WorldWideScience

Sample records for drug development clinical

  1. Pharmacometrics in early clinical drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacometrics, the science of quantitative clinical pharmacology, has been recognized as one of the main research fields able to improve efficiency in drug development, and to reduce attrition rates on the route from drug discovery to approval. This field of drug research, which builds heavily on

  2. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  3. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Colleen E.; An, Gary; Cannon, William R.; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E.; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S.; Sluka, James P.; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M.

    2016-02-17

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multi-scale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multi-scale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multi-scale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical techniques employed for multi-scale modeling approaches used in pharmacology and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art regarding drug development for: Excitable Systems (Heart); Cancer (Metastasis and Differentiation); Cancer (Angiogenesis and Drug Targeting); Metabolic Disorders; and Inflammation and Sepsis. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multi-scale models.

  4. Improving clinical drug development regulatory procedures for anticonvulsants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical development of antiepileptic drugs is demanding due to complex character of the disorder and to diversity of its forms and etiologies. Objective: The aim of this review was to suggest improvements in regulatory procedures for clinical development of antiepileptic drugs. Methods: The following databases of scientific articles were searched: MEDLINE, SCOPUS and SCINDEKS. In total 558 publications were retrieved. The types of articles selected were reviews, reports on clinical trials and letters to the Editor. Results: There are several changes of regulatory documents necessary for improving process of clinical development of antiepileptic drugs: preference of parallel groups design for add-on trials should be explicit; the noninferiority design for monotherapy clinical trials should be acceptable; restrictive formulations when trials of antiepileptic drugs in children are in question should be avoided; requirements in regard to the efficacy measures should be harmonized among the regulatory bodies; proactive attitude towards discovery of adverse events; and precise requirements for clinical trials specifically designed to prove anti-epileptogenic effects should be made clear. Conclusion: Current regulatory documents are incomplete in many aspects; an international effort to improve and harmonize guidelines for clinical development of antiepileptic drugs is necessary for improvement of this process.

  5. Use of biomarkers in ALS drug development and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, Nadine; Boehringer, Ashley; Bowser, Robert

    2015-05-14

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the discovery of candidate biomarkers for ALS. These biomarkers typically can either differentiate ALS from control subjects or predict disease course (slow versus fast progression). At the same time, late-stage clinical trials for ALS have failed to generate improved drug treatments for ALS patients. Incorporation of biomarkers into the ALS drug development pipeline and the use of biologic and/or imaging biomarkers in early- and late-stage ALS clinical trials have been absent and only recently pursued in early-phase clinical trials. Further clinical research studies are needed to validate biomarkers for disease progression and develop biomarkers that can help determine that a drug has reached its target within the central nervous system. In this review we summarize recent progress in biomarkers across ALS model systems and patient population, and highlight continued research directions for biomarkers that stratify the patient population to enrich for patients that may best respond to a drug candidate, monitor disease progression and track drug responses in clinical trials. It is crucial that we further develop and validate ALS biomarkers and incorporate these biomarkers into the ALS drug development process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ALS complex pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Delays in clinical development of neurological drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-06-28

    The delays in the approval and development of neurological drugs between Japan and other countries have been a major issue for patients with neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to analyze factors contributing to the delay in the launching of neurological drugs in Japan. We analyzed data from Japan and the US for the approval of 42 neurological drugs, all of which were approved earlier in the US than in Japan, and examined the potential factors that may cause the delay of their launch. Introductions of the 42 drugs in Japan occurred at a median of 87 months after introductions in the US. The mean review time of new drug applications for the 20 drugs introduced in Japan in January 2011 or later (15 months) was significantly shorter than that for the other 22 drugs introduced in Japan in December 2010 or earlier (24 months). The lag in the Japan's review time behind the US could not explain the approval delays. In the 31 of the 42 drugs, the application data package included overseas data. The mean review time of these 31 drugs (17 months) was significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs without overseas data (26 months). The mean approval lag behind the US of the 31 drugs (78 months) was also significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs (134 months). These results show that several important reforms in the Japanese drug development and approval system (e.g., inclusion of global clinical trial data) have reduced the delays in the clinical development of neurological drugs.

  7. Challenges in the clinical development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Valentina; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the current availability in the market of over two dozen antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), about one third of people with epilepsy fail to achieve complete freedom from seizures with existing medications. Moreover, currently available AEDs have significant limitations in terms of safety, tolerability and propensity to cause or be a target for clinically important adverse drug interactions. A review of the evidence shows that there are many misperceptions about the viability of investing into new therapies for epilepsy. In fact, there are clear incentives to develop newer and more efficacious medications. Developing truly innovative drugs requires a shift in the paradigms for drug discovery, which is already taking place by building on greatly expanded knowledge about the mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis, seizure generation, seizure spread and development of co-morbidities. AED development can also benefit by a review of the methodology currently applied in clinical AED development, in order to address a number of ethical and scientific concerns. As discussed in this article, many processes of clinical drug development, from proof-of-concept-studies to ambitious programs aimed at demonstrating antiepileptogenesis and disease-modification, can be facilitated by a greater integration of preclinical and clinical science, and by application of knowledge acquired during decades of controlled epilepsy trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premnath Shenoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017.

  9. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kazuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis-related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance-related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will be

  10. Challenges in the clinical development of orphan drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftmeijer-Vegter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Rare diseases are characterised by a low prevalence. There are so many different rare diseases, that millions of people are affected.The vast majority of these diseases suffer from a lack of approved treatment options and orphan drugs (ODs) therefore represent a huge unmet medical need. ODs face

  11. Mathematical modeling of efficacy and safety for anticancer drugs clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Silvia Maria; Borella, Elisa; Carrara, Letizia; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Magni, Paolo; Poggesi, Italo

    2018-01-01

    Drug attrition in oncology clinical development is higher than in other therapeutic areas. In this context, pharmacometric modeling represents a useful tool to explore drug efficacy in earlier phases of clinical development, anticipating overall survival using quantitative model-based metrics. Furthermore, modeling approaches can be used to characterize earlier the safety and tolerability profile of drug candidates, and, thus, the risk-benefit ratio and the therapeutic index, supporting the design of optimal treatment regimens and accelerating the whole process of clinical drug development. Areas covered: Herein, the most relevant mathematical models used in clinical anticancer drug development during the last decade are described. Less recent models were considered in the review if they represent a standard for the analysis of certain types of efficacy or safety measures. Expert opinion: Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict overall survival from earlier endpoints and validate their surrogacy in demonstrating drug efficacy in place of overall survival. An increasing number of mathematical models have also been developed to describe the safety findings. Modeling has been extensively used in anticancer drug development to individualize dosing strategies based on patient characteristics, and design optimal dosing regimens balancing efficacy and safety.

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of microdose clinical trials in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Naoe; Igarashi, Ataru; Kusama, Makiko; Maeda, Kazuya; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Microdose (MD) clinical trials have been introduced to obtain human pharmacokinetic data early in drug development. Here we assessed the cost-effectiveness of microdose integrated drug development in a hypothetical model, as there was no such quantitative research that weighed the additional effectiveness against the additional time and/or cost. First, we calculated the cost and effectiveness (i.e., success rate) of 3 types of MD integrated drug development strategies: liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, and positron emission tomography. Then, we analyzed the cost-effectiveness of 9 hypothetical scenarios where 100 drug candidates entering into a non-clinical toxicity study were selected by different methods as the conventional scenario without MD. In the base-case, where 70 drug candidates were selected without MD and 30 selected evenly by one of the three MD methods, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per one additional drug approved was JPY 12.7 billion (US$ 0.159 billion), whereas the average cost-effectiveness ratio of the conventional strategy was JPY 24.4 billion, which we set as a threshold. Integrating MD in the conventional drug development was cost-effective in this model. This quantitative analytical model which allows various modifications according to each company's conditions, would be helpful for guiding decisions early in clinical development.

  13. Recent trends for drug lag in clinical development of oncology drugs in Japan: does the oncology drug lag still exist in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    This study exhaustively and historically investigated the status of drug lag for oncology drugs approved in Japan. We comprehensively investigated oncology drugs approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014, using publicly available information. We also examined changes in the status of drug lag between Japan and the United States, as well as factors influencing drug lag. This study included 120 applications for approval of oncology drugs in Japan. The median difference over a 13-year period in the approval date between the United States and Japan was 875 days (29.2 months). This figure peaked in 2002, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. In 2014, the median approval lag was 281 days (9.4 months). Multiple regression analysis identified the following potential factors that reduce drug lag: "Japan's participation in global clinical trials"; "bridging strategies"; "designation of priority review in Japan"; and "molecularly targeted drugs". From 2001 to 2014, molecularly targeted drugs emerged as the predominant oncology drug, and the method of development has changed from full development in Japan or bridging strategy to global simultaneous development by Japan's taking part in global clinical trials. In line with these changes, the drug lag between the United States and Japan has significantly reduced to less than 1 year.

  14. Drug development in neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Jürgen

    2008-03-01

    Personalized medicine is still in its infancy concerning drug development in neuropsychopharmacology. Adequate biomarkers with clinical relevance to drug response and/or tolerability and safety largely remain to be identified. Possibly, this kind of personalized medicine will first gain clinical relevance in the dementias. The clinical relevance of the genotyping of drug-metabolizing enzymes as suggested by drug licensing authorities for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of medicinal products needs to be proven in sound clinical trials.

  15. Microdose clinical trial by use of radioisotope and perspective of its possible utilization in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Many promising PET tracers have been developed by the progress of molecular imaging research, and new era could be opened by clinical trials using investigational products labeled by RI. Guidance for microdose clinical trial issued by MHLW in June, 2008, is the regulatory basis to develop PET tracer under clinical trial by the pharmaceutical affairs law. In this review, the discussion from the aspect of regulatory science is highlighted, particularly, on the topics of guidance for microdose and exploratory IND study including sub-therapeutic dose (type II) and therapeutic dose (type III), the revised GMP for investigational product including RI-labeled product, and to ward guidance for microdose clinical trial for biological product. Finally, the US FDA guidance developing medical imaging drug including biological product is introduced, and then perspective of possible utilization of in vivo radiopharmaceutical agents in drug development is discussed. (author)

  16. The Influence of Big (Clinical) Data and Genomics on Precision Medicine and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Joshua C; Van Driest, Sara L; Wei, Wei-Qi; Roden, Dan M

    2018-03-01

    Drug development continues to be costly and slow, with medications failing due to lack of efficacy or presence of toxicity. The promise of pharmacogenomic discovery includes tailoring therapeutics based on an individual's genetic makeup, rational drug development, and repurposing medications. Rapid growth of large research cohorts, linked to electronic health record (EHR) data, fuels discovery of new genetic variants predicting drug action, supports Mendelian randomization experiments to show drug efficacy, and suggests new indications for existing medications. New biomedical informatics and machine-learning approaches advance the ability to interpret clinical information, enabling identification of complex phenotypes and subpopulations of patients. We review the recent history of use of "big data" from EHR-based cohorts and biobanks supporting these activities. Future studies using EHR data, other information sources, and new methods will promote a foundation for discovery to more rapidly advance precision medicine. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  17. Childhood extracranial neoplasms: the role of imaging in drug development and clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowkes, Lucy A.; Koh, Dow-Mu; MacVicar, David; Collins, David J.; Jerome, Neil P.; Chua, Sue C.; Pearson, Andrew D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age and new drugs are necessary to improve outcomes. Imaging is crucial to the drug development process and assessment of therapeutic response. In adults, tumours are often assessed with CT using size criteria. Unfortunately, techniques established in adults are not necessarily applicable in children due to differing pathophysiology, ability to cooperate and increased susceptibility to ionising radiation. MRI, in particular quantitative MRI, has to date not been fully utilised in children with extracranial neoplasms. The specific challenges of imaging in children, the potential for functional imaging techniques to inform upon and their inclusion in clinical trials are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Childhood extracranial neoplasms: the role of imaging in drug development and clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowkes, Lucy A.; Koh, Dow-Mu; MacVicar, David [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Collins, David J.; Jerome, Neil P. [Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Chua, Sue C. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Nuclear Medicine and PET Department, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Pearson, Andrew D.J. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Paediatric Drug Development Unit, Children and Young People' s Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age and new drugs are necessary to improve outcomes. Imaging is crucial to the drug development process and assessment of therapeutic response. In adults, tumours are often assessed with CT using size criteria. Unfortunately, techniques established in adults are not necessarily applicable in children due to differing pathophysiology, ability to cooperate and increased susceptibility to ionising radiation. MRI, in particular quantitative MRI, has to date not been fully utilised in children with extracranial neoplasms. The specific challenges of imaging in children, the potential for functional imaging techniques to inform upon and their inclusion in clinical trials are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Clinical trials for vaccine development in registry of Korea Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seog-Youn

    2013-01-01

    Based on the action plan "Ensuring a stable supply of National Immunization Program vaccines and sovereignty of biopharmaceutical products," Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) has made efforts to develop vaccines in the context of self reliance and to protect public health. Along with the recognized infrastructures for clinical trials, clinical trials for vaccines have also gradually been conducted at multinational sites as well as at local sites. KFDA will support to expand six to eleven kinds of vaccines by 2017. In accordance with integrated regulatory system, KFDA has promoted clinical trials, established national lot release procedure, and strengthened good manufacturing practices inspection and post marketing surveillance. Against this backdrop, KFDA will support the vaccine development and promote excellent public health protection.

  20. Microdialysis Monitoring in Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Role in Neuroprotective Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Carpenter, Keri L H; Hutchinson, Peter J; Helmy, Adel

    2017-03-01

    Injuries to the central nervous system continue to be vast contributors to morbidity and mortality; specifically, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death during the first four decades of life. Several modalities are used to monitor patients suffering from TBI in order to prevent detrimental secondary injuries. The microdialysis (MD) technique, introduced during the 1990s, presents the treating physician with a robust monitoring tool for brain chemistry in addition to conventional intracranial pressure monitoring. Nevertheless, some limitations remain, such as limited spatial resolution. Moreover, while there have been several attempts to develop new potential pharmacological therapies in TBI, there are currently no available drugs which have shown clinical efficacy that targets the underlying pathophysiology, despite various trials investigating a plethora of pharmaceuticals. Specifically in the brain, MD is able to demonstrate penetration of the drug through the blood-brain barrier into the brain extracellular space at potential site of action. In addition, the downstream effects of drug action can be monitored directly. In the future, clinical MD, together with other monitoring modalities, can identify specific pathological substrates which require tailored treatment strategies for patients suffering from TBI.

  1. Clinical trials information in drug development and regulation : existing systems and standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenhoef, Gert van; Tervonen, Tommi; Brock, Bert de; Hillege, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials provide pivotal evidence on drug efficacy and safety. The evidence, information from clinical trials, is currently used by regulatory decision makers in marketing authorization decisions, but only in an implicit manner. For clinical trials information to be used in a transparent and

  2. Clinical drug development using dynamic biomarkers to enable personalized health care in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Asger R; Karsdal, Morten A; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Despite massive investments in development of novel treatments for heterogeneous diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the resources spent have only benefitted a fraction of the population treated. Personalized Health Care to guide selection of a suitable patient population...... at higher risk of progression. We review the role of extra-cellular matrix proteins found to be upregulated in COPD. Novel biomarkers of connective tissue remodeling which may provide added value for a personalized approach by detecting subgroups of patients with active disease suitable for pharmacological...... already in the clinical development of new compounds could offer a solution. In this review, we discuss past successes and failures in drug development and biomarker research in COPD. We describe research in COPD phenotypes, and the required characteristics of a suitable biomarker for identifying patients...

  3. Clinical trials and late-stage drug development for Alzheimer’s disease: an appraisal from 1984 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lon S.; Mangialasche, Francesca; Andreasen, Niels; Feldman, Howard; Giacobini, Ezio; Jones, Roy; Mantua, Valentina; Mecocci, Patrizia; Pani, Luca; Winblad, Bengt; Kivipelto, Miia

    2014-01-01

    The modern era of drug development for Alzheimer’s disease began with the proposal of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory impairment and the 1984 research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease. Since then, despite the evaluation of numerous potential treatments in clinical trials, only four cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have shown sufficient safety and efficacy to allow marketing approval at an international level. Although this is probably because the other drugs tested were ineffective, inadequate clinical development methods have also been blamed for the failures. Here we review the development of treatments for Alzheimer’s disease during the past 30 years, considering the drugs, potential targets, late-stage clinical trials, development methods, emerging use of biomarkers and evolution of regulatory considerations in order to summarize advances and anticipate future developments. We have considered late-stage Alzheimer’s disease drug development from 1984 to 2013, including individual clinical trials, systematic and qualitative reviews, meta-analyses, methods, commentaries, position papers and guidelines. We then review the evolution of drugs in late clinical development, methods, biomarkers and regulatory issues. Although a range of small molecules and biological products against many targets have been investigated in clinical trials, the predominant drug targets have been the cholinergic system and the amyloid cascade. Trial methods have evolved incrementally: inclusion criteria have largely remained focused on mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease criteria, recently extending to early or prodromal Alzheimer disease or ‘mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease’, for drugs considered to be disease modifying. The duration of trials has remained at 6 to 12 months for drugs intended to improve symptoms; 18- to 24-month trials have been established for drugs expected to attenuate clinical course. Cognitive performance, activities

  4. Animal models to guide clinical drug development in ADHD: lost in translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Jeffery R; Hyland, Brian I; Tripp, Gail

    2011-01-01

    We review strategies for developing animal models for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is a behavioural disorder of unknown aetiology and pathophysiology. Current understanding suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the aetiology of ADHD. The involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in the pathophysiology of ADHD is probable. We review the clinical features of ADHD including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity and how these are operationalized for laboratory study. Measures of temporal discounting (but not premature responding) appear to predict known drug effects well (treatment validity). Open-field measures of overactivity commonly used do not have treatment validity in human populations. A number of animal models have been proposed that simulate the symptoms of ADHD. The most commonly used are the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (6-OHDA) animals. To date, however, the SHR lacks treatment validity, and the effects of drugs on symptoms of impulsivity and inattention have not been studied extensively in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. At the present stage of development, there are no in vivo models of proven effectiveness for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in ADHD. However, temporal discounting is an emerging theme in theories of ADHD, and there is good evidence of increased value of delayed reward following treatment with stimulant drugs. Therefore, operant behaviour paradigms that measure the effects of drugs in situations of delayed reinforcement, whether in normal rats or selected models, show promise for the future. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21480864

  5. Some uses of predictive probability of success in clinical drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Gasparini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Predictive probability of success is a (subjective Bayesian evaluation of the prob- ability of a future successful event in a given state of information. In the context of pharmaceutical clinical drug development, successful events relate to the accrual of positive evidence on the therapy which is being developed, like demonstration of su- perior efficacy or ascertainment of safety. Positive evidence will usually be obtained via standard frequentist tools, according to the regulations imposed in the world of pharmaceutical development.Within a single trial, predictive probability of success can be identified with expected power, i.e. the evaluation of the success probability of the trial. Success means, for example, obtaining a significant result of a standard superiority test.Across trials, predictive probability of success can be the probability of a successful completion of an entire part of clinical development, for example a successful phase III development in the presence of phase II data.Calculations of predictive probability of success in the presence of normal data with known variance will be illustrated, both for within-trial and across-trial predictions.

  6. 75 FR 37818 - Issues in the Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials for Antibacterial Drug Development; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... public workshop will help in developing topics for further discussion. Date and Time: The public workshop... Moser or Lori Benner, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Office of... of efficacy endpoints. Challenges in the conduct of clinical trials will be discussed, including good...

  7. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: Polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M.

    2013-01-17

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2013, 5:130-138. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1209 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: Drs Kieler-Ferguson and Fréchet declare no conflicts of interest. Dr Szoka is the founder of a liposome drug delivery company that is not working on any of the compounds mentioned in this article. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E L; Bento, A F; Cavalli, J; Oliveira, S K; Schwanke, R C; Siqueira, J M; Freitas, C S; Marcon, R; Calixto, J B

    2016-12-12

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose.

  10. Development of Pain Endpoint Models for Use in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials and Drug Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    US Food and Drug Administration Perspective.” Both manuscripts have been attached to annual report submitted to Department of Defenses in November...follow-up, conduct weekly telephone meetings with site data managers , and conduct monthly telephone meetings with site PIs (Months 23-75) Completed...Measurement in Cancer Clinical Trials: The US Food and Drug Administration Perspective. Cancer, 2014 Mar 1;120(5):761-7. doi: 10.1002/cncr.28470

  11. Metabonomics and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Pranov; Adams, Erwin; Augustijns, Patrick; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites as an end product of metabolism possess a wealth of information about altered metabolic control and homeostasis that is dependent on numerous variables including age, sex, and environment. Studying significant changes in the metabolite patterns has been recognized as a tool to understand crucial aspects in drug development like drug efficacy and toxicity. The inclusion of metabonomics into the OMICS study platform brings us closer to define the phenotype and allows us to look at alternatives to improve the diagnosis of diseases. Advancements in the analytical strategies and statistical tools used to study metabonomics allow us to prevent drug failures at early stages of drug development and reduce financial losses during expensive phase II and III clinical trials. This chapter introduces metabonomics along with the instruments used in the study; in addition relevant examples of the usage of metabonomics in the drug development process are discussed along with an emphasis on future directions and the challenges it faces.

  12. The microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay: the role of a drug-induced apoptosis assay in drug development and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosserman, Linda; Prendergast, Franklyn; Herbst, Roy; Fleisher, Martin; Salom, Emery; Strickland, Steven; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Rajurkar, Swapnil; Karimi, Misagh; Rogers, Karl; Davidson, Dirk; Willis, Carl; Penalver, Manuel; Homesley, Howard; Burrell, Matthew; Garrett, Audrey; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Presant, Cary A

    2012-08-15

    A drug-induced apoptosis assay, termed the microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay, has been developed. Blinded clinical trials have shown higher response rates and longer survival in groups of patients with acute myelocytic leukemia and epithelial ovarian cancer who have been treated with drugs that show high apoptosis in the MiCK assay. Unblinded clinical trials in multiple tumor types have shown that the assay will be used frequently by clinicians to determine treatment, and when used, results in higher response rates, longer times to relapse, and longer survivals. Model economic analyses suggest possible cost savings in clinical use based on increased generic drug use and single-agent substitution for combination therapies. Two initial studies with drugs in development are promising. The assay may help reduce costs and speed time to drug approval. Correlative studies with molecular biomarkers are planned. This assay may have a role both in personalized clinical therapy and in more efficient drug development. ©2012 AACR.

  13. New developments in the clinical use of drug-coated balloon catheters in peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghi J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jesse Naghi, Ethan A Yalvac, Ali Pourdjabbar, Lawrence Ang, John Bahadorani, Ryan R Reeves, Ehtisham Mahmud, Mitul Patel Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD involving the lower extremity is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD span the spectrum from lifestyle limiting claudication to ulceration and gangrene leading to amputation. Advancements including balloon angioplasty, self-expanding stents, drug-eluting stents, and atherectomy have resulted in high technical success rates for endovascular therapy in patients with PAD. However, these advances have been limited by somewhat high rates of clinical restenosis and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. The recent introduction of drug-coated balloon technology shows promise in limiting neointimal hyperplasia induced by vascular injury after endovascular therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary clinical data in the emerging area of drug-coated balloons. Keywords: drug-coated balloons, endovascular, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, paclitaxel, peripheral arterial disease

  14. Will clinical trial data disclosure reduce incentives to develop new uses of drugs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price II, William Nicholson; Minssen, Timo

    2015-01-01

    public trust in drugs and industry and the possibility of facilitating large cross-border clinical trials for, inter alia, rare diseases5. Despite these benefits, the costs and concerns associated with opening up trial data are also substantial—for patients (patient privacy), for research (related...

  15. Moving forward in uveitis therapy: preclinical to phase II clinical trial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Méndez, Raquel; Yilmaz, Taygan; Cordero-Coma, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Several advances have been made in the diagnostic approach and therapeutic management of patients with immune-mediated uveitis over the last few decades, which have to lead to an improvement in the visual prognosis of patients. However, the use of available therapies, including steroids and immunosuppressive drugs, is still associated with limited efficacy and potentially serious side effects. Consequently, efforts have been made to develop novel therapeutic alternatives including new molecules and innovative therapeutic approaches. Herein, the authors provide an updated review of those drugs in the initial phases of evaluation for the treatment of immune-mediated uveitides as well as the latest evidence from basic research. Enhanced understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms leading to immune-mediated uveitis has led to the identification of new therapeutic targets and thus to the development of more specific drugs. In addition, considering that the eye is a semi-enclosed chamber and that local therapy has the benefit of sparing the rest of the body from potentially toxic exposure, several attempts of establishing direct ophthalmologic avenues for delivery of the established and emerging drugs have also been made. All these advances have been an unquestionable step forward in the challenging management of uveitis patients.

  16. Development of a three-microneedle device for hypodermic drug delivery and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamizu, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Masao; Kim, Taishi; Matsushita, Yuki; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2012-08-01

    There is a potential use for intradermic or hypodermic drug delivery in skin surgery or aesthetic surgery. Hypodermic delivery with the use of a noninvasive device can be a more useful, reliable, and effective administration route to obtain higher compliance. The authors developed a microneedle device composed of three fine needles (three-microneedle device). The tip of each needle was fabricated with a bevel angle to release a drug broadly into the tissue in a horizontal fashion. In this study, the authors investigated the usefulness of this newly developed three-microneedle device for hypodermic liquid injection, focusing on the optimum insertion depth and the diffusion of injected materials to the tissue. The authors also assessed the efficacy of and patient satisfaction with three-microneedle device injections of botulinum toxin type A for wrinkle reduction in patients with glabellar rhytides. The three-microneedle device yielded consistent results in hypodermal diffusion. On India ink diffusion test and ultrasonographic imaging, three-microneedle device injection showed a broad diffusion in horizontal extension, as compared with usual 31-gauge needle injection. The efficiency and satisfaction of the patients receiving botulinum toxin type A with the three-microneedle device were highly rated. Three-microneedle device delivery enables accurate and broad diffusion of injected substances, thus reducing the total dose and/or injection number of drugs. Therapeutic, IV.

  17. Practical considerations in clinical strategy to support the development of injectable drug-device combination products for biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Easton, Rachael

    2018-01-01

    The development of an injectable drug-device combination (DDC) product for biologics is an intricate and evolving process that requires substantial investments of time and money. Consequently, the commercial dosage form(s) or presentation(s) are often not ready when pivotal trials commence, and it is common to have drug product changes (manufacturing process or presentation) during clinical development. A scientifically sound and robust bridging strategy is required in order to introduce these changes into the clinic safely. There is currently no single developmental paradigm, but a risk-based hierarchical approach has been well accepted. The rigor required of a bridging package depends on the level of risk associated with the changes. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic comparability or outcome studies are only required when important changes occur at a late stage. Moreover, an injectable DDC needs to be user-centric, and usability assessment in real-world clinical settings may be required to support the approval of a DDC. In this review, we discuss the common issues during the manufacturing process and presentation development of an injectable DDC and practical considerations in establishing a clinical strategy to address these issues, including key elements of clinical studies. We also analyze the current practice in the industry and review relevant and status of regulatory guidance in the DDC field.

  18. Practical considerations in clinical strategy to support the development of injectable drug-device combination products for biologics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Rachael

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of an injectable drug-device combination (DDC) product for biologics is an intricate and evolving process that requires substantial investments of time and money. Consequently, the commercial dosage form(s) or presentation(s) are often not ready when pivotal trials commence, and it is common to have drug product changes (manufacturing process or presentation) during clinical development. A scientifically sound and robust bridging strategy is required in order to introduce these changes into the clinic safely. There is currently no single developmental paradigm, but a risk-based hierarchical approach has been well accepted. The rigor required of a bridging package depends on the level of risk associated with the changes. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic comparability or outcome studies are only required when important changes occur at a late stage. Moreover, an injectable DDC needs to be user-centric, and usability assessment in real-world clinical settings may be required to support the approval of a DDC. In this review, we discuss the common issues during the manufacturing process and presentation development of an injectable DDC and practical considerations in establishing a clinical strategy to address these issues, including key elements of clinical studies. We also analyze the current practice in the industry and review relevant and status of regulatory guidance in the DDC field. PMID:29035675

  19. Quantitative decisions in drug development

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang-Stein, Christy

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a high-level treatise of evidence-based decisions in drug development. Because of the inseparable relationship between designs and decisions, a good portion of this book is devoted to the design of clinical trials. The book begins with an overview of product development and regulatory approval pathways. It then discusses how to incorporate prior knowledge into study design and decision making at different stages of drug development. The latter include selecting appropriate metrics to formulate decisions criteria, determining go/no-go decisions for progressing a drug candidate to the next stage and predicting the effectiveness of a product. Lastly, it points out common mistakes made by drug developers under the current drug-development paradigm. The book offers useful insights to statisticians, clinicians, regulatory affairs managers and decision-makers in the pharmaceutical industry who have a basic understanding of the drug-development process and the clinical trials conducted to support dru...

  20. Rapid Globalization of Medical Device Clinical Development Programs in Japan - The Case of Drug-Eluting Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Madoka; Suzuki, Yuka; Tominaga, Toshiyoshi

    2018-02-23

    Delays in the introduction to the Japanese market of drug-eluting stents (DES) developed overseas (i.e., "device lag") decreased sharply between 2004 and 2012. The reduction accompanied a shift in clinical development from a succession pattern (initial product development and approval overseas followed by eventual entrance into the Japanese market) to parallel development (employing multiregional clinical trials (MRCTs)). Although resource-intensive in the short-term, MRCTs are proving to be an effective tool in simultaneous global product development. Creative study designs and the absence of significant ethnic differences in Japanese subjects regarding DES safety and efficacy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of their coating drugs propel this process. More general factors such as medical need and industry incentivization also encourage this shift. Physicians' preference for DES over other percutaneous coronary interventions, the expanding global DES market, and streamlined development and approval prospects each motivate industry to continue investing in DES product development. The efforts of various stakeholders were also integral to overcoming practical obstacles, and contributions by 'Harmonization by Doing' and a premarket collaboration initiative between the USA and Japan were particularly effective. Today, USA/Japan regulatory cooperation is routine, and Japan is now integrated into global medical device development. MRCTs including Japanese subjects, sites, and investigators are now commonplace.

  1. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    .e. the infection became more asynchronous. Conclusions This simulation study demonstrates that the PD effect predicted from in vitro growth inhibition assays does not accord well with the PD effect of the anti-malarials observed within the patient. This simulation-based PK-PD modelling approach should not be considered as a replacement to conducting clinical trials but instead as a decision tool to improve the design of a clinical trial during drug development.

  2. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  3. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y., E-mail: frank.hsieh@nextcea.com

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  4. Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughns, Janelle D; Conklin, Laurie S; Long, Ying; Zheng, Panli; Faruque, Fahim; Green, Dionna J; van den Anker, John N; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2018-05-01

    There is a lack of dosing guidelines for use in obese children. Moreover, the impact of obesity on drug safety and clinical outcomes is poorly defined. The paucity of information needed for the safe and effective use of drugs in obese patients remains a problem, even after drug approval. To assess the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development, the pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 were reviewed for obesity studies. FDA labels were also reviewed for statements addressing obesity in pediatric patients. Forty-five drugs studied in pediatric patients under the FDA Amendments Act were found to have statements and key words in the medical and clinical pharmacology reviews and labels related to obesity. Forty-four products were identified similarly with pediatric studies under FDASIA. Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only 4 labels. We conclude that there is little information presently available to provide guidance related to dosing in obese pediatric patients. Moving forward, regulators, clinicians, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider situations in drug development in which the inclusion of obese patients in pediatric trials is necessary to facilitate the safe and effective use of new drug products in the obese pediatric population. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: Polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M.; Frechet, Jean; Szoka, Francis C.

    2013-01-01

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting

  6. Bioanalysis, metabolism & clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, R. ter

    2009-01-01

    The aims of all studies described in this thesis were to develop new bioanalytical and more patient friendly methods for studying the clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs and to ultimately improve antiretroviral treatment.

  7. Prevalence of acid-reducing agents (ARA) in cancer populations and ARA drug-drug interaction potential for molecular targeted agents in clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelick, Gillian S; Heffron, Timothy P; Chu, Laura; Dean, Brian; West, David A; Duvall, Scott L; Lum, Bert L; Budha, Nageshwar; Holden, Scott N; Benet, Leslie Z; Frymoyer, Adam; Dresser, Mark J; Ware, Joseph A

    2013-11-04

    Acid-reducing agents (ARAs) are the most commonly prescribed medications in North America and Western Europe. There are currently no data describing the prevalence of their use among cancer patients. However, this is a paramount question due to the potential for significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between ARAs, most commonly proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and orally administered cancer therapeutics that display pH-dependent solubility, which may lead to decreased drug absorption and decreased therapeutic benefit. Of recently approved orally administered cancer therapeutics, >50% are characterized as having pH-dependent solubility, but there are currently no data describing the potential for this ARA-DDI liability among targeted agents currently in clinical development. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the prevalence of ARA use among different cancer populations and (2) investigate the prevalence of orally administered cancer therapeutics currently in development that may be liable for an ARA-DDI. To address the question of ARA use among cancer patients, a retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed using two large healthcare databases: Thomson Reuters MarketScan (N = 1,776,443) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA, N = 1,171,833). Among all cancer patients, the total prevalence proportion of ARA use (no. of cancer patients receiving an ARA/total no. of cancer patients) was 20% and 33% for the MarketScan and VA databases, respectively. PPIs were the most commonly prescribed agent, comprising 79% and 65% of all cancer patients receiving a prescription for an ARA (no. of cancer patients receiving a PPI /no. of cancer patients receiving an ARA) for the MarketScan and VA databases, respectively. To estimate the ARA-DDI liability of orally administered molecular targeted cancer therapeutics currently in development, two publicly available databases, (1) Kinase SARfari and (2) canSAR, were examined. For those orally administered

  8. Hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 subtype identification in new HCV drug development and future clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Chevaliez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the development of new specific inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV enzymes and functions that may yield different antiviral responses and resistance profiles according to the HCV subtype, correct HCV genotype 1 subtype identification is mandatory in clinical trials for stratification and interpretation purposes and will likely become necessary in future clinical practice. The goal of this study was to identify the appropriate molecular tool(s for accurate HCV genotype 1 subtype determination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large cohort of 500 treatment-naïve patients eligible for HCV drug trials and infected with either subtype 1a or 1b was studied. Methods based on the sole analysis of the 5' non-coding region (5'NCR by sequence analysis or reverse hybridization failed to correctly identify HCV subtype 1a in 22.8%-29.5% of cases, and HCV subtype 1b in 9.5%-8.7% of cases. Natural polymorphisms at positions 107, 204 and/or 243 were responsible for mis-subtyping with these methods. A real-time PCR method using genotype- and subtype-specific primers and probes located in both the 5'NCR and the NS5B-coding region failed to correctly identify HCV genotype 1 subtype in approximately 10% of cases. The second-generation line probe assay, a reverse hybridization assay that uses probes targeting both the 5'NCR and core-coding region, correctly identified HCV subtypes 1a and 1b in more than 99% of cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the context of new HCV drug development, HCV genotyping methods based on the exclusive analysis of the 5'NCR should be avoided. The second-generation line probe assay is currently the best commercial assay for determination of HCV genotype 1 subtypes 1a and 1b in clinical trials and practice.

  9. Melatonergic drugs in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is widely known as "the darkness hormone". It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including cyto/neuroprotection, immune modulation, and energy metabolism have been ascribed to melatonin. A variety of studies have revealed a role for melatonin and its receptors in different pathophysiological conditions. However, the suitability of melatonin as a drug is limited because of its short half-life, poor oral bioavailability, and ubiquitous action. Due to the therapeutic potential of melatonin in a wide variety of clinical conditions, the development of new agents able to interact selectively with melatonin receptors has become an area of great interest during the last decade. Therefore, the field of melatonergic receptor agonists comprises a great number of structurally different chemical entities, which range from indolic to nonindolic compounds. Melatonergic agonists are suitable for sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric disorders related to circadian dysphasing, and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. The results of preclinical studies on animal models show that melatonin receptor agonists can be considered promising agents for the treatment of central nervous system-related pathologies. An overview of recent advances in the field of investigational melatonergic drugs will be presented in this review.

  10. Melatonergic drugs in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carocci A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alessia Carocci,1 Alessia Catalano,1 Maria Stefania Sinicropi2 1Department of Pharmacy–Drug Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, 2Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Cosenza, Italy Abstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is widely known as "the darkness hormone". It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including cyto/neuroprotection, immune modulation, and energy metabolism have been ascribed to melatonin. A variety of studies have revealed a role for melatonin and its receptors in different pathophysiological conditions. However, the suitability of melatonin as a drug is limited because of its short half-life, poor oral bioavailability, and ubiquitous action. Due to the therapeutic potential of melatonin in a wide variety of clinical conditions, the development of new agents able to interact selectively with melatonin receptors has become an area of great interest during the last decade. Therefore, the field of melatonergic receptor agonists comprises a great number of structurally different chemical entities, which range from indolic to nonindolic compounds. Melatonergic agonists are suitable for sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric disorders related to circadian dysphasing, and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. The results of preclinical studies on animal models show that melatonin receptor agonists can be considered promising agents for the treatment of central nervous system-related pathologies. An overview of recent advances in the field of investigational melatonergic drugs will be presented in this review. Keywords: MT1/MT2 ligands, circadian rhythms, melatonin 

  11. Method Development for Clinical Comprehensive Evaluation of Pediatric Drugs Based on Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: Application to Inhaled Corticosteroids for Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuncui; Jia, Lulu; Meng, Yao; Hu, Lihua; Liu, Yiwei; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Xuan; Han, Sheng; Peng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Xiaoling

    2018-04-01

    Establishing a comprehensive clinical evaluation system is critical in enacting national drug policy and promoting rational drug use. In China, the 'Clinical Comprehensive Evaluation System for Pediatric Drugs' (CCES-P) project, which aims to compare drugs based on clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness to help decision makers, was recently proposed; therefore, a systematic and objective method is required to guide the process. An evidence-based multi-criteria decision analysis model that involved an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was developed, consisting of nine steps: (1) select the drugs to be reviewed; (2) establish the evaluation criterion system; (3) determine the criterion weight based on the AHP; (4) construct the evidence body for each drug under evaluation; (5) select comparative measures and calculate the original utility score; (6) place a common utility scale and calculate the standardized utility score; (7) calculate the comprehensive utility score; (8) rank the drugs; and (9) perform a sensitivity analysis. The model was applied to the evaluation of three different inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) used for asthma management in children (a total of 16 drugs with different dosage forms and strengths or different manufacturers). By applying the drug analysis model, the 16 ICSs under review were successfully scored and evaluated. Budesonide suspension for inhalation (drug ID number: 7) ranked the highest, with comprehensive utility score of 80.23, followed by fluticasone propionate inhaled aerosol (drug ID number: 16), with a score of 79.59, and budesonide inhalation powder (drug ID number: 6), with a score of 78.98. In the sensitivity analysis, the ranking of the top five and lowest five drugs remains unchanged, suggesting this model is generally robust. An evidence-based drug evaluation model based on AHP was successfully developed. The model incorporates sufficient utility and flexibility for aiding the decision-making process, and can be a useful

  12. Acute Heart Failure Clinical Drug Development : From Planning to Proof of Activity to Phase III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, Gad; Voors, Adriaan A.; Weatherley, Beth Davison; Pang, Peter S.; Teerlink, John R.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Ponikowski, Piotr; Milo-Cotter, Olga; Dittrich, Howard; Teichman, Sam L.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Metra, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decades, attempts to develop new therapies for acute heart failure (AHF) have largely failed. Limitations in understanding the pathophysiology of AHF, its natural history, the effects of current therapies, the properties of new agents, and, importantly, study designs and execution have

  13. Fexinidazole--a new oral nitroimidazole drug candidate entering clinical development for the treatment of sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Torreele

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness, is a fatal parasitic disease caused by trypanosomes. Current treatment options for HAT are scarce, toxic, no longer effective, or very difficult to administer, in particular for the advanced, fatal stage of the disease (stage 2, chronic HAT. New safe, effective and easy-to-use treatments are urgently needed. Here it is shown that fexinidazole, a 2-substituted 5-nitroimidazole rediscovered by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi after extensive compound mining efforts of more than 700 new and existing nitroheterocycles, could be a short-course, safe and effective oral treatment curing both acute and chronic HAT and that could be implemented at the primary health care level. To complete the preclinical development and meet the regulatory requirements before initiating human trials, the anti-parasitic properties and the pharmacokinetic, metabolic and toxicological profile of fexinidazole have been assessed.Standard in vitro and in vivo anti-parasitic activity assays were conducted to assess drug efficacy in experimental models for HAT. In parallel, a full range of preclinical pharmacology and safety studies, as required by international regulatory guidelines before initiating human studies, have been conducted. Fexinidazole is moderately active in vitro against African trypanosomes (IC₅₀ against laboratory strains and recent clinical isolates ranged between 0.16 and 0.93 µg/mL and oral administration of fexinidazole at doses of 100 mg/kg/day for 4 days or 200 mg/kg/day for 5 days cured mice with acute and chronic infection respectively, the latter being a model for the advanced and fatal stage of the disease when parasites have disseminated into the brain. In laboratory animals, fexinidazole is well absorbed after oral administration and readily distributes throughout the body, including the brain. The absolute bioavailability of oral fexinidazole was 41% in mice

  14. Optimizing clinical drug product performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickinson, Paul A.; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Flanagan, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of Biopharmaceutics Risk Assessment Roadmap (BioRAM) and the BioRAM Scoring Grid is to facilitate optimization of clinical performance of drug products. BioRAM strategy relies on therapy-driven drug delivery and follows an integrated systems approach for formulating and addressing critical...... questions and decision-making (J Pharm Sci. 2014,103(11): 3777-97). In BioRAM, risk is defined as not achieving the intended in vivo drug product performance, and success is assessed by time to decision-making and action. Emphasis on time to decision-making and time to action highlights the value of well....... Application of the BioRAM Scoring Grid is illustrated using published literature. Organizational considerations for implementing BioRAM strategy, including the interactions, function, and skillsets of the BioRAM group members, are also reviewed. As a creative and innovative systems approach, we believe...

  15. Tau-Centric Targets and Drugs in Clinical Development for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Panza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of several Phase II/III clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease (AD with drugs targeting β-amyloid accumulation in the brain fuelled an increasing interest in alternative treatments against tau pathology, including approaches targeting tau phosphatases/kinases, active and passive immunization, and anti-tau aggregation. The most advanced tau aggregation inhibitor (TAI is methylthioninium (MT, a drug existing in equilibrium between a reduced (leuco-methylthioninium and oxidized form (MT+. MT chloride (methylene blue was investigated in a 24-week Phase II clinical trial in 321 patients with mild to moderate AD that failed to show significant positive effects in mild AD patients, although long-term observations (50 weeks and biomarker studies suggested possible benefit. The dose of 138 mg/day showed potential benefits on cognitive performance of moderately affected AD patients and cerebral blood flow in mildly affected patients. Further clinical evidence will come from the large ongoing Phase III trials for the treatment of AD and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia on a new form of this TAI, more bioavailable and less toxic at higher doses, called TRx0237. More recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued based on impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, a clinically used derivative of salicylic acid.

  16. Biochemical markers of bone turnover in the clinical development of drugs for osteoporosis and metastatic bone disease: potential uses and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Serge; Garnero, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover are used increasingly during the clinical development of drugs for the treatment of metabolic bone diseases such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and cancer that has metastasised to the bone. However, assessing the optimal value of these markers is often complicated, and such an assessment is an obvious prerequisite for rational use of the markers and, consequently, potential improvement of clinical drug development. Biochemical markers of bone turnover are substances in the blood or urine that are produced or released during bone remodelling. They provide semiquantitative information on bone remodelling, and are often the most adequate tool to describe the pharmacodynamics of the drug. Their use has increased considerably because of dose-effect relationships that have been seen with certain drugs, but also because they have proven relationships with clinical outcomes in several metabolic bone diseases. However, there is a lack of information on the kinetics of these markers, and the immunoassays that are frequently used in their monitoring often measure a mixture of fragments rather than a single molecular entity. For drug development it should also be realised that different markers, but also different assays for the same marker, may provide different results, considerably limiting the ability to compare results. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, relationships have been shown between several biochemical markers of bone turnover, and either fracture risk and/or the antifracture efficacy of drugs. Such relationships can be used for the development of drugs with similar mechanisms of action, but also for the development of these drugs for closely related indications, such as corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. In both of these instances, data on effects on biochemical markers of bone turnover are usually employed in combination with information about effects on bone mineral density. However, the relationships of these parameters

  17. Surrogacy in antiviral drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaunak, Sunil; Davies, Donald S

    2002-01-01

    The coming of age of molecular biology has resulted in an explosion in our understanding of the pathogenesis of virus related diseases. New pathogens have been identified and characterized as being responsible for old diseases. Empirical clinical evaluation of morbidity and mortality as outcome measures after a therapeutic intervention have started to give way to the use of an increasing number of surrogate markers. Using a combination of these markers, it is now possible to measure and monitor the pathogen as well as the host's response. Nowhere is this better exemplified in virology than in the field of AIDS. We have utilized the advances in pathogenesis and new antiretroviral drug development to: develop a new class of drugs which block the entry of HIV-1 into cells.develop a new approach for effectively delivering these drugs to those tissues in which most viral replication takes place. Over the last 10 years, our work has progressed from concept to clinical trial. Our laboratory based evaluation of the new molecules developed as well as our clinical evaluation of their safety and efficacy have had to respond and adapt to the rapid changes taking place in AIDS research. This paper discusses the problems encountered and the lessons learnt. PMID:12100230

  18. Identification of clinically significant drug-drug interactions in cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions in cardiac intensive care units of two tertiary care ... hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes or other diseases .... May result in digoxin toxicity (nausea, vomiting, cardiac.

  19. Clinical efficacy and health implications of inconsistency in different production batches of antimycotic drugs in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunshe, Adenike A O; Adepoju, Adedayo A; Oladimeji, Modupe E

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the in vitro efficacy and health implications of inconsistencies in different production batches of antimycotic drugs. in vitro susceptibility profiles of 36 Candida spp. - C. albicans (19.4%), C. glabrata (30.6%), C. tropicalis (33.3%), and C. pseudotropicalis (16.7%) - obtained from human endocervical and high vaginal swabs (ECS/HVS) to two different batches (B1 and B2) of six antimycotic drugs (clotrimazole, doxycycline, iconazole, itraconazole, metronidazole and nystatin) was determined using modified agar well-diffusion method. None of the Candida strains had entirely the same (100%) susceptibility / resistance profiles in both batches of corresponding antimycotic drugs; while, different multiple antifungal susceptibility (MAS) rates were also recorded in batches 1 and 2 for corresponding antifungals. Only 14.3%, 27.3%, 16.7-33.3%, and 8.3-25.0% of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. pseudotropicalis, and C. tropicalis strains, respectively, had similar susceptibility/resistance profiles toward coressponding antifungal agents in both batches; while up to 57.1% of C. albicans, 45.5% of C. glabrata, 66.7% of C. pseudotropicalis, and 50.0% of C. tropicalis strains were susceptible to one batch of antifungals but resistant to corresponding antifungals in the second batch. As high as 71.4% (C. albicans), 73.0% (C. glabrata), 50.0% (C. pseudotropicalis), and 66.74% (C. tropicalis) strains had differences of ≥ 10.0 mm among corresponding antimycotic agents. Candida strains exhibited different in vitro susceptibility / resistance patterns toward two batches of corresponding antimycotic agents, which has clinical implications on the efficacy of the drugs and treatment of patients. The findings of the present study will be of benefit in providing additional information in support of submission of drugs for registration to appropriate regulatory agencies.

