Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program, was initiated in FY 1986, and a general field-tested design is expected to be completed by FY 1998. Highlights of efforts in FY 1992 and FY 1993 included the resumption of field testing, the completion of the prototype barrier design, and the convening of an external peer review panel, which met twice with the barrier development team. The review panel provided helpful guidance on current and future barrier development activities, while commending the program for its significant technical contributions to innovative barrier technology development

  17. Transcriptomic analysis highlights epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during zygotic embryo development of Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vega-Bartol, José J; Simões, Marta; Lorenz, W Walter; Rodrigues, Andreia S; Alba, Rob; Dean, Jeffrey F D; Miguel, Célia M

    2013-08-30

    It is during embryogenesis that the plant body plan is established and the meristems responsible for all post-embryonic growth are specified. The molecular mechanisms governing conifer embryogenesis are still largely unknown. Their elucidation may contribute valuable information to clarify if the distinct features of embryo development in angiosperms and gymnosperms result from differential gene regulation. To address this issue, we have performed the first transcriptomic analysis of zygotic embryo development in a conifer species (Pinus pinaster) focusing our study in particular on regulatory genes playing important roles during plant embryo development, namely epigenetic regulators and transcription factors. Microarray analysis of P. pinaster zygotic embryogenesis was performed at five periods of embryo development from early developing to mature embryos. Our results show that most changes in transcript levels occurred in the first and the last embryo stage-to-stage transitions, namely early to pre-cotyledonary embryo and cotyledonary to mature embryo. An analysis of functional categories for genes that were differentially expressed through embryogenesis highlighted several epigenetic regulation mechanisms. While putative orthologs of transcripts associated with mechanisms that target transposable elements and repetitive sequences were strongly expressed in early embryogenesis, PRC2-mediated repression of genes seemed more relevant during late embryogenesis. On the other hand, functions related to sRNA pathways appeared differentially regulated across all stages of embryo development with a prevalence of miRNA functions in mid to late embryogenesis. Identification of putative transcription factor genes differentially regulated between consecutive embryo stages was strongly suggestive of the relevance of auxin responses and regulation of auxin carriers during early embryogenesis. Such responses could be involved in establishing embryo patterning. Later in

  18. Towards a sustainable system of drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, Ellen H.M.; Cohen, Adam F.; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-01-01

    Drug development has become the exclusive activity of large pharmaceutical companies. However, the output of new drugs has been decreasing for the past decade and the prices of new drugs have risen steadily, leading to access problems for many patients. By analyzing the history of drug development

  19. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  20. Prodrug Strategy in Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal Kelemen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prodrugs are chemically modified derivatives introduced in therapy due to their advantageous physico-chemical properties (greater stability, improved solubility, increased permeability, used in inactive form. Biological effect is exerted by the active derivatives formed in organism through chemical transformation (biotransformation. Currently, 10% of pharmaceutical products are used as prodrugs, nearly half of them being converted to active form by hydrolysis, mainly by ester hydrolysis. The use of prodrugs aims to improve the bioavailability of compounds in order to resolve some unfavorable characteristics and to reduce first-pass metabolism. Other objectives are to increase drug absorption, to extend duration of action or to achieve a better tissue/organ selective transport in case of non-oral drug delivery forms. Prodrugs can be characterized by chemical structure, activation mechanism or through the presence of certain functional groups suitable for their preparation. Currently we distinguish in therapy traditional prodrugs prepared by chemical derivatisation, bioprecursors and targeted delivery systems. The present article is a review regarding the introduction and applications of prodrug design in various areas of drug development.

  1. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer

  2. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

  3. Promoting positive youth development and highlighting reasons for living in Northwest Alaska through digital storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Lisa; Gubrium, Aline; Griffin, Megan; DiFulvio, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    Using a positive youth development framework, this article describes how a 3-year digital storytelling project and the 566 digital stories produced from it in Northwest Alaska promote protective factors in the lives of Alaska Native youth and serve as digital "hope kits," a suicide prevention approach that emphasizes young people's reasons for living. Digital stories are short, participant-produced videos that combine photos, music, and voice. We present process data that indicate the ways that digital stories serve as a platform for youth to reflect on and represent their lives, important relationships and achievements. In so doing, youth use the digital storytelling process to identify and highlight encouraging aspects of their lives, and develop more certain and positive identity formations. These processes are correlated with positive youth health outcomes. In addition, the digital stories themselves serve as reminders of the young people's personal assets--their reasons for living--after the workshop ends. Young people in this project often showed their digital stories to those who were featured positively within as a way to strengthen these interpersonal relationships. Evaluation data from the project show that digital storytelling workshops and outputs are a promising positive youth development approach. The project and the qualitative data demonstrate the need for further studies focusing on outcomes related to suicide prevention.

  4. Status of SINQ, the only MW spallation neutron source-highlighting target development and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Werner; Dai, Yong; Glasbrenner, Heike; Grosse, Mirco; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2006-01-01

    SINQ is a continuous spallation neutron source, driven by PSI's 590 MeV proton accelerator. Receiving a stable proton current of 1.3 mA, SINQ is the presently most powerful accelerator-driven facility worldwide. Besides the primary designation of SINQ to serve as user facility for neutron scattering and neutron imaging, PSI seeks to play a leading role in the development of the facility, focusing on spallation targets and materials research for high-dose radiation environments. Accompanying these activities, SINQ has established several projects serving a more general, profound development towards high-power spallation targets: the most prominent ones being SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP) and megawatt pilot experiment for a liquid metal target (MEGAPIE), complemented by LiSoR and VIMOS. Within the user program, SINQ is aspiring to attract an appropriate contingent of industrial applications. The paper highlights the potential for industrial applications by means of selected examples from strain mapping and neutron imaging

  5. Development and Optimization of controlled drug release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to develop and optimize an osmotically controlled drug delivery system of diclofenac sodium. Osmotically controlled oral drug delivery systems utilize osmotic pressure for controlled delivery of active drugs. Drug delivery from these systems, to a large extent, is independent of the physiological factors ...

  6. Orphan drugs: trends and issues in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Proteesh; Chawla, Shalini

    2018-04-12

    Research in rare diseases has contributed substantially toward the current understanding in the pathophysiology of the common diseases. However, medical needs of patients with rare diseases have always been neglected by the society and pharmaceutical industries based on their small numbers and unprofitability. The Orphan Drug Act (1983) was the first serious attempt to address the unmet medical needs for patients with rare diseases and to provide impetus for the pharmaceutical industry to promote orphan drug development. The process of drug development for rare diseases is no different from common diseases but involves significant cost and infrastructure. Further, certain aspect of drug research may not be feasible for the rare diseases. The drug-approving authority must exercise their scientific judgment and ensure due flexibility while evaluating data at various stages of orphan drug development. The emergence of patent cliff combined with the government incentives led the pharmaceutical industry to realize the good commercial prospects in developing an orphan drug despite the small market size. Indeed, many drugs that were given orphan designation ended up being blockbusters. The orphan drug market is projected to reach $178 billion by 2020, and the prospects of research and development in rare diseases appears to be quite promising and rewarding.

  7. Symposium Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen-Whitred, K.

    2015-01-01

    Overview/Highlights: To begin, I'd like to take a moment to highlight some of the novel elements of this Symposium as compared to those that have been held in the past. For the first time ever, this Symposium was organized around five concurrent sessions, covering over 300 papers and presentations. These sessions were complemented by an active series of exhibits put on by vendors, universities, ESARDA, INMM, and Member State Support Programmes. We also had live demonstrations throughout the week on everything from software to destructive analysis to instrumentation, which provided the participants the opportunity to see recent developments that are ready for implementation. I'm sure you all had a chance to observe - and, more importantly, interact with - the electronic Poster, or ePoster format used this past week. This technology was used here for the first time ever by the IAEA, and I'm sure was a first for many of us as well. The ePoster format allowed participants to interact with the subject matter, and the subject matter experts, in a dynamic, engaging way. In addition to the novel technology used here, I have to say that having the posters strategically embedded in the sessions on the same topic, by having each poster author introduce his or her topic to the assembled group in order to lure us to the poster area during the breaks, was also a novel and highly effective technique. A final highlight I'd like to touch on in terms of the Symposium organization is the diversity of participation. This chart shows the breakdown by geographical distribution for the Symposium, in terms of participants. There are no labels, so don't try to read any, I simply wanted to demonstrate that we had great representation in terms of both the Symposium participants in general and the session chairs more specifically-and on that note, I would just mention here that 59 Member States participated in the Symposium. But what I find especially interesting and

  8. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aarti; Jacob, Abraham; Tandon, Manas; Kumar, Dushyant

    2010-10-01

    The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model - niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases.

  9. Pediatric Melanoma and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Importance—Pediatric melanoma occurs, albeit rarely. Should patients be treated by today’s medical standards, or be subjected to medically unnecessary clinical studies? Observations—We identified international, industry-sponsored pediatric melanoma studies triggered by regulatory demands in www.clinicaltrials.gov and further pediatric melanoma studies demanded by European Union pediatric investigation plans. We retrieved related regulatory documents from the internet. We analyzed these studies for rationale and medical beneficence on the basis of physiology, pediatric clinical pharmacology and rationale. Regulatory authorities define children by chronological age, not physiologically. Newborns’ organs are immature but they develop and mature rapidly. Separate proof of efficacy in underage patients is justified formally/regulatorily but lacks medical sense. Children—especially post-puberty—and adults vis-a-vis medications are physiologically very similar. Two adolescent melanoma studies were terminated in 2016 because of waning recruitment, while five studies in pediatric melanoma and other solid tumors, triggered by European Union pediatric investigation plans, continue recruiting worldwide. Conclusions and Relevance—Regulatory-demanded pediatric melanoma studies are medically superfluous. Melanoma patients of all ages should be treated with effective combination treatment. Babies need special attention. Children need dose-finding and pharmacokinetic studies but adolescents metabolize and respond to drugs similarly to adults. Institutional Review Boards/ethics committees should suspend ongoing questionable pediatric melanoma studies and reject newly submitted questionable studies.

  10. Importance of ABC Transporters in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benadiba, Marcel; Maor, Yehoshua

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a huge family of ATP-dependent transmembrane proteins whose main function is exporting or importing substances or molecules through the cell membranes, plasma cell membrane, or inner membranes in organelles. They fulfill these functions by maintaining cell integrity, metabolism, and homeostasis. They are expressed in a variety of tissues as they transport numerous essential compounds including lipids and other signaling molecules. ABC transporters became widely studied since the discovery of their ability to carry a multitude of xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs, and in light of the fact that they represent a hurdle for the treatment of resistant cancers. In contrast, the role of ABC transporters in neurological diseases like Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s, depression, schizophrenia, and epilepsy remains controversial and their mechanism of action in these pathologies remains elusive, thus hindering the implementation of therapies aimed at modulating the functions of these transporters. To date, a number of natural and synthetic compounds are known to act as inhibitors, substrates, and even inducers of these transporters, being able to modulate their expression and/or function; however, their implication as therapeutic agents is far from reaching wide clinical utilization. This review highlights the importance of overcoming the challenges posed by ABC transporters in drug development.

  11. AEB highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    AEB HIGHLIGHTS is a half yearly report reflecting the most important recent achievements of the various Research and Technical Divisions of the Atomic Energy Board. It appears alternately in English and Afrikaans [af

  12. AEB highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    AEB HIGHLIGHTS is a half-yearly report reflecting the most important recent achievements of the various Research and Technical Divisions of the Atomic Energy Board. It appears alternately in English and Afrikaans [af

  13. Use of SPring-8 in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Kazumi

    2006-01-01

    Protein structure analysis consortium was established by 21 drug companies and has analyzed protein structures using the beam line BL32B2 of SPring-8 since September in 2002. Outline of the protein structure analysis consortium, contribution of SPring-8 to drug development, and the present status and future of use of SPring-8 are stated. For examples of structure analysis, the human nuclear enzyme (PARP-1) fragment complex crystal structure, human ISG20, human dipeptidine peptidase IV, human cMDH, chromatin binding human nuclear enzyme complex, change of structure of each step of tyrosine activation of bacteria tyrosine tRNA synthetase are described. Contribution of analysis of protein structure and functions to drug development, development process of new drug, drug screening using compounds database on the basis of the three dimensional structure of receptor active site, genome drug development, and the effects of a target drug on the market are explained. (S.Y.)

  14. Pharmacometrics in early clinical drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacometrics, the science of quantitative clinical pharmacology, has been recognized as one of the main research fields able to improve efficiency in drug development, and to reduce attrition rates on the route from drug discovery to approval. This field of drug research, which builds heavily on

  15. Positron emission tomography in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Fischman, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    There are four kinds of measurements that can be carried out with positron emission tomography (PET) that can contribute significantly to the process of drug development: pharmacodynamic measurement of tissue metabolism influenced by a given drug; precise measurements of tissue blood flow; tissue pharmacokinetics of a given drug following administration of a particular dose; and the temporal course of ligand-receptor interaction. One or more of these measurements can greatly improve the decision making involved in determining the appropriate dose of a drug, the clinical situations in which a drug might be useful, and the linkage of pharmacokinetics with pharmacodynamics, which is at the heart of effective drug development. The greater the potential of a particular compound as a therapeutic agent, the greater the potential for PET to contribute to the drug development process

  16. Combination therapy: the propitious rationale for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phougat, Neetu; Khatri, Savita; Singh, Anu; Dangi, Mrridula; Kumar, Manish; Dabur, Rajesh; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for many infections are extremely limited and at crisis point. We run the risk of entering a second pre-antibiotic era. There had been no miracle drug for the patients infected by resistant microbial pathogens. Most of the very few new drugs under development have problems with their toxicity, or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We are already decades behind in the discovery, characterization and development of new antimicrobials. In that scenario, we could not imagine surviving without newer and effective antimicrobial agents. Bacteria have been the champions of evolution and are still evolving continuously, where they pose serious challenges for humans. Along with the crisis of evolving resistance, the condition is made worst by the meager drug pipeline for new antimicrobials. Despite ongoing efforts only 2 new antibiotics (Telavancin in 2009 and Ceftaroline fosamil in 2010) have been approved since 2009 pipeline status report of Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). Recent approval of new combination based antiviral drugs such as Stribild (combination of four drugs for HIV treatment) and Menhibrix (combination vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children) proves that combination therapy is still the most promising approach to combat the ever evolving pathogens. Combination therapy involves the drug repurposing and regrouping of the existing antimicrobial agents to provide a synergistic approach for management of infectious diseases. This review article is an effort to highlight the challenges in new drug development and potential of combination drug therapy to deal with them.

  17. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1993-01-01

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications

  18. Inkjet Printing of Drug-Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles—A Platform for Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrika Wickström

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs have shown great potential in improving drug delivery of poorly water soluble (BCS class II, IV and poorly permeable (BCS class III, IV drugs, as well as facilitating successful delivery of unstable compounds. The nanoparticle technology would allow improved treatment by reducing adverse reactions of currently approved drugs and possibly reintroducing previously discarded compounds from the drug development pipeline. This study aims to highlight important aspects in mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN ink formulation development for digital inkjet printing technology and to advice on choosing a method (2D/3D for nanoparticle print deposit characterization. The results show that both unfunctionalized and polyethyeleneimine (PEI surface functionalized MSNs, as well as drug-free and drug-loaded MSN–PEI suspensions, can be successfully inkjet-printed. Furthermore, the model BCS class IV drug remained incorporated in the MSNs and the suspension remained physically stable during the processing time and steps. This proof-of-concept study suggests that inkjet printing technology would be a flexible deposition method of pharmaceutical MSN suspensions to generate patterns according to predefined designs. The concept could be utilized as a versatile drug screening platform in the future due to the possibility of accurately depositing controlled volumes of MSN suspensions on various materials.

  19. New Zealand’s Drug Development Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Carswell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industry’s profitability depends on identifying and successfully developing new drug candidates while trying to contain the increasing costs of drug development. It is actively searching for new sources of innovative compounds and for mechanisms to reduce the enormous costs of developing new drug candidates. There is an opportunity for academia to further develop as a source of drug discovery. The rising levels of industry outsourcing also provide prospects for organisations that can reduce the costs of drug development. We explored the potential returns to New Zealand (NZ from its drug discovery expertise by assuming a drug development candidate is out-licensed without clinical data and has anticipated peak global sales of $350 million. We also estimated the revenue from NZ’s clinical research industry based on a standard per participant payment to study sites and the number of industry-sponsored clinical trials approved each year. Our analyses found that NZ’s clinical research industry has generated increasing foreign revenue and appropriate policy support could ensure that this continues to grow. In addition the probability-based revenue from the out-licensing of a drug development candidate could be important for NZ if provided with appropriate policy and financial support.

  20. Development Impact Assessment Highlights Co-benefits of GHG Mitigation Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    This EC-LEDS document describes the Development Impact Assessment (DIA) process that explores interactions between development goals and the low emission development strategies. DIA aims to support informed decision-making by considering how policies and programs intended to meet one goal may impact other development priorities. Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) is a flagship U.S. government-led effort that assists countries in developing and implementing LEDS. The program enhances partner country efforts by providing targeting technical assistance and building a shared global knowledge base on LEDS. is a flagship U.S. government-led effort that assists countries in developing and implementing LEDS. The program enhances partner country efforts by providing targeting technical assistance and building a shared global knowledge base on LEDS.

  1. Antibacterial drug development: challenges, recent developments, and future considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, S; Laessig, K; Toerner, J; Farley, J; Cox, E

    2014-08-01

    A decline in antibacterial drug development coupled with emerging bacterial resistance has resulted in limited treatment options. One of the challenges facing antibacterial drug development is appropriate clinical trial designs. Noninferiority trials are appropriate to study new antibacterial drugs for the treatment of serious diseases; superiority trials can be challenging and cannot be the only acceptable trial design to study antibacterial drugs. Our efforts must continue to make new therapies available to meet patient needs.

  2. Development, use and evaluation of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E H; Launsø, Laila

    1987-01-01

    The article presents various perspectives of drug technology and health care policy in Denmark. Drugs dominate as the most widely used treatment technology in the health care system and the use of drugs is steadily increasing. The pharmaceutical industry's development of drugs is based...... on an economic estimate of developments, expenditures, marketing costs and the anticipated share of the market. Controlled clinical trials have become the main form of documentation required by the health authorities. This method is insufficient to evaluate the (side) effects of the drugs when in actual use....... Drugs fit perfectly the technical perception of disease, a perception which prevails in the pharmaceutical industry, medical science and in the treatment of disease. This perception believes that a disease is due to an attack or dysfunction in the biological-mechanical conditions of the individual...

  3. Corporate sustainability and inclusive development: highlights from international business and management research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourula, A.; Pisani, N.; Kolk, A.

    Sustainability has attracted increasing attention from business scholars as corporations have started to take more responsibility for their environmental, social, and development impacts. In this review, we focus on the latest sustainability-related research published in the international business

  4. Highlights in the development of the high-speed diesel engine for rail transport. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zima, S.

    In the 1920s, Maybach Motorenbau GmbH (MM) developed a lightweight high-speed diesel engine which helped make diesel power for railcars popular - not only in Germany. In the early Thirties, a 12-cylinder engine in V-configuration was derived from the lightweight 6-cylinder in-line engine; later the 12-cylinder became the first high-speed diesel engine to be uprated by exhaust-gas turbocharging. MM began developing its own engine accessories as well as engines since badly designed accessories had been causing engine damage in these early days of rail traction. Towards the end of the Forties, a new series of engines with higher cubic capacity was developed for repowering locomotives with diesel engines. Their unconventional design features gave these engines an extraordinary development potential. At the same time, the prewar railcar engines were refined and adapted to the hard conditions of shunting locomotives in particular. (orig./BWI).

  5. Highlights of NASA's Role in Developing State-of-the-Art Nondestructive Evaluation for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Since the 1970's, when the promise of composites was being pursued for aeronautics applications, NASA has had programs that addressed the development of NDE methods for composites. These efforts included both microscopic and macroscopic NDE. At the microscopic level, NDE investigations interrogated composites at the submicron to micron level to understand a composite's microstructure. A novel microfocus CT system was developed as well as the science underlying applications of acoustic microscopy to a composite's component material properties. On the macroscopic scale NDE techniques were developed that advanced the capabilities to be faster and more quantitative. Techniques such as stiffness imaging, ultrasonic arrays, laser based ultrasound, advanced acoustic emission, thermography, and novel health monitoring systems were researched. Underlying these methods has been a strong modeling capability that has aided in method development.

  6. Modeling and simulation for medical product development and evaluation : highlights from the FDA-C-Path-ISOP 2013 workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, Klaus; Sinha, Vikram; Allerheiligen, Sandra; Danhof, Meindert; Pinheiro, Jose; Kruhlak, Naomi; Wang, Yaning; Wang, Sue-Jane; Sauer, John-Michael; Marier, J. F.; Corrigan, Brian; Rogers, James; Heerspink, H. J. Lambers; Gumbo, Tawanda; Vis, Peter; Watkins, Paul; Morrison, Tina; Gillespie, William; Gordon, Mark Forrest; Stephenson, Diane; Hanna, Debra; Pfister, Marc; Lalonde, Richard; Colatsky, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Medical-product development has become increasingly challenging and resource-intensive. In 2004, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) described critical challenges facing medical-product development by establishing the critical path initiative [1]. Priorities identified included the need for

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND REGISTRATION OF CHIRAL DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITTE, DT; ENSING, K; FRANKE, JP; DEZEEUW, RA

    1993-01-01

    In this review we describe the impact of chirality on drug development and registration in the United States, Japan and the European Community. Enantiomers may have differences in their pharmacological profiles, and, therefore, chiral drugs ask for special analytical and pharmacological attention

  8. Development and Evaluation of Chronotherapeutic Drug Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop an oral capsule-based chronomodulated drug delivery system of salbutamol sulphate for the treatment of nocturnal asthma. Methods: The basic design of the proposed dosage form entails an insoluble cross-linked capsule body filled with drug-loaded pellets sealed with hydrocolloid plug and a soluble ...

  9. Psychiatric Drug Development: Diagnosing a Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Hyman, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Editor?s note: Although one in five Americans currently takes at least one psychiatric drug and mental disorders are recognized worldwide, global pharmaceutical industry funding for new, innovative medications is in serious decline despite promising advances in genetics. The author traces the evolution of psychiatric drug development, the reasons for its retreat, and the changes necessary to meet the growing demand.

  10. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Highlights 89/1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    low speed subsonic wind tunnels. In one of them the ESTRUCTURAS Y STRUCTURES AND aerodynamic coefficients of the latest Spanish MATERIALES MATERIALS I...RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE SPANISH AEROSPACE INDUSTRY Javier Alvarez Vara President of Construcciones Aeronauticas S.A. (CASA) INTRODUCTION The...CRAY supercomputer. CONSTRUCCIONES AERONAUTICAS 0 Technology laboratories. 25 e Test and prototypes laboratories. - The accomplishment (in close

  11. New drug development in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Pamela; Morland, Bruce

    2014-02-01

    Future advances in childhood cancer treatment will pivot on developing biology-driven new drug development pathways that build on current knowledge of oncogenic pathways; however, we need to address major barriers to accessing new drugs for clinical evaluation in childhood cancers. Through legislative change, substantial incentives to the pharmaceutical industry to invest in the ultra-rare diseases, such as childhood cancers, have encouraged greater engagement with paediatric oncology drug development consortia. Disappointingly, this has not translated into paediatric-focussed drug development. Adult disease-driven drug development will continue to dominate until biology/target-driven approaches prevail.There are specific challenges to undertaking early drug development trials in children with incurable disease. The balance between risk and benefit for a child participating in trials wherein the chance of clinical benefit is indeterminate has the potential for unrealistic optimism by both physicians and families. Importantly, innovative trial designs that assess safety and maximize information on potential efficacy from small patient numbers are needed. International collaboration in early phase trial consortia addresses these challenges. Academic networks concentrating early phase trials expertise and delivery of innovative trial designs will maximize appropriate selection of drugs that can translate into therapeutic advantage when incorporated into standard care.

  12. Use of biomarkers in ALS drug development and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, Nadine; Boehringer, Ashley; Bowser, Robert

    2015-05-14

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the discovery of candidate biomarkers for ALS. These biomarkers typically can either differentiate ALS from control subjects or predict disease course (slow versus fast progression). At the same time, late-stage clinical trials for ALS have failed to generate improved drug treatments for ALS patients. Incorporation of biomarkers into the ALS drug development pipeline and the use of biologic and/or imaging biomarkers in early- and late-stage ALS clinical trials have been absent and only recently pursued in early-phase clinical trials. Further clinical research studies are needed to validate biomarkers for disease progression and develop biomarkers that can help determine that a drug has reached its target within the central nervous system. In this review we summarize recent progress in biomarkers across ALS model systems and patient population, and highlight continued research directions for biomarkers that stratify the patient population to enrich for patients that may best respond to a drug candidate, monitor disease progression and track drug responses in clinical trials. It is crucial that we further develop and validate ALS biomarkers and incorporate these biomarkers into the ALS drug development process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ALS complex pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Highlights in the development of the high-speed diesel engine for rail transport. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zima, S.

    1988-04-01

    Today's high-speed, high-performance diesel engines can be traced back to engines developed in the early 1920s as drive units for railcars. The design and technical details of the earlier high-performance engines at Maybach Motorenbau GmbH (MM), Friedrichshafen, can be explained by the difficulties of achieving the necessary output given the state of the art at that time, and of ensuring the function of individual assemblies in rail transport. The interaction between the engine, auxiliaries and vehicle had various repercussions on the engine, and a lot of effort was required to recognize and eliminate the causes of these. The demand for higher performance was met by providing greater cubic capacity, primarily by using more cylinders. Starting in the mid-thirties, attempts were made to increase output via the effective-work/displacement ratio by means of exhaust gas turbocharging. In the early 1950s new, more powerful engines were developed, which in their design concept differed substantially from other comparable engines.

  14. Neural stem cell transcriptional networks highlight genes essential for nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, Tony D; Brand, Andrea H

    2009-12-16

    Neural stem cells must strike a balance between self-renewal and multipotency, and differentiation. Identification of the transcriptional networks regulating stem cell division is an essential step in understanding how this balance is achieved. We have shown that the homeodomain transcription factor, Prospero, acts to repress self-renewal and promote differentiation. Among its targets are three neural stem cell transcription factors, Asense, Deadpan and Snail, of which Asense and Deadpan are repressed by Prospero. Here, we identify the targets of these three factors throughout the genome. We find a large overlap in their target genes, and indeed with the targets of Prospero, with 245 genomic loci bound by all factors. Many of the genes have been implicated in vertebrate stem cell self-renewal, suggesting that this core set of genes is crucial in the switch between self-renewal and differentiation. We also show that multiply bound loci are enriched for genes previously linked to nervous system phenotypes, thereby providing a shortcut to identifying genes important for nervous system development.

  15. A combined experimental and in silico characterization to highlight additional structural features and properties of a potentially new drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Isadora T. S.; Costa, Fanny N.; Silva, Tiago F.; Barreiro, Eliezer J.; Lima, Lídia M.; Braz, Delson; Lombardo, Giuseppe M.; Punzo, Francesco; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Barroso, Regina C.

    2017-10-01

    LASSBio-1755 is a new cycloalkyl-N-acylhydrazone parent compound designed for the development of derivatives with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Although single crystal X-ray diffraction has been considered as the golden standard in structure determination, we successfully used X-ray powder diffraction data in the structural determination of new synthesized compounds, in order to overcome the bottle-neck due to the difficulties experienced in harvesting good quality single crystals of the compounds. We therefore unequivocally assigned the relative configuration (E) to the imine double bond and a s-cis conformation of the amide function of the N-acylhydrazone compound. These features are confirmed by a computational analysis performed on the basis of molecular dynamics calculations, which are extended not only to the structural characteristics but also to the analysis of the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters, a further information - missed in a typical powder diffraction analysis. The so inferred data were used to perform additional cycles of refinement and eventually generate a new cif file with additional physical information. Furthermore, crystal morphology prediction was performed, which is in agreement with the experimental images acquired by scanning electron microscopy, thus providing useful information on possible alternative paths for better crystallization strategies.

  16. Use of conventional radiopharmaceuticals in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owunwanne, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Non beta-plus radiopharmaceuticals are routinely used to monitor therapeutic and toxic effects of drugs but still there is hesitancy in using them in drug development mainly due to the fact that most of them cannot be used to directly assess the target site for which the drug is being developed. However, they can be useful during safety, preclinical and clinical testing of new drugs to measure or monitor the pharmacodynamic effects of the drug on the tissue. Initial toxic effect of the drug can be studied in small and or large animals. Screening of multiorgan toxicity can be done in small animals while chronological studies can be done in large animals where planar or SPECT imaging can be performed. For screening, a lipophilic radioactive tracer such as 125 I-HIPDM can be used to study multiorgan toxicity. The percentage uptake in various organs of the drug-treated and control animals are compared to each other and the difference is assumed to reflect the tissue response of the drug. Once such a determination is made, organ-specific radiopharmaceuticals are then used to more accurately determine the toxic effect of the candidate drug as exemplified in the use of In-111 antimyosin antibody to document cardiotoxicity of the anthracyclines (particularly adriamycin). During pre-clinical and clinical testing stages, the non beta-plus radiopharmaceutical can be used to determine the therapeutic efficacy of the candidate drug as exemplified in the use of Ga-67 citrate to monitor chemotherapeutic treatment in cancer patients. The use of non-beta plus radiopharmaceuticals in drug development offers several advantages: a) the procedure is currently being routinely used to monitor therapeutic and toxic effects of drugs; b) it is simple, repeatable and adaptable to a chronological study using the same animal when employing imaging technique; c) it can be done in human thereby avoiding the necessity of extrapolating data from animals to human. To establish the use of

  17. 2014 Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The annual report gives a summary overview of key research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2014. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and decommissioning, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear fuel research, radioactivity and the environment and medical applications with emphasis on dosimetry.

  18. 2013 Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The annual report gives a summary overview of key research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2013. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and decommissioing, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear fuel research, raduioactivity and the environment and medical applications with emphasis on dosimetry.

  19. Accessing external innovation in drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufféry, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    A decline in the productivity of the pharmaceutical industry research and development (R&D) pipeline has highlighted the need to reconsider the classical strategies of drug discovery and development, which are based on internal resources, and to identify new means to improve the drug discovery process. Accepting that the combination of internal and external ideas can improve innovation, ways to access external innovation, that is, opening projects to external contributions, have recently been sought. In this review, the authors look at a number of external innovation opportunities. These include increased interactions with academia via academic centers of excellence/innovation centers, better communication on projects using crowdsourcing or social media and new models centered on external providers such as built-to-buy startups or virtual pharmaceutical companies. The buzz for accessing external innovation relies on the pharmaceutical industry's major challenge to improve R&D productivity, a conjuncture favorable to increase interactions with academia and new business models supporting access to external innovation. So far, access to external innovation has mostly been considered during early stages of drug development, and there is room for enhancement. First outcomes suggest that external innovation should become part of drug development in the long term. However, the balance between internal and external developments in drug discovery can vary largely depending on the company strategies.

  20. Regional intestinal drug permeation: biopharmaceutics and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2014-06-16

    Over the last 25 years, profound changes have been seen in both the development and regulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms, due primarily to the extensive use of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) in both academia and industry. The BCS and the FDA scale-up and post-approval change guidelines were both developed during the 1990s and both are currently widely used to claim biowaivers. The development of the BCS and its wide acceptance were important steps in pharmaceutical science that contributed to the more rational development of oral dosage forms. The effective permeation (Peff) of drugs through the intestine often depends on the combined outcomes of passive diffusion and multiple parallel transport processes. Site-specific jejunal Peff cannot reflect the permeability of the whole intestinal tract, since this varies along the length of the intestine, but is a useful approximation of the fraction of the oral dose that is absorbed. It appears that drugs with a jejunal Peff>1.5×10(-4)cm/s will be completely absorbed no matter which transport mechanisms are utilized. In this paper, historical clinical data originating from earlier open, single-pass perfusion studies have been used to calculate the Peff of different substances from sites in the jejunum and ileum. More exploratory in vivo studies are required in order to obtain reliable data on regional intestinal drug absorption. The development of experimental and theoretical methods of assessing drug absorption from both small intestine and various sites in the colon is encouraged. Some of the existing human in vivo data are discussed in relation to commonly used cell culture models. It is crucial to accurately determine the input parameters, such as the regional intestinal Peff, as these will form the basis for the expected increase in modeling and simulation of all the processes involved in GI drug absorption, thus facilitating successful pharmaceutical development in the future. It is suggested

  1. Austrian highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Simon

    2001-01-01

    An overview of recent development in the Austrian hydroelectric industry is presented, and details of the installed capacity, the Austrian government's power market reform package, and the promotion of small-scale hydroelectric power plants are given. The operation of Verbund - Austria's largest power generator and distributor - and the restructuring of the Verbund's main Austrian Hydro Power (AHP) generating group are discussed. The export of power, the joint venture of Verbund with CIR Energia in Italy to market power to commercial and industrial users, and the controversy surrounding the Freudenau run-of-the river plant which successfully tested a matrix turbine are reported

  2. Counterfeit drugs and medical devices in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glass BD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Beverley D GlassSchool of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: The World Health Organization has reported that counterfeit medicines potentially make up more than 50% of the global drug market, with a significant proportion of these fake products being encountered in developing countries. This occurrence is attributed to a lack of effective regulation and a weak enforcement capacity existing in these countries, with an increase in this trade resulting from the growing size and sophistication of drug counterfeiters. In addition, due to both cost and lack of availability of medicines, consumers in developing countries are more likely to seek out these inexpensive options. The World Health Organization is mindful of the impact of counterfeit drugs on consumer confidence in health care systems, health professionals, the supply chain, and genuine suppliers of medicines and medical devices. Antibiotics, antituberculosis drugs, and antimalarial and antiretroviral drugs are frequently targeted, with reports of 60% of the anti-infective drugs in Asia and Africa containing active pharmaceutical ingredients outside their pharmacopoeial limits. This has obvious public health implications of increasing drug resistance and negating all the efforts that have already gone into the provision of medicines to treat these life threatening conditions in the developing world. This review, while focusing on counterfeit medicines and medical devices in developing countries, will present information on their impact and how these issues can be addressed by regulation and control of the supply chain using technology appropriate to the developing world. The complexity of the problem will also be highlighted in terms of the definition of counterfeit and substandard medicines, including gray pharmaceuticals. Although this issue presents as a global public health problem, outcomes in developing countries where counterfeit

  3. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future

  4. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  5. A Drug-Centric View of Drug Development: How Drugs Spread from Disease to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2016-04-01

    Drugs are often seen as ancillary to the purpose of fighting diseases. Here an alternative view is proposed in which they occupy a spearheading role. In this view, drugs are technologies with an inherent therapeutic potential. Once created, they can spread from disease to disease independently of the drug creator's original intentions. Through the analysis of extensive literature and clinical trial records, it can be observed that successful drugs follow a life cycle in which they are studied at an increasing rate, and for the treatment of an increasing number of diseases, leading to clinical advancement. Such initial growth, following a power law on average, has a degree of momentum, but eventually decelerates, leading to stagnation and decay. A network model can describe the propagation of drugs from disease to disease in which diseases communicate with each other by receiving and sending drugs. Within this model, some diseases appear more prone to influence other diseases than be influenced, and vice versa. Diseases can also be organized into a drug-centric disease taxonomy based on the drugs that each adopts. This taxonomy reflects not only biological similarities across diseases, but also the level of differentiation of existing therapies. In sum, this study shows that drugs can become contagious technologies playing a driving role in the fight against disease. By better understanding such dynamics, pharmaceutical developers may be able to manage drug projects more effectively.

  6. Dengue human infection models supporting drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorn, James; Van, Vinh Chau Nguyen; Simmons, Cameron P

    2014-06-15

    Dengue is a arboviral infection that represents a major global health burden. There is an unmet need for effective dengue therapeutics to reduce symptoms, duration of illness and incidence of severe complications. Here, we consider the merits of a dengue human infection model (DHIM) for drug development. A DHIM could allow experimentally controlled studies of candidate therapeutics in preselected susceptible volunteers, potentially using smaller sample sizes than trials that recruited patients with dengue in an endemic country. In addition, the DHIM would assist the conduct of intensive pharmacokinetic and basic research investigations and aid in determining optimal drug dosage. Furthermore, a DHIM could help establish proof of concept that chemoprophylaxis against dengue is feasible. The key challenge in developing the DHIM for drug development is to ensure the model reliably replicates the typical clinical and laboratory features of naturally acquired, symptomatic dengue. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Drug development: from concept to marketing!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Nihad A M; Ellis, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Drug development is an expensive, long and high-risk business taking 10-15 years and is associated with a high attrition rate. It is driven by medical need, disease prevalence and the likelihood of success. Drug candidate selection is an iterative process between chemistry and biology, refining the molecular properties until a compound suitable for advancing to man is found. Typically, about one in a thousand synthesised compounds is ever selected for progression to the clinic. Prior to administration to humans, the pharmacology and biochemistry of the drug is established using an extensive range of in vitro and in vivo test procedures. It is also a regulatory requirement that the drug is administered to animals to assess its safety. Later-stage animal testing is also required to assess carcinogenicity and effects on the reproductive system. Clinical phases of drug development include phase I in healthy volunteers to assess primarily pharmacokinetics, safety and toleration, phase II in a cohort of patients with the target disease to establish efficacy and dose-response relationship and large-scale phase III studies to confirm safety and efficacy. Experience tells us that approximately only 1 in 10 drugs that start the clinical phase will make it to the market. Each drug must demonstrate safety and efficacy in the intended patient population and its benefits must outweigh its risks before it will be approved by the regulatory agencies. Strict regulatory standards govern the conduct of pre-clinical and clinical trials as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. The assessment of the new medicinal product's safety continues beyond the initial drug approval through post-marketing monitoring of adverse events. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Regulatory circuitry governing fungal development, drug resistance, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Rebecca S; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E

    2011-06-01

    Pathogenic fungi have become a leading cause of human mortality due to the increasing frequency of fungal infections in immunocompromised populations and the limited armamentarium of clinically useful antifungal drugs. Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are the leading causes of opportunistic fungal infections. In these diverse pathogenic fungi, complex signal transduction cascades are critical for sensing environmental changes and mediating appropriate cellular responses. For C. albicans, several environmental cues regulate a morphogenetic switch from yeast to filamentous growth, a reversible transition important for virulence. Many of the signaling cascades regulating morphogenesis are also required for cells to adapt and survive the cellular stresses imposed by antifungal drugs. Many of these signaling networks are conserved in C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, which undergo distinct morphogenetic programs during specific phases of their life cycles. Furthermore, the key mechanisms of fungal drug resistance, including alterations of the drug target, overexpression of drug efflux transporters, and alteration of cellular stress responses, are conserved between these species. This review focuses on the circuitry regulating fungal morphogenesis and drug resistance and the impact of these pathways on virulence. Although the three human-pathogenic fungi highlighted in this review are those most frequently encountered in the clinic, they represent a minute fraction of fungal diversity. Exploration of the conservation and divergence of core signal transduction pathways across C. albicans, C. neoformans, and A. fumigatus provides a foundation for the study of a broader diversity of pathogenic fungi and a platform for the development of new therapeutic strategies for fungal disease.

  9. [Historical development of drug testing in Swiss equestrian sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, V; von Salis, B; Fürst, A

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the development of equine drug testing in horses in Switzerland. This was achieved through evaluation of a film made by the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Basel entitled 'Doping von Rennpferden' [Doping of Race Horses], toxicological detection, 1962', the analysis of doping test results of the Swiss Equestrian Federation and by interviewing individuals of various professions who were involved in equine drug testing at the time. The study compares early and modern methods of drug testing and highlights the changes in the attitude of equestrian athletes, horse owners and the general public toward doping in equestrian sports. The high sensitivity of modern analytical methods allows the detection of drugs at levels considerably below therapeutic concentrations. This has resulted in a shift from zero tolerance for Controlled Medication Substances to the establishment of sub-therapeutic threshold concentrations. The lists of performance-enhancing drugs used in doping are updated continually. It became clear from this work that in the early 1960s, Switzerland played a leadership role in anti-doping in equestrian sports, and that the efforts to keep the sport free of performance-enhancing drugs remain exemplary.

  10. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing.

  11. Challenges in developing drugs for primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Hargreaves, Richard; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    This review considers the history of drug development in primary headaches and discusses challenges to the discovery of innovative headache therapeutics. Advances in headache genetics have yet to translate to new classes of therapeutics and there are currently no clear predictive human biomarkers...... for any of the primary headaches that can guide preventative drug discovery and development. Primary headache disorder subtypes despite common phenotypic presentation are undoubtedly heterogeneous in their pathophysiology as judged by the variability of response to headache medicines. Sub......, despite having promising effects in basic pain models, have not delivered efficacy in the clinic. Future efforts may triage novel physiological mediators using human experimental models of headache pain to support drug discovery strategies that target active pathways pharmacologically....

  12. A Trojan horse in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Skytte, Dorthe Mondrup; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2009-01-01

    Available chemotherapeutics take advantage of the fast proliferation of cancer cells. Consequently slow growth makes androgen refractory prostate cancer resistant towards available drugs. No treatment is available at the present, when the cancer has developed metastases outside the prostate (T4 s...

  13. Communication in Drug Development: "Translating" Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settleman, Jeff; Cohen, Robert L

    2016-03-10

    The discovery and development of new medicines that promote human health and potentially extend natural life remains a remarkably challenging endeavor. In this Commentary, we identify key elements of communication required to successfully translate promising biological findings to novel approved drug therapies and discuss the attendant challenges and opportunities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Has molecular imaging delivered to drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Philip S.; Patel, Neel; McCarthy, Timothy J.

    2017-10-01

    Pharmaceutical research and development requires a systematic interrogation of a candidate molecule through clinical studies. To ensure resources are spent on only the most promising molecules, early clinical studies must understand fundamental attributes of the drug candidate, including exposure at the target site, target binding and pharmacological response in disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to quantitatively characterize these properties in small, efficient clinical studies. Specific benefits of molecular imaging in this setting (compared to blood and tissue sampling) include non-invasiveness and the ability to survey the whole body temporally. These methods have been adopted primarily for neuroscience drug development, catalysed by the inability to access the brain compartment by other means. If we believe molecular imaging is a technology platform able to underpin clinical drug development, why is it not adopted further to enable earlier decisions? This article considers current drug development needs, progress towards integration of molecular imaging into studies, current impediments and proposed models to broaden use and increase impact. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  15. Developing and Negotiating Effective School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavela, Kathleen J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated effective drug prevention strategies for school-aged populations from drug prevention programs funded by the Department of Health and Human Services Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. Interviews with model programs' directors and staff highlighted 15 strategies essential for developing effective programs. Strategies focused on…

  16. Drugs and development: the global impact of drug use and trafficking on social and economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2008-12-01

    Locating development efforts within the context of globalism and global drug capitalism, this article examines the significant health and social impact both legal and illegal drugs have on international development efforts. The paper takes on an issue that is generally overlooked in the development debate and is not much addressed in the current international development standard, the Millennium Development Goals, and yet is one that places serious constraints on the ability of underdeveloped nations to achieve improvement. The relationship between psychotropic or "mind/mood altering" drugs and sustainable development is rooted in the contribution that the legal and illegal drug trade makes to a set of barriers to development, including: (1) interpersonal crime and community violence; (2) the corruption of public servants and the disintegration of social institutions; (3) the emergence of new or enhanced health problems; (4) the lowering of worker productivity; (5) the ensnarement of youth in drug distribution and away from productive education or employment; (6) the skewing of economies to drug production and money laundering. The paper emphasizes the need for new approaches for diminishing the burden placed by drugs on development.

  17. A Trojan horse in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Skytte, Dorthe Mondrup; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2009-01-01

    Available chemotherapeutics take advantage of the fast proliferation of cancer cells. Consequently slow growth makes androgen refractory prostate cancer resistant towards available drugs. No treatment is available at the present, when the cancer has developed metastases outside the prostate (T4...... stage). Cytotoxins killing cells irrespective of the phase of the cell cycle will be able to kill slowly proliferating prostate cancer cells. Lack of selectivity, however, prevents their use as systemic drugs. Prostate cancer cells secrete characteristic proteolytic enzymes, e.g. PSA and hK2......, with unusual substrate specificity. Conjugation of cytotoxins with peptides, which are selective substrates for PSA or hK2, will afford prodrugs, from which the active drug only will be released in close vicinity of the cancer cells. Based on this strategy prodrugs targeted at prostate cancer cells have been...

  18. Mixed WTO ruling on generic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R

    2000-01-01

    On 17 March 2000, the World Trade Organization upheld the provision in Canada's patent laws that allows generic drug manufacturers to develop (but not sell) their cheaper versions of patented medicines before the 20-year patients expire. The decision prevents pharmaceutical companies from enjoying market monopolies beyond their patent terms, avoiding what would otherwise be even lengthier delays in the sale of cheaper, generic drugs in Canada. This decision is of significance not only to Canada, but also to other WTO member countries and to all individuals who use pharmaceutical products. However, the decision is not all positive: the WTO also ruled that Canada is violating international agreements by letting generic manufacturers stockpile their versions of patented drugs before patents expire. This article explains the issues, the arguments, and the decision.