  20. Prospective of clinical drugs for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alok, Amit; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Arun; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    We are living in an era of nuclear power where power derived from nuclear reaction is used for power generation as well as for nuclear weapons. The terrorism and the threat of dirty bombs looms around the civilized population. Therefore, there is a need to develop radioprotector which could prevent against the harmful effect of radiation. The research on radioprotector started more than fifty years ago but still there is no approved radioprotector in the drug market. Hundreds of lead molecule have been screened and have shown varying amount of radioprotection either in vitro or in vivo or in both. Only one drug amifostine was approved by FDA but due to its toxicity in head and neck cancer, this drug is no more in use. Antioxidants too have proven to be a potential radioprotector but the dose required for radioprotection is too high for maintenance of homeostasis in physiological system. We have taken an alternative approach of using clinical drugs like diclofenac and tetracycline for development of approach for radioprotection and reported the radioprotective role of diclofenac. The advantage of using clinical drug is its wide availability in the market and the ease with which it could be channelized for radioprotection. Antiradical assays have demonstrated possible use of tetracycline for radioprotection. Tetracycline has also ability to reduce oxidative damages ex vivo. Studies related to comet assay as well as antioxidant assays in different organs are in progress for designing further work for efficacy and elucidation of mechanisms. (author)

  1. New Zealand’s Drug Development Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Carswell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industry’s profitability depends on identifying and successfully developing new drug candidates while trying to contain the increasing costs of drug development. It is actively searching for new sources of innovative compounds and for mechanisms to reduce the enormous costs of developing new drug candidates. There is an opportunity for academia to further develop as a source of drug discovery. The rising levels of industry outsourcing also provide prospects for organisations that can reduce the costs of drug development. We explored the potential returns to New Zealand (NZ from its drug discovery expertise by assuming a drug development candidate is out-licensed without clinical data and has anticipated peak global sales of $350 million. We also estimated the revenue from NZ’s clinical research industry based on a standard per participant payment to study sites and the number of industry-sponsored clinical trials approved each year. Our analyses found that NZ’s clinical research industry has generated increasing foreign revenue and appropriate policy support could ensure that this continues to grow. In addition the probability-based revenue from the out-licensing of a drug development candidate could be important for NZ if provided with appropriate policy and financial support.

  2. A health record integrated clinical decision support system to support prescriptions of pharmaceutical drugs in patients with reduced renal function: design, development and proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemeikka, Tero; Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia; Elinder, Carl-Gustaf; Vég, Anikó; Törnqvist, Elisabeth; Cornelius, Birgitta; Korkmaz, Seher

    2015-06-01

    To develop and verify proof of concept for a clinical decision support system (CDSS) to support prescriptions of pharmaceutical drugs in patients with reduced renal function, integrated in an electronic health record system (EHR) used in both hospitals and primary care. A pilot study in one geriatric clinic, one internal medicine admission ward and two outpatient healthcare centers was evaluated with a questionnaire focusing on the usefulness of the CDSS. The usage of the system was followed in a log. The CDSS is considered to increase the attention on patients with impaired renal function, provides a better understanding of dosing and is time saving. The calculated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the dosing recommendation classification were perceived useful while the recommendation texts and background had been used to a lesser extent. Few previous systems are used in primary care and cover this number of drugs. The global assessment of the CDSS scored high but some elements were used to a limited extent possibly due to accessibility or that texts were considered difficult to absorb. Choosing a formula for the calculation of eGFR in a CDSS may be problematic. A real-time CDSS to support kidney-related drug prescribing in both hospital and outpatient settings is valuable to the physicians. It has the potential to improve quality of drug prescribing by increasing the attention on patients with renal insufficiency and the knowledge of their drug dosing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Drug Development for Metastasis Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontebasso, Yari; Dubinett, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is responsible for 90% of death from solid tumors. However, only a minority of metastasis-specific targets has been exploited therapeutically, and effective prevention and suppression of metastatic disease is still an elusive goal. In this review, we will first summarize the current state of knowledge about the molecular features of the disease, with particular focus on steps and targets potentially amenable to therapeutic intervention. We will then discuss the reasons underlying the paucity of metastatic drugs in the current oncological arsenal and potential ways to overcome this therapeutic gap. We reason that the discovery of novel promising targets, an increased understanding of the molecular features of the disease, the effect of disruptive technologies, and a shift in the current preclinical and clinical settings have the potential to create more successful drug development endeavors.

  4. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  5. Positron emission tomography in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Fischman, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    There are four kinds of measurements that can be carried out with positron emission tomography (PET) that can contribute significantly to the process of drug development: pharmacodynamic measurement of tissue metabolism influenced by a given drug; precise measurements of tissue blood flow; tissue pharmacokinetics of a given drug following administration of a particular dose; and the temporal course of ligand-receptor interaction. One or more of these measurements can greatly improve the decision making involved in determining the appropriate dose of a drug, the clinical situations in which a drug might be useful, and the linkage of pharmacokinetics with pharmacodynamics, which is at the heart of effective drug development. The greater the potential of a particular compound as a therapeutic agent, the greater the potential for PET to contribute to the drug development process

  6. A commentary on transdermal drug delivery systems in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Adam C

    2013-09-01

    The number of drugs available as marketed transdermal products is limited to those that exhibit the correct physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties that enable their effective delivery across the skin. In this respect, there are less than 20 drugs that are currently marketed in the US and EU as products that deliver systemic levels of their active ingredients. An analysis of clinical trials conducted in the transdermal sector shows a similar picture with only nine drugs accounting for approximately 80% of all transdermal clinical trials listed on ClinicalTrials.gov. Those drugs for which there are very few transdermal trials listed consist mostly of molecules that are inherently unsuitable for transdermal delivery and serve as a clear warning to drug developers that the science that governs transdermal drug delivery is well reflected by the successes and failures of drugs in development as well as those that make it to the market. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Palleria, Caterina; DI PAOLO, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In thi...

  8. Drug Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preclinical Research Preclinical Research Drugs undergo laboratory and animal testing to answer basic questions about safety. More Information ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  9. Success rates for product development strategies in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, E; Nelson, G M; Haynes, M; Sargeant, F

    2016-04-01

    While research has examined the likelihood that drugs progress across phases of clinical trials, no research to date has examined the types of product development strategies that are the most likely to be successful in clinical trials. This research seeks to identify the strategies that are most likely to reach the market-those generated using a novel product development strategy or strategies that combine a company's expertise with both drugs and indications, which we call combined experience strategies. We evaluate the success of product development strategies in the drug development process for a sample of 2562 clinical trials completed by 406 US pharmaceutical companies. To identify product development strategies, we coded each clinical trial according to whether it consisted of an indication or a drug that was new to the firm. Accordingly, a clinical trial that consists of both an indication and a drug that were both new to the firm represents a novel product development strategy; indication experience is a product development strategy that consists of an indication that a firm had tested previously in a clinical trial, but with a drug that was new to the firm; drug experience is a product development strategy that consists of a drug that the firm had prior experience testing in clinical trials, but with an indication that was new to the firm; combined experience consists of both a drug and an indication that the firm had experience testing in clinical trials. Success rates for product development strategies across clinical phases were calculated for the clinical trials in our sample. Combined experience strategies had the highest success rate. More than three and a half percent (0·036) of the trials that combined experience with drugs and indications eventually reached the market. The next most successful strategy is drug experience (0·025) with novel strategies trailing closely (0·024). Indication experience strategies are the least successful (0·008

  10. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  11. Drug-induced psoriasis: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balak DMW

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Deepak MW Balak, Enes Hajdarbegovic Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Exposure to certain drugs can elicit an induction or exacerbation of psoriasis. Although well-conducted systematic studies on drug-related psoriasis are mostly lacking, traditionally strong associations have been documented for beta-blockers, lithium, antimalarial drugs such as (hydroxychloroquine, interferons, imiquimod, and terbinafine. More recently, new associations have been reported for monoclonal antibody- and small-molecule-based targeted therapies used for oncological and immunological indications, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immune checkpoint inhibitors. Recognizing potential drug-related psoriasis is of clinical relevance to allow an optimal management of psoriasis. However, in clinical practice, identifying medication-related exacerbations and induction of psoriasis can be challenging. The clinical and histopathological features of drug-provoked psoriasis may differ little from that of “classical” nondrug-related forms of psoriasis. In addition, the latency period between start of the medication and onset of psoriasis can be significantly long for some drugs. Assessment of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale could be used as a practical tool to better differentiate drug-related psoriasis. The first step in the management of drug-related psoriasis is cessation and replacement of the offending drug when deemed clinically possible. However, the induced psoriasis skin lesions may persist after treatment withdrawal. Additional skin-directed treatment options for drug-related psoriasis follows the conventional psoriasis treatment guidelines and includes topical steroids and vitamin D analogs, ultraviolet phototherapy, systemic treatments, such as acitretin, methotrexate, and fumaric acid esters, and biological treatments

  12. Clinical efficacy of nebulized drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    1994-01-01

    There is a mandatory need for effortless drug administration to young children since the prevalence among them of recurrent wheezing is a 15-20%. It is becoming increasingly evident that many of these children respond dramatically well to beta2-agonists and topical steroids; accordingly this sub...

  13. Drug Development Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... molecule that contains genetic instructions to make proteins. Delivery of CFTR-encoded mRNA would allow the lung cells to create normally functioning CFTR protein, regardless of an individual’s specific CFTR gene mutation. This drug is delivered via inhalation. Editas This program is ...

  14. Drug development and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  15. Recommendations for Clinical Pathology Data Generation, Interpretation, and Reporting in Target Animal Safety Studies for Veterinary Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siska, William; Gupta, Aradhana; Tomlinson, Lindsay; Tripathi, Niraj; von Beust, Barbara

    Clinical pathology testing is routinely performed in target animal safety studies in order to identify potential toxicity associated with administration of an investigational veterinary pharmaceutical product. Regulatory and other testing guidelines that address such studies provide recommendations for clinical pathology testing but occasionally contain outdated analytes and do not take into account interspecies physiologic differences that affect the practical selection of appropriate clinical pathology tests. Additionally, strong emphasis is often placed on statistical analysis and use of reference intervals for interpretation of test article-related clinical pathology changes, with limited attention given to the critical scientific review of clinically, toxicologically, or biologically relevant changes. The purpose of this communication from the Regulatory Affairs Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology is to provide current recommendations for clinical pathology testing and data interpretation in target animal safety studies and thereby enhance the value of clinical pathology testing in these studies.

  16. Drug development for neurodevelopmental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Lindemann, Lothar; Jønch, Aia E

    2018-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders such as fragile X syndrome (FXS) result in lifelong cognitive and behavioural deficits and represent a major public health burden. FXS is the most frequent monogenic form of intellectual disability and autism, and the underlying pathophysiology linked to its causal ge......, FMR1, has been the focus of intense research. Key alterations in synaptic function thought to underlie this neurodevelopmental disorder have been characterized and rescued in animal models of FXS using genetic and pharmacological approaches. These robust preclinical findings have led...... to the implementation of the most comprehensive drug development programme undertaken thus far for a genetically defined neurodevelopmental disorder, including phase IIb trials of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antagonists and a phase III trial of a GABAB receptor agonist. However, none of the trials has...... been able to unambiguously demonstrate efficacy, and they have also highlighted the extent of the knowledge gaps in drug development for FXS and other neurodevelopmental disorders. In this Review, we examine potential issues in the previous studies and future directions for preclinical and clinical...

  17. Current drug and molecular therapies for the treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration: phase I to phase III clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiling; Chintalapudi, Sumana R; Jablonski, Monica M

    2017-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly. Atrophic AMD, including early, intermediate and geographic atrophy (GA), accounts for ~90% of all cases. It is a multifactorial degeneration characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and aging components. Although no FDA-approved treatment yet exists for the late stage of atrophic AMD, multiple pathological mechanisms are partially known and several promising therapies are in various stages of development. Areas covered: Underlying mechanisms that define atrophic AMD will help provide novel therapeutic targets that will address this largely unmet clinical need. The purpose of this paper is to review current promising drugs that are being evaluated in clinical trials. Because no pharmacological treatments are currently available for late stage of atrophic AMD, any new therapy would have extensive market potential. Expert opinion: The number of AMD patients is predicted to increase to ~30 million worldwide by 2020. In response to this enormous unmet clinical need, new promising therapies are being developed and evaluated in clinical trials. We propose that the assessment of novel interventions will also need to consider the genotypes of participants, as the benefit may be determined by polymorphisms in an individual's genetic background.

  18. Metallomics in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi Nhu Tam; Ostergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    in plasma. A detection limit of 41 ng/mL of platinum and a precision of 2.1 % (for 10 µg/mL of cisplatin standard) were obtained. Simultaneous measurements of phosphorous and platinum allows the simultaneous monitoring of the liposomes, liposome-encapsulated cisplatin, free cisplatin and cisplatin bound...... to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before...

  19. Nuclear imaging drug development tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, L.; Jurek, P.; Redshaw, R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the development of nuclear imaging as an enabling technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Molecular imaging is maturing into an important tool with expanding applications from validating that a drug reaches the intended target through to market launch of a new drug. Molecular imaging includes anatomical imaging of organs or tissues, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound.

  20. Drug discovery and developments in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the major burden being in developing countries. Many of ... The driving force for drug discovery and development by pharmaceutical firms ... world and particularly in the third world countries ..... GFHR (2000) Global Forum for Health Research:.

  1. Pediatric Melanoma and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Importance—Pediatric melanoma occurs, albeit rarely. Should patients be treated by today’s medical standards, or be subjected to medically unnecessary clinical studies? Observations—We identified international, industry-sponsored pediatric melanoma studies triggered by regulatory demands in www.clinicaltrials.gov and further pediatric melanoma studies demanded by European Union pediatric investigation plans. We retrieved related regulatory documents from the internet. We analyzed these studies for rationale and medical beneficence on the basis of physiology, pediatric clinical pharmacology and rationale. Regulatory authorities define children by chronological age, not physiologically. Newborns’ organs are immature but they develop and mature rapidly. Separate proof of efficacy in underage patients is justified formally/regulatorily but lacks medical sense. Children—especially post-puberty—and adults vis-a-vis medications are physiologically very similar. Two adolescent melanoma studies were terminated in 2016 because of waning recruitment, while five studies in pediatric melanoma and other solid tumors, triggered by European Union pediatric investigation plans, continue recruiting worldwide. Conclusions and Relevance—Regulatory-demanded pediatric melanoma studies are medically superfluous. Melanoma patients of all ages should be treated with effective combination treatment. Babies need special attention. Children need dose-finding and pharmacokinetic studies but adolescents metabolize and respond to drugs similarly to adults. Institutional Review Boards/ethics committees should suspend ongoing questionable pediatric melanoma studies and reject newly submitted questionable studies.

  2. Drug development: from concept to marketing!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Nihad A M; Ellis, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Drug development is an expensive, long and high-risk business taking 10-15 years and is associated with a high attrition rate. It is driven by medical need, disease prevalence and the likelihood of success. Drug candidate selection is an iterative process between chemistry and biology, refining the molecular properties until a compound suitable for advancing to man is found. Typically, about one in a thousand synthesised compounds is ever selected for progression to the clinic. Prior to administration to humans, the pharmacology and biochemistry of the drug is established using an extensive range of in vitro and in vivo test procedures. It is also a regulatory requirement that the drug is administered to animals to assess its safety. Later-stage animal testing is also required to assess carcinogenicity and effects on the reproductive system. Clinical phases of drug development include phase I in healthy volunteers to assess primarily pharmacokinetics, safety and toleration, phase II in a cohort of patients with the target disease to establish efficacy and dose-response relationship and large-scale phase III studies to confirm safety and efficacy. Experience tells us that approximately only 1 in 10 drugs that start the clinical phase will make it to the market. Each drug must demonstrate safety and efficacy in the intended patient population and its benefits must outweigh its risks before it will be approved by the regulatory agencies. Strict regulatory standards govern the conduct of pre-clinical and clinical trials as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. The assessment of the new medicinal product's safety continues beyond the initial drug approval through post-marketing monitoring of adverse events. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Clinical relevance of cimetidine drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, A F

    1992-01-01

    The excellent efficacy and tolerability profiles of H2-antagonists have established these agents as the leading class of antiulcer drugs. Attention has been focused on drug interactions with H2-antagonists as a means of product differentiation and because many patients are receiving multiple drug therapy. The main mechanism of most drug interactions involving cimetidine appears to be inhibition of the hepatic microsomal enzyme cytochrome P450, an effect which may be related to the different structures of H2-antagonists. Ranitidine appears to have less affinity than cimetidine for this system. There have been many published case reports and studies of drug interactions with cimetidine, but many of these have provided pharmacokinetic data only, with little information concerning the clinical significance of these findings. Nevertheless, the coadministration of cimetidine with drugs that have a narrow therapeutic margin (such as theophylline) may potentially result in clinically significant adverse effects. The monitoring of serum concentrations of drugs coadministered with cimetidine may reduce the risk of adverse events but does not abolish the problem. However, for most patients, concomitant administration of cimetidine with drugs possessing a wide therapeutic margin is unlikely to pose a significant problem.

  4. Early drug development of inhibitors of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor pathway: lessons from the first clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodon, Jordi; DeSantos, Victoria; Ferry, Robert Jean; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2008-09-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) was first cloned in 1986. Since then, intense work has defined classic phosphorelays activated via the IGF-IR, which regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, motility, and fate. The understanding of the roles of hormones in cancer and the growth hormone-IGF-IGF-binding protein axis specifically has yield to a second wave of development: the design of specific inhibitors that interrupt the signaling associated with this axis. The ability to manipulate these pathways holds not only significant therapeutic implications but also increase the chance of deeper insight about the role of the axis in carcinogenesis and metastasis. Nowadays, >25 molecules with the same goal are at different stages of development. Here, we review the clinical and preclinical experience with the two most-investigated strategies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, and the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy, as well as other alternatives and possible drug combinations. We also review the biomarkers explored in the first clinical trials, the strategies that have been explored thus far, and the clinical trials that are going to explore their role in cancer treatment.

  5. The role of radiolabelled compounds in preclinical drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    The role of radiolabelled compounds in the development of new drugs is discussed, with particular reference to their use in toxicological, metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies for the pre-clinical safety evaluation of new drugs. (U.K.)

  6. Mind the gap : predicting cardiovascular risk during drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chain, Anne S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular safety issues, specifically drug-induced QT/QTc-interval prolongation, remain a major cause of drug attrition during clinical development and is one of the main causes for post-market drug withdrawals accounting for 15-34% of all drug discontinuation. Given the potentially fatal

  7. The target landscape of clinical kinase drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaeger, Susan; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Wilhelm, Mathias; Polzer, Harald; Vick, Binje; Koenig, Paul-Albert; Reinecke, Maria; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Petzoldt, Svenja; Meng, Chen; Zecha, Jana; Reiter, Katrin; Qiao, Huichao; Helm, Dominic; Koch, Heiner; Schoof, Melanie; Canevari, Giulia; Casale, Elena; Depaolini, Stefania Re; Feuchtinger, Annette; Wu, Zhixiang; Schmidt, Tobias; Rueckert, Lars; Becker, Wilhelm; Huenges, Jan; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Gohlke, Bjoern-Oliver; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Kayser, Gian; Vooder, Tonu; Preissner, Robert; Hahne, Hannes; Tõnisson, Neeme; Kramer, Karl; Götze, Katharina; Bassermann, Florian; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Walch, Axel; Greif, Philipp A; Schneider, Sabine; Felder, Eduard Rudolf; Ruland, Juergen; Médard, Guillaume; Jeremias, Irmela; Spiekermann, Karsten; Kuster, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    Kinase inhibitors are important cancer therapeutics. Polypharmacology is commonly observed, requiring thorough target deconvolution to understand drug mechanism of action. Using chemical proteomics, we analyzed the target spectrum of 243 clinically evaluated kinase drugs. The data revealed previously unknown targets for established drugs, offered a perspective on the "druggable" kinome, highlighted (non)kinase off-targets, and suggested potential therapeutic applications. Integration of phosphoproteomic data refined drug-affected pathways, identified response markers, and strengthened rationale for combination treatments. We exemplify translational value by discovering SIK2 (salt-inducible kinase 2) inhibitors that modulate cytokine production in primary cells, by identifying drugs against the lung cancer survival marker MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase), and by repurposing cabozantinib to treat FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia. This resource, available via the ProteomicsDB database, should facilitate basic, clinical, and drug discovery research and aid clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Has molecular imaging delivered to drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Philip S.; Patel, Neel; McCarthy, Timothy J.

    2017-10-01

    Pharmaceutical research and development requires a systematic interrogation of a candidate molecule through clinical studies. To ensure resources are spent on only the most promising molecules, early clinical studies must understand fundamental attributes of the drug candidate, including exposure at the target site, target binding and pharmacological response in disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to quantitatively characterize these properties in small, efficient clinical studies. Specific benefits of molecular imaging in this setting (compared to blood and tissue sampling) include non-invasiveness and the ability to survey the whole body temporally. These methods have been adopted primarily for neuroscience drug development, catalysed by the inability to access the brain compartment by other means. If we believe molecular imaging is a technology platform able to underpin clinical drug development, why is it not adopted further to enable earlier decisions? This article considers current drug development needs, progress towards integration of molecular imaging into studies, current impediments and proposed models to broaden use and increase impact. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  9. Pharmacogenomics to Revive Drug Development in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-01

    Investment in cardiovascular drug development is on the decline as large cardiovascular outcomes trials require considerable investments in time, efforts and financial resources. Pharmacogenomics has the potential to help revive the cardiovascular drug development pipeline by providing new and better drug targets at an earlier stage and by enabling more efficient outcomes trials. This article will review some of the recent developments highlighting the value of pharmacogenomics for drug development. We discuss how genetic biomarkers can enable the conduct of more efficient clinical outcomes trials by enriching patient populations for good responders to the medication. In addition, we assess past drug development programs which support the added value of selecting drug targets that have established genetic evidence supporting the targeted mechanism of disease. Finally, we discuss how pharmacogenomics can provide valuable evidence linking a drug target to clinically relevant outcomes, enabling novel drug discovery and drug repositioning opportunities.

  10. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  11. Clinical toxicology of newer recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Simon L; Thomas, Simon H L

    2011-10-01

    Novel synthetic 'designer' drugs with stimulant, ecstasy-like (entactogenic) and/or hallucinogenic properties have become increasingly popular among recreational drug users in recent years. The substances used change frequently in response to market trends and legislative controls and it is an important challenge for poisons centres and clinical toxicologists to remain updated on the pharmacological and toxicological effects of these emerging agents. To review the available information on newer synthetic stimulant, entactogenic and hallucinogenic drugs, provide a framework for classification of these drugs based on chemical structure and describe their pharmacology and clinical toxicology. A comprehensive review of the published literature was performed using PUBMED and Medline databases, together with additional non-peer reviewed information sources, including books, media reports, government publications and internet resources, including drug user web forums. Novel synthetic stimulant, entactogenic or hallucinogenic designer drugs are increasingly available to users as demonstrated by user surveys, poisons centre calls, activity on internet drug forums, hospital attendance data and mortality data. Some population sub groups such as younger adults who attend dance music clubs are more likely to use these substances. The internet plays an important role in determining the awareness of and availability of these newer drugs of abuse. Most novel synthetic stimulant, entactogenic or hallucinogenic drugs of abuse can be classified according to chemical structure as piperazines (e.g. benzylpiperazine (BZP), trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), phenethylamines (e.g. 2C or D-series of ring-substituted amfetamines, benzodifurans, cathinones, aminoindans), tryptamines (e.g. dimethyltryptamine, alpha-methyltryptamine, ethyltryptamine, 5-methoxy-alphamethyltryptamine) or piperidines and related substances (e.g. desoxypipradrol, diphenylprolinol). Alternatively classification may

  12. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  13. Drug repurposing: translational pharmacology, chemistry, computers and the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Naiem T; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2013-01-01

    The process of discovering a pharmacological compound that elicits a desired clinical effect with minimal side effects is a challenge. Prior to the advent of high-performance computing and large-scale screening technologies, drug discovery was largely a serendipitous endeavor, as in the case of thalidomide for erythema nodosum leprosum or cancer drugs in general derived from flora located in far-reaching geographic locations. More recently, de novo drug discovery has become a more rationalized process where drug-target-effect hypotheses are formulated on the basis of already known compounds/protein targets and their structures. Although this approach is hypothesis-driven, the actual success has been very low, contributing to the soaring costs of research and development as well as the diminished pharmaceutical pipeline in the United States. In this review, we discuss the evolution in computational pharmacology as the next generation of successful drug discovery and implementation in the clinic where high-performance computing (HPC) is used to generate and validate drug-target-effect hypotheses completely in silico. The use of HPC would decrease development time and errors while increasing productivity prior to in vitro, animal and human testing. We highlight approaches in chemoinformatics, bioinformatics as well as network biopharmacology to illustrate potential avenues from which to design clinically efficacious drugs. We further discuss the implications of combining these approaches into an integrative methodology for high-accuracy computational predictions within the context of drug repositioning for the efficient streamlining of currently approved drugs back into clinical trials for possible new indications.

  14. Developing Clinical Competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.F. Wimmers (Paul)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe development of clinical competence is the main purpose of medical education. The long road to become clinically competent starts on the first day of medical school, and every institution strives to select the best students. The responsibility of medical schools is to train

  15. Drug Interactions in Clinical Practice | Ohaju-Obodo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of numerous drugs available today for clinical management of patients require consideration of their potential interactions - alteration of the effects of one drug by the concurrent or prior administration of one or more drugs (drug-drug interactions). There could also be alteration of the effects of a drug by food ...

  16. Challenges in developing drugs for primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Hargreaves, Richard; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    This review considers the history of drug development in primary headaches and discusses challenges to the discovery of innovative headache therapeutics. Advances in headache genetics have yet to translate to new classes of therapeutics and there are currently no clear predictive human biomarkers...... for any of the primary headaches that can guide preventative drug discovery and development. Primary headache disorder subtypes despite common phenotypic presentation are undoubtedly heterogeneous in their pathophysiology as judged by the variability of response to headache medicines. Sub......, despite having promising effects in basic pain models, have not delivered efficacy in the clinic. Future efforts may triage novel physiological mediators using human experimental models of headache pain to support drug discovery strategies that target active pathways pharmacologically....

  17. Fixed drug eruption at a dermatology clinic in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Olabisi Ayanlowo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed drug eruption (FDE is common cutaneous drug eruption characterized by the development of one or more annular, oval, erythematous, and hyperpigmented patches as a result of systemic exposure to a drug. Drugs causing FDE vary with prevailing diseases and prescription pattern in different parts of the world. This study is aimed at reviewing cases of FDE seen at the dermatology outpatient clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH over a 9-year period, highlighting the spectrum of drugs implicated and the clinical characteristics. Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from the clinic records and patients' case notes. These included the demographic details, duration of presentation, drugs implicated, and clinical characteristics. Results: FDE was diagnosed in 1.8% (295/16,160 of patients seen. There was a slight female preponderance. Antimalarials were the commonest group of medications implicated (51.0% followed by antibiotics (27.9%; analgesics (10.2%, herbal toothpaste (6.1%, and oral hypoglycemic agents (4.1%. Sulfonamides were the commonest group of drugs found in 78 patients (53.1% predominantly as sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine antimalarials and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole antibiotics (co-trimoxazole. Conclusion: Concerted efforts are needed to discourage over-the-counter sales and purchase of nonprescription sulfonamide-based medications. A change in prescription pattern from sulfonamides to other classes of antimalarials and antibiotics is desirable and/or recommended. Patients should inform their caregivers at any point of care about their reaction to drugs. It is advised that they have a list of common implicating drugs and they wear a medic alert or carry an ID card bearing this information.

  18. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2012-07-20

    Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells, active drug targeting to endothelial cells and triggered drug delivery. Significant progress has been made in this area of research both at the preclinical and at the clinical level, and a number of (primarily passively tumor-targeted) nanomedicine formulations have been approved for clinical use. Significant progress has also been made with regard to better understanding the (patho-) physiological principles of drug targeting to tumors. This has led to the identification of several important pitfalls in tumor-targeted drug delivery, including I) overinterpretation of the EPR effect; II) poor tumor and tissue penetration of nanomedicines; III) misunderstanding of the potential usefulness of active drug targeting; IV) irrational formulation design, based on materials which are too complex and not broadly applicable; V) insufficient incorporation of nanomedicine formulations in clinically relevant combination regimens; VI) negligence of the notion that the highest medical need relates to metastasis, and not to solid tumor treatment; VII) insufficient integration of non-invasive imaging techniques and theranostics, which could be used to personalize nanomedicine-based therapeutic interventions; and VIII) lack of (efficacy analyses in) proper animal models, which are physiologically more relevant and more predictive for the clinical situation. These insights strongly suggest that besides making ever more nanomedicine formulations, future efforts should also address some of the conceptual drawbacks of drug targeting to tumors, and that strategies should be developed to overcome these shortcomings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanis...

  20. AMS in drug development at GSK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.C.; Ellis, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    A history of the use of AMS in GSK studies spanning the last 8 years (1998-2005) is presented, including use in pilot studies through to clinical, animal and in vitro studies. A brief summary of the status of GSK's in-house AMS capability is outlined and views on the future of AMS in GSK are presented, including potential impact on drug development and potential advances in AMS technology

  1. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Di Paolo, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  2. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palleria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  3. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  4. Clinical pharmacokinetics of non-opiate abused drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busto, U; Bendayan, R; Sellers, E M

    1989-01-01

    The present review discusses the available data on the kinetic properties of non-opiate abused drugs including psychomotor stimulants, hallucinogens and CNS-depressants. Some of the drugs of abuse reviewed here are illicit drugs (e.g. cannabis, cocaine), while others are effective pharmacological agents but have the potential to be abused (e.g. benzodiazepines). Although some of the drugs mentioned in this review have been in use for centuries (e.g. caffeine, nicotine, cocaine, cannabis), knowledge of their kinetics and metabolism is very recent and in some cases still incomplete. This is partially due to the difficulties inherent in studying drugs of abuse in humans, and to the complex metabolism of some of these drugs (e.g. cannabis, caffeine) which has made it difficult to develop sensitive assays to determine biological pathways. Although drugs of abuse may have entirely different intrinsic pharmacological effects, the kinetic properties of such drugs are factors contributing to abuse and dependence. The pharmacokinetic properties that presumably contribute to self-administration and drug abuse include rapid delivery of the drug into the central nervous system and high free drug clearance. Kinetic characteristics also play an important role in the development of physical dependence and on the appearance of a withdrawal syndrome: the longer the half-life, the greater the likelihood of the development of physical dependence; the shorter the half-life, the earlier and more severe the withdrawal. The balance between these 2 factors, which has not yet been carefully studied, will also influence abuse patterns. The clinical significance of kinetic characteristics with respect to abuse is discussed where possible.

  5. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative

  6. Imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Wolf S.

    2006-01-01

    The employment of biomarkers (including imaging biomarkers, especially PET) in drug development has gained increasing attention during recent years. This has been partly stimulated by the hope that the integration of biomarkers into drug development programmes may be a means to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the drug development process by early identification of promising drug candidates - thereby counteracting the rising costs of drug development. More importantly, however, the interest in biomarkers for drug development is the logical consequence of recent advances in biosciences and medicine which are leading to target-specific treatments in the framework of ''personalised medicine''. A considerable proportion of target-specific drugs will show effects in subgroups of patients only. Biomarkers are a means to identify potential responders, or patient subgroups at risk for specific side-effects. Biomarkers are used in early drug development in the context of translational medicine to gain information about the drug's potential in different patient groups and disease states. The information obtained at this stage is mainly important for designing subsequent clinical trials and to identify promising drug candidates. Biomarkers in later phases of clinical development may - if properly validated - serve as surrogate endpoints for clinical outcomes. Regulatory agencies in the EU and the USA have facilitated the use of biomarkers early in the development process. The validation of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is part of FDA's ''critical path initiative''. (orig.)

  7. Towards a sustainable system of drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, Ellen H.M.; Cohen, Adam F.; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-01-01

    Drug development has become the exclusive activity of large pharmaceutical companies. However, the output of new drugs has been decreasing for the past decade and the prices of new drugs have risen steadily, leading to access problems for many patients. By analyzing the history of drug development

  8. Prodrug Strategy in Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal Kelemen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prodrugs are chemically modified derivatives introduced in therapy due to their advantageous physico-chemical properties (greater stability, improved solubility, increased permeability, used in inactive form. Biological effect is exerted by the active derivatives formed in organism through chemical transformation (biotransformation. Currently, 10% of pharmaceutical products are used as prodrugs, nearly half of them being converted to active form by hydrolysis, mainly by ester hydrolysis. The use of prodrugs aims to improve the bioavailability of compounds in order to resolve some unfavorable characteristics and to reduce first-pass metabolism. Other objectives are to increase drug absorption, to extend duration of action or to achieve a better tissue/organ selective transport in case of non-oral drug delivery forms. Prodrugs can be characterized by chemical structure, activation mechanism or through the presence of certain functional groups suitable for their preparation. Currently we distinguish in therapy traditional prodrugs prepared by chemical derivatisation, bioprecursors and targeted delivery systems. The present article is a review regarding the introduction and applications of prodrug design in various areas of drug development.

  9. [Clinical views from the forefront of immunosuppressive drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-11-01

    Recently, many immunosuppressants have been developed and some of them have already been introduced in clinical organ transplantation. With a new concept of immunoregulation, which focuses on prevention of rejection and over-immunosuppression, the latest protocol has been conducted. Chimeric or humanized antibodies targeting the lymphocyte surface molecule such as CD19, 20, 25, 40, and 52 are administrated in the induction phase, and calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporin and tacrolimus) are used as key drugs. For tapering the doses of them, the combined application of anti-metabolic agents of azathioprine, mizoribine, or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been proved effective. Lymphocyte forming drugs induce unique immunoregulation, targeting at sphingosine 1-phosphate (SlP) receptors. FTY720 is now in the procedure of clinical trial to compare with MMF. KRP203 is also a candidate for more specific SIP receptor agonist. In this issue, I reviewed the recent immunosuppressive strategy and focused on the advance of novel immunosuppressive drugs.

  10. Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs on Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although psychostimulants have been used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder for approximately 70 years, little is known about the long term effects of these drugs on developing brain. The observable effects of psychostimulants are influenced by the timing of exposure, the age of examination after drug exposure and sex. Preclinical studies point out that chronic psychostimulant exposure before adolescence cause reverse sensitization or tolerance and this leads to reduction in stimulant effectiveness in adolesecence and adulthood. Preclinical studies show the potential long term effects of psychostimulants. But it is necessary to investigate the relationship between preclinical effects and clinical practice. A developmental approach is needed to understand the impact of pediatric medications on the brain that includes assessment at multiple ages to completely characterize the long term effects of these medications. The aim of this paper is to review the effects of psychostimulants on developing brain.

  11. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  12. Developments in platinum anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylkowski, Bartosz; Jastrząb, Renata; Odani, Akira

    2018-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the unexpected discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin (Fig. 1) in 1965 by Prof. Rosenberg [1], a large number of its variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. Although cisplatin has been in use for over four decades, new and more effective platinum-based therapeutics are finally on the horizon. A wide introduction to anticancer studies is given by the authors of the previous chapter. This chapter aims at providing the readers with a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of recent developments of platinum anticancer drugs and to review the state of the art. The chapter is divided into two parts. In the first part we present a historical aspect of platinum and its complexes, while in the second part we give an overview of developments in the field of platinum anticancer agents.

  13. Development and Optimization of controlled drug release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to develop and optimize an osmotically controlled drug delivery system of diclofenac sodium. Osmotically controlled oral drug delivery systems utilize osmotic pressure for controlled delivery of active drugs. Drug delivery from these systems, to a large extent, is independent of the physiological factors ...

  14. Orphan drugs: trends and issues in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Proteesh; Chawla, Shalini

    2018-04-12

    Research in rare diseases has contributed substantially toward the current understanding in the pathophysiology of the common diseases. However, medical needs of patients with rare diseases have always been neglected by the society and pharmaceutical industries based on their small numbers and unprofitability. The Orphan Drug Act (1983) was the first serious attempt to address the unmet medical needs for patients with rare diseases and to provide impetus for the pharmaceutical industry to promote orphan drug development. The process of drug development for rare diseases is no different from common diseases but involves significant cost and infrastructure. Further, certain aspect of drug research may not be feasible for the rare diseases. The drug-approving authority must exercise their scientific judgment and ensure due flexibility while evaluating data at various stages of orphan drug development. The emergence of patent cliff combined with the government incentives led the pharmaceutical industry to realize the good commercial prospects in developing an orphan drug despite the small market size. Indeed, many drugs that were given orphan designation ended up being blockbusters. The orphan drug market is projected to reach $178 billion by 2020, and the prospects of research and development in rare diseases appears to be quite promising and rewarding.

  15. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Systemically Administered Antileishmanial Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    This review describes the pharmacokinetic properties of the systemically administered antileishmanial drugs pentavalent antimony, paromomycin, pentamidine, miltefosine and amphotericin B (AMB), including their absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and potential drug-drug interactions.

  16. Antibiotics in late clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Martens, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Most pharmaceutical companies have stopped or have severely limited investments to discover and develop new antibiotics to treat the increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, because the return on investment has been mostly negative for antibiotics that received marketing approved in the last few decades. In contrast, a few small companies have taken on this challenge and are developing new antibiotics. This review describes those antibiotics in late-stage clinical development. Most of them belong to existing antibiotic classes and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. The reasons for some of the past failures to find new molecules and a path forward to help attract investments to fund discovery of new antibiotics are described. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical information in drug package inserts in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivkar Y

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely recognized that accurate and reliable product information is essential for the safe and effective use of medications. Pharmaceutical companies are the primary source of most drug information, including package inserts. Package inserts are printed leaflets accompanying marketed drug products and contain information approved by the regulatory agencies. Studies on package inserts in India, in 1996, had shown that crucial information was often missing and they lacked uniformity. Aim: To assess the presentation and completeness of clinically important information provided in the currently available package inserts in India. Materials and Methods: Package inserts accompanying allopathic drug products marketed by pharmaceutical companies in India were collected. These package inserts were analyzed for the content of clinically important information in various sections. Statistical Analysis: The results were expressed as absolute numbers and percentages. Results: Preliminary analyses revealed that most package inserts did contain information under headings, such as, therapeutic indications, contraindications, undesirable effects, etc., listed in the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules 1945. The findings indicated considerable improvement in package inserts since 1996. However, on critical evaluation it was revealed that clinically important information was not well presented and was often incomplete. Information with regard to pediatric and geriatric use was present in only 44% and 13% of the package inserts, respectively. Only five of the inserts had information on the most frequent adverse drug reactions associated with the drug. Also, information on interactions and overdosage was often missing. Conclusion: Although the package inserts appear to have improved over the past decade there is still a definite need to further refine the clinical information contained, to minimize the risks to patients. This could be brought about by self

  18. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  19. TRPV3 in Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Broad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3 is a member of the TRP (Transient Receptor Potential super-family. It is a relatively underexplored member of the thermo-TRP sub-family (Figure 1, however, genetic mutations and use of gene knock-outs and selective pharmacological tools are helping to provide insights into its role and therapeutic potential. TRPV3 is highly expressed in skin, where it is implicated in skin physiology and pathophysiology, thermo-sensing and nociception. Gain of function TRPV3 mutations in rodent and man have enabled the role of TRPV3 in skin health and disease to be particularly well defined. Pre-clinical studies provide some rationale to support development of TRPV3 antagonists for therapeutic application for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions, itch and pain. However, to date, only one compound directed towards block of the TRPV3 receptor (GRC15300 has progressed into clinical trials. Currently, there are no known clinical trials in progress employing a TRPV3 antagonist.

  20. Preclinical experimental models of drug metabolism and disposition in drug discovery and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglu Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and development involve the utilization of in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Different models, ranging from test tube experiments to cell cultures, animals, healthy human subjects, and even small numbers of patients that are involved in clinical trials, are used at different stages of drug discovery and development for determination of efficacy and safety. The proper selection and applications of correct models, as well as appropriate data interpretation, are critically important in decision making and successful advancement of drug candidates. In this review, we discuss strategies in the applications of both in vitro and in vivo experimental models of drug metabolism and disposition.

  1. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirsagar N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, FungisomeTM drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India

  2. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model - niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases.

  3. NMR spectroscopy and drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craik, D.; Munro, S.

    1990-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for structural and conformational studies on drug molecules, the three-dimensional investigation of proteins structure and their interactions with ligands are discussed. In-vivo NMR studies of the effects of drugs on metabolism in perfused organs and whole animals are also briefly presented. 5 refs., ills

  4. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  5. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The

  6. Toward a normalized clinical drug knowledge base in China-applying the RxNorm model to Chinese clinical drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yaoyun; Jiang, Min; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Jiancheng; Liu, Yun; Tao, Cui; Jiang, Guoqian; Zhou, Yi; Xu, Hua

    2018-04-04

    In recent years, electronic health record systems have been widely implemented in China, making clinical data available electronically. However, little effort has been devoted to making drug information exchangeable among these systems. This study aimed to build a Normalized Chinese Clinical Drug (NCCD) knowledge base, by applying and extending the information model of RxNorm to Chinese clinical drugs. Chinese drugs were collected from 4 major resources-China Food and Drug Administration, China Health Insurance Systems, Hospital Pharmacy Systems, and China Pharmacopoeia-for integration and normalization in NCCD. Chemical drugs were normalized using the information model in RxNorm without much change. Chinese patent drugs (i.e., Chinese herbal extracts), however, were represented using an expanded RxNorm model to incorporate the unique characteristics of these drugs. A hybrid approach combining automated natural language processing technologies and manual review by domain experts was then applied to drug attribute extraction, normalization, and further generation of drug names at different specification levels. Lastly, we reported the statistics of NCCD, as well as the evaluation results using several sets of randomly selected Chinese drugs. The current version of NCCD contains 16 976 chemical drugs and 2663 Chinese patent medicines, resulting in 19 639 clinical drugs, 250 267 unique concepts, and 2 602 760 relations. By manual review of 1700 chemical drugs and 250 Chinese patent drugs randomly selected from NCCD (about 10%), we showed that the hybrid approach could achieve an accuracy of 98.60% for drug name extraction and normalization. Using a collection of 500 chemical drugs and 500 Chinese patent drugs from other resources, we showed that NCCD achieved coverages of 97.0% and 90.0% for chemical drugs and Chinese patent drugs, respectively. Evaluation results demonstrated the potential to improve interoperability across various electronic drug systems

  7. The worldwide trend of using botanical drugs and strategies for developing global drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyungseop

    2017-03-01

    Natural product drugs, or botanical drugs, are drugs composed of natural substances which have constituents with healthenhancing or medicinal activities. In Korea, government-led projects brought attention to botanical drugs invigorating domestic botanical drug industry. Foreign markets, as well, are growing bigger as the significance of botanical drugs stood out. To follow along with the tendency, Korea puts a lot of effort on developing botanical drugs suitable for global market. However, standards for approving drug sales vary by countries. And also, thorough standardization, certification, clinical studies and data of these will be required as well as data confirming safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, as an international exchange in botanical drug market continues, the importance of plant resources was emphasized. Thus countries' ownership of domestic natural resources became vital. Not only establishing a systematic method to secure domestic plant resources, but also cooperation with other countries on sharing natural resources is essential to procure natural resources effectively. Korea started to show visible results with botanical drugs, and asthma/COPD treatment made out of speedwell is one example. Sufficient investment and government's active support for basic infrastructure for global botanical drugs will bring Korea to much higher level of botanical drug development. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 111-116].

  8. Use of SPring-8 in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Kazumi

    2006-01-01

    Protein structure analysis consortium was established by 21 drug companies and has analyzed protein structures using the beam line BL32B2 of SPring-8 since September in 2002. Outline of the protein structure analysis consortium, contribution of SPring-8 to drug development, and the present status and future of use of SPring-8 are stated. For examples of structure analysis, the human nuclear enzyme (PARP-1) fragment complex crystal structure, human ISG20, human dipeptidine peptidase IV, human cMDH, chromatin binding human nuclear enzyme complex, change of structure of each step of tyrosine activation of bacteria tyrosine tRNA synthetase are described. Contribution of analysis of protein structure and functions to drug development, development process of new drug, drug screening using compounds database on the basis of the three dimensional structure of receptor active site, genome drug development, and the effects of a target drug on the market are explained. (S.Y.)

  9. Antimalarial Drug: From its Development to Deface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Tapan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Wiping out malaria is now the global concern as about three billion people are at risk of malaria infection globally. Despite of extensive research in the field of vaccine development for malaria, till now, no effective vaccine is available for use and hence only antimalarial drugs remain our best hope for both treatment and prevention of malaria. However, emergence and spread of drug resistance has been a major obstacle for the success of malaria elimination globally. This review will summarize the information related to antimalarial drugs, drug development strategies, drug delivery through nanoparticles, few current issues like adverse side effects of most antimalarial drugs, non availability of drugs in the market and use of fake/poor quality drugs that are hurdles to malaria control. As we don't have any other option in the present scenario, we have to take care of the existing tools and make them available to almost all malaria affected area.

  10. [Development of new drugs: opportunities and benefits for Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayona, Andrés; Fajardo, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    The development of innovative drugs allows coming up with new medicines to prevent and better treat illnesses. This improves people's quality of life and makes it more productive. Therefore, the mission of pharmaceutical research is to develop safe and effective drugs. Clinical trials allow the evaluation of the safety and efficacy profiles of new medicines, medical devices and diagnostic tests. Research and development (R&D) of new drugs is a long and costly process, where out of every 5000 to 10000 new components that enter preclinical testing, only one is approved. Compared to 2011, drug development has increased by 7.6%. According to ClinicalTrials.gov, 5% of the trials take place in Latin America, and Peru is in the fifth position. On the other hand, according to the Global Competitiveness Report issued by the World Economic Forum, Peru ranks 61st, its biggest challenges being the functioning of its public institutions, investment in R&D and technological capacity. The complexity of drug R&D results in a search for competitive places to develop clinical trials. Clinical Research is a humanized industry due to its ethical platform, stated in the guidelines of good clinical practices. This industry demands our country to develop a differentiating value that contributes to the development of knowledge and its competitiveness.

  11. Clinical impact of genetic variants of drug transporters in different ethnic groups within and across regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Chiho; Kikkawa, Hironori; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Suzuki, Misaki; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Ichikawa, Katsuomi; Fukae, Masato; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2013-11-01

    Drug transporters, together with drug metabolic enzymes, are major determinants of drug disposition and are known to alter the response to many commonly used drugs. Substantial frequency differences for known variants exist across geographic regions for certain drug transporters. To deliver efficacious medicine with the right dose for each patient, it is important to understand the contribution of genetic variants for drug transporters. Recently, mutual pharmacokinetic data usage among Asian regions, which are thought to be relatively similar in their own genetic background, is expected to accelerate new drug applications and reduce developmental costs. Polymorphisms of drug transporters could be key factors to be considered in implementing multiethnic global clinical trials. This review addresses the current knowledge on genetic variations of major drug transporters affecting drug disposition, efficacy and toxicity, focusing on the east Asian populations, and provides insights into future directions for precision medicine and drug development in east Asia.

  12. Use of Immunomodulatory Drugs at a Uveitis Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Longo, Claudia; Peiteado, Diana; Schlincker, Armelle; Hidalgo, Ventura; Pieren, Amara; Balsa, Alejandro; de Miguel, Eugenio

    2017-11-10

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis includes steroids and immunomodulatory drugs, the use of which has increased in the last few years, and the options have been enriched with the development of new treatments. However, clear therapeutic guidelines and protocols have not been developed. The purpose is to analyze the response to the drugs used and the characteristics of the patients treated at a multidisciplinary uveitis clinic. Observational and retrospective study of the patients attended to from January 2012 to December 2015. Infectious, posttraumatic and postoperative uveitis, as well as masquerade syndrome, were excluded. Two hundred six patients were included. Overall, 58.80% had uveitis without association of systemic disease, mostly idiopathic uveitis, and 35.65% had uveitis with systemic involvement, mainly related to spondyloarthritis. Uveitis without systemic association and anterior uveitis achieved disease control with local treatment more frequently than others (p=.002 and p treatment. Among those treated with immunomodulators, 53.26% needed a second drug and 31.52% needed a third drug. Women required immunomodulators more often than men (P=.042). Methotrexate was the most widely used immunomodulator. Posterior uveitis responded less favorably to the second immunomodulator than anterior uveitis (p=.006). Almost half of the patients needed an immunomodulatory drug and some of them required successive drug changes. Intermediate uveitis was the most treatment-refractory uveitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical practice - Drug desensitization in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, H.; Mulder, W.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Immediate type allergic reactions to medication are potentially life threatening and can hamper drug therapy of several medical conditions. Exact incidence and prevalence data for these reactions in children are lacking. If no alternative drug treatment is available, a desensitization procedure may

  14. Personalized Medicine: Pharmacogenomics and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Mirsadeghi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine aims is to supply the proper drug to the proper patient within the right dose. Pharmacogenomics (PGx is to recognize genetic variants that may influence drug efficacy and toxicity. All things considered, the fields cover a wide area, including basic drug discovery researches, the genetic origin of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel drug improvement, patient genetic assessment and clinical patient administration. At last, the objective of Pharmacogenomics is to anticipate a patient’s genetic response to a particular drug as a way of presenting the best possible medical treatment. By predicting the drug response of an individual, it will be possible to increase the success of therapies and decrease the incidence of adverse side effect.

  15. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  16. Reflection of successful anticancer drug development processes in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Fabian; Huber, Torsten; Meisel, Christian; Bundschus, Markus; Leser, Ulf

    2016-11-01

    The development of cancer drugs is time-consuming and expensive. In particular, failures in late-stage clinical trials are a major cost driver for pharmaceutical companies. This puts a high demand on methods that provide insights into the success chances of new potential medicines. In this study, we systematically analyze publication patterns emerging along the drug discovery process of targeted cancer therapies, starting from basic research to drug approval - or failure. We find clear differences in the patterns of approved drugs compared with those that failed in Phase II/III. Feeding these features into a machine learning classifier allows us to predict the approval or failure of a targeted cancer drug significantly better than educated guessing. We believe that these findings could lead to novel measures for supporting decision making in drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigational drugs in early development for treating dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesetti, Hemalatha; Khanna, Navin; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2016-09-01

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant arboviral disease of the current century. A drug for dengue is an urgent unmet need. As conventional drug discovery efforts have not produced any promising clinical candidates, there is a shift toward re-positioning pre-existing drugs for dengue to fast-track dengue drug development. This article provides an update on the current status of recently completed and ongoing dengue drug trials. All dengue drug trials described in this article were identified from a list of >230 trials that were returned upon searching the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform web portal using the search term 'dengue' on December 31(st), 2015. None of the handful of drugs tested so far has yielded encouraging results. Early trial experience has served to emphasize the challenge of drug testing in the short therapeutic time window available, the need for tools to predict 'high-risk' patients early on and the limitations of the existing pre-clinical model systems. Significant investment of efforts and resources is a must before the availability of a safe, effective and inexpensive dengue drug becomes a reality. Currently, supportive fluid therapy remains the only option available for dengue treatment.

  18. Repurposing Clinical Molecule Ebselen to Combat Drug Resistant Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Thangamani

    Full Text Available Without a doubt, our current antimicrobials are losing the battle in the fight against newly-emerged multidrug-resistant pathogens. There is a pressing, unmet need for novel antimicrobials and novel approaches to develop them; however, it is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to develop new antimicrobials. One strategy to reduce the time and cost associated with antimicrobial innovation is drug repurposing, which is to find new applications outside the scope of the original medical indication of the drug. Ebselen, an organoselenium clinical molecule, possesses potent antimicrobial activity against clinical multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, the activity of ebselen against Gram-positive pathogens exceeded those activities determined for vancomycin and linezolid, drugs of choice for treatment of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ebselen at which 90% of clinical isolates of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus were inhibited (MIC90 were found to be 0.5 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Ebselen showed significant clearance of intracellular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in comparison to vancomycin and linezolid. We demonstrated that ebselen inhibits the bacterial translation process without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, ebselen was found to exhibit excellent activity in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans MRSA-infected whole animal model. Finally, ebselen showed synergistic activities with conventional antimicrobials against MRSA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ebselen, with its potent antimicrobial activity and safety profiles, can be potentially used to treat multidrug resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections alone or in combination with other antibiotics and should be further clinically evaluated.

  19. Repurposing Clinical Molecule Ebselen to Combat Drug Resistant Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    Without a doubt, our current antimicrobials are losing the battle in the fight against newly-emerged multidrug-resistant pathogens. There is a pressing, unmet need for novel antimicrobials and novel approaches to develop them; however, it is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to develop new antimicrobials. One strategy to reduce the time and cost associated with antimicrobial innovation is drug repurposing, which is to find new applications outside the scope of the original medical indication of the drug. Ebselen, an organoselenium clinical molecule, possesses potent antimicrobial activity against clinical multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, the activity of ebselen against Gram-positive pathogens exceeded those activities determined for vancomycin and linezolid, drugs of choice for treatment of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ebselen at which 90% of clinical isolates of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus were inhibited (MIC90) were found to be 0.5 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Ebselen showed significant clearance of intracellular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in comparison to vancomycin and linezolid. We demonstrated that ebselen inhibits the bacterial translation process without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, ebselen was found to exhibit excellent activity in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans MRSA-infected whole animal model. Finally, ebselen showed synergistic activities with conventional antimicrobials against MRSA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ebselen, with its potent antimicrobial activity and safety profiles, can be potentially used to treat multidrug resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections alone or in combination with other antibiotics and should be further clinically evaluated.

  20. Development and validation of an EI-GC-MS method for the determination of benzodiazepine drugs and their metabolites in blood: applications in clinical and forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsis, Ioannis I; Athanaselis, Sotirios A; Nikolaou, Panagiota D; Pistos, Constantinos M; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Maravelias, Constantinos P

    2010-08-01

    Benzodiazepines are used widely in daily clinical practice, due to their multiple pharmacological actions. The frequent problems associated with the wide use of benzodiazepines, as well as the multiple incidents of poisonings, led to the necessity for the development of a precise, sensitive and rapid method for the simultaneous determination of the 23 most commonly used benzodiazepines (diazepam, nordiazepam, oxazepam, bromazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, medazepam, flurazepam, fludiazepam, tetrazepam, chlordiazepoxide, clobazam, midazolam, flunitrazepam, 7-amino-flunitrazepam, triazolam, prazepam, nimetazepam, nitrazepam, temazepam, lormetazepam, clonazepam, camazepam) in blood. A gas chromatographic method combined with mass spectrometric detection was developed, optimized and validated for the determination of the above substances. This method includes liquid-liquid extraction with chloroform at pH 9 and two stages of derivatization using tetramethylammonium hydroxide and propyliodide (propylation), as well as a mixture of triethylamine:propionic anhydride (propionylation). The recoveries were higher than 74% for all the benzodiazepines. The calibration curves were linear within the dynamic range of each benzodiazepine with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9981. The limits of detection and quantification for each analyte were statistically calculated from the relative calibration curves. Accuracy and precision were also calculated and were found to be less than 8.5% and 11.1%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the investigation of both forensic and clinical toxicological cases of accidental and suicidal poisoning. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Open source drug discovery--a new paradigm of collaborative research in tuberculosis drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshu; Scaria, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Chandra, Nagasuma; Banerjee, Sulagna; Raghunandanan, Muthukurussi V; Pandey, Vikas; Taneja, Bhupesh; Yadav, Jyoti; Dash, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Jaijit; Misra, Amit; Kumar, Anil; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Thomas, Zakir; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2011-09-01

    It is being realized that the traditional closed-door and market driven approaches for drug discovery may not be the best suited model for the diseases of the developing world such as tuberculosis and malaria, because most patients suffering from these diseases have poor paying capacity. To ensure that new drugs are created for patients suffering from these diseases, it is necessary to formulate an alternate paradigm of drug discovery process. The current model constrained by limitations for collaboration and for sharing of resources with confidentiality hampers the opportunities for bringing expertise from diverse fields. These limitations hinder the possibilities of lowering the cost of drug discovery. The Open Source Drug Discovery project initiated by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India has adopted an open source model to power wide participation across geographical borders. Open Source Drug Discovery emphasizes integrative science through collaboration, open-sharing, taking up multi-faceted approaches and accruing benefits from advances on different fronts of new drug discovery. Because the open source model is based on community participation, it has the potential to self-sustain continuous development by generating a storehouse of alternatives towards continued pursuit for new drug discovery. Since the inventions are community generated, the new chemical entities developed by Open Source Drug Discovery will be taken up for clinical trial in a non-exclusive manner by participation of multiple companies with majority funding from Open Source Drug Discovery. This will ensure availability of drugs through a lower cost community driven drug discovery process for diseases afflicting people with poor paying capacity. Hopefully what LINUX the World Wide Web have done for the information technology, Open Source Drug Discovery will do for drug discovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PROPOSAL OF GUIDELINE FOR CLINICAL TRIAL PROTOCOLS WITH HERBAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migdacelys Arboláez Estrada.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYCuba has extensive experience about herbal drugs, however only a few products get to the clinical phase of drug development. Our objective was to design new guidelines for clinical trials with herbal drugs.A detailed bibliographic search about regulatory aspects about clinical trials in Cuba and the world was done for development of the guideline. The guideline's proposed format includes: 1 Index, including the classification of the content. 2 Summary, 3 Fifteen chapters, related to the clinical trials. The guideline also propose the inclusion of annexes.A new guideline containing 15 chapters allows for writing more clear and detailed clinical trial protocols. The guideline contains the information required to guide the research staff who is interested in the validation of herbal drugs pharmacological activations from the perspective of clinical trials. RESUMEN Cuba tiene experiencia extensa sobre plantas medicinales, aunque solo algunos productos llegan a una fase clínica del desarrollo. Nuestro objetivo fué diseñar una nueva guía para ensayos clínicos con plantas medicinales.Hemos realizado una detallada búsqueda bibliográfica sobre aspectos reguladores de ensayos clínicos en Cuba y el resto del mundo para el desarrollo de la guía. El formato propuesto de la guia incluye: 1 Índice, incluyendo la clasificación de los contenidos. 2 Resumen, 3 Quince capítulos, relacionados con los ensayos clínicos. La guía también propone la inclusión de anexos.La nueva guía que contiene 15 capítulos que orientan la redacción de protocolos de ensayos clínicos más claros y más detallados. La guía contiene la información requerida para orientar al personal investigador interesado en la validación de la actividad farmacológica de las plantas medicinales desde la perspectiva de los ensayos clínicos.

  3. Improvement of Pediatric Drug Development: Regulatory and Practical Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Katusra; Carroll, Kelly A; Onishi, Taku; Matsumaru, Naoki; Brasseur, Daniel; Nakamura, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    A dearth in pediatric drug development often leaves pediatricians with no alternative but to prescribe unlicensed or off-label drugs with a resultant increased risk of adverse events. We present the current status of pediatric drug development and, based on our data analysis, clarify the problems in this area. Further action is proposed to improve the drug development that has pediatric therapeutic orphan status. We analyzed all Phase II/III and Phase III trials in ClinicalTrials.gov that only included pediatric participants (Performance index, an indicator of pediatric drug development, was calculated by dividing the annual number of pediatric clinical trials by million pediatric populations acquired from Census.gov. Effects of the 2 Japanese premiums introduced in 2010, for the enhancement of pediatric drug development, were analyzed by comparing mean performance index prepremiums (2006-2009) and postpremiums (2010-2014) among Japan, the European Union, and the United States. The European Union Clinical Trials Register and published reports from the European Medicines Agency were also surveyed to investigate the Paediatric Committee effect on pediatric clinical trials in the European Union. Mean difference of the performance index in prepremiums and postpremiums between Japan and the European Union were 0.296 (P 15% after 2008. Recruitment and ethical obstacles make conducting pediatric clinical trials challenging. An improved operational framework for conducting clinical trials should mirror the ever-improving regulatory framework that incentivizes investment in pediatric clinical trials. Technological approaches, enhancements in electronic medical record systems, and community approaches that actively incorporate input from physicians, researchers, and patients could offer a sustainable solution to recruitment of pediatric study participants. The key therefore is to improve pediatric pharmacotherapy collaboration among industry, government, academia, and

  4. Clinical neuropharmacology of drugs of abuse: a comparison of drug-discrimination and subject-report measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas H; Stoops, William W; Perry, Andrea S; Prendergast, Mark A; Rush, Craig R

    2003-12-01

    Advances in molecular pharmacology and behavioral science have helped elucidate the structure and function of the central nervous system and its relationship to behavior and has sparked the development of pharmacological agents that have increasingly selective and potent effects with fewer adverse side effects. The sensitivity and predictive validity of the two most commonly used methodologies for assessing the neuropharmacological effects of centrally active drugs, subject report of drug effects and drug discrimination, were examined. The sensitivity of the measures was comparable across stimulant, sedative, and opioid drugs. Results with drug-discrimination methodologies were generally consistent with hypothesized neuropharmacological mechanisms across all drug classes, whereas subject reports conformed under more limited testing conditions. Firm conclusions regarding the relative utility of drug-discrimination and subject-report measures for clinical studies of neuropharmacological mechanisms are limited by the small number of studies in which the two methodologies have been tested using identical pharmacological pretreatment manipulations.

  5. Moving Synergistically Acting Drug Combinations to the Clinic by Comparing Sequential versus Simultaneous Drug Administrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinavahi, Saketh S; Noory, Mohammad A; Gowda, Raghavendra; Drabick, Joseph J; Berg, Arthur; Neves, Rogerio I; Robertson, Gavin P

    2018-03-01

    Drug combinations acting synergistically to kill cancer cells have become increasingly important in melanoma as an approach to manage the recurrent resistant disease. Protein kinase B (AKT) is a major target in this disease but its inhibitors are not effective clinically, which is a major concern. Targeting AKT in combination with WEE1 (mitotic inhibitor kinase) seems to have potential to make AKT-based therapeutics effective clinically. Since agents targeting AKT and WEE1 have been tested individually in the clinic, the quickest way to move the drug combination to patients would be to combine these agents sequentially, enabling the use of existing phase I clinical trial toxicity data. Therefore, a rapid preclinical approach is needed to evaluate whether simultaneous or sequential drug treatment has maximal therapeutic efficacy, which is based on a mechanistic rationale. To develop this approach, melanoma cell lines were treated with AKT inhibitor AZD5363 [4-amino- N -[(1 S )-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxypropyl]-1-(7 H -pyrrolo[2,3- d ]pyrimidin-4-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamide] and WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 [2-allyl-1-(6-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-((4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl)amino)-1 H -pyrazolo[3,4- d ]pyrimidin-3(2 H )-one] using simultaneous and sequential dosing schedules. Simultaneous treatment synergistically reduced melanoma cell survival and tumor growth. In contrast, sequential treatment was antagonistic and had a minimal tumor inhibitory effect compared with individual agents. Mechanistically, simultaneous targeting of AKT and WEE1 enhanced deregulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair pathways by modulating transcription factors p53 and forkhead box M1, which was not observed with sequential treatment. Thus, this study identifies a rapid approach to assess the drug combinations with a mechanistic basis for selection, which suggests that combining AKT and WEE1 inhibitors is needed for maximal efficacy. Copyright © 2018 by The American

  6. Drug development for airway diseases: looking forward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holgate, Stephen; Agusti, Alvar; Strieter, Robert M.; Anderson, Gary P.; Fogel, Robert; Bel, Elisabeth; Martin, Thomas R.; Reiss, Theodore F.

    2015-01-01

    Advancing drug development for airway diseases beyond the established mechanisms and symptomatic therapies requires redefining the classifications of airway diseases, considering systemic manifestations, developing new tools and encouraging collaborations

  7. Analysis of clinical drug-drug interaction data to predict uncharacterized interaction magnitudes between antiretroviral drugs and co-medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, Felix; Kinvig, Hannah; Battegay, Manuel; Khoo, Saye; Owen, Andrew; Siccardi, Marco; Marzolini, Catia

    2018-04-23

    Despite their high potential for drug-drug-interactions (DDI), clinical DDI studies of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) are often lacking, because the full range of potential interactions cannot feasibly or pragmatically be studied, with some high-risk DDI studies also ethically difficult to undertake. Thus, a robust method to screen and to predict the likelihood of DDIs is required.We developed a method to predict DDIs based on two parameters: the degree of metabolism by specific enzymes such as CYP3A and the strength of an inhibitor or inducer. These parameters were derived from existing studies utilizing paradigm substrates, inducers and inhibitors of CYP3A, to assess the predictive performance of this method by verifying predicted magnitudes of changes in drug exposure against clinical DDI studies involving ARVs.The derived parameters were consistent with the FDA classification of sensitive CYP3A substrates and the strength of CYP3A inhibitors and inducers. Characterized DDI magnitudes (n = 68) between ARVs and co-medications were successfully quantified meaning 53%, 85% and 98% of the predictions were within 1.25-fold (0.80 - 1.25), 1.5-fold (0.66 - 1.48) and 2-fold (0.66 - 1.94) of the observed clinical data. In addition, the method identifies CYP3A substrates likely to be highly or conversely minimally impacted by CYP3A inhibitors or inducers, thus categorizing the magnitude of DDIs.The developed effective and robust method has the potential to support a more rational identification of dose adjustment to overcome DDIs being particularly relevant in a HIV-setting giving the treatments complexity, high DDI risk and limited guidance on the management of DDIs. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Impact of comorbidities and drug therapy on development of renal impairment in a predominantly African American and Hispanic HIV clinic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Rawlings

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available M Keith Rawlings1, Jennifer Klein1, Edna P Toubes Klingler1, Ejeanée Queen1, Lauren Rogers1, Linda H Yau2, Keith A Pappa2, Gary E Pakes21AIDS Arms Peabody Health Clinic, Dallas, Texas; 2GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USAPurpose: Renal impairment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients could potentially be caused by many factors. HIV-related renal impairment risks have been little studied in African Americans and Hispanics. We investigated the impact of HIV itself, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, comorbidities, and non-HIV-related drug treatment on glomerular filtration rate in a predominantly African American/Hispanic HIV-infected population who had received HAART for at least one year. This study was a retrospective electronic medical record database evaluation of renal impairment risks in a largely African American/Hispanic HIV population obtaining medical care at an HIV clinic in Dallas, Texas.Methods: Proportional hazards models were used to investigate an association between an estimated glomerular filtration rate decrease >25% from baseline (ie, renal impairment and demographics, antiretroviral/nonantiretroviral medications, comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection, hepatitis B virus [HBV] infection, CD4+ counts, viral load, and duration patients were monitored at the clinic (time on study.Results: In total, 323 patients were evaluated: 82% males; 61% African American/12% Hispanic/19% Caucasian; mean age 37.9 years (standard deviation [SD] 8.5; 6% HBV-positive; 34% HCV-positive; 29% hypertensive; 3% diabetic; 52% tenofovir-treated; mean weight 75.4 kg (SD, 15.4; mean estimated glomerular filtration 114.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 (SD, 36.7 using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD calculation method; mean creatinine clearance (from which estimated glomerular filtration was extrapolated by the Cockcroft-Gault calculation method 120.6 mL/min/1

  9. Molecular science for drug development and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-11-04

    With the avalanche of biological sequences generated in the postgenomic age, molecular science is facing an unprecedented challenge, i.e., how to timely utilize the huge amount of data to benefit human beings. Stimulated by such a challenge, a rapid development has taken place in molecular science, particularly in the areas associated with drug development and biomedicine, both experimental and theoretical. The current thematic issue was launched with the focus on the topic of "Molecular Science for Drug Development and Biomedicine", in hopes to further stimulate more useful techniques and findings from various approaches of molecular science for drug development and biomedicine.[...].

  10. Accelerating Precision Drug Development and Drug Repurposing by Leveraging Human Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, Jill M; Shirey-Rice, Jana K; Lavieri, Robert R; Jerome, Rebecca N; Zaleski, Nicole M; Aronoff, David M; Bastarache, Lisa; Niu, Xinnan; Holroyd, Kenneth J; Roden, Dan M; Skaar, Eric P; Niswender, Colleen M; Marnett, Lawrence J; Lindsley, Craig W; Ekstrom, Leeland B; Bentley, Alan R; Bernard, Gordon R; Hong, Charles C; Denny, Joshua C

    2017-04-01

    The potential impact of using human genetic data linked to longitudinal electronic medical records on drug development is extraordinary; however, the practical application of these data necessitates some organizational innovations. Vanderbilt has created resources such as an easily queried database of >2.6 million de-identified electronic health records linked to BioVU, which is a DNA biobank with more than 230,000 unique samples. To ensure these data are used to maximally benefit and accelerate both de novo drug discovery and drug repurposing efforts, we created the Accelerating Drug Development and Repurposing Incubator, a multidisciplinary think tank of experts in various therapeutic areas within both basic and clinical science as well as experts in legal, business, and other operational domains. The Incubator supports a diverse pipeline of drug indication finding projects, leveraging the natural experiment of human genetics.

  11. [Development of antituberculous drugs: current status and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Haruaki; Namba, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) remains the most frequent and important infectious disease causing morbidity and death. One-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the etiologic agent of TB. The World Health Organization estimates that about eight to ten million new TB cases occur annually worldwide and the incidence of TB is currently increasing. In this context, TB is in the top three, with malaria and HIV being the leading causes of death from a single infectious agent, and approximately two million deaths are attributable to TB annually. In particular, pulmonary TB, the most common form of TB, is a highly contagious and life-threatening infection. Moreover, enhanced susceptibility to TB in HIV-infected populations is another serious health problem throughout the world. In addition, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) has been increasing in incidence in many areas, not only in developing countries but industrialized countries as well, during the past decade. These situations, particularly the global resurgence of TB and the rapid emergence of MDR-TB, underscore the importance of the development of new antituberculous drugs and new protocols for efficacious clinical control of TB patients using ordinary antimycobacterial drugs. Concerning the development of new antituberculous drugs, the following points are of particular importance. (1) Development of drugs which display lasting antimycobacterial activity in vivo is desirable, since they can be administered with long intervals and consequently facilitate directly observed therapy and enhance patient compliance. (2) Development of novel antituberculosis compounds to combat MDR-TB is urgently needed. (3) The eradication of slowly metabolizing and, if possible, dormant populations of MTB organisms that cause relapse, using new classes of anti-TB drugs is very promising for prevention of TB incidence, because it will markedly reduce the incidence of active TB from persons who are

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND REGISTRATION OF CHIRAL DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITTE, DT; ENSING, K; FRANKE, JP; DEZEEUW, RA

    1993-01-01

    In this review we describe the impact of chirality on drug development and registration in the United States, Japan and the European Community. Enantiomers may have differences in their pharmacological profiles, and, therefore, chiral drugs ask for special analytical and pharmacological attention

  13. Challenges and perspective of drug repurposing strategies in early phase clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shumei; Moulder, Stacy L; Ueno, Naoto T; Wheler, Jennifer J; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant investments in the development of new agents only 5% of cancer drugs entering Phase I clinical trials are ultimately approved for routine clinical cancer care. Drug repurposing strategies using novel combinations of previously tested anticancer agents could reduce the cost and improve treatment outcomes. At MD Anderson Cancer Center, early phase clinical trials with drug repurposing strategies demonstrated promising outcomes in patients with both rare and common treatment refractory advanced cancers. Despite clinical efficacy advancing drug repurposing strategies in the clinical trial trajectory beyond early phase studies has been challenging mainly due to lack of funding and interest from the pharmaceutical industry. In this review, we delineate our experience and challenges with drug repurposing strategies.

  14. Drug-drug interactions among recently hospitalised patients--frequent but mostly clinically insignificant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Dalhoff, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients use and store considerable amounts of drugs. The aim of the present study was to identify potential drug-drug interactions between drugs used by patients recently discharged from the hospital and, subsequently, to estimate the clinical implications of these interactions. METHODS......: Patients were visited within 1 week following their discharge from hospital and interviewed about their drug use. Stored products were inspected. We used a bibliography (Hansten and Horn; Wolters Kluwer Health, St. Louis, Mo., 2004) to identify and classify potential drug-drug interactions. RESULTS......: eight per patient; range: 1-24). With respect to those drugs used daily or on demand, 476 potential interactions were identified (126 patients); none were class 1 (always avoid drug combination) and 25 were class 2 (usually avoid combination; 24 patients). Eleven of the potential class 2 interactions...

  15. Drug resistance in the mouse cancer clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottenberg, Sven; Borst, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the most pressing problems in treating cancer patients today. Local and regional disease can usually be adequately treated, but patients eventually die from distant metastases that have become resistant to all available chemotherapy. Although work on cultured tumor cell

  16. Rectal drug administration: clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A G; Moolenaar, F; de Leede, L G; Breimer, D D

    1982-01-01

    The human rectum represents a body cavity in which drugs can be easily introduced and retained and from which absorption is well possible. There are important therapeutic reasons why it is sometimes preferable to give a drug rectally rather than orally, e.g. in cases of nausea and vomiting. Drawbacks of rectal drug administration include the interruption of absorption by defaecation and lack of patient acceptability. The mechanism of drug absorption from the rectum is probably no different to that in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, despite the fact that the physiological circumstances (e.g. pH, fluid content) differ substantially, Absorption from aqueous and alcoholic solutions may occur very rapidly, which has proved to be of considerable therapeutic value in the rapid suppression of acute convulsive attacks by diazepam (e.g. in children), but absorption from suppositories is generally slower and very much dependent on the nature of the suppository base, the use of surfactants or other additives, particle size of the active ingredient, etc. There is some evidence that hepatic first-pass elimination of high clearance drugs is partially avoided after rectal administration, e.g. lignocaine. This can be explained by the rectal venous blood supply: the upper part is connected with the portal system, whereas the lower part is directly connected with the systemic circulation. Plasma concentration data following rectal administration of representatives of several classes of drugs are reviewed: anticonvulsants, non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hypnosedatives and anaesthetics, strong analgesics, theophylline and derivatives, corticosteroids, antibacterial agents, thiazinamium, promethazine, hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide, streptokinase, progesterone, ergotamine tartrate and levodopa. Only limited number of cases has it been adequately shown that the rectal route of administration gives plasma concentrations which are comparable to

  17. Investigation of toxic metabolites during drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kevin; Williams, Dominic P.; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2005-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant human health problem. Any organ system can be affected, including the liver, skin and kidney. Drug-induced liver injury is the most frequent reason for the withdrawal of an approved drug from the market, and it also accounts for up to 50% of cases of acute liver failure. The clinical picture is often diverse, even for the same drug. Mild, asymptomatic effects occur at a relatively high frequency with a number of drugs. Idiosyncratic toxicity is rare but potentially life-threatening. Many serious ADRs that occur in man are unpredictable from routine pathology and clinical chemistry in laboratory animals and are therefore poorly understood. The drug metabolist can determine the propensity of a novel chemical entity to either accumulate in the hepatocyte or undergo bioactivation in numerous model systems, from expressed enzymes, genetically engineered cells to whole animals. Bioactivation can be measured using trapping experiments with model nucleophiles or by measurement of non-specific covalent binding. The chemistry of the process is defined and the medicinal chemist can address the issue by seeking a metabolically stable pharmacophore to replace the potential toxicophore. However, we require a more fundamental understanding of the role of drug chemistry and biochemistry in ADRs. This requires knowledge of the ultimate toxin, signalling in cell defense and the sequence of molecular events, which ultimately lead to cell and tissue damage. It is imperative that such studies have a clinical level, but then translated into laboratory-based molecular studies. This will provide a deeper understanding of potential toxicophores for drug design and define candidate genes for pharmacogenomic approaches to individualized medicines

  18. Imaging drugs with and without clinical analgesic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Anderson, Julie; Schwarz, Adam J; Coimbra, Alexandre; Baumgartner, Richard; Pendse, G; George, Edward; Nutile, Lauren; Wallin, Diana; Bishop, James; Neni, Saujanya; Maier, Gary; Iyengar, Smriti; Evelhoch, Jeffery L; Bleakman, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2011-12-01

    The behavioral response to pain is driven by sensory and affective components, each of which is mediated by the CNS. Subjective pain ratings are used as readouts when appraising potential analgesics; however, pain ratings alone cannot enable a characterization of CNS pain circuitry during pain processing or how this circuitry is modulated pharmacologically. Having a more objective readout of potential analgesic effects may allow improved understanding and detection of pharmacological efficacy for pain. The pharmacological/functional magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI/fMRI) methodology can be used to objectively evaluate drug action on the CNS. In this context, we aimed to evaluate two drugs that had been developed as analgesics: one that is efficacious for pain (buprenorphine (BUP)) and one that failed as an analgesic in clinical trials aprepitant (APREP). Using phMRI, we observed that activation induced solely by BUP was present in regions with μ-opioid receptors, whereas APREP-induced activation was seen in regions expressing NK(1) receptors. However, significant pharmacological modulation of functional connectivity in pain-processing pathways was only observed following BUP administration. By implementing an evoked pain fMRI paradigm, these drugs could also be differentiated by comparing the respective fMRI signals in CNS circuits mediating sensory and affective components of pain. We report a correlation of functional connectivity and evoked pain fMRI measures with pain ratings as well as peak drug concentration. This investigation demonstrates how CNS-acting drugs can be compared, and how the phMRI/fMRI methodology may be used with conventional measures to better evaluate candidate analgesics in small subject cohorts.

  19. Expanding public-private collaborations to enhance cancer drug development: a report of the Institute of Medicine's workshop series, "Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Monica M; Canetta, Renzo; Nass, Sharyl J

    2014-11-01

    Since their inception in the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded cancer cooperative groups have been important contributors to cancer clinical and translational research. In 2010, a committee appointed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences completed a consensus review on the status of the U.S. publicly funded cancer clinical trials system. This report identified a need to reinvigorate the cooperative groups and provided recommendations for improving their effectiveness. Follow-up workshops to monitor progress were conducted by the IOM's National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2011 and 2013. One of the key recommendations of the IOM report was a call for greater collaboration among stakeholders in cancer research. In particular, more active engagement and better alignment of incentives among the cooperative groups, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the biopharmaceutical industry were identified as essential to achieving the promise of oncology drug development. This review, based on presentations and discussion during the IOM-ASCO workshops, outlines the progress and remaining challenges of these collaborations. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. Expanding Public-Private Collaborations to Enhance Cancer Drug Development: A Report of the Institute of Medicine’s Workshop Series, “Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Renzo; Nass, Sharyl J.

    2014-01-01

    Since their inception in the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded cancer cooperative groups have been important contributors to cancer clinical and translational research. In 2010, a committee appointed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences completed a consensus review on the status of the U.S. publicly funded cancer clinical trials system. This report identified a need to reinvigorate the cooperative groups and provided recommendations for improving their effectiveness. Follow-up workshops to monitor progress were conducted by the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2011 and 2013. One of the key recommendations of the IOM report was a call for greater collaboration among stakeholders in cancer research. In particular, more active engagement and better alignment of incentives among the cooperative groups, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the biopharmaceutical industry were identified as essential to achieving the promise of oncology drug development. This review, based on presentations and discussion during the IOM-ASCO workshops, outlines the progress and remaining challenges of these collaborations. PMID:25326161

  1. Development and Evaluation of Chronotherapeutic Drug Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The developed system is capable of releasing the drug after a 4-h lag period. However ... concentration would be at its maximum level, ... spheronizer (Caleva MBS, UK)operating at .... capsules show that the color intensity of the.

  2. Developing Effective Clinical Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Khamarko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education and training provides a means to improve performance among health care professionals (HCP. Research shows, however, that continuing professional education activities have inconsistent effects on HCP competence, performance, and patient health outcomes. Furthermore, the trainer’s role as a facilitator of knowledge translation (KT has been understudied. To understand how clinical trainers support their trainees in translating what they learned into practice, we conducted 16 in-depth interviews with expert trainers. These interviews yielded a variety of KT-enhancing strategies, including tailoring training activities to their trainees’ needs. In addition, participants recommended trainers familiarize themselves with their trainees’ work environments, be able to identify their knowledge deficits, and devote time to provide trainees with post-training support. Creating an effective training, one that leads to transfer, requires active planning, communication, and command of the training topic by skilled trainers.

  3. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V

    2016-01-01

    of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along...

  4. [Exploration and demonstration study on drug combination from clinical real world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Drug combination is extensive in the clinical real world,which is an important part and the inherent requirements of the post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The key issues and technology include multi-domain and multi-disciplinary such as the rationality, efficacy and safety evaluation of combination drug starting from clinical real world, study on component in vivo and mechanism of combination drug, the risk/benefit assessment and cost-benefit evaluation of combination drug and so on. The topic has been studied as clinical demonstration on combination therapy of variety of diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, insomnia, depression, hepatitis, herpes zoster, psoriasis and ectopic pregnancy. Meanwhile, multi-disciplinary dynamic innovation alliance of clinical drug combination has been presented, which can promote the academic development and improving service ability and level of TCM.

  5. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of this guidance is to assist sponsors in the clinical development of drugs for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (c...

  6. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-06-12

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  7. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spack Edward G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s. Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot

  8. Indolyl aryl sulfones (IASs): development of highly potent NNRTIs active against wt-HIV-1 and clinically relevant drug resistant mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Romano; Artico, Marino

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfones (IASs) are a potent class of NNRTIs developed from L-737,126, a lead agent discovered by Merck AG. IAS derivatives are endowed with inhibitory activities against wt HIV-1 in the low nanomolar concentration range. Introduction of two methyl groups at positions 3 and 5 of the phenyl ring of the aryl sulfonyl moiety furnished IAS derivatives such as 5-chloro- or 5-bromo-3-[(3,5-dimethylphenyl)sulfonyl]indole-2-carboxyamide, which showed very potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity against some mutants carrying NNRTI resistant mutations at positions 103 and 181 of the reverse transcriptase. IAS derivatives bearing 2-hydroxyethylcarboxyamide or 2-hydroxyethylcarboxyhydrazide groups at position 2 of the indole nucleus were more active than L-737,126 against the K103N-Y181C double mutant. A great improvement of antiviral activity against wt HIV-1 and resistant mutants was obtained by coupling 1-3 simple amino acids, such as glycine and alanine, in sequence, with the 3-[(3,5-dimethylphenyl)sulfonyl]-1H-indole-2-carbonyl moiety. The transformation of the chain terminus into amide or hydrazide, produced short peptides with high selectivity and potent activity against wt HIV-1, and the viral mutants Y181C, K103N-Y181C and EFV(R). IAS having two halogen atoms at the indole showed potent inhibitory activity against the Y181C and the EFV(R) resistant mutant strains. In particular, the introduction of a fluorine atom at position 4 of the indole ring notably contributed to improve the antiviral activities against both wt and the related resistant mutants. 5-Nitro-IASs were highly active against wt HIV-1 and exhibited low cytotoxicity. Experimental data highlighted the class IAS derivatives as promising candidates for clinical trials.

  9. Albumin-drug interaction and its clinical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Keishi; Chuang, Victor Tuan Giam; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2013-12-01

    Human serum albumin acts as a reservoir and transport protein for endogenous (e.g. fatty acids or bilirubin) and exogenous compounds (e.g. drugs or nutrients) in the blood. The binding of a drug to albumin is a major determinant of its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile. The present review discusses recent findings regarding the nature of drug binding sites, drug-albumin binding in certain diseased states or in the presence of coadministered drugs, and the potential of utilizing albumin-drug interactions in clinical applications. Drug-albumin interactions appear to predominantly occur at one or two specific binding sites. The nature of these drug binding sites has been fundamentally investigated as to location, size, charge, hydrophobicity or changes that can occur under conditions such as the content of the endogenous substances in question. Such findings can be useful tools for the analysis of drug-drug interactions or protein binding in diseased states. A change in protein binding is not always a problem in terms of drug therapy, but it can be used to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic agents or to enhance the accumulation of radiopharmaceuticals to targets for diagnostic purposes. Furthermore, several extracorporeal dialysis procedures using albumin-containing dialysates have proven to be an effective tool for removing endogenous toxins or overdosed drugs from patients. Recent findings related to albumin-drug interactions as described in this review are useful for providing safer and efficient therapies and diagnoses in clinical settings. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Serum Albumin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Pharmacogenetics of Cytochrome P450-Associated Drugs in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Aka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes are commonly involved in drug metabolism, and genetic variation in the genes encoding CYPs are associated with variable drug response. While genotype-guided therapy has been clinically implemented in adults, these associations are less well established for pediatric patients. In order to understand the frequency of pediatric exposures to drugs with known CYP interactions, we compiled all actionable drug–CYP interactions with a high level of evidence using Clinical Pharmacogenomic Implementation Consortium (CPIC data and surveyed 10 years of electronic health records (EHR data for the number of children exposed to CYP-associated drugs. Subsequently, we performed a focused literature review for drugs commonly used in pediatrics, defined as more than 5000 pediatric patients exposed in the decade-long EHR cohort. There were 48 drug–CYP interactions with a high level of evidence in the CPIC database. Of those, only 10 drugs were commonly used in children (ondansetron, oxycodone, codeine, omeprazole, lansoprazole, sertraline, amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and risperidone. For these drugs, reports of the drug–CYP interaction in cohorts including children were sparse. There are adequate data for implementation of genotype-guided therapy for children for three of the 10 commonly used drugs (codeine, omeprazole and lansoprazole. For the majority of commonly used drugs with known CYP interactions, more data are required to support pharmacogenomic implementation in children.

  11. Impact of Drug Metabolism/Pharmacokinetics and Their Relevance upon Taxus-based Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Cheng; Ge, Guang-Bo; Wang, Ping; Yang, Ling

    2018-05-22

    Drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) studies of Taxus natural products, their semi-synthetic derivatives and analogs are indispensable in the optimization of lead compounds and clinical therapy. These studies can lead to development of new drug entities with improved absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/T) profiles. To date, there have been no comprehensive reviews of the DMPK features of Taxus derived medicinal compounds.Natural and semi-synthetic taxanes may cause and could be affected by drug-drug interaction (DDI). Hence ADME/T studies of various taxane-containing formulations are important; to date these studies indicate that the role of cytochrome p450s and drug transporters is more prominent than phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Mechanisms of taxane DMPK mediated by nuclear receptors, microRNAs, and single nucleotide polymorphisms are being revealed. Herein we review the latest knowledge on these topics, as well as the gaps in knowledge of the DMPK issues of Taxus compounds. DDIs significantly impact the PK/pharmacodynamics performance of taxanes and co-administered chemicals, which may inspire researchers to develop novel formula. While the ADME/T profiles of some taxanes are well defined, DMPK studies should be extended to more Taxus compounds, species, and Taxus -involved formulations, which would be streamlined by versatile omics platforms and computational analyses. Further biopharmaceutical investigations will be beneficial tothe translation of bench findings to the clinical applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Optimization and Simulation in Drug Development - Review and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Clausen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    We give a review of pharmaceutical R&D and mathematical simulation and optimization methods used to support decision making within the pharmaceutical development process. The complex nature of drug development is pointed out through a description of the various phases of the pharmaceutical develo...... development process. A part of the paper is dedicated to the use of simulation techniques to support clinical trials. The paper ends with a section describing portfolio modelling methods in the context of the pharmaceutical industry....

  13. Recent Advances in Drug Development and Regulatory Science in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Naiqing

    2018-01-01

    As the second largest pharmaceutical market with a great potential for future growth, China has drawn much attention from the global pharmaceutical community. With an increasing government investment in biomedical research, the domestic biopharmaceutical (biotechnological) companies in China are turning their attention to the development of innovative medicines and targeting the global market. To introduce innovative products to Chinese patients sooner, to improve the efficiency of its review and approval processes, and to harmonize its regulatory science with international standards, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) has initiated a series of major changes to its policies and regulations. This paper presents a snapshot of China's pharmaceutical market, and research and development status, and introduces technical guidelines pertaining to clinical trials and new drug applications. The recent wave of ground-breaking reforms in CFDA's regulatory science is discussed. Examples of clinical trials and new drug applications are provided throughout the discussion.

  14. Development of a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Drug Prescription: Non-Interventional Naturalistic Description of the Antipsychotic Prescription Patterns in 4345 Outpatients and Future Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouiguet, Sofian; Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A; Ovejero-García, Santiago; Álvarez-García, Raquel; Carballo, Juan Jose; Lenca, Philippe; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSS) is able to significantly improve management pharmacological treatments. We developed a web application available on smartphones in order to help clinicians monitor prescription and further propose CDSS. A web application (www.MEmind.net) was developed to assess patients and collect data regarding gender, age, diagnosis and treatment. We analyzed antipsychotic prescriptions in 4345 patients attended in five Psychiatric Community Mental Health Centers from June 2014 to October 2014. The web-application reported average daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics, prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to defined daily dose (DDD) ratio. The MEmind web-application reported that antipsychotics were used in 1116 patients out of the total sample, mostly in 486 (44%) patients with schizophrenia related disorders but also in other diagnoses. Second generation antipsychotics (quetiapine, aripiprazole and long-acting paliperidone) were preferably employed. Low doses were more frequently used than high doses. Long acting paliperidone and ziprasidone however, were the only two antipsychotics used at excessive dosing. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was used in 287 (26%) patients with classic depot drugs, clotiapine, amisulpride and clozapine. In this study we describe the first step of the development of a web application that is able to make polypharmacy, high dose usage and off label usage of antipsychotics visible to clinicians. Current development of the MEmind web application may help to improve prescription security via momentary feedback of prescription and clinical decision support system.

  15. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases is to a large extent dependent on the availability of good experimental in vivo models in order to perform preclinical tests of new drugs and for the identification of novel drug targets. Here, we review a number of existing...... of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although one Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror...

  16. Development Considerations for Nanocrystal Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; John, Mathew; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-05-01

    Nanocrystal technology has emerged as a valuable tool for facilitating the delivery of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and enhancing API bioavailability. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received over 80 applications for drug products containing nanocrystals. These products can be delivered by different routes of administration and are used in a variety of therapeutic areas. To aid in identifying key developmental considerations for these products, a retrospective analysis was performed on the submissions received by the FDA to date. Over 60% of the submissions were for the oral route of administration. Based on the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), most nanocrystal drugs submitted to the FDA are class II compounds that possess low aqueous solubility and high intestinal permeability. Impact of food on drug bioavailability was reduced for most nanocrystal formulations as compared with their micronized counterparts. For all routes of administration, dose proportionality was observed for some, but not all, nanocrystal products. Particular emphasis in the development of nanocrystal products was placed on the in-process tests and controls at critical manufacturing steps (such as milling process), mitigation and control of process-related impurities, and the stability of APIs or polymorphic form (s) during manufacturing and upon storage. This emphasis resulted in identifying challenges to the development of these products including accurate determination of particle size (distribution) of drug substance and/or nanocrystal colloidal dispersion, identification of polymorphic form (s), and establishment of drug substance/product specifications.

  17. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing.

  18. Information needs for making clinical recommendations about potential drug-drug interactions: a synthesis of literature review and interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Katrina M; Nelson, Scott D; Hines, Lisa; Empey, Philip; Boyce, Richard D; Hochheiser, Harry

    2017-02-22

    Drug information compendia and drug-drug interaction information databases are critical resources for clinicians and pharmacists working to avoid adverse events due to exposure to potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs). Our goal is to develop information models, annotated data, and search tools that will facilitate the interpretation of PDDI information. To better understand the information needs and work practices of specialists who search and synthesize PDDI evidence for drug information resources, we conducted an inquiry that combined a thematic analysis of published literature with unstructured interviews. Starting from an initial set of relevant articles, we developed search terms and conducted a literature search. Two reviewers conducted a thematic analysis of included articles. Unstructured interviews with drug information experts were conducted and similarly coded. Information needs, work processes, and indicators of potential strengths and weaknesses of information systems were identified. Review of 92 papers and 10 interviews identified 56 categories of information needs related to the interpretation of PDDI information including drug and interaction information; study design; evidence including clinical details, quality and content of reports, and consequences; and potential recommendations. We also identified strengths/weaknesses of PDDI information systems. We identified the kinds of information that might be most effective for summarizing PDDIs. The drug information experts we interviewed had differing goals, suggesting a need for detailed information models and flexible presentations. Several information needs not discussed in previous work were identified, including temporal overlaps in drug administration, biological plausibility of interactions, and assessment of the quality and content of reports. Richly structured depictions of PDDI information may help drug information experts more effectively interpret data and develop recommendations

  19. Malignant mesothelioma clinical trial combines immunotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatwal, Monica S; Tanvetyanon, Tawee

    2018-04-01

    Immunotherapy by checkpoint inhibitor is effective for a number of solid tumors including malignant mesothelioma. Studies utilizing single-agent PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor for mesothelioma have reported tumor response rates in approximately 10-20% of patients treated. Given the success of combining these agents with CTLA-4 inhibitor in melanoma, there is a strong rationale to study it in mesothelioma. Recently results from clinical trials investigating this approach have been released. Though limited by small sample size, the studies conclusively demonstrated feasibility and suggested a modestly higher tumor response rate than one would expect from treatment with single-agent PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor. Nevertheless, toxicity was also increased. Immunotherapy-related deaths due to encephalitis, renal failure and hepatitis were observed. Further studies are warranted.