  19. The Development of Drugs against Acanthamoeba Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Aqeel, Yousuf

    2016-01-01

    For the past several decades, there has been little improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis and Acanthamoeba encephalitis, respectively. The discovery of a plethora of antiacanthamoebic compounds has not yielded effective marketed chemotherapeutics. The rate of development of novel antiacanthamoebic chemotherapies of translational value and the lack of interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing such chemotherapies have been disappointing. On the other hand, the market for contact lenses/contact lens disinfectants is a multi-billion-dollar industry and has been successful and profitable. A better understanding of drugs, their targets, and mechanisms of action will facilitate the development of more-effective chemotherapies. Here, we review the progress toward phenotypic drug discovery, emphasizing the shortcomings of useable therapies. PMID:27600042

  20. The Development of Drugs against Acanthamoeba Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Aqeel, Yousuf; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    For the past several decades, there has been little improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis and Acanthamoeba encephalitis, respectively. The discovery of a plethora of antiacanthamoebic compounds has not yielded effective marketed chemotherapeutics. The rate of development of novel antiacanthamoebic chemotherapies of translational value and the lack of interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing such chemotherapies have been disappointing. On the other hand, the market for contact lenses/contact lens disinfectants is a multi-billion-dollar industry and has been successful and profitable. A better understanding of drugs, their targets, and mechanisms of action will facilitate the development of more-effective chemotherapies. Here, we review the progress toward phenotypic drug discovery, emphasizing the shortcomings of useable therapies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Drug development against tuberculosis: Impact of alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shardendu K; Tripathi, Garima; Kishore, Navneet; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Archana; Tiwari, Vinod K

    2017-09-08

    Despite of the advances made in the treatment and management, tuberculosis (TB) still remains one of main public health problem. The contrary effects of first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs have generated extended research interest in natural products in the hope of devising new antitubercular leads. Interestingly, plethoras of natural products have been discovered to exhibit activity towards various resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Extensive applications of alkaloids in the field of therapeutics is well-established and nowday's researches being pursued to develop new potent drugs from natural sources for tuberculosis. Alkaloids are categorized in quite a few groups according to their structures and isolation from both terrestrial and marine sources. These new drugs might be a watershed in the battle against tuberculosis. This review summarizes alkaloids, which were found active against Mycobacteria since last ten years with special attention on the study of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and mode of action with their impact in drug discovery and development against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-target drugs: the trend of drug research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target-target and drug-drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the network visualization and the market trends. We discussed the possible reasons and proposed the rational strategies for drug research and development in the future.

  3. Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs on Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although psychostimulants have been used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder for approximately 70 years, little is known about the long term effects of these drugs on developing brain. The observable effects of psychostimulants are influenced by the timing of exposure, the age of examination after drug exposure and sex. Preclinical studies point out that chronic psychostimulant exposure before adolescence cause reverse sensitization or tolerance and this leads to reduction in stimulant effectiveness in adolesecence and adulthood. Preclinical studies show the potential long term effects of psychostimulants. But it is necessary to investigate the relationship between preclinical effects and clinical practice. A developmental approach is needed to understand the impact of pediatric medications on the brain that includes assessment at multiple ages to completely characterize the long term effects of these medications. The aim of this paper is to review the effects of psychostimulants on developing brain.

  4. Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

    2010-03-31

    With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

  5. Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Besmann, Theodore M.; Collins, Emory D.; Bell, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

  6. 75 FR 32482 - Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0247] Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; establishment of docket; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  7. Impact of preformulation on drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2013-09-01

    Preformulation assists scientists in screening lead candidates based on their physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties. This data is useful for selection of new chemical entities (NCEs) for preclinical efficacy/toxicity studies which is a major section under investigational new drug application. A strong collaboration between discovery and formulation group is essential for selecting right NCEs in order to reduce attrition rate in the late stage development. This article describes the significance of preformulation research in drug discovery and development. Various crucial preformulation parameters with case studies have been discussed. Physicochemical and biopharmaceutical characterization of NCEs is a decisive parameter during product development. Early prediction of these properties helps in selecting suitable physical form (salt, polymorph, etc.) of the candidate. Based on pharmacokinetic and efficacy/toxicity studies, suitable formulation for Phase I clinical studies can be developed. Overall these activities contribute in streamlining efficacy/toxicology evaluation, allowing pharmacologically effective and developable molecules to reach the clinic and eventually to the market. In this review, the magnitude of understanding preformulation properties of NCEs and their utility in product development has been elaborated with case studies.

  8. Model-assisted analysis of spatial and temporal variations in fruit temperature and transpiration highlighting the role of fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Nordey

    Full Text Available Fruit physiology is strongly affected by both fruit temperature and water losses through transpiration. Fruit temperature and its transpiration vary with environmental factors and fruit characteristics. In line with previous studies, measurements of physical and thermal fruit properties were found to significantly vary between fruit tissues and maturity stages. To study the impact of these variations on fruit temperature and transpiration, a modelling approach was used. A physical model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal variations of fruit temperature and transpiration according to the spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and thermal and physical fruit properties. Model predictions compared well to temperature measurements on mango fruits, making it possible to accurately simulate the daily temperature variations of the sunny and shaded sides of fruits. Model simulations indicated that fruit development induced an increase in both the temperature gradient within the fruit and fruit water losses, mainly due to fruit expansion. However, the evolution of fruit characteristics has only a very slight impact on the average temperature and the transpiration per surface unit. The importance of temperature and transpiration gradients highlighted in this study made it necessary to take spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and fruit characteristics into account to model fruit physiology.

  9. The development and maintenance of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Roy A; Koob, George F

    2014-01-01

    What is the defining property of addiction? We dust off a several-decades-long debate about the relative importance of two forms of reinforcement—positive reinforcement, subjectively linked to drug-induced euphoria, and negative reinforcement, subjectively linked to the alleviation of pain—both of which figure importantly in addiction theory; each of these forms has dominated addiction theory in its time. We agree that addiction begins with the formation of habits through positive reinforcement and that drug-opposite physiological responses often establish the conditions for negative reinforcement to come into play at a time when tolerance, in the form of increasing reward thresholds, appears to develop into positive reinforcement. Wise’s work has tended to focus on positive-reinforcement mechanisms that are important for establishing drug-seeking habits and reinstating them quickly after periods of abstinence, whereas Koob’s work has tended to focus on the negative-reinforcement mechanisms that become most obvious in the late stages of sustained addiction. While we tend to agree with each other about the early and late stages of addiction, we hold different views as to (i) the point between early and late at which the diagnosis of ‘addiction’ should be invoked, (ii) the relative importance of positive and negative reinforcement leading up to this transition, and (iii) the degree to which the specifics of negative reinforcement can be generalized across the range of addictive agents.

  10. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood. © 2013.

  11. Nurses' Views Highlight a Need for the Systematic Development of Patient Safety Culture in Forensic Psychiatry Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2017-11-04

    Although forensic nurses work with the most challenging psychiatric patients and manifest a safety culture in their interactions with patients, there have been few studies on patient safety culture in forensic psychiatric nursing. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe nurses' views of patient safety culture in their working unit and daily hospital work in 2 forensic hospitals in Finland. Data were collected over a period of 1 month by inviting nurses to answer an open-ended question in an anonymous Web-based questionnaire. A qualitative inductive analysis was performed on nurses' (n = 72) written descriptions of patient safety culture in state-owned forensic hospitals where most Finnish forensic patients are treated. Six main themes were identified: "systematization of an open and trusting communication culture," "visible and close interaction between managers and staff," "nonpunitive responses to errors, learning and developing," "balancing staff and patient perspectives on safety culture," "operational safety guidelines," and "adequate human resources to ensure safety." The findings highlight the influence of the prevailing culture on safety behaviors and outcomes for both healthcare workers and patients. Additionally, they underline the importance of an open culture with open communication and protocols.

  12. Developments in Diagnosis and Antileishmanial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Bhargava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis ranks the third in disease burden in disability-adjusted life years caused by neglected tropical diseases and is the second cause of parasite-related deaths after malaria; but for a variety of reasons, it is not receiving the attention that would be justified seeing its importance. Leishmaniasis is a diverse group of clinical syndromes caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk in 88 countries, with a global incidence of 1–1.5 million cases of cutaneous and 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. Improvements in diagnostic methods for early case detection and latest combitorial chemotherapeutic methods have given a new hope for combating this deadly disease. The cell biology of Leishmania and mammalian cells differs considerably and this distinctness extends to the biochemical level. This provides the promise that many of the parasite’s proteins should be sufficiently different from hosts and can be successfully exploited as drug targets. This paper gives a brief overview of recent developments in the diagnosis and approaches in antileishmanial drug discovery and development.

  13. Advancing cancer drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Cameron, David A

    2012-01-01

    Current drug-discovery strategies are typically 'target-centric' and are based upon high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries against nominated targets and a selection of lead compounds with optimized 'on-target' potency and selectivity profiles. However, high attrition of targeted agents in clinical development suggest that combinations of targeted agents will be most effective in treating solid tumors if the biological networks that permit cancer cells to subvert monotherapies are identified and retargeted. Conventional drug-discovery and development strategies are suboptimal for the rational design and development of novel drug combinations. In this article, we highlight a series of emerging technologies supporting a less reductionist, more agile, drug-discovery and development approach for the rational design, validation, prioritization and clinical development of novel drug combinations.

  14. Highlighting the evidence gap: how cost-effective are interventions to improve early childhood nutrition and development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batura, Neha; Hill, Zelee; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Lingam, Raghu; Colbourn, Timothy; Kim, Sungwook; Sikander, Siham; Pulkki-Brannstrom, Anni-Maria; Rahman, Atif; Kirkwood, Betty; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2015-07-01

    There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of early childhood interventions to improve the growth and development of children. Although, historically, nutrition and stimulation interventions may have been delivered separately, they are increasingly being tested as a package of early childhood interventions that synergistically improve outcomes over the life course. However, implementation at scale is seldom possible without first considering the relative cost and cost-effectiveness of these interventions. An evidence gap in this area may deter large-scale implementation, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We conduct a literature review to establish what is known about the cost-effectiveness of early childhood nutrition and development interventions. A set of predefined search terms and exclusion criteria standardized the search across five databases. The search identified 15 relevant articles. Of these, nine were from studies set in high-income countries and six in low- and middle-income countries. The articles either calculated the cost-effectiveness of nutrition-specific interventions (n = 8) aimed at improving child growth, or parenting interventions (stimulation) to improve early childhood development (n = 7). No articles estimated the cost-effectiveness of combined interventions. Comparing results within nutrition or stimulation interventions, or between nutrition and stimulation interventions was largely prevented by the variety of outcome measures used in these analyses. This article highlights the need for further evidence relevant to low- and middle-income countries. To facilitate comparison of cost-effectiveness between studies, and between contexts where appropriate, a move towards a common outcome measure such as the cost per disability-adjusted life years averted is advocated. Finally, given the increasing number of combined nutrition and stimulation interventions being tested, there is a significant need for evidence of cost

  15. Novel approaches in anti-arenaviral drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Andrew M.; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fevers caused by arenaviruses are among the most devastating emerging human diseases. Considering the number of individuals affected, the current lack of a licensed vaccine, and the limited therapeutic options, arenaviruses are arguably among the most neglected tropical pathogens and the development of efficacious anti-arenaviral drugs is of high priority. Over the past years significant efforts have been undertaken to identify novel potent inhibitors of arenavirus infection. High throughput screening of small molecule libraries employing pseudotype platforms led to the discovery of several potent and broadly active inhibitors of arenavirus cell entry that are effective against the major hemorrhagic arenaviruses. Mechanistic studies revealed that these novel entry inhibitors block arenavirus membrane fusion and provided novel insights into the unusual mechanism of this process. The success of these approaches highlights the power of small molecule screens in antiviral drug discovery and establishes arenavirus membrane fusion as a robust drug target. These broad screenings have been complemented by strategies targeting cellular factors involved in productive arenavirus infection. Approaches targeting the cellular protease implicated in maturation of the fusion-active viral envelope glycoprotein identified the proteolytic processing of the arenavirus glycoprotein precursor as a novel and promising target for anti-arenaviral strategies.

  16. Mind the gap : predicting cardiovascular risk during drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chain, Anne S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular safety issues, specifically drug-induced QT/QTc-interval prolongation, remain a major cause of drug attrition during clinical development and is one of the main causes for post-market drug withdrawals accounting for 15-34% of all drug discontinuation. Given the potentially fatal

  17. Intermittent claudication: new targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Eric P

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is the result of extensive atherosclerosis in the arterial supply to the lower extremities. PAD is associated with increased systemic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as substantial disability due to walking impairment. Claudication is the classic symptom of leg pain with walking that is relieved by rest, but patients with PAD without typical claudication also have a walking limitation. Treatment of the patient with PAD is directed towards reducing cardiovascular risk and improving exercise capacity. The pathophysiology of the physical impairment is complex as changes in the muscle distal to the arterial stenoses contribute to the limitations. Current treatment options to improve exercise performance have limitations emphasizing the need for new pharmacotherapies for this highly prevalent condition. The multifactorial contributors to the exercise impairment in PAD suggest potential targets for novel drug therapies. Advances in understanding angiogenesis make pharmacologic revascularization possible. However, ensuring that new blood vessels develop in a distribution relevant to the clinical impairment remains a challenge. Skeletal muscle metabolism and its regulation are altered in patients with PAD and strategies to improve the efficient oxidation of fuel substrates may improve muscle function. PAD is associated with increased oxidative stress which may result in injury to the muscle microvasculature and myocyte. Minimizing this oxidative stress by enhancing cellular defense mechanisms, administration of anti-inflammatory agents or by providing antioxidants, could prevent oxidative injury. Given the central role of atherosclerosis in the flow limitation, therapies to induce regression of atherosclerotic lesions could result in improved blood flow and oxygen delivery. Drugs targeting the distribution of blood flow in the microcirculatory environment of the muscle have the potential to better match oxygen delivery with

  18. [Access to essential drugs in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, P

    2001-01-01

    Every year infectious diseases kill about 13 million people, about 30.000 deaths a day. Almost half of the victims are children younger than 5 years old, most of them belong to developing countries. Most of the premature deaths and the incapacity cases associated to infectious diseases could be avoided if the poor had access to medicines. In the developing world, the poverty of the families, the inappropried public expense and the lack of sanitary infrastructures get together to leave out of the reach of the poor the possibility of an adequate medical treatment. According to World Health Organization (WHO) in the developing countries about 2,000 million people lack access to essential medicines. The new patent rules of the World Trade Organization (WTO) will reduce even more access to essential medicines to the poor. Granting trade exclusivity rights to the owners of the patents for a period of at least 20 years limits the right of the governments to allow production, trade and importation of low cost copies (generics) of patented drugs. It is not a theoretical or far away menace. The application of these more strict rules has all ready caused serious problems to developing countries producers of generics as India or Brazil or to importers of these as South Africa or Kenya. They have been press, taken to court and threaten of sanctions by the pharmaceutical industry and some developed countries governments. The decision of some developing countries to fight for their most needed people's health added to the international campaign for the access to essential medicines defended by some non governmental organizations like Act Up, Treatment Action Campaign, Doctors Without Borders and Intermon Oxfam have implied small victories on behalf of the poor countries access to medicines. But deeper changes in the patent rules and the investigation of the diseases of the developing world are needed to improve health in the developing countries.

  19. Nonstructural Proteins of Alphavirus—Potential Targets for Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Abu Bakar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are enveloped, positive single-stranded RNA viruses, typically transmitted by arthropods. They often cause arthralgia or encephalitic diseases in infected humans and there is currently no targeted antiviral treatment available. The re-emergence of alphaviruses in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the last decade, including chikungunya and o’nyong’nyong viruses, have intensified the search for selective inhibitors. In this review, we highlight key molecular determinants within the alphavirus replication complex that have been identified as viral targets, focusing on their structure and functionality in viral dissemination. We also summarize recent structural data of these viral targets and discuss how these could serve as templates to facilitate structure-based drug design and development of small molecule inhibitors.

  20. Development of Diazaquinomycin Class Antibiotics for the Treatment of Drug-Resistant TB Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Lakes antibiotic discovery program. February 4, 2014. UIC News Cover story: Highlights a Department of Defense grant between Drs. Murphy and...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0171 TITLE: Development of Diazaquinomycin Class Antibiotics for the Treatment of Drug-Resistant TB Infections...Class Antibiotics for the Treatment of Drug-Resistant TB Infections 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Scott Franzblau, Ph.D

  1. Using molecular similarity to highlight the challenges of routine immunoassay-based drug of abuse/toxicology screening in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siam Mohamed G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laboratory tests for routine drug of abuse and toxicology (DOA/Tox screening, often used in emergency medicine, generally utilize antibody-based tests (immunoassays to detect classes of drugs such as amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, opiates, and tricyclic antidepressants, or individual drugs such as cocaine, methadone, and phencyclidine. A key factor in assay sensitivity and specificity is the drugs or drug metabolites that were used as antigenic targets to generate the assay antibodies. All DOA/Tox screening immunoassays can be limited by false positives caused by cross-reactivity from structurally related compounds. For immunoassays targeted at a particular class of drugs, there can also be false negatives if there is failure to detect some drugs or their metabolites within that class. Methods Molecular similarity analysis, a computational method commonly used in drug discovery, was used to calculate structural similarity of a wide range of clinically relevant compounds (prescription and over-the-counter medications, illicit drugs, and clinically significant metabolites to the target ('antigenic' molecules of DOA/Tox screening tests. These results were compared with cross-reactivity data in the package inserts of immunoassays marketed for clinical testing. The causes for false positives for phencyclidine and tricyclic antidepressant screening immunoassays were investigated at the authors' medical center using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as a confirmatory method. Results The results illustrate three major challenges for routine DOA/Tox screening immunoassays used in emergency medicine. First, for some classes of drugs, the structural diversity of common drugs within each class has been increasing, thereby making it difficult for a single assay to detect all compounds without compromising specificity. Second, for some screening assays, common 'out-of-class' drugs may be structurally similar to the target

  2. A Development of Hybrid Drug Information System Using Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HwaMin Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent drug abuse or misuse cases and avoid over-prescriptions, it is necessary for medicine taker to be provided with detailed information about the medicine. In this paper, we propose a drug information system and develop an application to provide information through drug image recognition using a smartphone. We designed a contents-based drug image search algorithm using the color, shape and imprint of drug. Our convenient application can provide users with detailed information about drugs and prevent drug misuse.

  3. The role of radiolabelled compounds in preclinical drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    The role of radiolabelled compounds in the development of new drugs is discussed, with particular reference to their use in toxicological, metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies for the pre-clinical safety evaluation of new drugs. (U.K.)

  4. Industry Perspective of Drug Development for Pregnant/Breastfeeding Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth-Bradley, J M

    2016-07-01

    As part of drug development, drug companies conduct experiments to gather data about the potential toxicity of medications in pregnant and lactating animals. Increasingly, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are developed to simulate drug concentrations in pregnant and lactating women. As these women are not usually included in clinical trials, targeted postapproval safety monitoring, registries, or clinical studies may be performed to gather safety and efficacy information about drug use in these special populations. © 2016 ASCPT.

  5. Do national drug policies influence antiretroviral drug prices? Evidence from the Southern African Development community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Galárraga, Omar

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy of low- and middle-income countries’ (LMIC) national drug policies in managing antiretroviral (ARV) pharmaceutical prices is not well understood. Though ARV drug prices have been declining in LMIC over the past decade, little research has been done on the role of their national drug policies. This study aims to (i) analyse global ARV prices from 2004 to 2013 and (ii) examine the relationship of national drug policies to ARV prices. Analysis of ARV drug prices utilized data from the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization (WHO). Ten of the most common ARV drugs (first-line and second-line) were selected. National drug policies were also assessed for 12 countries in the South African Development Community (SADC), which self-reported their policies through WHO surveys. The best predictor of ARV drug price was generic status—the generic versions of 8 out of 10 ARV drugs were priced lower than branded versions. However, other factors such as transaction volume, HIV prevalence, national drug policies and PEPFAR/CHAI involvement were either not associated with ARV drug price or were not consistent predictors of price across different ARV drugs. In the context of emerging international trade agreements, which aim to strengthen patent protections internationally and potentially delay the sale of generic drugs in LMIC, this study shines a spotlight on the importance of generic drugs in controlling ARV prices. Further research is needed to understand the impact of national drug policies on ARV prices.

  6. Investigating Nature's Mysteries for Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than half of the drugs approved to treat cancer come from a natural product or a natural product prototype. Scientists in NCI-Frederick's Natural Products Branch are exploring ways to harness chemicals produced by marine invertebrates, other animals, plants, and microbes for cancer drug discovery.

  7. Development, use and evaluation of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E H; Launsø, Laila

    1987-01-01

    . Drugs offer a standard solution to health problems independent of the individuals' social life. Thus drugs become a tool which function in agreement with the disintegrated and achievement-orientated approach to disease as it is organized today. In general the statements in this article are not limited...

  8. Male central hypogonadism secondary to exogenous androgens: a review of the drugs and protocols highlighted by the online community of users for prevention and/or mitigation of adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolos, Stamatios; Reynolds, Michael; Panagiotopoulou, Nikoletta; McEleny, Kevin; Scally, Michael; Quinton, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Androgen- or anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) is no longer confined to professional athletes; its prevalence amongst young men and teenagers using androgens and/or anabolic steroids (AASs) is rising fast, and those affected can experience significant symptoms. Clinicians are increasingly encountering demanding, well-informed men affected by ASIH, yet lacking authoritative information on the subject may struggle to project a credible message. In this article, we overview the methods and drugs that men use in an attempt to counteract ASIH (with a view to either preventing its onset, or reversing it once it has developed) and summarize the scientific evidence underpinning these. The main channel for obtaining these drugs is the Internet, where they can be readily sourced without a valid prescription. An Internet search using relevant terms revealed a huge number of websites providing advice on how to buy and use products to counteract ASIH. Drugs arising repeatedly in our search included human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The quality and accuracy of the online information was variable, but review of medical literature also highlighted a lack of scientific data to guide clinical practice. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the AAS user's self-treatment strategies with regard to ASIH side-effect mitigation. By ensuring that they are well-informed, clinicians are more likely to retain the credibility and trust of AAS users, who will in turn likely be more open to engage with appropriate management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi; Nilsson Wallin, Annika

    2014-01-01

    the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during...... adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance...

  10. Developments in Clinical Practice: Follow up Clinic for BRCA Mutation Carriers: a Case Study Highlighting the "Virtual Clinic"

    OpenAIRE

    Ardern-Jones Audrey; Eeles Rosalind

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This paper highlights the need for carriers to be followed up by health professionals who understand the complexities of the BRCA syndrome. A BRCA carrier clinic has been established in London and regular follow up is an essential part of the care for families. An open door policy has been set up for patients who may meet or telephone the cancer genetic nurse specialist for support and care at any time. An example of the follow up work is discussed in the format of a case of a young ...

  11. Radiocarbon mass spectrometry for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Schulze-Konig Tim

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radiocarbon has a huge potential as a tracer for metabolism studies in humans. By using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for its detection, a unique sensitivity is reached reducing required radiation doses to a negligible level. Until recently, a widespread use of AMS in biomedical research was impeded by the high complexity of the instrument, time-consuming sample preparation, and a limited availability of measurement capacity. Over the last few years, tremendous progress has been achieved in the reduction of size and complexity of AMS instruments. It allowed designing a compact AMS system, dubbed BioMICADAS to address the needs of biomedical users. For more than two years, this system is in successful operation at a commercial service provider for the pharmaceutical industry. A further drastic simplification of radiocarbon mass spectrometers seems possible and could establish a regular usage of this technology in drug development. However, to reach this goal a better integration of AMS into the workflow of bioanalytical laboratories will be necessary. For this purpose, CO 2 accepting ion sources may be a key, since they enable an almost automated sample preparation. The status of radiocarbon AMS in biomedical research and its perspective will be discussed

  12. Targeting DNA repair systems in antitubercular drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Alina; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2018-01-28

    Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, are difficult to treat using currently available chemotherapeutics. Clinicians agree on the urgent need for novel drugs to treat tuberculosis. In this mini review, we summarize data that prompts the consideration of DNA repair-associated proteins as targets for the development of new antitubercular compounds. We discuss data, including gene expression data, that highlight the importance of DNA repair genes during the pathogenic cycle as well as after exposure to antimicrobials currently in use. Specifically, we report experiments on determining the essentiality of DNA repair-related genes. We report the availability of protein crystal structures and summarize discovered protein inhibitors. Further, we describe phenotypes of available gene mutants of M. tuberculosis and model organisms Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. We summarize experiments regarding the role of DNA repair-related proteins in pathogenesis and virulence performed both in vitro and in vivo during the infection of macrophages and animals. We detail the role of DNA repair genes in acquiring mutations, which influence the rate of drug resistance acquisition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Development of novel alkylating drugs as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Elzbieta; Tolcher, Anthony W

    2004-06-01

    Although conventional alkylating drugs have proven efficacy in the treatment of malignancies, the agents themselves are not selective. Therefore, non-specific alkylation of cellular nucleophilic targets may contribute to many of the observed toxic effects. Novel approaches to drug discovery have resulted in candidate agents that are focused on 'soft alkylation'--alkylators with greater target selectivity. This review highlights the discovery of small molecule drugs that bind to DNA with higher selectivity, act in a unique hypoxic tumor environment, or covalently bind specific protein targets overexpressed in cancer, such as topoisomerase II, glutathione transferase pi1, beta-tubulin and histone deacetylase.

  14. Clinical pharmacology: special safety considerations in drug development and pharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuah, Kwame N; Hughes, Dyfrig; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2004-01-01

    The dose of a drug is a major determinant of its safety, and establishing a safe dose of a novel drug is a prime objective during clinical development. The design of pre-marketing clinical trials precludes the representation of important subpopulations such as children, the elderly and people with co-morbidities. Therefore, postmarketing surveillance (PMS) activities are required to monitor the safety profile of drugs in real clinical practice. Furthermore, individual variations in pharmacogenetic profiles, the immune system, drug metabolic pathways and drug-drug interactions are also important factors in the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Thus, the safety of a drug is a major clinical consideration before and after it is marketed. A multidisciplinary approach is required to enhance the safety profile of drugs at all stages of development, including PMS activities. Clinical pharmacology encompasses a range of disciplines and forms the backbone of drug safety consideration during clinical drug development. In this review we give an overview of the clinical drug development process and consider its limitations. We present a discussion of several aspects of clinical pharmacology and their application to enhancing drug safety. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling provides a method of predicting a clinically safe dose; consideration of drug pharmacokinetics in special populations may enhance safe therapeutics in a wider spectrum of patients, while pharmacogenetics provides the possibility of genotype-specific therapeutics. Pharmacovigilance activities are also discussed. Given the complex nature and unpredictability of type B reactions, PMS activities are crucial in managing the risks drugs pose to the general population. The various aspects of clinical pharmacology discussed make a strong case for this field as the backbone of optimising and promoting safe development and use of drugs.

  15. Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Gerard J.; Ross, Ted M.; Evans, Thomas G.; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The “Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy” session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials. PMID:25148426

  16. Development and trends in the drug treatment of essential hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    AIM: A brief survey is given of the development of the drug therapy of essential hypertension over five decades, followed by a discussion on newer antihypertensive drugs and principles. DRUGS THAT MODULATE THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM: Virtually all levels and elements of the sympathetic nervous

  17. Imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Wolf S. [Global Medical Development Diagnostics, Schering AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The employment of biomarkers (including imaging biomarkers, especially PET) in drug development has gained increasing attention during recent years. This has been partly stimulated by the hope that the integration of biomarkers into drug development programmes may be a means to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the drug development process by early identification of promising drug candidates - thereby counteracting the rising costs of drug development. More importantly, however, the interest in biomarkers for drug development is the logical consequence of recent advances in biosciences and medicine which are leading to target-specific treatments in the framework of ''personalised medicine''. A considerable proportion of target-specific drugs will show effects in subgroups of patients only. Biomarkers are a means to identify potential responders, or patient subgroups at risk for specific side-effects. Biomarkers are used in early drug development in the context of translational medicine to gain information about the drug's potential in different patient groups and disease states. The information obtained at this stage is mainly important for designing subsequent clinical trials and to identify promising drug candidates. Biomarkers in later phases of clinical development may - if properly validated - serve as surrogate endpoints for clinical outcomes. Regulatory agencies in the EU and the USA have facilitated the use of biomarkers early in the development process. The validation of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is part of FDA's ''critical path initiative''. (orig.)

  18. Imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Wolf S.

    2006-01-01

    The employment of biomarkers (including imaging biomarkers, especially PET) in drug development has gained increasing attention during recent years. This has been partly stimulated by the hope that the integration of biomarkers into drug development programmes may be a means to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the drug development process by early identification of promising drug candidates - thereby counteracting the rising costs of drug development. More importantly, however, the interest in biomarkers for drug development is the logical consequence of recent advances in biosciences and medicine which are leading to target-specific treatments in the framework of ''personalised medicine''. A considerable proportion of target-specific drugs will show effects in subgroups of patients only. Biomarkers are a means to identify potential responders, or patient subgroups at risk for specific side-effects. Biomarkers are used in early drug development in the context of translational medicine to gain information about the drug's potential in different patient groups and disease states. The information obtained at this stage is mainly important for designing subsequent clinical trials and to identify promising drug candidates. Biomarkers in later phases of clinical development may - if properly validated - serve as surrogate endpoints for clinical outcomes. Regulatory agencies in the EU and the USA have facilitated the use of biomarkers early in the development process. The validation of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is part of FDA's ''critical path initiative''. (orig.)

  19. Investigation of toxic metabolites during drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kevin; Williams, Dominic P.; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2005-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant human health problem. Any organ system can be affected, including the liver, skin and kidney. Drug-induced liver injury is the most frequent reason for the withdrawal of an approved drug from the market, and it also accounts for up to 50% of cases of acute liver failure. The clinical picture is often diverse, even for the same drug. Mild, asymptomatic effects occur at a relatively high frequency with a number of drugs. Idiosyncratic toxicity is rare but potentially life-threatening. Many serious ADRs that occur in man are unpredictable from routine pathology and clinical chemistry in laboratory animals and are therefore poorly understood. The drug metabolist can determine the propensity of a novel chemical entity to either accumulate in the hepatocyte or undergo bioactivation in numerous model systems, from expressed enzymes, genetically engineered cells to whole animals. Bioactivation can be measured using trapping experiments with model nucleophiles or by measurement of non-specific covalent binding. The chemistry of the process is defined and the medicinal chemist can address the issue by seeking a metabolically stable pharmacophore to replace the potential toxicophore. However, we require a more fundamental understanding of the role of drug chemistry and biochemistry in ADRs. This requires knowledge of the ultimate toxin, signalling in cell defense and the sequence of molecular events, which ultimately lead to cell and tissue damage. It is imperative that such studies have a clinical level, but then translated into laboratory-based molecular studies. This will provide a deeper understanding of potential toxicophores for drug design and define candidate genes for pharmacogenomic approaches to individualized medicines

  20. The worldwide trend of using botanical drugs and strategies for developing global drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyungseop

    2017-03-01

    Natural product drugs, or botanical drugs, are drugs composed of natural substances which have constituents with healthenhancing or medicinal activities. In Korea, government-led projects brought attention to botanical drugs invigorating domestic botanical drug industry. Foreign markets, as well, are growing bigger as the significance of botanical drugs stood out. To follow along with the tendency, Korea puts a lot of effort on developing botanical drugs suitable for global market. However, standards for approving drug sales vary by countries. And also, thorough standardization, certification, clinical studies and data of these will be required as well as data confirming safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, as an international exchange in botanical drug market continues, the importance of plant resources was emphasized. Thus countries' ownership of domestic natural resources became vital. Not only establishing a systematic method to secure domestic plant resources, but also cooperation with other countries on sharing natural resources is essential to procure natural resources effectively. Korea started to show visible results with botanical drugs, and asthma/COPD treatment made out of speedwell is one example. Sufficient investment and government's active support for basic infrastructure for global botanical drugs will bring Korea to much higher level of botanical drug development. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 111-116].

  1. Simulating carbon capture by enhanced weathering with croplands: an overview of key processes highlighting areas of future model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lyla L; Beerling, David J; Quegan, Shaun; Banwart, Steven A

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced weathering (EW) aims to amplify a natural sink for CO 2 by incorporating powdered silicate rock with high reactive surface area into agricultural soils. The goal is to achieve rapid dissolution of minerals and release of alkalinity with accompanying dissolution of CO 2 into soils and drainage waters. EW could counteract phosphorus limitation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in tropical soils, and soil acidification, a common agricultural problem studied with numerical process models over several decades. Here, we review the processes leading to soil acidification in croplands and how the soil weathering CO 2 sink is represented in models. Mathematical models capturing the dominant processes and human interventions governing cropland soil chemistry and GHG emissions neglect weathering, while most weathering models neglect agricultural processes. We discuss current approaches to modelling EW and highlight several classes of model having the potential to simulate EW in croplands. Finally, we argue for further integration of process knowledge in mathematical models to capture feedbacks affecting both longer-term CO 2 consumption and crop growth and yields. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Chemical synthesis, characterisation, analytical method development and control to promote exposure assessments and toxicological testing. Highlights from COMPARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, Aa.; Malmberg, T.; Weiss, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    The issue of endocrine disruptor effects in wildlife and humans grow increasingly important during the 1990s'. As part of the focus on endocrine disruptors new contaminants and their metabolites were put forward for studies with endpoints related to hormone disruption. One such large group of chemicals and/or metabolites of neutral semi-persistent or persistent compounds was the substituted phenols, particularly the halogenated phenolic compounds (HPCs). Polychlorobiphenylols (OHPCBs) were reported to be strongly retained in human blood plasma in 1995 and this article was the first study to point out the general retention of several OH-PCBs in the plasma. The metabolic formation of OH-PCBs was well known and the specific blood retention had been reported for at least one PCB congener, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (CB-77) in some previous studies. The identification of OH-PCBs being retained in blood and their specific binding to transthyretin (TTR) has formed much of the basis for two EU R and D programs, first RENCO and now COMPARE. The present report is aimed to highlight some of the results obtained within the COMPARE program mainly dealing with the chemical synthesis, characterisation and analytical aspects of HPCs.

  3. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development: 2016 conference insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Abrey, Lauren E; Heffron, Timothy P; Tonge, Peter J; Dar, Arvin C; Weiss, William A; Gallo, James M

    2017-07-18

    CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development November 2016, AZ, USA The 2016 second CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference addressed diverse viewpoints about why new drug discovery/development focused on CNS cancers has been sorely lacking. Despite more than 70,000 individuals in the USA being diagnosed with a primary brain malignancy and 151,669-286,486 suffering from metastatic CNS cancer, in 1999, temozolomide was the last drug approved by the US FDA as an anticancer agent for high-grade gliomas. Among the topics discussed were economic factors and pharmaceutical risk assessments, regulatory constraints and perceptions and the need for improved imaging surrogates of drug activity. Included were modeling tumor growth and drug effects in a medical environment in which direct tumor sampling for biological effects can be problematic, potential new drugs under investigation and targets for drug discovery and development. The long trajectory and diverse impediments to novel drug discovery, and expectation that more than one drug will be needed to adequately inhibit critical intracellular tumor pathways were viewed as major disincentives for most pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies. While there were a few unanimities, one consensus is the need for continued and focused discussion among academic and industry scientists and clinicians to address tumor targets, new drug chemistry, and more time- and cost-efficient clinical trials based on surrogate end points.

  4. The Integral Role of Career Development in Supporting Programs of Study and Career Pathways. Transition Highlights. Issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchik, Stephanie; Oertle, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    According to Sears (1982), career development is "the total constellation of economic, sociological, psychological, educational, physical, and chance factors that combine to shape one's career." This definition was advanced by the Illinois Career Development Task Force that engaged in more than a year of deliberation. Career development…

  5. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein drug development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Daniel Lagassé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016.

  6. Advantages of toxicokinetics in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, I

    1998-12-28

    Toxicokinetic (TK) study is generally required for toxicological evaluation and safety assessment, particularly in the pivotal toxicological studies which are requested on the basis of drug registration. The estimation points of TK data are: (1) determination of TK profile in toxicity study, (2) selection of dose, dosing form, alternative dosing route, (3) help for the evaluation of toxicity (non-effect/toxic dose, toxicological mechanism), (4) comparative evaluation between animal and human cases, (5) recommendation of the starting dose in the first human clinical trial. On the other hand, as a very recent trend, TK data are practically used for the purpose of drug discovery such as lead-optimization and candidate-selection. This paper presents practical examples of TK data in terms of their usefulness, and discusses how to evaluate the toxicity of a drug with the aid of a variety of TK studies.

  7. A development perspective on adolescent drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, D; Moselle, K A

    1985-01-01

    Adolescent drug use is placed in an historical and developmental perspective. Existing evidence concerning causes and consequences of adolescent drug use is inconclusive. In the absence of conclusive empirical evidence and cogent theories, we present a prima facie case against early adolescent drug use by defending six propositions which posit specific cognitive, conative, and affective negative consequences including impairment of attention and memory; developmental lag imposing categorical limitations on the level of maximum functioning available to the user in cognitive, moral and psychosocial domains; amotivational syndrome; consolidation of diffuse or negative identity; and social alienation and estrangement. We call for a program of research which could provide credible evidence to support or rebut these propositions, and thus address the factual claims underlying the sociomoral concerns of social policy planners.

  8. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  9. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Open source drug discovery--a new paradigm of collaborative research in tuberculosis drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshu; Scaria, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Chandra, Nagasuma; Banerjee, Sulagna; Raghunandanan, Muthukurussi V; Pandey, Vikas; Taneja, Bhupesh; Yadav, Jyoti; Dash, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Jaijit; Misra, Amit; Kumar, Anil; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Thomas, Zakir; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2011-09-01

    It is being realized that the traditional closed-door and market driven approaches for drug discovery may not be the best suited model for the diseases of the developing world such as tuberculosis and malaria, because most patients suffering from these diseases have poor paying capacity. To ensure that new drugs are created for patients suffering from these diseases, it is necessary to formulate an alternate paradigm of drug discovery process. The current model constrained by limitations for collaboration and for sharing of resources with confidentiality hampers the opportunities for bringing expertise from diverse fields. These limitations hinder the possibilities of lowering the cost of drug discovery. The Open Source Drug Discovery project initiated by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India has adopted an open source model to power wide participation across geographical borders. Open Source Drug Discovery emphasizes integrative science through collaboration, open-sharing, taking up multi-faceted approaches and accruing benefits from advances on different fronts of new drug discovery. Because the open source model is based on community participation, it has the potential to self-sustain continuous development by generating a storehouse of alternatives towards continued pursuit for new drug discovery. Since the inventions are community generated, the new chemical entities developed by Open Source Drug Discovery will be taken up for clinical trial in a non-exclusive manner by participation of multiple companies with majority funding from Open Source Drug Discovery. This will ensure availability of drugs through a lower cost community driven drug discovery process for diseases afflicting people with poor paying capacity. Hopefully what LINUX the World Wide Web have done for the information technology, Open Source Drug Discovery will do for drug discovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinase-Centric Computational Drug Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Volkamer, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Kinases are among the most studied drug targets in industry and academia, due to their involvement in a majority of cellular processes and, upon dysregulation, in a variety of diseases including cancer, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders. The high interest in this druggable protein family

  12. IGC highlights 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The major thrust of the research and development (R and D) activities of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam is oriented towards mastering fast breeder reactor (FBR) technology. Towards this end, its current R and D activities are carried out in a wide variety of disciplines. Highlights of its R and D activities during 1988 are summarised under the headings: Reactor Engineering and Design, Reactor Physics and Safety, Materials Science and Technology, Sodium Chemistry and Technology, Fuel Reprocessing and Electronics and Instrumentation. The text is illustrated with a number of figures, graphs and coloured pictures. (M.G.B.). figs., tabs

  13. BARC highlights '88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of research and development activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay during 1988 are presented in chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, and Life Sciences. Main thrust of the R and D activities of BARC is on nuclear power reactor technology and all stages of nuclear fuel cycle. Some activities are also in the frontier areas such as high temperature superconductivity and inertial confinement fusion. (M.G.B.). figs., tabs., coloured ills

  14. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Colleen E.; An, Gary; Cannon, William R.; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E.; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S.; Sluka, James P.; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M.

    2016-02-17

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multi-scale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multi-scale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multi-scale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical techniques employed for multi-scale modeling approaches used in pharmacology and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art regarding drug development for: Excitable Systems (Heart); Cancer (Metastasis and Differentiation); Cancer (Angiogenesis and Drug Targeting); Metabolic Disorders; and Inflammation and Sepsis. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multi-scale models.

  15. An active role for machine learning in drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complexity of biological systems, cutting-edge machine-learning methods will be critical for future drug development. In particular, machine-vision methods to extract detailed information from imaging assays and active-learning methods to guide experimentation will be required to overcome the dimensionality problem in drug development. PMID:21587249

  16. A two-pronged approach in leishmaniasis drug development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nancy Kamau

    innovative approach rather than invention is being developed at CBRD's Leishmania laboratory. This is to .... Lancet. 2002; 359: 2188–94. 9. Nwaka S and Ridley RG. Virtual drug discovery and development for neglected diseases through public-private partnerships. Nature Reviews on Drug. Discovery. 2003; 2: 919-928.

  17. Getting rid of the unwanted: highlights of developments and challenges of biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Rasheed A

    2014-12-01

    The quest for quality mineral resources has led to the development of many technologies that can be used to refine minerals. Biohydrometallurgy is becoming an increasingly acceptable technology worldwide because it is cheap and environmentally friendly. This technology has been successfully developed for some sulphidic minerals such as gold and copper. In spite of wide acceptability of this technology, there are limitations to its applications especially in the treatment of non-sulphidic minerals such as iron ore minerals. High levels of elements such as potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) in iron ore minerals are known to reduce the quality and price of these minerals. Hydrometallurgical methods that are non-biological involving the use of chemicals are usually used to deal with this problem. However, recent advances in mining technologies favour green technologies, known as biohydrometallurgy, with minimal impact on the environment. This technology can be divided into two, namely bioleaching and biobeneficiation. This review focuses on Biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals. Biobeneficiation of iron ore is very challenging due to the low price and chemical constitution of the ore. There are substantial interests in the exploration of this technology for improving the quality of iron ore minerals. In this review, current developments in the biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals are considered, and potential solutions to challenges faced in the wider adoption of this technology are proposed.

  18. Delays in clinical development of neurological drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-06-28

    The delays in the approval and development of neurological drugs between Japan and other countries have been a major issue for patients with neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to analyze factors contributing to the delay in the launching of neurological drugs in Japan. We analyzed data from Japan and the US for the approval of 42 neurological drugs, all of which were approved earlier in the US than in Japan, and examined the potential factors that may cause the delay of their launch. Introductions of the 42 drugs in Japan occurred at a median of 87 months after introductions in the US. The mean review time of new drug applications for the 20 drugs introduced in Japan in January 2011 or later (15 months) was significantly shorter than that for the other 22 drugs introduced in Japan in December 2010 or earlier (24 months). The lag in the Japan's review time behind the US could not explain the approval delays. In the 31 of the 42 drugs, the application data package included overseas data. The mean review time of these 31 drugs (17 months) was significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs without overseas data (26 months). The mean approval lag behind the US of the 31 drugs (78 months) was also significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs (134 months). These results show that several important reforms in the Japanese drug development and approval system (e.g., inclusion of global clinical trial data) have reduced the delays in the clinical development of neurological drugs.

  19. Drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) involving 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC), 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and doxylamine highlighted by hair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larabi, Islam Amine; Martin, Marie; Etting, Isabelle; Penot, Pauline; Fabresse, Nicolas; Alvarez, Jean Claude

    2018-03-10

    Recently, the emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS) has led to their wide use among clubbers and men who have sex with men (MSM) for their stimulant effects. However, their use in drug facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) has rarely been described. Herein we report a case of a 44 years-old man who was assaulted after a party. Due to late reporting of the offense, only hair (black) was sampled 15 days later and a segmental analysis was achieved to look for most DFSA agents and NPS. Twenty mg of each segment (A:0-1cm, B:1-3cm and C:3-5cm) were incubated in phosphate buffer pH 5.0. After alkaline liquid extraction and chromatographic separation on 1.9 μm Hypersil GOLD PFP column, compounds were detected by a TSQ Vantage mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization in positive mode with MRM acquisition. 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and doxylamine were found in proximal segment at very low concentrations (3, 5 and 9 pg/mg, respectively) which is in agreement with a single exposure in the previous month corresponding to the alleged facts. These substances were not detected in segments B and C showing a lack of repetitive exposure before the alleged event. Thus, the results do not contradict the patient's claim of being assaulted. Doxylamine has already been encountered in such cases but no publications referring to 4-MEC or MDPV use have ever been documented. Our case reports the unusual administration of cathinones to achieve a sexual assault and stresses the interest of seeking for designer drugs when dealing with DFSA cases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and trial of the drug interaction database system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The drug interaction database system was originally developed at Songklanagarind Hospital. Data sets of drugs available in Songklanagarind Hospital comprising standard drug names, trade names, group names, and drug interactions were set up using Microsoft® Access 2000. The computer used was a Pentium III processor running at 450 MHz with 128 MB SDRAM operated by Microsoft® Windows 98. A robust structured query language algorithm was chosen for detecting interactions. The functioning of this database system, including speed and accuracy of detection, was tested at Songklanagarind Hospital and Naratiwatrachanagarind Hospital using hypothetical prescriptions. Its use in determining the incidence of drug interactions was also evaluated using a retrospective prescription data file. This study has shown that the database system correctly detected drug interactions from prescriptions. Speed of detection was approximately 1 to 2 seconds depending on the size of prescription. The database system was of benefit in determining of incidence rate of drug interaction in a hospital.