  20. Mathematical modeling for novel cancer drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    Mathematical modeling enables: the in silico classification of cancers, the prediction of disease outcomes, optimization of therapy, identification of promising drug targets and prediction of resistance to anticancer drugs. In silico pre-screened drug targets can be validated by a small number of carefully selected experiments. This review discusses the basics of mathematical modeling in cancer drug discovery and development. The topics include in silico discovery of novel molecular drug targets, optimization of immunotherapies, personalized medicine and guiding preclinical and clinical trials. Breast cancer has been used to demonstrate the applications of mathematical modeling in cancer diagnostics, the identification of high-risk population, cancer screening strategies, prediction of tumor growth and guiding cancer treatment. Mathematical models are the key components of the toolkit used in the fight against cancer. The combinatorial complexity of new drugs discovery is enormous, making systematic drug discovery, by experimentation, alone difficult if not impossible. The biggest challenges include seamless integration of growing data, information and knowledge, and making them available for a multiplicity of analyses. Mathematical models are essential for bringing cancer drug discovery into the era of Omics, Big Data and personalized medicine.

  1. Development of clinical dosage forms for a poorly water-soluble drug II: formulation and characterization of a novel solid microemulsion preconcentrate system for oral delivery of a poorly water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Hynes, Sara R; Haefele, Thomas F; Pudipeddi, Madhu; Royce, Alan E; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2009-05-01

    The solution of a poorly water-soluble drug in a liquid lipid-surfactant mixture, which served as a microemulsion preconcentrate, was converted into a solid form by incorporating it in a solid polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix. The solid microemulsion preconcentrates thus formed consisted of Capmul PG8 (propylene glycol monocaprylate) as oil, Cremophor EL (polyoxyl 35 castor oil) as surfactant, and hydrophilic polymer PEG 3350 as solid matrix. The drug (aqueous solubility: 0.17 microg/mL at pH 1-8 and 25 degrees C) was dissolved in a melt of the mixture at 65-70 degrees C and then the hot solution was filled into hard gelatin capsules; the liquid gradually solidified upon cooling below 55 degrees C. The solid system was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and the dispersion testing in water. It was confirmed that a solid microemulsion preconcentrate is a two-phase system, where clusters of crystalline PEG 3350 formed the solid structure (m.p. 55-60 degrees C) and the liquid microemulsion preconcentrate dispersed in between PEG 3350 crystals as a separate phase. The drug remained dissolved in the liquid phase. In vitro release testing showed that the preconcentrate dispersed readily in water forming a microemulsion with the drug dissolved in the oil particles (PEG 3350 did not interfere with the process of self-microemulsification.

  2. Drugs' development in acute heart failure: what went wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneggi, Vincenzo; Sivakumar, Nithy; Chen, Deborah; Matter, Alex

    2018-05-08

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a major burden disease, with a complex physiopathology, unsatisfactory diagnosis, treatment and a very poor prognosis. In the last two decades, a number of drugs have progressed from preclinical to early and late clinical development, but only a few of them have been approved and added to a stagnant pharmacological armamentarium. We have reviewed the data published on drugs developed for AHF since early 2000s, trying to recognise factors that have worked for a successful approval or for the stoppage of the program, in an attempt to delineate future trajectories for AHF drug development. Our review has identified limitations at both preclinical and clinical levels. At the preclinical level, the major shortcoming is represented by animal models looking at short-term endpoints which do not recapitulate the complexity of the human disease. At the clinical level, the main weakness is given by the disconnect between short-term endpoints assessed in the early stage of drug development, and medium-long-term endpoints requested in Phase 3 for regulatory approval. This is further amplified by the lack of validation and standardisation of short- and long-term endpoints; absence of predictive biomarkers; conduct of studies on heterogeneous populations; and use of different eligibility criteria, time of assessments, drug schedules and background therapies. Key goals remain a better understanding of AHF and the construction of a successful drug development program. A reasonable way to move forward resides in a strong collaboration between main stakeholders of therapeutic innovation: scientific community, industry and regulatory agencies.

  3. [Targeting high-risk drugs to optimize clinical pharmacists' intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, Anne-Laure; Bourdelin, Magali; Maison, Ophélie; Coursier, Sandra; Bontemps, Hervé

    2016-12-01

    By the Order of 6 April 2011, the pharmacist must validate all the prescriptions containing "high-risk drugs" or those of "patients at risk". To optimize this clinical pharmacy activity, we identified high-risk drugs. A list of high-risk drugs has been established using literature, pharmacists' interventions (PI) performed in our hospital and a survey sent to hospital pharmacists. In a prospective study (analysis of 100 prescriptions for each high-risk drug selected), we have identified the most relevant to target. We obtained a statistically significant PI rate (P<0.05) for digoxin, oral anticoagulants direct, oral methotrexate and colchicine. This method of targeted pharmaceutical validation based on high-risk drugs is relevant to detect patients with high risk of medicine-related illness. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Integration of Antibody Array Technology into Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Whittaker, Kelly; Zhang, Huihua; Wu, Jian; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    Antibody arrays represent a high-throughput technique that enables the parallel detection of multiple proteins with minimal sample volume requirements. In recent years, antibody arrays have been widely used to identify new biomarkers for disease diagnosis or prognosis. Moreover, many academic research laboratories and commercial biotechnology companies are starting to apply antibody arrays in the field of drug discovery. In this review, some technical aspects of antibody array development and the various platforms currently available will be addressed; however, the main focus will be on the discussion of antibody array technologies and their applications in drug discovery. Aspects of the drug discovery process, including target identification, mechanisms of drug resistance, molecular mechanisms of drug action, drug side effects, and the application in clinical trials and in managing patient care, which have been investigated using antibody arrays in recent literature will be examined and the relevance of this technology in progressing this process will be discussed. Protein profiling with antibody array technology, in addition to other applications, has emerged as a successful, novel approach for drug discovery because of the well-known importance of proteins in cell events and disease development.

  5. The intersection of stress, drug abuse and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, Pushpa V

    2002-01-01

    Use or abuse of licit and illicit substances is often associated with environmental stress. Current clinical evidence clearly demonstrates neurobehavioral, somatic growth and developmental deficits in children born to drug-using mothers. However, the effects of environmental stress and its interaction with prenatal drug exposure on a child's development is unknown. Studies in pregnant animals under controlled conditions show drug-induced long-term alterations in brain structures and functions of the offspring. These cytoarchitecture alterations in the brain are often associated with perturbations in neurotransmitter systems that are intimately involved in the regulation of the stress responses. Similar abnormalities have been observed in the brains of animals exposed to other adverse exogenous (e.g., environmental stress) and/or endogenous (e.g., glucocorticoids) experiences during early life. The goal of this article is to: (1) provide evidence and a perspective that common neural systems are influenced during development both by perinatal drug exposure and early stress exposure; and (2) identify gaps and encourage new research examining the effects of early stress and perinatal drug exposure, in animal models, that would elucidate how stress- and drug-induced perturbations in neural systems influence later vulnerability to abused drugs in adult offspring.

  6. Drug screening in clinical or forensic toxicology: are there differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Beyer, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    Legal and medical practitioners need to remember that, with respect to drug analysis, there are two distinct disciplines in analytical toxicology concerned with human biological matrices, namely clinical and forensic toxicology. Both fields use similar analytical techniques designed to detect and quantify drugs, chemicals and poisons in fluids or tissues. In clinical toxicology, analytical results help to specify the appropriate treatment of a poisoned or intoxicated patient. In forensic toxicology, the results often play a vital role in determining the possible impairment or behavioural changes in an individual, or the contribution of drugs or poisons to death in a medico-legal investigation. This column provides an overview of the similarities and differences inherent in clinical and forensic toxicology.

  7. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug-eluting stents: from bench-top to clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basalus, Mounir Welson Zakhary

    2013-01-01

    The development of drug-eluting stents (DES) has improved the invasive treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease by reducing both, restenosis rate and need for reinterventions. This success resulted in a widespread utilization of DES in clinical practice and entailed many clinical research

  9. The Use of Social Media in Orphan Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Christopher-Paul; Ni, Wendi

    2017-11-01

    Social media has transformed how people interact with one another through the Internet, and it has the potential to do the same for orphan drug development. Currently, social media influences the orphan drug development process in the following three ways: assisting the study of orphan diseases, increasing the awareness of orphan disease, and playing a vital role in clinical trials. However, there are some caveats to the utilization of social media, such as the need to protect patient privacy by adequately de-identifying personal health information, assuring consistent quality and representativeness of the data, and preventing the unblinding of patient group assignments. Social media has both potential for improving orphan drug development and pitfalls, but with proper oversight on the part of companies, support and participation of patients and their advocacy groups, and timely guidance from regulatory authorities, the positives outweigh the negatives for this powerful and patient-centric tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative analysis of three drug-drug interaction screening systems against probable clinically relevant drug-drug interactions: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhič, Neža; Mrhar, Ales; Brvar, Miran

    2017-07-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening systems report potential DDIs. This study aimed to find the prevalence of probable DDI-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and compare the clinical usefulness of different DDI screening systems to prevent or warn against these ADRs. A prospective cohort study was conducted in patients urgently admitted to medical departments. Potential DDIs were checked using Complete Drug Interaction®, Lexicomp® Online™, and Drug Interaction Checker®. The study team identified the patients with probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs on admission, the causality of which was assessed using the Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of screening systems to prevent or warn against probable DDI-related ADRs were evaluated. Overall, 50 probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs were found in 37 out of 795 included patients taking at least two drugs, most common of them were bleeding, hyperkalemia, digitalis toxicity, and hypotension. Complete Drug Interaction showed the best sensitivity (0.76) for actual DDI-related ADRs, followed by Lexicomp Online (0.50), and Drug Interaction Checker (0.40). Complete Drug Interaction and Drug Interaction Checker had positive predictive values of 0.07; Lexicomp Online had 0.04. We found no difference in specificity and negative predictive values among these systems. DDI screening systems differ significantly in their ability to detect probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value.

  11. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, more than 25% of all anticancer drugs are developed as oral formulations. Oral administration of drugs has several advantages over intravenous (i.v.) administration. It will on average be more convenient for patients, because they can take oral medication themselves, there is no need for

  12. A Trojan horse in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Skytte, Dorthe Mondrup; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2009-01-01

    Available chemotherapeutics take advantage of the fast proliferation of cancer cells. Consequently slow growth makes androgen refractory prostate cancer resistant towards available drugs. No treatment is available at the present, when the cancer has developed metastases outside the prostate (T4 s...

  13. Free software to analyse the clinical relevance of drug interactions with antiretroviral agents (SIMARV®) in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, N A; Amariles, P; Monsalve, M; Faus, M J

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has extended the expected lifespan of patients with HIV/AIDS. However, the therapeutic benefits of some drugs used simultaneously with highly active antiretroviral therapy may be adversely affected by drug interactions. The goal was to design and develop a free software to facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. A comprehensive Medline/PubMed database search of drug interactions was performed. Articles that recognized any drug interactions in HIV disease were selected. The publications accessed were limited to human studies in English or Spanish, with full texts retrieved. Drug interactions were analyzed, assessed, and grouped into four levels of clinical relevance according to gravity and probability. Software to systematize the information regarding drug interactions and their clinical relevance was designed and developed. Overall, 952 different references were retrieved and 446 selected; in addition, 67 articles were selected from the citation lists of identified articles. A total of 2119 pairs of drug interactions were identified; of this group, 2006 (94.7%) were drug-drug interactions, 1982 (93.5%) had an identified pharmacokinetic mechanism, and 1409 (66.5%) were mediated by enzyme inhibition. In terms of clinical relevance, 1285 (60.6%) drug interactions were clinically significant in patients with HIV (levels 1 and 2). With this information, a software program that facilitates identification and assessment of the clinical relevance of antiretroviral drug interactions (SIMARV ® ) was developed. A free software package with information on 2119 pairs of antiretroviral drug interactions was designed and developed that could facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanistic systems modeling to guide drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Brian J; Papin, Jason A; Musante, Cynthia J

    2013-02-01

    A crucial question that must be addressed in the drug development process is whether the proposed therapeutic target will yield the desired effect in the clinical population. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies place a large investment on research and development, long before confirmatory data are available from human trials. Basic science has greatly expanded the computable knowledge of disease processes, both through the generation of large omics data sets and a compendium of studies assessing cellular and systemic responses to physiologic and pathophysiologic stimuli. Given inherent uncertainties in drug development, mechanistic systems models can better inform target selection and the decision process for advancing compounds through preclinical and clinical research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Drugs and development: the global impact of drug use and trafficking on social and economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2008-12-01

    Locating development efforts within the context of globalism and global drug capitalism, this article examines the significant health and social impact both legal and illegal drugs have on international development efforts. The paper takes on an issue that is generally overlooked in the development debate and is not much addressed in the current international development standard, the Millennium Development Goals, and yet is one that places serious constraints on the ability of underdeveloped nations to achieve improvement. The relationship between psychotropic or "mind/mood altering" drugs and sustainable development is rooted in the contribution that the legal and illegal drug trade makes to a set of barriers to development, including: (1) interpersonal crime and community violence; (2) the corruption of public servants and the disintegration of social institutions; (3) the emergence of new or enhanced health problems; (4) the lowering of worker productivity; (5) the ensnarement of youth in drug distribution and away from productive education or employment; (6) the skewing of economies to drug production and money laundering. The paper emphasizes the need for new approaches for diminishing the burden placed by drugs on development.

  16. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the following: (1) What FDA Expects in a...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...-sponsorship with the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop. The...

  17. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrer, Estelle; Dieterle, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  18. Drug-diagnostics co-development in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eSimon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Developments in genomics are providing a biological basis for the heterogeneity of clinical course and response to treatment that have long been apparent to clinicians The ability to molecularly characterize of human diseases presents new opportunities to develop more effective treatments and new challenges for the design and analysis of clinical trials.In oncology, treatment of broad populations with regimens that benefit a minority of patients is less economically sustainable with expensive molecularly targeted therapeutics. The established molecular heterogeneity of human diseases requires the development of new paradigms for the design and analysis of randomized clinical trials as a reliable basis for predictive medicine. We review prospective designs for the development of new therapeutics and predictive biomarkers to inform their use. We cover designs for a wide range of settings. At one extreme is the development of a new drug with a single candidate biomarker and strong biological evidence that marker negative patients are unlikely to benefit from the new drug. At the other extreme are phase III clinical trials involving both genome-wide discovery of a predictive classifier and internal validation of that classifier. We have outlined a prediction based approach to the analysis of randomized clinical trials that both preserves the type I error and provides a reliable internally validated basis for predicting which patients are most likely or unlikely to benefit from a new regimen.

  19. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  20. Mixed WTO ruling on generic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R

    2000-01-01

    On 17 March 2000, the World Trade Organization upheld the provision in Canada's patent laws that allows generic drug manufacturers to develop (but not sell) their cheaper versions of patented medicines before the 20-year patients expire. The decision prevents pharmaceutical companies from enjoying market monopolies beyond their patent terms, avoiding what would otherwise be even lengthier delays in the sale of cheaper, generic drugs in Canada. This decision is of significance not only to Canada, but also to other WTO member countries and to all individuals who use pharmaceutical products. However, the decision is not all positive: the WTO also ruled that Canada is violating international agreements by letting generic manufacturers stockpile their versions of patented drugs before patents expire. This article explains the issues, the arguments, and the decision.

  1. Heterocyclic Scaffolds: Centrality in Anticancer Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Lone, Mohammad Nadeem; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been cursed for human beings for long time. Millions people lost their lives due to cancer. Despite of the several anticancer drugs available, cancer cannot be cured; especially at the late stages without showing any side effect. Heterocyclic compounds exhibit exciting medicinal properties including anticancer. Some market selling heterocyclic anticancer drugs include 5-flourouracil, methortrexate, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, etc. Besides, some natural products such as vinblastine and vincristine are also used as anticancer drugs. Overall, heterocyclic moeities have always been core parts in the expansion of anticancer drugs. This article describes the importance of heterocyclic nuclei in the development of anticancer drugs. Besides, the attempts have been made to discuss both naturally occurring and synthetic heterocyclic compounds as anticancer agents. In addition, some market selling anticancer heterocyclic compounds have been described. Moreover, the efforts have been made to discuss the mechanisms of actions and recent advances in heterocyclic compounds as anticancer agents. The current challenges and future prospectives of heterocyclic compounds have also been discussed. Finally, the suggestions for syntheses of effective, selective, fast and human friendly anticancer agents are discussed into the different sections.

  2. Which Benefits Are Mentioned Most Often in Drug Development Publications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Strüver, MSc

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Both theoretically expected and actually reported benefits in the majority of the included publications emphasized the importance of individual patient benefits from drug development rather than the collective benefits to society in general. The authors of these publications emphasized the right of each individual patient or subject to look for and expect some personal benefit from participating in a clinical trial rather than considering societal benefit as a top priority. From an ethical point of view, the benefits each individual patient receives from his or her participation in a clinical trial might also be seen as a societal benefit, especially when the drug or device tested, if approved for marketing, would eventually be made available for other similar patients from the country in which the clinical trial was conducted.

  3. An Overview of Clinical and Commercial Impact of Drug Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery systems are widely researched and developed to improve the delivery of pharmaceutical compounds and molecules. The last few decades have seen a marked growth of the field fueled by increased number of researchers, research funding, venture capital and the number of start-ups. Collectively, the growth has led to novel systems that make use of micro/nano-particles, transdermal patches, inhalers, drug reservoir implants and antibody-drug conjugates. While the increased research activity is clearly an indication of proliferation of the field, clinical and commercial translation of early-stage research ideas is critically important for future growth and interest in the field. Here, we will highlight some of the examples of novel drug delivery systems that have undergone such translation. Specifically, we will discuss the developments, advantages, limitations and lessons learned from: (i) microparticle-based depot formulations, (ii) nanoparticle-based cancer drugs, (iii) transdermal systems, (iv) oral drug delivery systems, (v) pulmonary drug delivery, (vi) implants and (vii) antibody-drug conjugates. These systems have impacted treatment of many prevalent diseases including diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, among others. At the same time, these systems are integral and enabling components of products that collectively generate annual revenues exceeding US $100 billion. These examples provide strong evidence of the clinical and commercial impact of drug delivery systems. PMID:24747160

  4. Editorial : Clinical drug interactions | Kokwaro | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 78, No 10 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Clinical drug interactions. G. O. Kokwaro. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (10): 505-506). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  5. Multi-target drugs: the trend of drug research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target-target and drug-drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the network visualization and the market trends. We discussed the possible reasons and proposed the rational strategies for drug research and development in the future.

  6. Drug development against tuberculosis: Impact of alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shardendu K; Tripathi, Garima; Kishore, Navneet; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Archana; Tiwari, Vinod K

    2017-09-08

    Despite of the advances made in the treatment and management, tuberculosis (TB) still remains one of main public health problem. The contrary effects of first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs have generated extended research interest in natural products in the hope of devising new antitubercular leads. Interestingly, plethoras of natural products have been discovered to exhibit activity towards various resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Extensive applications of alkaloids in the field of therapeutics is well-established and nowday's researches being pursued to develop new potent drugs from natural sources for tuberculosis. Alkaloids are categorized in quite a few groups according to their structures and isolation from both terrestrial and marine sources. These new drugs might be a watershed in the battle against tuberculosis. This review summarizes alkaloids, which were found active against Mycobacteria since last ten years with special attention on the study of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and mode of action with their impact in drug discovery and development against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients: A nationwide database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazbar, Janja; Locatelli, Igor; Horvat, Nejc; Kos, Mitja

    2018-06-01

    Adverse drug events due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) represent a considerable public health burden, also in Slovenia. A better understanding of the most frequently occurring potential DDIs may enable safer pharmacotherapy and minimize drug-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of potential DDIs among outpatients in Slovenia. An analysis of potential DDIs was performed using health claims data on prescription drugs from a nationwide database. The Lexi-Interact Module was used as the reference source of interactions. The influence of patient-specific predictors on the risk of potential clinically relevant DDIs was evaluated using logistic regression model. The study population included 1,179,803 outpatients who received 15,811,979 prescriptions. The total number of potential DDI cases identified was 3,974,994, of which 15.6% were potentially clinically relevant. Altogether, 9.3% (N = 191,213) of the total population in Slovenia is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs, and the proportion is higher among women and the elderly. After adjustment for cofactors, higher number of medications and older age are associated with higher odds of clinically relevant potential DDIs. The burden of DDIs is highest with drug combinations that increase risk of bleeding, enhance CNS depression or anticholinergic effects or cause cardiovascular complications. The current study revealed that 1 in 10 individuals in the total Slovenian population is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs yearly. Taking into account the literature based conservative estimate that approximately 1% of potential DDIs result in negative health outcomes, roughly 1800 individuals in Slovenia experience an adverse health outcome each year as a result of clinically relevant potential interactions alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 32667 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... products. This guidance revises the guidance for industry entitled ``Clinical Development Programs for... Information, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave... (HFM-40), Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 1401 Rockville...

  9. 78 FR 32669 - New Approaches to Antibacterial Drug Development; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR... concern, we are seeking to explore new clinical development paradigms for antibacterial drugs. Areas of ongoing need are numerous and include new drugs for treatment of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia...

  10. Development of Drugs and Technology for Radiation Theragnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Jeong Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is tailored medical treatment that targets the individual characteristics of each patient. Theragnosis, combining diagnosis and therapy, plays an important role in selecting appropriate patients. Noninvasive in vivo imaging can trace small molecules, antibodies, peptides, nanoparticles, and cells in the body. Recently, imaging methods have been able to reveal molecular events in cells and tissues. Molecular imaging is useful not only for clinical studies but also for developing new drugs and new treatment modalities. Preclinical and early clinical molecular imaging shows biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and efficacy. When therapeutic materials are labeled using radioisotopes, nuclear imaging with positron emission tomography or gamma camera can be used to treat diseases and monitor therapy simultaneously. Such nuclear medicine technology is defined as radiation theragnosis. We review the current development of drugs and technology for radiation theragnosis using peptides, albumin, nanoparticles, and cells.

  11. Development of drugs and technology for radiation theragnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hwan Jeong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Biomedical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Personalized medicine is tailored medical treatment that targets the individual characteristics of each patient. Theragnosis, combining diagnosis and therapy, plays an important role in selecting appropriate patients. Noninvasive in vivo imaging can trace small molecules, antibodies, peptides, nanoparticles, and cells in the body. Recently, imaging methods have been able to reveal molecular events in cells and tissues. Molecular imaging is useful not only for clinical studies but also for developing new drugs and new treatment modalities. Preclinical and early clinical molecular imaging shows biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and efficacy. When therapeutic materials are labeled using radioisotopes, nuclear imaging with positron emission tomography or gamma camera can be used to treat diseases and monitor therapy simultaneously. Such nuclear medicine technology is defined as radiation theragnosis. We review the current development of drugs and technology for radiation theragnosis using peptides, albumin, nanoparticles, and cells.

  12. 75 FR 32482 - Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0247] Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; establishment of docket; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  13. Challenges and opportunities for the development of new antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forray, Carlos; Buller, Raimund

    2017-11-01

    In spite of the significant impact that the serendipitous discovery of drugs with antipsychotic properties had on the care of patients with psychotic disorders, there are significant challenges when aiming at therapeutic goals such as remission, recovery, improved health-related quality of life and functioning. The efficacy and effectiveness of existing antipsychotic drugs fail to address the full spectrum of symptoms and functional deficits that currently prevent patients with psychotic disorders from achieving fulfilling lives. The study of the pharmacological mechanism of action has increased our knowledge on molecular targets and brain circuits related to the antipsychotic properties of this drug class. However, our understanding of how these molecular targets and brain circuits relate to other aspects of disease pathophysiology like cognitive impairment and negative symptoms is incomplete although these are significant clinical unmet needs. Currently, there is still an important knowledge gap between psychopathology and pathophysiology in schizophrenia research. This may have contributed to some recent costly failures of large clinical development programs for drugs targeted at glutamatergic function and nicotinic receptors. The lack of success of these pharmacological approaches to achieve clinical validation raises important questions concerning the underlying hypothesis that guided the choice of molecular targets, and about the predictive validity of translational models that supported the rationale for testing these drugs in clinical studies. From a clinical perspective there is a need to more strongly consider the disease heterogeneity linked to the use of the current diagnostic classification of subjects and to the validity of the psychopathological constructs and assessments that are used to assess clinical outcomes. A paradigm shift in the development of drugs for schizophrenia is needed. This will require among other addressing: the shortcomings of a

  14. Relationship between drug interactions and drug-related negative clinical outcomes in two community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug interactions may represent an iatrogenic risk that should be controlled in community pharmacies at the dispensing level. Aim: We analyzed the association between potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs and negative clinical outcomes.Methods: We used dispensing data from two community pharmacies: instances where drug dispensing was associated with a potential DDI and a comparison group of randomized dispensing operations with no potential DDI. In cases where potential DDIs were detected, we analyzed the underlying negative clinical outcomes. Age and gender data were included in the analysis.Results: During the study period, we registered 417 potential DDIs. The proportion of women and age were higher in the study group than in the comparison group. The average potential DDIs per patient was 1.31 (SD=0.72. The Consejo General de Colegios Oficiales de Farmacéuticos (CGCOF database did not produce an alert in 2.4% of the cases. Over-the-counter medication use was observed in 5% of the potential DDI cases. The drugs most frequently involved in potential DDIs were acenocoumarol, calcium salts, hydrochlorothiazide, and alendronic acid, whereas the most predominant potential DDIs were calcium salts and bisphosphonates, oral antidiabetics and thiazide diuretics, antidiabetics and glucose, and oral anticoagulant and paracetamol. The existence of a drug-related negative clinical outcome was observed only in 0.96% of the potential DDI cases (50% safety cases and 50% effectiveness cases. Conclusions: Only a small proportion of the detected potential DDIs lead to medication negative outcomes. Considering the drug-related negative clinical outcomes encountered, tighter control would be recommended in potential DDIs with NSAIDs or benzodiazepines.

  15. Biomarkers as drug development tools: discovery, validation, qualification and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Virginia B

    2018-06-01

    The 21st Century Cures Act, approved in the USA in December 2016, has encouraged the establishment of the national Precision Medicine Initiative and the augmentation of efforts to address disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment on the basis of a molecular understanding of disease. The Act adopts into law the formal process, developed by the FDA, of qualification of drug development tools, including biomarkers and clinical outcome assessments, to increase the efficiency of clinical trials and encourage an era of molecular medicine. The FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have developed similar processes for the qualification of biomarkers intended for use as companion diagnostics or for development and regulatory approval of a drug or therapeutic. Biomarkers that are used exclusively for the diagnosis, monitoring or stratification of patients in clinical trials are not subject to regulatory approval, although their qualification can facilitate the conduct of a trial. In this Review, the salient features of biomarker discovery, analytical validation, clinical qualification and utilization are described in order to provide an understanding of the process of biomarker development and, through this understanding, convey an appreciation of their potential advantages and limitations.

  16. Nose-to-brain drug delivery: An update on clinical challenges and progress towards approval of anti-Alzheimer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mukta; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra; Antimisiaris, Sophia G; Chougule, Mahavir Bhupal; Shoyele, Sunday A; Alexander, Amit

    2018-05-23

    which could present sufficient experimental findings to support its clinical safety profile. It also underlines the fact that majority of work related to the nose-to-brain delivery of anti-AD drugs is limited only up to preclinical studies. In this review article, we have discussed the latest works on various novel formulations loaded with various anti-Alzheimer agents. These agents include galantamine, deferoxamine, tacrine, tarenflurbil, rivastigmine, risperidone, curcumin, quercetin, piperine, insulin, etc. and various peptides towards the development of a promising IN drug delivery system for the treatment of AD. Through this review article, we want to drag the attention of the researchers working in this field towards the challenges and hurdles of practical applicability IN delivery of anti-AD drugs. Moreover, the attention towards the clinical studies will ease the approval process for the administration of anti-Alzheimer drugs via IN route. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Anti-Epileptic Drugs and their Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein I. Johannessen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The serum concentration achieved and maintained following the administration of a fixed drug dosage is a direct consequence of the interactions of a wide variety of interrelated processes, including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, and the physiological status of the patient. These interrelationships are reviewed with specific reference to the major anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbitone, phenytoin, sodium valproate, and carbamazepine, as well as a new first-line antiepileptic, oxcarbazepine. Both older drugs, such as phenobarbitone and phenytoin, and newer drugs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ and sodium valproate, have been studied extensively over the past years giving valuable information for drug treatment. An important feature of oxcarbazepine (OXC , which was developed through minimal changes in the structure of CBZ in order to improve on the tolerability of CBZ without sacrificing efficacy, is that its metabolites do not include the 11-epoxide which has been implicated in the side-effects of CBZ. In man, OXC is metabolized to a monohydroxy derivative which has independent anti-epileptic properties. OXC seems to lack several disadavantageous pharmacokinetic properties common to other major anti-epileptic drugs. OXC does not influence its own metabolism after repeated administration, in contrast to the auto-induction displayed by CBZ. The metabolism of OXC is not influenced by anti-epileptic co-medication and does not influence the kinetics of other anti-epileptic drugs – or if it does, then to a lesser extent than CBZ.

  18. [Relevance of drug use in clinical manifestations of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Horcajadas, F; Sánchez Romero, S; Padín Calo, J J

    2002-01-01

    To study the association between drugs use with schizophrenia clinical manifestations. The sample consists of 82 out-patients with schizophrenia, between 18 and 45 years old. They were evaluated with Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). A 6 months follow up was carried out. 37,8% patients had lifetime drug dependence (including alcohol and others drugs except for tobacco). The prevalence of dependence for the different drugs were: opioids 9,8%, cocaine 11%, alcohol 29,3%, cannabis 24,4%, tobacco 68,3%, caffeine 15,9%. Drug dependent had more family and legal problems. At the multiple regression analysis it was observed that cannabis and tobacco dependence was associated with a decrease in the PANSS negative symptoms subscale, and on the contrary, alcohol dependence produces a similar intensity increase at that scoring. We don't detect any clinical relevance effects over positive symptoms. Cannabis and tobacco may improve schizophrenia negative symptoms or neuroleptic secondary effects or patients with few negative symptoms may have more predisposition to the use, on the contrary alcohol use can impairment those symptoms.

  19. Drugs in development for Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Tom H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2006-01-01

    The current development of emerging pharmacological treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD), front preclinical to launch, is summarized. Advances over the past year are highlighted, including the significant progress of several drugs through various stages of development. Several agents have been discontinued from development, either because of adverse effects or lack of clinical efficacy. The methyl-esterified form of L-DOPA (melevodopa) and the monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline have both been launched. With regard to the monoamine re-uptake inhibitors, many changes have been witnessed, with new agents reaching preclinical development and pre-existing ones being discontinued or having no development reported. Of the dopamine agonists, many continue to progress successfully through clinical trials. Others have struggled to demonstrate a significant advantage over currently available treatments and have been discontinued. The field of non-dopaminergic treatments remains dynamic. The alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonists and the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists remain in clinical trials. Trials of the neuronal' synchronization modulator levetiracetam are at an advanced stage, and there has also been a new addition to the class (ie, seletracetam). There has been a change in the landscape of neuroprotective agents that modulate disease progression. Candidates from the classes of growth factors and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors have been discontinued, or no development has been reported, and the mixed lineage kinase inhibitor CEP-1347 has been discontinued for PD treatment. Other drugs in this field, such as neuroimmunophilins, estrogens and alpha-synuclein oligomerization inhibitors, remain in development.

  20. Validation of a microdose probe drug cocktail for clinical drug interaction assessments for drug transporters and CYP3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksaritanont, T; Tatosian, D A; Chu, X; Railkar, R; Evers, R; Chavez-Eng, C; Lutz, R; Zeng, W; Yabut, J; Chan, G H; Cai, X; Latham, A H; Hehman, J; Stypinski, D; Brejda, J; Zhou, C; Thornton, B; Bateman, K P; Fraser, I; Stoch, S A

    2017-04-01

    A microdose cocktail containing midazolam, dabigatran etexilate, pitavastatin, rosuvastatin, and atorvastatin has been established to allow simultaneous assessment of a perpetrator impact on the most common drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A, and the major transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP)1B, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and MDR1 P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The clinical utility of these microdose cocktail probe substrates was qualified by conducting clinical drug interaction studies with three inhibitors with different in vitro inhibitory profiles (rifampin, itraconazole, and clarithromycin). Generally, the pharmacokinetic profiles of the probe substrates, in the absence and presence of the inhibitors, were comparable to their reported corresponding pharmacological doses, and/or in agreement with theoretical expectations. The exception was dabigatran, which resulted in an approximately twofold higher magnitude for microdose compared to conventional dosing, and, thus, can be used to flag a worst-case scenario for P-gp. Broader application of the microdose cocktail will facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the roles of drug transporters in drug disposition and drug interactions. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  2. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius A Vaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  3. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Julius A; Patnaik, Ashis

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  4. Hypericum perforatum: pharmacokinetic, mechanism of action, tolerability, and clinical drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Whalley, Benjamin J; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Esposito, Stefania; Patanè, Marinella; Upton, Roy; Pugliese, Michela; Chimirri, Serafina; Mammì, Maria; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-05-01

    Hypericum perforatum (HP) belongs to the Hypericaceae family and is one of the oldest used and most extensively investigated medicinal herbs. The medicinal form comprises the leaves and flowering tops of which the primary ingredients of interest are naphthodianthrones, xanthones, flavonoids, phloroglucinols (e.g. hyperforin), and hypericin. Although several constituents elicit pharmacological effects that are consistent with HP's antidepressant activity, no single mechanism of action underlying these effects has thus far been found. Various clinical trials have shown that HP has a comparable antidepressant efficacy as some currently used antidepressant drugs in the treatment of mild/moderate depression. Interestingly, low-hyperforin-content preparations are effective in the treatment of depression. Moreover, HP is also used to treat certain forms of anxiety. However, HP can induce various cytochrome P450s isozymes and/or P-glycoprotein, of which many drugs are substrates and which are the main origin of HP-drug interactions. Here, we analyse the existing evidence describing the clinical consequence of HP-drug interactions. Although some of the reported interactions are based on findings from in vitro studies, the clinical importance of which remain to be demonstrated, others are based on case reports where causality can, in some cases, be determined to reveal clinically significant interactions that suggest caution, consideration, and disclosure of potential interactions prior to informed use of HP. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A G Agúndez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing is useful for patient selection, but final dosing adjustment should be carried out on the basis of clinical or analytical parameters rather than on pharmacogenomic information.Patient selection may seem a modest objective, but it constitutes a crucial improvement with regard to the pre-pharmacogenomics situation and it saves patients’ lives. However we should not overstate the current power of pharmacogenomics. At present the pharmacogenomics of anticancer drugs is not sufficiently developed for dose adjustments based on pharmacogenomics only, and no current guidelines recommend such adjustments without considering clinical and/or analytical parameters.

  7. Nonimaging detectors in drug development and approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H N

    2001-07-01

    Regulatory applications for imaging biomarkers will expand in proportion to the validation of specific parameters as they apply to individual questions in the management of disease. This validation is likely to be applicable only to a particular class of drug or a single mechanism of action. Awareness among the world's regulatory authorities of the potential for these emerging technologies is high, but so is the cost to the sponsor (including the logistics of including images in a dossier), and therefore the pharmaceutical industry must evaluate carefully the potential benefit of each technology for its drug development programs, just as the authorities must consider carefully the extent to which the method is valid for the use to which the applicant has put it. For well-characterized tracer systems, it may be possible to design inexpensive cameras that make rapid assessments.

  8. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is number seven in WHO's list of all diseases causing disability and the third most costly neurological disorder in Europe. Acute attacks are treatable by highly selective drugs such as the triptans but there is still a huge unmet therapeutic need. Unfortunately, drug development...... for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...... responses elicited by such measures are crucial. The most naturalistic way of inducing attacks is by infusion of endogenous signaling molecules that are known to cause migraine in patients. The most valid response is recording of neural activity in the trigeminal system. The most useful headache related...

  9. A clinical perspective on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhotra, Ritu M; Ikram, Mohd; Srivastava, Sunny; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucoadhesion can be defined as a state in which two components, of which one is of biological origin, are held together for extended periods of time by the help of interfacial forces. Among the various transmucosal routes, buccal mucosa has excellent accessibility and relatively immobile mucosa, hence suitable for administration of retentive dosage form. The objective of this paper is to review the works done so far in the field of mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems (MBDDS), with a clinical perspective. Starting with a brief introduction of the mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, oral mucosa, and the theories of mucoadhesion, this article then proceeds to cover the works done so far in the field of MBDDS, categorizing them on the basis of ailments they are meant to cure. Additionally, we focus on the various patents, recent advancements, and challenges as well as the future prospects for mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems. PMID:24683406

  10. How to ascertain drug related deaths during clinical trials ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, R D

    2013-10-01

    Recent guidelines by the Drug Controller General of India require extra care by Investigators & Sponsors of Clinical Trials in India. The author, an eminent member & Chairman of various Independent Ethics Committees in Mumbai, proposes various concrete solutions for adherence to these guidelines. Insurance cover to the subjects, use of Internet databanks for drug interactions, active involvement by the pharmacologists in Ethics Committee, review of data from animal studies, being amongst them. In case of death due to trial, autopsies, or at least verbal autopsies, are essential in the interest of Science and Law. More importantly Anticipation and prevention of ADEs can be done by exclusion of subjects from trials by using newer technologies like cDNA in microarrays to determine several polygenic quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and tests for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). Drug manufacturers must provide prototypes of Affymetrix chips to clinicians and bear the cost in their own enlightened self-interest.

  11. Risk of Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic-based Drug-drug Interactions with Drugs Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Between 2013 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Zhou, Zhu; Tay-Sontheimer, Jessica; Levy, Rene H; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2018-03-23

    A total of 103 drugs (including 14 combination drugs) were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from 2013 to 2016. Pharmacokinetic-based drug interaction profiles were analyzed using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database and the clinical relevance of these observations was characterized based on information from New Drug Application reviews. CYP3A was identified as a major contributor to clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs), involved in approximately 2/3 of all interactions. Transporters (alone or with enzymes) were found to participate in about half of all interactions, although most of these were weak-to-moderate interactions. When considered as victims, eight new molecular entities (NMEs; cobimetinib, ibrutnib, isavuconazole, ivabradine, naloxegol, paritaprevir, simeprevir, and venetoclax) were identified as sensitive substrates of CYP3A, two NMEs (pirfenidone and tasimelteon) were sensitive substrates of CYP1A2, one NME (dasabuvir) was a sensitive substrate of CYP2C8, one NME (eliglustat) was a sensitive substrate of CYP2D6, and one NME (grazoprevir) was a sensitive substrate of OATP1B1/3 (with changes in exposure greater than 5-fold when co-administered with a strong inhibitor). Interestingly, approximately 75% of identified CYP3A substrates were also substrates of P-gp. As perpetrators, most clinical DDIs involved weak-to-moderate inhibition or induction, with only two drugs (Viekira Pak and idelalisib) showing strong inhibition of CYP3A, and one NME (lumacaftor) considered as a strong CYP3A inducer. Among drugs with large changes in exposure (≥ 5-fold), whether as victim or perpetrator, the most represented therapeutic classes were antivirals and oncology drugs, suggesting a significant risk of clinical DDIs in these patient populations. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Developing clinical piano improvisation skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Teaching piano improvisation skills for use in clinical work relies on the development of a range of musical techniques and therapeutic methods that are combined and integrated. Simple musical styles of playing such as melody dialogues, two chord accompaniments, walking basses (tonal and atonal), 6...... skilful way of helping a client or group of clients move, or develop their musical expression (Wigram & Bonde 2002 pp 278-279). Frame-working is a method that offers a musical structure to the music of a client. This structure could have the goal of enhancing the music aesthetically, or guiding the client...

  13. Breaking barriers to novel analgesic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Roberson, David P; Bean, Bruce P; Woolf, Clifford J

    2017-08-01

    Acute and chronic pain complaints, although common, are generally poorly served by existing therapies. This unmet clinical need reflects a failure to develop novel classes of analgesics with superior efficacy, diminished adverse effects and a lower abuse liability than those currently available. Reasons for this include the heterogeneity of clinical pain conditions, the complexity and diversity of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, and the unreliability of some preclinical pain models. However, recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of pain are beginning to offer opportunities for developing novel therapeutic strategies and revisiting existing targets, including modulating ion channels, enzymes and G-protein-coupled receptors.

  14. The development and maintenance of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Roy A; Koob, George F

    2014-01-01

    What is the defining property of addiction? We dust off a several-decades-long debate about the relative importance of two forms of reinforcement—positive reinforcement, subjectively linked to drug-induced euphoria, and negative reinforcement, subjectively linked to the alleviation of pain—both of which figure importantly in addiction theory; each of these forms has dominated addiction theory in its time. We agree that addiction begins with the formation of habits through positive reinforcement and that drug-opposite physiological responses often establish the conditions for negative reinforcement to come into play at a time when tolerance, in the form of increasing reward thresholds, appears to develop into positive reinforcement. Wise’s work has tended to focus on positive-reinforcement mechanisms that are important for establishing drug-seeking habits and reinstating them quickly after periods of abstinence, whereas Koob’s work has tended to focus on the negative-reinforcement mechanisms that become most obvious in the late stages of sustained addiction. While we tend to agree with each other about the early and late stages of addiction, we hold different views as to (i) the point between early and late at which the diagnosis of ‘addiction’ should be invoked, (ii) the relative importance of positive and negative reinforcement leading up to this transition, and (iii) the degree to which the specifics of negative reinforcement can be generalized across the range of addictive agents.

  15. «Dallas Buyers Club (2013» clinical research with drugs for the AIDS epidemic 80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian de HAAN-BOSCH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dallas Buyers Club (2013, inspired by true events, tells the story of Ron Woodroof, a middle?aged elec? trician from Dallas (Texas, who is diagnosed with AIDS in 1985. With few treatment options, he estab? lishes the Dallas Buyers Club in order to provide unapproved drugs to the AIDS community. This results in constant business travels, disputes with the FDA and problems with the law and the IRS. The article analyzes the buyers’ clubs phenomenon in the US, the drugs cited in the film and the clinical trial with zidovudine shown in the movie. The film could be useful as a teaching tool providing an introduction to the AIDS epidemic, clinical research and drug development, bioethics of human research and the agen? cies that regulate drug approval and their availability. Finally, the article presents a possible guideline for the use of the film in a teaching environment.

  16. Developing drug formularies for the "National Medical Holding" JSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmadyar, N S; Khairulin, B E; Amangeldy-Kyzy, S; Ospanov, M A

    2015-01-01

    One of the main problems of drug provision of multidisciplinary hospitals is the necessity to improve the efficiency of budget spending. Despite the efforts undertaken in Kazakhstan for improving the mechanism of drug distribution (creation of the Kazakhstan National Formulary, Unified National Health System, the handbook of medicines (drugs) costs in the electronic register of inpatients (ERI), having a single distributor), the number of unresolved issues still remain."National Medical Holding" JSC (NMH) was established in 2008 and unites 6 innovational healthcare facilities with up to 1431 beds (700 children and 731 adults), located in the medical cluster - which are "National Research Center for Maternal and Child Health" JSC (NRCMC), "Republic Children's Rehabilitation Center" JSC (RCRC), "Republican Diagnostic Center" JSC (RDC), "National Centre for Neurosurgery" JSC (NCN), "National Research Center for Oncology and Transplantation" JSC (NRCOT) and "National Research Cardiac Surgery Center" JSC (NRCSC). The main purpose of NMH is to create an internationally competitive "Hospital of the Future", which will provide the citizens of Kazakhstan and others with a wide range of medical services based on advanced medical technology, modern hospital management, international quality and safety standards. These services include emergency care, outpatient diagnostic services, obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, internal medicine, neurosurgery, cardiac surgery, transplantation, cancer care for children and adults, as well as rehabilitation treatment. To create a program of development of a drug formulary of NMH and its subsidiaries. In order to create drug formularies of NMH, analytical, software and statistical methods were used.AII subsidiary organizations of NMH (5 out of 6) except for the NRCOT have been accredited by Joint Commission International (JCI) standards, which ensure the safety of patients and clinical staff, by improving the technological

  17. Antibody-drug conjugates for cancer therapy: The technological and regulatory challenges of developing drug-biologic hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gregory S

    2015-09-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new class of therapeutic agents that combine the targeting ability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with small molecule drugs. The combination of a mAb targeting a cancer-specific antigen with a cytotoxin has tremendous promise as a new type of targeted cancer therapy. Two ADCs have been approved and many more are in clinical development, suggesting that this new class of drugs is coming to the forefront. Because of their unique nature as biologic-small drug hybrids, ADCs are challenging to develop, from both the scientific and regulatory perspectives. This review discusses both these aspects in current practice, and surveys the current state of the art of ADC drug development. Copyright © 2015 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Progress and promise for the MDMA drug development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduccia, Allison A; Holland, Julie; Mithoefer, Michael C

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacotherapy is often used to target symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but does not provide definitive treatment, and side effects of daily medication are often problematic. Trauma-focused psychotherapies are more likely than drug treatment to achieve PTSD remission, but have high dropout rates and ineffective for a large percentage of patients. Therefore, research into drugs that might increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy is a logical avenue of investigation. The most promising drug studied as a catalyst to psychotherapy for PTSD thus far is 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), commonly known as the recreational drug "Ecstasy." MDMA stimulates the release of hormones and neurochemicals that affect key brain areas for emotion and memory processing. A series of recently completed phase 2 clinical trials of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment of PTSD show favorable safety outcomes and large effect sizes that warrant expansion into multi-site phase 3 trials, set to commence in 2018. The nonprofit sponsor of the MDMA drug development program, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), is supporting these trials to explore whether MDMA, administered on only a few occasions, can increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Brain imaging techniques and animal models of fear extinction are elucidating neural mechanisms underlying the robust effects of MDMA on psychological processing; however, much remains to be learned about the complexities of MDMA effects as well as the complexities of PTSD itself.

  19. Drug development for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers from 1979 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Nancy A; Khan, Omar F; Imam, Hasiba; Tang, Patricia A; Monzon, Jose; Li, Haocheng; Sun, Gavin; Ezeife, Doreen; Parimi, Sunil; Dowden, Scot; Tam, Vincent C

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the drug development pathway is critical for streamlining the development of effective cancer treatments. The objective of the current study was to delineate the drug development timeline and attrition rate of different drug classes for common cancer disease sites. Drugs entering clinical trials for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer were identified using a pharmaceutical business intelligence database. Data regarding drug characteristics, clinical trials, and approval dates were obtained from the database, clinical trial registries, PubMed, and regulatory Web sites. A total of 411 drugs met the inclusion criteria for breast cancer, 246 drugs met the inclusion criteria for colorectal cancer, and 315 drugs met the inclusion criteria for non-small cell lung cancer. Attrition rates were 83.9% for breast cancer, 87.0% for colorectal cancer, and 92.0% for non-small cell lung cancer drugs. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer, there was a trend toward higher attrition rates for targeted monoclonal antibodies compared with other agents. No tumor site-specific differences were noted with regard to cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory, or small molecule kinase inhibitor drugs. Drugs classified as "others" in breast cancer had lower attrition rates, primarily due to the higher success of hormonal medications. Mean drug development times were 8.9 years for breast cancer, 6.7 years for colorectal cancer, and 6.6 years for non-small cell lung cancer. Overall oncologic drug attrition rates remain high, and drugs are more likely to fail in later-stage clinical trials. The refinement of early-phase trial design may permit the selection of drugs that are more likely to succeed in the phase 3 setting. Cancer 2017;123:4672-4679. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. [New drug developments of snake venom polypeptides and progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sihai; Feng, Mei; Xiong, Yan

    2017-11-28

    The value of snake venom polypeptides in clinical application has drawn extensive attention, and the development of snake polypeptides into new drugs with anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, analgesic or antihypertensive properties has become the recent research hotspot. With the rapid development of molecular biology and biotechnology, the mechanisms of snake venom polypeptides are also gradually clarified. Numerous studies have demonstrated that snake venom polypeptides exert their pharmacological effects by regulating ion channels, cell proliferation, apoptosis, intracellular signaling pathway, and expression of cytokine as well as binding to relevant active sites or receptors.