  1. Editor's Highlight: Development of Novel Neural Embryonic Stem CellTests for High-Throughput Screening of Embryotoxic Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kumiko; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Higashi, Kiyoshi; Muroi, Akane; Le Coz, Florian; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Saito, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    There is a great demand for appropriate alternative methods to rapidly evaluate the developmental and reproductive toxicity of a wide variety of chemicals. We used the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) into cardiomyocytes as a basis for establishing a rapid and highly reproducible invitro embryotoxicity test known as the Hand1-Luc Embryonic Stem Cell Test (Hand1-Luc EST). In this study, we developed novel neural-Luc ESTs using two marker genes for neural development, tubulin beta-3 (Tubb3) and Reelin (Reln), and evaluated the capacity of these tests to predict developmental toxicity. In addition, we tested whether an integrated approach (a combination of neural-Luc ESTs and the Hand1-Luc EST) improved developmental toxicant detection. To perform our neural-Luc ESTs, we needed to generate stable transgenic mESCs with individual promoters linked to the luciferase gene, and to establish that similar changes in promoter activities and mRNA expression levels occur during neural differentiation. Based on the concentration-response curves of 15 developmental toxicants and 17 non-developmental toxic chemicals, we derived a prediction formula and assessed the capacity of this formula to predict developmental toxicity. Although both were highly sensitive and specific for predicting developmental toxicity, neural-Luc ESTs had similar predictive capacities. In contrast, neural-Luc ESTs and Hand1-Luc EST had significantly different predictive powers. As expected, the combination of these ESTs increased the sensitivity of developmental toxicant detection. These results demonstrate the convenience and the usefulness of this combination of ESTs as an alternative assay system for future toxicological and mechanistic studies of developmental toxicity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Reflection of successful anticancer drug development processes in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Fabian; Huber, Torsten; Meisel, Christian; Bundschus, Markus; Leser, Ulf

    2016-11-01

    The development of cancer drugs is time-consuming and expensive. In particular, failures in late-stage clinical trials are a major cost driver for pharmaceutical companies. This puts a high demand on methods that provide insights into the success chances of new potential medicines. In this study, we systematically analyze publication patterns emerging along the drug discovery process of targeted cancer therapies, starting from basic research to drug approval - or failure. We find clear differences in the patterns of approved drugs compared with those that failed in Phase II/III. Feeding these features into a machine learning classifier allows us to predict the approval or failure of a targeted cancer drug significantly better than educated guessing. We believe that these findings could lead to novel measures for supporting decision making in drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Challenges in orphan drug development and regulatory policy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alice; Xie, Zhi

    2017-01-18

    While regulatory policy is well defined for orphan drug development in the United States and Europe, rare disease policy in China is still evolving. Many Chinese patients currently pay out of pocket for international treatments that are not yet approved in China. The lack of a clear definition and therefore regulatory approval process for rare diseases has, until now, de-incentivized pharmaceutical companies to pursue rare disease drug development in China. In turn, many grassroots movements have begun to support rare disease patients and facilitate drug discovery through research. Recently, the Chinese FDA set new regulatory guidelines for drugs being developed in China, including an expedited review process for life-saving treatments. In this review, we discuss the effects of these new policy changes on and suggest potential solutions to innovate orphan drug development in China.

  4. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Malve

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses.

  5. Fall Meeting Hydrology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Roger

    The AGU 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco offered the full range of subjects represented by the Hydrology Section's technical committees. The total number of papers was double the number of just 4 years ago. Sessions were well attended. The following highlights were prepared from material written by session organizers.There were 3 full days of papers on snow, ice, and permafrost. One highlight was the special session on new developments in glacier mass-balance studies, which was organized to compare existing methods and examine new techniques for assessing changes in ice mass of the polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Current methods for assessing mass change of the ice sheets include satellite laser altimetry to detect surface-elevation changes, surface-based control volume methods to determine net ice flux in a region, and ice-shelf melting and iceberg calving to determine mass loss from the ice sheet. Using these techniques, it is difficult to tell whether the ice sheet is gaining or losing mass. Methods that use drainage basin inputs/outputs indicate a net mass increase, whereas methods that emphasize oceanographic estimates of ice-shelf melting suggest a net mass decrease and estimates based on satellite altimetry are equivocal.

  6. Anticancer drug development from traditional cytotoxic to targeted therapies: evidence of shorter drug research and development time, and shorter drug lag in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata-Shoda, E; Masuda, S; Kimura, H

    2012-10-01

    Concern about the drug lag, the delay in marketing approval between one country and another, for anticancer drugs has increased in Japan. Although a number of studies have investigated the drug lag, none has investigated it in relation to the transition of anticancer therapy from traditional cytotoxic drugs to molecularly targeted agents. Our aim was to investigate current trend in oncology drug lag between the US and Japan and identify oncology drugs approved in only one of the two countries. Publicly and commercially available data sources were used to identify drugs approved in the US and Japan as of 31 December 2010 and the data used to calculate the drug lag for individual drugs. Fifty-one drugs were approved in both the US and Japan, whereas 34 and 19 drugs were approved only in the US or Japan, respectively. Of the 19 drugs approved only in Japan, 12 had not been subject to development for a cancer indication in the US, and all were approved before 1996 in Japan. Of the 34 drugs approved only in the US, 20 had not been subject to development in Japan, and none was in the top 25 by annual US anticancer drug-class sales. For drugs approved in both countries, the mean approval lag of the molecularly targeted drugs (MTDs) was significantly shorter than that of the non-molecularly targeted drugs (non-MTDs) (3·3 vs. 5·4 years). Further, mean R&D time of the MTDs was significantly shorter than that of non-MTDs (10·0 vs. 13·7 years). The price of MTDs had increased on average by 6·6% annually in the US, whereas it had decreased on average by 4·3% biyearly in Japan. The emergence of new molecularly targeted agents has contributed to reducing the approval lag, most likely due to improvements in R&D strategy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Otic drug delivery systems: formulation principles and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Li, Mingshuang; Smyth, Hugh; Zhang, Feng

    2018-04-25

    Disorders of the ear severely impact the quality of life of millions of people, but the treatment of these disorders is an ongoing, but often overlooked challenge particularly in terms of formulation design and product development. The prevalence of ear disorders has spurred significant efforts to develop new therapeutic agents, but perhaps less innovation has been applied to new drug delivery systems to improve the efficacy of ear disease treatments. This review provides a brief overview of physiology, major diseases, and current therapies used via the otic route of administration. The primary focuses are on the various administration routes and their formulation principles. The article also presents recent advances in otic drug deliveries as well as potential limitations. Otic drug delivery technology will likely evolve in the next decade and more efficient or specific treatments for ear disease will arise from the development of less invasive drug delivery methods, safe and highly controlled drug delivery systems, and biotechnology targeting therapies.

  8. Pharmacogenomics and its potential impact on drug and formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnstrom, Karin; Burgess, Diane J

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic research have provided the basis for new insights into the importance of genetic and genomic markers during the different stages of drug development. A new field of research, pharmacogenomics, which studies the relationship between drug effects and the genome, has emerged. Structural pharmacogenomics maps the complete DNA sequences of whole genomes (genotypes) including individual variations, and functional pharmacogenomics assesses the expression levels of thousands of genes in one single experiment. Together, these two areas of pharmacogenomics have generated massive databases, which have become a challenge for the research field of informatics and have fostered a new branch of research, bioinformatics. If skillfully used, the databases generated by pharmacogenomics together with data mining on the Web promise to improve the drug development process in a variety of areas: identification of drug targets, evaluation of toxicity, classification of diseases, evaluation of formulations, assessment of drug response and treatment, post-marketing applications, and development of personalized medicines.

  9. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Orphan Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Matthew; Levenson, James; Quillin, John

    2017-08-01

    Since the introduction of the Orphan Drug Act (ODA) in 1983, orphan drug approvals in the United States have jumped from growth is widely attributed to the financial incentives the ODA gives to companies that develop these medicines, and it is likely to continue for a unique reason: partnerships between pharmaceutical firms and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies. This emerging trend is the subject of this article, which begins by considering how rare-disease drugs are regulated and the rising interest in nonclinical genetic testing. It then outlines how DTC companies analyze DNA and how their techniques benefit researchers and drug developers. Then, after an overview of the current partnerships between DTCs and drug developers, it examines concerns about privacy and cost brought up by these partnerships. The article concludes by contrasting the enormous positive potential of DTC-pharma relationships and their concomitant dangers, especially to consumer privacy and cost to the healthcare system.

  10. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  11. Design and Development of a Proniosomal Transdermal Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to develop a proniosomal carrier system for captopril for the treatment of hypertension that is capable of efficiently delivering entrapped drug over an extended period of time. Method: The potential of proniosomes as a transdermal drug delivery system for captopril was investigated by ...

  12. Accelerating Precision Drug Development and Drug Repurposing by Leveraging Human Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, Jill M; Shirey-Rice, Jana K; Lavieri, Robert R; Jerome, Rebecca N; Zaleski, Nicole M; Aronoff, David M; Bastarache, Lisa; Niu, Xinnan; Holroyd, Kenneth J; Roden, Dan M; Skaar, Eric P; Niswender, Colleen M; Marnett, Lawrence J; Lindsley, Craig W; Ekstrom, Leeland B; Bentley, Alan R; Bernard, Gordon R; Hong, Charles C; Denny, Joshua C

    2017-04-01

    The potential impact of using human genetic data linked to longitudinal electronic medical records on drug development is extraordinary; however, the practical application of these data necessitates some organizational innovations. Vanderbilt has created resources such as an easily queried database of >2.6 million de-identified electronic health records linked to BioVU, which is a DNA biobank with more than 230,000 unique samples. To ensure these data are used to maximally benefit and accelerate both de novo drug discovery and drug repurposing efforts, we created the Accelerating Drug Development and Repurposing Incubator, a multidisciplinary think tank of experts in various therapeutic areas within both basic and clinical science as well as experts in legal, business, and other operational domains. The Incubator supports a diverse pipeline of drug indication finding projects, leveraging the natural experiment of human genetics.

  13. Patterns and problems of drug consumption in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Káldor, A

    1976-05-01

    Delayed and sometimes total lack of communications, lower standards of medical care, low physician: population ratio, absence of monitoring systems affect all phases of drug consumption in developing countries--from procedures for introducing a new drug to its marketing on a broad scale, and ultimate decline. The number of prescriptions and the choice of drug are determined only partly by physicians. Such other factors as medicaments furnished by the government either free or at a small charge, the type of health service, accessibility to paramedical and nonmedical advice, as well as hard-sell marketing practices, often through the mass media, tend to set the pattern of drug usage. The practice of drug storming in "home pharmacies", a phenomenon surveyed by the author, is described and the reasons for it analyzed. In general, the categories of drugs (e.g., antibiotics, cardiovascular, analgesics) consumed are the same in the rest of Europe, the United States, and Latin America. Among the minor tranquilizers, the consumption of meprobamate has risen by about a third, chlordiazepoxide markedly, while phenobarbital consumption has remained about the same from 1969 to 1973. This is said to illustrate the pattern of an upward curve in consumption of a new drug, and the displacement of an old one. The overall rise of these drugs during this period was 72.1% in Hungary. Similar surveys are reported for oral hypoglycemic and antiarrhythmic drugs. Of hypotensive drugs, rauwolfia usage has declined and methyldopa has increased by over 200%.

  14. New science-based endpoints to accelerate oncology drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloff, Gary J; Sigman, Caroline C

    2005-03-01

    Although several new oncology drugs have reached the market, more than 80% of drugs for all indications entering clinical development do not get marketing approval, with many failing late in development often in Phase III trials, because of unexpected safety issues or difficulty determining efficacy, including confounded outcomes. These factors contribute to the high costs of oncology drug development and clearly show the need for faster, more cost-effective strategies for evaluating oncology drugs and better definition of patients who will benefit from treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding of neoplastic progression at the cellular and molecular levels have spurred the discovery of molecularly targeted drugs. This progress along with advances in imaging and bioassay technologies are the basis for describing and evaluating new biomarker endpoints as well as for defining other biomarkers for identifying patient populations, potential toxicity, and providing evidence of drug effect and efficacy. Definitions and classifications of these biomarkers for use in oncology drug development are presented in this paper. Science-based and practical criteria for validating biomarkers have been developed including considerations of mechanistic plausibility, available methods and technology, and clinical feasibility. New promising tools for measuring biomarkers have also been developed and are based on genomics and proteomics, direct visualisation by microscopy (e.g., confocal microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis of cellular features), nanotechnologies, and direct and remote imaging (e.g., fluorescence endoscopy and anatomical, functional and molecular imaging techniques). The identification and evaluation of potential surrogate endpoints and other biomarkers require access to and analysis of large amounts of data, new technologies and extensive research resources. Further, there is a requirement for a convergence of research, regulatory and drug developer

  15. Drug development against tuberculosis: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasava, Mahesh S; Bhoi, Manoj N; Rathwa, Sanjay K; Borad, Mayuri A; Nair, Sneha G; Patel, Hitesh D

    2017-10-01

    Infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) was observed as early as 5000 years ago with evidence, which is a primeval enemy of the humanoid race. MTB is the pathogen which is responsible for causing the infectious disease tuberculosis; it remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in poor low-income countries as well as in developing countries because of non-availability of reliable laboratory facilities. The current treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is lengthy, complex, and connected with severe harmful side effects and poor outcomes. The present cure against tuberculosis has substantial restrictions, in terms of their efficiency, side-effect outline, and complication of handling. Furthermore, the emergence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) outbreaks during the 1990s and additionally in recent times the vast deadly strains of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) and totally drug resistance tuberculosis (TDR-TB) is hampering efforts to control and manage tuberculosis (TB). As a result, novel methodologies for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are severely desired. A number of new potential anti-tuberculosis drug candidates with novel modes of action have been entered in clinical trials in recent years. These agents are most likely to be effective against resistant strains. The treatment landscape is beginning to shift, with the recent approvals by Food and Drug Administration to the new TB drugs bedaquiline and delamanid. Also, the pipeline of potential new treatments has been fulfilled with several compounds in clinical trials or preclinical development with promising activities against sensitive and resistant MTB bacteria. An additional new chemical entity is also under development. The already existing drugs with their suggested mode of treatment as well as new probable anti-tuberculosis drug moieties which are at present in the pipeline has been summarized in this

  16. Development of polymer-polysaccharide hydrogels for controlling drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Aaron David

    The use of polymers as biomaterials has evolved over the past several decades, encompassing an expanding synthetic toolbox and many bio-mimetic approaches. Both synthetic and natural polymers have been used as components for biomaterials as their unique chemical structures can provide specific functions for desired applications. Of these materials, heparin, a highly sulfated naturally occurring polysaccharide, has been investigated extensively as a core component in drug delivery platforms and tissue engineering. The goal of this work was to further explore the use of heparin via conjugation with synthetic polymers for applications in drug delivery. We begin by investigating low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), a depolymerized heparin that is used medicinally in the prevention of thrombosis by subcutaneous injection or intravenous drip. Certain disease states or disorders require frequent administration with invasive delivery modalities leading to compliance issues for individuals on prolonged therapeutic courses. To address these issues, a long-term delivery method was developed for LMWH via subcutaneous injection of in situ hydrogelators. This therapy was accomplished by chemical modification of LMWH with maleimide functionality so that it may be crosslinked into continuous hydrogel networks with four-arm thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG-SH). These hydrogels degrade via hydrolysis over a period of weeks and release bioactive LMWH with first-order kinetics as determined by in vitro and in vivo models, thus indicating the possibility of an alternative means of heparin delivery over current accepted methodologies. Evaluation of the maleimide-thiol chemistries applied in the LMWH hydrogels revealed reversibility for some conjugates under reducing conditions. Addition chemistries, such as maleimide-thiol reactions, are widely employed in biological conjugates and are generally accepted as stable. Here we show that the resulting succinimide thioether formed by the

  17. [Development of antituberculous drugs: current status and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Haruaki; Namba, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) remains the most frequent and important infectious disease causing morbidity and death. One-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the etiologic agent of TB. The World Health Organization estimates that about eight to ten million new TB cases occur annually worldwide and the incidence of TB is currently increasing. In this context, TB is in the top three, with malaria and HIV being the leading causes of death from a single infectious agent, and approximately two million deaths are attributable to TB annually. In particular, pulmonary TB, the most common form of TB, is a highly contagious and life-threatening infection. Moreover, enhanced susceptibility to TB in HIV-infected populations is another serious health problem throughout the world. In addition, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) has been increasing in incidence in many areas, not only in developing countries but industrialized countries as well, during the past decade. These situations, particularly the global resurgence of TB and the rapid emergence of MDR-TB, underscore the importance of the development of new antituberculous drugs and new protocols for efficacious clinical control of TB patients using ordinary antimycobacterial drugs. Concerning the development of new antituberculous drugs, the following points are of particular importance. (1) Development of drugs which display lasting antimycobacterial activity in vivo is desirable, since they can be administered with long intervals and consequently facilitate directly observed therapy and enhance patient compliance. (2) Development of novel antituberculosis compounds to combat MDR-TB is urgently needed. (3) The eradication of slowly metabolizing and, if possible, dormant populations of MTB organisms that cause relapse, using new classes of anti-TB drugs is very promising for prevention of TB incidence, because it will markedly reduce the incidence of active TB from persons who are

  18. Navigating the Future of Cardiovascular Drug Development-Leveraging Novel Approaches to Drive Innovation and Drug Discovery: Summary of Findings from the Novel Cardiovascular Therapeutics Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povsic, Thomas J; Scott, Rob; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Blaustein, Robert; Edelberg, Jay M; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Solomon, Scott D; Fox, Jonathan C; Healy, Kevin E; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Losordo, Douglas W; Malik, Fady I; Monia, Brett P; Montgomery, Rusty L; Riesmeyer, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Gregory G; Zelenkofske, Steven L; Wu, Joseph C; Wasserman, Scott M; Roe, Matthew T

    2017-08-01

    The need for novel approaches to cardiovascular drug development served as the impetus to convene an open meeting of experts from the pharmaceutical industry and academia to assess the challenges and develop solutions for drug discovery in cardiovascular disease. The Novel Cardiovascular Therapeutics Summit first reviewed recent examples of ongoing or recently completed programs translating basic science observations to targeted drug development, highlighting successes (protein convertase sutilisin/kexin type 9 [PCSK9] and neprilysin inhibition) and targets still under evaluation (cholesteryl ester transfer protein [CETP] inhibition), with the hope of gleaning key lessons to successful drug development in the current era. Participants then reviewed the use of innovative approaches being explored to facilitate rapid and more cost-efficient evaluations of drug candidates in a short timeframe. We summarize observations gleaned from this summit and offer insight into future cardiovascular drug development. The rapid development in genetic and high-throughput drug evaluation technologies, coupled with new approaches to rapidly evaluate potential cardiovascular therapies with in vitro techniques, offer opportunities to identify new drug targets for cardiovascular disease, study new therapies with better efficiency and higher throughput in the preclinical setting, and more rapidly bring the most promising therapies to human testing. However, there must be a critical interface between industry and academia to guide the future of cardiovascular drug development. The shared interest among academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies in developing promising therapies to address unmet clinical needs for patients with cardiovascular disease underlies and guides innovation and discovery platforms that are significantly altering the landscape of cardiovascular drug development.

  19. Consensus rank orderings of molecular fingerprints illustrate the most genuine similarities between marketed drugs and small endogenous human metabolites, but highlight exogenous natural products as the most important ‘natural’ drug transporter substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve O'Hagan

    2017-06-01

    We next explicitly recognise that natural evolution will have selected for the ability to transport dietary substances, including plant, animal and microbial ‘secondary’ metabolites, that are of benefit to the host. These should also be explored in terms of their closeness to marketed drugs. We thus compared the TS of marketed drugs with the contents of various databases of natural products. When this is done, we find that some 80 % of marketed drugs are within a TS of 0.7 to a natural product, even using just the MACCS encoding. For patterned and TYPICAL encodings, 80 % and 98 % of drugs are within a TS of 0.8 to (an endogenite or an exogenous natural product. This implies strongly that it is these exogeneous (dietary and medicinal natural products that are more to be seen as the ‘natural’ substrates of drug transporters (as is recognised, for instance, for the solute carrier SLC22A4 and ergothioneine. This novel analysis casts an entirely different light on the kinds of natural molecules that are to be seen as most like marketed drugs, and hence potential transporter substrates, and further suggests that a renewed exploitation of natural products as drug scaffolds would be amply rewarded.

  20. PSI scientific highlights 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.

    2012-04-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the major highlights of the work done at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, in 2011. According to the institute's director, work was concerned with the design and analysis of advanced materials with new functionalities, for application in fields as diverse as communications and energy technology, transportation, construction and medicine. Of particular topical interest are research projects on materials for application in the field of energy, for example for improving batteries for future electrically powered vehicles. Another example is in the field of catalysts. Environmentally harmful compounds, such as nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide produced in an engine, are transformed into nontoxic gases through catalytic conversion. Work progress on the SwissFEL installation is noted, including a breakthrough for SwissFEL main Linac C-band accelerating systems. Further topics in relation to the SwissFEL system are noted. Planning of the initial set of experimental stations at the SwissFEL is discussed and close collaboration with growing number of user communities is noted. Cross-Correlation Scattering, and a theoretical framework for this method is being developed and experimentally verified, using artificial nanostructures and synchrotron radiation. Highlights of further research work are discussed, including topics such as Synchrotron light, work done on neutrons and muons, particle physics, micro and nanotechnology as well as on biomolecular research and radiopharmacy. Large research facilities are discussed as is the PSI proton therapy installation. General energy topics are looked at, as are nuclear energy and safety aspects and environmental and energy systems analysis. Various further work includes factors causing glacier retreat and aerosols. User facilities are listed, including accelerators, the SLS light source, the SINQ neutron source, the UCN ultra-cold neutron source

  1. An update on the development of drugs against smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2008-08-01

    The smallpox virus can potentially be used as a biological weapon and pose a serious threat to human populations, thus rendering the development of measures against it particularly important. There is a lack of effective antiviral drugs for the treatment of smallpox and, as a result, a number of viral as well as host targets are being explored in preclinical and clinical studies to assess their efficacy as potential therapeutic agents. This review describes the latest approaches used to develop drugs against smallpox.

  2. Investigational drugs in early development for treating dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesetti, Hemalatha; Khanna, Navin; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2016-09-01

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant arboviral disease of the current century. A drug for dengue is an urgent unmet need. As conventional drug discovery efforts have not produced any promising clinical candidates, there is a shift toward re-positioning pre-existing drugs for dengue to fast-track dengue drug development. This article provides an update on the current status of recently completed and ongoing dengue drug trials. All dengue drug trials described in this article were identified from a list of >230 trials that were returned upon searching the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform web portal using the search term 'dengue' on December 31(st), 2015. None of the handful of drugs tested so far has yielded encouraging results. Early trial experience has served to emphasize the challenge of drug testing in the short therapeutic time window available, the need for tools to predict 'high-risk' patients early on and the limitations of the existing pre-clinical model systems. Significant investment of efforts and resources is a must before the availability of a safe, effective and inexpensive dengue drug becomes a reality. Currently, supportive fluid therapy remains the only option available for dengue treatment.

  3. The teaching of drug development to medical students: collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A G; Jackson, D; Barnett, D B

    2005-04-01

    Collaboration between the medical school at Leicester and a local pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca, led to the design and implementation of an optional third year special science skills module teaching medical students about drug discovery and development. The module includes didactic teaching about the complexities of the drug discovery process leading to development of candidate drugs for clinical investigation as well as practical experience of the processes involved in drug evaluation preclinically and clinically. It highlights the major ethical and regulatory issues concerned with the production and testing of novel therapies in industry and the NHS. In addition it helps to reinforce other areas of the medical school curriculum, particularly the understanding of clinical study design and critical appraisal. The module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and the critical appraisal of a drug advertisement. This paper describes the objectives of the module and its content. In addition we outline the results of an initial student evaluation of the module and an assessment of its impact on student knowledge and the opinion of the pharmaceutical industry partner. This module has proven to be popular with medical students, who acquire a greater understanding of the work required for drug development and therefore reflect more favourably on the role of pharmaceutical companies in the UK.

  4. Benefit-Risk Assessment in Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan

    This thesis covers the development, testing and use of an eight-step structured method for data-driven benefit-risk assessment. The aim of this thesis was to create a tailored method for the assessment of clinical data. The focus has been on three major aspects: (i) A simple preliminary method wa...

  5. Pharmacologic considerations in use and development of antituberculosis drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Geraint

    2014-09-18

    Rational development and deployment of antituberculosis drugs depend on a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics that underlie their clinical behavior. Successful implementation of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic approach faces difficulties that, although not unique to tuberculosis as a therapeutic area, in combination pose a significant scientific challenge. In recent years, a multidisciplinary response combining new technological and analytical approaches has begun to directly address many of these issues, shedding light on some previously poorly understood aspects of drug distribution and response. These advances have important implications for optimization of existing and development of novel drug regimens, putting quantitative pharmacology at the heart of preclinical and early drug development. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Mathematical modeling for novel cancer drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    Mathematical modeling enables: the in silico classification of cancers, the prediction of disease outcomes, optimization of therapy, identification of promising drug targets and prediction of resistance to anticancer drugs. In silico pre-screened drug targets can be validated by a small number of carefully selected experiments. This review discusses the basics of mathematical modeling in cancer drug discovery and development. The topics include in silico discovery of novel molecular drug targets, optimization of immunotherapies, personalized medicine and guiding preclinical and clinical trials. Breast cancer has been used to demonstrate the applications of mathematical modeling in cancer diagnostics, the identification of high-risk population, cancer screening strategies, prediction of tumor growth and guiding cancer treatment. Mathematical models are the key components of the toolkit used in the fight against cancer. The combinatorial complexity of new drugs discovery is enormous, making systematic drug discovery, by experimentation, alone difficult if not impossible. The biggest challenges include seamless integration of growing data, information and knowledge, and making them available for a multiplicity of analyses. Mathematical models are essential for bringing cancer drug discovery into the era of Omics, Big Data and personalized medicine.

  7. Development of braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Wen; Huang Zhengming; Liu Xiangyang

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this work are twofold. Firstly, while most work on electrospinning is limited to the development of only functional materials, a structural application of electrospun nanofibers is explored. Secondly, a drug-loaded tissue suture is fabricated and its various properties are characterized. Braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures are obtained by combining an electrospinning process with a braiding technique followed by a coating procedure. Two different electrospinning techniques, i.e. blend and coaxial electrospinning, to incorporate a model drug cefotaxime sodium (CFX-Na) into poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers have been applied and compared with each other. Properties of the braided drug-loaded sutures are characterized through a variety of methods including SEM, TEM and tensile testing. The results show that the nanofibers had a preferable micromorphology. The drug was incorporated into the polymer nanofibers homogeneously, with no cross-linking. The nanofibers maintained their fibrous structures. An in vitro release study indicates that the drug-loaded nanofibers fabricated by blend electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning had a different drug release behavior. An inhibition zone experiment shows that both sutures obtained from the nanofibers of the different electrospinning techniques had favorable antibacterial properties. The drug-loaded sutures had preferable histological compatibility performance compared with commercial silk sutures in an in vivo comparative study.

  8. [Development of new drugs: opportunities and benefits for Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayona, Andrés; Fajardo, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    The development of innovative drugs allows coming up with new medicines to prevent and better treat illnesses. This improves people's quality of life and makes it more productive. Therefore, the mission of pharmaceutical research is to develop safe and effective drugs. Clinical trials allow the evaluation of the safety and efficacy profiles of new medicines, medical devices and diagnostic tests. Research and development (R&D) of new drugs is a long and costly process, where out of every 5000 to 10000 new components that enter preclinical testing, only one is approved. Compared to 2011, drug development has increased by 7.6%. According to ClinicalTrials.gov, 5% of the trials take place in Latin America, and Peru is in the fifth position. On the other hand, according to the Global Competitiveness Report issued by the World Economic Forum, Peru ranks 61st, its biggest challenges being the functioning of its public institutions, investment in R&D and technological capacity. The complexity of drug R&D results in a search for competitive places to develop clinical trials. Clinical Research is a humanized industry due to its ethical platform, stated in the guidelines of good clinical practices. This industry demands our country to develop a differentiating value that contributes to the development of knowledge and its competitiveness.

  9. Development of a brazilian nanoencapsulated drug for schistosomiasis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Bastos da Fonseca

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that, according to the World Health Organization, constitutes a major public health problem associated with severe morbidity, mostly children in preschool age. The administration of drugs in children always constitutes a difficult task, especially when formulations are not developed specifically for pediatric use, when high doses of drug are required and the drug has a bitter taste, as in the case of praziquantel. Polymer nanoparticles are promising systems for development of encapsulated drugs with low water solubility and bitter taste, due to the good physical and chemical stability, adequate biocompatibility and simple manufacturing processes. Moreover, they can enhance the bioavailabili-ty and reduce variability of treatment among patients. Poly (methyl methacrylate doped with praziquantel was produced through a miniemulsion polymerization pro-cess to compose a pediatric pharmaceutical suspension. Nanoparticles were cha-racterized in terms of physico-chemical properties, toxicological properties and biological activity in mice, being concluded that obtained results were satisfactory. The results were encapsulation rate around 90%, absence of chemical interaction drug - polymer and the presence of biological activity. A collaborative approach was used for this development, involving national partnerships and independent funding mechanisms, a powerful pathway for development of drugs for neglected diseases.

  10. Integration of Antibody Array Technology into Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Whittaker, Kelly; Zhang, Huihua; Wu, Jian; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    Antibody arrays represent a high-throughput technique that enables the parallel detection of multiple proteins with minimal sample volume requirements. In recent years, antibody arrays have been widely used to identify new biomarkers for disease diagnosis or prognosis. Moreover, many academic research laboratories and commercial biotechnology companies are starting to apply antibody arrays in the field of drug discovery. In this review, some technical aspects of antibody array development and the various platforms currently available will be addressed; however, the main focus will be on the discussion of antibody array technologies and their applications in drug discovery. Aspects of the drug discovery process, including target identification, mechanisms of drug resistance, molecular mechanisms of drug action, drug side effects, and the application in clinical trials and in managing patient care, which have been investigated using antibody arrays in recent literature will be examined and the relevance of this technology in progressing this process will be discussed. Protein profiling with antibody array technology, in addition to other applications, has emerged as a successful, novel approach for drug discovery because of the well-known importance of proteins in cell events and disease development.

  11. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26410809

  12. Neonatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs disrupts striatal synaptic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcelli, Patrick A; Janssen, Megan J; Vicini, Stefano; Gale, Karen

    2012-09-01

    Drug exposure during critical periods of brain development may adversely affect nervous system function, posing a challenge for treating infants. This is of particular concern for treating neonatal seizures, as early life exposure to drugs such as phenobarbital is associated with adverse neurological outcomes in patients and induction of neuronal apoptosis in animal models. The functional significance of the preclinical neurotoxicity has been questioned due to the absence of evidence for functional impairment associated with drug-induced developmental apoptosis. We used patch-clamp recordings to examine functional synaptic maturation in striatal medium spiny neurons from neonatal rats exposed to antiepileptic drugs with proapoptotic action (phenobarbital, phenytoin, lamotrigine) and without proapoptotic action (levetiracetam). Phenobarbital-exposed rats were also assessed for reversal learning at weaning. Recordings from control animals revealed increased inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connectivity between postnatal day (P)10 and P18. This maturation was absent in rats exposed at P7 to a single dose of phenobarbital, phenytoin, or lamotrigine. Additionally, phenobarbital exposure impaired striatal-mediated behavior on P25. Neuroprotective pretreatment with melatonin, which prevents drug-induced neurodevelopmental apoptosis, prevented the drug-induced disruption in maturation. Levetiracetam was found not to disrupt synaptic development. Our results provide the first evidence that exposure to antiepileptic drugs during a sensitive postnatal period impairs physiological maturation of synapses in neurons that survive the initial drug insult. These findings suggest a mechanism by which early life exposure to antiepileptic drugs can impact cognitive and behavioral outcomes, underscoring the need to identify therapies that control seizures without compromising synaptic maturation. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  13. Developing an Agent-Based Drug Model to Investigate the Synergistic Effects of Drug Combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongjie; Yin, Zuojing; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhang, Le

    2017-12-14

    The growth and survival of cancer cells are greatly related to their surrounding microenvironment. To understand the regulation under the impact of anti-cancer drugs and their synergistic effects, we have developed a multiscale agent-based model that can investigate the synergistic effects of drug combinations with three innovations. First, it explores the synergistic effects of drug combinations in a huge dose combinational space at the cell line level. Second, it can simulate the interaction between cells and their microenvironment. Third, it employs both local and global optimization algorithms to train the key parameters and validate the predictive power of the model by using experimental data. The research results indicate that our multicellular system can not only describe the interactions between the microenvironment and cells in detail, but also predict the synergistic effects of drug combinations.

  14. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  15. Nano-formulations of drugs: Recent developments, impact and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandam, Jaison; Chan, Yen San; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Nano-formulations of medicinal drugs have attracted the interest of many researchers for drug delivery applications. These nano-formulations enhance the properties of conventional drugs and are specific to the targeted delivery site. Dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-emulsions and micelles are some of the nano-formulations that are gaining prominence in pharmaceutical industry for enhanced drug formulation. Wide varieties of synthesis methods are available for the preparation of nano-formulations to deliver drugs in biological system. The choice of synthesis methods depend on the size and shape of particulate formulation, biochemical properties of drug, and the targeted site. This article discusses recent developments in nano-formulation and the progressive impact on pharmaceutical research and industries. Additionally, process challenges relating to consistent generation of nano-formulations for drug delivery are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spack Edward G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s. Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot

  17. Live-Cell High Content Screening in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esner, Milan; Meyenhofer, Felix; Bickle, Marc

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, automated microscopy has become an important tool for the drug discovery and development process. The establishment of imaging modalities as screening tools depended on technological breakthroughs in the domain of automated microscopy and automated image analysis. These types of assays are often referred to as high content screening or high content analysis (HCS/HCA). The driving force to adopt imaging for drug development is the quantity and quality of cellular information that can be collected and the enhanced physiological relevance of cellular screening compared to biochemical screening. Most imaging in drug development is performed on fixed cells as this allows uncoupling the preparation of the cells from the acquisition of the images. Live-cell imaging is technically challenging, but is very useful for many aspects of the drug development pipeline such as kinetic studies of compound mode of action or to analyze the motion of cellular components. Most vendors of HCS microscopy systems offer the option of environmental chambers and onboard pipetting on their platforms. This reflects the wish and desire of many customers to have the ability to perform live-cell assays on their HCS automated microscopes. This book chapter summarizes the challenges and advantages of live-cell imaging in drug discovery. Examples of applications are presented and the motivation to perform these assays in kinetic mode is discussed.

  18. Recent strategies for drug development in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, David E; Malemud, Charles J

    2016-12-01

    The US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved 3 medications for treating fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). There have been no additional FDA approvals since January 2009 and the efficacy of the FDA-approved medications for FMS has been questioned. Areas covered: The "search for studies" tool using clinicaltrials.gov and PubMed were employed. The term, "fibromyalgia" was used for clinicaltrials.gov. The terms employed for PubMed were "Name-of-Drug Fibromyalgia", "Fibromyalgia Treatment" or "Fibromyalgia Drug Treatment." Clinical trials were reviewed if they were prospective and blinded, and if they employed a comparator, either placebo or another pharmaceutical. Expert commentary: Progress toward standardizing the outcome measures for FMS clinical trials have been made but challenges remain. Several pharmaceutical candidates for FMS have been tested since 2009. The results of these studies with potential novel targets for drug development for FMS were reviewed including the results of trials with sodium oxybate, quetiapine, esreboxetine, nabilone, memantine, naltrexone, and melatonin.

  19. The Use of Social Media in Orphan Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Christopher-Paul; Ni, Wendi

    2017-11-01

    Social media has transformed how people interact with one another through the Internet, and it has the potential to do the same for orphan drug development. Currently, social media influences the orphan drug development process in the following three ways: assisting the study of orphan diseases, increasing the awareness of orphan disease, and playing a vital role in clinical trials. However, there are some caveats to the utilization of social media, such as the need to protect patient privacy by adequately de-identifying personal health information, assuring consistent quality and representativeness of the data, and preventing the unblinding of patient group assignments. Social media has both potential for improving orphan drug development and pitfalls, but with proper oversight on the part of companies, support and participation of patients and their advocacy groups, and timely guidance from regulatory authorities, the positives outweigh the negatives for this powerful and patient-centric tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Educative game on drugs for blind individuals: development and assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Monaliza Ribeiro; Rebouças, Cristiana Brasil de Almeida; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2013-08-01

    Study aimed to develop and assess an educational game on psychoactive drugs accessible to blind individuals, conducted in three steps: development of the educative game, evaluation by three special education experts, and assessment by twelve blind individuals. As a result, a board game called Drugs: staying clean was developed. In the Alpha version, experts made suggestions regarding the game rules and instructions and the board base, including square texture, game pieces, and Braille writing. In Beta version, we proceeded to the assessment by the blind participants, who suggested changes in the square texture and the addition of Velcro-type material to fix the counters on the board. Then, the Gamma version was played by the last pairs of blind players and was considered by them to be adequate. In the evaluation of the experts, the game was appropriate, as it allowed access to information on psychoactive drugs in a ludic and playful manner.

  1. Understanding the transport properties of metabolites: case studies and considerations for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J; Chu, Xiaoyan; Polli, Joseph W; Paine, Mary F; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Recent analyses demonstrated that metabolites are unlikely to contribute significantly to clinical inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated drug metabolism, and that only ∼2% of this type of drug interaction could not be predicted from the parent drug alone. Due to generally increased polarity and decreased permeability, metabolites are less likely to interact with P450s, but their disposition is instead more likely to involve transporters. This commentary presents case studies illustrating the potential importance of transporters as determinants of metabolite disposition, and as sites of drug interactions, which may alter drug efficacy and safety. Many of these examples are hydrophilic phase II conjugates involved in enterohepatic cycling, where modulation of transporter-dependent disposition may alter pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The case studies suggest that characterization of metabolite disposition, toxicology, and pharmacology should not focus solely on metabolites with appreciable systemic exposure, but should take into consideration major excretory metabolites. A more thorough understanding of metabolite (phase I and II; circulating and excreted) transport properties during drug development may provide an improved understanding of complex drug-drug interactions (DDIs) that can alter drug and/or metabolite systemic and intracellular exposure. Knowledge and capability gaps remain in clinical translation of in vitro and animal data regarding metabolite disposition. To this end, useful experimental and modeling approaches are highlighted. Application of these tools may lead to a better understanding of metabolite victim and perpetrator DDI potential, and ultimately the establishment of approaches for prediction of pharmacodynamic and toxicodynamic consequences of metabolite transport modulation.

  2. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution.

  3. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Julius A; Patnaik, Ashis

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  4. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius A Vaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  5. Anti-Influenza Treatment: Drugs Currently Used and Under Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarelle, Luciano; Lecuona, Emilia; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a very common contagious disease that carries significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment with antiviral drugs is available, which if administered early, can reduce the risk of severe complications. However, many virus types develop resistance to those drugs, leading to a notable loss of efficacy. There has been great interest in the development of new drugs to combat this disease. A wide range of drugs has shown anti-influenza activity, but they are not yet available for use in the clinic. Many of these target viral components, which others are aimed at elements in the host cell which participate in the viral cycle. Modulating host components is a strategy which minimizes the development of resistance, since host components are not subject to the genetic variability of the virus. The main disadvantage is the risk of treatment-related side effects. The aim of this review is to describe the main pharmacological agents currently available and new drugs in the pipeline with potential benefit in the treatment of influenza. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential drug development candidates for human soil-transmitted helminthiases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Olliaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Few drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH; the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole are the only drugs being used for preventive chemotherapy as they can be given in one single dose with no weight adjustment. While generally safe and effective in reducing intensity of infection, they are contra-indicated in first-trimester pregnancy and have suboptimal efficacy against Trichuris trichiura. In addition, drug resistance is a threat. It is therefore important to find alternatives.We searched the literature and the animal health marketed products and pipeline for potential drug development candidates. Recently registered veterinary products offer advantages in that they have undergone extensive and rigorous animal testing, thus reducing the risk, cost and time to approval for human trials. For selected compounds, we retrieved and summarised publicly available information (through US Freedom of Information (FoI statements, European Public Assessment Reports (EPAR and published literature. Concomitantly, we developed a target product profile (TPP against which the products were compared.The paper summarizes the general findings including various classes of compounds, and more specific information on two veterinary anthelmintics (monepantel, emodepside and nitazoxanide, an antiprotozoal drug, compiled from the EMA EPAR and FDA registration files.Few of the compounds already approved for use in human or animal medicine qualify for development track decision. Fast-tracking to approval for human studies may be possible for veterinary compounds like emodepside and monepantel, but additional information remains to be acquired before an informed decision can be made.

  7. Drug discovery and development for rare genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Simeonov, Anton

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 7,000 rare diseases affect millions of individuals in the United States. Although rare diseases taken together have an enormous impact, there is a significant gap between basic research and clinical interventions. Opportunities now exist to accelerate drug development for the treatment of rare diseases. Disease foundations and research centers worldwide focus on better understanding rare disorders. Here, the state-of-the-art drug discovery strategies for small molecules and biological approaches for orphan diseases are reviewed. Rare diseases are usually genetic diseases; hence, employing pharmacogenetics to develop treatments and using whole genome sequencing to identify the etiologies for such diseases are appropriate strategies to exploit. Beginning with high throughput screening of small molecules, the benefits and challenges of target-based and phenotypic screens are discussed. Explanations and examples of drug repurposing are given; drug repurposing as an approach to quickly move programs to clinical trials is evaluated. Consideration is given to the category of biologics which include gene therapy, recombinant proteins, and autologous transplants. Disease models, including animal models and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients, are surveyed. Finally, the role of biomarkers in drug discovery and development, as well as clinical trials, is elucidated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Barriers to Alzheimer disease drug discovery and development in academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eldik, Linda J; Koppal, Tanuja; Watterson, D Martin

    2002-01-01

    The drug discovery and the drug development processes represent a continuum of recursive activities that range from initial drug target identification to final Food and Drug Administration approval and marketing of a new therapeutic. Drug discovery, as its name implies, is more exploratory and less focused in many cases, whereas drug development has a clinically defined endpoint and a specific disease goal. Academia has historically made major contributions to this process at the early discovery phases. However, current trends in the organization of the pharmaceutical industry suggest an expanded role for academia in the near future. Megamergers among major pharmaceutical corporations indicate their movement toward a focus on end-stage clinical trials, manufacturing, and marketing. There has been a parallel increase in outsourcing of intermediate steps to specialty small pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and contract service companies. The new paradigm suggests that academia will play an increasingly important role at the proof-of-principle stage of basic and clinical drug discovery research, in training the future skilled work force, and in close partnerships with small pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. However, academic drug discovery research faces a set of barriers to progress, the relative importance of which varies with the home institution and the details of the research area. These barriers fall into four general categories: (1) the historical administrative structure and environment of academia; (2) the structure and emphasis of peer review panels that control research funding by government and private agencies; (3) the organization and operation of the academic infrastructure; and (4) the structure and availability of specialized resources and information management. Selected examples of barriers to drug discovery and drug development research and training in academia are presented, as are some specific recommendations designed to minimize or

  9. Optimization and Simulation in Drug Development - Review and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Clausen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    We give a review of pharmaceutical R&D and mathematical simulation and optimization methods used to support decision making within the pharmaceutical development process. The complex nature of drug development is pointed out through a description of the various phases of the pharmaceutical...... development process. A part of the paper is dedicated to the use of simulation techniques to support clinical trials. The paper ends with a section describing portfolio modelling methods in the context of the pharmaceutical industry....

  10. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF DOMESTIC INFUSION DRUGS BASED ON PARACETAMOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almakaeva L.G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The intravenous form of paracetamol compared with oral more reliably supports effective drug concentration in blood plasma that promotes a higher therapeutic effect. Recent studies have confirmed that the use of the intravenous form of paracetamol to deal with postoperative pain multimodal analgesia modes results in reducing the frequency and quantity of opioids administered , and, as a consequence, its associated side effects. The drug Paracetamol , infusion solution 10 mg / ml to 100 ml glass bottles is a drug - generic . His qualitative and quantitative composition is developed from the study of literature data about the drug - similar to " Perfalhan , 10 mg / ml solution for infusion in 100 mL " company Bristol - Myers Squibb, France and experimental work. The aim of our study is development and support of the national composition of the infusion of the drug on the basis of paracetamol, selection of excipients that provide stability of the active substances. Materials and methods. The object of the study was the substance of paracetamol manufactured by Zhejiang Kangle Pharmaceutical Co. , Ltd, China. During the work conducted qualitative and quantitative monitoring sample preparation for indicators of stability: pH content of the active ingredient , transparency, color, impurities , contamination by the methods described in the SFU [and nor- ral documentation to the drug . One potential factor of instability is the effect of paracetamol oxygen, due to the presence in the molecule of paracetamol and -NH possibility of oxidation. Results and Discussion. Paracetamol is derived atsetamina . Substance acetylation are p - aminophenol with acetic anhydride . Saturated aqueous solution has a pH of paracetamol - ment about 6 . Paracetamol is a crystalline white powder , sparingly soluble in water, soluble in 96% alcohol, very slightly soluble in metilenhloride . . Active substance enters in comparison drug in the concentration of 10 mg/ml. Stable

  12. Assessment of the incidence of substandard drugs in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, O; Taylor, R B; Behrens, R H

    1997-09-01

    In a number of developing countries there is reportedly a high incidence of the availability of substandard drugs. The majority of these reports do not contain quantitative data to support these claims, nor do they describe the methodology employed for the quality assessment. Many assume counterfeiting as the reason for the poor quality and in some cases this is not justified. We collected 96 samples of chloroquine and selected antibacterials from Nigeria and Thailand in a controlled and methodical manner and analysed them using appropriately validated methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography capable of detecting drug-related impurities and quantifying active drug(s). The results indicate that 36.5% of the samples were substandard with respect to pharmacopoeial limits. Decomposition was the cause of poor quality in a number of the samples but overall, poor manufacturing appeared to be prevalent. The analyses generated little evidence to indicate fraudulent manufacturing. Treatment failure and drug-resistance are possible consequences of the use of substandard drugs.