  1. Evaluation of transporters in drug development: Current status and contemporary issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue-Chih; Arya, Vikram; Yang, Xinning; Volpe, Donna A; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    Transporters govern the access of molecules to cells or their exit from cells, thereby controlling the overall distribution of drugs to their intracellular site of action. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions mediated by transporters are of increasing interest in drug development. Drug transporters, acting alone or in concert with drug metabolizing enzymes, can play an important role in modulating drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, thus affecting the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of a drug. The drug interaction guidance documents from regulatory agencies include various decision criteria that may be used to predict the need for in vivo assessment of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. Regulatory science research continues to assess the prediction performances of various criteria as well as to examine the strength and limitations of each prediction criterion to foster discussions related to harmonized decision criteria that may be used to facilitate global drug development. This review discusses the role of transporters in drug development with a focus on methodologies in assessing transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions, challenges in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of transporters, and emerging transporter research areas including biomarkers, assessment of tissue concentrations, and effect of diseases on transporters. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Biomarkers in early phase development of central nervous system drugs : a conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Jeroen-Paul van der

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a conceptual framework for the use of Central Nervous System (CNS) biomarkers in early phase clinical drug development. In the Introduction the current use of biomarkers in early CNS drug development is discussed. A conceptual framework for the

  3. SMART drug delivery systems: Back to the future vs. clinical reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and material science have re-ignited interest in drug delivery research. Arguably, however, hardly any of the systems developed and strategies proposed are really relevant for shaping the future (clinical) face of the nanomedicine field. Consequently, as outlined in

  4. Current good manufacturing practice and investigational new drugs intended for use in clinical trials. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for human drugs, including biological products, to exempt most phase 1 investigational drugs from complying with the regulatory CGMP requirements. FDA will continue to exercise oversight of the manufacture of these drugs under FDA's general statutory CGMP authority and through review of the investigational new drug applications (IND). In addition, elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a guidance document entitled "Guidance for Industry: CGMP for Phase 1 Investigational Drugs" dated November 2007 (the companion guidance). This guidance document sets forth recommendations on approaches to compliance with statutory CGMP for the exempted phase 1 investigational drugs. FDA is taking this action to focus a manufacturer's effort on applying CGMP that is appropriate and meaningful for the manufacture of the earliest stage investigational drug products intended for use in phase 1 clinical trials while ensuring safety and quality. This action will also streamline and promote the drug development process.

  5. Sex, gender, and pharmaceutical politics: From drug development to marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Ronald, Lorna M

    2010-08-01

    Biological sex differences and sociocultural gender norms affect the provision of health care products and services, but there has been little explicit analysis of the impact of sex differences and gender norms on the regulation of pharmaceutical development and marketing. This article provides an overview of the regulation of pharmaceuticals and examines the ways that regulatory agencies account for sex and gender in their review of scientific data and marketing materials. The primary focus is on the US context, but information is also included about regulatory models in Europe, Canada, and Japan for comparative purposes. Specific examples show how sex differences and gender norms influence scientific and policy decisions about pharmaceuticals. The United States and Canada were found to be the only countries that have explicit requirements to include women in clinical trials and to perform sex-based subgroup analysis on study results. The potential influence of politics on regulatory decisions may have led to an uneven application of standards, as seen through the examples of mifepristone (for abortion) and sildenafil citrate (for erectile dysfunction). Three detailed case studies illustrate the importance of considering sex and gender in pharmaceutical development and marketing: Phase I clinical trials; human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine; and tegaserod, a drug for irritable bowel syndrome. Sex and gender play important roles in pharmaceutical regulation, from the design of clinical trials and the approval of new drugs to advertising and postmarketing surveillance. However, regulatory agencies pay insufficient attention to both biological sex differences and sociocultural gender norms. This disregard perpetuates inequalities by ignoring drug safety problems that predominate in women and by allowing misleading drug marketing that reinforces gender stereotypes. Recommendations have been made to improve the regulation of pharmaceuticals in regard to sex and

  6. Ethical challenges in developing drugs for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Felix; Banayan, David; Boley, Randy; Karnik, Niranjan

    2017-05-01

    As the classification of mental disorders advances towards a disease model as promoted by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), there is hope that a more thorough neurobiological understanding of mental illness may allow clinicians and researchers to determine treatment efficacy with less diagnostic variability. This paradigm shift has presented a variety of ethical issues to be considered in the development of psychiatric drugs. These challenges are not limited to informed consent practices, industry funding, and placebo use. The consideration for alternative research models and quality of research design also present ethical challenges in the development of psychiatric drugs. The imperatives to create valid and sound research that justify the human time, cost, risk and use of limited resources must also be considered. Clinical innovation, and consideration for special populations are also important aspects to take into account. Based on the breadth of these ethical concerns, it is particularly important that scientific questions regarding the development of psychiatric drugs be answered collaboratively by a variety of stakeholders. As the field expands, new ethical considerations will be raised with increased focus on genetic markers, personalized medicine, patient-centered outcomes research, and tension over funding. We suggest that innovation in trial design is necessary to better reflect practices in clinical settings and that there must be an emphasized focus on expanding the transparency of consent processes, regard for suicidality, and care in working with special populations to support the goal of developing sound psychiatric drug therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinically important drug interactions with zopiclone, zolpidem and zaleplon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Leah M; von Moltke, Lisa L; Greenblatt, David J

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia, an inability to initiate or maintain sleep, affects approximately one-third of the American population. Conventional benzodiazepines, such as triazolam and midazolam, were the treatment of choice for short-term insomnia for many years but are associated with adverse effects such as rebound insomnia, withdrawal and dependency. The newer hypnosedatives include zolpidem, zaleplon and zopiclone. These agents may be preferred over conventional benzodiazepines to treat short-term insomnia because they may be less likely to cause significant rebound insomnia or tolerance and are as efficacious as the conventional benzodiazepines. This review aims to summarise the published clinical drug interaction studies involving zolpidem, zaleplon and zopiclone. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may be clinically important are highlighted. Clinical trials have studied potential interactions of zaleplon, zolpidem and zopiclone with the following types of drugs: cytochrome P450 (CYP) inducers (rifampicin), CYP inhibitors (azoles, ritonavir and erythromycin), histamine H(2) receptor antagonists (cimetidine and ranitidine), antidepressants, antipsychotics, antagonists of benzodiazepines and drugs causing sedation. Rifampicin significantly induced the metabolism of the newer hypnosedatives and decreased their sedative effects, indicating that a dose increase of these agents may be necessary when they are administered with rifampicin. Ketoconazole, erythromycin and cimetidine inhibited the metabolism of the newer hypnosedatives and enhanced their sedative effects, suggesting that a dose reduction may be required. Addition of ethanol to treatment with the newer hypnosedatives resulted in additive sedative effects without altering the pharmacokinetic parameters of the drugs. Compared with some of the conventional benzodiazepines, fewer clinically important interactions appear to have been reported in the literature with zaleplon, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  8. Clinical assessment of drug-drug interactions of tasimelteon, a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Brian W; Torres, Rosarelis; Dressman, Marlene A; Kramer, William G; Baroldi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Tasimelteon ([1R-trans]-N-[(2-[2,3-dihydro-4-benzofuranyl] cyclopropyl) methyl] propanamide), a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist that demonstrates specificity and high affinity for melatonin receptor types 1 and 2 (MT1 and MT2 receptors), is the first treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder. Tasimelteon is rapidly absorbed, with a mean absolute bioavailability of approximately 38%, and is extensively metabolized primarily by oxidation at multiple sites, mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP3A4/5, as initially demonstrated by in vitro studies and confirmed by the results of clinical drug-drug interactions presented here. The effects of strong inhibitors and moderate or strong inducers of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4/5 on the pharmacokinetics of tasimelteon were evaluated in humans. Coadministration with fluvoxamine resulted in an approximately 6.5-fold increase in tasimelteon's area under the curve (AUC), whereas cigarette smoking decreased tasimelteon's exposure by approximately 40%. Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in an approximately 54% increase in tasimelteon's AUC, whereas rifampin pretreatment resulted in a decrease in tasimelteon's exposure of approximately 89%. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  9. Effectiveness of a Clinical Skills Workshop for drug-dosage calculation in a nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugnetti, Anna Maria; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Rosa, Francesca; Sasso, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical and calculation skills are widely acknowledged as being key nursing competences if patients are to receive care that is both effective and safe. Indeed, weaknesses in mathematical competence may lead to the administration of miscalculated drug doses, which in turn may harm or endanger patients' lives. However, little attention has been given to identifying appropriate teaching and learning strategies that will effectively facilitate the development of these skills in nurses. One such approach may be simulation. To evaluate the effectiveness of a Clinical Skills Workshop on drug administration that focused on improving the drug-dosage calculation skills of second-year nursing students, with a view to promoting safety in drugs administration. A descriptive pre-post test design. Educational. Simulation center. The sample population included 77 nursing students from a Northern Italian University who attended a 30-hour Clinical Skills Workshop over a period of two weeks. The workshop covered integrated teaching strategies and innovative drug-calculation methodologies which have been described to improve psychomotor skills and build cognitive abilities through a greater understanding of mathematics linked to clinical practice. Study results showed a significant improvement between the pre- and the post-test phases, after the intervention. Pre-test scores ranged between 0 and 25 out of a maximum of 30 points, with a mean score of 15.96 (SD 4.85), and a median score of 17. Post-test scores ranged between 15 and 30 out of 30, with a mean score of 25.2 (SD 3.63) and a median score of 26 (pstudy shows that Clinical Skills Workshops may be tailored to include teaching techniques that encourage the development of drug-dosage calculation skills, and that training strategies implemented during a Clinical skills Workshop can enhance students' comprehension of mathematical calculations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and applications of radiolabelled drugs in pharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landvatter, S.W.; Heys, J.R.; Garner, K.T.; Mack, J.F.; Senderoff, S.G.; Shu, A.Y.; Villani, A.J.; Saunders, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiolabelled drugs play a vital role in the development of new pharmaceuticals including application in drug discovery, pre-clinical development and clinical development. The synthesis of these pharmaceuticals in tritium or carbon-14 labelled form poses many challenges for the synthetic organic chemist. The actual choice of synthetic route must take into account the small scale, limited choice and high cost of labelled precursors, and the positioning of the label into a metabolically stable position. There are, however, a number of synthetic strategies available for overcoming these constraints. Although in some C-14 syntheses the requisite labelled raw material can be purchased and the existing synthesis adapted for labelling, frequently the synthetic challenge is the synthesis of a structurally simple, yet commercially unavailable, labelled precursor (e.g., γ-butyrolactone-[2- 14 C], cyclohexanone-[ 3 H], CuCN-[ 14 C], 2-furancarboxaldehyde-[ 14 C]). Another useful strategy in C-14 synthesis is the conversion of an advanced intermediate, or perhaps the unlabelled product itself, into a precursor which can then be reconverted into the labelled version of the intermediate. Occasionally, a new total synthesis must be developed. In addition to these strategies, tritium labelling can uniquely take advantage of exchange labelling techniques, synthesis and reduction of unsaturated precursors, or tritium-halogen replacement reactions. Examples of these strategies and use of the labelled products are discussed

  11. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated saturated mutagenesis screen predicts clinical drug resistance with improved accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Leyuan; Boucher, Jeffrey I; Paulsen, Janet; Matuszewski, Sebastian; Eide, Christopher A; Ou, Jianhong; Eickelberg, Garrett; Press, Richard D; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Druker, Brian J; Branford, Susan; Wolfe, Scot A; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Schiffer, Celia A; Green, Michael R; Bolon, Daniel N

    2017-10-31

    Developing tools to accurately predict the clinical prevalence of drug-resistant mutations is a key step toward generating more effective therapeutics. Here we describe a high-throughput CRISPR-Cas9-based saturated mutagenesis approach to generate comprehensive libraries of point mutations at a defined genomic location and systematically study their effect on cell growth. As proof of concept, we mutagenized a selected region within the leukemic oncogene BCR-ABL1 Using bulk competitions with a deep-sequencing readout, we analyzed hundreds of mutations under multiple drug conditions and found that the effects of mutations on growth in the presence or absence of drug were critical for predicting clinically relevant resistant mutations, many of which were cancer adaptive in the absence of drug pressure. Using this approach, we identified all clinically isolated BCR-ABL1 mutations and achieved a prediction score that correlated highly with their clinical prevalence. The strategy described here can be broadly applied to a variety of oncogenes to predict patient mutations and evaluate resistance susceptibility in the development of new therapeutics. Published under the PNAS license.

  12. A Development of Hybrid Drug Information System Using Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HwaMin Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent drug abuse or misuse cases and avoid over-prescriptions, it is necessary for medicine taker to be provided with detailed information about the medicine. In this paper, we propose a drug information system and develop an application to provide information through drug image recognition using a smartphone. We designed a contents-based drug image search algorithm using the color, shape and imprint of drug. Our convenient application can provide users with detailed information about drugs and prevent drug misuse.

  13. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  14. The impact of the written request process on drug development in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kristen M; Reaman, Gregory; Avant, Debbie; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Modernization Act, enacted in 1997, created a pediatric exclusivity incentive allowing sponsors to qualify for an additional 6 months of marketing exclusivity after satisfying the requirements outlined in the Written Request (WR). This review evaluates the impact of the WR mechanism on the development of oncology drugs in children. A search of the FDA document archiving, reporting, and regulatory tracking system was performed for January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. Drugs were identified and pediatric-specific labeling information was obtained from Drugs@fda.gov and FDA Pediatric Labeling Changes Table. Fifty WRs have been issued for oncology drugs. Pediatric studies have been submitted for 14 drugs. Thirteen received pediatric exclusivity. As of December 31, 2010, labeling changes have been made for 11 drugs. Three drugs were approved for pediatric use. WRs have provided a mechanism to promote the study of drugs in pediatric malignancies. Information from studies resulting from the WRs regarding safety, pharmacokinetics, and tolerability of oncology drugs has been incorporated into pediatric labeling for 11/14 of the drugs. Earlier communication and collaboration between the FDA, National Cancer Institute, clinical investigators, and commercial sponsors are envisioned to facilitate the identification and prioritization of emerging new drugs of interest for WR consideration. Since this is the only regulatory mechanism, resulting from specific legislative initiatives relevant to cancer drug development for children, efforts to enhance its impact on increasing drug approval for pediatric cancer indications are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Impact of Breakthrough Therapy Designation on Development Strategies and Timelines for Nononcology Drugs and Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, A F; Murphy, W R

    2016-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA, 2012) introduced the Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD), a new tool to expedite development of medicines to treat serious or life-threatening diseases. The majority of BTDs have gone to oncology drugs, and a recent publication by Shea et al. 1 reviewed the impact of BTD on oncology drug development. This article reviews the impact of BTD on development strategies and timelines for nononcology drugs. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. Open source biotechnology : A drug for developing countries' health problems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, M.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    In developing countries, many people suffer from diseases for which there are no drugs or for which drugs exist that they cannot afford because they are too expensive. The advent of genomics has sparked the idea that new drugs can be more easily developed and that genomics thus could lessen the

  17. SIMulation of Medication Error induced by Clinical Trial drug labeling: the SIMME-CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Cecile; Schwiertz, Vérane; Sarfati, Laura; Gourc-Berthod, Chloé; Guédat, Marie-Gabrielle; Alloux, Céline; Vantard, Nicolas; Gauthier, Noémie; He, Sophie; Kiouris, Elena; Caffin, Anne-Gaelle; Bernard, Delphine; Ranchon, Florence; Rioufol, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    To assess the impact of investigational drug labels on the risk of medication error in drug dispensing. A simulation-based learning program focusing on investigational drug dispensing was conducted. The study was undertaken in an Investigational Drugs Dispensing Unit of a University Hospital of Lyon, France. Sixty-three pharmacy workers (pharmacists, residents, technicians or students) were enrolled. Ten risk factors were selected concerning label information or the risk of confusion with another clinical trial. Each risk factor was scored independently out of 5: the higher the score, the greater the risk of error. From 400 labels analyzed, two groups were selected for the dispensing simulation: 27 labels with high risk (score ≥3) and 27 with low risk (score ≤2). Each question in the learning program was displayed as a simulated clinical trial prescription. Medication error was defined as at least one erroneous answer (i.e. error in drug dispensing). For each question, response times were collected. High-risk investigational drug labels correlated with medication error and slower response time. Error rates were significantly 5.5-fold higher for high-risk series. Error frequency was not significantly affected by occupational category or experience in clinical trials. SIMME-CT is the first simulation-based learning tool to focus on investigational drug labels as a risk factor for medication error. SIMME-CT was also used as a training tool for staff involved in clinical research, to develop medication error risk awareness and to validate competence in continuing medical education. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  18. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for Alzheimer's disease management: Technical, industrial, and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming Ming; El-Salamouni, Noha S; El-Refaie, Wessam M; Hazzah, Heba A; Ali, Mai M; Tosi, Giovanni; Farid, Ragwa M; Blanco-Prieto, Maria J; Billa, Nashiru; Hanafy, Amira S

    2017-01-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease with high prevalence in the rapidly growing elderly population in the developing world. The currently FDA approved drugs for the management of symptomatology of AD are marketed mainly as conventional oral medications. Due to their gastrointestinal side effects and lack of brain targeting, these drugs and dosage regiments hinder patient compliance and lead to treatment discontinuation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (NTDDS) administered by different routes can be considered as promising tools to improve patient compliance and achieve better therapeutic outcomes. Despite extensive research, literature screening revealed that clinical activities involving NTDDS application in research for AD are lagging compared to NTDDS for other diseases such as cancers. The industrial perspectives, processability, and cost/benefit ratio of using NTDDS for AD treatment are usually overlooked. Moreover, active and passive immunization against AD are by far the mostly studied alternative AD therapies because conventional oral drug therapy is not yielding satisfactorily results. NTDDS of approved drugs appear promising to transform this research from 'paper to clinic' and raise hope for AD sufferers and their caretakers. This review summarizes the recent studies conducted on NTDDS for AD treatment, with a primary focus on the industrial perspectives and processability. Additionally, it highlights the ongoing clinical trials for AD management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A primer of drug safety surveillance: an industry perspective. Part I: Information flow, new drug development, and federal regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, M C

    1992-01-01

    To place the fundamentals of clinical drug safety surveillance in a conceptual framework that will facilitate understanding and application of adverse drug event data to protect the health of the public and support a market for pharmaceutical manufacturers' products. Part I of this series provides a background for the discussion of drug safety by defining the basic terms and showing the flow of safety information through a pharmaceutical company. The customers for adverse drug event data are identified to provide a basis for providing quality service. The development of a drug product is briefly reviewed to show the evolution of safety data. Drug development and safety are defined by federal regulations. These regulations are developed by the FDA with information from pharmaceutical manufacturers. The intent of the regulations and the accompanying guidelines is described. An illustration from the news media is cited to show an alternative, positive approach to handling an adverse event report. This review uses primary sources from the federal laws (regulations), commentaries, and summaries. Very complex topics are briefly summarized in the text and additional readings are presented in an appendix. Secondary sources, ranging from newspaper articles to judicial summaries, illustrate the interpretation of adverse drug events and opportunities for drug safety surveillance intervention. The reference materials used were articles theoretically or practically applicable in the day-to-day practice of drug safety surveillance. The role of clinical drug safety surveillance in product monitoring and drug development is described. The process of drug safety surveillance is defined by the Food and Drug Administration regulations, product labeling, product knowledge, and database management. Database management is subdivided into the functions of receipt, retention, retrieval, and review of adverse event reports. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic interaction ;of the components

  20. Do national drug policies influence antiretroviral drug prices? Evidence from the Southern African Development community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Galárraga, Omar

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy of low- and middle-income countries’ (LMIC) national drug policies in managing antiretroviral (ARV) pharmaceutical prices is not well understood. Though ARV drug prices have been declining in LMIC over the past decade, little research has been done on the role of their national drug policies. This study aims to (i) analyse global ARV prices from 2004 to 2013 and (ii) examine the relationship of national drug policies to ARV prices. Analysis of ARV drug prices utilized data from the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization (WHO). Ten of the most common ARV drugs (first-line and second-line) were selected. National drug policies were also assessed for 12 countries in the South African Development Community (SADC), which self-reported their policies through WHO surveys. The best predictor of ARV drug price was generic status—the generic versions of 8 out of 10 ARV drugs were priced lower than branded versions. However, other factors such as transaction volume, HIV prevalence, national drug policies and PEPFAR/CHAI involvement were either not associated with ARV drug price or were not consistent predictors of price across different ARV drugs. In the context of emerging international trade agreements, which aim to strengthen patent protections internationally and potentially delay the sale of generic drugs in LMIC, this study shines a spotlight on the importance of generic drugs in controlling ARV prices. Further research is needed to understand the impact of national drug policies on ARV prices.

  1. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi; Nilsson Wallin, Annika

    2014-01-01

    the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during...... adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance......Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability...

  2. Discovery and development of new antibacterial drugs: learning from experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nicole; Czaplewski, Lloyd; Piddock, Laura J V

    2018-06-01

    Antibiotic (antibacterial) resistance is a serious global problem and the need for new treatments is urgent. The current antibiotic discovery model is not delivering new agents at a rate that is sufficient to combat present levels of antibiotic resistance. This has led to fears of the arrival of a 'post-antibiotic era'. Scientific difficulties, an unfavourable regulatory climate, multiple company mergers and the low financial returns associated with antibiotic drug development have led to the withdrawal of many pharmaceutical companies from the field. The regulatory climate has now begun to improve, but major scientific hurdles still impede the discovery and development of novel antibacterial agents. To facilitate discovery activities there must be increased understanding of the scientific problems experienced by pharmaceutical companies. This must be coupled with addressing the current antibiotic resistance crisis so that compounds and ultimately drugs are delivered to treat the most urgent clinical challenges. By understanding the causes of the failures and successes of the pharmaceutical industry's research history, duplication of discovery programmes will be reduced, increasing the productivity of the antibiotic drug discovery pipeline by academia and small companies. The most important scientific issues to address are getting molecules into the Gram-negative bacterial cell and avoiding their efflux. Hence screening programmes should focus their efforts on whole bacterial cells rather than cell-free systems. Despite falling out of favour with pharmaceutical companies, natural product research still holds promise for providing new molecules as a basis for discovery.

  3. Bridging Adult Experience to Pediatrics in Oncology Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ruby; Zhao, Hong; Reaman, Gregory; Liu, Qi; Wang, Yaning; Stewart, Clinton F; Burckart, Gilbert

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric drug development in the United States has grown under the current regulations made permanent by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012. Over 1200 pediatric studies have now been submitted to the US FDA, but there is still a high rate of failure to obtain pediatric labeling for the indication pursued. Pediatric oncology represents special problems in that the disease is most often dissimilar to any cancer found in the adult population. Therefore, the development of drug dosing in pediatric oncology patients represents a special challenge. Potential approaches to pediatric dosing in oncology patients include extrapolation of efficacy from adult studies in those few cases where the disease is similar, inclusion of adolescent patients in adult trials when possible, and bridging the adult dose to the pediatric dose. An analysis of the recommended phase 2 dose for 40 molecularly targeted agents in pediatric patients provides some insight into current practices. Increased knowledge of tumor biology and efforts to identify and validate molecular targets and genetic abnormalities that drive childhood cancers can lead to increased opportunities for precision medicine in the treatment of pediatric cancers. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy.

  5. Investigating Nature's Mysteries for Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than half of the drugs approved to treat cancer come from a natural product or a natural product prototype. Scientists in NCI-Frederick's Natural Products Branch are exploring ways to harness chemicals produced by marine invertebrates, other animals, plants, and microbes for cancer drug discovery.

  6. Development, use and evaluation of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E H; Launsø, Laila

    1987-01-01

    . Drugs offer a standard solution to health problems independent of the individuals' social life. Thus drugs become a tool which function in agreement with the disintegrated and achievement-orientated approach to disease as it is organized today. In general the statements in this article are not limited...

  7. [Significance of re-evaluation and development of Chinese herbal drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yue; Ma, Zengchun; Zhang, Boli

    2012-01-01

    The research of new herbal drugs involves in new herbal drugs development and renew the old drugs. It is necessary to research new herbal drugs based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The current development of famous TCM focuses on the manufacture process, quality control standards, material basis and clinical research. But system management of security evaluation is deficient, the relevant system for the safety assessment TCM has not been established. The causes of security problems, security risks, target organ of toxicity, weak link of safety evaluation, and ideas of safety evaluation are discussed in this paper. The toxicology research of chinese herbal drugs is necessary based on standard of good laboratory practices (GLP), the characteristic of Chinese herbal drugs is necessary to be fully integrated into safety evaluation. The safety of new drug research is necessary to be integrated throughout the entire process. Famous Chinese medicine safety research must be paid more attention in the future.

  8. Preparative Scale Resolution of Enantiomers Enables Accelerated Drug Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Leek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of pure enantiomers is of increasing importance not only for the pharmaceutical industry but also for agro-chemistry and biotechnology. In drug discovery and development, the enantiomers of a chiral drug depict unique chemical and pharmacological behaviors in a chiral environment, such as the human body, in which the stereochemistry of the chiral drugs determines their pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and toxicological properties. We present a number of challenging case studies of up-to-kilogram separations of racemic or enriched isomer mixtures using preparative liquid chromatography and super critical fluid chromatography to generate individual enantiomers that have enabled the development of new candidate drugs within AstraZeneca. The combination of chromatography and racemization as well as strategies on when to apply preparative chiral chromatography of enantiomers in a multi-step synthesis of a drug compound can further facilitate accelerated drug discovery and the early clinical evaluation of the drug candidates.

  9. Radiocarbon mass spectrometry for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Schulze-Konig Tim

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radiocarbon has a huge potential as a tracer for metabolism studies in humans. By using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for its detection, a unique sensitivity is reached reducing required radiation doses to a negligible level. Until recently, a widespread use of AMS in biomedical research was impeded by the high complexity of the instrument, time-consuming sample preparation, and a limited availability of measurement capacity. Over the last few years, tremendous progress has been achieved in the reduction of size and complexity of AMS instruments. It allowed designing a compact AMS system, dubbed BioMICADAS to address the needs of biomedical users. For more than two years, this system is in successful operation at a commercial service provider for the pharmaceutical industry. A further drastic simplification of radiocarbon mass spectrometers seems possible and could establish a regular usage of this technology in drug development. However, to reach this goal a better integration of AMS into the workflow of bioanalytical laboratories will be necessary. For this purpose, CO 2 accepting ion sources may be a key, since they enable an almost automated sample preparation. The status of radiocarbon AMS in biomedical research and its perspective will be discussed

  10. Cancer Drug Development: New Targets for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt

    1996-01-01

    cancer drug screening and cancer drug development. At the NCI, for example, the old in vivo mouse screen using mouse lymphomas has been shelved; it discovered compounds with some activity in lymphomas, but not the common solid tumors of adulthood. It has been replaced with an initial in vitro screen of some sixty cell lines, representing the common solid tumors-ovary, G.I., lung, breast, CNS, melanoma and others. The idea was to not only discover new drugs with specific anti-tumor activity but also to use the small volumes required for in vitro screening as a medium to screen for new natural product compounds, one of the richest sources of effective chemotherapy. The cell line project had an unexpected dividend. The pattern of sensitivity in the panel predicted the mechanism of action of unknown compounds. An antifolate suppressed cell growth of the different lines like other antifolates, anti-tubulin compounds suppressed like other anti-tubulins, and so on. It now became possible, at a very early stage of cancer drug screening, to select for drugs with unknown-and potentially novel-mechanisms of action. The idea was taken to the next logical step, and that was to characterize the entire panel for important molecular properties of human malignancy: mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53, expression of important oncogenes like ras or myc, the gp170 gene which confers multiple drug resistance, protein-specific kinases, and others. It now became possible to use the cell line panel as a tool to detect new drugs which targeted a specific genetic property of the tumor cell. Researchers can now ask whether a given drug is likely to inhibit multiple drug resistance or kill cells which over-express specific oncogenes at the earliest phase of drug discovery. In this issue of The Oncologist, Tom Connors celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of cancer chemotherapy. His focus is on the importance of international collaboration in clinical trials and the negative impact of

  11. Data-intensive drug development in the information age: applications of Systems Biology/Pharmacology/Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosawa, Naoki; Manabe, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies continuously face challenges to deliver new drugs with true medical value. R&D productivity of drug development projects depends on 1) the value of the drug concept and 2) data and in-depth knowledge that are used rationally to evaluate the drug concept's validity. A model-based data-intensive drug development approach is a key competitive factor used by innovative pharmaceutical companies to reduce information bias and rationally demonstrate the value of drug concepts. Owing to the accumulation of publicly available biomedical information, our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases has developed considerably; it is the basis for identifying the right drug target and creating a drug concept with true medical value. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of disease animal models can also be improved; it can thus support rational extrapolation of animal experiment results to clinical settings. The Systems Biology approach, which leverages publicly available transcriptome data, is useful for these purposes. Furthermore, applying Systems Pharmacology enables dynamic simulation of drug responses, from which key research questions to be addressed in the subsequent studies can be adequately informed. Application of Systems Biology/Pharmacology to toxicology research, namely Systems Toxicology, should considerably improve the predictability of drug-induced toxicities in clinical situations that are difficult to predict from conventional preclinical toxicology studies. Systems Biology/Pharmacology/Toxicology models can be continuously improved using iterative learn-confirm processes throughout preclinical and clinical drug discovery and development processes. Successful implementation of data-intensive drug development approaches requires cultivation of an adequate R&D culture to appreciate this approach.

  12. Drug therapy problems identification by clinical pharmacists in a private hospital in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoud, T; Waheedi, M; Lemay, J; Awad, A

    2018-05-01

    To report the types and frequency of drug therapy problems (DTPs) identified and the physician acceptance of the clinical pharmacist interventions in a private hospital in Kuwait. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 3500 patients admitted to the hospital between December 2010 and April 2013. A structured approach was used to identify DTPs and recommend interventions. Data were analyzed using MAXQDA version 11. A total of 670 DTPs were identified and recommendations were proposed to treating physicians for each DTP. Overdosage was the most frequently identified drug therapy problem (30.8%), followed by low dosage (17.6%), unnecessary drug therapy (17.3%), need for additional drug therapy (11.6%), and need for different drug product (11.6%). The drug classes most frequently involved were anti-infectives (36.9%), analgesics (25.2%), and gastrointestinal agents (15.5%). More than two-third of the interventions (67.5%) were accepted and implemented by physicians. The most frequently accepted interventions were related to nonadherence, adverse drug reaction, monitoring parameters, inappropriate dosage, and need for additional drug therapy. The current findings expand the existing body of data by reporting on pharmacist recommendations of identified DTPs and importantly, their high rate of acceptance and implementation by the treating physician. These results could serve as a springboard to support further development and implementation of clinical pharmacy services in other healthcare settings in Kuwait. Copyright © 2018 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Translating data on antihypertensive drugs into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M A

    1998-06-01

    Two problems in the treatment of hypertension continue to be largely unsolved. The first, and more simple, is our inability to adequately control blood pressure in the majority of hypertensive patients. This not only reflects the difficulty of retaining patients in effective treatment programs, but also of convincing physicians to strive for optimal blood pressure levels. There is a continuing need for new antihypertensive drugs and combinations to help accomplish these goals. The second major problem is that the major clinical endpoints, including coronary events and renal failure, have not been adequately reduced by traditional therapies. Standard regimens, particularly those including diuretics, have protected against strokes and heart failure. Our improved understanding of vascular biology in hypertension has directed interest to the mechanisms in hypertensive patients that might accelerate atherosclerosis and vascular events in these individuals. This involves addressing the concomitant metabolic risk factors that comprise the "Hypertension Syndrome," and, perhaps of equal importance, finding therapies that directly inhibit unwanted types of growth and proliferative activities within the walls of critical arteries. Many substances within the endothelium and the vascular wall may participate as initiators or mediators of pathology, but most information thus far has focused on the renin-angiotensin system. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (and potentially angiotensin receptor blockers) have provided coronary and renal protection in various cardiovascular conditions, though not yet in formal hypertension trials. Calcium channel blockers have also shown promise, including recent stroke and cardiovascular benefits in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, but, again, definitive coronary data in hypertension are awaited. Unless concomitant conditions mandate the selection of a particular antihypertensive drug class, physicians currently have a dilemma

  14. Clinical pharmacology in Russia-historical development and current state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodnikova Goryachkina, Ksenia; Burbello, Aleksandra; Sychev, Dmitry; Frolov, Maxim; Kukes, Vladimir; Petrov, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology in Russia has long history and is currently active, but rather unrecognized internationally. It is governmentally approved as a teaching/scientific specialty since 1983 and as a medical specialty since 1997. Courses of clinical pharmacology are included in the undergraduate curricula in the 5th and/or 6th year of education at all medical schools in the Russian Federation. Postgraduate education includes initial specialization in internal medicine with further residency in clinical pharmacology. Governmental legislation recommends that every healthcare institution has either a department or a single position of clinical pharmacologist. Major routine duties include information about and monitoring of medication use, consultations in difficult clinical situations, pharmacogenetic counseling, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacovigilance, and participation in drug and therapeutics (formulary) committees. There are official experts in clinical pharmacology in Russia responsible for coordinating relevant legislative issues. The chief expert clinical pharmacologist represents the discipline directly at the Ministry of Health. Research in clinical pharmacology in Russia is extensive and variable, but only some of it is published internationally. Russia is a participant of international societies of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics and collaboration is actively ongoing. There are still certain problems related to the development of the discipline in Russia-some healthcare institutions do not see the need for clinical pharmacology. However, the number of clinical pharmacologists in Russia is increasing as well as their role in physicians' education, national healthcare, and research.

  15. [Predictive factors of clinically significant drug-drug interactions among regimens based on protease inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and raltegravir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Miguel; Torres, Rafael; Jusdado, Juan José; Pastor, Susana; Agud, Jose Luis

    2016-04-15

    To determine the prevalence and types of clinically significant drug-drug interactions (CSDI) in the drug regimens of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment. retrospective review of database. Centre: Hospital Universitario Severo Ochoa, Infectious Unit. one hundred and forty-two participants followed by one of the authors were selected from January 1985 to December 2014. from their outpatient medical records we reviewed information from the last available visit of the participants, in relation to HIV infection, comorbidities, demographics and the drugs that they were receiving; both antiretroviral drugs and drugs not related to HIV infection. We defined CSDI from the information sheet and/or database on antiretroviral drug interactions of the University of Liverpool (http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org) and we developed a diagnostic tool to predict the possibility of CSDI. By multivariate logistic regression analysis and by estimating the diagnostic performance curve obtained, we identified a quick tool to predict the existence of drug interactions. Of 142 patients, 39 (29.11%) had some type of CSDI and in 11.2% 2 or more interactions were detected. In only one patient the combination of drugs was contraindicated (this patient was receiving darunavir/r and quetiapine). In multivariate analyses, predictors of CSDI were regimen type (PI or NNRTI) and the use of 3 or more non-antiretroviral drugs (AUC 0.886, 95% CI 0.828 to 0.944; P=.0001). The risk was 18.55 times in those receiving NNRTI and 27,95 times in those receiving IP compared to those taking raltegravir. Drug interactions, including those defined as clinically significant, are common in HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral drugs, and the risk is greater in IP-based regimens. Raltegravir-based prescribing, especially in patients who receive at least 3 non-HIV drugs could avoid interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The Development Impact of the Illegality of Drug Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Keefer, Philip; Loayza, Norman V.; Soares, Rodrigo R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the unintended consequences of the war on drugs, particularly for developing countries, and weighs them against the evidence regarding the efficacy of prohibition to curb drug use and trade. It reviews the available evidence and presents new results that indicate that prohibition has limited effects on drug prevalence and prices, most likely indicating a combination of i...

  17. Identification of possible adverse drug reactions in clinical notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, Pernille; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Aagaard, Lise

    2015-01-01

    and labeling status. Findings: A total of 207 patients were included in the study leading to the identification of 163 AEs. 14% were categorized as certain, 60% as probable/likely, and 26% as possible. 15 (9%) ADRs were unlabeled of which two were serious: peripheral edema associated with sitagliptin......Objective: Through manual review of clinical notes for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending a Danish diabetes center, the aim of the study was to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with three classes of glucose-lowering medicines: "Combinations of oral blood....... Methods: For observed adverse events (AEs) we extracted time to onset, outcome, and suspected medicine(s). AEs were assessed according to World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality criteria and analyzed with respect to suspected medicines, type of ADR (system organ class), seriousness...

  18. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ..., electronic record requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA), is announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's...

  19. IMPACT OF CLINICAL-TRIALS ON THE ADOPTION OF NEW DRUGS WITHIN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENIG, P; HAAIJER-RUSKAMP, FM; WESSELING, H

    1991-01-01

    To assess the influence that clinical trials may have on the introduction of new drugs into prescribing routines, the adoption of drugs has been studied in a university hospital in the Netherlands. A significant relation was found between the testing of semi-innovative drugs in clinical trials in

  20. Inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: clinical and drug delivery perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugianto, Tiffanie Daisy; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is a chronic, progressive, suppurative lung disease characterized by permanent dilatation of bronchial subdivisions, which further causes accumulation of sputum and bacterial infections. The advent of inhaled antibiotics over the past two decades has been expected to effectively attenuate the problem of chronic bacterial infections in CF and NCFB subjects with higher, local drug concentrations and minimal systemic side effects. This review summarizes and evaluates current clinical evidence of efficacy and adverse effects of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB, as well as ongoing preclinical and clinical studies, followed by a discussion of issues and challenges in clinical practice and drug delivery strategies, together with future research directions. The evidence base of the clinical efficacy of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB is limited and the degrees of reported clinical benefits have been modest and conflicting. Challenges surrounding inhaled antibiotics application and development include the lack of knowledge of disease factors and optimum management strategies, unreceptive lung pathophysiology and the lack of factors that support compliance and tolerability. Nonetheless, research continues to give birth to new clinical findings and novel formulations such as combination antibiotics and sustained-release formulations, which add great value to the development of efficacious, safe and convenient inhalable antibiotics of the future.

  1. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  2. Radiopharmaceutical development and clinical needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radionuclides for medical applications has continued to grow at a very rapid pace. The use of radiotracers for nuclear medicine imaging and for radiotherapy of cancer as well as certain benign disorders is firmly established as an important clinical modality. Over the past ten years, nuclear medicine has experienced an evolution towards functional studies and novel therapeutic approaches. New radionuclides are required for these applications. In the developmental stages, each new isotope has to go through a phase of careful scrutiny and evaluation, and practical concerns related to the cost of production and availability must be addressed. The development of 18 F-labeled radiopharmaceuticals has opened a completely new area of investigation. Research on bioconjugates (this term includes radiolabeled antibodies, peptides, receptor-specific and other bioactive molecules) has experienced rapid growth because of the promise of a number of these ''bioactive molecules'' to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides for tumor-associated and other specific antigens/receptors ''in vivo''. The new concept of nuclear medicine, particularly when applied to the field of oncology is directed towards the physiological mechanisms and the study of molecular disfunctions. The search for new radiopharmaceuticals thus aims at studying tumors at a tissue and molecular level. Examples of this new approach are scans utilizing the following substances: -guanethidine and noradrenaline analogues such as meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine labeled with iodine-131 or iodine-123 aimed at targeting neuroendocrine cells and their secretory granules; -various monoclonal antibodies directed at different tumor types, both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radioimmunotherapy is considered particularly suited for treatment of tumors not easily amenable to surgery and for the treatment of small disseminated lesions; -somatostatin analogs tagged with indium-111 or more recently with Yttrium

  3. Approaches to modernize the combination drug development paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Day

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in genomic sequencing and omics-based capabilities are uncovering tremendous therapeutic opportunities and rapidly transforming the field of cancer medicine. Molecularly targeted agents aim to exploit key tumor-specific vulnerabilities such as oncogenic or non-oncogenic addiction and synthetic lethality. Additionally, immunotherapies targeting the host immune system are proving to be another promising and complementary approach. Owing to substantial tumor genomic and immunologic complexities, combination strategies are likely to be required to adequately disrupt intricate molecular interactions and provide meaningful long-term benefit to patients. To optimize the therapeutic success and application of combination therapies, systematic scientific discovery will need to be coupled with novel and efficient clinical trial approaches. Indeed, a paradigm shift is required to drive precision medicine forward, from the traditional “drug-centric” model of clinical development in pursuit of small incremental benefits in large heterogeneous groups of patients, to a “strategy-centric” model to provide customized transformative treatments in molecularly stratified subsets of patients or even in individual patients. Crucially, to combat the numerous challenges facing combination drug development—including our growing but incomplete understanding of tumor biology, technical and informatics limitations, and escalating financial costs—aligned goals and multidisciplinary collaboration are imperative to collectively harness knowledge and fuel continual innovation.

  4. Extensively and Pre-Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Clinical Isolates of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Using Classical Second Line Drugs (Levofloxacin and Amikacin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, I. A.; Khan, F. A.; Khan, K. A.; Satti, L.; Ghafoor, T.; Fayyaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To find out the frequency of Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR) and pre-XDR tuberculosis in clinical isolates of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Tuberculosis (TB) by determining the susceptibilities against Levofloxacin and Amikacin (classical second line antituberculosis drugs). Study Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Microbiology Department, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from September 2011 to August 2013. Methodology: Amikacin (AK) and Levofloxacin (LEVO) were obtained in chemically pure form from Sigma (Taufkirchen, Germany). The breakpoint concentration used for AK was 1.0 micro g/ml and for LEVO 2.0 micro g/ml. Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 system was used to carry out drug susceptibility testing as per recommended protocol. Results: A total of 3 MDR-TB isolates (3 percentage) turned out to be XDR-TB based upon simultaneous resistance to injectable second line antituberculosis drug AK and one of the fluoro-quinolones (LEVO). A total of 24 MDR-TB isolates (24 percentage) were found to be pre-XDR based upon resistance to LEVO alone. Treatment status record of patients with XDR and pre-XDRTB isolates revealed that majority of patients had received fluoroquinolones (FQs) during the course of treatment. Conclusion: XDR-TB has started to emerge in MDR-TB isolates in our set up. The worrying sign is the high frequency of pre-XDR tuberculosis. Urgent steps need to be taken to stem the tide of pre-XDR-TB in our population. It is thus recommended to develop facilities to carry out drug susceptibility testing to monitor the status of pre-XDR and XDR-TB in our population. (author)

  5. Drugs in development for toxoplasmosis: advances, challenges, and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, P Holland; Doggett, Joseph Stone

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes fatal and debilitating brain and eye diseases. Medicines that are currently used to treat toxoplasmosis commonly have toxic side effects and require prolonged courses that range from weeks to more than a year. The need for long treatment durations and the risk of relapsing disease are in part due to the lack of efficacy against T. gondii tissue cysts. The challenges for developing a more effective treatment for toxoplasmosis include decreasing toxicity, achieving therapeutic concentrations in the brain and eye, shortening duration, eliminating tissue cysts from the host, safety in pregnancy, and creating a formulation that is inexpensive and practical for use in resource-poor areas of the world. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in identifying and developing new compounds for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. Unlike clinically used medicines that were repurposed for toxoplasmosis, these compounds have been optimized for efficacy against toxoplasmosis during preclinical development. Medicines with enhanced efficacy as well as features that address the unique aspects of toxoplasmosis have the potential to greatly improve toxoplasmosis therapy. This review discusses the facets of toxoplasmosis that are pertinent to drug design and the advances, challenges, and current status of preclinical drug research for toxoplasmosis.

  6. A development perspective on adolescent drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, D; Moselle, K A

    1985-01-01

    Adolescent drug use is placed in an historical and developmental perspective. Existing evidence concerning causes and consequences of adolescent drug use is inconclusive. In the absence of conclusive empirical evidence and cogent theories, we present a prima facie case against early adolescent drug use by defending six propositions which posit specific cognitive, conative, and affective negative consequences including impairment of attention and memory; developmental lag imposing categorical limitations on the level of maximum functioning available to the user in cognitive, moral and psychosocial domains; amotivational syndrome; consolidation of diffuse or negative identity; and social alienation and estrangement. We call for a program of research which could provide credible evidence to support or rebut these propositions, and thus address the factual claims underlying the sociomoral concerns of social policy planners.

  7. Kinase-Centric Computational Drug Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Volkamer, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Kinases are among the most studied drug targets in industry and academia, due to their involvement in a majority of cellular processes and, upon dysregulation, in a variety of diseases including cancer, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders. The high interest in this druggable protein family

  8. Analysis of Drug Development Paradigms for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Denis L; de Melo Gagliato, Débora; Giles, Francis J; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2018-04-15

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors have unique toxicities and response kinetics compared with cytotoxic and gene-targeted anticancer agents. We investigated the impact of innovative/accelerated immunotherapy drug development/approval models on the accuracy of safety and efficacy assessments by searching the FDA website. Initial phase I trials for each agent were reviewed and safety and efficacy data compared with that found in later trials leading to regulatory approvals of the same agents. As of June 2017, the FDA approved six checkpoint inhibitors for a variety of cancer types. All checkpoint inhibitors received a priority review status and access to at least two additional FDA special access programs, more often breakthrough therapy designation and accelerated approval. Median clinical development time (investigational new drug application to approval) was 60.77 months [avelumab had the shortest timeline (52.33 months)]. Response rates during early phase I trials (median = 16%) are higher than for phase I trials of other agents (with the exception of gene-targeted agents tested with a biomarker). Doses approved were usually not identical to doses recommended on phase I trials. Approximately 50% of types of immune-related and 43% of types of clinically relevant toxicities from later trials were identified in early-phase trials. Even so, treatment-related mortality remains exceedingly low in later studies (0.33% of patients). In conclusion, efficacy and safety of immune checkpoint inhibitors appear to be reasonably predicted from the dose-finding portion of phase I trials, indicating that the fast-track development of these agents is safe and justified. Clin Cancer Res; 24(8); 1785-94. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Interdisciplinary researches for potential developments of drugs and natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunrat Chaveerach

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Developments of drugs or natural products from plants are possibly made, simple to use and lower cost than modern drugs. The development processes can be started with studying local wisdom and literature reviews to choose the plants which have long been used in diverse areas, such as foods, traditional medicine, fragrances and seasonings. Then those data will be associated with scientific researches, namely plant collection and identification, phytochemical screening by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, pharmacological study/review for their functions, and finally safety and efficiency tests in human. For safety testing, in vitro cell toxicity by cell viability assessment and in vitro testing of DNA breaks by the comet assay in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells can be performed. When active chemicals and functions containing plants were chosen with safety and efficacy for human uses, then, the potential medicinal natural products will be produced. Based on these procedures, the producing cost will be cheaper and the products can be evaluated for their clinical properties. Thus, the best and lowest-priced medicines and natural products can be distributed worldwide.