  13. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in the development of drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Nuclear medicine imaging techniques have great potential in the study of the behaviour of drug formulations and drug delivery systems in human subjects. No other technique can locate so precisely the site of disintegration of a tablet in the Gl tract, the depth of penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung, or the residence time of a drug on the cornea. By using the gamma camera to image the in vivo distribution of pharmaceutical formulations radio labelled with a suitable gamma emitting radionuclide, images may be used to quantify the biodistribution, release and kinetics of drug formulations and delivery from novel carrier systems and devices. Radionuclide tracer techniques allow correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery. The strength of the technique lies in the quantitative nature of radionuclide images. Example will be shown of studies which examine the rate of transit of orally-administered formulations through the GI tract, as well as describing the development of devices for specific targeting of drugs to the colon. Data will also demonstrate the effectiveness of devices such as spacers in pulmonary drug delivery, in both normal volunteers, and in asthmatic subjects. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility but, may also be used in submission to Regulatory Authorities in product registration dossiers

  14. Accelerating safe drug development: an ideal approach to approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grever, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Although enormous progress in therapeutic research has improved the lives of patients with hematologic malignancies, these earlier achievements resulted from strategic combinations of agents with unique mechanisms of action and nonoverlapping toxicities. Continued investment in the modern era of drug discovery and development will focus on targeted therapies. Targeting of specific molecular pathways is expected to achieve effective tumor cell reduction with less overall toxicity. The translational processes involved in moving novel therapeutic strategies from the laboratory toward the clinic require close monitoring. The efforts in both cancer drug discovery and development will require extensive collaboration among basic scientists, clinical investigators, and regulatory scientists. The transition from older methods of therapeutic research will require laboratory support to define eligible patients based upon their pretreatment profile. The principles of preclinical drug development based upon decades of experience in predicting toxicity and designing therapeutic strategies are still needed to insure that safety is a high priority. The opportunities for developing novel targeted combination therapies in uniquely profiled patients will hopefully enable successful breakthroughs. Several concrete examples of exciting new agents are discussed here. Defining the predicted mechanism of resistance to these new targeted agents will enable investigators to subsequently design strategies to circumvent resistance with effective combinations. Drug discovery and development are complex and expensive, so efficiency and cooperation in task completion must be tracked.

  15. Developing a paediatric drug formulary for the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Tjitske M; de Wildt, Saskia N; Liem, Yves; Offringa, Martin; de Hoog, Matthijs

    2017-04-01

    As many drugs in paediatrics are used off-label, prescribers face a lack of evidence-based dosing guidelines. A Dutch framework was developed to provide dosing guidelines based on best available evidence from registration data, investigator-initiated research, professional guidelines, clinical experience and consensus. This has clarified the scientific grounds of drug use for children and encouraged uniformity in prescribing habits in the Netherlands. The developed framework and the current content of the Dutch Paediatric Formulary could be used as basis for similar initiatives worldwide, preferably in a concerted effort to ultimately provide children with effective and safe drug therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Recent Advances in Drug Development and Regulatory Science in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Naiqing

    2018-01-01

    As the second largest pharmaceutical market with a great potential for future growth, China has drawn much attention from the global pharmaceutical community. With an increasing government investment in biomedical research, the domestic biopharmaceutical (biotechnological) companies in China are turning their attention to the development of innovative medicines and targeting the global market. To introduce innovative products to Chinese patients sooner, to improve the efficiency of its review and approval processes, and to harmonize its regulatory science with international standards, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) has initiated a series of major changes to its policies and regulations. This paper presents a snapshot of China's pharmaceutical market, and research and development status, and introduces technical guidelines pertaining to clinical trials and new drug applications. The recent wave of ground-breaking reforms in CFDA's regulatory science is discussed. Examples of clinical trials and new drug applications are provided throughout the discussion.

  17. Quantitative EEG Brain Mapping In Psychotropic Drug Development, Drug Treatment Selection, and Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, Turan M.; Itil, Kurt Z.

    1995-05-01

    Quantification of standard electroencephalogram (EEG) by digital computers [computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG)] has transformed the subjective analog EEG into an objective scientific method. Until a few years ago, CEEG was only used to assist in the development of psychotropic drugs by means of the quantitative pharmaco EEG. Thanks to the computer revolution and the accompanying reductions in cost of quantification, CEEG can now also be applied in psychiatric practice. CEEG can assist the physician in confirming clinical diagnoses, selecting psychotropic drugs for treatment, and drug treatment monitoring. Advancements in communications technology allow physicians and researchers to reduce the costs of acquiring a high-technology CEEG brain mapping system by utilizing the more economical telephonic services.

  18. Open data in drug discovery and development: lessons from malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Timothy N C; Willis, Paul; Burrows, Jeremy N; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing consensus that drug discovery thrives in an open environment. Here, we describe how the malaria community has embraced four levels of open data - open science, open innovation, open access and open source - to catalyse the development of new medicines, and consider principles that could enable open data approaches to be applied to other disease areas.

  19. Systems Biology and the Development of Vaccines and Drugs for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2004-11-16

    Nov 16, 2004 ... Systems Biology and the Development of Vaccines and Drugs for Malaria Treatments. Ezekiel F. ... Microarray technology enables simultaneous gene expression analysis of thousands of genes, enabling a snapshot of an organisms' ... and DNA-derived samples to DNA chips allows the monitoring of gene ...

  20. Design and Development of a Proniosomal Transdermal Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick Erah

    Design and Development of a Proniosomal. Transdermal Drug Delivery System for Captopril. Ankur Gupta*, Sunil Kumar Prajapati, M Balamurugan, Mamta. Singh .... beadlets 12, microcapsules 13 bioadhesive system 14, floating tablets and capsules 15, semisolid matrix systems16, and microspheres17. Proniosomes ...

  1. Pharmacologic Considerations in Use and Development of Antituberculosis Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Rational development and deployment of antituberculosis drugs depend on a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics that underlie their clinical behavior. Successful implementation of a pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic approach faces difficulties that, although not unique to tuberculosis as a therapeutic area, in combination pose a significant scientific challenge. In recent years, a multidisciplinary response combining new technological and analytical approaches...

  2. Development of aptamer based HIV-1 entry inhibitor prophylactic drugs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    London, G

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Conference and Exhibition of Pathology, Embassy Suites Las Vegas, USA, 5-6 August 2013 Development of aptamer based HIV-1 entry inhibitor prophylactic drugs Grace London1, Hazel Mufhandu1, Devin Sok2, Lynn Morris3, Dennis R Burton4, Bongani Mayosi5...

  3. Strategies to address low drug solubility in discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Charman, Susan A; Shanker, Ravi M; Charman, William N; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-01-01

    Drugs with low water solubility are predisposed to low and variable oral bioavailability and, therefore, to variability in clinical response. Despite significant efforts to "design in" acceptable developability properties (including aqueous solubility) during lead optimization, approximately 40% of currently marketed compounds and most current drug development candidates remain poorly water-soluble. The fact that so many drug candidates of this type are advanced into development and clinical assessment is testament to an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the approaches that can be taken to promote apparent solubility in the gastrointestinal tract and to support drug exposure after oral administration. Here we provide a detailed commentary on the major challenges to the progression of a poorly water-soluble lead or development candidate and review the approaches and strategies that can be taken to facilitate compound progression. In particular, we address the fundamental principles that underpin the use of strategies, including pH adjustment and salt-form selection, polymorphs, cocrystals, cosolvents, surfactants, cyclodextrins, particle size reduction, amorphous solid dispersions, and lipid-based formulations. In each case, the theoretical basis for utility is described along with a detailed review of recent advances in the field. The article provides an integrated and contemporary discussion of current approaches to solubility and dissolution enhancement but has been deliberately structured as a series of stand-alone sections to allow also directed access to a specific technology (e.g., solid dispersions, lipid-based formulations, or salt forms) where required.

  4. From research on rare diseases to new orphan drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases have a prevalence of lower than 5 in 10,000 inhabitants and are life-threatening or chronically debilitating. It is estimated that worldwide more than 5000 rare diseases exist, which account for over 55 million patients in the EU and the US together. However, the development of drugs

  5. Toxicokinetics in drug development: an overview of toxicokinetic application in the development of PNU-101017, an anxiolytic drug candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, W Z; Williams, M G; Branstetter, D G

    2000-11-01

    The importance of toxicokinetics in the drug development has been identified in the last decade. The main objectives of toxicokinetics in general are to define the drug bioavailability, dose proportionality, gender differences, and species differences in pharmacokinetics and metabolism, from which the target organ toxicity can be predicted and the safety doses in the first human clinical trial can be established. Toxicokinetic studies may also serve as a tool for the toxicologic pathologist in understanding models used for predicting and assessing drug-related toxic response. Toxicokinetics/toxicodynamics are critical to investigating the toxicological mechanism and understanding the comparative toxicity between animals and humans. This report presents an overview of the application of toxicokinetics and its impact in the drug development of PNU-101017, a drug candidate for the treatment of anxioety. Serial specifically designed toxicokinetic studies identified a steep dose-response relationship between the clinical signs and PNU-101017 serum or CSF concentrations, characterized the centrally mediated respiratory depression as the toxicity leading to the lethality, and demonstrated marked species differences in the sensitivity to the toxic effects. These findings lead to a termination of PNU-101017 development due to the safety concern in humans.

  6. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G; King, Ross D

    2015-03-06

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist 'Eve' designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax.

  7. FY 2016 Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-23

    This fact sheet summarizes the research highlights for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) for Fiscal Year 2106. Topics covered include additive manufacturing for the wind industry, biomass-based chemicals substitutions, carbon fiber manufacturing facility siting, geothermal power plant turbines, hydrogen refueling stations, hydropower turbines, LEDs and lighting, light-duty automotive lithium-ion cells, magnetocaloric refrigeration, silicon carbide power electronics for variable frequency motor drives, solar photovoltaics, and wide bandgap semiconductor opportunities in power electronics.

  8. Recent highlights from STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Wangmei

    2018-02-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment takes advantage of its excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities at mid-rapidity to explore the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter created in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. The STAR collaboration presented 7 parallel and 2 plenary talks at Strangeness in Quark Matter 2017 and covered various topics including heavy flavor measurements, bulk observables, electro-magnetic probes and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  9. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke T. Annema

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  10. ESO Highlights in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    As is now the tradition, the European Southern Observatory looks back at the exciting moments of last year. 2008 was in several aspects an exceptionally good year. Over the year, ESO's telescopes provided data for more than 700 scientific publications in refereed journals, making ESO the most productive ground-based observatory in the world. ESO PR Highlights 2008 ESO PR Photo 01a/09 The image above is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2008. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2008 page. Austria signed the agreement to join the other 13 ESO member states (ESO 11/08 and 20/08), while the year marked the 10th anniversary of first light for ESO's "perfect science machine", the Very Large Telescope (ESO 16/08 and 17/08). The ALMA project, for which ESO is the European partner, had a major milestone in December, as the observatory was equipped with its first antenna (ESO 49/08). Also the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope impressed this year with some very impressive and publicly visible results. Highlights came in many fields: Astronomers for instance used the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to discover and image a probable giant planet long sought around the star Beta Pictoris (ESO 42/08). This is now the eighth extrasolar planet to have been imaged since the VLT imaged the first extrasolar planet in 2004 (three of eight were imaged with VLT). The VLT also enabled three students to confirm the nature of a unique planet (ESO 45/08). This extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is a planet about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. The world's foremost planet-hunting instrument, HARPS, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, scored a new first, finding a system of three super-Earths around a star (ESO 19/08). Based on the complete HARPS sample, astronomers now think that one Sun-like star out of three harbours short orbit, low

  11. The role of BCS (biopharmaceutics classification system) and BDDCS (biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system) in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Leslie Z

    2013-01-01

    Biopharmaceutics Classification System and Biopharmaceutics Drug Distribution Classification System are complimentary, not competing, classification systems that aim to improve, simplify, and speed drug development. Although both systems are based on classifying drugs and new molecular entities into four categories using the same solubility criteria, they differ in the criterion for permeability and have different purposes. Here, the details and applications of both systems are reviewed with particular emphasis of their role in drug development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Development of biosimilars in an era of oncologic drug shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li E

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Edward Li,1 Janakiraman Subramanian,2 Scott Anderson,3 Dolca Thomas,4 Jason McKinley,5 Ira A Jacobs4 1University of New England College of Pharmacy, Portland, ME, USA; 2Hanna Cancer Associates, Knoxville, TN, USA; 3Pfizer Inc, La Jolla, CA, USA; 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 5Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA Abstract: Acute and chronic shortages of various pharmaceuticals and particularly of sterile injectable products are being reported on a global scale, prompting evaluation of more effective strategies to manage current shortages and development of new, high-quality pharmaceutical products to mitigate the risk of potential future shortages. Oncology drugs such as liposomal doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil represent examples of first-choice drugs critically affected by shortages. Survey results indicate that the majority of hospitals and practicing oncologists have experienced drug shortages, which may have compromised patient safety and clinical outcomes, and increased health care costs, due to delays or changes in treatment regimens. Clinical trials evaluating novel agents in combination with standard-of-care drugs are also being affected by drug shortages. Clinical and ethical considerations on treatment objectives, drug indication, and availability of alternative options may help in prioritizing cancer patients involved in active drug shortages. The United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have identified manufacturing problems, delays in supply, and lack of available active ingredients as the most frequent causes of recent or ongoing drug shortages, and have released specific guidance to monitor, manage, and reduce the risk of shortages. The upcoming loss of exclusivity for a number of anticancer biologics, together with the introduction of an abbreviated approval pathway for biosimilars, raises the question of whether these products will be vulnerable to shortages. Future supply by reliable

  13. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D.

  14. Conference report: hot topics in antibody-drug conjugate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela

    2013-12-01

    American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, USA, 19-23 May 2013 The National Biotechnology Conference, is a premier meeting for biotechnology professionals covering a broad range of hot topics in the biotechnology industry. Attracting participants from academia, industry and regulatory, this meeting features sessions that aim to address emerging subjects of interest and allows for open exchange between scientists. The 2013 conference featured leading researchers in the fields of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and immunogenicity. Herein, we present a summary of the ADC hot topics, including bioanalytical and PK considerations, quantitative evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity and ADME to understand ADC drug-drug interactions, and clinical considerations for ADC development. This article aims to summarize the recommendations that were made by the speakers during various sessions throughout the conference.

  15. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: A drug target for the development of antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anju; Maqbool, Mudasir; Mobashir, Mohammad; Hoda, Nasimul

    2017-01-05

    Malaria is a critical human disease with extensive exploration yet unestablished due to occurrence of frequent drug resistance. This aspect of malaria pharmacology calls for the introduction of new antimalarial. The drugs reported till date targeted different stages of the parasites in order to stop their growth and proliferation. Beside this, various drugs that could inhibit the imperative enzymes of the parasite have also been reported. Amid them, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has a key worth. DHODH is involved in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis of the malarial parasite which acts as a primary source of energy for its survival. Since life of the parasite utterly depends on pyrimidine biosynthesis, so it can be used as an apt drug target for malaria eradication. In addition to this, DHODH is also present in human and their active sites have significant structural dissimilarities, so the development of selective inhibitors may prove to be a milestone in search of new antimalarials. Inhibitors of human DHODH have been used to treat autoimmune diseases such as, rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis and have been investigated in the treatment of cancer, viral diseases, as well as in plant pathology. Here, we have reviewed the important role of DHODH as a viable drug target against malaria, its importance for the survival of the parasite, and DHODH inhibitors reported so far. The rate of success of the reported DHODH inhibitors and further required improvements have also been accounted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress and promise for the MDMA drug development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduccia, Allison A; Holland, Julie; Mithoefer, Michael C

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacotherapy is often used to target symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but does not provide definitive treatment, and side effects of daily medication are often problematic. Trauma-focused psychotherapies are more likely than drug treatment to achieve PTSD remission, but have high dropout rates and ineffective for a large percentage of patients. Therefore, research into drugs that might increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy is a logical avenue of investigation. The most promising drug studied as a catalyst to psychotherapy for PTSD thus far is 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), commonly known as the recreational drug "Ecstasy." MDMA stimulates the release of hormones and neurochemicals that affect key brain areas for emotion and memory processing. A series of recently completed phase 2 clinical trials of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment of PTSD show favorable safety outcomes and large effect sizes that warrant expansion into multi-site phase 3 trials, set to commence in 2018. The nonprofit sponsor of the MDMA drug development program, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), is supporting these trials to explore whether MDMA, administered on only a few occasions, can increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Brain imaging techniques and animal models of fear extinction are elucidating neural mechanisms underlying the robust effects of MDMA on psychological processing; however, much remains to be learned about the complexities of MDMA effects as well as the complexities of PTSD itself.

  17. Gene and metabolite regulatory network analysis of early developing fruit tissues highlights new candidate genes for the control of tomato fruit composition and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounet, Fabien; Moing, Annick; Garcia, Virginie; Petit, Johann; Maucourt, Michael; Deborde, Catherine; Bernillon, Stéphane; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Colquhoun, Ian; Defernez, Marianne; Giraudel, Jean-Luc; Rolin, Dominique; Rothan, Christophe; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine

    2009-03-01

    Variations in early fruit development and composition may have major impacts on the taste and the overall quality of ripe tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit. To get insights into the networks involved in these coordinated processes and to identify key regulatory genes, we explored the transcriptional and metabolic changes in expanding tomato fruit tissues using multivariate analysis and gene-metabolite correlation networks. To this end, we demonstrated and took advantage of the existence of clear structural and compositional differences between expanding mesocarp and locular tissue during fruit development (12-35 d postanthesis). Transcriptome and metabolome analyses were carried out with tomato microarrays and analytical methods including proton nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Pairwise comparisons of metabolite contents and gene expression profiles detected up to 37 direct gene-metabolite correlations involving regulatory genes (e.g. the correlations between glutamine, bZIP, and MYB transcription factors). Correlation network analyses revealed the existence of major hub genes correlated with 10 or more regulatory transcripts and embedded in a large regulatory network. This approach proved to be a valuable strategy for identifying specific subsets of genes implicated in key processes of fruit development and metabolism, which are therefore potential targets for genetic improvement of tomato fruit quality.

  18. Improvement of Pediatric Drug Development: Regulatory and Practical Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Katusra; Carroll, Kelly A; Onishi, Taku; Matsumaru, Naoki; Brasseur, Daniel; Nakamura, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    A dearth in pediatric drug development often leaves pediatricians with no alternative but to prescribe unlicensed or off-label drugs with a resultant increased risk of adverse events. We present the current status of pediatric drug development and, based on our data analysis, clarify the problems in this area. Further action is proposed to improve the drug development that has pediatric therapeutic orphan status. We analyzed all Phase II/III and Phase III trials in ClinicalTrials.gov that only included pediatric participants (Japan, the European Union, and the United States. The European Union Clinical Trials Register and published reports from the European Medicines Agency were also surveyed to investigate the Paediatric Committee effect on pediatric clinical trials in the European Union. Mean difference of the performance index in prepremiums and postpremiums between Japan and the European Union were 0.296 (P Japan and the United States were 0.560 (P Japan was more active after the introduction of these premiums, even reaching the level of the European Union. The Pediatric Regulation and the Paediatric Committee promoted pediatric drug development in the European Union. The registered number of clinical trials that includes at least 1 participants 15% after 2008. Recruitment and ethical obstacles make conducting pediatric clinical trials challenging. An improved operational framework for conducting clinical trials should mirror the ever-improving regulatory framework that incentivizes investment in pediatric clinical trials. Technological approaches, enhancements in electronic medical record systems, and community approaches that actively incorporate input from physicians, researchers, and patients could offer a sustainable solution to recruitment of pediatric study participants. The key therefore is to improve pediatric pharmacotherapy collaboration among industry, government, academia, and community. Expanding the regulatory steps taken in the European Union

  19. Recent lab-on-chip developments for novel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Nauman; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2017-07-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micro total analysis systems (μTAS) revolutionized the biochemical and electronic industries, and this miniaturization process became a key driver for many markets. Now, it is a driving force for innovations in life sciences, diagnostics, analytical sciences, and chemistry, which are called 'lab-on-a-chip, (LOC)' devices. The use of these devices allows the development of fast, portable, and easy-to-use systems with a high level of functional integration for applications such as point-of-care diagnostics, forensics, the analysis of biomolecules, environmental or food analysis, and drug development. In this review, we report on the latest developments in fabrication methods and production methodologies to tailor LOC devices. A brief overview of scale-up strategies is also presented together with their potential applications in drug delivery and discovery. The impact of LOC devices on drug development and discovery has been extensively reviewed in the past. The current research focuses on fast and accurate detection of genomics, cell mutations and analysis, drug delivery, and discovery. The current research also differentiates the LOC devices into new terminology of microengineering, like organ-on-a-chip, stem cells-on-a-chip, human-on-a-chip, and body-on-a-chip. Key challenges will be the transfer of fabricated LOC devices from lab-scale to industrial large-scale production. Moreover, extensive toxicological studies are needed to justify the use of microfabricated drug delivery vehicles in biological systems. It will also be challenging to transfer the in vitro findings to suitable and promising in vivo models. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1381. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1381 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  1. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide. PMID:23986704

  2. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gaspar Carreño

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP. Methods: The procedure was developed in six phases: 1 hazard definition; 2 definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs’ selection and special handling; 3 detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4 categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5 information and training of professionals; 6 implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Results: Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. Conclusions: The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs.

  3. Core Competencies for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honorio eSilva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine, are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain Learning Outcomes anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide.

  4. Inhaled biopharmaceutical drug development: nonclinical considerations and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Mary C; Kirton, Chris; Gliddon, Dan; Wolff, Ron K

    2013-03-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are complex molecules often manufactured from living systems and their specificity and novelty holds great promise for the treatment of chronic diseases for which there are currently no cures. The inhalation route of biopharmaceutical drug delivery is attractive because the large surface area of the lung, and close proximity of the alveolar and vascular systems, maximizes the potential for drug delivery to the lung and/or systemic circulation. In addition, costs of delivery to the patient are potentially much reduced, in comparison with parental administration, since inhalation is non-invasive and likely to promote patient compliance. However, in comparison with small molecule drug development, developing an inhaled biopharmaceutical that is effective and safe for human use is associated with many challenges. This review considers some general principles of drug delivery to lung and issues associated with the translation of proof of concept studies to toxicology safety studies (e.g. aerosol generation, species selection, exaggerated pharmacology, and immunogenicity). This review also presents a summary of nonclinical and clinical data from inhaled biopharmaceuticals which are either marketed for human use or in Phase II clinical trials (e.g. DNase, insulin, human growth hormone, vaccines, therapeutic plasmid DNA complexes).

  5. Science Highlights from SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erick T.

    2017-06-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR to provide infrared and sub-millimeter observing capabilities to the worldwide astronomical community. With a wide range of instruments that cover both imaging and spectroscopy, SOFIA has produced unique scientific results that could not be obtained with a ground-based facility. In this talk, I will describe highlights from a range of areas in astronomy. A particular strength of SOFIA is high resolution spectroscopy. In the mid-infrared, the instrument EXES has enabled velocity-resolved observations of solar system, interstellar, and star forming regions. The heterodyne spectrometer GREAT has been a particularly productive instrument on SOFIA, with high resolution studies of the gas in the interstellar medium. With its extremely high spectral resolution, GREAT has allowed dynamical studies of clouds and their interactions. I will highlight observations that demonstrate the infall of material in star-forming regions. SOFIA can go to where the science is. This mobility is important for localized events such as occultations. Results from the recent Pluto occultation campaign will be discussed.

  6. [Chapter 2. Transitions in drug-discovery technology and drug-development in Japan (1980-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Noriko; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In 1970s, the material patent system was introduced in Japan. Since then, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies have endeavored to create original in-house products. From 1980s, many of the innovative products were small molecular drugs and were developed using powerful medicinal-chemical technologies. Among them were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive organs and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese companies were able to launch some blockbuster drugs. At the same time, the pharmaceutical market, which had grown rapidly for two decades, was beginning to level off. From the late 1990s, drug development was slowing down due to the lack of expertise in biotechnology such as genetic engineering. In response to the circumstances, the research and development on biotechnology-based drugs such as antibody drugs have become more dynamic and popular at companies than small molecule drugs. In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the transitions in drug discovery and development between 1980 and 2010.

  7. Using X-Ray Crystallography to Simplify and Accelerate Biologics Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, Mark L; Baker, Edward N; Dunn, Michael F; Laue, Thomas M; Carpenter, John F

    2017-02-01

    Every major biopharmaceutical company incorporates a protein crystallography unit that is central to its structure-based drug discovery efforts. Yet these capabilities are rarely leveraged toward the formal higher order structural characterization that is so challenging but integral to large-scale biologics manufacturing. Although the biotech industry laments the shortcomings of its favored biophysical techniques, x-ray crystallography is not even considered for drug development. Why not? We suggest that this is due, at least in part, to outdated thinking (for a recent industry-wide survey, see Gabrielson JP, Weiss IV WF. Technical decision-making with higher order structure data: starting a new dialogue. J Pharm Sci. 2015;104(4):1240-1245). We examine some myths surrounding protein crystallography and highlight the inherent properties of protein crystals (molecular identity, biochemical purity, conformational uniformity, and macromolecular crowding) as having practicable commonalities with today's patient-focused liquid drug products. In the new millennium, protein crystallography has become essentially a routine analytical test. Its application may aid the identification of better candidate molecules that are more amenable to high-concentration processing, formulation, and analysis thereby helping to make biologics drug development quicker, simpler, and cheaper. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The agony and ecstasy of "OMIC" technologies in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, John A

    2005-02-01

    Over the last decade we have witnessed a fundamental change in how biomedical research is carried out and we can now assess the impact of the Human Genome Project on drug discovery and development. Advances in "omics" technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabonomics) were touted as having the potential to revolutionize our approach to disease diagnosis, prognostication and development of novel therapeutics. However, the promise of rapid advances in medicine "from the lab bench to the bedside" has not manifested as of yet. Indeed it appears that the translational applications of genomic-based research have preceded the development of both (i) a conceptual framework for disease understanding and (ii) effective tools that can exploit the vast amounts of data derived from these efforts. In reality great progress has been made, however understanding processes such as disease progression (or drug response) requires systematic insight into dynamic (and temporal) differences in gene regulation, interaction and function. This review will discuss "omic" technologies with the emphasis upon advances in our understanding of the human genome derived transcriptome (RNA), and its proteome (proteins), while focusing upon the translation of this information into the drug development paradigm.

  9. Highlights from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Autermann, Christian

    2018-01-01

    This article summarizes the latest highlights from the CMS experiment as presented at the Lepton Photon conference 2017 in Guangzhou, China. A selection of the latest physics results, the latest detector upgrades, and the current detector status are discussed. CMS has analyzed the full dataset of proton-proton collision data delivered by the LHC in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of $13$\\,TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $40$\\,fb$^{-1}$. The leap in center-of-mass energy and in luminosity with respect to the $7$ and $8$\\,TeV runs enabled interesting and relevant new physics results. A new silicon pixel tracking detector was installed during the LHC shutdown 2016/17 and has successfully started operation.

  10. PSI scientific highlights 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.; Dury, T.

    2013-05-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) reviews research in various areas carried out by the institute in 2012. Also, the various facilities to be found at the institute are described. Research focus and highlights are discussed. These include work done using synchrotron light, neutrons and muons as well as work done in the particle physics, microtechnology and nanotechnology areas. Further areas of research include biomolecular research, radiopharmacy, radiochemistry and environmental chemistry. Other areas covered include general energy research and work done at the Competence Center for Energy and Mobility CCEM, work done on nuclear energy safety as well as systems analysis in the environmental and energy areas. The report is concluded with facts and figures on the PSI, its Advisory Board and its organisational structures

  11. Development of Drugs and Technology for Radiation Theragnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Jeong Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is tailored medical treatment that targets the individual characteristics of each patient. Theragnosis, combining diagnosis and therapy, plays an important role in selecting appropriate patients. Noninvasive in vivo imaging can trace small molecules, antibodies, peptides, nanoparticles, and cells in the body. Recently, imaging methods have been able to reveal molecular events in cells and tissues. Molecular imaging is useful not only for clinical studies but also for developing new drugs and new treatment modalities. Preclinical and early clinical molecular imaging shows biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and efficacy. When therapeutic materials are labeled using radioisotopes, nuclear imaging with positron emission tomography or gamma camera can be used to treat diseases and monitor therapy simultaneously. Such nuclear medicine technology is defined as radiation theragnosis. We review the current development of drugs and technology for radiation theragnosis using peptides, albumin, nanoparticles, and cells.

  12. Development of drugs and technology for radiation theragnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hwan Jeong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Biomedical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Personalized medicine is tailored medical treatment that targets the individual characteristics of each patient. Theragnosis, combining diagnosis and therapy, plays an important role in selecting appropriate patients. Noninvasive in vivo imaging can trace small molecules, antibodies, peptides, nanoparticles, and cells in the body. Recently, imaging methods have been able to reveal molecular events in cells and tissues. Molecular imaging is useful not only for clinical studies but also for developing new drugs and new treatment modalities. Preclinical and early clinical molecular imaging shows biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and efficacy. When therapeutic materials are labeled using radioisotopes, nuclear imaging with positron emission tomography or gamma camera can be used to treat diseases and monitor therapy simultaneously. Such nuclear medicine technology is defined as radiation theragnosis. We review the current development of drugs and technology for radiation theragnosis using peptides, albumin, nanoparticles, and cells.

  13. Ethical challenges in developing drugs for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Felix; Banayan, David; Boley, Randy; Karnik, Niranjan

    2017-05-01

    As the classification of mental disorders advances towards a disease model as promoted by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), there is hope that a more thorough neurobiological understanding of mental illness may allow clinicians and researchers to determine treatment efficacy with less diagnostic variability. This paradigm shift has presented a variety of ethical issues to be considered in the development of psychiatric drugs. These challenges are not limited to informed consent practices, industry funding, and placebo use. The consideration for alternative research models and quality of research design also present ethical challenges in the development of psychiatric drugs. The imperatives to create valid and sound research that justify the human time, cost, risk and use of limited resources must also be considered. Clinical innovation, and consideration for special populations are also important aspects to take into account. Based on the breadth of these ethical concerns, it is particularly important that scientific questions regarding the development of psychiatric drugs be answered collaboratively by a variety of stakeholders. As the field expands, new ethical considerations will be raised with increased focus on genetic markers, personalized medicine, patient-centered outcomes research, and tension over funding. We suggest that innovation in trial design is necessary to better reflect practices in clinical settings and that there must be an emphasized focus on expanding the transparency of consent processes, regard for suicidality, and care in working with special populations to support the goal of developing sound psychiatric drug therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography Application to Drug Development and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Piero A.

    The research for the identification and development of new drugs represents a very complex process implying long times and massive investments. This process was not able to parallel the rate of discoveries made in the field of genomic and molecular biology and a gap created between demand of new drugs and the ability of pharmaceutical companies to select good candidates. Positron Emission Tomography, among the different Molecular Imaging modalities, could represent a new tool for the early assessment and screening of new drug candidates and, due to its physical performances and the characteristics of positron-labeled tracers, gain the role of "Biomarker" accepted by the Companies and the Regulatory Bodies of Drug Agencies. To fulfil this task PET has to exploit all of its special features such as data absolute quantification and modelling, high spatial resolution and dynamic imaging. Relevant efforts need to be directed to the careful design and validation of experimental protocols with the main goal of achieving consistency in multi- centric trials.

  15. Non-profit Drug Research and Development at a Crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosławski, Szymon; Toumi, Mondher; Auquier, Pascal; Dussart, Claude

    2018-02-07

    In wealthy nations, non-profit drug R&D has been proposed to reduce the prices of medicines. We sought to review the ethical and economic issues concerning non-profit drug R&D companies, and the possible impact that their pricing strategy may have on the innovation efforts from for-profit companies targeting the same segment of the pharmaceutical market. There are two possible approaches to pricing drugs developed by non-profit R&D programs: pricing that maximises profits and "affordable" pricing that reflects the cost of manufacturing and distribution, plus a margin that ensures sustainability of the drug supply. Overall, the non-profits face ethical challenges - due to the lack of resources, they are unable to independently commercialize their products on a large scale; however, the antitrust law does not permit them to impose prices on potential licensees. Also, reduced prices for the innovative products may result in drying the for-profit R&D in the area.

  16. Which Benefits Are Mentioned Most Often in Drug Development Publications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strüver, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to identify theoretically expected as well as actually reported benefits from drug development and the importance of individual patient benefits compared to the collective benefits to society in general. Ethical guidelines require that clinical research involving humans offer the potential for benefit. A number of characteristics can be applied to define research benefit. Often benefit is categorized as being either direct or indirect. Indirect benefits can involve collective benefits for society rather than any benefits to the trial patient or subject. The purpose of this review was to examine which potential individual and societal benefits were mentioned as being expected in publications from government experts and which were mentioned in publications describing completed drug development trial results. Literature on research benefit was first identified by searching the PubMed database using several combinations of the key words benefit and clinical research . The search was limited to articles published in English. A Google search with the same combinations of key words but without any language limitation was then performed. Additionally, the reference lists of promising articles were screened for further thematically related articles. Finally, a narrative review was performed of relevant English- and German-language articles published between 1996 and 2016 to identify which of several potential benefits were either theoretically expected or which were mentioned in publications on clinical drug development trial results. The principal benefits from drug development discussed included 2 main types of benefit, namely individual benefits for the patients and collective benefits for society. Twenty-one of an overall total of 26 articles discussing theoretically expected benefits focused on individual patient benefits, whereas 17 out of 26 articles mentioned collective benefits to society. In these publications, the most commonly mentioned theoretically

  17. A Theoretical Analysis of the Geography of Schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso Highlights the Roles of Human Mobility and Water Resources Development in Disease Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Saez, Javier; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Casagrandi, Renato; Sokolow, Susanne H; De Leo, Giulio A; Mande, Theophile; Ceperley, Natalie; Froehlich, Jean-Marc; Sou, Mariam; Karambiri, Harouna; Yacouba, Hamma; Maiga, Amadou; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We study the geography of schistosomiasis across Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of water-based disease dynamics. The model quantitatively addresses the geographic stratification of disease burden in a novel framework by explicitly accounting for drivers and controls of the disease, including spatial information on the distributions of population and infrastructure, jointly with a general description of human mobility and climatic/ecological drivers. Spatial patterns of disease are analysed by the extraction and the mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The relevance of the work lies in the novel mapping of disease burden, a byproduct of the parametrization induced by regional upscaling, by model-guided field validations and in the predictive scenarios allowed by exploiting the range of possible parameters and processes. Human mobility is found to be a primary control at regional scales both for pathogen invasion success and the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development highlighted by systematic reviews are accounted for by the average distances of human settlements from water bodies that are habitats for the parasite's intermediate host. Our results confirm the empirical findings about the role of water resources development on disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free also by inspection of empirical prevalence patterns. We conclude that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the proposed framework provides a powerful tool for large-scale public health planning and schistosomiasis management.

  18. A Theoretical Analysis of the Geography of Schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso Highlights the Roles of Human Mobility and Water Resources Development in Disease Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Saez

    Full Text Available We study the geography of schistosomiasis across Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of water-based disease dynamics. The model quantitatively addresses the geographic stratification of disease burden in a novel framework by explicitly accounting for drivers and controls of the disease, including spatial information on the distributions of population and infrastructure, jointly with a general description of human mobility and climatic/ecological drivers. Spatial patterns of disease are analysed by the extraction and the mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The relevance of the work lies in the novel mapping of disease burden, a byproduct of the parametrization induced by regional upscaling, by model-guided field validations and in the predictive scenarios allowed by exploiting the range of possible parameters and processes. Human mobility is found to be a primary control at regional scales both for pathogen invasion success and the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development highlighted by systematic reviews are accounted for by the average distances of human settlements from water bodies that are habitats for the parasite's intermediate host. Our results confirm the empirical findings about the role of water resources development on disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free also by inspection of empirical prevalence patterns. We conclude that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the proposed framework provides a powerful tool for large-scale public health planning and schistosomiasis management.

  19. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS IN IAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Kreft

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We are reviewing and commenting highlights of the research published in Image Analysis and Stereology journal (IAS, volume 35, where 16 original research papers on image analysis, computer vision, modelling, and other approaches were published. We have reported on the precision of curve length estimation in the plane. Further, a focus was on a robust estimation technique for 3D point cloud registration. Next contribution in computer vision was on the accuracy of stereo matching algorithm based on illumination control. An attempt was also made to automatically diagnose prenatal cleft lip with representative key points and identify the type of defect in three-dimensional ultrasonography. Similarly, a new report is presenting estimation of torsion of digital curves in 3D images and next, the nuchal translucency by ultrasound is being analyzed. Also in ophthalmology, image analysis may help physicians to establish a correct diagnosis, which is supported by a new approach to measure tortuosity of retinal vessel. Another report of medical significance analyzed correlation of the shape parameters for characterization of images of corneal endothelium cells. Shape analysis is also an important topic in material science, e.g. in analyzing fine aggregates in concrete. As in concrete, in fiber reinforced composites image analysis may aid in improved quality, where the direction of fibers have decisive impact on properties. Automatic defect detection using a computer vision system improves productivity quality in industrial production, hence we report of a new Haar wavelet-based approach.

  20. Ion channels and transporters in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is the major challenge in the treatment of cancer. MDR can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux and the failure to undergo drug-induced apoptosis. Evasion of drug-induced apoptosis through modulation of ion...

  1. New Hypnotic Drug Development and Pharmacologic Considerations for Clinical Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanious, Mariah Kincaid; Beutler, Sascha S; Kaye, Alan D; Urman, Richard D

    2017-06-01

    Since the public demonstration of ether as a novel, viable anesthetic for surgery in 1846, the field of anesthesia has continually sought the ideal anesthetic-rapid onset, potent sedation-hypnosis with a high therapeutic ratio of toxic dose to minimally effective dose, predictable clearance to inactive metabolites, and minimal side effects. This article aims to review current progress of novel induction agent development and provide an update on the most promising drugs poised to enter clinical practice. In addition, the authors describe trends in novel agent development, implications for health care costs, and implications for perioperative care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [New drug developments of snake venom polypeptides and progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sihai; Feng, Mei; Xiong, Yan

    2017-11-28

    The value of snake venom polypeptides in clinical application has drawn extensive attention, and the development of snake polypeptides into new drugs with anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, analgesic or antihypertensive properties has become the recent research hotspot. With the rapid development of molecular biology and biotechnology, the mechanisms of snake venom polypeptides are also gradually clarified. Numerous studies have demonstrated that snake venom polypeptides exert their pharmacological effects by regulating ion channels, cell proliferation, apoptosis, intracellular signaling pathway, and expression of cytokine as well as binding to relevant active sites or receptors.

  3. The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) for efficient target analysis and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Meik; Liang, Chunguang; Nilla, Santosh; Cecil, Alexander; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) has been designed to provide fast, tailored information on drugs and their protein networks including indications, protein targets and side-targets. Starting queries include compound, target and protein interactions and organism-specific protein families. Furthermore, drug name, chemical structures and their SMILES notation, affected proteins (potential drug targets), organisms as well as diseases can be queried including various combinations and refinement of searches. Drugs and protein interactions are analyzed in detail with reference to protein structures and catalytic domains, related compound structures as well as potential targets in other organisms. DrumPID considers drug functionality, compound similarity, target structure, interactome analysis and organismic range for a compound, useful for drug development, predicting drug side-effects and structure-activity relationships.Database URL:http://drumpid.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Drug Development and Challenges for Neuromuscular Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouelhi, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Drug development process faces many challenges, including those encountered in clinical trials for neuromuscular diseases. Drug development is a lengthy and highly costly process. Out of 10 compounds entering first study in man (phase 1), only one compound reaches the market after an average of 14 years with a cost of $2.7 billion. Nevertheless, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, prescription drugs constituted only 9 % of each health care dollar spent in USA in 2013. Examples of challenges encountered in neuromuscular clinical trials include lack of validated patient-reported outcome tools, blinding issues, and the use of placebo in addition to lack of health authority guidance for orphan diseases. Patient enrollment challenge is the leading cause of missed clinical trial deadlines observed in about 80 % of clinical trials, resulting in delayed availability of potentially life-saving therapies. Another specific challenge introduced by recent technology is the use of social media and risk of bias. Sharing personal experiences while in the study could easily introduce bias among patients that would interfere with accurate interpretation of collected data. To minimize this risk, recent neuromuscular studies incorporate as an inclusion criterion the patient's agreement not to share any of study experiences through social media with other patients during the study conduct. Consideration of these challenges will allow timely response to the high unmet medical needs for many neuromuscular diseases.

  5. The Role of Natural Products in Drug Discovery and Development against Neglected Tropical Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mubanga Cheuka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Endemic in 149 tropical and subtropical countries, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect more than 1 billion people annually, including 875 million children in developing economies. These diseases are also responsible for over 500,000 deaths per year and are characterized by long-term disability and severe pain. The impact of the combined NTDs closely rivals that of malaria and tuberculosis. Current treatment options are associated with various limitations including widespread drug resistance, severe adverse effects, lengthy treatment duration, unfavorable toxicity profiles, and complicated drug administration procedures. Natural products have been a valuable source of drug regimens that form the cornerstone of modern pharmaceutical care. In this review, we highlight the potential that remains untapped in natural products as drug leads for NTDs. We cover natural products from plant, marine, and microbial sources including natural-product-inspired semi-synthetic derivatives which have been evaluated against the various causative agents of NTDs. Our coverage is limited to four major NTDs which include human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis and lymphatic filariasis.

  6. Clinical development of monoclonal antibody-based drugs in HIV and HCV diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flego Michela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Today there are many licensed antiviral drugs, but the emergence of drug resistant strains sometimes invalidates the effects of the current therapies used in the treatment of infectious diseases. Compared to conventional antiviral drugs, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs used as pharmacological molecules have particular physical characteristics and modes of action, and, therefore, they should be considered as a distinct therapeutic class. Despite being historically validated, antibodies may represent a novel tool for combatting infectious diseases. The current high cost of mAbs' production, storage and administration (by injection only and the consequent obstacles to development are outweighed by mAbs' clinical advantages. These are related to a low toxicity combined with high specificity and versatility, which allows a specific antibody to mediate various biological effects, ranging from the virus neutralization mechanisms to the modulation of immune responses. This review briefly summarizes the recent technological advances in the field of immunoglobulin research, and the current status of mAb-based drugs in clinical trials for HIV and HCV diseases. For each clinical trial the available data are reported and the emerging conceptual problems of the employed mAbs are highlighted. This overview helps to give a clear picture of the efficacy and challenges of the mAbs in the field of these two infectious diseases which have such a global impact.

  7. Adolescent Neurocognitive Development, Self-Regulation, and School-Based Drug Use Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thaddeus A.; Black, David S.; Zaman, Adnin; Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Sussman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is marked by several key development-related changes, including neurocognitive changes. Cognitive abilities associated with self-regulation are not fully developed until late adolescence or early adulthood whereas tendencies to take risks and seek thrilling and novel experience seem to increase significantly throughout this phase, resulting in a discrepancy between increased susceptibility to poor regulation and lower ability to exercise self-control. Increased vulnerability to drug use initiation, maintenance, and dependence during adolescence may be explained based on this imbalance in the self-regulation system. In this paper, we highlight the relevance of schools as a setting for delivering adolescent drug use prevention programs that are based on recent findings from neuroscience concerning adolescent brain development. We discuss evidence from school-based as well as laboratory research that suggests that suitable training may improve adolescents’ executive brain functions that underlie self-regulation abilities and, as a result, help prevent drug use and abuse. We note that considerable further research is needed in order (1) to determine that self-regulation training has effects at the neurocognitive level and (2) to effectively incorporate self-regulation training based on neuropsychological models into school-based programming. PMID:23408284

  8. Challenges and opportunities for the development of new antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forray, Carlos; Buller, Raimund

    2017-11-01

    In spite of the significant impact that the serendipitous discovery of drugs with antipsychotic properties had on the care of patients with psychotic disorders, there are significant challenges when aiming at therapeutic goals such as remission, recovery, improved health-related quality of life and functioning. The efficacy and effectiveness of existing antipsychotic drugs fail to address the full spectrum of symptoms and functional deficits that currently prevent patients with psychotic disorders from achieving fulfilling lives. The study of the pharmacological mechanism of action has increased our knowledge on molecular targets and brain circuits related to the antipsychotic properties of this drug class. However, our understanding of how these molecular targets and brain circuits relate to other aspects of disease pathophysiology like cognitive impairment and negative symptoms is incomplete although these are significant clinical unmet needs. Currently, there is still an important knowledge gap between psychopathology and pathophysiology in schizophrenia research. This may have contributed to some recent costly failures of large clinical development programs for drugs targeted at glutamatergic function and nicotinic receptors. The lack of success of these pharmacological approaches to achieve clinical validation raises important questions concerning the underlying hypothesis that guided the choice of molecular targets, and about the predictive validity of translational models that supported the rationale for testing these drugs in clinical studies. From a clinical perspective there is a need to more strongly consider the disease heterogeneity linked to the use of the current diagnostic classification of subjects and to the validity of the psychopathological constructs and assessments that are used to assess clinical outcomes. A paradigm shift in the development of drugs for schizophrenia is needed. This will require among other addressing: the shortcomings of a

  9. Clinical Development of Anti-mitotic Drugs in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olziersky, Anna-Maria; Labidi-Galy, S Intidhar

    2017-01-01

    Mitosis is one of the most fundamental processes of life by which a mammalian cell divides into two daughter cells. Mitosis has been an attractive target for anticancer therapies since fast proliferation was identified as one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. Despite efforts into developing specific inhibitors for mitotic kinases and kinesins, very few drugs have shown the efficiency of microtubule targeting-agents in cancer cells with paclitaxel being the most successful. A deeper translational research accompanying clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs will help in identifying potent biomarkers predictive for response. Here, we review the current knowledge of mitosis targeting agents that have been tested so far in the clinics.

  10. Industrial natural product chemistry for drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Armin; Brönstrup, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Covering: up to March 2013. In addition to their prominent role in basic biological and chemical research, natural products are a rich source of commercial products for the pharmaceutical and other industries. Industrial natural product chemistry is of fundamental importance for successful product development, as the vast majority (ca. 80%) of commercial drugs derived from natural products require synthetic efforts, either to enable economical access to bulk material, and/or to optimize drug properties through structural modifications. This review aims to illustrate issues on the pathway from lead to product, and how they have been successfully addressed by modern natural product chemistry. It is focused on natural products of current relevance that are, or are intended to be, used as pharmaceuticals.

  11. STS-70 mission highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The highlights of the STS-70 mission are presented in this video. The flight crew consisted of Cmdr. John Hendricks, Pilot Kevin Kregel, Flight Engineer Nancy Curie, and Mission Specialists Dr. Don Thomas and Dr. Mary Ellen Weber. The mission's primary objective was the deployment of the 7th Tracking Data and Relay Satellite (TDRS), which will provide a communication, tracking, telemetry, data acquisition, and command services space-based network system essential to low Earth orbital spacecraft. Secondary mission objectives included activating and studying the Physiological and Anatomical Rodent Experiment/National Institutes of Health-Rodents (PARE/NIH-R), The Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS), the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG) studies, the Space Tissue Loss/National Institutes of Health-Cells (STL/NIH-C) experiment, the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) experiment, Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment-2 (SAREX-2), the Visual Function Tester-4 (VFT-4), the Hand-Held, Earth Oriented, Real-Time, Cooperative, User-Friendly, Location-Targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES), the Microcapsules in Space-B (MIS-B) experiment, the Windows Experiment (WINDEX), the Radiation Monitoring Equipment-3 (RME-3), and the Military Applications of Ship Tracks (MAST) experiment. There was an in-orbit dedication ceremony by the spacecrew and the newly Integrated Mission Control Center to commemorate the Center's integration. The STS-70 mission was the first mission monitored by this new control center. Earth views included the Earth's atmosphere, a sunrise over the Earth's horizon, several views of various land masses, some B/W lightning shots, some cloud cover, and a tropical storm.

  12. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex, gender, and pharmaceutical politics: From drug development to marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Ronald, Lorna M

    2010-08-01

    Biological sex differences and sociocultural gender norms affect the provision of health care products and services, but there has been little explicit analysis of the impact of sex differences and gender norms on the regulation of pharmaceutical development and marketing. This article provides an overview of the regulation of pharmaceuticals and examines the ways that regulatory agencies account for sex and gender in their review of scientific data and marketing materials. The primary focus is on the US context, but information is also included about regulatory models in Europe, Canada, and Japan for comparative purposes. Specific examples show how sex differences and gender norms influence scientific and policy decisions about pharmaceuticals. The United States and Canada were found to be the only countries that have explicit requirements to include women in clinical trials and to perform sex-based subgroup analysis on study results. The potential influence of politics on regulatory decisions may have led to an uneven application of standards, as seen through the examples of mifepristone (for abortion) and sildenafil citrate (for erectile dysfunction). Three detailed case studies illustrate the importance of considering sex and gender in pharmaceutical development and marketing: Phase I clinical trials; human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine; and tegaserod, a drug for irritable bowel syndrome. Sex and gender play important roles in pharmaceutical regulation, from the design of clinical trials and the approval of new drugs to advertising and postmarketing surveillance. However, regulatory agencies pay insufficient attention to both biological sex differences and sociocultural gender norms. This disregard perpetuates inequalities by ignoring drug safety problems that predominate in women and by allowing misleading drug marketing that reinforces gender stereotypes. Recommendations have been made to improve the regulation of pharmaceuticals in regard to sex and

  14. Role of clinical pharmacology in the development of antiplatelet drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the role of clinical pharmacology in the development of low-dose aspirin and other antiplatelet agents during the past 30 years, emphasizing the main determinants of several success stories as well as of complete failures in the field. The author employs personal appraisal of the literature, with emphasis on personal contributions to the field. Low-dose aspirin provides an interesting paradigm of the independent development of a "new" antiplatelet agent by the medical/scientific community. Aspirin "resistance," improved dosing regimens for personalized therapy, and chemoprevention of colorectal cancer are thoroughly discussed. The industry-driven development paradigm includes 12 mechanism-based antiplatelet agents. Of those completing Phase 3, only 6 have been approved for the acute treatment or secondary prevention of atherothrombosis. Inadequate Phase 2 studies were largely involved in Phase 3 failures. The design of mechanism-based pharmacodynamic biomarkers and sophisticated Phase 2 investigations appear as an important key to successful drug development in this field. Clinical pharmacology has an excellent track record in this endeavor, and its role needs to be expanded, as suggested by the case studies discussed in this review. Finally, the choice of appropriate platelet-dependent end points and homogeneous clinical settings for Phase 3 trials not only represent desirable objectives for an integrated scientific and regulatory discussion but also deserve proper ethical consideration by all stakeholders to avoid an unacceptable burden of drug toxicity and an unsustainable waste of financial resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis and applications of radiolabelled drugs in pharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landvatter, S.W.; Heys, J.R.; Garner, K.T.; Mack, J.F.; Senderoff, S.G.; Shu, A.Y.; Villani, A.J.; Saunders, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiolabelled drugs play a vital role in the development of new pharmaceuticals including application in drug discovery, pre-clinical development and clinical development. The synthesis of these pharmaceuticals in tritium or carbon-14 labelled form poses many challenges for the synthetic organic chemist. The actual choice of synthetic route must take into account the small scale, limited choice and high cost of labelled precursors, and the positioning of the label into a metabolically stable position. There are, however, a number of synthetic strategies available for overcoming these constraints. Although in some C-14 syntheses the requisite labelled raw material can be purchased and the existing synthesis adapted for labelling, frequently the synthetic challenge is the synthesis of a structurally simple, yet commercially unavailable, labelled precursor (e.g., γ-butyrolactone-[2- 14 C], cyclohexanone-[ 3 H], CuCN-[ 14 C], 2-furancarboxaldehyde-[ 14 C]). Another useful strategy in C-14 synthesis is the conversion of an advanced intermediate, or perhaps the unlabelled product itself, into a precursor which can then be reconverted into the labelled version of the intermediate. Occasionally, a new total synthesis must be developed. In addition to these strategies, tritium labelling can uniquely take advantage of exchange labelling techniques, synthesis and reduction of unsaturated precursors, or tritium-halogen replacement reactions. Examples of these strategies and use of the labelled products are discussed

  16. Impact analysis of ICH S9 on non-clinical development of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Milton; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Beken, Sonja

    2015-10-01

    Cancer presents a major healthcare challenge worldwide, with several millions new cases a year, and represents a therapeutic area with a high need for new drugs. To respond to this, the parties of the International Conference for Harmonization agreed in 2007 to develop a guideline on nonclinical requirements for oncology therapeutics' development (ICH S9), which came into effect in early 2010. This guideline includes recommendations to facilitate and accelerate the development and marketing of cancer therapeutic agents for serious and life threatening malignancies and aims to address this need through a refinement and a reduction in the use of experimental animals, following the 3Rs principles. To assess the impact of ICH S9 on drug development and reduction of animal use, we performed an analysis of Marketing Authorization Applications at the European Medicines Agency relevant to the period in which the development of the guideline was approaching the final steps and its early implementation period. From the analysis performed, a consistent trend towards a decrease in the average number of non-clinical studies performed (-40.7%) and number of animals used per development program (-58.1%) for new chemical entities has been detected, highlighting increasing compliance by companies to the recommendations of ICH S9. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent trends for drug lag in clinical development of oncology drugs in Japan: does the oncology drug lag still exist in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    This study exhaustively and historically investigated the status of drug lag for oncology drugs approved in Japan. We comprehensively investigated oncology drugs approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014, using publicly available information. We also examined changes in the status of drug lag between Japan and the United States, as well as factors influencing drug lag. This study included 120 applications for approval of oncology drugs in Japan. The median difference over a 13-year period in the approval date between the United States and Japan was 875 days (29.2 months). This figure peaked in 2002, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. In 2014, the median approval lag was 281 days (9.4 months). Multiple regression analysis identified the following potential factors that reduce drug lag: "Japan's participation in global clinical trials"; "bridging strategies"; "designation of priority review in Japan"; and "molecularly targeted drugs". From 2001 to 2014, molecularly targeted drugs emerged as the predominant oncology drug, and the method of development has changed from full development in Japan or bridging strategy to global simultaneous development by Japan's taking part in global clinical trials. In line with these changes, the drug lag between the United States and Japan has significantly reduced to less than 1 year.

  18. In silico machine learning methods in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobchev, Dimitar A; Pillai, Girinath G; Karelson, Mati

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning (ML) computational methods for predicting compounds with pharmacological activity, specific pharmacodynamic and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) properties are being increasingly applied in drug discovery and evaluation. Recently, machine learning techniques such as artificial neural networks, support vector machines and genetic programming have been explored for predicting inhibitors, antagonists, blockers, agonists, activators and substrates of proteins related to specific therapeutic targets. These methods are particularly useful for screening compound libraries of diverse chemical structures, "noisy" and high-dimensional data to complement QSAR methods, and in cases of unavailable receptor 3D structure to complement structure-based methods. A variety of studies have demonstrated the potential of machine-learning methods for predicting compounds as potential drug candidates. The present review is intended to give an overview of the strategies and current progress in using machine learning methods for drug design and the potential of the respective model development tools. We also regard a number of applications of the machine learning algorithms based on common classes of diseases.

  19. Development of immunotoxicity testing strategies for immunomodulatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Thomas T; Evans, Ellen W

    2012-01-01

    The ICH S8 immunotoxicity testing guideline for human pharmaceuticals was published in 2006 and was intended to provide guidance for assessing the immunotoxicity potential of low-molecular-weight drugs that are not intended to alter the immune system. For drugs intended to modulate the immune system, immunotoxicity testing strategies are generally developed on a case-by-case approach since the targets, intended patient population, and mechanisms of action of the test compound will determine the type of testing needed. Some of the general principles of ICH S8, however, may be applied to immunotoxicity testing strategies for immunomodulatory drugs. A weight-of-evidence approach using factors discussed in ICH S8 in concert with an assessment of the potential value of additional immunotoxicity testing should be considered. For most situations, immunotoxicity studies with immunomodulatory compounds evaluate off-target effects on the immune system and exaggerated pharmacology. The potential use of data from these studies and considerations such as translatability to humans are discussed.

  20. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Oil shale highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The low prices of crude oil have continued to retard the commercial development of oil shale and other syn fuels. Although research funds are more difficult to find, some R and D work by industry, academia, and governmental agencies continues in the United States and in other parts of the world. Improvements in retorting technology, upgrading oil-shale feedstock, and developing high-value niche-market products from shale oil are three notable areas of research that have been prominent for the past several years. Although the future prices of conventional crude cannot be predicted, it seems evident that diminishing supplies and a burgeoning world population will force us to turn to alternate fossil fuels as well as to cleaner sources of non-fossil energy. (author)

  2. BARC highlights 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Some of the important research and development (R and D) activities carried out at the Centre during the last two or three years are described in brief. The descriptions are arranged under the headings : Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Material and Materials Science, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, and Life Sciences. The text is illustrated with a number of photographs - some of them coloured. (M.G.B.)

  3. Novel synthetic drugs currently in clinical development for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robak, Pawel; Robak, Tadeusz

    2017-11-01

    Over the last few years, several new synthetic drugs, particularly Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and BCL-2 inhibitors have been developed and investigated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Areas covered: This review highlights key aspects of BTK, PI3K and BCL-2 inhibitors that are currently at various stages of preclinical and clinical development in CLL. A literature review of the MEDLINE database for articles in English concerning CLL, B-cell receptor, BCL-2 antagonists, BTK inhibitors and PI3K inhibitors, was conducted via PubMed. Publications from 2000 through July 2017 were scrutinized. The search terms used were acalabrutinib, ACP-196, BGB-3111, ONO-4059, GS-4059, duvelisib, IPI-145, TGR-1202, copanlisib, Bay 80-6946, buparlisib, BKM-120, BCL-2 inhibitors, venetoclax, ABT-263, navitoclax, CDK inhibitors, alvocidib, flavopiridol, dinaciclib, SCH 727,965, palbociclib, PD-0332991, in conjunction with CLL. Conference proceedings from the previous five years of the ASH and EHA Annual Scientific Meetings were searched manually. Additional relevant publications were obtained by reviewing the references from the chosen articles. Expert opinion: The use of new synthetic drugs is a promising strategy for the treatment of CLL. Data from ongoing and future clinical trials will aid in better defining the status of new drugs in the treatment of CLL.

  4. Ethnobotany and ethnopharmacy--their role for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Michael; Bremner, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Local and traditional knowledge has been the starting point for many successful drug development projects over the last decades. Here we discuss some examples of anti-cancer drugs which have had enormous impact as anti-cancer agents (camptothecan, taxol and derivatives) and a few examples of drugs currently under various stages of preclinical development. Ethnobotanists investigate the relationship between humans and plants in all its complexity, and such research is generally based on a detailed observation and study of the use a society makes of plants. The requirements of modern research on natural products as, for example, outlined in the Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio Convention) and the overall approach in ethnobotanical research are also discussed. Selected phytochemical-pharmacological studies based on traditional plant use are used to highlight the potential of ethnobotany driven anti-cancer research. The link between traditionally used plants and targets of the NF-kappaB pathway is discussed using on an EU-funded, multidisciplinary project as an example. Lastly the potential of chemopreventive agents derived from traditional food plants is briefly addressed.

  5. Energy Policy. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Energy Policy Highlights showcases recent developments in energy policies among all 28 IEA member countries. Each contribution underscores the changing nature of both global and domestic energy challenges, as well as the commonality of energy concerns among member countries. The policies highlighted in this publication identify an urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as a clear policy objective. Electricity, enhancing energy efficiency and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix in a cost effective manner are likewise areas of common focus. On the end-user side, increasing public awareness of domestic energy policies through improved transparency and engagement is an important facet of policy support among IEA member countries. The successful implementation of policies and other initiatives benefitted from efforts to inform the public.

  6. Methodological issues in clinical drug development for essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Michael A; Snyder, Madeline R; Elble, Rodger J; Boutzoukas, Angelique E; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common tremor disorders in the world. Despite this, only two medications have received Level A recommendations from the American Academy of Neurology to treat it (primidone and propranolol). Even though these medications provide relief to a large group of ET patients, up to 50% of patients are non-responders. Additional medications to treat ET are needed. This review discusses some of the methodological issues that should be addressed for quality clinical drug development in ET.

  7. Drugs in development for toxoplasmosis: advances, challenges, and current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alday PH

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available P Holland Alday,1 Joseph Stone Doggett1,2 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Oregon Health & Science University, 2Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Toxoplasma gondii causes fatal and debilitating brain and eye diseases. Medicines that are currently used to treat toxoplasmosis commonly have toxic side effects and require prolonged courses that range from weeks to more than a year. The need for long treatment durations and the risk of relapsing disease are in part due to the lack of efficacy against T. gondii tissue cysts. The challenges for developing a more effective treatment for toxoplasmosis include decreasing toxicity, achieving therapeutic concentrations in the brain and eye, shortening duration, eliminating tissue cysts from the host, safety in pregnancy, and creating a formulation that is inexpensive and practical for use in resource-poor areas of the world. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in identifying and developing new compounds for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. Unlike clinically used medicines that were repurposed for toxoplasmosis, these compounds have been optimized for efficacy against toxoplasmosis during preclinical development. Medicines with enhanced efficacy as well as features that address the unique aspects of toxoplasmosis have the potential to greatly improve toxoplasmosis therapy. This review discusses the facets of toxoplasmosis that are pertinent to drug design and the advances, challenges, and current status of preclinical drug research for toxoplasmosis. Keywords: Toxoplasma gondii, therapeutics, preclinical medicine, experimental medicine, mechanism of action, Apicomplexa

  8. Drugs in development for toxoplasmosis: advances, challenges, and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, P Holland; Doggett, Joseph Stone

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes fatal and debilitating brain and eye diseases. Medicines that are currently used to treat toxoplasmosis commonly have toxic side effects and require prolonged courses that range from weeks to more than a year. The need for long treatment durations and the risk of relapsing disease are in part due to the lack of efficacy against T. gondii tissue cysts. The challenges for developing a more effective treatment for toxoplasmosis include decreasing toxicity, achieving therapeutic concentrations in the brain and eye, shortening duration, eliminating tissue cysts from the host, safety in pregnancy, and creating a formulation that is inexpensive and practical for use in resource-poor areas of the world. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in identifying and developing new compounds for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. Unlike clinically used medicines that were repurposed for toxoplasmosis, these compounds have been optimized for efficacy against toxoplasmosis during preclinical development. Medicines with enhanced efficacy as well as features that address the unique aspects of toxoplasmosis have the potential to greatly improve toxoplasmosis therapy. This review discusses the facets of toxoplasmosis that are pertinent to drug design and the advances, challenges, and current status of preclinical drug research for toxoplasmosis.

  9. Immuno-Oncology: The Third Paradigm in Early Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Liberal, Juan; Hierro, Cinta; Ochoa de Olza, Maria; Rodon, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    Clinical researchers in oncology face the difficulty of developing new drugs for treating cancer patients. This challenge nowadays extends towards new horizons since a high number of drugs are developed in each of the three paradigms: classical cytotoxics, new targeted agents, and emergent immunotherapeutic approaches. Over the last decade, there has been an unstoppable progress in this third paradigm, to the extent that in 2013 immunotherapy was granted the scientific breakthrough of the year. However, the novel mechanisms of action of these immunotherapeutic agents entail a whole new series of concepts, resulting in a number of unresolved questions to which clarification is crucial for their success: establishment of accurate preclinical models able to predict human toxicities, better selection of candidate populations, finding and validation of predictive biomarkers, definition of suitable endpoints, improvements in first-in-human study designs, proposal of more accurate radiological response criteria, management of novel immune-related toxicities and development of combinations based on a biological rationale. In this article, we review the major challenges to overcome in forthcoming years. The final role of immunotherapy in cancer will be determined by our capacity to shed some light on some of these key points.

  10. Interactions of dendrimers with biological drug targets: reality or mystery - a gap in drug delivery and development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2016-07-21

    Dendrimers have emerged as novel and efficient materials that can be used as therapeutic agents/drugs or as drug delivery carriers to enhance therapeutic outcomes. Molecular dendrimer interactions are central to their applications and realising their potential. The molecular interactions of dendrimers with drugs or other materials in drug delivery systems or drug conjugates have been extensively reported in the literature. However, despite the growing application of dendrimers as biologically active materials, research focusing on the mechanistic analysis of dendrimer interactions with therapeutic biological targets is currently lacking in the literature. This comprehensive review on dendrimers over the last 15 years therefore attempts to identify the reasons behind the apparent lack of dendrimer-receptor research and proposes approaches to address this issue. The structure, hierarchy and applications of dendrimers are briefly highlighted, followed by a review of their various applications, specifically as biologically active materials, with a focus on their interactions at the target site. It concludes with a technical guide to assist researchers on how to employ various molecular modelling and computational approaches for research on dendrimer interactions with biological targets at a molecular level. This review highlights the impact of a mechanistic analysis of dendrimer interactions on a molecular level, serves to guide and optimise their discovery as medicinal agents, and hopes to stimulate multidisciplinary research between scientific, experimental and molecular modelling research teams.

  11. BARC highlights 86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is the premier multidisciplinary research establishment of the Department of Atomic Energy (India). It provides Research and Development (R and D) support to the nuclear programmes of the country. Some of its important R and D activities and achievements during 1986 are described in brief in the chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Life Sciences, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, and Electronics and Instrumentation. The entire text is illustrated with a number of diagrams and photographs. (M.G.B.)

  12. Cytogenetic highlights and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Nancy B

    2016-06-01

    Medical cytogenetics, genetic diagnostics, and medical genetics had their origins in the late 1950's, as evaluation of human chromosomes became possible, and it was recognized that chromosomal abnormalities could cause a variety of clinical phenotypes. Dr. Laird Jackson began his medical and scientific career just as this field was emerging and he was an early adopter and driver of several key trends in the development of these fields, notably in the area of prenatal diagnostics. Laird's greatest impact was in his work to demonstrate the clinical utility of amniocentesis, chorionic villous sampling, and chromosomal microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, M.G.; Nies, A.T.; Knibbe, C.A.; Schaeffeler, E.; Tibboel, D.; Schwab, M.; Wildt, S.N. de

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug

  14. Summary and highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimonti G.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy means development, and access to energy and electricity should be possible for everyone. The energy challenge for the years to come is to have a sustainable energy supply and after the week spent in Varenna it is clear that “sustainable” cannot be identified with green gas emission reduction only: it has to be an energy supply system respectful of the environment and the humankind, able to provide reliable and affordable energy to the whole world population. This is definitely not an easy challenge: no single energy technology will suffice to safeguard our future and any possible solution has to be exploited at its best, from renewable to nuclear energy, from clean fossil fuels to biofuels. Last but not least, it is the energy efficiency that, given the actual technology, may give the most important and immediate contribution to this challenge. Meanwhile researchers must examine a broad range of options and develop different kinds of technologies: only new investments on R&D can allow to meet the growing demand for energy in a responsible, equitable, and sustainable way.

  15. Development and evaluation of an electronic drug and therapeutics bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2002-10-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a paperless drug and therapeutics bulletin that is distributed by electronic mail from the pharmacy department of an Australian teaching hospital. A standardized format for the bulletin was designed and approved in February 2001. The aim of the bulletin is to facilitate the timely dissemination of concise, factual information about issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety, and the cost-effective use of medicines. A simple and attractive graphic design was chosen, and the hospital's clinical pharmacists and drug information staff developed an initial bank of content during the period immediately preceding the launch. The bulletin is presented as a 1-page, read-only file in Word for Windows format and was initially distributed by electronic mail to all users of the hospital's computerized communication network. As the popularity of the bulletin increased, healthcare practitioners from outside of the hospital began to request permission for inclusion on the circulation list, and the content was frequently forwarded by E-mail to workers in other hospitals and community-based settings. The bulletin is now distributed to pharmacists around Australia via 2 separate moderated discussion lists, one of which provides an archive site for previous editions. Healthcare workers in Singapore, the US, Canada, and New Zealand also receive the bulletin, which is now also abstracted by a major Australian pharmacy journal. A readership survey (also electronically distributed) was used to seek feedback after the publication of the first 12 editions. Readers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the content, format, and frequency of distribution of the materials. Although the concept and execution of this project was relatively simple, an extensive literature review did not reveal any previously published reports describing this type of approach to the distribution of a pharmacy bulletin. The

  16. Highlights of CP 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Various developing topics in CP violation are reviewed. There are many theoretical reasons to hope that the CKM paradigm may be incomplete. It is surely too soon to be claiming new physics in \\epsilon^\\prime/\\epsilon or in D^0-\\bar D^0 mixing, but rare K decays offer interesting places to search for new physics. It is probably also premature to see a clash between global CKM fits and current estimates of sin \\beta and \\gamma, where much more precise data will soon be available. There are interesting possibilities to look for CP violation in neutrino oscillations and in Higgs physics. Rapid progress can be expected now that CP violation is moving to the top of the particle physics agenda.

  17. Peripatetic Highlights in Bern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Ann M.

    The capital city of the Swiss Canton of Bern and of the Swiss Confederation is nestled in a narrow loop of the Aare river, at the foot of the Alps. The old town, founded around 1191, is well preserved despite a devastating fire in 1405.** Major industries of the region developed under the constraints of modest domestic markets, high transportation costs, and protectionist legislation across national borders. Switzerland thus found its niche in higher-end markets, such as chocolate making, engine building, instruments, fine textiles, and chemicals or pharmaceuticals. My tour past historically significant scientific sites in Bern will use the local legacy of its most illustrious residents, Albert Einstein (1879-1955), who lived there from 1902-1909, and Fritz Houtermans (1903-1966), who lived there from 1952-1966, as its guiding thread through the old town and the university district. Place names in italics mark stops along the tour.

  18. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL's annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory's facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future

  19. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  20. February 2017 - NIF Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-13

    February was a very productive month with only 20 shot days on the calendar. There were 41 target shots performed for the HED, ICF, and the Discovery Science (DS) program. The DS program had a week dedicated to their experiments that was extraordinarily fruitful: 14 target shots were performed for five independent teams, each of whom had a unique experimental platform to field. The teams and the facility worked extraordinarily well to pull off this feat! Additionally, the facility developed high-energy laser operations on a demonstration quad to investigate taking NIF to a new level of performance, and the ICF program demonstrated a 40% increase in the yield from a capsule that had a new, 5-μm-diameter fill tube that apparently mitigates some of the issues that have affected implosions to date. Details follow below.

  1. Photon science 2012. Highlights and annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, Karen; Gehrke, Rainer; Gutt, Christian; Incoccia-Hermes, Lucia; Laarmann, Tim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Roehlsberger, Ralf; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Vainio, Ulla; Zimmermann, Martin von

    2012-12-01

    The synchrotron-radiation research at DESY is reviewed. The following topics are dealt with: Research highlights, research platforms and outstations, light sources, new technologies and developments. (HSI)

  2. Interdisciplinary researches for potential developments of drugs and natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunrat Chaveerach

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Developments of drugs or natural products from plants are possibly made, simple to use and lower cost than modern drugs. The development processes can be started with studying local wisdom and literature reviews to choose the plants which have long been used in diverse areas, such as foods, traditional medicine, fragrances and seasonings. Then those data will be associated with scientific researches, namely plant collection and identification, phytochemical screening by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, pharmacological study/review for their functions, and finally safety and efficiency tests in human. For safety testing, in vitro cell toxicity by cell viability assessment and in vitro testing of DNA breaks by the comet assay in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells can be performed. When active chemicals and functions containing plants were chosen with safety and efficacy for human uses, then, the potential medicinal natural products will be produced. Based on these procedures, the producing cost will be cheaper and the products can be evaluated for their clinical properties. Thus, the best and lowest-priced medicines and natural products can be distributed worldwide.

  3. Drug discovery and development tomorrow -- changing the mindset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    Today's drug discovery and development paradigm is not working, and something needs to be done about it. There is good reason to believe that a move away from reliance on animal surrogates for human subjects in the Pharma Industry's R&D programmes could provide an important step forward. However, no serious move will be made in that direction until there is some hard evidence that it will be rewarded with improved productivity outcomes. The Safer Medicines Trust are proposing that a study be undertaken, involving a range of drugs that have been approved for human use, but have subsequently proved to have limitations in terms of safety and/or efficacy. The aim is to determine the efficiency of a battery of human-based test methods to identify a compound's safety and efficacy profiles, and to compare this with that of the more traditional, largely animal-based methods that were employed in their original development. Should such an approach prove more reliable, the authorities will be faced with important decisions relating to the role of human biological test data in regulatory submissions, while the Pharma Industry will be faced with the key logistical issue of how to acquire the human biomaterials necessary to make possible the routine application of such test methods. 2009 FRAME.

  4. Recombinant drug development, regulation, and commercialization: an Indian industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niharika; Manchikanti, Padmavati

    2011-04-01

    The Indian biopharmaceutical sector comprises nearly 40 companies that manufacture and/or market 14 recombinant drugs that account for nearly 50 products. Among these, 22 companies have manufacturing facilities in India. The aim of the present study was to analyze the patenting trends, commercialization, and regulatory system for biopharmaceuticals in India. Representatives from 19 such biopharmaceutical companies were interviewed on aspects related to regulatory compliance, manufacturing, commercialization, and innovation in order to understand the challenges faced by them in the current regulatory and patent system. The study revealed that 94% of the companies have filed patents and 52% are developing new biologic entities in areas such as diabetes mellitus, cancer, and congestive heart diseases. Forty-two percent of the companies consider delays in regulatory approval to be a major constraint for biopharmaceutical industry development. Almost all are of the opinion that uniform guidelines across countries would help to prevent delays in the commercialization of products. A high proportion of representatives of the biopharmaceutical industry in India identified that elaboration of regulatory guidelines, defined submission requirements, and drug approval timelines are vital to the growth of the biopharmaceutical industry. © 2011 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  6. HIGHLIGHTS OF MAGNETOELECTROPOLISHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz eHryniewicz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The research work has been concerned on the studies and development of electrochemical polishing in the magnetic field (MEP in comparison with the standard electropolishing methods performed without stirring (EP and the process with the forced electrolyte mixing (MIX. Advanced techniques were used in the studies, to measure the effects of the surface treatment. They are as follows: scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS, surface roughness, and nanoindentation measurements. For the corrosion studies, the electrochemical methods were used, such as: open circuit potential OCP, potentiodynamic curves PC, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS measurements. The MEP process is advised mainly due to the opportunity to enrich the surface layer with the chromium compounds (austenitic stainless steels, or titanium compounds (CP Ti Grade 2, Nitinol. The surface layers of biomaterials after MEP process contain much lower amount of carcinogenic compounds, like chromium VI oxidation stage (Cr6+ (austenitic stainless steels and nickel compounds (austenitic stainless steel & Nitinol versus those ones obtained after EP & MIX treatments. It is interesting that apart from the significant modification of the surface layer obtained after MEP, also mechanical properties, such as nanohardness, modulus of elasticity, and mechanical resistance to bending and torsion, undergo considerable advantageous changes. All they make the MEP process very promising for application in many clean industries, such as medical equipment and devices, electronics, food industry, etc.

  7. Parasites! Graphic Exploration of Tropical Disease Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, Susan M

    2018-02-01

    Parasites!, a 2010 comic sponsored by the Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology, demonstrates that a graphic narrative can play a role in energizing public debate. Part of the genre known as graphic medicine-comics about illness, treatment, disability, and caregiving-Parasites! is intended to educate readers of all ages about illnesses less known in the developed world. Two visual strategies in particular enable the comic to offer an alternative and aesthetic response to questions about developing drugs to treat tropical diseases for profit. By including visuals and text, and not just one of these formats, viewers must reorient themselves aesthetically and epistemologically to ethical, social, cultural, and political structures that adversely affect human health. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  8. A new roadmap for biopharmaceutical drug product development: Integrating development, validation, and quality by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moe, Sheryl; Lim, Fredric J; Wong, Rita L; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Sundaram, Jagannathan; Sane, Samir U

    2011-08-01

    Quality by design (QbD) is a science- and risk-based approach to drug product development. Although pharmaceutical companies have historically used many of the same principles during development, this knowledge was not always formally captured or proactively submitted to regulators. In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has also recognized the need for more controls in the drug manufacturing processes, especially for biological therapeutics, and it has recently launched an initiative for Pharmaceutical Quality for the 21st Century to modernize pharmaceutical manufacturing and improve product quality. In the biopharmaceutical world, the QbD efforts have been mainly focused on active pharmaceutical ingredient processes with little emphasis on drug product development. We present a systematic approach to biopharmaceutical drug product development using a monoclonal antibody as an example. The approach presented herein leverages scientific understanding of products and processes, risk assessments, and rational experimental design to deliver processes that are consistent with QbD philosophy without excessive incremental effort. Data generated using these approaches will not only strengthen data packages to support specifications and manufacturing ranges but hopefully simplify implementation of postapproval changes. We anticipate that this approach will positively impact cost for companies, regulatory agencies, and patients, alike. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Impact Biopharmaceutics and Formulation Strategies in Drug Development-Industry Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Chung, John; van Asperen, Judith; Heimbach, Tycho

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in drug development and regulatory applications. Although most of the published examples have focused on aspects such as first-in-human (FIH) dose predictions or drug-drug interactions, several publications have highlighted the application of these models in the biopharmaceutics field and their use to inform formulation development. In this report, we present 5 case studies of use of such models in this biopharmaceutics/formulation space across different pharmaceutical companies. The case studies cover different aspects of biopharmaceutics or formulation questions including (1) prediction of absorption prior to FIH studies; (2) optimization of formulation and dissolution method post-FIH data; (3) early exploration of a modified-release formulation; (4) addressing bridging questions for late-stage formulation changes; and (5) prediction of pharmacokinetics in the fed state for a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class I drug with fasted state data. The discussion of the case studies focuses on how such models can facilitate decisions and biopharmaceutic understanding of drug candidates and the opportunities for increased use and acceptance of such models in drug development and regulatory interactions. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a probucol-releasing antithrombogenic drug eluting stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Kumar; Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Sung Won; Park, Kinam

    2012-05-01

    The success of drug eluting stents (DESs) has been challenged by the manifestation of late stent thrombosis after DES implantation. The incomplete regeneration of the endothelial layer poststenting triggers adverse signaling processes precipitating in thrombosis. Various approaches have been attempted to prevent thrombosis, including the delivery of biological agents, such as estradiol, that promote endothelialization, and the use of natural polymers as coating materials. The underlying challenge has been the inability to release the biological agent in synchronization with the temporal sequence of vascular wound healing in vivo. The natural healing process of the endothelium after an injury starts after a week and may take up to a month in humans. This article presents a novel DES formulation using a hemocompatible polyurethane (PU) matrix to sustain the release of probucol (PB), an endothelial agonist, by exploiting the greater difference in the solubility parameters of PB and PU. This results in the formation of crystalline PB aggregates retarding drug release from PU. The physicochemical properties of PB in PU were confirmed using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Drug-polymer compatibility was examined using infrared spectral analysis. Also, in vitro studies using primary human aortic endothelial cells resulted in the selection of 5% w/w PB as the optimal dose, to be further tested in vitro and in vivo. This work develops and tests a promising new DES formulation to enable faster endothelial cell proliferation poststenting, potentially minimizing the incidence and severity of thrombotic events after DES implantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tissue Chips to aid drug development and modeling for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lucie A; Tagle, Danilo A

    2016-01-01

    The technologies used to design, create and use microphysiological systems (MPS, "tissue chips" or "organs-on-chips") have progressed rapidly in the last 5 years, and validation studies of the functional relevance of these platforms to human physiology, and response to drugs for individual model organ systems, are well underway. These studies are paving the way for integrated multi-organ systems that can model diseases and predict drug efficacy and toxicology of multiple organs in real-time, improving the potential for diagnostics and development of novel treatments of rare diseases in the future. This review will briefly summarize the current state of tissue chip research and highlight model systems where these microfabricated (or bioengineered) devices are already being used to screen therapeutics, model disease states, and provide potential treatments in addition to helping elucidate the basic molecular and cellular phenotypes of rare diseases. Microphysiological systems hold great promise and potential for modeling rare disorders, as well as for their potential use to enhance the predictive power of new drug therapeutics, plus potentially increase the statistical power of clinical trials while removing the inherent risks of these trials in rare disease populations.

  12. Origin and Development of Drug Addiction in South Asia with Special Reference to Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Farhana Sarfaraz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During the course of this search man has extracted opium from poppy plant, cocaine from the leaves of coca bush, and cannabis from the hemp plant. Initially the use of these was only for the purpose of relieving the physical and mental capabilities, and for medicinaland surgical purpose. But the human spirit of innovation must have led to the use of these substances for mood-altering effects and offer an escape from the real and difficult world of existence to a more agreeable world of fantasy. These things are perhaps a few of the oldest natural substances a fewer of the oldest natural substances used by human race.The major purpose of the study is to highlight the origin and development of the drug addiction in the South Asian region, and discover its impacts on Pakistan. The problem of the drug addiction, which once could be learned as a by-product of drug traffickingthroughout Pakistan has become a major challenge for the governments, philanthropists and the social reformers of this age. The present extent of addiction depicts a bleak future for the generation to come, unless a revolutionary, well-coordinated and determined approach is envisaged and implemented.

  13. Liposomal Drug Product Development and Quality: Current US Experience and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mamta; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-05-01

    Research in the area of liposomes has grown substantially in the past few decades. Liposomes are lipid bilayer structures that can incorporate drug substances to modify the drug's pharmacokinetic profile thereby improving drug delivery. The agency has received over 400 liposomal drug product submissions (excluding combination therapies), and there are currently eight approved liposomal drug products on the US market. In order to identify the pain points in development and manufacturing of liposomal drug products, a retrospective analysis was performed from a quality perspective on submissions for new and generic liposomal drug products. General analysis on liposomal drug product submissions was also performed. Results indicated that 96% of the submissions were Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, 3% were New Drug Applications (NDAs), and the remaining 1% was Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). Doxorubicin hydrochloride was the most commonly used drug substance incorporated into the liposomes (31%). The majority of the liposomal products were administered via intravenous route (84%) with cancer (various types) being the most common indication (63%). From a quality perspective, major challenges during the development of liposomal drug products included identification and (appropriate) characterization of critical quality attributes of liposomal drug products and suitable control strategies during product development. By focusing on these areas, a faster and more efficient development of liposomal drug products may be achieved. Additionally, in this way, the drug review process for such products can be streamlined.

  14. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ...; Formerly 2008N-0004] Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's current thinking regarding the overall development program and clinical trial designs for drugs to support an indication for the...

  15. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of this guidance is to assist sponsors in the clinical development of drugs for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (c...

  16. Highlights of the 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Graciela; Carter, Kara; Janeba, Zlatko; Sampath, Aruna; Schang, Luis M; Tarbet, E Bart; Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Bray, Mike; Esté, José A

    2017-09-01

    The 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Atlanta, GA, USA from May 18 to 21, 2017. This report provides an account of award lectures, invited keynote addresses and oral presentations during the meeting. The 2017 Gertrude Elion Memorial Lecture Award by Michael Sofia highlighted one of the most important accomplishments in recent drug discovery in antiviral research, the identification of the hepatitis C virus direct-acting antiviral sofosbuvir and new alternatives to combat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The Antonín Holý Lecture Award by David Chu on medicinal chemistry provided an overview of early developments of nucleoside analogs for the treatment of HIV and varicella zoster virus infection and how this knowledge serves to develop new drugs targeting HBV. Priscilla Yang gave the first ISAR Women in Science lecture. She reported on pharmacological validation of new antiviral targets for dengue, Zika and other flaviviruses. The William Prusoff Young Investigator Lecture Award by Maaike Everts described the Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance and the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Consortium, and how they are helping to accelerate the development of new antivirals. The 30th ICAR was a success in promoting new discoveries in antiviral drug development and research. The 31st ICAR will be held in Porto, Portugal, June 11-15, 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Approaches to modernize the combination drug development paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Day

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in genomic sequencing and omics-based capabilities are uncovering tremendous therapeutic opportunities and rapidly transforming the field of cancer medicine. Molecularly targeted agents aim to exploit key tumor-specific vulnerabilities such as oncogenic or non-oncogenic addiction and synthetic lethality. Additionally, immunotherapies targeting the host immune system are proving to be another promising and complementary approach. Owing to substantial tumor genomic and immunologic complexities, combination strategies are likely to be required to adequately disrupt intricate molecular interactions and provide meaningful long-term benefit to patients. To optimize the therapeutic success and application of combination therapies, systematic scientific discovery will need to be coupled with novel and efficient clinical trial approaches. Indeed, a paradigm shift is required to drive precision medicine forward, from the traditional “drug-centric” model of clinical development in pursuit of small incremental benefits in large heterogeneous groups of patients, to a “strategy-centric” model to provide customized transformative treatments in molecularly stratified subsets of patients or even in individual patients. Crucially, to combat the numerous challenges facing combination drug development—including our growing but incomplete understanding of tumor biology, technical and informatics limitations, and escalating financial costs—aligned goals and multidisciplinary collaboration are imperative to collectively harness knowledge and fuel continual innovation.

  18. Developing a Dissociative Nanocontainer for Peptide Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kelly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The potency, selectivity, and decreased side effects of bioactive peptides have propelled these agents to the forefront of pharmacological research. Peptides are especially promising for the treatment of neurological disorders and pain. However, delivery of peptide therapeutics often requires invasive techniques, which is a major obstacle to their widespread application. We have developed a tailored peptide drug delivery system in which the viral capsid of P22 bacteriophage is modified to serve as a tunable nanocontainer for the packaging and controlled release of bioactive peptides. Recent efforts have demonstrated that P22 nanocontainers can effectively encapsulate analgesic peptides and translocate them across blood-brain-barrier (BBB models. However, release of encapsulated peptides at their target site remains a challenge. Here a Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP reaction is applied to trigger P22 nanocontainer disassembly under physiological conditions. Specifically, the ROMP substrate norbornene (5-Norbornene-2-carboxylic acid is conjugated to the exterior of a loaded P22 nanocontainer and Grubbs II Catalyst is used to trigger the polymerization reaction leading to nanocontainer disassembly. Our results demonstrate initial attempts to characterize the ROMP-triggered release of cargo peptides from P22 nanocontainers. This work provides proof-of-concept for the construction of a triggerable peptide drug delivery system using viral nanocontainers.

  19. Developing drugs for the developing world: an economic, legal, moral, and political dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, D B

    2001-05-01

    This paper discusses the economic, legal, moral, and political difficulties in developing drugs for the developing world. It argues that large, global pharmaceutical companies have social responsibilities to the developing world, and that they may exercise these responsibilities by investing in research and development related to diseases that affect developing nations, offering discounts on drug prices, and initiating drug giveaways. However, these social responsibilities are not absolute requirements and may be balanced against other obligations and commitments in light of economic, social, legal, political, and other conditions. How a company decides to exercise its social responsibilities to the developing world depends on (1) the prospects for a reasonable profit and (2) the prospects for a productive business environment. Developing nations can either help or hinder the pharmaceutical industry's efforts to exercise social responsibility through various policies and practices. To insure that companies can make a reasonable profit, developing nations should honor pharmaceutical product patents and adhere to international intellectual property treaties, such as the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement. To insure the companies have a good business environment, developing nations should try to promote the rule of law, ethical business practices, stable currencies, reliable banking systems, free and open markets, democracy, and other conditions conducive to business. Overall, this paper advocates for reciprocity and cooperation between pharmaceutical companies and developing nations to address the problem of developing drugs for the developing world. In pursuing this cooperative approach, developing nations may use a variety of other techniques to encourage pharmaceutical companies to act responsibly, such as subsidizing pharmaceutical research, helping to design and implement research protocols, providing a guaranteed market, and

  20. The role of globalization in drug development and access to orphan drugs: orphan drug legislation in the US/EU and in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Renée J G; Bighash, Lida; Bryón Nieto, Alejandro; Tannus Branco de Araújo, Gabriela; Gay-Molina, Juan Gabriel; Augustovski, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Compared to a decade ago, nearly three times as many drugs for rare diseases are slated for development. This article addresses the market access issues associated with orphan drug status in Europe and the United States in contrast to the legislation in five Latin American (LA) countries that have made strides in this regard--Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Argentina. Based on the success of orphan drug legislation in the EU and US, LA countries should strive to adopt similar strategies with regard to rare diseases and drug development. With the implementation of new targeted regulations, reimbursement strategies, and drug approvals, accessibility to treatment will be improved for people afflicted with rare diseases in these developing countries.

  1. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematical Gazette, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reprinted are "The Teaching of Euclid" by Bertrand Russell, an article on integrals by G. H. Hardy, "An Address on Relativity" by A. S. Eddington, "The Food of the Gods" by Prof. E. H. Neville, and "Simplicity and Truthfulness in Arithmetic" by W. Hope-Jones. (CT)

  2. Adverse drug reaction reporting by doctors in a developing country ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting is the most widely used and cost effective method of monitoring the safety of drugs. This method is heavily afflicted by underreporting by healthcare professionals. The study aims at assessing adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting rate by doctors, knowledge of the ...

  3. Development of hydroxyapatite bone cement for controlled drug ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... difference could be detected in XRD patterns of the TCH–HA cement with various amounts of drug. By increasing the drug concentration, mechanical strength of cement was decreased and its setting time was increased. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using HA cement as a carrier for drug delivery.