  10. Interdisciplinary researches for potential developments of drugs and natural products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arunrat Chaveerach; Runglawan Sudmoon; Tawatchai Tanee

    2017-01-01

    Developments of drugs or natural products from plants are possibly made,simple to use and lower cost than modern drugs.The development processes can be started with studying local wisdom and literature reviews to choose the plants which have long been used in diverse areas,such as foods,traditional medicine,fragrances and seasonings.Then those data will be associated with scientific researches,namely plant collection and identification,phytochemical screening by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry,pharmacological study/review for their functions,and finally safety and efficiency tests in human.For safety testing,in vitro cell toxicity by cell viability assessment and in vitro testing of DNA breaks by the comet assay in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells can be performed.When active chemicals and functions containing plants were chosen with safety and efficacy for human uses,then,the potential medicinal natural products will be produced.Based on these procedures,the producing cost will be cheaper and the products can be evaluated for their clinical properties.Thus,the best and lowest-priced medicines and natural products can be distributed worldwide.

  11. Accelerating drug development for neuroblastoma - New Drug Development Strategy: an Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer, European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents and International Society of Paediatric Oncology Europe Neuroblastoma project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Caron, Hubert; Geoerger, Birgit; Eggert, Angelika; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Brock, Penelope; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Chesler, Louis; Schulte, Johannes H; De Preter, Katleen; Molenaar, Jan; Schramm, Alexander; Eilers, Martin; Van Maerken, Tom; Johnsen, John Inge; Garrett, Michelle; George, Sally L; Tweddle, Deborah A; Kogner, Per; Berthold, Frank; Koster, Jan; Barone, Giuseppe; Tucker, Elizabeth R; Marshall, Lynley; Herold, Ralf; Sterba, Jaroslav; Norga, Koen; Vassal, Gilles; Pearson, Andrew Dj

    2017-08-01

    Neuroblastoma, the commonest paediatric extra-cranial tumour, remains a leading cause of death from cancer in children. There is an urgent need to develop new drugs to improve cure rates and reduce long-term toxicity and to incorporate molecularly targeted therapies into treatment. Many potential drugs are becoming available, but have to be prioritised for clinical trials due to the relatively small numbers of patients. Areas covered: The current drug development model has been slow, associated with significant attrition, and few new drugs have been developed for neuroblastoma. The Neuroblastoma New Drug Development Strategy (NDDS) has: 1) established a group with expertise in drug development; 2) prioritised targets and drugs according to tumour biology (target expression, dependency, pre-clinical data; potential combinations; biomarkers), identifying as priority targets ALK, MEK, CDK4/6, MDM2, MYCN (druggable by BET bromodomain, aurora kinase, mTORC1/2) BIRC5 and checkpoint kinase 1; 3) promoted clinical trials with target-prioritised drugs. Drugs showing activity can be rapidly transitioned via parallel randomised trials into front-line studies. Expert opinion: The Neuroblastoma NDDS is based on the premise that optimal drug development is reliant on knowledge of tumour biology and prioritisation. This approach will accelerate neuroblastoma drug development and other poor prognosis childhood malignancies.

  12. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  13. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Kiessling, F.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells,

  14. A two-pronged approach in leishmaniasis drug development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nancy Kamau

    Trouiller P; Olliaro P; Torreele E;. Orbinski J; Laing R and Ford N. Drug development for neglected diseases: a deficient market and a public-health policy failure. Lancet. 2002; 359: 2188–94. 9. Nwaka S and Ridley RG. Virtual drug discovery and development for neglected diseases through public-private partnerships.

  15. An active role for machine learning in drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complexity of biological systems, cutting-edge machine-learning methods will be critical for future drug development. In particular, machine-vision methods to extract detailed information from imaging assays and active-learning methods to guide experimentation will be required to overcome the dimensionality problem in drug development. PMID:21587249

  16. [New drug development by innovative drug administration--"change" in pharmaceutical field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T

    1997-11-01

    New drug development can be made by providing products of higher "selectivity for the drug" for medical treatment. There are two ways for the approach to get higher "selectivity of drug": 1) discovery of new compounds with high selectivity of drug; 2) innovation of new drug administration, that is new formulation and/or method with high selectivity of drug by integration and harmonization of various hard/soft technologies. An extensive increase of biological information and advancement of surrounding science and technology may modify the situation as the latter overcomes the former in the 21 century. As the science and technology in the 21 century is said to be formed on "3H", that is, 1. hybrid; 2. hi-quality; 3. husbandry, the new drug development by innovative drug administration is exactly based on the science and technology of 3H. Its characteristic points are interdisciplinary/interfusion, international, of philosophy/ethics, and systems of hard/hard/heart. From these points of view, not only the advance of unit technology but also a revolution in thinking way should be "must" subjects. To organize this type of research well, a total research activity such as ROR (research on research) might take an important and efficient role. Here the key words are the "Optimization technology" and "Change in Pharmaceutical Fields." As some examples of new drug innovation, our trials on several topical mucosal adhesive dosage forms and parenteral administration of peptide drugs such as insulin and erythropoietin will be described.

  17. Medication Development of Ibogaine as a Pharmacotherapy for Drug Dependencea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Deborah C; Kovera, Craig A; Buck, Billy E; Norenberg, Michael D; Shapshak, Paul; Hearn, W Lee; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    1998-05-01

    The potential for deriving new psychotherapeutic medications from natural sources has led to renewed interest in rain forest plants as a source of lead compounds for the development of antiaddiction medications. Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid found in the roots of Tabernanthe iboga (Apocynaceae family), a rain forest shrub that is native to equatorial Africa. Ibogaine is used by indigenous peoples in low doses to combat fatigue, hunger and in higher doses as a sacrament in religious rituals. Members of American and European addict self-help groups have claimed that ibogaine promotes long-term drug abstinence from addictive substances, including psychostimulants and cocaine. Anecdotal reports attest that a single dose of ibogaine eliminates withdrawal symptoms and reduces drug cravings for extended periods of time. The purported antiaddictive properties of ibogaine require rigorous validation in humans. We have initiated a rising tolerance study using single administration to assess the safety of ibogaine for the treatment of cocaine dependency. The primary objectives of the study are to determine safety, pharmacokinetics and dose effects, and to identify relevant parameters of efficacy in cocaine-dependent patients. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of ibogaine in humans are assessed by analyzing the concentration-time data of ibogaine and its desmethyl metabolite (noribogaine) from the Phase I trial, and by conducting in vitro experiments to elucidate the specific disposition processes involved in the metabolism of both parent drug and metabolite. The development of clinical safety studies of ibogaine in humans will help to determine whether there is a rationale for conducting efficacy trials in the future.

  18. Medication development of ibogaine as a pharmacotherapy for drug dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, D C; Kovera, C A; Buck, B E; Norenberg, M D; Shapshak, P; Hearn, W L; Sanchez-Ramos, J

    1998-05-30

    The potential for deriving new psychotherapeutic medications from natural sources has led to renewal interest in rain forest plants as a source of lead compounds for the development of antiaddiction medications. Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid found in the roots of Tabernanthe iboga (Apocynaceae family), a rain forest shrub that is native to equatorial Africa. Ibogaine is used by indigenous peoples in low doses to combat fatigue, hunger and in higher doses as a sacrament in religious rituals. Members of American and European addict self-help groups have claimed that ibogaine promotes long-term drug abstinence from addictive substances, including psychostimulants and cocaine. Anecdotal reports attest that a single dose of ibogaine eliminates withdrawal symptoms and reduces drug cravings for extended periods of time. The purported antiaddictive properties of ibogaine require rigorous validation in humans. We have initiated a rising tolerance study using single administration to assess the safety of ibogaine for treatment of cocaine dependency. The primary objectives of the study are to determine safety, pharmacokinetics and dose effects, and to identify relevant parameters of efficacy in cocaine-dependent patients. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of ibogaine in humans are assessed by analyzing the concentration-time data of ibogaine and its desmethyl metabolite (noribogaine) from the Phase I trial, and by conducting in vitro experiments to elucidate the specific disposition processes involved in the metabolism of both parent drug and metabolite. The development of clinical safety studies of ibogaine in humans will help to determine whether there is a rationale for conducting efficacy trials in the future.

  19. Utilization of the Bridging Strategy for the Development of New Drugs in Oncology to Avoid Drug Lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Seiji; Koyama, Nobuyuki; Hidaka, Shinji

    2017-11-01

    Global trial (GT) strategy and bridging (BG) strategy are currently the main clinical development strategies of oncology drugs in Japan, but the relationship between development style and drug lag and how the bridging strategy has contributed to the solution of drug lag have not been clear. We investigated the potential factors that influenced submission lag (SL), and also compared the differences in SL among early-initiation BG strategy, late-initiation BG strategy, and GT strategy. A stepwise linear regression analysis identified the potential factors that shorten SL: development start lag and development style. Comparison of the differences in SL among the strategies also indicated that the SL in the GT strategy and that in the early-initiation BG strategy were significantly shorter than that in the late-initiation BG strategy. The findings in our study suggest that the late-initiation BG strategy may not contribute to shortening drug lag. Because the number of late-initiation BG studies has not decreased, we propose first that pharmaceutical companies should initiate clinical development as early as possible in Japan so that they can choose the GT strategy as a first option at the next step, and second when they cannot choose the GT strategy after investigating differences in exposure between Japanese and non-Japanese in a phase 1 study, they should select the early BG strategy to avoid future drug lag. It is also important for the regulatory authorities to provide reasonable guidance to have a positive impact on strategic decisions, even for foreign-capital companies. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Evaluation of the Potential Risk of Drugs to Induce Hepatotoxicity in Human?Relationships between Hepatic Steatosis Observed in Non-Clinical Toxicity Study and Hepatotoxicity in Humans-

    OpenAIRE

    Goda, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Akio; Takahashi, Akemi; Takahashi, Tadakazu; Saito, Kosuke; Maekawa, Keiko; Saito, Yoshiro; Sugai, Shoichiro

    2017-01-01

    In the development of drugs, we sometimes encounter fatty change of the hepatocytes (steatosis) which is not accompanied by degenerative change in the liver in non-clinical toxicity studies. In this study, we investigated the relationships between fatty change of the hepatocytes noted in non-clinical toxicity studies of compound X, a candidate compound in drug development, and mitochondrial dysfunction in order to estimate the potential risk of the compound to induce drug-induced liver injury...

  1. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  2. On-site management of investigational products and drug delivery systems in conformity with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méthot, Julie; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Investigators and research teams participating in clinical trials have to deal with complex investigational products, study designs, and research environments. The emergence of new drug delivery systems and investigational products combining more than one drug and the development of biodrugs such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, siRNA, and gene therapy to treat orphan or common diseases constitute a new challenge for investigators and clinical sites. We describe the requirements and challenges of drug management in conformity with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs) for investigators and sites participating in clinical trials. Review At all sites participating in clinical trials, standard operating procedures (SOPs) covering the critical path of drug and drug delivery systems management are required. All steps should be auditable, including reception, validation, storage, access, preparation, distribution, techniques of administration, use, return, and destruction of research products. Biodrugs require traceability and specific SOPs on the management of potential immune reactions. Investigational products must be stored under standard auditable conditions. The traceability of storage conditions (including temperature) requires these conditions to be monitored on a continuous basis. A dedicated space with restricted access limited to authorized qualified personnel facilitates the monitoring. The development of standardized, auditable settings and the application of dedicated, site-specific SOPs for the management of investigational products and drug delivery systems contribute to guarantee the compliance to GCP requirements.

  3. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Wen Su

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer were utilized. An I2E query extracts “Serious Adverse Events” (SAE data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer.

  4. The current status of oral contraceptive clinical development in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Y

    1989-01-01

    Since the oral contraceptive guideline was issued in April 1987, Japanese pharmaceutical firms have been asking physicians to perform clinical studies of the low-dose OCs. At present, eight products from six companies are under clinical development. Ethinyl estradiol (30-35 micrograms per tablet) as an estrogen component is common to all the test drugs. The progestin component in each OC is norethindrone, levonorgestrel, or desogestrel. Phase I clinical studies on small numbers of healthy volunteers showed that they could tolerate the test drugs without any serious complaints. The effects on endocrine systems, including the inhibition of ovulation, were also examined. Pharmacokinetic parameters of active ingredients were comparable to those of Western women, and no substantial difference seemed to exist between Japanese and Western women. As an example, the results of phase I studies of OJK-777 (Ortho-Novum 7/7/7) are mentioned. Phase III clinical studies, which are "open studies," are now under progress with more than 3,000 women. The major objectives are to examine (1) how well the drugs are tolerated, and the dropout rates; (2) the effects on cycle control, especially bleeding patterns; (3) effects on the cardiovascular system, including coagulation and lipid metabolism; (4) effects on hormone secretions. Although some women have been taking the test drugs for more than 12 cycles, overall statistics are not yet available, because the guideline requires long-term administration (for more than 24 cycles). However, some characteristic features observed thus far are discussed.

  5. Drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes: mechanisms and potential clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Randall; Funk, Ryan S; Axcell, Erick; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2012-08-01

    Many commercially available, weakly basic drugs have been shown to be lysosomotropic, meaning they are subject to extensive sequestration in lysosomes through an ion trapping-type mechanism. The extent of lysosomal trapping of a drug is an important therapeutic consideration because it can influence both activity and pharmacokinetic disposition. The administration of certain drugs can alter lysosomes such that their accumulation capacity for co-administered and/or secondarily administered drugs is altered. In this review the authors explore what is known regarding the mechanistic basis for drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes. Specifically, the authors address the influence of drugs on lysosomal pH, volume and lipid processing. Many drugs are known to extensively accumulate in lysosomes and significantly alter their structure and function; however, the therapeutic and toxicological implications of this remain controversial. The authors propose that drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes represent an important potential source of variability in drug activity and pharmacokinetics. Most evaluations of drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes have been performed in cultured cells and isolated tissues. More comprehensive in vivo evaluations are needed to fully explore the impact of this drug-drug interaction pathway on therapeutic outcomes.

  6. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Venlafaxine in an Everyday Clinical Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Rix; Kuhlmann, Ida Berglund; Pottegård, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Venlafaxine is a commonly used antidepressant agent. We aimed to provide detailed information on the associations between venlafaxine dose and concentrations of venlafaxine, by patient age and sex. From a therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database located at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, we...... identified all adults for whom the treating physician had requested clinical advice on the TDM result for venlafaxine between 2002 and 2012. We identified 1,077 TDM samples of venlafaxine from 334 males and 743 females (median age 45 years), and the median daily dose was 225 mg. Median plasma concentration...... of venlafaxine and o-desmethyvenlafaxine (ODV) were 306 nmol/L and 861 nmol/L, respectively. The median dose-corrected serum level for venlafaxine was 1.49 nmol/L/mg., while the dose-corrected serum level of men and women were 1.21 nmol/L/mg and 1.60 nmol/L/mg, respectively. The dose-corrected sum of venlafaxine...

  7. An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Clinical Significance of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Non-Antirheumatic Drugs According to Rheumatologists and Pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, Eric N.; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Jansen, Tim L. Th. A.; Houtman, Nella M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    Background: Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) must be recognized in a timely manner and managed appropriately to prevent adverse drug reactions or therapeutic failure. Because the evidence for most DDIs is based on case reports or poorly documented clinical information, there is a

  8. PP22. PROGRESSING RADIOTHERAPY-DRUG COMBINATIONS TOWARDS EARLY PHASE CLINICAL TRIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dr Hazel; Stock, Dr Julie; Chalmers, Prof Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Radiotherapy-Drug Combinations consortium (RaDCom) works with UK-based investigators to design and deliver high quality preclinical projects evaluating specific radiotherapy-drug combinations. We have several collaborations with industry, from in vitro projects to understand the novel agent in the context of radiobiology, through to preclinical studies that will generate data to support the development of radiotherapy combination trials. RaDCom facilitates the coordination of industry interactions, triage new proposals, monitor active projects, and engages with the radiotherapy community to promote collaboration and networking (via a capability map). The CRUK New Agents Committee Preclinical Combination Grant scheme provides one of the funding options for these studies, with the potential to feed into early phase clinical trials via the ECMC Combinations Alliance. RaDCom also supports broader radiotherapy research initiatives, by working to improve preclinical quality assurance and identifying a route to registration for radiotherapy-drug treatments. These activities will place the UK at the forefront of radiotherapy-drug preclinical research and provide a significant incentive for pharmaceutical companies to invest in this area and utilise the RaDCom network. Further information can be found on our webpage: http://ctrad.ncri.org.uk/research-support/radiation-drug-combinations-radcom Successful projects from RaDCom can then move into early phase combinations trials within the Combinations Alliance. The Combinations Alliance supports early phase combination studies in the UK via the ECMC (Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres) network. It focuses on translational research, and enables clinical project teams to work with disease experts to set up investigator led trials. The CRUK Centre of Drug Development (CDD) supports these studies with further management and coordination ensuring more robust timelines and delivery. The Combinations Alliance framework

  9. Drug side effect extraction from clinical narratives of psychiatry and psychology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sunghwan; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Chute, Christopher G; Savova, Guergana K

    2011-12-01

    To extract physician-asserted drug side effects from electronic medical record clinical narratives. Pattern matching rules were manually developed through examining keywords and expression patterns of side effects to discover an individual side effect and causative drug relationship. A combination of machine learning (C4.5) using side effect keyword features and pattern matching rules was used to extract sentences that contain side effect and causative drug pairs, enabling the system to discover most side effect occurrences. Our system was implemented as a module within the clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System. The system was tested in the domain of psychiatry and psychology. The rule-based system extracting side effects and causative drugs produced an F score of 0.80 (0.55 excluding allergy section). The hybrid system identifying side effect sentences had an F score of 0.75 (0.56 excluding allergy section) but covered more side effect and causative drug pairs than individual side effect extraction. The rule-based system was able to identify most side effects expressed by clear indication words. More sophisticated semantic processing is required to handle complex side effect descriptions in the narrative. We demonstrated that our system can be trained to identify sentences with complex side effect descriptions that can be submitted to a human expert for further abstraction. Our system was able to extract most physician-asserted drug side effects. It can be used in either an automated mode for side effect extraction or semi-automated mode to identify side effect sentences that can significantly simplify abstraction by a human expert.

  10. [The trend of developing new disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Tomita, Naoki; Ishiki, Aiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-03-01

    Development of symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer s disease by cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil was successful. However, it is a disappointment that development of disease-modifying drugs such as anti-amyloid drug based on amyloid-cascade theory has been interrupted or unsuccessful. Therefore, we have to be more cautious regarding inclusion criteria for clinical trials of new drugs. We agree that potentially curative drugs should be started before symptoms begin as a preemptive therapy or prevention trial. The concept of personalized medicine also is important when ApoE4-related amyloid reducing therapy is considered. Unfortunately, Japanese-ADNI has suffered a setback since 2014. However, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare gave a final remark that there was nothing wrong in the data managing process in the J-ADNI data center. We should pay more attention to worldwide challenges of speeding up new drug development.

  11. Development and evaluation of an electronic drug and therapeutics bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2002-10-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a paperless drug and therapeutics bulletin that is distributed by electronic mail from the pharmacy department of an Australian teaching hospital. A standardized format for the bulletin was designed and approved in February 2001. The aim of the bulletin is to facilitate the timely dissemination of concise, factual information about issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety, and the cost-effective use of medicines. A simple and attractive graphic design was chosen, and the hospital's clinical pharmacists and drug information staff developed an initial bank of content during the period immediately preceding the launch. The bulletin is presented as a 1-page, read-only file in Word for Windows format and was initially distributed by electronic mail to all users of the hospital's computerized communication network. As the popularity of the bulletin increased, healthcare practitioners from outside of the hospital began to request permission for inclusion on the circulation list, and the content was frequently forwarded by E-mail to workers in other hospitals and community-based settings. The bulletin is now distributed to pharmacists around Australia via 2 separate moderated discussion lists, one of which provides an archive site for previous editions. Healthcare workers in Singapore, the US, Canada, and New Zealand also receive the bulletin, which is now also abstracted by a major Australian pharmacy journal. A readership survey (also electronically distributed) was used to seek feedback after the publication of the first 12 editions. Readers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the content, format, and frequency of distribution of the materials. Although the concept and execution of this project was relatively simple, an extensive literature review did not reveal any previously published reports describing this type of approach to the distribution of a pharmacy bulletin. The

  12. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based...... on 7684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the "adverse reactions" section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5 x 5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE......Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply...

  13. Challenges in orphan drug development and regulatory policy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alice; Xie, Zhi

    2017-01-18

    While regulatory policy is well defined for orphan drug development in the United States and Europe, rare disease policy in China is still evolving. Many Chinese patients currently pay out of pocket for international treatments that are not yet approved in China. The lack of a clear definition and therefore regulatory approval process for rare diseases has, until now, de-incentivized pharmaceutical companies to pursue rare disease drug development in China. In turn, many grassroots movements have begun to support rare disease patients and facilitate drug discovery through research. Recently, the Chinese FDA set new regulatory guidelines for drugs being developed in China, including an expedited review process for life-saving treatments. In this review, we discuss the effects of these new policy changes on and suggest potential solutions to innovate orphan drug development in China.

  14. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... marketing applications, (2) what is meant by ``due diligence'' in obtaining financial disclosures from...: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

  15. Drug efficiency: a new concept to guide lead optimization programs towards the selection of better clinical candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braggio, Simone; Montanari, Dino; Rossi, Tino; Ratti, Emiliangelo

    2010-07-01

    As a result of their wide acceptance and conceptual simplicity, drug-like concepts are having a major influence on the drug discovery process, particularly in the selection of the 'optimal' absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity and physicochemical parameters space. While they have an undisputable value when assessing the potential of lead series or in evaluating inherent risk of a portfolio of drug candidates, they result much less useful in weighing up compounds for the selection of the best potential clinical candidate. We introduce the concept of drug efficiency as a new tool both to guide the drug discovery program teams during the lead optimization phase and to better assess the developability potential of a drug candidate.

  16. Doing the right things and doing things right : inpatient drug surveillance assisted by clinical decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter J.; Suijkerbuijk, Bas O.; Nannan Panday, Prashant V.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    Increased budget constraints and a continuous focus on improved quality require an efficient inpatient drug surveillance process. We describe a hospital-wide drug surveillance strategy consisting of a multidisciplinary evaluation of drug surveillance activities and using clinical decision support to

  17. FDA drug safety communications: a narrative review and clinical considerations for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Zachary A; Vande Griend, Joseph P; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2012-08-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has new regulatory authorities intended to enhance drug safety monitoring in the postmarketing period. This has resulted in an increase in communication from the FDA in recent years about the safety profile of certain drugs. It is important to stay abreast of the current literature on drug risks to effectively communicate these risks to patients, other health care providers, and the general public. To summarize 4 new FDA drug safety communications by describing the evidence supporting the risks and the clinical implications for older adults. The FDA Web site was reviewed for new drug safety communications from May 2011 to April 2012 that would be relevant to older adults. Approved labeling for each drug or class was obtained from the manufacturer, and PubMed was searched for primary literature that supported the drug safety concern. FDA drug safety communications for 4 drugs were chosen because of the potential clinical importance in older adults. A warning for citalopram was made because of potential problems with QT prolongation in patients taking less than 40 mg per day. The evidence suggests minor changes in QT interval. Given the flat dose-response curve in treating depression with citalopram, the new 20-mg/d maximum dose in older adults is sensible. Another warning was made for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection. A dose-response relationship was found for this drug risk. With C. difficile infections on the rise in older adults, along with other safety risks of PPI therapy, PPIs should only be used in older adults indicated for therapy for the shortest duration possible. In addition, a warning about dabigatran was made. There is strong evidence from a large clinical trial, as well as case reports, of increased bleeding risk in older adults taking dabigatran, especially in older adults with decreased renal function. This medication should be used with caution in older

  18. Clinical outcomes of the inclusion of the therapeutic drug monitoring report in the electronic clinical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sáez Belló

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the inclusion of the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Report (TDMR in the Electronic Clinical Record (ECR. Method: An observational ambispective cohort study with a duration of 149 days: PRE (retrospective, 49 days with the TDMR printed in paper, and POST (prospective, 100 days with the TDMR included in the ECR. Exclusion criteria: Patients not hospitalized, applications for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring by Critical Care and Neonatal Units, as well as monitoring with an objective other than dose adjustment. Variables: Number of TDMRs prepared, number of patients admitted with TDMR, time of delay for treatment adjustment, defined as the number of adjustments made to the treatment within over or under 24 hours from the time of TDMR preparation, and medication errors (MEs associated with said delay, as well as the degree of acceptance of the TDMR. Results: 690 TDMRs were conducted in 391 patients, 339 in PRE (n = 206 and 351 in POST (n = 185. The number of treatment modifications made in under 24 hours increased from 73.9% in PRE to 87.3% in POST [RR = 1.2 (CI95% = 0.97-1.43. We identified 35 patients with ME, 9.7% of them in PRE and 8.1% in POST (RR = 0.84 (CI95% = 0.44-1.58]. The degree of acceptance of the pharmacist recommendation increased from 53.3% in PRE to 68.3% in POST [RR = 1.3 (CI95% = 1.02- 1.62]. Conclusions: The inclusion of the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Report (TDMR in the Electronic Clinical Record increases the degree of acceptance of recommendations, and may reduce the delay in treatment modifications, reducing MEs and improving the process quality in terms of efficacy and safety

  19. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  20. Fragment-based drug discovery as alternative strategy to the drug development for neglected diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Juliana da Fonseca Rezende E; Gomes, Renan Augusto; Vital-Fujii, Drielli Gomes; Ferreira, Glaucio Monteiro; Trossini, Gustavo Henrique Goulart

    2017-12-01

    Neglected diseases (NDs) affect large populations and almost whole continents, representing 12% of the global health burden. In contrast, the treatment available today is limited and sometimes ineffective. Under this scenery, the Fragment-Based Drug Discovery emerged as one of the most promising alternatives to the traditional methods of drug development. This method allows achieving new lead compounds with smaller size of fragment libraries. Even with the wide Fragment-Based Drug Discovery success resulting in new effective therapeutic agents against different diseases, until this moment few studies have been applied this approach for NDs area. In this article, we discuss the basic Fragment-Based Drug Discovery process, brief successful ideas of general applications and show a landscape of its use in NDs, encouraging the implementation of this strategy as an interesting way to optimize the development of new drugs to NDs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Pharmacogenomics and its potential impact on drug and formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnstrom, Karin; Burgess, Diane J

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic research have provided the basis for new insights into the importance of genetic and genomic markers during the different stages of drug development. A new field of research, pharmacogenomics, which studies the relationship between drug effects and the genome, has emerged. Structural pharmacogenomics maps the complete DNA sequences of whole genomes (genotypes) including individual variations, and functional pharmacogenomics assesses the expression levels of thousands of genes in one single experiment. Together, these two areas of pharmacogenomics have generated massive databases, which have become a challenge for the research field of informatics and have fostered a new branch of research, bioinformatics. If skillfully used, the databases generated by pharmacogenomics together with data mining on the Web promise to improve the drug development process in a variety of areas: identification of drug targets, evaluation of toxicity, classification of diseases, evaluation of formulations, assessment of drug response and treatment, post-marketing applications, and development of personalized medicines.

  2. Otic drug delivery systems: formulation principles and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Li, Mingshuang; Smyth, Hugh; Zhang, Feng

    2018-04-25

    Disorders of the ear severely impact the quality of life of millions of people, but the treatment of these disorders is an ongoing, but often overlooked challenge particularly in terms of formulation design and product development. The prevalence of ear disorders has spurred significant efforts to develop new therapeutic agents, but perhaps less innovation has been applied to new drug delivery systems to improve the efficacy of ear disease treatments. This review provides a brief overview of physiology, major diseases, and current therapies used via the otic route of administration. The primary focuses are on the various administration routes and their formulation principles. The article also presents recent advances in otic drug deliveries as well as potential limitations. Otic drug delivery technology will likely evolve in the next decade and more efficient or specific treatments for ear disease will arise from the development of less invasive drug delivery methods, safe and highly controlled drug delivery systems, and biotechnology targeting therapies.

  3. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  4. Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Gerard J.; Ross, Ted M.; Evans, Thomas G.; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The “Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy” session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials. PMID:25148426

  5. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials.

  6. Big Data: transforming drug development and health policy decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Demissie; Berger, Marc L

    The explosion of data sources, accompanied by the evolution of technology and analytical techniques, has created considerable challenges and opportunities for drug development and healthcare resource utilization. We present a systematic overview these phenomena, and suggest measures to be taken for effective integration of the new developments in the traditional medical research paradigm and health policy decision making. Special attention is paid to pertinent issues in emerging areas, including rare disease drug development, personalized medicine, Comparative Effectiveness Research, and privacy and confidentiality concerns.

  7. Design and Development of a Proniosomal Transdermal Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to develop a proniosomal carrier system for captopril for the treatment of hypertension that is capable of efficiently delivering entrapped drug over an extended period of time. Method: The potential of proniosomes as a transdermal drug delivery system for captopril was investigated by ...

  8. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives.

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J

    The disposition of many drugs in cystic fibrosis is abnormal compared with healthy individuals. In general, changes include an increased volume of distribution expressed in liters per kg bodyweight for highly hydrophilic drugs such as aminoglycosides, and, to a lesser extent, for penicillins and

  10. Online drug databases: a new method to assess and compare inclusion of clinically relevant information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristina; Fresco, Paula; Monteiro, Joaquim; Rama, Ana Cristina Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Evidence-Based Practice requires health care decisions to be based on the best available evidence. The model "Information Mastery" proposes that clinicians should use sources of information that have previously evaluated relevance and validity, provided at the point of care. Drug databases (DB) allow easy and fast access to information and have the benefit of more frequent content updates. Relevant information, in the context of drug therapy, is that which supports safe and effective use of medicines. Accordingly, the European Guideline on the Summary of Product Characteristics (EG-SmPC) was used as a standard to evaluate the inclusion of relevant information contents in DB. To develop and test a method to evaluate relevancy of DB contents, by assessing the inclusion of information items deemed relevant for effective and safe drug use. Hierarchical organisation and selection of the principles defined in the EGSmPC; definition of criteria to assess inclusion of selected information items; creation of a categorisation and quantification system that allows score calculation; calculation of relative differences (RD) of scores for comparison with an "ideal" database, defined as the one that achieves the best quantification possible for each of the information items; pilot test on a sample of 9 drug databases, using 10 drugs frequently associated in literature with morbidity-mortality and also being widely consumed in Portugal. Main outcome measure Calculate individual and global scores for clinically relevant information items of drug monographs in databases, using the categorisation and quantification system created. A--Method development: selection of sections, subsections, relevant information items and corresponding requisites; system to categorise and quantify their inclusion; score and RD calculation procedure. B--Pilot test: calculated scores for the 9 databases; globally, all databases evaluated significantly differed from the "ideal" database; some DB performed

  11. Pharmacogenomic and clinical data link non-pharmacokinetic metabolic dysregulation to drug side effect pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Filipp, F. V.; Bordbar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug side effects cause a significant clinical and economic burden. However, mechanisms of drug action underlying side effect pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we integrate pharmacogenomic and clinical data with a human metabolic network and find that non-pharmacokinetic metabolic pathways...

  12. Inkjet Printing of Drug-Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles-A Platform for Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickström, Henrika; Hilgert, Ellen; Nyman, Johan O; Desai, Diti; Şen Karaman, Didem; de Beer, Thomas; Sandler, Niklas; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2017-11-21

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have shown great potential in improving drug delivery of poorly water soluble (BCS class II, IV) and poorly permeable (BCS class III, IV) drugs, as well as facilitating successful delivery of unstable compounds. The nanoparticle technology would allow improved treatment by reducing adverse reactions of currently approved drugs and possibly reintroducing previously discarded compounds from the drug development pipeline. This study aims to highlight important aspects in mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) ink formulation development for digital inkjet printing technology and to advice on choosing a method (2D/3D) for nanoparticle print deposit characterization. The results show that both unfunctionalized and polyethyeleneimine (PEI) surface functionalized MSNs, as well as drug-free and drug-loaded MSN-PEI suspensions, can be successfully inkjet-printed. Furthermore, the model BCS class IV drug remained incorporated in the MSNs and the suspension remained physically stable during the processing time and steps. This proof-of-concept study suggests that inkjet printing technology would be a flexible deposition method of pharmaceutical MSN suspensions to generate patterns according to predefined designs. The concept could be utilized as a versatile drug screening platform in the future due to the possibility of accurately depositing controlled volumes of MSN suspensions on various materials.

  13. Inkjet Printing of Drug-Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles—A Platform for Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrika Wickström

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs have shown great potential in improving drug delivery of poorly water soluble (BCS class II, IV and poorly permeable (BCS class III, IV drugs, as well as facilitating successful delivery of unstable compounds. The nanoparticle technology would allow improved treatment by reducing adverse reactions of currently approved drugs and possibly reintroducing previously discarded compounds from the drug development pipeline. This study aims to highlight important aspects in mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN ink formulation development for digital inkjet printing technology and to advice on choosing a method (2D/3D for nanoparticle print deposit characterization. The results show that both unfunctionalized and polyethyeleneimine (PEI surface functionalized MSNs, as well as drug-free and drug-loaded MSN–PEI suspensions, can be successfully inkjet-printed. Furthermore, the model BCS class IV drug remained incorporated in the MSNs and the suspension remained physically stable during the processing time and steps. This proof-of-concept study suggests that inkjet printing technology would be a flexible deposition method of pharmaceutical MSN suspensions to generate patterns according to predefined designs. The concept could be utilized as a versatile drug screening platform in the future due to the possibility of accurately depositing controlled volumes of MSN suspensions on various materials.

  14. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the following: (1) What FDA...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical...

  15. Cdc7 kinase - a new target for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; O'Dwyer, Michael; Santocanale, Corrado; Kelly, Kevin; Carew, Jennifer; Giles, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The cell division cycle 7 (Cdc7) is a serine threonine kinase that is of critical importance in the regulation of normal cell cycle progression. Cdc7 kinase is highly conserved during evolution and much has been learned about its biological roles in humans through the study of lower eukaryotes, particularly yeasts. Two important regulator proteins, Dbf4 and Drf1, bind to and modulate the kinase activity of human Cdc7 which phosphorylates several sites on Mcm2 (minichromosome maintenance protein 2), one of the six subunits of the replicative DNA helicase needed for duplication of the genome. Through regulation of both DNA synthesis and DNA damage response, both key functions in the survival of tumour cells, Cdc7 becomes an attractive target for pharmacological inhibition. There are much data available on the pre-clinical anti-cancer effects of Cdc7 depletion and although there are no available Cdc7 inhibitors in clinical trials as yet, several lead compounds are being optimised for this purpose. In this review, we will address the current status of Cdc7 as an important target for new drug development.

  16. Overview of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Wagner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous factors that recommend the use of biomarkers in drug development including the ability to provide a rational basis for selection of lead compounds, as an aid in determining or refining mechanism of action or pathophysiology, and the ability to work towards qualification and use of a biomarker as a surrogate endpoint. Examples of biomarkers come from many different means of clinical and laboratory measurement. Total cholesterol is an example of a clinically useful biomarker that was successfully qualified for use as a surrogate endpoint. Biomarkers require validation in most circumstances. Validation of biomarker assays is a necessary component to delivery of high-quality research data necessary for effective use of biomarkers. Qualification is necessary for use of a biomarker as a surrogate endpoint. Putative biomarkers are typically identified because of a relationship to known or hypothetical steps in a pathophysiologic cascade. Biomarker discovery can also be effected by expression profiling experiment using a variety of array technologies and related methods. For example, expression profiling experiments enabled the discovery of adipocyte related complement protein of 30 kD (Acrp30 or adiponectin as a biomarker for in vivo activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR γ activity.

  17. PCSK9: Regulation and Target for Drug Development for Dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Amy C; Dron, Jacqueline S; Hegele, Robert A; Huff, Murray W

    2017-01-06

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9) is a secreted zymogen expressed primarily in the liver. PCSK9 circulates in plasma, binds to cell surface low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, is internalized, and then targets the receptors to lysosomal degradation. Studies of naturally occurring PCSK9 gene variants that caused extreme plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) deviations and altered atherosclerosis risk unleashed a torrent of biological and pharmacological research. Rapid progress in understanding the physiological regulation of PCSK9 was soon translated into commercially available biological inhibitors of PCSK9 that reduced LDL-C levels and likely also cardiovascular outcomes. Here we review the swift evolution of PCSK9 from novel gene to drug target, to animal and human testing, and finally to outcome trials and clinical applications. In addition, we explore how the genetics-guided path to PCSK9 inhibitor development exemplifies a new paradigm in pharmacology. Finally, we consider some potential challenges as PCSK9 inhibition becomes established in the clinic.

  18. The teaching of drug development to medical students: collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A G; Jackson, D; Barnett, D B

    2005-04-01

    Collaboration between the medical school at Leicester and a local pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca, led to the design and implementation of an optional third year special science skills module teaching medical students about drug discovery and development. The module includes didactic teaching about the complexities of the drug discovery process leading to development of candidate drugs for clinical investigation as well as practical experience of the processes involved in drug evaluation preclinically and clinically. It highlights the major ethical and regulatory issues concerned with the production and testing of novel therapies in industry and the NHS. In addition it helps to reinforce other areas of the medical school curriculum, particularly the understanding of clinical study design and critical appraisal. The module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and the critical appraisal of a drug advertisement. This paper describes the objectives of the module and its content. In addition we outline the results of an initial student evaluation of the module and an assessment of its impact on student knowledge and the opinion of the pharmaceutical industry partner. This module has proven to be popular with medical students, who acquire a greater understanding of the work required for drug development and therefore reflect more favourably on the role of pharmaceutical companies in the UK.

  19. Ethnically diverse pluripotent stem cells for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakunle, Eyitayo S; Loring, Jeanne F

    2012-12-01

    Genetic variation is an identified factor underlying drug efficacy and toxicity, and adverse drug reactions, such as liver toxicity, are the primary reasons for post-marketing drug failure. Genetic predisposition to toxicity might be detected early in the drug development pipeline by introducing cell-based assays that reflect the genetic and ethnic variation of the expected treatment population. One challenge for this approach is obtaining a collection of suitable cell lines derived from ethnically diverse populations. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) seem ideal for this purpose. They can be obtained from any individual, can be differentiated into multiple relevant cell types, and their self-renewal capability makes it possible to generate large quantities of quality-controlled cell types. Here, we discuss the benefits and challenges of using iPSCs to introduce genetic diversity into the drug development process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human In Silico Drug Trials Demonstrate Higher Accuracy than Animal Models in Predicting Clinical Pro-Arrhythmic Cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Passini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Early prediction of cardiotoxicity is critical for drug development. Current animal models raise ethical and translational questions, and have limited accuracy in clinical risk prediction. Human-based computer models constitute a fast, cheap and potentially effective alternative to experimental assays, also facilitating translation to human. Key challenges include consideration of inter-cellular variability in drug responses and integration of computational and experimental methods in safety pharmacology. Our aim is to evaluate the ability of in silico drug trials in populations of human action potential (AP models to predict clinical risk of drug-induced arrhythmias based on ion channel information, and to compare simulation results against experimental assays commonly used for drug testing. A control population of 1,213 human ventricular AP models in agreement with experimental recordings was constructed. In silico drug trials were performed for 62 reference compounds at multiple concentrations, using pore-block drug models (IC50/Hill coefficient. Drug-induced changes in AP biomarkers were quantified, together with occurrence of repolarization/depolarization abnormalities. Simulation results were used to predict clinical risk based on reports of Torsade de Pointes arrhythmias, and further evaluated in a subset of compounds through comparison with electrocardiograms from rabbit wedge preparations and Ca2+-transient recordings in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs. Drug-induced changes in silico vary in magnitude depending on the specific ionic profile of each model in the population, thus allowing to identify cell sub-populations at higher risk of developing abnormal AP phenotypes. Models with low repolarization reserve (increased Ca2+/late Na+ currents and Na+/Ca2+-exchanger, reduced Na+/K+-pump are highly vulnerable to drug-induced repolarization abnormalities, while those with reduced inward current density

  1. Human In Silico Drug Trials Demonstrate Higher Accuracy than Animal Models in Predicting Clinical Pro-Arrhythmic Cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passini, Elisa; Britton, Oliver J; Lu, Hua Rong; Rohrbacher, Jutta; Hermans, An N; Gallacher, David J; Greig, Robert J H; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-01-01

    Early prediction of cardiotoxicity is critical for drug development. Current animal models raise ethical and translational questions, and have limited accuracy in clinical risk prediction. Human-based computer models constitute a fast, cheap and potentially effective alternative to experimental assays, also facilitating translation to human. Key challenges include consideration of inter-cellular variability in drug responses and integration of computational and experimental methods in safety pharmacology. Our aim is to evaluate the ability of in silico drug trials in populations of human action potential (AP) models to predict clinical risk of drug-induced arrhythmias based on ion channel information, and to compare simulation results against experimental assays commonly used for drug testing. A control population of 1,213 human ventricular AP models in agreement with experimental recordings was constructed. In silico drug trials were performed for 62 reference compounds at multiple concentrations, using pore-block drug models (IC 50 /Hill coefficient). Drug-induced changes in AP biomarkers were quantified, together with occurrence of repolarization/depolarization abnormalities. Simulation results were used to predict clinical risk based on reports of Torsade de Pointes arrhythmias, and further evaluated in a subset of compounds through comparison with electrocardiograms from rabbit wedge preparations and Ca 2+ -transient recordings in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs). Drug-induced changes in silico vary in magnitude depending on the specific ionic profile of each model in the population, thus allowing to identify cell sub-populations at higher risk of developing abnormal AP phenotypes. Models with low repolarization reserve (increased Ca 2+ /late Na + currents and Na + /Ca 2+ -exchanger, reduced Na + /K + -pump) are highly vulnerable to drug-induced repolarization abnormalities, while those with reduced inward current density

  2. Drug safety is a barrier to the discovery and development of new androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William R; Car, Bruce D; Shi, Hong; Levesque, Paul C; Obermeier, Mary T; Gan, Jinping; Arezzo, Joseph C; Powlin, Stephanie S; Dinchuk, Joseph E; Balog, Aaron; Salvati, Mark E; Attar, Ricardo M; Gottardis, Marco M

    2011-04-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) antagonists are part of the standard of care for prostate cancer. Despite the almost inevitable development of resistance in prostate tumors to AR antagonists, no new AR antagonists have been approved for over a decade. Treatment failure is due in part to mutations that increase activity of AR in response to lower ligand concentrations as well as to mutations that result in AR response to a broader range of ligands. The failure to discover new AR antagonists has occurred in the face of continued research; to enable progress, a clear understanding of the reasons for failure is required. Non-clinical drug safety studies and safety pharmacology assays were performed on previously approved AR antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide), next generation antagonists in clinical testing (MDV3100, BMS-641988), and a pre-clinical drug candidate (BMS-501949). In addition, non-clinical studies with AR mutant mice, and EEG recordings in rats were performed. Non-clinical findings are compared to disclosures of clinical trial results. As a drug class, AR antagonists cause seizure in animals by an off-target mechanism and are found in vitro to inhibit GABA-A currents. Clinical trials of candidate next generation AR antagonists identify seizure as a clinical safety risk. Non-clinical drug safety profiles of the AR antagonist drug class create a significant barrier to the identification of next generation AR antagonists. GABA-A inhibition is a common off-target activity of approved and next generation AR antagonists potentially explaining some side effects and safety hazards of this class of drugs. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The role of radio pharmacological imaging in streamlining the drug development process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    Radio imaging techniques have found a place in clinical diagnosis, but there has been a hesitancy to use this approach in drug development. This reluctance may have been due to the availability of ligands, the time and cost of synthesis and the number of centres and for many the benefits are not evident. The use in drug development is potentially large since tomography can measure drug levels, specific binding, blood flow and activity within the human body. In drug discovery, the synthesis of candidate drugs with specific binding properties are dependent on understanding the disease and using appropriate in vitro or animal models. Using small animal tomographs, these can be validated using radio imaging. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic problems, such as the distribution of inhaled gases, drug targeting into tumours of the brain or specific gastrointestinal absorption sites can be investigated within the human rather than relying on animals. The high specific activity allows low doses to be administered to man with limited safety studies permitting kinetic and metabolic studies to be undertaken early in development. Safety studies and ensuing toxicological endpoints in animals rely on histopathology for gross degenerative in physiological function. Where concern exists, radio imaging could detect early in situ changes in humans, for example hepatic toxicity, before they become hazardous. In clinical studies, the action of drugs can be measured directly at the effector site prior to undertaking longer studies, which is important for many diseases, but particularly for those such as Alzheimer's disease, where improvements may be slow or subtle

  4. Primary psychosis with comorbid drug abuse and drug-induced psychosis: Diagnostic and clinical evolution at follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, M C; Di Pace, C; Reggiori, A; Paletta, S; Colasanti, A

    2017-10-01

    The study reports a follow-up assessment of 48 patients with concomitant drug abuse at the first admission for psychosis. We focused on the diagnostic distinction between primary psychosis with concomitant drug abuse and drug induced psychosis, to observe whether the diagnoses are stable over time and whether the clinical course significantly differs. The study examined 25 primary psychotic disorder with comorbid drug abuse and 23 drug-induced psychotic disorder patients. Diagnostic and psychopathological assessments were made at baseline and at follow-up. Mean follow-up period was 4.96 years. Patients with comorbid Drug Abuse exhibited higher scores in the item Unusual Content of Thought at baseline than drug-induced psychotic disorder patients: 5.48 vs 4.39 while the two patients groups did not differ in any of the BPRS items evaluated at follow-up. The primary psychosis with comorbid drug abuse and the substance induced psychosis groups were similar regarding diagnostic stability, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia at follow-up occurred similarly. There was no evidence that Drug Induced psychotic patients' symptoms tend to improve more after cessation of drug abuse. An earlier age of onset was found in primary psychotic patients, particularly for patients diagnosed as affected by schizophrenia at follow up. These results might reflect the uncertainty of the distinction between Primary and Drug Induced Psychosis and the difficulties in applying the DSM IV-TR criteria for diagnosing comorbid drug use disorders and psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Benefit-Risk Assessment in Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan

    developed, tested and used. Standardised diagrams for the visualisation of results from the assessment have been established, and different diagrams have been developed for different scenarios. For the visualisation of results from single and/or multiple similar trial assessments, tornado-like diagrams were...

  6. Research Ethics and Commercial Drug Development: When Integrity Threatens Profitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bélisle Pipon, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This case, based on personal experiences and on those found in the literature, highlights the delicate tension faced by drug development companies having to balance research integrity and their profitability.

  7. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Fred

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. Methods We interviewed six patients (four men and two women with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. Results There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. Conclusion The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area.