  4. Developing a coordinated response to drug abuse in Pakistan.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes moves towards the coordination of efforts to respond to the worsening drug abuse situation in Pakistan which affects all segments of society. The efforts reported seek to rectify inconsistencies in treatment policy resulting in unsatisfactory outcomes. Examples of collaborative strategies with encouraging results need further underpinning and expansion. There is, however, a lack of realization at the policy level of the need to effect changes in treatment formulated on a consistent and evidence-based approach. Policy has therefore been reviewed and proposals made for a comprehensive treatment strategy in line with international best practices to deal with this problem effectively and efficiently. Establishment of an addiction study centre at university level to continue professional and academic development is suggested.

  5. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premnath Shenoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017.

  6. 78 FR 68459 - Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-1279] Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food...

  7. Developing a Molecular Roadmap of Drug-Food Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    in ∼ 1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global...... view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in Drug-Bank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing...... a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map....

  8. A primer of drug safety surveillance: an industry perspective. Part I: Information flow, new drug development, and federal regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, M C

    1992-01-01

    To place the fundamentals of clinical drug safety surveillance in a conceptual framework that will facilitate understanding and application of adverse drug event data to protect the health of the public and support a market for pharmaceutical manufacturers' products. Part I of this series provides a background for the discussion of drug safety by defining the basic terms and showing the flow of safety information through a pharmaceutical company. The customers for adverse drug event data are identified to provide a basis for providing quality service. The development of a drug product is briefly reviewed to show the evolution of safety data. Drug development and safety are defined by federal regulations. These regulations are developed by the FDA with information from pharmaceutical manufacturers. The intent of the regulations and the accompanying guidelines is described. An illustration from the news media is cited to show an alternative, positive approach to handling an adverse event report. This review uses primary sources from the federal laws (regulations), commentaries, and summaries. Very complex topics are briefly summarized in the text and additional readings are presented in an appendix. Secondary sources, ranging from newspaper articles to judicial summaries, illustrate the interpretation of adverse drug events and opportunities for drug safety surveillance intervention. The reference materials used were articles theoretically or practically applicable in the day-to-day practice of drug safety surveillance. The role of clinical drug safety surveillance in product monitoring and drug development is described. The process of drug safety surveillance is defined by the Food and Drug Administration regulations, product labeling, product knowledge, and database management. Database management is subdivided into the functions of receipt, retention, retrieval, and review of adverse event reports. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic interaction ;of the components

  9. Applying insights from biofilm biology to drug development - can a new approach be developed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Molin, Søren

    2013-01-01

    as well as antibiotics, and the treatment of biofilm infections presents a considerable unmet clinical need. To date, there are no drugs that specifically target bacteria in biofilms; however, several approaches are in early-stage development. Here, we review current insights into biofilm physiology...

  10. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pyelonephritis with sepsis, renal damage in young children, pre-term birth, and complications of frequent antimicrobial use including high-level antibiotic resistance and Clostridium difficile colitis. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of UTI, but less common pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis and other enterococci frequently take advantage of an abnormal or catheterized urinary tract to cause opportunistic infections. While antibiotic therapy has historically been very successful in controlling UTI, the high rate of recurrence remains a major problem, and many individuals suffer from chronically recurring UTI, requiring long-term prophylactic antibiotic regimens to prevent recurrent UTI. Furthermore, the global emergence of multi-drug resistant UPEC in the past ten years spotlights the need for alternative therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat UTI, including anti-infective drug therapies and vaccines. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the identification of promising drug and vaccine targets. We then discuss the development of new UTI drugs and vaccines, highlighting the challenges these approaches face and the need for a greater understanding of urinary tract mucosal immunity. PMID:26999391

  11. Mass spectrometry innovations in drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papac, D I; Shahrokh, Z

    2001-02-01

    This review highlights the many roles mass spectrometry plays in the discovery and development of new therapeutics by both the pharmaceutical and the biotechnology industries. Innovations in mass spectrometer source design, improvements to mass accuracy, and implementation of computer-controlled automation have accelerated the purification and characterization of compounds derived from combinatorial libraries, as well as the throughput of pharmacokinetics studies. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry, chemical reaction interface-mass spectrometry and continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry are promising alternatives for conducting mass balance studies in man. To meet the technical challenges of proteomics, discovery groups in biotechnology companies have led the way to development of instruments with greater sensitivity and mass accuracy (e.g., MALDI-TOF, ESI-Q-TOF, Ion Trap), the miniaturization of separation techniques and ion sources (e.g., capillary HPLC and nanospray), and the utilization of bioinformatics. Affinity-based methods coupled to mass spectrometry are allowing rapid and selective identification of both synthetic and biological molecules. With decreasing instrument cost and size and increasing reliability, mass spectrometers are penetrating both the manufacturing and the quality control arenas. The next generation of technologies to simplify the investigation of the complex fate of novel pharmaceutical entities in vitro and in vivo will be chip-based approaches coupled with mass spectrometry.

  12. Evaluation of transporters in drug development: Current status and contemporary issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue-Chih; Arya, Vikram; Yang, Xinning; Volpe, Donna A; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    Transporters govern the access of molecules to cells or their exit from cells, thereby controlling the overall distribution of drugs to their intracellular site of action. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions mediated by transporters are of increasing interest in drug development. Drug transporters, acting alone or in concert with drug metabolizing enzymes, can play an important role in modulating drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, thus affecting the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of a drug. The drug interaction guidance documents from regulatory agencies include various decision criteria that may be used to predict the need for in vivo assessment of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. Regulatory science research continues to assess the prediction performances of various criteria as well as to examine the strength and limitations of each prediction criterion to foster discussions related to harmonized decision criteria that may be used to facilitate global drug development. This review discusses the role of transporters in drug development with a focus on methodologies in assessing transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions, challenges in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of transporters, and emerging transporter research areas including biomarkers, assessment of tissue concentrations, and effect of diseases on transporters. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Enhancement of the efficiency of magnetic targeting for drug delivery: Development and evaluation of magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Quanliang; Han Xiaotao; Li Liang

    2011-01-01

    Deep magnetic capture and clinical application are the current trends for magnetic targeted drug delivery system. More promising and possible strategies are needed to overcome the current limitations and further improve the magnetic targeting technique. Recent advances in the development of targeting magnet system show promise in progressing this technology from the laboratory to the clinic. Starting from well-known basic concepts, current limitations of magnetic targeted drug delivery system are analyzed. Meanwhile, the design concepts and evaluations of some effective improvements in magnet system are discussed and reviewed with reference to (i) reasonable design of magnet system; (ii) control modes of magnet system used to generate dynamical magnetic fields; and (iii) magnetic field driving types. - Research Highlights: → The current limitations of MTDDS for deep capture and clinical application are analyzed. → The development of magnet system shows promise in progressing MTDDS to clinical application. → The design concepts and evaluations of improvements in magnet system are reviewed and discussed. → The key to improve magnet system lies in controllable magnets and different excitations.

  14. 78 FR 63223 - Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...] Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug... Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development'' and opportunity for public comment. The document published with an incorrect date for submission of electronic and written comments. This document corrects that...

  15. 78 FR 40485 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ...] Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug...) is extending the comment period for the public docket on lung cancer patient-focused drug development... electronic or written comments to the docket by August 28, 2013. ADDRESSES: Submit electronic comments to...

  16. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  17. Ergosterol biosynthesis and drug development for Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A Urbina

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of the currently available drugs nifurtimox (NFX and benznidazole (BZN used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease; herein we discuss their limitations along with potential alternatives with a focus on ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors (EBI. These compounds are currently the most advanced candidates for new anti-T. cruzi agents given that they block de novo production of 24-alkyl-sterols, which are essential for parasite survival and cannot be replaced by a host's own cholesterol. Among these compounds, new triazole derivatives that inhibit the parasite's C14± sterol demethylase are the most promising, as they have been shown to have curative activity in murine models of acute and chronic Chagas disease and are active against NFX and BZN-resistant T. cruzi strains; among this class of compounds, posaconazole (Schering-Plough Research Institute and ravuconazole (Eisai Company are poised for clinical trials in Chagas disease patients in the short term. Other T. cruzi-specific EBI, with in vitro and in vivo potency, include squalene synthase, lanosterol synthase and squalene epoxidase-inhibitors as well as compounds with dual mechanisms of action (ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition and free radical generation, but they are less advanced in their development process. The main putative advantages of EBI over currently available therapies include their higher potency and selectivity in both acute and chronic infections, activity against NFX and BZN-resistant T. cruzi strains, and much better tolerability and safety profiles. Limitations may include complexity and cost of manufacture of the new compounds. As for any new drug, such compounds will require extensive clinical testing before being introduced for clinical use, and the complexity of such studies, particularly in chronic patients, will be compounded by the current limitations in the verification of true parasitological cures for

  18. Accelerating the development of therapeutic strategies for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vjecha, Michael J; Tiberi, Simon; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2018-03-23

    Recent progress in the discovery, development and evaluation of new drugs and combination regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis through greater collaboration between industry, donors and academia provides renewed hope for overcoming the challenges in tuberculosis treatment.

  19. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors

  20. Linked Open drug data for pharmaceutical research and development

    OpenAIRE

    Samwald M.; Jentzsch A.; Bouton C.; Kallesoe C.S.; Willighagen E.; Hajagos J.; Scott Marshall M.; Prud'hommeaux E.; Hassanzadeh O.; Pichler E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract There is an abundance of information about drugs available on the Web. Data sources range from medicinal chemistry results, over the impact of drugs on gene expression, to the outcomes of drugs in clinical trials. These data are typically not connected together, which reduces the ease with which insights can be gained. Linking Open Drug Data (LODD) is a task force within the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLS IG). LODD has surveyed pu...

  1. Strategy and planning for chemopreventive drug development: clinical development plans. Chemoprevention Branch and Agent Development Committee. National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloff, G J; Crowell, J A; Boone, C W; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; Greenwald, P; Alberts, D S; Covey, J M; Doody, L A; Knapp, G G

    1994-01-01

    At the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, the Chemoprevention Branch and Agent Development Committee develop strategies for efficiently identifying, procuring, and advancing the most promising drugs into clinical trials. Scientific expertise is applied at each phase of development to critically review the testing methods and results, and to establish and apply criteria for evaluating the agents for further development. The Clinical Development Plan, prepared by the Chemoprevention Branch and the Agent Development Committee, is a summary of the status of the agent regarding evidence for safety and chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. It also contains the strategy for further development of the drug that addresses pharmacodynamics, drug effect measurements, intermediate biomarkers for monitoring efficacy, toxicity, supply and formulation, regulatory approval, and proposed clinical trials. Sixteen Clinical Development Plans are presented here: N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), aspirin, calcium, beta-carotene, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), DHEA analog 8354, 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acid, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), ibuprofen, oltipraz, piroxicam, Proscar, sulindac, tamoxifen, vitamin D3 and analogs, and vitamin E. The objective of publishing these plans is to stimulate interest and thinking among the scientific community on the prospects for developing chemopreventive drugs.

  2. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Jan Henje; Lampert, Anette; Hoffmann, Georg F; Ries, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations. Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years) than in the US (4.3 years). Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation.

  3. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Henje Döring

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations.Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE criteria.Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years than in the US (4.3 years.Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation.

  4. Projecting ADME Behavior and Drug-Drug Interactions in Early Discovery and Development: Application of the Extended Clearance Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kattan, Ayman F; Varma, Manthena V; Steyn, Stefan J; Scott, Dennis O; Maurer, Tristan S; Bergman, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    To assess the utility of Extended Clearance Classification System (ECCS) in understanding absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) attributes and enabling victim drug-drug interaction (DDI) predictions. A database of 368 drugs with relevant ADME parameters, main metabolizing enzymes, uptake transporters, efflux transporters, and highest change in exposure (%AUC) in presence of inhibitors was developed using published literature. Drugs were characterized according to ECCS using ionization, molecular weight and estimated permeability. Analyses suggested that ECCS class 1A drugs are well absorbed and systemic clearance is determined by metabolism mediated by CYP2C, esterases, and UGTs. For class 1B drugs, oral absorption is high and the predominant clearance mechanism is hepatic uptake mediated by OATP transporters. High permeability neutral/basic drugs (class 2) showed high oral absorption, with metabolism mediated generally by CYP3A, CYP2D6 and UGTs as the predominant clearance mechanism. Class 3A/4 drugs showed moderate absorption with dominant renal clearance involving OAT/OCT2 transporters. Class 3B drugs showed low to moderate absorption with hepatic uptake (OATPs) and/or renal clearance as primary clearance mechanisms. The highest DDI risk is typically seen with class 2/1B/3B compounds manifested by inhibition of either CYP metabolism or active hepatic uptake. Class 2 showed a wider range in AUC change likely due to a variety of enzymes involved. DDI risk for class 3A/4 is small and associated with inhibition of renal transporters. ECCS provides a framework to project ADME profiles and further enables prediction of victim DDI liabilities in drug discovery and development.

  5. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Complement activation as a bioequivalence issue relevant to the development of generic liposomes and other nanoparticulate drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szebeni, Janos, E-mail: jszebeni2@gmail.com [Nanomedicine Research and Education Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest & SeroScience Ltd, Budapest (Hungary); Storm, Gert [Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-12-18

    Liposomes are known to activate the complement (C) system, which can lead in vivo to a hypersensitivity syndrome called C activation-related pseudoallergy (CARPA). CARPA has been getting increasing attention as a safety risk of i.v. therapy with liposomes, whose testing is now recommended in bioequivalence evaluations of generic liposomal drug candidates. This review highlights the adverse consequences of C activation, the unique symptoms of CARPA triggered by essentially all i.v. administered liposomal drugs, and the various features of vesicles influencing this adverse immune effect. For the case of Doxil, we also address the mechanism of C activation and the opsonization vs. long circulation (stealth) paradox. In reviewing the methods of assessing C activation and CARPA, we delineate the most sensitive porcine model and an algorithm for stepwise evaluation of the CARPA risk of i.v. liposomes, which are proposed for standardization for preclinical toxicology evaluation of liposomal and other nanoparticulate drug candidates. - Highlights: • Outlining of difficulties in generic development of liposomal drugs. • New regulatory requirements to evaluate CARPA in preclinical studies. • Review of complement activation by liposomes and its adverse consequences (CARPA). • Assays of C activation in vitro and CARPA in vivo, with the porcine test in focus. • Decision tree how to handle the risk of CARPA assessed by a battery of tests.

  7. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Mooij (Miriam); A.T. Nies (Anne T.); C.A.J. Knibbe (Catherijne); E. Schaeffeler (Elke); D. Tibboel (Dick); M. Schwab (Matthias); S.N. de Wildt (Saskia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMembrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown

  8. Paediatric Drug Development and Formulation Design-a European Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nales, D.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/174866968; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Aylward, Brian; de Vries, Rutger; Egberts, Toine C G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162850050; Rademaker, Carin M A; Schobben, Alfred F A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068352735

    The availability of licensed paediatric drugs is lagging behind those for adults, and there is a lack of safe formulations in suitable doses that children are able and willing to take. As a consequence, children are commonly treated with off-label or unlicensed drugs. As off-label and unlicensed

  9. Paediatric Drug Development and Formulation Design—a European Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riet-Nales, Diana A.; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Aylward, Brian; de Vries, Rutger; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; Schobben, Alfred F A M

    The availability of licensed paediatric drugs is lagging behind those for adults, and there is a lack of safe formulations in suitable doses that children are able and willing to take. As a consequence, children are commonly treated with off-label or unlicensed drugs. As off-label and unlicensed

  10. Homelessness and drug misuse in developing countries: A mathematical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunu, C. P.

    2014-06-01

    Homelessness and drug-misuse are known to exist like siamese twins. We present a model to capture the dynamics in the growth in the number of homeless (street kids and street adults) and drug misusers. The reproduction numbers of the model are determined and analyzed. Results from this study suggests that adult peer pressure plays a more significant role in the growth of drug-misuse and the number of street kids. This result suggests that in resource constrained settings intervention strategies should be tailor made to target adults whose behaviour influence others to misuse drugs and abuse children. Furthermore, numerical simulations show that homelessness and drug-misuse positively enhances, the growth of each other. Thus, to effectively control these two social problems require strategies targeting both of them.

  11. Linked open drug data for pharmaceutical research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samwald Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an abundance of information about drugs available on the Web. Data sources range from medicinal chemistry results, over the impact of drugs on gene expression, to the outcomes of drugs in clinical trials. These data are typically not connected together, which reduces the ease with which insights can be gained. Linking Open Drug Data (LODD is a task force within the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLS IG. LODD has surveyed publicly available data about drugs, created Linked Data representations of the data sets, and identified interesting scientific and business questions that can be answered once the data sets are connected. The task force provides recommendations for the best practices of exposing data in a Linked Data representation. In this paper, we present past and ongoing work of LODD and discuss the growing importance of Linked Data as a foundation for pharmaceutical R&D data sharing.

  12. Linked open drug data for pharmaceutical research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwald, Matthias; Jentzsch, Anja; Bouton, Christopher; Kallesøe, Claus Stie; Willighagen, Egon; Hajagos, Janos; Marshall, M Scott; Prud'hommeaux, Eric; Hassenzadeh, Oktie; Pichler, Elgar; Stephens, Susie

    2011-05-16

    There is an abundance of information about drugs available on the Web. Data sources range from medicinal chemistry results, over the impact of drugs on gene expression, to the outcomes of drugs in clinical trials. These data are typically not connected together, which reduces the ease with which insights can be gained. Linking Open Drug Data (LODD) is a task force within the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLS IG). LODD has surveyed publicly available data about drugs, created Linked Data representations of the data sets, and identified interesting scientific and business questions that can be answered once the data sets are connected. The task force provides recommendations for the best practices of exposing data in a Linked Data representation. In this paper, we present past and ongoing work of LODD and discuss the growing importance of Linked Data as a foundation for pharmaceutical R&D data sharing.

  13. Drug-Induced Apoptosis: Mechanism by which Alcohol and Many Other Drugs Can Disrupt Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Olney

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Maternal ingestion of alcohol during pregnancy can cause a disability syndrome termed Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD, which may include craniofacial malformations, structural pathology in the brain, and a variety of long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances. There is compelling evidence that exposure to alcohol during early embryogenesis (4th week of gestation can cause excessive death of cell populations that are essential for normal development of the face and brain. While this can explain craniofacial malformations and certain structural brain anomalies that sometimes accompany FASD, in many cases these features are absent, and the FASD syndrome manifests primarily as neurobehavioral disorders. It is not clear from the literature how alcohol causes these latter manifestations. In this review we will describe a growing body of evidence documenting that alcohol triggers widespread apoptotic death of neurons and oligodendroglia (OLs in the developing brain when administered to animals, including non-human primates, during a period equivalent to the human third trimester of gestation. This cell death reaction is associated with brain changes, including overall or regional reductions in brain mass, and long-term neurobehavioral disturbances. We will also review evidence that many drugs used in pediatric and obstetric medicine, including general anesthetics (GAs and anti-epileptics (AEDs, mimic alcohol in triggering widespread apoptotic death of neurons and OLs in the third trimester-equivalent animal brain, and that human children exposed to GAs during early infancy, or to AEDs during the third trimester of gestation, have a significantly increased incidence of FASD-like neurobehavioral disturbances. These findings provide evidence that exposure of the developing human brain to GAs in early infancy, or to alcohol or AEDs in late gestation, can cause FASD-like neurodevelopmental disability syndromes. We propose that the mechanism by which

  14. PCSK9: Regulation and Target for Drug Development for Dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Amy C; Dron, Jacqueline S; Hegele, Robert A; Huff, Murray W

    2017-01-06

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9) is a secreted zymogen expressed primarily in the liver. PCSK9 circulates in plasma, binds to cell surface low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, is internalized, and then targets the receptors to lysosomal degradation. Studies of naturally occurring PCSK9 gene variants that caused extreme plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) deviations and altered atherosclerosis risk unleashed a torrent of biological and pharmacological research. Rapid progress in understanding the physiological regulation of PCSK9 was soon translated into commercially available biological inhibitors of PCSK9 that reduced LDL-C levels and likely also cardiovascular outcomes. Here we review the swift evolution of PCSK9 from novel gene to drug target, to animal and human testing, and finally to outcome trials and clinical applications. In addition, we explore how the genetics-guided path to PCSK9 inhibitor development exemplifies a new paradigm in pharmacology. Finally, we consider some potential challenges as PCSK9 inhibition becomes established in the clinic.

  15. Cdc7 kinase - a new target for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; O'Dwyer, Michael; Santocanale, Corrado; Kelly, Kevin; Carew, Jennifer; Giles, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The cell division cycle 7 (Cdc7) is a serine threonine kinase that is of critical importance in the regulation of normal cell cycle progression. Cdc7 kinase is highly conserved during evolution and much has been learned about its biological roles in humans through the study of lower eukaryotes, particularly yeasts. Two important regulator proteins, Dbf4 and Drf1, bind to and modulate the kinase activity of human Cdc7 which phosphorylates several sites on Mcm2 (minichromosome maintenance protein 2), one of the six subunits of the replicative DNA helicase needed for duplication of the genome. Through regulation of both DNA synthesis and DNA damage response, both key functions in the survival of tumour cells, Cdc7 becomes an attractive target for pharmacological inhibition. There are much data available on the pre-clinical anti-cancer effects of Cdc7 depletion and although there are no available Cdc7 inhibitors in clinical trials as yet, several lead compounds are being optimised for this purpose. In this review, we will address the current status of Cdc7 as an important target for new drug development.

  16. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    OpenAIRE

    Pignatello, R.; Musumeci, T.; Basile, L.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physi...

  17. Research synergy and drug development: Bright stars in neighboring constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keserci, Samet; Livingston, Eric; Wan, Lingtian; Pico, Alexander R; Chacko, George

    2017-11-01

    Drug discovery and subsequent availability of a new breakthrough therapeutic or 'cure' is a compelling example of societal benefit from research advances. These advances are invariably collaborative, involving the contributions of many scientists to a discovery network in which theory and experiment are built upon. To document and understand such scientific advances, data mining of public and commercial data sources coupled with network analysis can be used as a digital methodology to assemble and analyze component events in the history of a therapeutic. This methodology is extensible beyond the history of therapeutics and its use more generally supports (i) efficiency in exploring the scientific history of a research advance (ii) documenting and understanding collaboration (iii) portfolio analysis, planning and optimization (iv) communication of the societal value of research. Building upon prior art, we have conducted a case study of five anti-cancer therapeutics to identify the collaborations that resulted in the successful development of these therapeutics both within and across their respective networks. We have linked the work of over 235,000 authors in roughly 106,000 scientific publications that capture the research crucial for the development of these five therapeutics. Applying retrospective citation discovery, we have identified a core set of publications cited in the networks of all five therapeutics and additional intersections in combinations of networks. We have enriched the content of these networks by annotating them with information on research awards from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). Lastly, we have mapped these awards to their cognate peer review panels, identifying another layer of collaborative scientific activity that influenced the research represented in these networks.

  18. Research synergy and drug development: Bright stars in neighboring constellations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Keserci

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and subsequent availability of a new breakthrough therapeutic or ‘cure’ is a compelling example of societal benefit from research advances. These advances are invariably collaborative, involving the contributions of many scientists to a discovery network in which theory and experiment are built upon. To document and understand such scientific advances, data mining of public and commercial data sources coupled with network analysis can be used as a digital methodology to assemble and analyze component events in the history of a therapeutic. This methodology is extensible beyond the history of therapeutics and its use more generally supports (i efficiency in exploring the scientific history of a research advance (ii documenting and understanding collaboration (iii portfolio analysis, planning and optimization (iv communication of the societal value of research. Building upon prior art, we have conducted a case study of five anti-cancer therapeutics to identify the collaborations that resulted in the successful development of these therapeutics both within and across their respective networks. We have linked the work of over 235,000 authors in roughly 106,000 scientific publications that capture the research crucial for the development of these five therapeutics. Applying retrospective citation discovery, we have identified a core set of publications cited in the networks of all five therapeutics and additional intersections in combinations of networks. We have enriched the content of these networks by annotating them with information on research awards from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH. Lastly, we have mapped these awards to their cognate peer review panels, identifying another layer of collaborative scientific activity that influenced the research represented in these networks. Keywords: Information science, Cancer research

  19. Summary of highlights of the international conference of the United Nations on the environment and the development (CNUMAD) or summit of the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, Juanita

    1996-01-01

    In June of 1992, Rio de Janeiro became headquarters of the most impressive international summit that, from 1972, when it was carried out in Stockholm the first international meeting on environment, it had been carried out until the moment as regards environment and development: the Conference of the United Nations on environment and Development (CNUMAD). More than 100 state heads and 172 governments official representatives, thousands of members of non-governmental organizations, delegates of the UN and of other international organizations, and representatives of the media from all over the world participated. More than 18.000 participants of all the countries intervened in public forums, seminars and chats, parallel to the official conference. Their preparation lasted two years, from the moment in that the resolution was adopted 44/228 of the UN, in December of 1989 that approved its realization. This conference marked a true historical landmark in the analysis, reflection and agreement of agreements and programmatic bases, guided toward a new form of international cooperation as regards development and environment. If for some the summit was a success, for other it represented a failure. It should be pointed out, however that above all the conference must evaluate as a starting point, not necessarily simple, of an entire process of change in the treatment of the problem of the development. From the beginning of their preparation, the discussions on the conference polarized reflecting a debate of old it dates between the countries of the north and those of the south. Of a side, the developed countries were interested in only discussing the environment topics, while to the countries in development interested them the analysis of their development necessities. During many years, the countries of the south interpreted the controversy like an effort of the countries of the north to deviate the attention of the thematic of the trade and the development, and to escape

  20. A pathway-specific microarray analysis highlights the complex and co-ordinated transcriptional networks of the developing grain of field-grown barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Friis, Carsten; Bowra, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the molecular and biochemical interactions associated with amino acid biosynthesis and storage protein accumulation in the developing grains of field-grown barley. Our strategy was to analyse the transcription of genes associated with the biosynthesis of stora...

  1. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although one Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror...

  2. Fundamental study for development magnetic drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Y.; Akiyama, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2009-01-01

    Side-effects and lowering effects by diffusion of drugs such as anticancer agents is one of the serious issues in medication. To solve this problem, it is necessary to control the drugs quantitatively, spatially and temporally within the human body. Magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is one of the technologies to make it possible, in which the ferromagnetic drug injected into the blood vessel is conducted to diseased part by external magnetic force. As a fundamental experiment, the accumulation experiment using ferromagnetic particles were performed with simulated capillary vessels composed of glass beads channels in this work. Additionally, accumulation calculation of ferromagnetic particles was conducted to check the validity of accumulation experiment. From these result, the 2D distribution of particle accumulation in the experiment corresponded with that of particle accumulation in the calculation. It was suggested that the proper position of magnet should be changed according to the depth of diseased part.

  3. Army Drug Development Program. Phase 1. Clinical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    previous studies of WR 194,965’HTPC^ (an antimalarial of the Mannich base class), the top tolerated single dose in man was...significant. O0NC1IJSION: rto adverse reaction to drug. BMI-MBB 114 INDIVI0IAL FJlIUlxn’ FINAL SUMMARY EXPKRIMfWT ND. 15: QDMriNUATION OF...Other laboratory abnormalities were minimal or inoonnistent and rot considered significant. ODNgjJSION: No .»Iverse reaction to drug

  4. Transdermal Drug Delivery: Innovative Pharmaceutical Developments Based on Disruption of the Barrier Properties of the Stratum Corneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlam Zaid Alkilani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin offers an accessible and convenient site for the administration of medications. To this end, the field of transdermal drug delivery, aimed at developing safe and efficacious means of delivering medications across the skin, has in the past and continues to garner much time and investment with the continuous advancement of new and innovative approaches. This review details the progress and current status of the transdermal drug delivery field and describes numerous pharmaceutical developments which have been employed to overcome limitations associated with skin delivery systems. Advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches are detailed, commercially marketed products are highlighted and particular attention is paid to the emerging field of microneedle technologies.

  5. Surface roughness from highlight structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Rong; Koenderink, Jan J.; Kappers, Astrid M L

    1999-01-01

    Highlights are due to specular reflection and cause the lustrous or mirrorlike appearance of many material surfaces. We investigated in detail the structure of highlight patterns that are due to material surface roughness. We interpret results in terms of a simple model of a random Gaussian surface.

  6. Approaches in topical ocular drug delivery and developments in the use of contact lenses as drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Prina; Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Al-Kinani, Ali; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Chang, Ming-Wei; Alany, Raid G; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2017-07-01

    Drug-delivery approaches have diversified over the last two decades with the emergence of nanotechnologies, smart polymeric systems and multimodal functionalities. The intended target for specific treatment of disease is the key defining developing parameter. One such area which has undergone significant advancements relates to ocular delivery. This has been expedited by the development of material advancement, mechanistic concepts and through the deployment of advanced process technologies. This review will focus on the developments within lens-based drug delivery while touching on conventional and current methods of topical ocular drug delivery. A summary table will provide quick reference to note the key findings in this area. In addition, the review also elucidates current theranostic and diagnostic approaches based on ocular lenses.

  7. Design, development and optimization of selfmicroemulsifying drug delivery system of an anti-obesity drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagruti Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to formulate a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS containing orlistat. The oil, surfactant and co-surfactant were decided based on the solubility studies. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were plotted, microemulsification area was determined and different formulations were prepared. Particle size, zeta potential, dispersibility test and thermodynamic stability studies were measured. In-vitro dissolution test of thermodynamically stable formulations OS-B and OS-C were carried and results were compared with those of plain drug and suspension formulation. Stability studies performed indicated that formulation OS-C remained stable over 12 months period. Thus this investigation concluded that hydrophobic drugs like orlistat can be delivered effectively through the formulation of SMEDDS.

  8. Platelet-activating factor podoplanin: from discovery to drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Ai; Miyata, Kenichi; Fujita, Naoya

    2017-06-01

    Tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation facilitates hematogenous metastasis by promoting tumor embolization, preventing immunological assaults and shear stress, and the platelet-releasing growth factors support tumor growth and invasion. Podoplanin, also known as Aggrus, is a type I transmembrane mucin-like glycoprotein and is expressed on wide range of tumor cells. Podoplanin has a role in platelet aggregation and metastasis formation through the binding to its platelet receptor, C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The podoplanin research was originally started from the cloning of highly metastatic NL-17 subclone from mouse colon 26 cancer cell line and from the establishment of 8F11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) that could neutralize NL-17-induced platelet aggregation and hematogenous metastasis. Later on, podoplanin was identified as the antigen of 8F11 mAb, and its ectopic expression brought to cells the platelet-aggregating abilities and hematogenous metastasis phenotypes. From the 8F11 mAb recognition epitopes, podoplanin is found to contain tandemly repeated, highly conserved motifs, designated platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domains. Series of analyses using the cells expressing the mutants and the established neutralizing anti-podoplanin mAbs uncovered that both PLAG3 and PLAG4 domains are associated with the CLEC-2 binding. The neutralizing mAbs targeting PLAG3 or PLAG4 could suppress podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and hematogenous metastasis through inhibiting the podoplanin-CLEC-2 binding. Therefore, these domains are certainly functional in podoplanin-mediated metastasis through its platelet-aggregating activity. This review summarizes the platelet functions in metastasis formation, the role of platelet aggregation-inducing factor podoplanin in pathological and physiological situations, and the possibility to develop podoplanin-targeting drugs in the future.

  9. Genetically Defined Strains in Drug Development and Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festing, Michael F W

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern about the poor quality and lack of repeatability of many pre-clinical experiments involving laboratory animals. According to one estimate as much as $28 billion is wasted annually in the USA alone in such studies. A decade ago the FDA's "Critical path" white paper noted that "The traditional tools used to assess product safety-animal toxicology and outcomes from human studies-have changed little over many decades and have largely not benefited from recent gains in scientific knowledge. The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing." Repeat-dose 28-days and 90-days toxicity tests in rodents have been widely used as part of a strategy to assess the safety of drugs and chemicals but their repeatability and power to detect adverse effects have not been formally evaluated.The guidelines (OECD TG 407 and 408) for these tests specify the dose levels and number of animals per dose but do not specify the strain of animals which should be used. In practice, almost all the tests are done using genetically undefined "albino" rats or mice in which the genetic variation, a major cause of inter-individual and strain variability, is unknown and uncontrolled. This chapter suggests that a better strategy would be to use small numbers of animals of several genetically defined strains of mice or rats instead of the undefined animals used at present. Inbred strains are more stable providing more repeatable data than outbred stocks. Importantly their greater phenotypic uniformity should lead to more powerful and repeatable tests. Any observed strain differences would indicate genetic variation in response to the test substance, providing key data. We suggest that the FDA and other regulators and funding organizations should support research to evaluate this alternative.

  10. Sex, drugs and sports: prostaglandins, epitestosterone and sexual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Bryan K

    2007-01-01

    Amateau and McCarthy's findings published in Nature Neuroscience (June 2004) are noteworthy for suggesting a role for prostaglandins in sexual development. However, evidence suggests that in manipulating PGE2, they unknowingly implicated 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [E.C. 1.1.1.50], 3(or 17)alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [E.C. 1.1.1.209] and their respective products, androsterone (ADT) and epitestosterone (EpiT), in the developmental masculinization of sex behavior. EpiT is generally regarded as a hormonally inactive 17alpha-epimer of testosterone (T). In rats, the kidney is the primary site of EpiT formation, whereas in humans it originates from the gonads, with only a small contribution secreted by the adrenals. Because the ratio of T to EpiT is nearly constant, it is presently used for assessing steroid abuse in competitive sports, where the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) considers a T/EpiT ratio >4 evidence of T doping. Despite its central role in the detection of illict anabolic steroid use, our knowledge of factors effecting EpiT production is poor. Clues in the literature, however, reveal that prostaglandin-mediated processes, such as LHRH release, may influence its production. Antimycotics, NSAIDs, and opioid analgesics used in sports medicine are all known to effect prostaglandin E2 synthesis. Primary PGs are potent inhibitors of ADT oxidation, while indomethacin, a prostaglandin blocker, powerfully inhibits 3alpha-HSD reduction and ADT oxidation. This is significant because ADT inhibits the oxidation of EpiT, and may modulate its antiandrogenic and neuroprotective effects. It is hypothesized that the T/EpiT ratio is increased by COX-2 inhibitors and opiod analgesics, and decreased by antimycotics that do not impair testosterone biosynthesis. Given the devastating personal and career consequences that may result from false positive drug tests, substantive research on the effects of PGE2 manipulations on EpiT is warranted.

  11. Mechanisms Underlying the Risk to Develop Drug Addiction, Insights From Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ryvkin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adapt to environmental changes is an essential feature of biological systems, achieved in animals by a coordinated crosstalk between neuronal and hormonal programs that allow rapid and integrated organismal responses. Reward systems play a key role in mediating this adaptation by reinforcing behaviors that enhance immediate survival, such as eating or drinking, or those that ensure long-term survival, such as sexual behavior or caring for offspring. Drugs of abuse co-opt neuronal and molecular pathways that mediate natural rewards, which under certain circumstances can lead to addiction. Many factors can contribute to the transition from drug use to drug addiction, highlighting the need to discover mechanisms underlying the progression from initial drug use to drug addiction. Since similar responses to natural and drug rewards are present in very different animals, it is likely that the central systems that process reward stimuli originated early in evolution, and that common ancient biological principles and genes are involved in these processes. Thus, the neurobiology of natural and drug rewards can be studied using simpler model organisms that have their systems stripped of some of the immense complexity that exists in mammalian brains. In this paper we review studies in Drosophila melanogaster that model different aspects of natural and drug rewards, with an emphasis on how motivational states shape the value of the rewarding experience, as an entry point to understanding the mechanisms that contribute to the vulnerability of drug addiction.

  12. The effect size, study design, and development experience in commercially sponsored studies for new drug applications in approved drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Satoshi; Kusama, Makiko; Ono, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies incorporate different features into the trials for new drug applications (NDAs) to render them efficient, making use of their experience. The objective of this analysis was to examine the associations between outcome and features related to study design and clinical development experience in commercially sponsored clinical trials. We collected data of phase 2 and phase 3 trials of all the drugs that obtained approval for depression, schizophrenia, asthma, hypertension, and diabetes in Japan from 1970 to 2011. In total, 145 trials from 90 test drugs were eligible for our study. We calculated the effect size, the standard mean of differences between test drug and comparator therapeutic effects, as the objective variable for use in our analysis. A linear mixed effect model with nested and crossed random effects was used in the analysis including variety of therapeutic area, test drugs and clinical trials. The analysis showed that trial features including sample size, subjective endpoints and active comparator of the same mode of action were negatively associated with effect size. In addition, sponsors' domestic clinical development experience with similar drugs seemed to have a positive association, but prior development experience in foreign countries did not. The accumulation of skills and knowledge within sponsors, and accumulated experience in domestic professionals who implement clinical trials under study contracts with sponsors would be of great importance for yielding clear outcomes. This study provides additional evidence with respect to possible sizes and directions of the influence of study design features that must be considered when planning and implementing trials for new drug applications, and when retrospectively comparing outcomes from trials with different designs and environments.

  13. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM particle component(s in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  14. Drug development for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers from 1979 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Nancy A; Khan, Omar F; Imam, Hasiba; Tang, Patricia A; Monzon, Jose; Li, Haocheng; Sun, Gavin; Ezeife, Doreen; Parimi, Sunil; Dowden, Scot; Tam, Vincent C

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the drug development pathway is critical for streamlining the development of effective cancer treatments. The objective of the current study was to delineate the drug development timeline and attrition rate of different drug classes for common cancer disease sites. Drugs entering clinical trials for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer were identified using a pharmaceutical business intelligence database. Data regarding drug characteristics, clinical trials, and approval dates were obtained from the database, clinical trial registries, PubMed, and regulatory Web sites. A total of 411 drugs met the inclusion criteria for breast cancer, 246 drugs met the inclusion criteria for colorectal cancer, and 315 drugs met the inclusion criteria for non-small cell lung cancer. Attrition rates were 83.9% for breast cancer, 87.0% for colorectal cancer, and 92.0% for non-small cell lung cancer drugs. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer, there was a trend toward higher attrition rates for targeted monoclonal antibodies compared with other agents. No tumor site-specific differences were noted with regard to cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory, or small molecule kinase inhibitor drugs. Drugs classified as "others" in breast cancer had lower attrition rates, primarily due to the higher success of hormonal medications. Mean drug development times were 8.9 years for breast cancer, 6.7 years for colorectal cancer, and 6.6 years for non-small cell lung cancer. Overall oncologic drug attrition rates remain high, and drugs are more likely to fail in later-stage clinical trials. The refinement of early-phase trial design may permit the selection of drugs that are more likely to succeed in the phase 3 setting. Cancer 2017;123:4672-4679. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. Development of magnetic drug delivery system using HTS bulk magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, T.; Fukui, S.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is the method which the magnetic seeded drug is injected into a blood vessel and then controlled and accumulated by a magnet located outside of the human body. A high accumulation efficiency of the drug to a local diseased part and reduction in side-effects to normal organs are expected by using MDDS. The most important element in MDDS is a magnetic field generator. The high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnet which can generate high magnetic field and magnetic field gradient extending to a point distant from the magnet in several ten millimeters is necessary to achieve the MDDS. In this study, the computer simulation and model experiment were conducted in order to confirm the applicability of MDDS to ovary of the cow body

  16. Drugs of abuse and increased risk of psychosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Anand; Manning, Elizabeth E; Klug, Maren; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2012-12-01

    There is considerable evidence to suggest that the abuse of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis and methamphetamine, has aetiological roles in the pathogenesis of psychosis and schizophrenia. Factors that may increase susceptibility to the propsychotic effects of these drugs include the age at which the abuse starts as well as family history of genetic polymorphisms relevant to the pathophysiology of this disorder. However, the neurobiological mechanisms involved in drug abuse-associated psychosis remain largely unclear. This paper presents an overview of the available evidence, including clinical, animal model, and molecular studies, with a focus on brain regions and neurotransmitters systems, such as dopamine and glutamate, previously implicated in psychosis. It is clear that further studies are urgently needed to provide a greater insight into the mechanisms that mediate the long-term and neurodevelopmental effects of cannabis and methamphetamine. A dialogue between basic science and clinical research may help to identify at-risk individuals and novel pathways for treatment and prevention.

  17. Development of novel drug delivery prototypes devices for targeted delivery drug therapy at the molecular level in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Oberhozer, Theunis Gerhardus; Perchyonok, Victoria Tamara

    2011-09-01

    A novel approach in target specific molecular prototype drug delivery system concerns the attempt to employ radical affording substances (RAS) or radical quenching substances (RQS) as prodrugs able to produce irreversible damage on the desired target and therefore to stimulate cellular apoptosis. However, radical species generated can react quickly within the chemical environment prior to reaching its proper site of action. In this short communication, we report our investigations towards developing two alternative novel, simple, flexible and effective drug delivery systems that provide optimal dosage of drugs precisely where and when needed and therefore achieve and sustain a complex delivery profile. We have demonstrated the application of two effective molecular prototype delivery systems able to harness free radical reactivity within the laboratory where biological processes can be studied and controlled, leading to the prevention of disease and the development of new treatments for disease states mediated by free radicals.

  18. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app.

  19. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in TPT. These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by fluorescent emission. Here we examine the fluorescence spectra of highlighter inks using green and violet laser pointers. We use an RSpec Explorer spectrometer to obtain spectra and compare the emission spectra of blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and purple highlighters. The website Compound Interest details the chemical composition of highlighter inks; in addition, the site discusses how some base dye colors can be combined to produce the variety commercially available colors. Spectra obtained in this study were qualitatively consistent with the Compound Interest site. We discuss similarities and differences between various highlighter colors and conclude with the relevance of such studies to physics students.

  20. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app

  1. The development of drugs for treatment of sleeping sickness: a historical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steverding Dietmar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Only four drugs are available for the chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness; Suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine. The history of the development of these drugs is well known and documented. suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol were developed in the first half of the last century by the then recently established methods of medicinal chemistry. Eflornithine, originally developed in the 1970s as an anti-cancer drug, became a treatment of sleeping sickness largely by accident. This review summarises the developmental processes which led to these chemotherapies from the discovery of the first bioactive lead compounds to the identification of the final drugs.

  2. Challenges in the clinical development of orphan drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftmeijer-Vegter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Rare diseases are characterised by a low prevalence. There are so many different rare diseases, that millions of people are affected.The vast majority of these diseases suffer from a lack of approved treatment options and orphan drugs (ODs) therefore represent a huge unmet medical need. ODs face

  3. Design and Development of a Proniosomal Transdermal Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proniosomes were characterised by transmission electron microscopy. In vitro studies showed prolonged release of entrapped captopril. At refrigerated conditions, higher drug retention was observed. Conclusion: It is evident from this study that proniosomes are a promising prolonged delivery system for captopril and have ...

  4. Therapeutic Targets for Influenza - Perspectives in Drug Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majerová, Taťána; Hoffman, H.; Majer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2010), s. 81-103 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : influenza * drug research * protein structure * oligonucleotides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  5. Drug-evoked plasticity: do addictive drugs reopen a critical period of postnatal synaptic development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla eBellone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As in other parts of the central nervous system of the mouse, glutamatergic synapses onto dopamine (DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA mature postnatally. At birth many AMPARs lack GluA2R subunit and most NMDARs contain the GluN2B subunit. Within two weeks these receptors are replaced with GluA2- and GluN2A- containing AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively. Recent data suggest that a single injection of cocaine (or another drug of addiction triggers glutamate receptor redistribution with the reappearance of the subunits typically present in immature synapses, as if addictive drugs reopen the developmental critical period. Here we review the experimental evidence for this hypothesis and discuss the implications for circuit function.

  6. Drug-evoked plasticity: do addictive drugs reopen a critical period of postnatal synaptic development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellone, Camilla; Lüscher, Christian

    2012-01-01

    As in other parts of the central nervous system (CNS) of the mouse, glutamatergic synapses onto dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) mature postnatally. At birth many AMPA receptors (AMPARs) lack GluA2R subunit and most NMDARs contain the GluN2B subunit. Within 2 weeks these receptors are replaced with GluA2- and GluN2A- containing AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively. Recent data suggest that a single injection of cocaine (or another drug of addiction) triggers glutamate receptor redistribution with the reappearance of the subunits typically present in immature synapses, as if addictive drugs reopen the developmental critical period. Here we review the experimental evidence for this hypothesis and discuss the implications for circuit function.

  7. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R.; Musumeci, T.; Basile, L.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy. PMID:21430952

  8. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R; Musumeci, T; Basile, L; Carbone, C; Puglisi, G

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy.

  9. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pignatello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy.

  10. [Application of phosphates and phosphonates prodrugs in drug research and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xun; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Lin-Xiang; Jiang, Hua-Liang; Liu, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Based on the character of the molecular structure, the prodrugs of phosphates and phosphonates were divided into two categories. The first is the drug which contained the phosphate group, introducing protected groups to increase lipophilicity and improve bioavailability. The other one is the drug which had no phosphate group, introducing the phosphate group into molecules to enhance the solubility, regulate the distribution coefficient and enhance the drug-like property. This review focuses on the application of phosphates and phosphonates in drug research and development based on improvement of physico-chemical property, drug safety and the pharmacokinetics.

  11. [Development of Internet-based system to collect and provide drug information for patients/consumers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Fuki; Hori, Satoko; Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    For drug fostering and evolution, it is important to collect information directly from patients on the efficacy and safety of drugs as well as patient needs. At present, however, information gathered by healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, or governments is not sufficient. There is concern that patients may fail to recognize the importance of providing information voluntarily. The present study was conducted to provide drug information to patients/consumers, to enlighten them on the importance of providing drug information by themselves, and to develop an Internet website, called "Minkusu," for collecting drug information from patients. This website is based on a registration system (free of charge). It is designed to provide information on proper drug use, and to collect opinions about drugs. As of May 31, 2012, a total of 1149 people had been registered. The male/female ratio of registered members was approximately 1:1, and patients/consumers accounted for 23%. According to the results of a questionnaire survey, several patient/consumer members appreciated the usefulness of the information service, and they took an opportunity to know of the concepts of drug development and evolution (Ikuyaku, in Japanese) through the information services provided by this site. In conclusion, the developed information system would contribute to the proper use of drugs by patients/consumers and to the promotion of drug development and evolution.

  12. Unveiling changes in the landscape of patient populations in cancer early drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro, Cinta; Azaro, Analía; Argilés, Guillem; Elez, Elena; Gómez, Patricia; Carles, Joan; Rodon, Jordi

    2017-02-21

    The introduction of new Molecularly Targeted Agents (MTA) has changed the landscape in Early Drug Development (EDD) over the last two decades, leading to an improvement in clinical trial design. Previous Phase 1 (Ph1) studies with cytotoxics focused on safety objectives, only recruiting heavily pre-treated cancer patients, have been left behind. In this review, we will illustrate the slow although unstoppable change that has increasingly been observed in those populations candidate to participate in EDD trials with the advent of MTA. As more evidence regarding oncogene addiction becomes available, molecular-biomarker driven selection has been implemented among Molecularly-Selected Population (MSP) studies. New Window-Of-Opportunity (WOO) and Phase 0 (Ph0) studies have been developed in order to assess whether a MTA produces the hypothetical proposed biological effect. The rising need of getting early pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics data has led to the conduction of Healthy Volunteer (HV) studies, in part favoured for the particular and different toxicity profile of these MTA. However, several challenges will need to be addressed in order to boost the implementation of these new clinical trial designs in the forthcoming years. Among the problems to overcome, we would highlight a better coordination effort between centers for ensuring adequate patient accrual among small patient populations and a deepening into the ethics implied in enrolling patients in studies with no therapeutic intent. However, these tribulations will be certainly compensated by the possibility of opening a new horizon of treatment for diseases with dismal prognosis.

  13. Development of PLGA–PEG encapsulated miltefosine based drug delivery system against visceral leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rishikesh; Sahoo, Ganesh Chandra [Biomedical and Nanomedicine Department, Rajendra Memorial Research Institute Medical Science (ICMR) (India); Pandey, Krishna; Das, V.N.R.; Topno, Roshan K. [Clinical Medicine Department, Rajendra Memorial Research Institute Medical Science (ICMR) (India); Ansari, Md Yousuf [Pharmacoinformatics Department, National Institute Pharmaceutica Research and Education Industrial Area, Hajipur (India); Rana, Sindhuprava [Biomedical and Nanomedicine Department, Rajendra Memorial Research Institute Medical Science (ICMR) (India); Das, Pradeep [Molecular Biology Department, Rajendra Memorial Research Institute Medical Science (ICMR) (India)

    2016-02-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems are ideal technology to increase the maximum mechanism of action with smaller dose, we have developed miltefosine encapsulated PLGA–PEG nanoparticles (PPEM) to target macrophage of infected tissues against Leishmania donovani. The structural characterization of PLGA–PEG by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has shown a size range of 10 to 15 nm. Synthesis and drug encapsulation confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and confirmed NP encapsulation. The dose of nano encapsulated miltefosine decreased by fifty percent as compared to that of a conventional miltefosine and Amphoterecin B. The inhibition of amastigotes in the splenic tissue with nano encapsulated miltefosine (23.21 ± 23) was significantly more than the conventional miltefosine (89.22 ± 52.7) and Amphoterecin B (94.12 ± 55.1). This study signifies that there is an increased contact surface area of the nano encapsulated drug and significant reduction in size, improved the efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo study than that of the conventional miltefosine, Amphoterecin B. - Graphical abstract: The analyses of detailed structure characterized by TEM and DLS confirmed the nano-size of the particle 10–20 nm and FTIR confirmed for antileishmanial drug encapsulation in to PLGA–PEG. The dose of miltefosine is decreased by fifty percent as the IC50 value is decreased from 0.2 to 0.1 μg. Further inhibitions of amastigotes in the splenic tissue with these nanoparticles are significantly more than the conventional miltefosine and PLGA–PEG encapsulated Amphoterecin B (23.21 ± 23/89.09 ± 52.7/92.12 ± 55.1). - Highlights: • Synthesis of PLGA-PEG encapsulated miltefosine nanoparticles has been done. • An IC50 value of PPEM (0.1 ug/ml), miltefosine (0.2 μg/ml) and AmpB (1 μg/ml) were observed two fold better efficacies. • Inhibition of amastigotes of PPEM (23.21 ± 23) was significantly more than

  14. Probing suitable therapeutic nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery and diagnostic reproductive health biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Rakhi [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); National Institute of Animal Welfare, Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Faridabad, Haryana 121 004 (India); Jha, Pradeep K., E-mail: jha.rk.pk@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Gupta, Santosh; Bhuvaneshwaran, S.P. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Hossain, Maidul [Department of Chemistry & Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102 (India); Guha, Sujoy K. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2016-04-01

    Nanomaterial mediated drug delivery represents a highly promising technique while its selectivity for reproductive healthcare application still remains a challenge. Since the delicate structure and functional role of reproductive tissue and gametes require the use of biocompatible nanomedicine/devices that do not affect fertility or the development of resulting offspring, this paper reports an intercomparative study of human spermatozoa interaction with three different nanoparticles (NPs) namely; iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4)}, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and graphene platelet nanopowder (GPN) to probe their suitability for drug delivery carrier and biomarker development purposes. ATR–FTIR results revealed that the sperm cell interaction with GPN had maximum amide I absorption for cell proteins and C=O stretching of the peptide backbone at the band around 1657 cm{sup −1} followed by iron oxide NPs whereas MWCNT had no absorption. These results showed that GPN followed by iron oxide NPs got maximally entrapped by cell membrane protein with maximum disruption but MWCNT exhibited less entrapment but significantly higher internalization which was further validated by morphological analysis of these cell NP interaction by SEM, HRTEM and fluorescence microscopy. The uptake kinetics and penetration mechanism of NPs were examined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Interestingly, ITC results confirmed ATR–FTIR and morphological observations that the binding of GPN and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs with cell was exothermic and their bindings were favored by both negative enthalpy and positive entropy whereas in the case of MWCNT it was endothermic supported by unfavorable positive enthalpy and a favorable entropy change. Hence, it was evident that MWCNT had better internalization efficiency without disrupting the sperm lipid membrane compared to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and GPN NPs. Therefore, this work proposes CNT as promising means. - Highlights: • Biophysical

  15. Utilization of the Bridging Strategy for the Development of New Drugs in Oncology to Avoid Drug Lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Seiji; Koyama, Nobuyuki; Hidaka, Shinji

    2017-11-01

    Global trial (GT) strategy and bridging (BG) strategy are currently the main clinical development strategies of oncology drugs in Japan, but the relationship between development style and drug lag and how the bridging strategy has contributed to the solution of drug lag have not been clear. We investigated the potential factors that influenced submission lag (SL), and also compared the differences in SL among early-initiation BG strategy, late-initiation BG strategy, and GT strategy. A stepwise linear regression analysis identified the potential factors that shorten SL: development start lag and development style. Comparison of the differences in SL among the strategies also indicated that the SL in the GT strategy and that in the early-initiation BG strategy were significantly shorter than that in the late-initiation BG strategy. The findings in our study suggest that the late-initiation BG strategy may not contribute to shortening drug lag. Because the number of late-initiation BG studies has not decreased, we propose first that pharmaceutical companies should initiate clinical development as early as possible in Japan so that they can choose the GT strategy as a first option at the next step, and second when they cannot choose the GT strategy after investigating differences in exposure between Japanese and non-Japanese in a phase 1 study, they should select the early BG strategy to avoid future drug lag. It is also important for the regulatory authorities to provide reasonable guidance to have a positive impact on strategic decisions, even for foreign-capital companies. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-01-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. - Highlights: • Herein, we have synthesized boron-modified diblock copolymer. • Bpin-PLA-PEOz, which will be served as new boron containing vehicle for transporting the boron drug. • This boron containing Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle was low toxicity can be applied to drug delivery

  17. Biomarkers in early phase development of central nervous system drugs : a conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Jeroen-Paul van der

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a conceptual framework for the use of Central Nervous System (CNS) biomarkers in early phase clinical drug development. In the Introduction the current use of biomarkers in early CNS drug development is discussed. A conceptual framework for the

  18. 78 FR 66744 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of the draft guidance is to assist sponsors in the development...-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in processing your requests. See the SUPPLEMENTARY... Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR...

  19. Development of polycationic amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Varan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paclitaxel is a potent anticancer drug that is effective against a wide spectrum of cancers. To overcome its bioavailability problems arising from very poor aqueous solubility and tendency to recrystallize upon dilution, paclitaxel is commercially formulated with co-solvents such as Cremophor EL® that are known to cause serious side effects during chemotherapy. Amphiphilic cyclodextrins are favored oligosaccharides as drug delivery systems for anticancer drugs, having the ability to spontaneously form nanoparticles without surfactant or co-solvents. In the past few years, polycationic, amphiphilic cyclodextrins were introduced as effective agents for gene delivery in the form of nanoplexes. In this study, the potential of polycationic, amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles were evaluated in comparison to non-ionic amphiphilic cyclodextrins and core–shell type cyclodextrin nanoparticles for paclitaxel delivery to breast tumors. Pre-formulation studies were used as a basis for selecting the suitable organic solvent and surfactant concentration for the novel polycationic cyclodextrin nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were then extensively characterized with particle size distribution, polydispersity index, zeta potential, drug loading capacity, in vitro release profiles and cytotoxicity studies.Results: Paclitaxel-loaded cyclodextrin nanoparticles were obtained in the diameter range of 80−125 nm (depending on the nature of the cyclodextrin derivative where the smallest diameter nanoparticles were obtained with polycationic (PC βCDC6. A strong positive charge also helped to increase the loading capacity of the nanoparticles with paclitaxel up to 60%. Interestingly, cyclodextrin nanoparticles were able to stabilize paclitaxel in aqueous solution for 30 days. All blank cyclodextrin nanoparticles were demonstrated to be non-cytotoxic against L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. In addition, paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles have a

  20. Biotransformation and bioactivation reactions - 2015 literature highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Thomas A; Dalvie, Deepak; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Cyrus Khojasteh, S

    2016-05-01

    Since 1972, Drug Metabolism Reviews has been recognized as one of the principal resources for researchers in pharmacological, pharmaceutical and toxicological fields to keep abreast of advances in drug metabolism science in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. With a distinguished list of authors and editors, the journal covers topics ranging from relatively mature fields, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, to a variety of emerging fields. We hope to continue this tradition with the current compendium of mini-reviews that highlight novel biotransformation processes that were published during the past year. Each review begins with a summary of the article followed by our comments on novel aspects of the research and their biological implications. This collection of highlights is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather to be illustrative of recent research that provides new insights or approaches that advance the field of drug metabolism. Abbreviations NAPQI N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine ALDH aldehyde dehydrogenase AO aldehyde oxidase AKR aldo-keto reductase CES carboxylesterase CSB cystathionine β-synthase CSE cystathionine γ-lyase P450 cytochrome P450 DHPO 2,3-dihydropyridin-4-one ESI electrospray FMO flavin monooxygenase GSH glutathione GSSG glutathione disulfide ICPMS inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry i.p. intraperitoneal MDR multidrug-resistant NNAL 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol NNK 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone oaTOF orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight PBK physiologically based kinetic PCP pentachlorophenol SDR short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SULT sulfotransferase TB tuberculosis.

  1. The Sacramento Dependency Drug Court: development and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Sharon M; Young, Nancy K; Moore, Toni; DiPirro-Beard, Sharon

    2007-05-01

    Dependency Drug Courts (DDCs) are a growing method of addressing the functional status and reunification success of families involved in child welfare and affected by substance use disorders. Despite widespread interest in DDCs, few evaluations have appeared in the literature to help inform the discussion about their effectiveness. This article provides a description of various types of DDCs and reports 24-month reunification rates from the Sacramento DDC. Results indicated that DDC participants had higher rates of treatment participation than did comparison participants. In addition, at 24 months, 42% of the DDC children had reunified versus 27.2% of the comparison children. There were no differences in treatment completion or child reunification rates by parent's primary drug problem. Rates of recidivism were extremely low for both the DDC and comparison groups and did not differ significantly. The results of the present study are encouraging and suggest that rigorous, controlled studies are merited to further evaluate the effectiveness of DDCs.

  2. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Earth Sciences Division in atmospheric science research. Figure 1.1 shows the 20-year record of peer-reviewed publications and proposals among the various Laboratories. This data shows that the scientific work being conducted in the Laboratories is competitive with the work being done elsewhere in universities and other government agencies. The office of Deputy Director for Atmospheric Research will strive to maintain this record by rigorously monitoring and promoting quality while emphasizing coordination and integration among atmospheric disciplines. Also, an appropriate balance will be maintained between the scientists' responsibility for large collaborative projects and missions and their need to carry out active science research as a principal investigator. This balance allows members of the Laboratories to improve their scientific credentials, and develop leadership potentials. Interdisciplinary research is carried out in collaboration with other laboratories and research groups within the Earth Sciences Division, across the Sciences and Exploration Directorate, and with partners in universities and other government agencies. Members of the Laboratories interact with the general public to support a wide range of interests in the atmospheric sciences. Among other activities, the Laboratories raise the public's awareness of atmospheric science by presenting public lectures and demonstrations, by making scientific data available to wide audiences, by teaching, and by mentoring students and teachers. The Atmosphere Laboratories make substantial efforts to attract and recruit new scientists to the various areas of atmospheric research. We strongly encourage the establishment of partnerships with Federal and state agencies that have operational responsibilities to promote the societal application of our science products. This report describes our role in NASA's mission, provides highlights of our research scope and activities, and summarizes our scientists' major

  3. The importance of greater speed in drug development for advanced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David J; Stewart, Andrew A; Wheatley-Price, Paul; Batist, Gerald; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Schiller, Joan; Clemons, Mark; Bradford, John-Peter; Gillespie, Laurel; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2018-03-30

    It takes on average 6-12 years to develop new anticancer drugs from discovery to approval. Effective new agents prolong survival. To demonstrate the importance of rapid drug approval, we calculated life-years potentially saved if selected agents were approved more rapidly. As illustrative examples, we used 27 trials documenting improvements in survival. We multiplied improvement in median survival by numbers of patients dying annually and multiplied this by number of years from drug discovery until approval. For every year by which time to drug approval could have been shortened, there would have been a median number of life-years potentially saved of 79,920 worldwide per drug. Median number of life-years lost between time of drug discovery and approval was 1,020,900 per example. If we were able to use available opportunities to decrease the time required to take a drug from discovery to approval to 5 years, the median number of life-years saved per example would have been 523,890 worldwide. Various publications have identified opportunities to speed drug development without sacrificing patient safety. While many investigational drugs prove to be ineffective, some significantly prolong survival and/or reduce suffering. These illustrative examples suggest that a substantial number of life-years could potentially be saved by increasing the efficiency of development of new drugs for advanced malignancies. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Drug-evoked plasticity: do addictive drugs reopen a critical period of postnatal synaptic development?

    OpenAIRE

    Bellone, Camilla; Lüscher, Christian

    2012-01-01

    As in other parts of the central nervous system (CNS) of the mouse, glutamatergic synapses onto dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) mature postnatally. At birth many AMPA receptors (AMPARs) lack GluA2R subunit and most NMDARs contain the GluN2B subunit. Within 2 weeks these receptors are replaced with GluA2- and GluN2A- containing AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively. Recent data suggest that a single injection of cocaine (or another drug of addiction) triggers glutamate rece...

  5. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  6. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y., E-mail: frank.hsieh@nextcea.com

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  7. Drug-polymer solubility and miscibility: Stability consideration and practical challenges in amorphous solid dispersion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Huang, Jun; Hussain, Munir A

    2010-07-01

    Drug-polymer solid dispersion has been demonstrated as a feasible approach to formulate poorly water-soluble drugs in the amorphous form, for the enhancement of dissolution rate and bioperformance. The solubility (for crystalline drug) and miscibility (for amorphous drug) in the polymer are directly related to the stabilization of amorphous drug against crystallization. Therefore, it is important for pharmaceutical scientists to rationally assess solubility and miscibility in order to select the optimal formulation (e.g., polymer type, drug loading, etc.) and recommend storage conditions, with respect to maximizing the physical stability. This commentary attempts to discuss the concepts and implications of the drug-polymer solubility and miscibility on the stabilization of solid dispersions, review recent literatures, and propose some practical strategies for the evaluation and development of such systems utilizing a working diagram. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  8. Data-intensive drug development in the information age: applications of Systems Biology/Pharmacology/Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosawa, Naoki; Manabe, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies continuously face challenges to deliver new drugs with true medical value. R&D productivity of drug development projects depends on 1) the value of the drug concept and 2) data and in-depth knowledge that are used rationally to evaluate the drug concept's validity. A model-based data-intensive drug development approach is a key competitive factor used by innovative pharmaceutical companies to reduce information bias and rationally demonstrate the value of drug concepts. Owing to the accumulation of publicly available biomedical information, our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases has developed considerably; it is the basis for identifying the right drug target and creating a drug concept with true medical value. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of disease animal models can also be improved; it can thus support rational extrapolation of animal experiment results to clinical settings. The Systems Biology approach, which leverages publicly available transcriptome data, is useful for these purposes. Furthermore, applying Systems Pharmacology enables dynamic simulation of drug responses, from which key research questions to be addressed in the subsequent studies can be adequately informed. Application of Systems Biology/Pharmacology to toxicology research, namely Systems Toxicology, should considerably improve the predictability of drug-induced toxicities in clinical situations that are difficult to predict from conventional preclinical toxicology studies. Systems Biology/Pharmacology/Toxicology models can be continuously improved using iterative learn-confirm processes throughout preclinical and clinical drug discovery and development processes. Successful implementation of data-intensive drug development approaches requires cultivation of an adequate R&D culture to appreciate this approach.

  9. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Cheryl A.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS.

  10. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Cheryl A; Black, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS.

  11. Brookhaven highlights, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The highlights of research conducted between October 1985 and September 1987 at Brookhaven National Laboratory are reviewed in this publication. Also covered are the administrative and financial status of the laboratory and a brief mention of meetings held and honors received. (FI)

  12. The story of artesunate-mefloquine (ASMQ), innovative partnerships in drug development: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Susan; Diap, Graciela; Kiechel, Jean-René

    2013-02-21

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a not-for profit organization committed to providing affordable medicines and access to treatments in resource-poor settings. Traditionally drug development has happened "in house" within pharmaceutical companies, with research and development costs ultimately recuperated through drug sales. The development of drugs for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases requires a completely different model that goes beyond the scope of market-driven research and development. Artesunate and mefloquine are well-established drugs for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, with a strong safety record based on many years of field-based studies and use. The administration of such artemisinin-based combination therapy in a fixed-dose combination is expected to improve patient compliance and to reduce the risk of emerging drug resistance. DNDi developed an innovative approach to drug development, reliant on strong collaborations with a wide range of partners from the commercial world, academia, government institutions and NGOs, each of which had a specific role to play in the development of a fixed dose combination of artesunate and mefloquine. DNDi undertook the development of a fixed-dose combination of artesunate with mefloquine. Partnerships were formed across five continents, addressing formulation, control and production through to clinical trials and product registration, resulting in a safe and efficacious fixed dose combination treatment which is now available to treat patients in resource-poor settings. The south-south technology transfer of production from Farmanguinhos/Fiocruz in Brazil to Cipla Ltd in India was the first of its kind. Of additional benefit was the increased capacity within the knowledge base and infrastructure in developing countries. This collaborative approach to drug development involving international partnerships and independent funding mechanisms is a powerful new way to develop drugs for

  13. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  14. [The trend of developing new disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Tomita, Naoki; Ishiki, Aiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-03-01

    Development of symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer s disease by cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil was successful. However, it is a disappointment that development of disease-modifying drugs such as anti-amyloid drug based on amyloid-cascade theory has been interrupted or unsuccessful. Therefore, we have to be more cautious regarding inclusion criteria for clinical trials of new drugs. We agree that potentially curative drugs should be started before symptoms begin as a preemptive therapy or prevention trial. The concept of personalized medicine also is important when ApoE4-related amyloid reducing therapy is considered. Unfortunately, Japanese-ADNI has suffered a setback since 2014. However, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare gave a final remark that there was nothing wrong in the data managing process in the J-ADNI data center. We should pay more attention to worldwide challenges of speeding up new drug development.

  15. Is Compulsory Licensing Bad for Public Health? Some Critical Comments on Drug Accessibility in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guennif, Samira

    2017-10-01

    As one of the flexibilities provided by the agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) establishing minimum standards for the protection of property rights, compulsory license (CL) represents a means towards the protection of public health issues within a context of stringent protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs), most notably in poor-resource settings. However, recent literature asserts that CL constitutes a serious limitation to the full enjoyment of property rights by innovators and may therefore threaten drug accessibility in developing countries. This paper outlines the impact of CL on drug accessibility in developing countries by addressing the three main dimensions of accessibility (availability, affordability and quality) and proceeding to a literature survey of key arguments for and against CL. It concludes that CL inhibits neither the availability of essential drugs nor the affordability of life-saving treatments or the supply of high-quality drugs in developing countries, in particular antiretroviral drugs.

  16. Approaches in topical ocular drug delivery and developments in the use of contact lenses as drug-delivery devices

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, P.; Haj-Ahmad, R.; Al-Kinani, Ali; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Chang, Ming-Wei; Alany, Raid G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Drug-delivery approaches have diversified over the last two decades with the emergence of nanotechnologies, smart polymeric systems and multimodal functionalities. The intended target for specific treatment of disease is the key defining developing parameter. One such area which has undergone significant advancements relates to ocular delivery....

  17. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O.

    2015-05-22

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  18. Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, J. C.; Lara, L. M.; Quilis, V.; Gorgas, J.

    2013-05-01

    "Highlights of Astronomy and Astrophysics VII" contains the Proceedings of the biannual meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society held in Valencia from July 9 to 13, 2012. Over 300 astronomer, both national and international researchers, attended to the conference covering a wide variety of astrophysical topics: Galaxies and Cosmology, The Milky Way and Its Components, Planetary Sciences, Solar Physics, Instrumentation and Computation, and Teaching and Outreach of Astronomy.

  19. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Highlights were: 1. Fission product release: benchmark calculations for severe nuclear accidents; 2. Thermochemical data for reactor materials and fission products; 3. thermochemical calculations on fuel of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; 4. Formation of organic tellurides during nuclear accidents?; 5. Reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4; 6. Transmutation of fission products; 7. The thermal conductivity of high-burnup UO 2 fuel; 8. Tritium retention in graphite. (orig./HP)

  20. Sirtuins: Novel targets for metabolic disease in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weijian

    2008-01-01

    Calorie restriction extends lifespan and produces a metabolic profile desirable for treating diseases such as type 2 diabetes. SIRT1, an NAD + -dependent deacetylase, is a principal modulator of pathways downstream of calorie restriction that produces beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Activation of SIRT1 leads to enhanced activity of multiple proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and FOXO which helps to mediate some of the in vitro and in vivo effects of sirtuins. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic SIRT1 activator, mimics the effects of calorie restriction in lower organisms and in mice fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in unveiling the molecular mechanisms that underpin sirtuin as therapeutic candidates and discuss the possibility of using resveratrol as potential drug for treatment of diabetes

  1. Design and Implementation of an Interdisciplinary Elective Course in Drug Discovery, Development, and Commercialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. Ettouati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the design and implementation of an elective course in drug discovery, development, and commercialization for pharmacy, medical, biomedical graduate, business, and law students. Case Study: This course included didactic lectures, student group discussions, a longitudinal assignment, and a question and answer panel session. A 9-item instrument using a 5-point response scale was used for course evaluation. The longitudinal assignment was the creation and presentation of a product lifecycle strategic plan (PLSP. Respondents rated 'agree' and 'strongly agree' in the course providing useful information on drug discovery (39% and 53%, drug development (39% and 60%, and drug commercialization (33% and 60%. The majority of student-reported overall understanding of the drug discovery and drug development process was rated 'very good' (49% and 46%, while the drug commercialization process was rated 'good' (46%. Conclusions: An elective course on drug discovery, development, and commercialization included enrollment of students with diverse educational training. The course provided useful information and improved overall student understanding.   Type: Case Study

  2. Cardiovascular Organ-on-a-Chip Platforms for Drug Discovery and Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, J.; Sadeghi, H.; Manbachi, A.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Brinegar, K.; Zhang, Y.S.; Ferreira, L.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are prevalent worldwide and are the most frequent causes of death in the United States. Although spending in drug discovery/development has increased, the amount of drug approvals has seen a progressive decline. Particularly, adverse side effects to the heart and general

  3. Exploring Professional Identity Development in Alcohol and Drug Counselors in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Lori; Haas, Deborah; Massella, John; Young, Jared; Toth, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Professional identity development is an emerging area for alcohol and drug counselors. Few studies have investigated professional identity in alcohol and drug counselors (Ogborne, Braun, & Schmidt, 2001; Massella, Simons, Young, Haas, & Toth 2013). The goal of the current study is to add to this area of research. A total of 1,333 certified…

  4. The Development of Videos in Culturally Grounded Drug Prevention for Rural Native Hawaiian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Helm, Susana; McClain, Latoya L.; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate narrative scripts to be used for the video components of a culturally grounded drug prevention program for rural Native Hawaiian youth. Scripts to be used to film short video vignettes of drug-related problem situations were developed based on a foundation of pre-prevention research funded by the…

  5. A brief history of antidepressant drug development: from tricyclics to beyond ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor Silva; Hiroaki-Sato, Vinícius Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Although monoaminergic-targeted drugs have prompted great advances in the development of treatments for depression, the need for new options persists, since these drugs still have a delayed clinical effect and most patients do not respond properly to them. Recently, the observation of the antidepressant effects of ketamine brought on a new wave of studies regarding the comprehension of the neurobiology of depression and the development of new and more effective antidepressant drugs. Thus, in this paper, we present a historical review of the development of monoaminergic antidepressant drugs and the role of ketamine as the introductory agent of a new era in the research of the neurobiology of depression. Firstly, we review how the pharmacological treatment for major depression started, and we point out the main drugs discovered, the researchers involved, and how the studies developed have contributed to the understanding of the neurobiology of depression. Secondly, the major problems regarding the clinical efficacy and acceptance of these drugs are discussed, and the introduction of the glutamatergic system as a target for antidepressant drugs is presented. Finally, we review how ketamine revealed itself as an exciting option towards obtaining pharmacological agents to treat depression, through the understanding of biological markers. Discussion Ketamine contributed to confirm that different targets of the glutamatergic system and neurotrophic pathways are strictly related to the neurobiology of depression. There are several antidepressant drugs based on ketamine's mechanism of action already in the pipeline, and glutamatergic-targeted antidepressants may be on the market in the near future.

  6. Working towards New Drugs against Parasitic Worms in a Public-Development Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Sarah; Gasser, Robin B

    2018-01-01

    There is a clear need to develop new and inexpensive drugs to alleviate diseases caused by parasitic worms in animals and humans worldwide. In this article we discuss the roles and advantages of working in public-private partnerships (PPPs) - among academia, industry, and philanthropy - to enable anthelmintic drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total risk estimations - challenges and opportunities for practical implementation: highlights of a CardioVascular Clinical Trialists (CVCT) Workshop of the ESC Working Group on CardioVascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2011-11-03

    This paper presents a summary of the potential practical and economic barriers to implementation of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total cardiovascular risk estimations in the general population. It also reviews various possible solutions to overcome these barriers. The report is based on discussion among experts in the area at a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy that took place in September 2009. It includes a review of the evidence in favour of the \\'treat-to-target\\' paradigm, as well as potential difficulties with this approach, including the multiple pathological processes present in high-risk patients that may not be adequately addressed by this strategy. The risk-guided therapy approach requires careful definitions of cardiovascular risk and consideration of clinical endpoints as well as the differences between trial and \\'real-world\\' populations. Cost-effectiveness presents another issue in scenarios of finite healthcare resources, as does the difficulty of documenting guideline uptake and effectiveness in the primary care setting, where early modification of risk factors may be more beneficial than later attempts to manage established disease. The key to guideline implementation is to improve the quality of risk assessment and demonstrate the association between risk factors, intervention, and reduced event rates. In the future, this may be made possible by means of automated data entry and various other measures. In conclusion, opportunities exist to increase guideline implementation in the primary care setting, with potential benefits for both the general population and healthcare resources.

  8. Orphan drugs in development for urea cycle disorders: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häberle J

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Häberle,1 Shawn E McCandless2 1Division of Metabolism and Children's Research Center, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Center for Human Genetics, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: The urea cycle disorders are caused by deficiency of one of the six hepatic enzymes or two transporters involved in detoxification of ammonia. The resulting hyperammonemia causes severe brain injury unless aggressive steps are taken to reduce the accumulation of ammonia, which is thought to be the most toxic metabolite. This review describes the current state of chronic management of urea cycle disorders, focusing on new and emerging therapies. Management strategies include the mainstay of treatment, namely dietary protein restriction and supplementation with l-arginine or l-citrulline. Several currently approved medications utilize and enhance alternative pathways of waste nitrogen excretion (sodium benzoate, sodium phenylacetate, sodium phenylbutyrate in several formulations, and glycerol phenylbutyrate, working through conjugation of the drug to either glycine (in the case of benzoate or glutamine, the products of which are excreted in the urine. Carglumic acid activates the first committed step of conversion of ammonia to urea, carbamoylphosphate synthetase, and thus effectively treats defective synthesis of the endogenous activator, N-acetylglutamate, whether due to genetic defects or biochemical inhibition of the N-acetylglutamate synthase enzyme. Approaches to neuroprotection during episodes of hyperammonemia are discussed, including the use of controlled hypothermia (brain cooling, as well as proposed, but as yet untested, pharmacologic therapies. Finally, cell-based therapies, including liver transplantation, infusion of fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes, use of stem cells, and new approaches to gene

  9. The paradigm shift to an “open” model in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Au

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising cost of healthcare, the rising cost for drug development, the patent cliff for Big pharma, shorter patent protection, decrease reimbursement, and the recession have made it more difficult for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry to develop drugs. Due to the unsustainable amount of time and money in developing a drug that will have a significant return on investment (ROI it has become hard to sustain a robust pipeline. The industry is transforming its business model to meet these challenges. In essence a paradigm shift is occurring; the old “closed” model is giving way to a new “open” business model.

  10. Mathematical modeling of efficacy and safety for anticancer drugs clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Silvia Maria; Borella, Elisa; Carrara, Letizia; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Magni, Paolo; Poggesi, Italo

    2018-01-01

    Drug attrition in oncology clinical development is higher than in other therapeutic areas. In this context, pharmacometric modeling represents a useful tool to explore drug efficacy in earlier phases of clinical development, anticipating overall survival using quantitative model-based metrics. Furthermore, modeling approaches can be used to characterize earlier the safety and tolerability profile of drug candidates, and, thus, the risk-benefit ratio and the therapeutic index, supporting the design of optimal treatment regimens and accelerating the whole process of clinical drug development. Areas covered: Herein, the most relevant mathematical models used in clinical anticancer drug development during the last decade are described. Less recent models were considered in the review if they represent a standard for the analysis of certain types of efficacy or safety measures. Expert opinion: Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict overall survival from earlier endpoints and validate their surrogacy in demonstrating drug efficacy in place of overall survival. An increasing number of mathematical models have also been developed to describe the safety findings. Modeling has been extensively used in anticancer drug development to individualize dosing strategies based on patient characteristics, and design optimal dosing regimens balancing efficacy and safety.

  11. GPCR homomers and heteromers: a better choice as targets for drug development than GPCR monomers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Ferré, Sergi; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael; Canela, Enric I

    2009-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are targeted by many therapeutic drugs marketed to fight against a variety of diseases. Selection of novel lead compounds are based on pharmacological parameters obtained assuming that GPCR are monomers. However, many GPCR are expressed as dimers/oligomers. Therefore, drug development may consider GPCR as homo- and hetero-oligomers. A two-state dimer receptor model is now available to understand GPCR operation and to interpret data obtained from drugs interacting with dimers, and even from mixtures of monomers and dimers. Heteromers are distinct entities and therefore a given drug is expected to have different affinities and different efficacies depending on the heteromer. All these concepts would lead to broaden the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting GPCRs, including receptor heteromer-selective drugs with a lower incidence of side effects, or to identify novel pharmacological profiles using cell models expressing receptor heteromers.

  12. PRELIMINARILY DEVELOPMENT OF A MOISTURE-ACTIVATED BIORESORBABLE POLYMERIC PLATFORM FOR DRUG DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renê O. do Couto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioresorbable polymeric films were prepared by solvent casting using a tyrosine-derived polycarbonate and metronidazole (MDZ as the model drug at 2.5%, 5% and 10% (w/w. Drug loading did not affect the water uptake, drug release, polymer degradation or erosion profiles. All devices released approximately 85% (w/w of the drug within a 1.5 h period. This may be attributed to the rapid water uptake of the polymer. An increase in the water uptake correlated with a linear rate increase of the polymer degradation (0.968 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.999. Moreover, MDZ presented a remarkable plasticizing effect for the polymer and drug loading exerted a significant impact on the mechanical properties of the obtained films. The results obtained can be used to further the development of novel biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric platforms for the delivery of metronidazole and other drugs in a broad range of pharmaceutical applications.

  13. The development of videos in culturally grounded drug prevention for rural native Hawaiian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Scott K; Helm, Susana; McClain, Latoya L; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate narrative scripts to be used for the video components of a culturally grounded drug prevention program for rural Native Hawaiian youth. Scripts to be used to film short video vignettes of drug-related problem situations were developed based on a foundation of pre-prevention research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Seventy-four middle- and high-school-aged youth in 15 focus groups adapted and validated the details of the scripts to make them more realistic. Specifically, youth participants affirmed the situations described in the scripts and suggested changes to details of the scripts to make them more culturally specific. Suggested changes to the scripts also reflected preferred drug resistance strategies described in prior research, and varied based on the type of drug offerer described in each script (i.e., peer/friend, parent, or cousin/sibling). Implications for culturally grounded drug prevention are discussed.

  14. Developing a drug awareness program in an international school. Cross-cultural issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, P R

    1999-10-01

    In 1996, as an overseas school nurse/health educator, the author designed a health and personal development curriculum for an international school in Bandung, Indonesia, where 220 children from 26 different countries were enrolled. Part of the health curriculum included a drug awareness program for students from kindergarten through high school. Many parents, students, administrators, and faculty had never been involved in such a program before; therefore, obtaining acceptance from these groups was a first step in designing the drug awareness program. Because there have been no school or government anti-drug groups to promote drug prevention, this program was the first of its kind in the international community of Bandung. A review of the literature guided the choice of intervention strategies built into the program. Information also was collected about the major risk and protective factors that are known to be associated with an increased risk of drug use in the international community. Existing models of drug use prevention were used in designing the program. As in most prevention programs, drug use was viewed as a deficit in coping or self-regulation skills. The drug awareness program was developed with emphasis on peer, school, and community factors potentially influencing the tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use of the adolescent students.

  15. [Development of a novel transdermal delivery system of peptide and protein drugs using microneedle arrays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptide and protein drugs may be limited by the stratum corneum, which is a protective barrier against the entry of microorganisms and water. Many approaches have been utilized to promote peptide and protein drugs delivery across the stratum corneum, including chemical enhancer modification and physical disruption of barrier function. However, it has been difficult to achieve therapeutic levels of peptide and protein drugs via this route without any skin irritation. Recently, attention has been paid to the possibility of using microneedle arrays in delivering peptide and protein drugs into the skin. As a novel and minimally invasive approach, microneedle arrays are capable of creating superficial pathways across the skin for peptide and protein drugs to achieve enhanced transdermal drug delivery. This method combines the efficacy of conventional injection needles with the convenience of transdermal patches, while minimizing the disadvantages of these administration methods. Therefore, microneedle arrays are a very useful alternative method for delivering peptide and protein drugs from the skin into the systemic circulation without any serious damage to skin. In this review, recent challenges in the developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are summarized. Then, future developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are also discussed in order to improve their therapeutic efficacy and safety.

  16. The Expected Net Present Value of Developing Weight Management Drugs in the Context of Drug Safety Litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Anita; Carls, Ginger; Deng, Edmund; Tuttle, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Following withdrawals, failures, and significant litigation settlements, drug product launches in the anti-obesity category slowed despite a large and growing unmet need. Litigation concerns, a more risk-averse regulatory policy, and the difficulty of developing a product with a compelling risk-benefit profile in this category may have limited innovators' expected return on investment and restricted investment in this therapeutic area. The objective of the study was to estimate perceived manufacturer risk associated with product safety litigation and increased development costs vs. revenue expectations on anticipated return on investment and to determine which scenarios might change a manufacturer's investment decision. Expected net present value of a weight-management drug entering pre-clinical trials was calculated for a range of scenarios representing evolving expectations of development costs, revenue, and litigation risk over the past 25 years. These three factors were based on published estimates, historical data, and analogs from other therapeutic areas. The main driver in expected net present value calculations is expected revenue, particularly if one assumes that litigation risk and demand are positively correlated. Changes in development costs associated with increased regulatory concern with potential safety issues for the past 25 years likely did not impact investment decisions. Regulatory policy and litigation risk both played a role in anti-obesity drug development; however, product revenue-reflecting efficacy at acceptable levels of safety-was by far the most important factor. To date, relatively modest sales associated with recent product introductions suggest that developing a product that is sufficiently efficacious with an acceptable level of safety continues to be the primary challenge in this market.

  17. Performance Enhancement at the Cost of Potential Brain Plasticity: Neural Ramifications of Nootropic Drugs in the Healthy Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R. Urban

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive enhancement is perhaps one of the most intriguing and controversial topics in neuroscience today. Currently, the main classes of drugs used as potential cognitive enhancers include psychostimulants (methylphenidate, amphetamine, but wakefulness-promoting agents (modafinil and glutamate activators (ampakine are also frequently used. Pharmacologically, substances that enhance the components of the memory/learning circuits - dopamine, glutamate (neuronal excitation, and/or norepinephrine - stand to improve brain function in healthy individuals beyond their baseline functioning. In particular, non-medical use of prescription stimulants such as methylphenidate and illicit use of psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement have seen a recent rise among teens and young adults in schools and college campuses. However, this enhancement likely comes with a neuronal, as well as ethical, cost. Altering glutamate function via the use of psychostimulants may impair behavioral flexibility, leading to the development and/or potentiation of addictive behaviors. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine do not display linear effects; instead, their modulation of cognitive and neuronal function maps on an inverted-U curve. Healthy individuals run the risk of pushing themselves beyond optimal levels into hyperdopaminergic and hypernoradrenergic states, thus vitiating the very behaviors they are striving to improve. Finally, recent studies have begun to highlight potential damaging effects of stimulant exposure in healthy juveniles. This review explains how the main classes of cognitive enhancing drugs affect the learning and memory circuits, and highlights the potential risks and concerns in healthy individuals, particularly juveniles and adolescents. We emphasize the performance enhancement at the potential cost of brain plasticity that is associated with the neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain.

  18. Resolution of inflammation: mechanisms and opportunity for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Ana L; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Lucas, Christopher D; Rossi, Adriano G; Pinho, Vanessa; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is a beneficial host reaction to tissue damage and has the essential primary purpose of restoring tissue homeostasis. Inflammation plays a major role in containing and resolving infection and may also occur under sterile conditions. The cardinal signs of inflammation dolor, calor, tumor and rubor are intrinsically associated with events including vasodilatation, edema and leukocyte trafficking into the site of inflammation. If uncontrolled or unresolved, inflammation itself can lead to further tissue damage and give rise to chronic inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity with eventual loss of organ function. It is now evident that the resolution of inflammation is an active continuous process that occurs during an acute inflammatory episode. Successful resolution requires activation of endogenous programs with switch from production of pro-inflammatory towards pro-resolving molecules, such as specific lipid mediators and annexin A1, and the non-phlogistic elimination of granulocytes by apoptosis with subsequent removal by surrounding macrophages. These processes ensure rapid restoration of tissue homeostasis. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of resolution of inflammation, highlighting the pharmacological strategies that may interfere with the molecular pathways which control leukocyte survival and clearance. Such strategies have proved beneficial in several pre-clinical models of inflammatory diseases, suggesting that pharmacological modulation of the resolution process may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development, implementation and management of a drug testing program in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    To combat the rising use of drugs in the workplace many American companies have implemented drug testing programs and are testing employees and job applicants for use of illegal drugs. In addition, on September 15, 1986, Executive Order No.12564 was issued by President Reagan, which requires all federal agencies to develop programs and policies, one of the goals of which is to achieve a drug-free federal workplace. Included in this Executive Order is the requirement that federal agencies implement drug testing has become a prevalent practice as a means to detect and deter drug use in the workplace. Before a drug testing program is implemented, it is imperative that policies and procedures are developed that (1) ensure the accuracy of test results, (2) protect the validity and integrity of the specimen, (3) guarantee due process, and (4) maintain confidentiality. To make certain that these prerequisites were met in the government drug testing programs, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was directed to develop technical and scientific guidelines for conducting such programs. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Early development drug formulation on a chip: fabrication of nanoparticles using a microfluidic spray dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Julian; Windbergs, Maike; Abate, Adam R; Trebbin, Martin; Shum, Ho Cheung; Förster, Stephan; Weitz, David A

    2011-07-21

    Early development drug formulation is exacerbated by increasingly poor bioavailability of potential candidates. Prevention of attrition due to formulation problems necessitates physicochemical analysis and formulation studies at a very early stage during development, where the availability of a new substance is limited to small quantities, thus impeding extensive experiments. Miniaturization of common formulation processes is a strategy to overcome those limitations. We present a versatile technique for fabricating drug nanoformulations using a microfluidic spray dryer. Nanoparticles are formed by evaporative precipitation of the drug-loaded spray in air at room temperature. Using danazol as a model drug, amorphous nanoparticles of 20-60 nm in diameter are prepared with a narrow size distribution. We design the device with a geometry that allows the injection of two separate solvent streams, thus enabling co-spray drying of two substances for the production of drug co-precipitates with tailor-made composition for optimization of therapeutic efficiency.

  1. Moonlighting adenosine deaminase: a target protein for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Antoni; Gracia, Eduard; Moreno, Estefania; Mallol, Josefa; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Interest in adenosine deaminase (ADA) in the context of medicine has mainly focused on its enzymatic activity. This is justified by the importance of the reaction catalyzed by ADA not only for the intracellular purine metabolism, but also for the extracellular purine metabolism as well, because of its capacity as a regulator of the concentration of extracellular adenosine that is able to activate adenosine receptors (ARs). In recent years, other important roles have been described for ADA. One of these, with special relevance in immunology, is the capacity of ADA to act as a costimulator, promoting T-cell proliferation and differentiation mainly by interacting with the differentiation cluster CD26. Another role is the ability of ADA to act as an allosteric modulator of ARs. These receptors have very general physiological implications, particularly in the neurological system where they play an important role. Thus, ADA, being a single chain protein, performs more than one function, consistent with the definition of a moonlighting protein. Although ADA has never been associated with moonlighting proteins, here we consider ADA as an example of this family of multifunctional proteins. In this review, we discuss the different roles of ADA and their pathological implications. We propose a mechanism by which some of their moonlighting functions can be coordinated. We also suggest that drugs modulating ADA properties may act as modulators of the moonlighting functions of ADA, giving them additional potential medical interest. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Scaling predictive modeling in drug development with cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Alvarsson, Jonathan; Holm, Marcus; Eklund, Martin; Carlsson, Lars; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-26

    Growing data sets with increased time for analysis is hampering predictive modeling in drug discovery. Model building can be carried out on high-performance computer clusters, but these can be expensive to purchase and maintain. We have evaluated ligand-based modeling on cloud computing resources where computations are parallelized and run on the Amazon Elastic Cloud. We trained models on open data sets of varying sizes for the end points logP and Ames mutagenicity and compare with model building parallelized on a traditional high-performance computing cluster. We show that while high-performance computing results in faster model building, the use of cloud computing resources is feasible for large data sets and scales well within cloud instances. An additional advantage of cloud computing is that the costs of predictive models can be easily quantified, and a choice can be made between speed and economy. The easy access to computational resources with no up-front investments makes cloud computing an attractive alternative for scientists, especially for those without access to a supercomputer, and our study shows that it enables cost-efficient modeling of large data sets on demand within reasonable time.