  8. Drugs of abuse and increased risk of psychosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Anand; Manning, Elizabeth E; Klug, Maren; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2012-12-01

    There is considerable evidence to suggest that the abuse of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis and methamphetamine, has aetiological roles in the pathogenesis of psychosis and schizophrenia. Factors that may increase susceptibility to the propsychotic effects of these drugs include the age at which the abuse starts as well as family history of genetic polymorphisms relevant to the pathophysiology of this disorder. However, the neurobiological mechanisms involved in drug abuse-associated psychosis remain largely unclear. This paper presents an overview of the available evidence, including clinical, animal model, and molecular studies, with a focus on brain regions and neurotransmitters systems, such as dopamine and glutamate, previously implicated in psychosis. It is clear that further studies are urgently needed to provide a greater insight into the mechanisms that mediate the long-term and neurodevelopmental effects of cannabis and methamphetamine. A dialogue between basic science and clinical research may help to identify at-risk individuals and novel pathways for treatment and prevention.

  9. Contrast media: interactions with other drugs and clinical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Exley, C.M.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2005-01-01

    Many patients with multiple medical problems who are receiving a variety of drugs are investigated with imaging techniques which require intravascular contrast media. The Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology therefore decided to review the literature and to draw up simple guidelines on interactions between contrast media and other drugs. An extensive literature search was carried out and summarized in a report. Based on the available information, simple guidelines have been drawn up. The report and guidelines were discussed at the 11th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Santiago de Compostela. Contrast media may interact with other drugs, and may interfere with isotope studies and biochemical measurements. Awareness of the patient drug history is important to avoid potential hazards. Simple guidelines are presented. (orig.)

  10. A New Drug Release Method in Early Development of Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Cai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro drug release tests are a widely used tool to measure the variance between transdermal product performances and required by many authorities. However, the result cannot provide a good estimation of the in vivo drug release. In the present work, a new method for measuring drug release from patches has been explored and compared with the conventional USP apparatus 2 and 5 methods. Durogesic patches, here used as a model patch, were placed on synthetic skin simulator and three moisture levels (29, 57, 198 μL cm−2 were evaluated. The synthetic skin simulators were collected after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 24 hours and extracted with pH 1.0 hydrochloric acid solution. The drug concentrations in the extractions were measured by isocratic reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. The results showed that, with the increasing moisture level on the synthetic skin simulator, the drug release rate increased. In comparison with the conventional USP method, the drug release results performed by the new method were in more correlation to the release rate claimed in the product label. This new method could help to differentiate the drug release rates among assorted formulations of transdermal drug delivery systems in the early stage of development.

  11. The Development of Drugs against Acanthamoeba Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Aqeel, Yousuf; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    For the past several decades, there has been little improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis and Acanthamoeba encephalitis, respectively. The discovery of a plethora of antiacanthamoebic compounds has not yielded effective marketed chemotherapeutics. The rate of development of novel antiacanthamoebic chemotherapies of translational value and the lack of interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing such chemotherapies have been disappointing. O...

  12. Vitamin E-drug interactions: molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podszun, Maren; Frank, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol and -tocotrienol) is an essential factor in the human diet and regularly taken as a dietary supplement by many people, who act under the assumption that it may be good for their health and can do no harm. With the publication of meta-analyses reporting increased mortality in persons taking vitamin E supplements, the safety of the micronutrient was questioned and interactions with prescription drugs were suggested as one potentially underlying mechanism. Here, we review the evidence in the scientific literature for adverse vitamin E-drug interactions and discuss the potential of each of the eight vitamin E congeners to alter the activity of drugs. In summary, there is no evidence from animal models or randomised controlled human trials to suggest that the intake of tocopherols and tocotrienols at nutritionally relevant doses may cause adverse nutrient-drug interactions. Consumption of high-dose vitamin E supplements ( ≥  300 mg/d), however, may lead to interactions with the drugs aspirin, warfarin, tamoxifen and cyclosporine A that may alter their activities. For the majority of drugs, however, interactions with vitamin E, even at high doses, have not been observed and are thus unlikely.

  13. Use of analgesic and sedative drugs in the NICU: integrating clinical trials and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrmeyer, Xavier; Vutskits, Laszlo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2010-02-01

    Recent advances in neonatal intensive care include and are partly attributable to growing attention for comfort and pain control in the term and preterm infant requiring intensive care.Limitation of painful procedures is certainly possible, but most critically ill infants require unavoidable painful or stressful procedures such as intubation, mechanical ventilation, or catheterization.Many analgesics (opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)and sedatives (benzodiazepines and other anesthetic agents) are available but their use varies considerably among units. This review summarizes current experimental knowledge on the effects of sedative and analgesic drugs on brain development and reviews clinical evidence that speaks for or against the use of common analgesic and sedative drugs in the NICU but avoids any discussion of anesthesia during surgery. Risk/benefit ratios of intermittent boluses or continuous infusions for the commonly used sedative and analgesic agents are discussed in the light of clinical and experimental studies. The limitations of extrapolating experimental results from animals to humans must be considered while making practical recommendations based on the currently available evidence.

  14. [Clinical audit on drug prescriptions for elderly patients hospitalized in a unit of psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaraut, C; Caron, J; Bayonne, L; Moalic, Y

    2016-02-01

    increased from 30% to 60% (P≤0.01). In parallel to the improvement of these criteria, it was noted that the average number of psychotropic drugs prescribed was significantly reduced (from 3.3 to 2.79 psychotropic/patients, P=0.078). The involvement of a pharmacist in cross-professional meetings of a care unit of psychiatry for the elderly has contributed in setting up a clinical audit focused on the drug management of these patients. This work enabled measurement of the progress made in the use of anticholinergic drugs, following the guidelines. In the mean time, it has been highlighted that the standards used are difficult to comply with regarding some criteria. For instance, the use of neuroleptics in the case of elderly patients hospitalized in the unit of psychiatry and not in the unit of geriatrics requires specific adjustments. Indeed, there are patients whose disorders have led to psychiatric hospitalization, which may require a combination of two neuroleptics. This paved the way for us to develop, within a working group representative of all professionals involved, a list fitting our medical practice and integrated into a guidebook adapted to the drug therapy management of elderly patients in psychiatry. The approach being successful, this targeted clinical audit will be extended to patients aged 75 years and over, hospitalized in other care units of the hospital. Copyright © 2015 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical skill development for community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, D J; Murphy, C M; Carter, B L

    1996-09-01

    The importance of establishing clinical pharmacy services in the community cannot be understated in light of current challenges to the traditional dispensing role as the primary service of the community pharmacist. Advancements in automated dispensing technology and declining prescription fee reimbursement are rapidly forcing pharmacists to seek alternative sources of revenue. Providing pharmaceutical care is a viable option to increase customer loyalty job satisfaction, and reimbursement. To support the development of clinical services, academic institutions are forming partnerships with individual community practitioners to overcome perceived educational and training barriers. The authors describe the design and development of two unique clinical skill development programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This paper also outlines the patient focused services that the participants have established upon completing the training. These programs successfully enhanced participants' therapeutic knowledge base and facilitated development of the clinical skills necessary for direct patient care.

  16. How modeling and simulation have enhanced decision making in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Raymond; Ewy, Wayne; Corrigan, Brian W; Ouellet, Daniele; Hermann, David; Kowalski, Kenneth G; Lockwood, Peter; Koup, Jeffrey R; Donevan, Sean; El-Kattan, Ayman; Li, Cheryl S W; Werth, John L; Feltner, Douglas E; Lalonde, Richard L

    2005-04-01

    The idea of model-based drug development championed by Lewis Sheiner, in which pharmacostatistical models of drug efficacy and safety are developed from preclinical and available clinical data, offers a quantitative approach to improving drug development and development decision-making. Examples are presented that support this paradigm. The first example describes a preclinical model of behavioral activity to predict potency and time-course of response in humans and assess the potential for differentiation between compounds. This example illustrates how modeling procedures expounded by Lewis Sheiner provided the means to differentiate potency and the lag time between drug exposure and response and allow for rapid decision making and dose selection. The second example involves planning a Phase 2a dose-ranging and proof of concept trial in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The issue was how to proceed with the study and what criteria to use for a go/no go decision. The combined knowledge of AD disease progression, and preclinical and clinical information about the drug were used to simulate various clinical trial scenarios to identify an efficient and effective Phase 2 study. A design was selected and carried out resulting in a number of important learning experiences as well as extensive financial savings. The motivation for this case in point was the "Learn-Confirm" paradigm described by Lewis Sheiner. The final example describes the use of Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and simulation to confirm efficacy across doses. In the New Drug Application for gabapentin, data from two adequate and well-controlled clinical trials was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in support of the approval of the indication for the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia. The clinical trial data was not replicated for each of the sought dose levels in the drug application presenting a regulatory dilemma. Exposure response analysis submitted in the New Drug

  17. Clinical trials using a radiopharmaceutical investigational drug: What legal environment and what authorizations required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Deeb, G.; Nguon, B.; Tibi, A.; Rizzo-Padoin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Recent revision of the legal environment for clinical research in France provided an opportunity to review what a hospital needs to carry out clinical trials using a radiopharmaceutical investigational drug. Legal measures concerning radiopharmaceutical investigational drugs are indeed more complex than those of classical clinical trials because of the additional legal provisions governing the use of ionizing radiation. Thus, requirements by the concerned staff (sponsor, pharmacist, person in charge of the nuclear activity) are described here. (authors) [fr

  18. Industry Perspective of Pediatric Drug Development in the United States: Involvement of the European Union Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Taku; Tsukamoto, Katsura; Matsumaru, Naoki; Waki, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Efforts to promote the development of pediatric pharmacotherapy include regulatory frameworks and close collaboration between the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. We characterized the current status of pediatric clinical trials conducted in the United States by the pharmaceutical industry, focusing on the involvement of the European Union member countries, to clarify the industry perspective. Data on US pediatric clinical trials were obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov . Binary regression analysis was performed to identify what factors influence the likelihood of involvement of European Union countries. A total of 633 US pediatric clinical trials that met inclusion criteria were extracted and surveyed. Of these, 206 (32.5%) involved a European Union country site(s). The results of binary regression analysis indicated that attribution of industry, phase, disease area, and age of pediatric participants influenced the likelihood of the involvement of European Union countries in US pediatric clinical trials. Relatively complicated or large pediatric clinical trials, such as phase II and III trials and those that included a broad age range of participants, had a significantly greater likelihood of the involvement of European Union countries ( P European Union countries, and (3) feasibility of clinical trials is mainly concerned by pharmaceutical industry for pediatric drug development. Additional incentives for high marketability may further motivate pharmaceutical industry to develop pediatric drugs.

  19. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ...) Modernizing FDA's Clinical Trials/BIMO Programs; (3) What FDA Expects in a Pharmaceutical Clinical Trial; (4) Medical Device Aspects of Clinical Research; (5) Adverse Event Reporting--Science, Regulation, Error, and...

  20. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein drug development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Daniel Lagassé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016.

  1. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors

  2. Developing a web page: bringing clinics online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie; Berns, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Introducing clinical staff education, along with new policies and procedures, to over 50 different clinical sites can be a challenge. As any staff educator will confess, getting people to attend an educational inservice session can be difficult. Clinical staff request training, but no one has time to attend training sessions. Putting the training along with the policies and other information into "neat" concise packages via the computer and over the company's intranet was the way to go. However, how do you bring the clinics online when some of the clinical staff may still be reluctant to turn on their computers for anything other than to gather laboratory results? Developing an easy, fun, and accessible Web page was the answer. This article outlines the development of the first training Web page at the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation, Madison, WI.

  3. Counterfeit drugs and medical devices in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glass BD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Beverley D GlassSchool of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: The World Health Organization has reported that counterfeit medicines potentially make up more than 50% of the global drug market, with a significant proportion of these fake products being encountered in developing countries. This occurrence is attributed to a lack of effective regulation and a weak enforcement capacity existing in these countries, with an increase in this trade resulting from the growing size and sophistication of drug counterfeiters. In addition, due to both cost and lack of availability of medicines, consumers in developing countries are more likely to seek out these inexpensive options. The World Health Organization is mindful of the impact of counterfeit drugs on consumer confidence in health care systems, health professionals, the supply chain, and genuine suppliers of medicines and medical devices. Antibiotics, antituberculosis drugs, and antimalarial and antiretroviral drugs are frequently targeted, with reports of 60% of the anti-infective drugs in Asia and Africa containing active pharmaceutical ingredients outside their pharmacopoeial limits. This has obvious public health implications of increasing drug resistance and negating all the efforts that have already gone into the provision of medicines to treat these life threatening conditions in the developing world. This review, while focusing on counterfeit medicines and medical devices in developing countries, will present information on their impact and how these issues can be addressed by regulation and control of the supply chain using technology appropriate to the developing world. The complexity of the problem will also be highlighted in terms of the definition of counterfeit and substandard medicines, including gray pharmaceuticals. Although this issue presents as a global public health problem, outcomes in developing countries where counterfeit

  4. Drug-drug interactions in patients treated for cancer : a prospective study on clinical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Jansman, F. G. A.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; de Man, F.; Piran, F.; Vincenten, I.; Jager, A.; Rijneveld, A. W.; Brugma, J. D.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; van Gelder, T.

    Background: Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are of major concern in oncology, since cancer patients typically take many concomitant medications. Retrospective studies have been conducted to determine the prevalence of DDIs. However, prospective studies on DDIs needing interventions in cancer patients

  5. Clinical management of drug-drug interactions in HCV therapy: Challenges and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.M.; Back, D.; Buggisch, P.; Buti, M.; Craxi, A.; Foster, G.; Klinker, H.; Larrey, D.; Nikitin, I.; Pol, S. van der; Puoti, M.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Wedemeyer, H.; Zeuzem, S.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often take multiple co-medications to treat adverse events related to HCV therapy, or to manage other co-morbidities. Drug-drug interactions associated with this polypharmacy are relatively new to the field of HCV pharmacotherapy. With the advent of the

  6. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, [No Value; Movig, KL; Moolenaar, M; Hekster, YA; Brouwers, [No Value; Heerdink, ER; Nolen, WA; Egberts, AC

    Objective: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as

  7. A patent extension proposal to end the underrepresentation of women in clinical trials and secure meaningful drug guidance for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Historically, women have been systematically excluded from or underrepresented in human clinical trials of new drugs. Due to fundamental physiological differences between women and men with regard to how drugs work in the human body, testing of drugs in men alone can both deny women the full benefit of a drug and cause them to suffer from increased adverse side effects. Attempts to reform drug development law and agency practices to resolve this problem have met with only partial success. Proposed herein is a patent term extension and for studies in women, modeled upon the pediatric patent term extension, but with several key differences intended to reduce the cost to the public and fund auxiliary programs to address off-patent medicines as well. Such an extension would incentivize this research and provide meaningful guidance to women and their physicians.

  8. Prevalence of Potential and Clinically Relevant Statin-Drug Interactions in Frail and Robust Older Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Michele; Hilmer, Sarah; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Reeve, Emily; Gnjidic, Danijela

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of older people are prescribed statins and are also exposed to polypharmacy, placing them at increased risk of statin-drug interactions. To describe the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions in older inpatients according to frailty status. A cross-sectional study of patients aged ≥65 years who were prescribed a statin and were admitted to a teaching hospital between 30 July and 10 October 2014 in Sydney, Australia, was conducted. Data on socio-demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Potential statin-drug interactions were defined if listed in the Australian Medicines Handbook and three international drug information sources: the British National Formulary, Drug Interaction Facts and Drug-Reax(®). Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were defined as interactions with the highest severity rating in at least two of the three international drug information sources. Frailty was assessed using the Reported Edmonton Frail Scale. A total of 180 participants were recruited (median age 78 years, interquartile range 14), 35.0% frail and 65.0% robust. Potential statin-drug interactions were identified in 10% of participants, 12.7% of frail participants and 8.5% of robust participants. Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were identified in 7.8% of participants, 9.5% of frail participants and 6.8% of robust participants. Depending on the drug information source used, the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions ranged between 14.4 and 35.6% and between 14.4 and 20.6%, respectively. In our study of frail and robust older inpatients taking statins, the overall prevalence of potential statin-drug interactions was low and varied significantly according to the drug information source used.

  9. Drug Repositioning: An Opportunity to Develop Novel Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Ballard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia, affecting approximately two thirds of the 35 million people worldwide with the condition. Despite this, effective treatments are lacking, and there are no drugs that elicit disease modifying effects to improve outcome. There is an urgent need to develop and evaluate more effective pharmacological treatments. Drug repositioning offers an exciting opportunity to repurpose existing licensed treatments for use in AD, with the benefit of providing a far more rapid route to the clinic than through novel drug discovery approaches. This review outlines the current most promising candidates for repositioning in AD, their supporting evidence and their progress through trials to date. Furthermore, it begins to explore the potential of new transcriptomic and microarray techniques to consider the future of drug repositioning as a viable approach to drug discovery.

  10. Nephron segment specific microRNA biomarkers of pre-clinical drug-induced renal toxicity: Opportunities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassirpour, Rounak, E-mail: Rounak.nassirpour@pfizer.com [Drug Safety, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 1 Burtt Rd, Andover, MA 01810 (United States); Ramaiah, Shashi K. [Drug Safety, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 610 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Whiteley, Laurence O. [Drug Safety, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 1 Burtt Rd, Andover, MA 01810 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity is a common drug development complication for pharmaceutical companies. Sensitive, specific, translatable and non-invasive biomarkers of renal toxicity are urgently needed to diagnose nephron segment specific injury. The currently available gold standard biomarkers for nephrotoxicity are not kidney-specific, lack sensitivity for early detection, and are not suitable for renal damage localization (glomerular vs tubulointerstitial injury). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly gaining momentum as promising biomarkers of various organ toxicities, including drug induced renal injury. This is mostly due to their stability in easily accessible biofluids, ease of developing nucleic acids detection compared to protein detection assays, as well as their interspecies translatability. Increasing concordance of miRNA findings by standardizing methodology most suitable for their detection and quantitation, as well as characterization of their expression pattern in a cell type specific manner, will accelerate progress toward validation of these miRNAs as biomarkers in pre-clinical, and clinical settings. This review aims to highlight the current pre-clinical findings surrounding miRNAs as biomarkers in two important segments of the nephron, the glomerulus and tubules. - Highlights: • miRNAs are promising biomarkers of drug-induced kidney injury. • Summarized pre-clinical miRNA biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity. • Described the strengths and challenges associated with miRNAs as biomarkers.

  11. Phase II drugs under clinical investigation for the treatment of chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Shilan; Didari, Tina; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorder that significantly impairs the quality of life in affected subjects. As almost half of the patients suffering from CC are not satisfied with currently available medicines, there is a need to develop new molecules with better effectiveness and tolerability. The authors include all experimental and clinical trials (up to Phase II) about new investigational drugs for the treatment of CC. The article identifies nine new agents: mitemcinal, TD-8954, YKP10811, itopride, RM-131, KWA-0711, elobixibat, velusetrag, and naronapride. All nine agents have shown prokinetic effects in different stages of the development. The mechanisms of new developing drugs include: the activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine type-4 (5-HT4), ghrelin and motilin receptors, antagonizing dopamine type-2 (D2) receptors, inhibition of ileal bile acid reabsorption and acetylcholine esterase, as well as water absorption from the GI tract. At this current point in time, new generations of 5-HT4 receptor agonists (velusetrag, noranopride and YKP10811) are hoped to progress, further in the future, due to better efficiency and safety. However, it is not possible to make a concise conclusion at this current time due to a lack of evidence. Further clinical trials with a longer duration and a larger sample size are warranted.

  12. Co-morbidity and clinically significant interactions between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs in elderly patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Emmi; Virta, Lauri J; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Keränen, Tapani

    2017-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the frequency of potential pharmacokinetic drug-to-drug interactions in elderly patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We also investigated co-morbid conditions associated with epilepsy. From the register of Kuopio University Hospital (KUH) we identified community-dwelling patients aged 65 or above with newly diagnosed epilepsy and in whom use of the first individual antiepileptic drug (AED) began in 2000-2013 (n=529). Furthermore, register data of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland were used for assessing potential interactions in a nationwide cohort of elderly subjects with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We extracted all patients aged 65 or above who had received special reimbursement for the cost of AEDs prescribed on account of epilepsy in 2012 where their first AED was recorded in 2011-2012 as monotherapy (n=1081). Clinically relevant drug interactions (of class C or D) at the time of starting of the first AED, as assessed via the SFINX-PHARAO database, were analysed. Hypertension (67%), dyslipidemia (45%), and ischaemic stroke (32%) were the most common co-morbid conditions in the hospital cohort of patients. In these patients, excessive polypharmacy (more than 10 concomitant drugs) was identified in 27% of cases. Of the patients started on carbamazepine, 52 subjects (32%) had one class-C or class-D drug interaction and 51 (31%) had two or more C- or D-class interactions. Only 2% of the subjects started on valproate exhibited a class-C interaction. None of the subjects using oxcarbazepine displayed class-C or class-D interactions. Patients with 3-5 (OR 4.22; p=0.05) or over six (OR 8.86; p=0.003) other drugs were more likely to have C- or D-class interaction. The most common drugs with potential interactions with carbamazepine were dihydropyridine calcium-blockers, statins, warfarin, and psychotropic drugs. Elderly patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy are at high risk of clinically relevant pharmacokinetic

  13. Development of a gastroretentive pulsatile drug delivery platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitinan, Sumalee; McConville, Jason T

    2012-04-01

    To develop a novel gastroretentive pulsatile drug delivery platform by combining the advantages of floating dosage forms for the stomach and pulsatile drug delivery systems. A gastric fluid impermeable capsule body was used as a vessel to contain one or more drug layer(s) as well as one or more lag-time controlling layer(s). A controlled amount of air was sealed in the innermost portion of the capsule body to reduce the overall density of the drug delivery platform, enabling gastric floatation. An optimal mass fill inside the gastric fluid impermeable capsule body enabled buoyancy in a vertical orientation to provide a constant surface area for controlled erosion of the lag-time controlling layer. The lag-time controlling layer consisted of a swellable polymer, which rapidly formed a gel to seal the mouth of capsule body and act as a barrier to gastric fluid ingress. By varying the composition of the lag-time controlling layer, it was possible to selectively program the onset of the pulsatile delivery of a drug. This new delivery platform offers a new method of delivery for a variety of suitable drugs targeted in chronopharmaceutical therapy. This strategy could ultimately improve drug efficacy and patient compliance, and reduce harmful side effects by scaling back doses of drug administered. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. The application of machine learning techniques in the clinical drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Huan-Yu; Jin, Wan-Lin; Yan, Cheng-Kai; Yang, Huan

    2018-05-25

    The development of a novel drug is an extremely complicated process that includes the target identification, design and manufacture, and proper therapy of the novel drug, as well as drug dose selection, drug efficacy evaluation, and adverse drug reaction control. Due to the limited resources, high costs, long duration, and low hit-to-lead ratio in the development of pharmacogenetics and computer technology, machine learning techniques have assisted novel drug development and have gradually received more attention by researchers. According to current research, machine learning techniques are widely applied in the process of the discovery of new drugs and novel drug targets, the decision surrounding proper therapy and drug dose, and the prediction of drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. In this article, we discussed the history, workflow, and advantages and disadvantages of machine learning techniques in the processes mentioned above. Although the advantages of machine learning techniques are fairly obvious, the application of machine learning techniques is currently limited. With further research, the application of machine techniques in drug development could be much more widespread and could potentially be one of the major methods used in drug development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Transforming RN education: clinical learning and clinical knowledge development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, P

    1993-04-01

    Transforming RN education has the potential for transforming clinical teaching and learning for all students. The returning RN student offers possibilities for clinical learning that the generic student does not have, but this should not cause us to limit the returning RN student to the generic level. Where possible innovative programs should be developed to move the RN student from baccalaureate level to the Master's level. As educators, we should take the opportunity to increase the numbers of nurses who are educationally prepared to move into advanced levels of practice. The returning RN student offers a rich human resource for the profession, and a rich resource for improving our clinical teaching as well as our practice.

  16. Development of a brazilian nanoencapsulated drug for schistosomiasis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Bastos da Fonseca

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that, according to the World Health Organization, constitutes a major public health problem associated with severe morbidity, mostly children in preschool age. The administration of drugs in children always constitutes a difficult task, especially when formulations are not developed specifically for pediatric use, when high doses of drug are required and the drug has a bitter taste, as in the case of praziquantel. Polymer nanoparticles are promising systems for development of encapsulated drugs with low water solubility and bitter taste, due to the good physical and chemical stability, adequate biocompatibility and simple manufacturing processes. Moreover, they can enhance the bioavailabili-ty and reduce variability of treatment among patients. Poly (methyl methacrylate doped with praziquantel was produced through a miniemulsion polymerization pro-cess to compose a pediatric pharmaceutical suspension. Nanoparticles were cha-racterized in terms of physico-chemical properties, toxicological properties and biological activity in mice, being concluded that obtained results were satisfactory. The results were encapsulation rate around 90%, absence of chemical interaction drug - polymer and the presence of biological activity. A collaborative approach was used for this development, involving national partnerships and independent funding mechanisms, a powerful pathway for development of drugs for neglected diseases.

  17. Developing clinical teaching capacities of midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Sharon; Sweet, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Competency Standards in Australia articulate that the midwife must be able to contribute to the professional development of themselves and others. Few undergraduate health professional curricula currently incorporate content for the development of specific knowledge and skills required for clinical teaching. This project aimed to understand and enhance midwifery students' preparedness to assume their future clinical teaching responsibilities. Design-based research was used to implement an educational intervention aimed at developing clinical teaching skills through a peer education session between 1st and 3rd year students. The perspectives of 30 undergraduate midwifery students about their preparedness for their teaching role and the intervention were obtained through 3 focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Three themes were identified encompassing the research aims and objectives; 'Co-creating a culture for learning', 'reciprocal teaching and learning' and 'developing clinical teaching capacities'. The findings indicate that the midwifery students had a holistic understanding of their responsibilities in clinical teaching in the workplace. They were able to identify ways in which their teaching capacities were being developed through their clinical experiences and the curriculum, both intended and hidden. Despite limited educational activities for clinical teaching, the midwifery students made explicit connections of the relational interdependence of workplace-based experiences and their learning. Students were clearly able to identify ways in which their own learning experiences and the culture in which this learning is embedded, assists them to develop clinical teaching skills, ready to support the next generation of midwifery students. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A reliable and valid index was developed to measure appropriate psychotropic drug use in dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, K.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Smalbrugge, M.; Nelissen-Vrancken, M.H.J.M.; Wetzels, R.B.; Smeets, C.H.W.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to develop an index derived from the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) items that is suited for clinical studies evaluating appropriateness of psychotropic drug use (PDU) for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in patients with dementia in nursing homes and to

  19. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26410809

  20. The Rise, Fall and Subsequent Triumph of Thalidomide: Lessons Learned in Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Waqas; Arfons, Lisa M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.

    2011-01-01

    Perhaps no other drug in modern medicine rivals the dramatic revitalization of thalidomide. Originally marketed as a sedative, thalidomide gained immense popularity worldwide among pregnant women because of its effective anti-emetic properties in morning sickness. Mounting evidence of human teratogenicity marked a dramatic fall from grace and led to widespread social, legal and economic ramifications. Despite its tragic past thalidomide emerged several decades later as a novel and highly effective agent in the treatment of various inflammatory and malignant diseases. In 2006 thalidomide completed its remarkable renaissance becoming the first new agent in over a decade to gain approval for the treatment of plasma cell myeloma. The catastrophic collapse yet subsequent revival of thalidomide provides important lessons in drug development. Never entirely abandoned by the medical community, thalidomide resurfaced as an important drug once the mechanisms of action were further studied and better understood. Ongoing research and development of related drugs such as lenalidomide now represent a class of irreplaceable drugs in hematological malignancies. Further, the tragedies associated with this agent stimulated the legislation which revamped the FDA regulatory process, expanded patient informed consent procedures and mandated more transparency from drug manufacturers. Finally, we review recent clinical trials summarizing selected medical indications for thalidomide with an emphasis on hematologic malignancies. Herein, we provide a historic perspective regarding the up-and-down development of thalidomide. Using PubMed databases we conducted searches using thalidomide and associated keywords highlighting pharmacology, mechanisms of action, and clinical uses. PMID:23556097

  1. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Herbal Supplements and Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goey, A.K.L.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer treatment the response to chemotherapy is often characterized by a wide interpatient variability. The increasing popularity of herbal supplements among cancer patients may contribute to this phenomenon. Since these supplements may affect drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes,

  2. 75 FR 14448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the following: (1) What FDA...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Society of Clinical Research Associates, Inc. (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``FDA...

  3. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ..., electronic record requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Research Associates (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial...

  4. Identification of drug-related problems by a clinical pharmacist in addition to computerized alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, R.J.; Jansen, M.; Duisenberg-van Essenberg, M.; C.C., Tijssen; Roukema, J.A.; van den Bemt, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Both clinical pharmacists and computerized physician order entry systems with clinical decision support (CPOE/CDSS) can reduce drug-related problems (DRPs). However, the contribution of a clinical pharmacist in addition to CPOE/CDSS has not been established in a prospective study.

  5. Identification of drug-related problems by a clinical pharmacist in addition to computerized alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Zaal (Rianne); M.M.P.M. Jansen (Mark M. P.); M. Duisenberg-Van Essenberg (Marjolijn); C.C. Tijssen (Cees); J.A. Roukema; P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground Both clinical pharmacists and computerized physician order entry systems with clinical decision support (CPOE/CDSS) can reduce drug-related problems (DRPs). However, the contribution of a clinical pharmacist in addition to CPOE/CDSS has not been established in a prospective

  6. Enrichment Strategies in Pediatric Drug Development: An Analysis of Trials Submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dionna J; Liu, Xiaomei I; Hua, Tianyi; Burnham, Janelle M; Schuck, Robert; Pacanowski, Michael; Yao, Lynne; McCune, Susan K; Burckart, Gilbert J; Zineh, Issam

    2017-12-08

    Clinical trial enrichment involves prospectively incorporating trial design elements that increase the probability of detecting a treatment effect. The use of enrichment strategies in pediatric drug development has not been systematically assessed. We analyzed the use of enrichment strategies in pediatric trials submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration from 2012-2016. In all, 112 efficacy studies associated with 76 drug development programs were assessed and their overall success rates were 78% and 75%, respectively. Eighty-eight trials (76.8%) employed at least one enrichment strategy; of these, 66.3% employed multiple enrichment strategies. The highest trial success rates were achieved when all three enrichment strategies (practical, predictive, and prognostic) were used together within a single trial (87.5%), while the lowest success rate was observed when no enrichment strategy was used (65.4%). The use of enrichment strategies in pediatric trials was found to be associated with trial and program success in our analysis. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. COMPUTER DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF DRUG DEPENDENCE THROUGH ARTIFICIAL NEURONAL NETWORK: PEDAGOGICAL AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. SANTOS

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available To develop and to evaluate the efficiency of a software able to simulate a virtual patient at different stages of addition was the main goal and challenge of this work. We developed the software in Borland™ Delphi  5®  programming language. Techniques of artificial intelligence, neuronal networks and expert systems, were responsible for modeling the neurobiological structures and mechanisms of the interaction with the drugs used. Dynamical simulation and  hypermedia were designed to increase the software’s interactivity which was able to show graphical information from virtual instrumentation and from realistic functional magnetic resonance imaging display. Early, the program was designed to be used by undergraduate students to improve their neurophysiologic learn, based not only in an interaction of membrane receptors with drugs, but in such a large behavioral simulation. The experimental manipulation of the software was accomplished by: i creating a virtual patient from a normal mood to a behavioral addiction, increasing gradatively: alcohol, opiate or cocaine doses. ii designing an approach to treat the patient, to get total or partial remission of behavioral disorder by combining psychopharmacology and psychotherapy. Integration of dynamic simulation with hypermedia and artificial intelligence has been able to point out behavioral details as tolerance, sensitization and level of addiction to drugs of abuse and so on, turned into a potentially useful tool in the development of teaching activities on several ways, such as education as well clinical skills, in which it could assist patients, families and health care to improve and test their knowledge and skills about different faces supported by drugs dependency. Those features are currently under investigation.

  8. Developments in statistical evaluation of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Oud, Johan; Ghidey, Wendimagegn

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various ways of approaching and interpreting the data produced by clinical trial studies, with a special emphasis on the essential role that biostatistics plays in clinical trials. Over the past few decades the role of statistics in the evaluation and interpretation of clinical data has become of paramount importance. As a result the standards of clinical study design, conduct and interpretation have undergone substantial improvement. The book includes 18 carefully reviewed chapters on recent developments in clinical trials and their statistical evaluation, with each chapter providing one or more examples involving typical data sets, enabling readers to apply the proposed procedures. The chapters employ a uniform style to enhance comparability between the approaches.

  9. Scientific and Regulatory Considerations in Solid Oral Modified Release Drug Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Sander, Sanna; Duan, John; Rosencrance, Susan; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Yu, Lawrence; Seo, Paul; Rege, Bhagwant

    2016-11-01

    This review presents scientific and regulatory considerations for the development of solid oral modified release (MR) drug products. It includes a rationale for patient-focused development based on Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles. Product and process understanding of MR products includes identification and risk-based evaluation of critical material attributes (CMAs), critical process parameters (CPPs), and their impact on critical quality attributes (CQAs) that affect the clinical performance. The use of various biopharmaceutics tools that link the CQAs to a predictable and reproducible clinical performance for patient benefit is emphasized. Product and process understanding lead to a more comprehensive control strategy that can maintain product quality through the shelf life and the lifecycle of the drug product. The overall goal is to develop MR products that consistently meet the clinical objectives while mitigating the risks to patients by reducing the probability and increasing the detectability of CQA failures.

  10. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor as a Target for Antidepressant Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah S. Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important new area of antidepressant drug development involves targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. This receptor, which is distributed widely in regions of the brain associated with depression, is also implicated in other important processes that are relevant to depression, such as stress and inflammation. The two classes of drugs that target nAChRs can be broadly divided into mecamylamine- and cytisine-based compounds. These drugs probably exert their effects via antagonism at α4β2 nAChRs, and strong preclinical data support the antidepressant efficacy of both classes when used in conjunction with other primary antidepressants (e.g., monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Although clinical data remain limited, preliminary results in this area constitute a compelling argument for further evaluation of the nAChR as a target for future antidepressant drug development.

  11. Antipsychotic drug treatment for patients with schizophrenia: theoretical background, clinical considerations and patients preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2009-01-01

      The cornerstone in treatment of psychosis is antipsychotic drugs. Treatment options have increased over the years; newer antipsychotic drugs with a proposed efficacy regarding negative and cognitive symptoms, but also a shift in side-effects from neurological side-effects to metabolic side......-effects have arisen as the new challenge. The basis of successful pharmacological treatment is a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of action, the desired effects and side-effects of antipsychotic drugs, a good relationship with the patient and a thorough monitoring of the patient before and during...... treatment. The clinically relevant aspects of antipsychotic drug treatment are reviewed; mechanism of antipsychotic drug action, clinical considerations in treatment, switching antipsychotic drugs, polypharmacy, safety and patient preference.  ...

  12. Accessing external innovation in drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufféry, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    A decline in the productivity of the pharmaceutical industry research and development (R&D) pipeline has highlighted the need to reconsider the classical strategies of drug discovery and development, which are based on internal resources, and to identify new means to improve the drug discovery process. Accepting that the combination of internal and external ideas can improve innovation, ways to access external innovation, that is, opening projects to external contributions, have recently been sought. In this review, the authors look at a number of external innovation opportunities. These include increased interactions with academia via academic centers of excellence/innovation centers, better communication on projects using crowdsourcing or social media and new models centered on external providers such as built-to-buy startups or virtual pharmaceutical companies. The buzz for accessing external innovation relies on the pharmaceutical industry's major challenge to improve R&D productivity, a conjuncture favorable to increase interactions with academia and new business models supporting access to external innovation. So far, access to external innovation has mostly been considered during early stages of drug development, and there is room for enhancement. First outcomes suggest that external innovation should become part of drug development in the long term. However, the balance between internal and external developments in drug discovery can vary largely depending on the company strategies.

  13. Challenges of developing and conducting clinical trials in rare disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Lucas; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Temple, Robert

    2018-04-01

    Rare disease drug development is a rapidly expanding field. Clinical researchers in rare diseases face many challenges when conducting trials in small populations. Disease natural history is often poorly understood and the ability to detect clinically meaningful outcomes requires understanding of their rate of occurrence and variability, both of which contribute to difficulties in powering a study. Standard trial designs are not optimized to obtain adequate safety and efficacy data from small numbers of patients, so alternative designs (enrichment, crossover, adaptive, N-of 1) need to be considered. The affected patients can be hard to identify, especially early in the course of their disease, are generally geographically dispersed, and are often children. Trials are frequently conducted on an international scale and may be subject to complex or multiple regulatory agency oversights and may be affected by local customs, cultures, and practices. A basic understanding of the FDA programs supporting development of drugs for rare diseases is provided by this review and the role of early consultation with the FDA is emphasized. Of recent FDA New Molecular Entities (NME) approvals, 41% (17 approvals) in 2014, 47% (21 approvals) in 2015, and 41% (9 approvals) in 2016 were for rare disease indications. Through effective interactions and collaborations with physicians, institutions, and patient groups, sponsors have been successful in bringing new treatments to market for individuals affected by rare diseases. Challenges to drug development have been overcome through the focused efforts of patients/families, non-profit patient advocacy groups, drug developers, and regulatory authorities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Actors of Columbian drug trade : development and transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Smolíková

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to portray the main shifts which have been taking place in Colombian drug scene since the 70’s up to the present especially in relation to actors of this business and form of their activity. At first the development of Colombian drug trade till the 80’s when two big cartels centered in Medellín and Cali arose will be briefly outlined. These cartels were able to control a great part of domestic drug trade and due to their enormous power represented serious threat to Colombian state. Thus the cartels declared open warfare with the state in the 80’s. After the cartels’ elimination in the middle of 90’s new actors represented by small drug organizations arose in Colombian drug scene. These small groups were dependent upon cooperation with foreign partners, especially with Mexican cartels. Ever more important role in drug business is played by Colombian left-wing guerilla groups which will be described in the next part of the article. The problem of right-wing paramilitary groups and their participation in Colombian drug trade will be mentioned as well.

  15. Nano-formulations of drugs: Recent developments, impact and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandam, Jaison; Chan, Yen San; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Nano-formulations of medicinal drugs have attracted the interest of many researchers for drug delivery applications. These nano-formulations enhance the properties of conventional drugs and are specific to the targeted delivery site. Dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-emulsions and micelles are some of the nano-formulations that are gaining prominence in pharmaceutical industry for enhanced drug formulation. Wide varieties of synthesis methods are available for the preparation of nano-formulations to deliver drugs in biological system. The choice of synthesis methods depend on the size and shape of particulate formulation, biochemical properties of drug, and the targeted site. This article discusses recent developments in nano-formulation and the progressive impact on pharmaceutical research and industries. Additionally, process challenges relating to consistent generation of nano-formulations for drug delivery are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Epstein

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly ‘blue skies’ R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  17. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Epstein

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly ‘blue skies’ R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  18. Orphan drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojša; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of ...

  19. Leveling the playing field: bringing development of biomarkers and molecular diagnostics up to the standards for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poste, George; Carbone, David P; Parkinson, David R; Verweij, Jaap; Hewitt, Stephen M; Jessup, J Milburn

    2012-03-15

    Molecular diagnostics are becoming increasingly important in clinical research to stratify or identify molecularly profiled patient cohorts for targeted therapies, to modify the dose of a therapeutic, and to assess early response to therapy or monitor patients. Molecular diagnostics can also be used to identify the pharmacogenetic risk of adverse drug reactions. The articles in this CCR Focus section on molecular diagnosis describe the development and use of markers to guide medical decisions regarding cancer patients. They define sources of preanalytic variability that need to be minimized, as well as the regulatory and financial challenges involved in developing diagnostics and integrating them into clinical practice. They also outline a National Cancer Institute program to assist diagnostic development. Molecular diagnostic clinical tests require rigor in their development and clinical validation, with sensitivity, specificity, and validity comparable to those required for the development of therapeutics. These diagnostics must be offered at a realistic cost that reflects both their clinical value and the costs associated with their development. When genome-sequencing technologies move into the clinic, they must be integrated with and traceable to current technology because they may identify more efficient and accurate approaches to drug development. In addition, regulators may define progressive drug approval for companion diagnostics that requires further evidence regarding efficacy and safety before full approval can be achieved. One way to accomplish this is to emphasize phase IV postmarketing, hypothesis-driven clinical trials with biological characterization that would permit an accurate definition of the association of low-prevalence gene alterations with toxicity or response in large cohorts.

  20. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  1. 76 FR 12742 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2008-D-0457] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices Indicated... other electrical continence devices; protective garment for incontinence; surgical mesh; electrosurgical...

  2. Developing and promoting an intranet site for a drug information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerison, Emily C; Graham, Angie S

    2008-04-01

    The development and promotion of a drug information service (DIS) intranet site are described. Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC) is an acute and tertiary care facility with 613 licensed inpatient beds and 48 outpatient clinics. A DIS intranet site was developed to allow better accessibility to pharmacy forms and products (e.g., drug shortage list, reference guides) and to reduce repetitive requests to the DIS. The goal was to continue to provide information to SHC health care providers but allow the drug information specialist to focus on answering clinical questions. The intranet site was completed over a four-month period. The intranet site was divided into seven webpages: DIS overview, pharmacy and therapeutics, frequently asked questions, quick drug reference guide, ask the pharmacist, drug information resources, and referral center. The preparation for and implementation of the promotional phase took approximately two months. Promotional strategies included the creation and dissemination of brochures and stickers. The intranet site went live on January 1, 2007, and the advertising campaign began one month later. The utility of the site was measured for five months by tracking the number of visits to the site, the number of visits to each webpage, and the number of downloaded files. Request volume, caller affiliation, and question types received by the DIS call center were also recorded. Establishing a DIS intranet site required a considerable time investment and a willingness to work with existing infrastructures, such as the marketing and communications department and Web marketing staff.

  3. Drug-Induced QTc Interval Prolongation: A Multicenter Study to Detect Drugs and Clinical Factors Involved in Every Day Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Guillermo A; Alvarez, Paulino A; Ponte, Marcelo L; Belloso, Waldo H; Bagnes, Claudia; Sparanochia, Cecilia; Gonzalez, Claudio D; Villa Etchegoyen, M Cecilia; Diez, Roberto A; Di Girolamo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The actual prevalence of drug induced QTc prolongation in clinical practice is unknown. Our objective was to determine the occurrence and characteristics of drug-induced QT prolongation in several common clinical practices. Additionally, a subgroup of patients treated with dextropropoxyphene of particular interest for the regulatory authority was analysed. Medical history and comorbidities predisposing to QT interval prolongation were registered for 1270 patient requiring medical assistance that involved drug administration. Three ionograms and ECGs were performed: baseline, intra- and after treatment; QT interval was corrected with Bazzet formula. Among patients, 9.9% presented QTc >450/470 ms, 3% QTc > 500 ms, 12.7% ΔQTc >30 ms and 5.2% ΔQTc >60 ms. QTc prolongation associated with congestive heart failure, ischemic cardiopathy, diabetes, renal failure, arrhythmias, hypothyroidism, and bradycardia. At univariate analysis, clarithromycin, haloperidol, tramadol, amiodarone, glyceryl trinitrate, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, amoxicillin + sulbactam, ampicillin + sulbactam, fentanyl, piperacillin + tazobactam, and diazepam prolonged QTc. Prolongation remained significantly associated with furosemide, clarithromycin, glyceryl trinitrate and betalactamase inhibitors after multivariate analysis. QT interval prolongation in everyday practice is frequent, in association to clinical factors and drugs that can be easily identified for monitoring and prevention strategies.

  4. Retrospective use of PBPK modelling to understand a clinical drug-drug interaction between dextromethorphan and GSK1034702.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael J; Bloomer, Jackie; Dear, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    1. In a clinical trial, a strong drug-drug interaction (DDI) was observed between dextromethorphan (DM, the object or victim drug) and GSK1034702 (the precipitant or perpetrator drug), following single and repeat doses. This study determined the inhibition parameters of GSK1034702 in vitro and applied PBPK modelling approaches to simulate the clinical observations and provide mechanistic hypotheses to understand the DDI. 2. In vitro assays were conducted to determine the inhibition parameters of human CYP2D6 by GSK1034702. PBPK models were populated with the in vitro parameters and DDI simulations conducted and compared to the observed data from a clinical study with DM and GSK1034702. 3. GSK1034702 was a potent direct and metabolism-dependent inhibitor of human CYP2D6, with inhibition parameters of: IC 50  =   1.6 μM, K inact  = 3.7 h -1 and K I  = 0.8 μM. Incorporating these data into PBPK models predicted a DDI after repeat, but not single, 5 mg doses of GSK1034702. 4. The DDI observed with repeat administration of GSK1034702 (5 mg) can be attributed to metabolism-dependent inhibition of CYP2D6. Further, in vitro data were generated and several potential mechanisms proposed to explain the interaction observed following a single dose of GSK1034702.

  5. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Materials and methods Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. Results The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. Discussion The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. Conclusions The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives. PMID:23703825

  6. Gender bias in clinical research, pharmaceutical marketing, and the prescription of drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Chilet-Rosell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This thesis is part of the studies of gender bias in health which together with the paradigm of evidence-based medicine shares the empirical assumption that there are inaccuracies in medical practice, in addition to a lack of rigour and transparency. It worked with the distinction between the concepts of sex and gender and between the concepts of sex-related differences and gender inequalities, in terms of applying a gender perspective in the study design and the subsequent analysis. This PhD review presents the research process conducted in Spain, which can provide an example for future research. Study I described a review of 58 clinical trials (CTs of etoricoxib to assess its compliance with the Recommendations of Evaluation of Gender Differences in the Clinical Evaluation of Drugs. In Study II, key informants from professions related to different areas in drug development and pharmacovigilance held a working meeting to reach a consensus document on recommendations for the study and evaluation of gender differences in CTs in Spain. In Study III, the websites of the eight best-selling hormone replacement therapy drugs in Spain on Google first page of results were analysed. In Study IV, a logistic regression analysis was performed to compare analgesic prescription by sex in regions with a higher or lower Gender Development Index (GDI than the Spanish average. Gender biases identified in this thesis limited the legitimacy of medicine, which is not based on the best possible evidence. The results also demonstrate the existence of inequalities between men and women that are not due merely to biological differences, but are gender inequalities stemming from the social differences that exist between both sexes.