  3. Investigational drugs in development for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtman, Howard

    2017-08-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is an important cause of end stage kidney disease and is a paradigm for the study of glomerular scarring. There are no FDA approved treatments for this condition. Current therapies, assessed based on reduction in proteinuria, are generally effective in a subset of patients which suggests that FSGS is a heterogeneous group of glomerular disorders or podocytopathies that converge on a common histopathological phenotype. Areas covered: We searched for investigational drugs agents that target different pathophysiological pathways using the key words 'FSGS' and 'podocyte' in American and European clinical trial registers (clinicaltrials.gov; clinicaltrialsregister.eu). Published articles were searched in PubMed, Medline, the Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Library. Expert opinion: Progress is being made in defining the mechanism of action of subtypes of FSGS. Current and investigational therapies for FSGS target these different pathways of injury. It is anticipated that advances in systems biology will further refine the classification of FSGS by subdividing the disease based on the primary mechanism of glomerular injury, identify biomarkers to discriminate between different subtypes, and enable appropriate selection of appropriate therapy for each individual in accordance with the goals of precision medicine.

  4. The methylazoxymethanol acetate rat model: molecular and epigenetic effect in the developing prefrontal cortex: An Editorial Highlight for 'Epigenetic mechanisms underlying NMDA receptor hypofunction in the prefrontal cortex of juvenile animals in the MAM model for schizophrenia' on page 320.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiyu; Gomes, Felipe V; Grace, Anthony A

    2017-11-01

    This Editorial highlights an article by Gulchina and colleagues in the current issue of the Journal of Neurochemistry, in which the authors describe molecular and epigenetic changes in the developing prefrontal cortex of the rats exposed to methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM). They found an NMDAR hypofunction present in the prefrontal cortex of juvenile MAM rats which was associated with abnormal epigenetic regulation of the Grin2b gene. These changes may be related to early cognitive impairments observed in MAM rats and schizophrenia patients. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster Past ... reason is that we're not selecting the right biological changes to target from the start. How ...

  6. Sewage epidemiology and illicit drug research: the development of ethical research guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prichard, J; Hall, W.; de Voogt, P.; Zuccato, E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To discuss the need to develop ethical guidelines for researchers using sewage epidemiology to monitor drug use in the general population and specific precincts, including prisons, schools and workplaces. Method Describe current applications of sewage epidemiology, identify potential ethical

  7. Collaboration with Pharma Will Introduce Nanotechnologies in Early Stage Drug Development | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Lab has begun to assist several major pharmaceutical companies in adopting nanotechnologies in early stage drug development, when the approach is most efficient and cost-effective. For some time, the national lab’s Nanotechno

  8. Collaboration with Pharma Will Introduce Nanotechnologies in Early Stage Drug Development | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Lab has begun to assist several major pharmaceutical companies in adopting nanotechnologies in early stage drug development, when the approach is most efficient and cost-effective.

  9. Collaboration with Pharma Will Introduce Nanotechnologies in Early Stage Drug Development | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Lab has begun to assist several major pharmaceutical companies in adopting nanotechnologies in early stage drug development, when the approach is most efficient and cost-effective. For some time, the national lab’s Nanotechno

  10. Identification, isolation and characterization of active compounds from the Indian green mussels to develop drugs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ) display biological activity against the malaria parasite (mouse and human tested). A compound (NIO-3) may find use for developing effective drugs for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, prevention of bone...

  11. Establishing Good Practices for Exposure?Response Analysis of Clinical Endpoints in Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Overgaard, RV; Ingwersen, SH; Torn?e, CW

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial aims at promoting good practices for exposure?response (E-R) analyses of clinical endpoints in drug development. The focus is on practical aspects of E-R analyses to assist modeling scientists with a process of performing such analyses in a consistent manner across individuals and projects and tailored to typical clinical drug development decisions. This includes general considerations for planning, conducting, and visualizing E-R analyses, and how these are linked to key questi...

  12. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF DRUGS ON THE ORGANISM OF A FUTURE CHILD DURING FETAL STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Sher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Article assesses the impact of adverse factors on intrauterine development of the child, first of all, drugs. The author stresses that the importance of drug safety (D is due to the large number of unintended pregnancies worldwide. A list of the D, providing proven teratogenic effects on a child organism is presenting. It is shown that the D teratogenic effect in humans can not be assessed on the basis of experimental data obtained in animals due to the difference between metabolic and detoxification processes in a different mammals and individuals. Key words: drugs, safety, teratogenic effects, fetal development, the unborn child. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 57–60.

  13. Guidelines to PET measurements of the target occupancy in the brain for drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Varrone, Andrea; Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Salvadori, Piero [CNR Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica, Pisa (Italy); Gee, Antony [Kings College London, Department of Chemistry and Biology, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Windhorst, Albert; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vercouillie, Johnny [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, UMR Inserm U930, Tours (France); Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    This guideline summarizes the current view of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine Drug Development Committee. The purpose of this guideline is to guarantee a high standard of PET studies that are aimed at measuring target occupancy in the brain within the framework of development programs of drugs that act within the central nervous system (CNS drugs). This guideline is intended to present information specifically adapted to European practice. The information provided should be applied within the context of local conditions and regulations. (orig.)

  14. Common characteristics of open source software development and applicability for drug discovery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Røttingen John-Arne

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innovation through an open source model has proven to be successful for software development. This success has led many to speculate if open source can be applied to other industries with similar success. We attempt to provide an understanding of open source software development characteristics for researchers, business leaders and government officials who may be interested in utilizing open source innovation in other contexts and with an emphasis on drug discovery. Methods A systematic review was performed by searching relevant, multidisciplinary databases to extract empirical research regarding the common characteristics and barriers of initiating and maintaining an open source software development project. Results Common characteristics to open source software development pertinent to open source drug discovery were extracted. The characteristics were then grouped into the areas of participant attraction, management of volunteers, control mechanisms, legal framework and physical constraints. Lastly, their applicability to drug discovery was examined. Conclusions We believe that the open source model is viable for drug discovery, although it is unlikely that it will exactly follow the form used in software development. Hybrids will likely develop that suit the unique characteristics of drug discovery. We suggest potential motivations for organizations to join an open source drug discovery project. We also examine specific differences between software and medicines, specifically how the need for laboratories and physical goods will impact the model as well as the effect of patents.

  15. Common characteristics of open source software development and applicability for drug discovery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardal, Christine; Alstadsæter, Annette; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2011-09-28

    Innovation through an open source model has proven to be successful for software development. This success has led many to speculate if open source can be applied to other industries with similar success. We attempt to provide an understanding of open source software development characteristics for researchers, business leaders and government officials who may be interested in utilizing open source innovation in other contexts and with an emphasis on drug discovery. A systematic review was performed by searching relevant, multidisciplinary databases to extract empirical research regarding the common characteristics and barriers of initiating and maintaining an open source software development project. Common characteristics to open source software development pertinent to open source drug discovery were extracted. The characteristics were then grouped into the areas of participant attraction, management of volunteers, control mechanisms, legal framework and physical constraints. Lastly, their applicability to drug discovery was examined. We believe that the open source model is viable for drug discovery, although it is unlikely that it will exactly follow the form used in software development. Hybrids will likely develop that suit the unique characteristics of drug discovery. We suggest potential motivations for organizations to join an open source drug discovery project. We also examine specific differences between software and medicines, specifically how the need for laboratories and physical goods will impact the model as well as the effect of patents.

  16. Organized crime impact study highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porteous, S.D.

    1998-10-01

    A study was conducted to address the issue of how organized crime impacts on Canadians and their communities both socially and economically. As far as environmental crime is concerned, three main areas of concern have been identified: (1) illicit trade in ozone depleting substances, (2) illicit hazardous waste treatment, and (3) disposal of illicit trade in endangered species. To gauge the magnitude of organized crime activity, the market value of worldwide illegal trafficking in illicit drugs was estimated to be as high as $100 billion worldwide (between $1.4 to 4 billion in Canada). It is suspected that Canada supplies a substantial portion of the U.S. black market in chlorofluorocarbons with most of the rest being supplied from Mexico. Another area of concern involves the disposal of hazardous wastes. Canada produces approximately 5.9 million tonnes of hazardous waste annually. Of these, 3.2 million tonnes are sent to off-site disposal facilities for specialized treatment and recycling. The treatment of hazardous waste is a very profitable business, hence vulnerable to fraudulent practices engaged in by organized crime groups. Environmental implications of this and other environmental crimes, as well as their economic, commercial, health and safety impact were examined. Other areas of organized crime activity in Canada (drugs, economic crimes, migrant trafficking, counterfeit products, motor vehicle theft, money laundering) were also part of the study.

  17. Recent developments in our understanding of the implications of traditional African medicine on drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, Chrisna; Hamman, Josias H

    2018-02-01

    The use of traditional herbal medicines has become increasingly popular globally, but in some countries, it is the main or sometimes even the only healthcare service available in the most rural areas. This is especially true for Africa where herbal medicines form a key component of traditional medicinal practices and there is access to a diversity of medicinal plants. Although many benefits have been derived from the use of traditional herbal medicines, many concerns are associated with their use of which herb-drug interactions have been identified to have a rising impact on patient treatment outcome. One type of pharmacokinetic interaction involves the modulation of drug metabolizing enzymes, which may result in enhanced or reduced bioavailability of co-administered drugs. Areas covered: This review highlights the current information available on drug metabolism-associated information with regards to traditional African medicines related to some of the most prevalent diseases burdening the African continent. Expert opinion: It is clear from previous studies that enzyme modulation by traditional African medicines plays a significant role in the pharmacokinetics of some co-administered drugs, but more research is needed to provide detailed information on these interactions, specifically for treatment of prevalent diseases such as tuberculosis and hypertension.

  18. Technological advances in precision medicine and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Elaine; Patterson, Nicole E; Montagna, Cristina

    New technologies are rapidly becoming available to expand the arsenal of tools accessible for precision medicine and to support the development of new therapeutics. Advances in liquid biopsies, which analyze cells, DNA, RNA, proteins, or vesicles isolated from the blood, have gained particular interest for their uses in acquiring information reflecting the biology of tumors and metastatic tissues. Through advancements in DNA sequencing that have merged unprecedented accuracy with affordable cost, personalized treatments based on genetic variations are becoming a real possibility. Extraordinary progress has been achieved in the development of biological therapies aimed to even further advance personalized treatments. We provide a summary of current and future applications of blood based liquid biopsies and how new technologies are utilized for the development of biological therapeutic treatments. We discuss current and future sequencing methods with an emphasis on how technological advances will support the progress in the field of precision medicine.

  19. Strategic R&D transactions in personalized drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Tomohiro; Lim, Yeongjoo; Kodama, Kota

    2018-03-21

    Although external collaboration capability influences the development of personalized medicine, key transactions in the pharmaceutical industry have not been addressed. To explore specific trends in interorganizational transactions and key players, we longitudinally surveyed strategic transactions, comparing them with other advanced medical developments, such as antibody therapy, as controls. We found that the financing deals of start-ups have surged over the past decade, accelerating intellectual property (IP) creation. Our correlation and regression analyses identified determinants of financing deals among alliance deals, acquisition deals, patents, research and development (R&D) licenses, market licenses, and scientific papers. They showed that patents positively correlated with transactions, and that the number of R&D licenses significantly predicted financing deals. This indicates, for the first time, that start-ups and investors lead progress in personalized medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  1. Antiviral Information Management System (AIMS): a prototype for operational innovation in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Pravin R; Neal, Lauren; Florian, Jeff; Chen, Ying; Naeger, Lisa; Robertson, Sarah; Soon, Guoxing; Birnkrant, Debra

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a prototype for an operational innovation in knowledge management (KM). These operational innovations are geared toward managing knowledge efficiently and accessing all available information by embracing advances in bioinformatics and allied fields. The specific components of the proposed KM system are (1) a database to archive hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment data in a structured format and retrieve information in a query-capable manner and (2) an automated analysis tool to inform trial design elements for HCV drug development. The proposed framework is intended to benefit drug development by increasing efficiency of dose selection and improving the consistency of advice from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is also hoped that the framework will encourage collaboration among FDA, industry, and academic scientists to guide the HCV drug development process using model-based quantitative analysis techniques.

  2. The role of radio pharmacological imaging in streamlining the drug development process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    Radio imaging techniques have found a place in clinical diagnosis, but there has been a hesitancy to use this approach in drug development. This reluctance may have been due to the availability of ligands, the time and cost of synthesis and the number of centres and for many the benefits are not evident. The use in drug development is potentially large since tomography can measure drug levels, specific binding, blood flow and activity within the human body. In drug discovery, the synthesis of candidate drugs with specific binding properties are dependent on understanding the disease and using appropriate in vitro or animal models. Using small animal tomographs, these can be validated using radio imaging. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic problems, such as the distribution of inhaled gases, drug targeting into tumours of the brain or specific gastrointestinal absorption sites can be investigated within the human rather than relying on animals. The high specific activity allows low doses to be administered to man with limited safety studies permitting kinetic and metabolic studies to be undertaken early in development. Safety studies and ensuing toxicological endpoints in animals rely on histopathology for gross degenerative in physiological function. Where concern exists, radio imaging could detect early in situ changes in humans, for example hepatic toxicity, before they become hazardous. In clinical studies, the action of drugs can be measured directly at the effector site prior to undertaking longer studies, which is important for many diseases, but particularly for those such as Alzheimer's disease, where improvements may be slow or subtle

  3. DECIDE: Developing Extensive Curriculum for Interdisciplinary Drug Education. A Resource Guide for Secondary Teachers. Bulletin No. 6, 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide is designed to assist secondary school teachers in developing sequential drug education activities for infusion into the general curriculum, particularly in the communicative arts areas. The scope of the materials encompasses health habits, drug use and abuse, drug laws, and the pharmacology of drugs in specific sections by subject…

  4. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On Developing brain (ePOD) study : methods and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottelier, Marco A; Schouw, Marieke L J; Klomp, Anne; Tamminga, Hyke G H; Schrantee, Anouk G M; Bouziane, Cheima; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Boer, Frits; Ruhé, Henricus G; Denys, D.; Rijsman, Roselyne; Lindauer, Ramon J L; Reitsma, Hans B; Geurts, Hilde M; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal studies have shown that methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) have different effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic system in the developing brain compared to the developed brain. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On the Developing brain (ePOD) study is a combination of

  5. The effects of psychotropic drugs on developing brain (ePOD) study: methods and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottelier, M.A.; Schouw, M.L.J.; Klomp, A.; Tamminga, G.H.; Schrantee, A.G.M.; Bouziane, C.; de Ruiter, M.B.; Boer, F.; Ruhé, H.G.; Denys, D.; Rijsman, R.; Lindauer, R.J.L.; Reitsma, H.B.; Geurts, H.M.; Reneman, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Animal studies have shown that methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) have different effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic system in the developing brain compared to the developed brain. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On the Developing brain (ePOD) study is a combination of

  6. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On Developing brain (ePOD) study : methods and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottelier, Marco A.; Schouw, Marieke L. J.; Klomp, Anne; Tamminga, Hyke G. H.; Schrantee, Anouk G. M.; Bouziane, Cheima; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Boer, Frits; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Denys, Damiaan; Rijsman, Roselyne; Lindauer, Ramon J. L.; Reitsma, Hans B.; Geurts, Hilde M.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Animal studies have shown that methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) have different effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic system in the developing brain compared to the developed brain. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On the Developing brain (ePOD) study is a combination of

  7. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On Developing brain (ePOD) study: methods and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottelier, Marco A.; Schouw, Marieke L. J.; Klomp, Anne; Tamminga, Hyke G. H.; Schrantee, Anouk G. M.; Bouziane, Cheima; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Boer, Frits; Ruhé, Henricus G.; Denys, Damiaan; Rijsman, Roselyne; Lindauer, Ramon J. L.; Reitsma, Hans B.; Geurts, Hilde M.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) have different effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic system in the developing brain compared to the developed brain. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On the Developing brain (ePOD) study is a combination of different

  8. The impact of nanobiotechnology on the development of new drug delivery systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayser, Oliver; Lemke, A.; Hernandez-Trejo, N.

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology, or systems/devices manufactured at the molecular level, is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. A part of this field is the development of nanoscaled drug delivery devices. Nanoparticles have been developed as an important strategy to deliver

  9. The development of digital library system for drug research information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H J; Kim, S R; Yoo, D S; Lee, S H; Suh, O K; Cho, J H; Shin, H T; Yoon, J P

    1998-01-01

    The sophistication of computer technology and information transmission on internet has made various cyber information repository available to information consumers. In the era of information super-highway, the digital library which can be accessed from remote sites at any time is considered the prototype of information repository. Using object-oriented DBMS, the very first model of digital library for pharmaceutical researchers and related professionals in Korea has been developed. The published research papers and researchers' personal information was included in the database. For database with research papers, 13 domestic journals were abstracted and scanned for full-text image files which can be viewed by Internet web browsers. The database with researchers' personal information was also developed and interlinked to the database with research papers. These database will be continuously updated and will be combined with world-wide information as the unique digital library in the field of pharmacy.

  10. IAP proteins as targets for drug development in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrez L

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Laurence Dubrez,1,2 Jean Berthelet,1,2 Valérie Glorian,1,21Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Inserm, Dijon, France; 2Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, FranceAbstract: The inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs constitute a family of proteins involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell death, immune and inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell motility. There is accumulating evidence supporting IAP-targeting in tumors: IAPs regulate various cellular processes that contribute to tumor development, such as cell death, cell proliferation, and cell migration; their expression is increased in a number of human tumor samples, and IAP overexpression has been correlated with tumor growth, and poor prognosis or low response to treatment; and IAP expression can be rapidly induced in response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy because of the presence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES-dependent mechanism of translation initiation, which could contribute to resistance to antitumor therapy. The development of IAP antagonists is an important challenge and was subject to intense research over the past decade. Six molecules are currently in clinical trials. This review focuses on the role of IAPs in tumors and the development of IAP-targeting molecules for anticancer therapy.Keywords: Smac mimetics, apoptosis, antitumor therapy

  11. Studies on novel drug development using developing chick embryo and its future aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Chiaki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Endo, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Described is the use of developing chick embryo (DCE), an advantageous alternative experimental animal, in studies on development of novel drugs like radio-sensitizer and on toxicological evaluation. Authors have established DCE transplanted with mouse mammary gland tumor EMT6/KU cells and have found that etanidazole, a radio-sensitizing nitroimidazole derivative, exerts the significant tumor shrinking activity in this tumor-bearing DCE when irradiated by 8 Gy X-ray. They are to test the sensitizing activity of their synthetic nitroimidazole derivatives and other structure-related sensitizers like clinically used (in Denmark) nimorazole. In addition, as the antioxidant activity in vivo can be hardly tested, authors are trying to make DCE system for it since they have studied the activity of derivatives of artepillin C, an active principle of propolis. They are also using DCE chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) for testing the anti-angiogenic activity aiming to develop an antitumor agent from compounds related to fingolimod (FTY-720). For the test of anti-tumor activity in various cell types, their observation is that some of tumor cell types cannot take in DCE. Recently DCE has been used in toxicology for prediction of cardiovascular system like bradycardia and QT elongation, and for lethality test. Hen's egg test-CAM (HET-CAM) and cultured cell system to test irritation are reported to be more valid than other standard methods. DCE system is simple, inexpensive, and unnecessary for particular equipment and facility and desirably becomes an alternative experimental animal next to those like zebra-fish, rat and mouse. (author)

  12. Drug development and clinical trial design in pancreatico-biliary malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jennifer; Carter, Louise; Basu, Bristi; Cook, Natalie

    Pancreatico-biliary (P-B) tumors arise from the pancreas, bile duct, and ampulla of Vater. Despite their close anatomical location, they have different etiology and biology. However, they uniformly share a poor prognosis, with no major improvements observed in overall survival over decades, even in the face of progress in diagnostic imaging and surgical techniques, and advances in systemic and loco-regional radiation therapies. To date, cytotoxic treatment has been associated with modest benefits in the advanced disease setting, and survival for patients with stage IV disease has not exceeded a year. Therefore, there is a pressing need to identify better treatments which may impact more significantly. Frequently, encouraging signals of potential efficacy for novel agents in early phase clinical trials have been followed by disappointing failures in larger phase III trials, raising the valid question of how drug development can be optimized for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and biliary tract malignancies. In this article we summarize the current therapeutic options for these patients and their limitations. The biological context of these cancers is reviewed, highlighting features that may make them resistant to standard chemotherapeutics and could be potential therapeutic targets. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, defined as phase I and non-randomised phase II trials, within the clinical context and current therapeutic landscape of P-B tumors and postulate how translational studies and trial design may enable better realization of emerging targets together with a proposed model for future patient management. A detailed summary of current phase I clinical trials in P-B tumors is provided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin TL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tara L Lin1, William Matsui21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Division of Hematologic Malignancies, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely regulates self-renewal and terminal differentiation in embryonic development, but is typically silenced in adult tissues, with reactivation usually only during tissue repair. Aberrant Hh pathway signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis, self-renewal, and chemotherapy resistance of a growing number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Major components of the Hh pathway include the Hh ligands (Sonic, Desert, and Indian, the transmembrane receptor Patched, the signal transducer Smoothened (Smo, and transcription factors Gli1–3 which regulate the transcription of Hh target genes. Mutations in Hh pathway genes, increased Hh signaling in tumor stroma, and Hh overexpression in self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells have been described, and these different modes of Hh signaling have implications for the design of Hh pathway inhibitors and their integration into conventional treatment regimens. Discovery of a naturally-occurring Smo inhibitor, cyclopamine, and the identification of Hh pathway mutations and over expression in cancer cells prompted the development of several cyclopamine derivatives. Encouraging laboratory and in vivo data has resulted in Phase I and II clinical trials of Smo inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of Hh pathway signaling in malignancy and Smo antagonists in development. Recent data with these agents shows that they are well-tolerated and may be effective for subsets of patients. Challenges remain

  14. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tara L; Matsui, William

    2012-01-01

    Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh) represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely regulates self-renewal and terminal differentiation in embryonic development, but is typically silenced in adult tissues, with reactivation usually only during tissue repair. Aberrant Hh pathway signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis, self-renewal, and chemotherapy resistance of a growing number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Major components of the Hh pathway include the Hh ligands (Sonic, Desert, and Indian), the transmembrane receptor Patched, the signal transducer Smoothened (Smo), and transcription factors Gli1-3 which regulate the transcription of Hh target genes. Mutations in Hh pathway genes, increased Hh signaling in tumor stroma, and Hh overexpression in self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells) have been described, and these different modes of Hh signaling have implications for the design of Hh pathway inhibitors and their integration into conventional treatment regimens. Discovery of a naturally-occurring Smo inhibitor, cyclopamine, and the identification of Hh pathway mutations and over expression in cancer cells prompted the development of several cyclopamine derivatives. Encouraging laboratory and in vivo data has resulted in Phase I and II clinical trials of Smo inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of Hh pathway signaling in malignancy and Smo antagonists in development. Recent data with these agents shows that they are well-tolerated and may be effective for subsets of patients. Challenges remain for appropriate patient selection and the optimal combination and sequence of these targeted therapies into current treatment paradigms.

  15. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. Development and in Vitro Characterization of Photochemically Crosslinked Polyvinylpyrrolidone Coatings for Drug-Coated Balloons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svea Petersen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP is a conventionally applied hydrophilic lubricious coating on catheter-based cardiovascular devices, used in order to ease movement through the vasculature. Its use as drug reservoir and transfer agent on drug-coated balloons (DCB is therefore extremely promising with regard to the simplification of its approval as a medical device. Here, we developed a PVP-based coating for DCB, containing paclitaxel (PTX as a model drug, and studied the impact of crosslinking via UV radiation on drug stability, wash off, and transfer during simulated use in an in vitro vessel model. We showed that crosslinking was essential for coating stability and needed to be performed prior to PTX incorporation due to decreased drug bioavailability as a result of photodecomposition and/or involvement in vinylic polymerization with PVP under UV radiation. Moreover, the crosslinking time needed to be carefully controlled. While short radiation times did not provide enough coating stability, associated with high wash off rates during DCB insertion, long radiation times lowered drug transfer efficiency upon balloon expansion. A ten minutes radiation of PVP, however, combined a minimized drug wash off rate of 34% with an efficient drug transfer of 49%, underlining the high potential of photochemically crosslinked PVP as a coating matrix for DCB.

  17. Development of a rational scale to assess the harm of drugs of potential misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David; King, Leslie A; Saulsbury, William; Blakemore, Colin

    2007-03-24

    Drug misuse and abuse are major health problems. Harmful drugs are regulated according to classification systems that purport to relate to the harms and risks of each drug. However, the methodology and processes underlying classification systems are generally neither specified nor transparent, which reduces confidence in their accuracy and undermines health education messages. We developed and explored the feasibility of the use of a nine-category matrix of harm, with an expert delphic procedure, to assess the harms of a range of illicit drugs in an evidence-based fashion. We also included five legal drugs of misuse (alcohol, khat, solvents, alkyl nitrites, and tobacco) and one that has since been classified (ketamine) for reference. The process proved practicable, and yielded roughly similar scores and rankings of drug harm when used by two separate groups of experts. The ranking of drugs produced by our assessment of harm differed from those used by current regulatory systems. Our methodology offers a systematic framework and process that could be used by national and international regulatory bodies to assess the harm of current and future drugs of abuse.

  18. Applicability of bioanalysis of multiple analytes in drug discovery and development: review of select case studies including assay development considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2006-05-01

    The development of sound bioanalytical method(s) is of paramount importance during the process of drug discovery and development culminating in a marketing approval. Although the bioanalytical procedure(s) originally developed during the discovery stage may not necessarily be fit to support the drug development scenario, they may be suitably modified and validated, as deemed necessary. Several reviews have appeared over the years describing analytical approaches including various techniques, detection systems, automation tools that are available for an effective separation, enhanced selectivity and sensitivity for quantitation of many analytes. The intention of this review is to cover various key areas where analytical method development becomes necessary during different stages of drug discovery research and development process. The key areas covered in this article with relevant case studies include: (a) simultaneous assay for parent compound and metabolites that are purported to display pharmacological activity; (b) bioanalytical procedures for determination of multiple drugs in combating a disease; (c) analytical measurement of chirality aspects in the pharmacokinetics, metabolism and biotransformation investigations; (d) drug monitoring for therapeutic benefits and/or occupational hazard; (e) analysis of drugs from complex and/or less frequently used matrices; (f) analytical determination during in vitro experiments (metabolism and permeability related) and in situ intestinal perfusion experiments; (g) determination of a major metabolite as a surrogate for the parent molecule; (h) analytical approaches for universal determination of CYP450 probe substrates and metabolites; (i) analytical applicability to prodrug evaluations-simultaneous determination of prodrug, parent and metabolites; (j) quantitative determination of parent compound and/or phase II metabolite(s) via direct or indirect approaches; (k) applicability in analysis of multiple compounds in select

  19. Use of Pharmacogenomics and Biomarkers in the Development of New Drugs for Alzheimer Disease in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Yasuto

    2015-08-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) and biomarkers have been utilized for improving the benefit/risk ratios of drugs and the efficiency of drug development. In the development of drugs for Alzheimer disease (AD), a number of clinical trials have failed to demonstrate clinical efficacy. To overcome this circumstance, the importance of using PGx/biomarkers for enhancing recruitment into clinical trials and for evaluating the efficacy of treatments has been increasingly recognized. In this article, the current status and examples of the use of PGx/biomarkers in Japan for drug development are explained. Guidelines, notifications, and administrative notices related to PGx/biomarkers were downloaded from the Web sites of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), the US Food and Drug Administration, and the European Medicines Agency. Data from clinical studies of AD drugs were obtained from the review reports of the PMDA. To analyze the current status of the use of PGx/biomarkers in Japan, "Issues to Consider in the Clinical Evaluation and Development of Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease (Interim Summary)" was also downloaded from PMDA Web site. There are 2 major measures of utilizing PGx/biomarkers for drug development: (1) biomarker qualification and (2) companion diagnostics. Recently, the PMDA issued a number of guidelines and notifications for their practical use. Although examples of qualified PGx/biomarkers and approved companion diagnostics are limited at present, it is expected that the use of PGx/biomarkers for the development of drugs against AD would increase. For promoting the use of PGx/biomarkers in the development of drugs against AD, PGx/biomarkers should be qualified as early as possible. To that end, accumulating data on PGx/biomarkers from nonclinical or clinical trials and the concurrent development of reliable diagnostics in the early stage of the development process are indispensable. It is important to strengthen collaboration among the academia

  20. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Fred

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. Methods We interviewed six patients (four men and two women with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. Results There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. Conclusion The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area.

  1. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skårberg, Kurt; Nyberg, Fred; Engström, Ingemar

    2008-11-28

    The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. We interviewed six patients (four men and two women) with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area.

  2. Application of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development at Pfizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Dickins, Maurice; Youdim, Kuresh; Gosset, James R; Attkins, Neil J; Hay, Tanya L; Gurrell, Ian K; Logan, Y Raj; Bungay, Peter J; Jones, Barry C; Gardner, Iain B

    2012-01-01

    Early prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and drug-drug interactions (DDI) in drug discovery and development allows for more informed decision making. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling can be used to answer a number of questions throughout the process of drug discovery and development and is thus becoming a very popular tool. PBPK models provide the opportunity to integrate key input parameters from different sources to not only estimate PK parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. Using examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilized through the stages of drug discovery and development to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and to increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however, some limitations need to be addressed to realize its application and utility more broadly.

  3. Highlights from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz Maestre, Juan

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the status and some recent results of the CMS experiment at the LHC. The performance of the detector is assessed using a luminosity of $\\approx 5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ recorded in the first part of the 2017 data-taking period. Run~2 physics studies use data collected at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $36~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Highlights from studies in the Higgs sector are the first observation of its decay into tau leptons by a single experiment, the most precise measurement of its mass, $\\mathrm{m_H} = 125.26 \\pm 0.21~\\mathrm{GeV}$ and a first search for the $\\mathrm{H}\\to\\mathrm{b\\overline{b}}$ decay in a phase space region that is sensitive to the gluon-fusion production mechanism. In the electroweak sector, CMS provides the currently most precise measurement of the effective weak mixing angle at the LHC: $\\sin\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.23101\\pm 0.00052$, using an integrated luminosity of $\\approx 20~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqr...

  4. Prospects for the development of epigenetic drugs for CNS conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-07-01

    Advances in our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and their role in neuropsychiatric disorders are paving the way for a potential new therapeutic approach that is focused on reversing the epigenetic underpinnings of neuropsychiatric conditions. In this article, the complexity of epigenetic processes and the current level of proof for their involvement in CNS disorders are discussed. The preclinical evidence for efficacy of pharmacological approaches that target epigenetics in the CNS and the particular challenges of this approach are also examined. Finally, strategies to address these challenges through the development of improved evidence-based epigenetic therapeutics and through combining pharmacological and behavioural approaches are presented.

  5. Orphan drugs in development for Huntington's disease: challenges and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgunder JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Marc Burgunder1–4 1Swiss Huntington’s Disease Centre, Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 3Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 4Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a monogenic disorder encompassing a variable phenotype with progressive cognitive, psychiatric, and movement disorders. Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this disorder has made substantial advances since the discovery of the gene mutation. The dynamic mutation is the expansion of a CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene, which is transcribed into an abnormal protein with an elongated polyglutamine tract. Polyglutamine HTT accumulates and is changed in its function in multifaceted ways related to the numerous roles of the normal protein. The protein is expressed in numerous areas of the brain and also in other organs. The major brain region involved in the disease process is the striatum, but it is clear that other systems are involved as well. This accumulated knowledge has now led to the development of treatment strategies based on specific molecular pathways for symptomatic and disease course-modifying treatment. The most proximal way to handle the disturbed protein is to hinder the gene transcription, translation, and/or to increase protein clearance. Other mechanisms now being approached include modulation of energy and intracellular signaling, induction of factors potentially leading to neuroprotection, as well as modulation of glial function. Several clinical trials based on these approaches are now under way, and it is becoming clear that a future disease-modifying therapy will be a combination of several approaches harmonized with symptomatic treatments. In this review, some of the most promising and

  6. Biotransformation and bioactivation reactions - 2016 literature highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Dalvie, Deepak; Miller, Grover

    2017-08-01

    We are pleased to present a second annual issue highlighting a previous year's literature on biotransformation and bioactivation. Each contributor to this issue worked independently to review the articles published in 2016 and proposed three to four articles, which he or she believed would be of interest to the broader research community. In each synopsis, the contributing author summarized the procedures, analyses and conclusions as described in the original manuscripts. In the commentary sections, our authors offer feedback and highlight aspects of the work that may not be apparent from an initial reading of the article. To be fair, one should still read the original article to gain a more complete understanding of the work conducted. Most of the articles included in this review were published in Drug Metabolism and Disposition or Chemical Research in Toxicology, but attempts were made to seek articles in 25 other journals. Importantly, these articles are not intended to represent a consensus of the best papers of the year, as we did not want to make any arbitrary standards for this purpose, but rather they were chosen by each author for their notable findings and descriptions of novel metabolic pathways or biotransformations. I am pleased that Drs. Rietjens and Dalvie have again contributed to this annual review. We would like to welcome Grover P Miller as an author for this year's issue, and we thank Tom Baillie for his contributions to last year's edition. We have intentionally maintained a balance of authors such that two come from an academic setting and two come from industry. Finally, please drop us a note if you find this review helpful. We would be pleased to hear your opinions of our commentary, and we extend an invitation to anyone who would like to contribute to a future edition of this review. This article is dedicated to Professor Thomas Baillie for his exceptional contributions to the field of drug metabolism.

  7. Practical, regulatory and clinical considerations for development of inhalation drug products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Hou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The formulation and device collectively constitute an inhalation drug product. Development of inhaled drugs must consider the compatibility between formulation and device in order to achieve the intended pharmaceutical performance and usability of the product to improve patient compliance with treatment instruction. From the points of formulation, device and patient use, this article summarizes the inhalation drugs, including pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI, dry powder inhaler (DPI, and nebulizer that are currently available in the US and UK markets. It also discusses the practical considerations for the development of inhalers and provides an update on the corresponding regulations of the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the EMA (European Medicines Agency.

  8. Application of toxicogenomic tools in the drug research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Nicolas; Anglade, Isolde; Vericat, Joan Albert

    2009-04-10

    The cost for the development of new active and safe drugs is higher than ever and continues to increase. At the same time, both the pharmaceutical industry and the Regulatory Authorities are, despite the increasing effort to develop safer drugs, concerned by the risk of unexpected side effects observed in the late steps of the development of new drugs, either in late clinical development or after marketing approval. Then, the early knowledge of any potential toxic effect of a new drug is a key issue to allow adequate decision making. This means that current approaches based on the determination of the No-Adverse-Effect-Level and the Human-Equivalent-Dose are far from being perfect, and fail mainly to detect toxic phenomena of low intensity and/or low frequency. To improve the predictability of the existing experimental models, Toxicogenomics could be included into the in vitro candidate-selection steps and/or during the regulatory preclinical (or clinical) studies. In this communication, the authors present an example of the use of Toxicogenomic data to support decision making when selecting a new candidate to regulatory development. The authors also present a second example of integration of Toxicogenomics with the animal regulatory studies within the preclinical development of a new drug.

  9. Clostridium difficile Drug Pipeline: Challenges in Discovery and Development of New Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade Clostridium difficile has become a bacterial pathogen of global significance. Epidemic strains have spread throughout hospitals, while community acquired infections and other sources ensure a constant inoculation of spores into hospitals. In response to the increasing medical burden, a new C. difficile antibiotic, fidaxomicin, was approved in 2011 for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. Rudimentary fecal transplants are also being trialed as effective treatments. Despite these advances, therapies that are more effective against C. difficile spores and less damaging to the resident gastrointestinal microbiome and that reduce recurrent disease are still desperately needed. However, bringing a new treatment for C. difficile infection to market involves particular challenges. This review covers the current drug discovery pipeline, including both small molecule and biologic therapies, and highlights the challenges associated with in vitro and in vivo models of C. difficile infection for drug screening and lead optimization. PMID:25760275

  10. Search for New Bioactive Marine Natural Products and Application to Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Natural products are well recognized as an important source of lead compounds in drug development. During the past >30 years, we have discovered >1000 novel bioactive natural products from Okinawan marine organisms (sponges, tunicates, cone shells, etc.) and microorganisms (fungi, bacteria, dinoflagellates, etc.). Some of them are used as bioprobes useful for basic studies of life sciences, while others are expected to be candidates of drug leads.

  11. Beyond America's War on Drugs: Developing Public Policy to Navigate the Prevailing Pharmacological Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Andrew; Bennett, Alex S; Elliott, Luther

    2015-03-30

    This paper places America's "war on drugs" in perspective in order to develop a new metaphor for control of drug misuse. A brief and focused history of America's experience with substance use and substance use policy over the past several hundred years provides background and a framework to compare the current Pharmacological Revolution with America's Nineteenth Century Industrial Revolution. The paper concludes with cautions about growing challenges and provides suggestions for navigating this revolution and reducing its negative impact on individuals and society.

  12. The newer, 'atypical' antipsychotic drugs--their development and current therapeutic use.

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, T

    1999-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need to become more aware of a new generation of antipsychotic drugs that are 'atypical' in that, unlike traditional neuroleptics, they do not cause extrapyramidal side-effects; they may also be more effective against both the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia by their actions on various neurotransmitter pathways in the brain. This is a non-systematic review of the development of these new drugs and outlines how they are currently being used. It inclu...

  13. The Pim kinases: new targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Kelly, Kevin; Carew, Jennifer; Nawrocki, Stefan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Sarantopoulos, John; Bearss, David; Giles, Francis

    2011-12-01

    The three Pim kinases are a small family of serine/threonine kinases regulating several signaling pathways that are fundamental to cancer development and progression. They were first recognized as pro-viral integration sites for the Moloney Murine Leukemia virus. Unlike other kinases, they possess a hinge region which creates a unique binding pocket for ATP. Absence of a regulatory domain means that these proteins are constitutively active once transcribed. Pim kinases are critical downstream effectors of the ABL (ableson), JAK2 (janus kinase 2), and Flt-3 (FMS related tyrosine kinase 1) oncogenes and are required by them to drive tumorigenesis. Recent investigations have established that the Pim kinases function as effective inhibitors of apoptosis and when overexpressed, produce resistance to the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, rapamycin . Overexpression of the PIM kinases has been reported in several hematological and solid tumors (PIM 1), myeloma, lymphoma, leukemia (PIM 2) and adenocarcinomas (PIM 3). As such, the Pim kinases are a very attractive target for pharmacological inhibition in cancer therapy. Novel small molecule inhibitors of the human Pim kinases have been designed and are currently undergoing preclinical evaluation.

  14. Developments in Methods for Measuring the Intestinal Absorption of Nanoparticle-Bound Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Caiyun; Zhao, Liling; Zhao, Ruixia; Zhu, Yongtao; Pan, Weisan

    2016-07-21

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, novel drug delivery systems comprising orally administered nanoparticles (NPs) have been paid increasing attention in recent years. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs has significant influence on drug efficacy and therapeutic dosage, and it is therefore imperative that the intestinal absorption of oral NPs be investigated. This review examines the various literature on the oral absorption of polymeric NPs, and provides an overview of the intestinal absorption models that have been developed for the study of oral nanoparticles. Three major categories of models including a total of eight measurement methods are described in detail (in vitro: dialysis bag, rat gut sac, Ussing chamber, cell culture model; in situ: intestinal perfusion, intestinal loops, intestinal vascular cannulation; in vivo: the blood/urine drug concentration method), and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are contrasted and elucidated. In general, in vitro and in situ methods are relatively convenient but lack accuracy, while the in vivo method is troublesome but can provide a true reflection of drug absorption in vivo. This review summarizes the development of intestinal absorption experiments in recent years and provides a reference for the systematic study of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticle-bound drugs.

  15. In silico tools used for compound selection during target-based drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    The target-based drug discovery process, including target selection, screening, hit-to-lead (H2L) and lead optimization stage gates, is the most common approach used in drug development. The full integration of in vitro and/or in vivo data with in silico tools across the entire process would be beneficial to R&D productivity by developing effective selection criteria and drug-design optimization strategies. This review focuses on understanding the impact and extent in the past 5 years of in silico tools on the various stage gates of the target-based drug discovery approach. There are a large number of in silico tools available for establishing selection criteria and drug-design optimization strategies in the target-based approach. However, the inconsistent use of in vitro and/or in vivo data integrated with predictive in silico multiparameter models throughout the process is contributing to R&D productivity issues. In particular, the lack of reliable in silico tools at the H2L stage gate is contributing to the suboptimal selection of viable lead compounds. It is suggested that further development of in silico multiparameter models and organizing biologists, medicinal and computational chemists into one team with a single accountable objective to expand the utilization of in silico tools in all phases of drug discovery would improve R&D productivity.

  16. Phenotypic screening approaches to develop Aurora kinase inhibitors: Drug Discovery perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eMarugán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting mitotic regulators as a strategy to fight cancer implies the development of drugs against key proteins such as Aurora A and B. Current drugs which target mitosis through a general mechanism of action (stabilization/destabilization of microtubules, have several side effects (neutropenia, alopecia, emesis. Pharmaceutical companies aim at avoiding these unwanted effects by generating improved and selective drugs that increase the quality of life of the patients. However, the development of these drugs is an ambitious task that involves testing thousands of compounds through biochemical and cell-based assays. In addition, molecules usually target complex biological processes, involving several proteins and different molecular pathways, further emphasizing the need for high-throughput screening techniques and multiplexing technologies in order to identify drugs with the desired phenotype.We will briefly describe two multiplexing technologies (high-content imaging, microarrays and flow cytometry and two key processes for drug discovery research (assay development and validation following our own published industry quality standards. We will further focus on high-content imaging as a useful tool for phenotypic screening and will provide a concrete example of high-content imaging assay to detect Aurora A or B selective inhibitors discriminating the off-target effects related to inhibition of other cell cycle or non-cell cycle key regulators. Finally, we will describe other assays that can help to characterize the in vitro pharmacology of the inhibitors.

  17. Globalization of quantitative pharmacology: first international symposium of quantitative pharmacology in drug development and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Shi, Jun; Xie, Hai-Tang; Huang, Xiao-Hui; Fossler, Michael J; Sun, Rui-Yuan

    2008-07-01

    The First International Symposium on Quantitative Pharmacology in Drug Development and Regulatory Sciences was held this past October in Nanjing, China, marking the first time scientists from around the globe gathered to discuss topics related to quantitative pharmacology in the Far East. With the recent trend toward global drug development and clinical trials in nontraditional countries, China has been regarded by many as the next frontier for the pharmaceutical industry. Quantitative pharmacology embraces all phases of pharmaceutical research and development, providing a mechanism to bridge decision making from one phase of development to the next, and it facilitates multidisciplinary partnerships through the assembly of both data and models that describe complex biological, biopharmaceutic, and clinical settings. Efforts in China are at an early stage, but it is clear that Chinese scientists embrace the discipline and are keen to promote this methodology in the registration of new drugs in China. While challenges exist, they represent an exciting area of future collaboration.

  18. [Contact and dialogue between drug companies and the global regulatory authorities throughout research and development phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Marianne; Thomsen, Mads Krogsgaard

    2003-04-14

    Contact between pharmaceutical companies and local as well as global regulatory authorities (Ministry of Health) takes place throughout the development phase and especially when a clinical study is to be initiated. This contact is important both for the company and for the authorities, as both parties are constantly kept informed about the development progress and about the potential unexpected findings in connection with development of a new drug. The authority dialogue secures that authorities and companies exploit their resources optimally and patients get access to new, safe and efficacious drugs without delay.

  19. Predicting drug disposition via application of BCS: transport/absorption/ elimination interplay and development of a biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chi-Yuan; Benet, Leslie Z

    2005-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) was developed to allow prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic performance of drug products from measurements of permeability (determined as the extent of oral absorption) and solubility. Here, we suggest that a modified version of such a classification system may be useful in predicting overall drug disposition, including routes of drug elimination and the effects of efflux and absorptive transporters on oral drug absorption; when transporter-enzyme interplay will yield clinically significant effects (e.g., low bioavailability and drug-drug interactions); the direction, mechanism, and importance of food effects; and transporter effects on postabsorption systemic drug concentrations following oral and intravenous dosing. These predictions are supported by a series of studies from our laboratory during the past few years investigating the effect of transporter inhibition and induction on drug metabolism. We conclude by suggesting that a Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) using elimination criteria may expand the number of Class 1 drugs eligible for a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence studies and provide predictability of drug disposition profiles for Classes 2, 3, and 4 compounds.

  20. Development of a multilayered association polymer system for sequential drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakavanam Sundararaj, Sharath kumar

    As all the physiological processes in our body are controlled by multiple biomolecules, comprehensive treatment of certain disease conditions may be more effectively achieved by administration of more than one type of drug. Thus, the primary objective of this research was to develop a multilayered, polymer-based system for sequential delivery of multiple drugs. This particular device was designed aimed at the treatment of periodontitis, a highly prevalent oral inflammatory disease that affects 90% of the world population. This condition is caused by bacterial biofilm on the teeth, resulting in a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The polymers used for the fabrication of this multilayered device consists of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) complexed with Pluronic F-127 (P). After evaluating morphology of the resulting CAPP system, in vitro release of small molecule drugs and a model protein was studied from both single and multilayered devices. Drug release from single-layered CAPP films followed zero-order kinetics related to surface erosion property of the association polymer. Release studies from multilayered CAPP devices showed the possibility of achieving intermittent release of one type of drug as well as sequential release of more than one type of drug. Mathematical modeling accurately predicted the release profiles for both single layer and multilayered devices. After the initial characterization of the CAPP system, the device was specifically modified to achieve sequential release of drugs aimed at the treatment of periodontitis. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. To obtain different erosion