  7. Gender bias in clinical research, pharmaceutical marketing, and the prescription of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilet-Rosell, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is part of the studies of gender bias in health which together with the paradigm of evidence-based medicine shares the empirical assumption that there are inaccuracies in medical practice, in addition to a lack of rigour and transparency. It worked with the distinction between the concepts of sex and gender and between the concepts of sex-related differences and gender inequalities, in terms of applying a gender perspective in the study design and the subsequent analysis. This PhD review presents the research process conducted in Spain, which can provide an example for future research. Study I described a review of 58 clinical trials (CTs) of etoricoxib to assess its compliance with the Recommendations of Evaluation of Gender Differences in the Clinical Evaluation of Drugs. In Study II, key informants from professions related to different areas in drug development and pharmacovigilance held a working meeting to reach a consensus document on recommendations for the study and evaluation of gender differences in CTs in Spain. In Study III, the websites of the eight best-selling hormone replacement therapy drugs in Spain on Google first page of results were analysed. In Study IV, a logistic regression analysis was performed to compare analgesic prescription by sex in regions with a higher or lower Gender Development Index (GDI) than the Spanish average. Gender biases identified in this thesis limited the legitimacy of medicine, which is not based on the best possible evidence. The results also demonstrate the existence of inequalities between men and women that are not due merely to biological differences, but are gender inequalities stemming from the social differences that exist between both sexes.

  8. Innovative approaches to clinical development and trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Orloff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical innovation is increasingly risky, costly and at times inefficient, which has led to a decline in industry productivity. Despite the increased investment in R&D by the industry, the number of new molecular entities achieving marketing authorization is not increasing. Novel approaches to clinical development and trial design could have a key role in overcoming some of these challenges by improving efficiency and reducing attrition rates. The effectiveness of clinical development can be improved by adopting a more integrated model that increases flexibility and maximizes the use of accumulated knowledge. Central to this model of drug development are novel tools, including modelling and simulation, Bayesian methodologies, and adaptive designs, such as seamless adaptive designs and sample-size re-estimation methods. Applications of these methodologies to early- and late-stage drug development are described with some specific examples, along with advantages, challenges, and barriers to implementation. Because they are so flexible, these new trial designs require significant statistical analyses, simulations and logistical considerations to verify their operating characteristics, and therefore tend to require more time for the planning and protocol development phase. Greater awareness of the distinct advantages of innovative designs by regulators and sponsors are crucial to increasing the adoption of these modern tools.

  9. Discovery and Early Clinical Development of 2-{6-[2-(3,5-Dichloro-4-pyridyl)acetyl]-2,3-dimethoxyphenoxy}-N-propylacetamide (LEO 29102), a Soft-Drug Inhibitor of Phosphodiesterase 4 for Topical Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felding, Jakob; D. Sørensen, Morten; Poulsen, Tina D.

    2014-01-01

    mediated side effects. Here we describe our approach to circumvent this issue by applying a soft-drug concept in the design of a topically acting PDE4 inhibitor for treatment of dermatological diseases. We used a fast follower approach, starting from piclamilast. In particular, simultaneous introduction...

  10. [Alternatives to the drug research and development model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Germán

    2015-03-01

    One-third of the global population lacks access to medications; the situation is worse in poor countries, where up to 50% of the population lacks access. The failure of current incentive systems based in intellectual property to offer the necessary pharmaceutical products, especially in the global south, is a call to action. Problems related to drug access cannot be solved solely through improvements or modifications in the existing incentive models. The intellectual property system model does not offer sufficient innovation for developing countries; new mechanisms that effectively promote innovation and drug access simultaneously are needed. A binding international agreement on research and development, negotiated under the auspices of the World Health Organization, could provide an adequate framework for guaranteeing priority-setting, coordination, and sustainable financing of drugs at reasonable prices for developing countries.

  11. Current developments in clinical multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    Two-photon microscopy has been introduced in 1990 [1]. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched by the JenLab company with the tomograph DermaInspectTM. In 2010, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel mobile multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. The multiphoton excitation of fluorescent biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin as well as the second harmonic generation of collagen is induced by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid highquality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system, and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research, and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the multiphoton tomographs in Europe, Asia, and Australia.

  12. The patient's safety and access to experimental drugs after the termination of clinical trials: regulations and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo Eccard; Amato, Angélica Amorim; Sousa, Thiago do Rego; de Carvalho, Marta Rodrigues; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi

    2018-05-12

    Participants' rights and safety must be guaranteed not only while a clinical trial is being conducted but also when a clinical trial finishes. The criteria for post-trial access to experimental drugs, however, are unclear in various countries. The objectives of this study were (i) to ascertain if there were regulations or guidelines related to patients' access to drugs after the end of clinical trials in the countries selected in the study and (ii) to analyze trends in post-trial access in countries classified by their level of economic development. This study is a retrospective review. The data are from the records of clinical trials from 2014 registered in the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) database. Among the countries selected, provision of drugs post-trial is mandatory only in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Finland, and Peru. The plans for post-trial access tend to be more present in low- and middle-income and upper middle-income countries, in comparison with high-income countries. Studies involving vulnerable populations are 2.53 times more likely to have plans for post-trial access than studies which do not. The guaranteeing of post-trial access remains mandatory in few countries. Considering that individuals seen as vulnerable have been included in clinical trials without plans for post-trial access, stakeholders must discuss the need to develop regulations mandating the guaranteeing of post-trial access in specified situations.

  13. Comparison of three commercial knowledge bases for detection of drug-drug interactions in clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kin Wah; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Cunningham, Jean; Higby-Baker, Stefanie; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    To compare 3 commercial knowledge bases (KBs) used for detection and avoidance of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in clinical practice. Drugs in the DDI tables from First DataBank (FDB), Micromedex, and Multum were mapped to RxNorm. The KBs were compared at the clinical drug, ingredient, and DDI rule levels. The KBs were evaluated against a reference list of highly significant DDIs from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). The KBs and the ONC list were applied to a prescription data set to simulate their use in clinical decision support. The KBs contained 1.6 million (FDB), 4.5 million (Micromedex), and 4.8 million (Multum) clinical drug pairs. Altogether, there were 8.6 million unique pairs, of which 79% were found only in 1 KB and 5% in all 3 KBs. However, there was generally more agreement than disagreement in the severity rankings, especially in the contraindicated category. The KBs covered 99.8-99.9% of the alerts of the ONC list and would have generated 25 (FDB), 145 (Micromedex), and 84 (Multum) alerts per 1000 prescriptions. The commercial KBs differ considerably in size and quantity of alerts generated. There is less variability in severity ranking of DDIs than suggested by previous studies. All KBs provide very good coverage of the ONC list. More work is needed to standardize the editorial policies and evidence for inclusion of DDIs to reduce variation among knowledge sources and improve relevance. Some DDIs considered contraindicated in all 3 KBs might be possible candidates to add to the ONC list. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  14. Developing new drugs for ovarian cancer: a challenging task in a changing reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, R M; Carter, S K

    1984-01-01

    Recent therapeutic and technological advances have profoundly modified the parameters of new drug testing in ovarian cancer. The potential of compounds tested today in this disease therefore needs to be assessed according to this changing reality. Previous treatment with or without cisplatin is the criterion we have applied in our review of the single agent clinical data. Results obtained with older compounds have also been, when possible, reassessed in order to facilitate a comparative interpretation of recent trials. A brief overview of the most recently developed laboratory screening models has been conducted in order to stress their close relationship and their crucial role in future new drug development.

  15. Drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of alginate pellets prepared by melt technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anirbandeep; Harjoh, Nurulaini; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Dan, Shubhasis; Wong, Tin Wui

    2016-01-01

    Alginate pellets prepared by the aqueous agglomeration technique experience fast drug dissolution due to the porous pre-formed calcium alginate microstructure. This study investigated in vitro drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of intestinal-specific calcium acetate-alginate pellets against calcium-free and calcium carbonate-alginate pellets. Alginate pellets were prepared by solvent-free melt pelletization instead of aqueous agglomeration technique using chlorpheniramine maleate as model drug. A fast in situ calcium acetate dissolution in pellets resulted in rapid pellet breakup, soluble Ca(2+) crosslinking of alginate fragments and drug dissolution retardation at pH 1.2, which were not found in other pellet types. The preclinical drug absorption rate was lower with calcium acetate loaded than calcium-free alginate pellets. In human subjects, however, the extent and the rate of drug absorption were higher from calcium acetate-loaded pellets than calcium-free alginate pellets. The fine, dispersible and weakly gastric mucoadhesive calcium alginate pellets underwent fast human gastrointestinal transit. They released the drug at a greater rate than calcium-free pellets in the intestine, thereby promoting drug bioavailability. Calcium acetate was required as a disintegrant more than as a crosslinking agent clinically to promote pellet fragmentation, fast gastrointestinal transit and drug release in intestinal medium, and intestinal-specific drug bioavailability.

  16. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  17. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson David R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI.

  18. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution.

  19. Current status and future prospects of the development of clinical Pharmacy in China: A SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zhao, Qingwei; Zhang, Xiangyi; Yang, Hongyu; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Xingguo

    2016-03-01

    In many industrialized countries, clinical pharmacy has developed into a separate discipline and become a vital part of inpatient care in hospitals. However, as compared to many established branches of medicine, clinical pharmacy is still in its infancy, with much room for growth, improvement, and recognition by both the medical community and patients. In this study, a widely-recognized development strategy analysis tool, Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat (SWOT), was used to systematically address several key issues to the development of clinical pharmacy in China. This analysis aims to provide feasible recommendations for the development of clinical pharmacy in China by identifying current problems and growth opportunities. Full development of clinical pharmacy as a mature clinical discipline will help promote the rational use of drugs by both clinicians and patients and lead to enhanced drug efficacy and safety.

  20. Quantitative PET Imaging in Drug Development: Estimation of Target Occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganawa, Mika; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Rossano, Samantha; Carson, Richard E

    2017-12-11

    Positron emission tomography, an imaging tool using radiolabeled tracers in humans and preclinical species, has been widely used in recent years in drug development, particularly in the central nervous system. One important goal of PET in drug development is assessing the occupancy of various molecular targets (e.g., receptors, transporters, enzymes) by exogenous drugs. The current linear mathematical approaches used to determine occupancy using PET imaging experiments are presented. These algorithms use results from multiple regions with different target content in two scans, a baseline (pre-drug) scan and a post-drug scan. New mathematical estimation approaches to determine target occupancy, using maximum likelihood, are presented. A major challenge in these methods is the proper definition of the covariance matrix of the regional binding measures, accounting for different variance of the individual regional measures and their nonzero covariance, factors that have been ignored by conventional methods. The novel methods are compared to standard methods using simulation and real human occupancy data. The simulation data showed the expected reduction in variance and bias using the proper maximum likelihood methods, when the assumptions of the estimation method matched those in simulation. Between-method differences for data from human occupancy studies were less obvious, in part due to small dataset sizes. These maximum likelihood methods form the basis for development of improved PET covariance models, in order to minimize bias and variance in PET occupancy studies.

  1. Potential drug development candidates for human soil-transmitted helminthiases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Olliaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Few drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH; the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole are the only drugs being used for preventive chemotherapy as they can be given in one single dose with no weight adjustment. While generally safe and effective in reducing intensity of infection, they are contra-indicated in first-trimester pregnancy and have suboptimal efficacy against Trichuris trichiura. In addition, drug resistance is a threat. It is therefore important to find alternatives.We searched the literature and the animal health marketed products and pipeline for potential drug development candidates. Recently registered veterinary products offer advantages in that they have undergone extensive and rigorous animal testing, thus reducing the risk, cost and time to approval for human trials. For selected compounds, we retrieved and summarised publicly available information (through US Freedom of Information (FoI statements, European Public Assessment Reports (EPAR and published literature. Concomitantly, we developed a target product profile (TPP against which the products were compared.The paper summarizes the general findings including various classes of compounds, and more specific information on two veterinary anthelmintics (monepantel, emodepside and nitazoxanide, an antiprotozoal drug, compiled from the EMA EPAR and FDA registration files.Few of the compounds already approved for use in human or animal medicine qualify for development track decision. Fast-tracking to approval for human studies may be possible for veterinary compounds like emodepside and monepantel, but additional information remains to be acquired before an informed decision can be made.

  2. Recent developments in drug eluting devices with tailored interfacial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Rexach, Eva; Meaurio, Emilio; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2017-11-01

    Drug eluting devices have greatly evolved during past years to become fundamental products of great marketing importance in the biomedical field. There is currently a large diversity of highly specialized devices for specific applications, making the development of these devices an exciting field of research. The replacement of the former bare metal devices by devices loaded with drugs allowed the sustained and controlled release of drugs, to achieve the desired local therapeutic concentration of drug. The newer devices have been "engineered" with surfaces containing micro- and nanoscale features in a well-controlled manner, that have shown to significantly affect cellular and subcellular function of various biological systems. For example, the topography can be structured to form an antifouling surface mimicking the defense mechanisms found in nature, like the skin of the shark. In the case of bone implants, well-controlled nanostructured interfaces can promote osteoblast differentiation and matrix production, and enhance short-term and long-term osteointegration. In any case, the goal of current research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, and rapid healing. This article reviews recent trends in the development of drug eluting devices, as well as recent developments on the micro/nanotechnology scales, and their future challenges. For this purpose medical devices have been divided according to the different systems of the body they are focused to: orthopedic devices, breathing stents, gastrointestinal and urinary systems, devices for cardiovascular diseases, neuronal implants, and wound dressings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Site-specific antibody-drug conjugates: the nexus of bioorthogonal chemistry, protein engineering, and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Paresh; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-02-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) combine the specificity of antibodies with the potency of small molecules to create targeted drugs. Despite the simplicity of this concept, generation of clinically successful ADCs has been very difficult. Over the past several decades, scientists have learned a great deal about the constraints on antibodies, linkers, and drugs as they relate to successful construction of ADCs. Once these components are in hand, most ADCs are prepared by nonspecific modification of antibody lysine or cysteine residues with drug-linker reagents, which results in heterogeneous product mixtures that cannot be further purified. With advances in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering, there is growing interest in producing ADCs by site-specific conjugation to the antibody, yielding more homogeneous products that have demonstrated benefits over their heterogeneous counterparts in vivo. Here, we chronicle the development of a multitude of site-specific conjugation strategies for assembly of ADCs and provide a comprehensive account of key advances and their roots in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering.

  4. Development of the siriraj clinical asthma score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichyanond, Pakit; Veskitkul, Jittima; Rienmanee, Nuanphong; Pacharn, Punchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong

    2013-09-01

    Acute asthmatic attack in children commonly occurs despite the introduction of effective controllers such as inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene modifiers. Treatment of acute asthmatic attack requires proper evaluation of attack severity and appropriate selection of medical therapy. In children, measurement of lung function is difficult during acute attack and thus clinical asthma scoring may aid physician in making further decision regarding treatment and admission. We enrolled 70 children with acute asthmatic attack with age range from 1 to 12 years (mean ± SD = 51.5 ± 31.8 months) into the study. Twelve selected asthma severity items were assessed by 2 independent observers prior to administration of salbutamol nebulization (up to 3 doses at 20 minutes interval). Decision for further therapy and admission was made by emergency department physician. Three different scoring systems were constructed from items with best validity. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of these scores were assessed. Inter-rater reliability was assessed for each score. Review of previous scoring systems was also conducted and reported. Three severity items had poor validity, i.e., cyanosis, depressed cerebral function, and I:E ratio (p > 0.05). Three items had poor inter-rater reliability, i.e., breath sound quality, air entry, and I:E ratio. These items were omitted and three new clinical scores were constructed from the remaining items. Clinical scoring system comprised retractions, dyspnea, O2 saturation, respiratory rate and wheezing (rangeof score 0-10) gave the best accuracy and inter-rater variability and were chosen for clinical use-Siriraj Clinical Asthma Score (SCAS). A Clinical Asthma Score that is simple, relatively easy to administer and with good validity and variability is essential for treatment of acute asthma in children. Several good candidate scores have been introduced in the past. We described the development of the Siriraj Clinical Asthma Score (SCAS) in

  5. Application of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development at Pfizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Dickins, Maurice; Youdim, Kuresh; Gosset, James R; Attkins, Neil J; Hay, Tanya L; Gurrell, Ian K; Logan, Y Raj; Bungay, Peter J; Jones, Barry C; Gardner, Iain B

    2012-01-01

    Early prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and drug-drug interactions (DDI) in drug discovery and development allows for more informed decision making. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling can be used to answer a number of questions throughout the process of drug discovery and development and is thus becoming a very popular tool. PBPK models provide the opportunity to integrate key input parameters from different sources to not only estimate PK parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. Using examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilized through the stages of drug discovery and development to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and to increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however, some limitations need to be addressed to realize its application and utility more broadly.

  6. Drugs and personality: comparison of drug users, nonusers, and other clinical groups on the 16PF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotts, J V; Shontz, F C

    1991-10-01

    This article reviews published 16PF research on drug users. It also compares the 16PF scores of a new sample of nonusers with scores of matched groups of heavy, chronic users of cocaine, amphetamine, opiates, and barbiturates/sedative hypnotics, as well as combined groups of stimulant users, depressant users, and a combined group of users of all substances. No significant differences were found among drug user groups, but the profile of the nonuser group was distinctive. K-Means Cluster Analyses, as well as Cattell's Similarity and Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficients, were used to compare profiles of these new samples with the 19 groups described in an earlier meta-analysis of published 16PF studies. Data from the new samples did not cluster with data from other published research, although certain specific similarities appeared in more detailed correlational analyses. Methodological problems are discussed, and it is recommended that in future studies drug user groups be more carefully selected and defined, sample descriptions be more thorough and complete, complete profile information be routinely provided, and efforts be made to explore the utility of the Cattell CAQ in studies of drug users/misusers.

  7. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in the development of drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Nuclear medicine imaging techniques have great potential in the study of the behaviour of drug formulations and drug delivery systems in human subjects. No other technique can locate so precisely the site of disintegration of a tablet in the Gl tract, the depth of penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung, or the residence time of a drug on the cornea. By using the gamma camera to image the in vivo distribution of pharmaceutical formulations radio labelled with a suitable gamma emitting radionuclide, images may be used to quantify the biodistribution, release and kinetics of drug formulations and delivery from novel carrier systems and devices. Radionuclide tracer techniques allow correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery. The strength of the technique lies in the quantitative nature of radionuclide images. Example will be shown of studies which examine the rate of transit of orally-administered formulations through the GI tract, as well as describing the development of devices for specific targeting of drugs to the colon. Data will also demonstrate the effectiveness of devices such as spacers in pulmonary drug delivery, in both normal volunteers, and in asthmatic subjects. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility but, may also be used in submission to Regulatory Authorities in product registration dossiers

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF DOMESTIC INFUSION DRUGS BASED ON PARACETAMOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almakaeva L.G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The intravenous form of paracetamol compared with oral more reliably supports effective drug concentration in blood plasma that promotes a higher therapeutic effect. Recent studies have confirmed that the use of the intravenous form of paracetamol to deal with postoperative pain multimodal analgesia modes results in reducing the frequency and quantity of opioids administered , and, as a consequence, its associated side effects. The drug Paracetamol , infusion solution 10 mg / ml to 100 ml glass bottles is a drug - generic . His qualitative and quantitative composition is developed from the study of literature data about the drug - similar to " Perfalhan , 10 mg / ml solution for infusion in 100 mL " company Bristol - Myers Squibb, France and experimental work. The aim of our study is development and support of the national composition of the infusion of the drug on the basis of paracetamol, selection of excipients that provide stability of the active substances. Materials and methods. The object of the study was the substance of paracetamol manufactured by Zhejiang Kangle Pharmaceutical Co. , Ltd, China. During the work conducted qualitative and quantitative monitoring sample preparation for indicators of stability: pH content of the active ingredient , transparency, color, impurities , contamination by the methods described in the SFU [and nor- ral documentation to the drug . One potential factor of instability is the effect of paracetamol oxygen, due to the presence in the molecule of paracetamol and -NH possibility of oxidation. Results and Discussion. Paracetamol is derived atsetamina . Substance acetylation are p - aminophenol with acetic anhydride . Saturated aqueous solution has a pH of paracetamol - ment about 6 . Paracetamol is a crystalline white powder , sparingly soluble in water, soluble in 96% alcohol, very slightly soluble in metilenhloride . . Active substance enters in comparison drug in the concentration of 10 mg/ml. Stable

  9. Integrity, standards, and QC-related issues with big data in pre-clinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, John F; Ung, Matthew; Escalante-Chong, Renan; Ross, Jermaine; Zhang, Jenny; Cha, Yoonjeong; Lysaght, Andrew; Funt, Jason; Kusko, Rebecca

    2018-06-01

    The tremendous expansion of data analytics and public and private big datasets presents an important opportunity for pre-clinical drug discovery and development. In the field of life sciences, the growth of genetic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data is partly driven by a rapid decline in experimental costs as biotechnology improves throughput, scalability, and speed. Yet far too many researchers tend to underestimate the challenges and consequences involving data integrity and quality standards. Given the effect of data integrity on scientific interpretation, these issues have significant implications during preclinical drug development. We describe standardized approaches for maximizing the utility of publicly available or privately generated biological data and address some of the common pitfalls. We also discuss the increasing interest to integrate and interpret cross-platform data. Principles outlined here should serve as a useful broad guide for existing analytical practices and pipelines and as a tool for developing additional insights into therapeutics using big data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Capillary Electrophoresis Hyphenated with Mass Spectrometry for Determination of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Drugs in Clinical Urine Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Maráková

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Azathioprine is the main thiopurine drug used in the treatment of immune-based inflammations of gastrointestinal tract. For the purpose of therapy control and optimization, effective and reliable analytical methods for a rapid drug monitoring in biological fluids are essential. Here, we developed a separation method based on the capillary electrophoresis (CE hyphenated with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS for the simultaneous determination of azathioprine and its selected metabolites (6-thioguanine, 6-mercaptopurine, and 6-methylmercaptopurine as well as other co-medicated drugs (mesalazine, prednisone, and allopurinol. The optimized CE-MS/MS conditions provided a very efficient and stable system for the separation and sensitive detection of these drugs in human urine matrices. The developed method was successfully applied for the assay of the targeted drugs and their selected metabolites in urine samples collected from patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and receiving azathioprine therapy. The developed CE-MS/MS method, due to its reliability, short analysis time, production of complex clinical profiles, and favorable performance parameters, evaluated according to FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method validation, is proposed for routine clinical laboratories to optimize thiopurine therapy, estimate enzymatic activity, and control patient compliance with medication and co-medication.

  11. Deciphering the clinical effect of drugs through large-scale data integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Sonny Kim

    . This work demonstrates the power of a strategy that uses clinical data mining in association with chemical biology in order to reduce the search space and aid identification of novel drug actions. The second article described in chapter 3 outlines a high confidence side-effect-drug interaction dataset. We...... demonstrates the importance of using high-confidence drug-side-effect data in deciphering the effect of small molecules in humans. In summary, this thesis presents computational systems chemical biology approaches that can help identify clinical effects of small molecules through large-scale data integration...

  12. New drug developments in the Latin Americas (Argentina, Costa Rica, Mexico and Panama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, T A; Galvan, L; Udabe, R U; Vergara, L; Zoch, C

    1974-07-01

    New drug developments in four Latin American countries, i.e. Argentina, Costa Rica, Mexico and Panama and the United States were compared. In contradistinction to the United States, clinical investigations with newly developed drugs in the four countries are based on contracts between individual investigators and the pharmaceutical industry without governmental interference. There are no adequate facilities to develop new psychoactive preparation in the four Latin American countries. Nevertheless, psychopharmacological practices are essentially the same as in the United States or Canada and all important psychoactive preparations used in the United States are available in the Latin Americas. Some of the newer-thioxanthene, butyrophenone and diphenylbutylpiperidine preparations which are still under clinical investigation in the United States are already available for clinical use in Argentina, Costa Rica, Mexico and Panama. While there is less governmental control than in the United States or Canada, with regard to clinical investigations of drugs or with regard to marketing newly developed preparations, there is no evidence of abuse. Finally, it should be noted that the introduction of psychotropic drugs brought about a new era in psychiatry in the Latin Americas. It becomes increasingly obvious that psychiatry today is practiced on the basis of knowledge derived from clinical impressions and on the basis of findings verified in clinical testings, i.e. on the basis of two different standards. Accordingly, as in Europe and North America, a re-examination of traditional concepts has begun in the Latin Americas. There are indications that biological psychiatry in general, and psychopharmacology in particular, are gaining increasing importance in the Latin Americas. This has led to the creation of a training program in biological psychiatry by the World Health Organization in Montreal, in cooperation with the Division of Psychopharmacology of the Department of

  13. Developing a stone database for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Benjamin W; Noble, Jeremy G; Reynard, John M

    2011-09-01

    Our objective was to design an intranet-based database to streamline stone patient management and data collection. The system developers used a rapid development approach that removed the need for laborious and unnecessary documentation, instead focusing on producing a rapid prototype that could then be altered iteratively. By using open source development software and website best practice, the development cost was kept very low in comparison with traditional clinical applications. Information about each patient episode can be entered via a user-friendly interface. The bespoke electronic stone database removes the need for handwritten notes, dictation, and typing. From the database, files may be automatically generated for clinic letters, operation notes. and letters to family doctors. These may be printed or e-mailed from the database. Data may be easily exported for audits, coding, and research. Data collection remains central to medical practice, to improve patient safety, to analyze medical and surgical outcomes, and to evaluate emerging treatments. Establishing prospective data collection is crucial to this process. In the current era, we have the opportunity to embrace available technology to facilitate this process. The database template could be modified for use in other clinics. The database that we have designed helps to provide a modern and efficient clinical stone service.

  14. Perestroika in pharma: evolution or revolution in drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Garret A

    2010-01-01

    New-drug approvals have remained roughly constant since 1950, while the cost of drug development has soared. It seems likely that a more modular approach to drug discovery and development will evolve, deriving some features from the not-for-profit sector. For this to occur, we must address the deficit in human capital with expertise in both translational medicine and therapeutics and also in regulatory science; utilize regulatory reform to incentivize innovation and the expansion of the precompetitive space; and develop an informatics infrastructure that permits the global, secure, and compliant sharing of heterogeneous data across academic and industry sectors. These developments, likely prompted by the perception of crisis rather than opportunity, will require linked initiatives among academia, the pharmaceutical industry, the US National Institutes of Health, and the US Food and Drug Administration, along with a more adventurous role for venture capital. A failure to respond threatens the United States' lead in biomedical science and in the development and regulation of novel therapeutics. 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  15. Clinical and Drug Resistance Characteristics of New Pediatric Tuberculosis Cases in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Dong, Fang; Li, Qin-Jing; Yin, Qing-Qin; Song, Wen-Qi; Mokrousov, Igor; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Shen, A-Dong

    2018-05-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and characteristics of drug resistance in newly diagnosed pediatric tuberculosis (TB) patients in northern China. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were collected from September 2010 to October 2016 at the Beijing Children's Hospital. Patients were divided into two groups (resistant to at least one drug and pan-susceptible) according to drug susceptibility testing (DST) results. A total of 132 new cases, mainly from northern China (87.9%), were included in the study. The median age was 1.9 years (1 month-15 years). Resistance to at least one drug was detected in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 33 (25%) cases. Eight cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) (6.1%) were detected. The two groups did not differ in clinical presentations (disease site, fever >2 weeks, and cough >2 weeks) or in chest imaging (lesion location, lymphadenitis [mediastinal], and pleural effusion). The rate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance in new pediatric TB cases was as high as in the new adult patients surveyed in the national drug resistance survey conducted in 2007. No significant difference was observed in clinical features between patients infected with drug-resistant and drug-susceptible strains. Routine DST is important for prescribing effective antituberculosis treatment regimens.

  16. Direct anti-atherosclerotic therapy; development of natural anti-atherosclerotic drugs preventing cellular cholesterol retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhov, Alexander N

    2013-01-01

    The results of numerous clinical trials with statins and other drugs have demonstrated the principal possibility of the prevention and regression of atherosclerosis by pharmacotherapy. This review describes the use of cultured human arterial cells for the mass screening of anti-atherosclerotic substances, the investigation of the mechanisms responsible for their atherosclerosis-related effects, and the optimization of anti-atherosclerotic and anti-atherogenic drug and dietary therapies. Natural products can be considered promising drugs for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. Our basic studies have shown that cellular lipidosis is the principal event in the genesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Using cellular models and natural products, we have developed an approach to prevent lipid accumulation in arterial cells. Based on our knowledge of atherosclerosis, we developed drugs that possess direct anti-atherosclerotic activity. Two-year treatment with allicor (garlic powder) has a direct anti-atherosclerotic effect on carotid atherosclerosis in asymptomatic men. Inflaminat (calendula, elder, and violet), which possesses anti-cytokine activity, has been shown to cause the regression of carotid atherosclerosis following the treatment of asymptomatic men for one year. The phytoestrogen-rich drug karinat (garlic powder, extract of grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cones, β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid) prevents the development of carotid atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Thus, our basic findings were successfully translated into clinical practice. Because of this translation, a novel approach to antiatherosclerotic therapy was developed. Our clinical trial confirmed the efficacy of both the novel approach and the novel drugs.

  17. Drugs and Polymers for Delivery Systems in OA Joints: Clinical Needs and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Janssen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a big burden of disease worldwide and one of the most common causes of disability in the adult population. Currently applied therapies consist of physical therapy, oral medication, intra-articular injections, and surgical interventions, with the main goal being to reduce pain and improve function and quality of life. Intra-articular (IA administration of drugs has potential benefits in OA treatment because it minimizes systemic bioavailability and side effects associated with oral administration of drugs without compromising the therapeutic effect in the joint. However, IA drug residence time is short and there is a clinical need for a vehicle that is able to provide a sustained release long enough for IA therapy to fulfill its promise. This review summarizes the use of different polymeric systems and the incorporated drugs for IA drug delivery in the osteoarthritic joint with a primary focus on clinical needs and opportunities.

  18. Identification of possible adverse drug reactions in clinical notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, Pernille; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Aagaard, Lise

    2015-01-01

    and stomach ulcer associated with liraglutide. Of the unlabeled ADRs, 13 (87%) were associated with "other blood glucose lowering medications," the remaining 2 (13%) with "DDP-4 inhibitors." Conclusion: Clinical notes could potentially reveal unlabeled ADRs associated with prescribed medicines and sufficient...

  19. [Does the public sector have an independent research role in the development of drugs?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grønlykke, Thor Buch

    2003-04-14

    Exclusively private companies do drug development. The State contributes with education of academics and basic research constituting the basis of half of the drugs developed by the private companies. The Danish private drug research amounts to six billion DKK per year, corresponding to the estimated price of the development of one new drug. The development shows a negative tendency. There are doubts about the scientific credibility, the number of new drugs is declining, drug development costs are rising, and the competitiveness in Europe is declining compared with the one of The United States. Continued improvement of Danish drug development can be achieved by stimulation of the public research related to drug development.

  20. Clinical usage of hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M

    2005-06-28

    Factors predisposing hormone-dependent tissues to the development of tumors coincide, at least partly, with hormonal-metabolic promoters (like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, visceral obesity, etc.) of other main non-communicable diseases. This important knowledge poses the question of whether the same approach which is applied for prevention/treatment of a metabolic syndrome and the associated endocrine disorders might also be used in preventive and therapeutic oncology. Whereas an answer to this question remains controversial and is based mainly on experimental evidence, there is accumulating clinical data suggesting a practical significance of such a strategy, even though it is not to be considered as directly cytostatic. Among the many drugs under discussion, three groups of medicines (statins, antidiabetic biguanides, and thiazolidinediones) are the most attractive. The concept of metabolic rehabilitation is proposed and used practically in an adjuvant setting for the correction of the above-mentioned endocrine-metabolic disorders commonly found in cancer patients. The current use and aim of this approach is to improve the survival of patients and limit cancer progression. Nonetheless, it also appears potentially useful as a neoadjuvant therapy as well as a prophylactic treatment earlier in life for specific groups of people with hormone-associated enhanced oncological risk. It seems possible that certain hypolipidemic and antidiabetic medicines with pleiotropic effects might be combined with traditional antisteroid prevention/therapeutic approaches in routine clinical situations as well as for overcoming resistance to standard cancer hormonal therapies including receptor-negative cases. Characteristic at the end of the 20th and at the beginning of the 21st century is an epidemic of diabetes and obesity, which might further increase the incidence of certain cancers. This makes it timely to apply hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs (in combination

  1. Developing Federal Clinical Care Recommendations for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M; Tepper, Naomi K; Curtis, Kathryn M; Moskosky, Susan B; Gavin, Loretta E

    2015-08-01

    The provision of family planning services has important health benefits for the U.S. Approximately 25 million women in the U.S. receive contraceptive services annually and 44 million make at least one family planning-related clinical visit each year. These services are provided by private clinicians, as well as publicly funded clinics, including specialty family planning clinics, health departments, Planned Parenthoods, community health centers, and primary care clinics. Recommendations for providing quality family planning services have been published by CDC and the Office of Population Affairs of the DHHS. This paper describes the process used to develop the women's clinical services portion of the new recommendations and the rationale underpinning them. The recommendations define family planning services as contraceptive care, pregnancy testing and counseling, achieving pregnancy, basic infertility care, sexually transmitted disease services, and preconception health. Because many women who seek family planning services have no other source of care, the recommendations also include additional screening services related to women's health, such as cervical cancer screening. These clinical guidelines are aimed at providing the highest-quality care and are designed to establish a national standard for family planning in the U.S. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N. [Stony Brook University Health Science Center, Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  3. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  4. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on oncotargets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozako T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomohiro Kozako,1 Naomichi Arima,2 Makoto Yoshimitsu,3 Shin-Ichro Honda,1 Shinji Soeda11Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 3Department of Hematology and Immunology, Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, JapanAbstract: Nanotechnology is the development of an engineered device at the atomic, molecular, and macromolecular level in the nanometer range. Advances in nanotechnology have proven beneficial in therapeutic fields such as drug-delivery and gene/protein delivery. Antigen delivery systems are important for inducing and modifying immune responses. In cellular immunity, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs are important in the host defense against tumors. Key to the development of CTL-inducible vaccines is the ability to deliver antigens to antigen-presenting cells efficiently and to induce the subsequent activation of T cell-mediated immunity without adjuvants, as they can induce excessive inflammation leading to systemic febrile disease. Since expression and cloning methods for tumor-associated antigens have been reported, cancer vaccines that induce effective cell immunity may be promising therapeutic candidates, but Th2 cells are undesirable for use in cancer immunotherapy. Peptide vaccines have immunological and economic advantages as cancer vaccines because CTL epitope peptides from tumor-associated antigens have high antigen-specificity. However, cancer vaccines have had limited effectiveness in clinical responses due to the ability of cancer cells to “escape” from cancer immunity and a low efficiency of antigen-specific CTL induction due to immunogenic-free synthetic peptides. In contrast, carbohydrate-decorated particles such as carbohydrate-coated liposomes with encapsulated antigens might be more suitable as

  5. Measuring clinical trial transparency: an empirical analysis of newly approved drugs and large pharmaceutical companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer E; Wilenzick, Marc; Ritcey, Nolan; Ross, Joseph S; Mello, Michelle M

    2017-12-05

    To define a series of clinical trial transparency measures and apply them to large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies and their 2014 FDA-approved drugs. Cross-sectional descriptive analysis of all clinical trials supporting 2014 Food and Drugs Administration (FDA)-approved new drug applications (NDAs) for novel drugs sponsored by large companies. Data from over 45 sources, including Drugs@FDA.gov, ClinicalTrials.gov, corporate and international registries; PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, corporate press releases, Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings and personal communications with drug manufacturers. Trial registration, results reporting, clinical study report (CSR) synopsis sharing, biomedical journal publication, and FDA Amendments Acts (FDAAA) compliance, analysed on the drug level. The FDA approved 19 novel new drugs, sponsored by 11 large companies, involving 553 trials, in 2014. We analysed 505 relevant trials. Per drug, a median of 100% (IQR 86%-100%) of trials in patients were registered, 71% (IQR 57%-100%) reported results or shared a CSR synopsis, 80% (70%-100%) were published and 96% (80%-100%) were publicly available in some form by 13 months after FDA approval. Disclosure rates were lower at FDA approval (65%) and improved significantly by 6 months post FDA approval. Per drug, a median of 100% (IQR 75%-100%) of FDAAA-applicable trials were compliant. Half of reviewed drugs had publicly disclosed results for all trials in patients in our sample. One trial was uniquely registered in a corporate registry, and not ClinicalTrials.gov; 0 trials were uniquely registered in international registries. Among large pharmaceutical companies and new drugs, clinical trial transparency is high based on several standards, although opportunities for improvement remain. Transparency is markedly higher for trials in patients than among all trials supporting drug approval, including trials in healthy volunteers. Ongoing efforts to publicly track

  6. From research on rare diseases to new orphan drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases have a prevalence of lower than 5 in 10,000 inhabitants and are life-threatening or chronically debilitating. It is estimated that worldwide more than 5000 rare diseases exist, which account for over 55 million patients in the EU and the US together. However, the development of drugs

  7. Developments in clinical trials: a Pharma Matters report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, A; Nuskey, B; Rabasseda, X; Arias, E

    2014-08-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry strives to meet the ever-increasing complexity of drug development, new technology in clinical trials has become a beacon of hope. With big data comes the promise of accelerated patient recruitment, real-time monitoring of clinical trials, bioinformatics empowerment of quicker phase progression, and the overwhelming benefits of precision medicine for select trials. Risk-based monitoring stands to benefit as well. With a strengthening focus on centralized data by the FDA and industry's transformative initiative, TransCelerate, a new era in trial risk mitigation has begun. The traditional method of intensive on-site monitoring is becoming a thing of the past as statistical, real-time analysis of site and trial-wide data provides the means to monitor with greater efficiency and effectiveness from afar. However, when it comes to big data, there are challenges that lie ahead. Patient privacy, commercial investment protection, technology woes and data variability are all limitations to be met with considerable thought. At the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology this year, clinical trials on psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases were discussed in detail. This review of clinical research reports on novel therapies for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis reveals the impact of these diseases and the drug candidates that have been successful in phase II and III studies. Data-focused highlights of novel dermatological trials, as well as real-life big data approaches and an insight on the new methodology of risk-based monitoring, are all discussed in this edition of Developments in Clinical Trials. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  8. A staged screening of registered drugs highlights remyelinating drug candidates for clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleuteri, C.; Olla, S.; Veroni, C.; Umeton, R.; Mechelli, R.; Romano, S.; Buscarinu, Mc.; Ferrari, F.; Calò, G.; Ristori, G.; Salvetti, M.; Agresti, C.

    2017-04-01

    There is no treatment for the myelin loss in multiple sclerosis, ultimately resulting in the axonal degeneration that leads to the progressive phase of the disease. We established a multi-tiered platform for the sequential screening of drugs that could be repurposed as remyelinating agents. We screened a library of 2,000 compounds (mainly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds and natural products) for cellular metabolic activity on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPC), identifying 42 molecules with significant stimulating effects. We then characterized the effects of these compounds on OPC proliferation and differentiation in mouse glial cultures, and on myelination and remyelination in organotypic cultures. Three molecules, edaravone, 5-methyl-7-methoxyisoflavone and lovastatin, gave positive results in all screening tiers. We validated the results by retesting independent stocks of the compounds, analyzing their purity, and performing dose-response curves. To identify the chemical features that may be modified to enhance the compounds’ activity, we tested chemical analogs and identified, for edaravone, the functional groups that may be essential for its activity. Among the selected remyelinating candidates, edaravone appears to be of strong interest, also considering that this drug has been approved as a neuroprotective agent for acute ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Japan.

  9. Drugs in development and dietary approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrado Angelini, Elisabetta Tasca Neuromuscular Laboratory, Fondazione San Camillo Hospital IRCCS, Venice, Italy Abstract: Therapeutic trials studying Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD in Europe and the USA have been done using a protocol that includes manual muscle testing and functional testing, and have shown the efficacy of steroid drugs in various doses and regimens. Further, drisapersen and eteplirsen (exon skipping drugs and ataluren (a drug to overcome stop codon mutations have achieved some clinical improvement. Cardioprotective drugs are efficacious in DMD, and eplerenone, an aldosterone inhibitor and diuretic, is now being used to treat the disease. The dietary approach should be used in wheelchair-bound DMD children in combination with respiratory assistance. The importance of some of the treatments proposed is that they might also be useful in other genetic disorders where stop codon mutations are present; moreover, it is possible that these new treatments will improve quality of life for many patients. Keywords: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, steroids, ataluren, drisapersen, eplerenone, eteplirsen

  10. Development of clinical application of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun [and others

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are (1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized (2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized (3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer (4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial (5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil (6) to provide basic technique for electric chart (7) promote developing database system for image information (8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation.

  11. Development of clinical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are 1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized 2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized 3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer 4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial 5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil 6) to provide basic technique for electric chart 7) promote developing database system for image information 8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation

  12. Clinical Decision Support to Implement CYP2D6 Drug-Gene Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Pedro J; Parkulo, Mark; Blair, David; Elliott, Michelle; Schultz, Cloann; Sutton, Joseph; Rao, Padma; Bruflat, Jamie; Bleimeyer, Robert; Crooks, John; Gabrielson, Donald; Nicholson, Wayne; Rohrer Vitek, Carolyn; Wix, Kelly; Bielinski, Suzette J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kullo, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The level of CYP2D6 metabolic activity can be predicted by pharmacogenomic testing, and concomitant use of clinical decision support has the potential to prevent adverse effects from those drugs metabolized by this enzyme. Our initial findings after implementation of clinical decision support alerts integrated in the electronic health records suggest high feasibility, but also identify important challenges.

  13. Physician adherence to hypertension treatment guidelines and drug acquisition costs of antihypertensive drugs at the cardiac clinic: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulameer SA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaymaa Abdalwahed Abdulameer1, Mohanad Naji Sahib1, Noorizan Abd Aziz1,2, Yahaya Hassan1,2, Hadeer Akram Abdul AlRazzaq1, Omar Ismail31School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Hospital Pulau Pinang, 10900, Penang, MalaysiaAbstract: Prescribing pattern surveys are one of the pharmacoepidemiological techniques that provide an unbiased picture of prescribing habits. Prescription surveys permit the identification of suboptimal prescribing patterns for further evaluation. The aims of this study were to determine the prescribing trend, adherence of the prescribers to the guideline, and the impact of drug expenditure on drug utilization at the cardiac clinic of Penang Hospital, Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study. Demographic data of the patients, diagnoses and the drugs prescribed were recorded. The average drug acquisition costs (ADAC were calculated for each antihypertensive drug class on a daily and annual basis. Adherence to the guideline was calculated as a percentage of the total number of patients. A total of 313 individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The average age of the study population was 59.30 ± 10.35 years. The mean number of drugs per prescription in the study was 2.09 ± 0.78. There were no significant differences in the demographic data. Antihypertensive drugs were used in monotherapy and polytherapy in 20.8% and 79.2% of the patients, respectively. Adherence to the guideline regarding prescription occurred in 85.30% of the patients. The lowest priced drug class was diuretics and the highest was angiotensin-receptor blockers. In conclusion, the total adherence to the guideline was good; the adherence percentage only slightly decreased with a co-existing comorbidity (such as diabetes mellitus. The use of thiazide diuretics was encouraged because they are well tolerated and

  14. Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Itzstein, Mark; Thomson, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Viruses, particularly those that are harmful to humans, are the 'silent terrorists' of the twenty-first century. Well over four million humans die per annum as a result of viral infections alone. The scourge of influenza virus has plagued mankind throughout the ages. The fact that new viral strains emerge on a regular basis, particularly out of Asia, establishes a continual socio-economic threat to mankind. The arrival of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 heightened the threat of a potential human pandemic to the point where many countries have put in place 'preparedness plans' to defend against such an outcome. The discovery of the first designer influenza virus sialidase inhibitor and anti-influenza drug Relenza, and subsequently Tamiflu, has now inspired a number of continuing efforts towards the discovery of next generation anti-influenza drugs. Such drugs may act as 'first-line-of-defence' against the spread of influenza infection and buy time for necessary vaccine development particularly in a human pandemic setting. Furthermore, the fact that influenza virus can develop resistance to therapeutics makes these continuing efforts extremely important. An overview of the role of the virus-associated glycoprotein sialidase (neuraminidase) and some of the most recent developments towards the discovery of anti-influenza drugs based on the inhibition of influenza virus sialidase is provided in this chapter.

  15. Drug delivery system innovation and Health Technology Assessment: Upgrading from Clinical to Technological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzitta, Michele; Bruno, Giorgio; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Mendicino, Francesca R; Ricci, Maurizio

    2015-11-30

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a multidisciplinary health political instrument that evaluates the consequences, mainly clinical and economical, of a health care technology; the HTA aim is to produce and spread information on scientific and technological innovation for health political decision making process. Drug delivery systems (DDS), such as nanocarriers, are technologically complex but they have pivotal relevance in therapeutic innovation. The HTA process, as commonly applied to conventional drug evaluation, should upgrade to a full pharmaceutical assessment, considering the DDS complexity. This is useful to study more in depth the clinical outcome and to broaden its critical assessment toward pharmaceutical issues affecting the patient and not measured by the current clinical evidence approach. We draw out the expertise necessary to perform the pharmaceutical assessment and we propose a format to evaluate the DDS technological topics such as formulation and mechanism of action, physicochemical characteristics, manufacturing process. We integrated the above-mentioned three points in the Evidence Based Medicine approach, which is data source for any HTA process. In this regard, the introduction of a Pharmaceutics Expert figure in the HTA could be fundamental to grant a more detailed evaluation of medicine product characteristics and performances and to help optimizing DDS features to overcome R&D drawbacks. Some aspects of product development, such as manufacturing processes, should be part of the HTA as innovative manufacturing processes allow new products to reach more effectively patient bedside. HTA so upgraded may encourage resource allocating payers to invest in innovative technologies and providers to focus on innovative material properties and manufacturing processes, thus contributing to bring more medicines in therapy in a sustainable manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug development in Parkinson's disease: from emerging molecules to innovative drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2013-11-01

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at addressing motor symptoms but there is no therapy focused on modifying the course of the disease. Successful treatment strategies have been so far limited and brain drug delivery remains a major challenge that restricts its treatment. This review provides an overview of the most promising emerging agents in the field of PD drug discovery, discussing improvements that have been made in brain drug delivery for PD. It will be shown that new approaches able to extend the length of the treatment, to release the drug in a continuous manner or to cross the blood-brain barrier and target a specific region are still needed. Overall, the results reviewed here show that there is an urgent need to develop both symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments, giving priority to neuroprotective treatments. Promising perspectives are being provided in this field by rasagiline and by neurotrophic factors like glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The identification of disease-relevant genes has also encouraged the search for disease-modifying therapies that function by identifying molecularly targeted drugs. The advent of new molecular and cellular targets like α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 or parkin, among others, will require innovative delivery therapies. In this regard, drug delivery systems (DDS) have shown great potential for improving the efficacy of conventional and new PD therapy and reducing its side effects. The new DDS discussed here, which include microparticles, nanoparticles and hydrogels among others, will probably open up possibilities that extend beyond symptomatic relief. However, further work needs to be done before DDS become a therapeutic option for PD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microdosing and drug development: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham; Noveck, Robert; Burt, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Microdosing is an approach to early drug development where exploratory pharmacokinetic data are acquired in humans using inherently safe sub-pharmacologic doses of drug. The first publication of microdose data was 10 years ago and this review comprehensively explores the microdose concept from conception, over the past decade, up until the current date. Areas covered The authors define and distinguish the concept of microdosing from similar approaches. The authors review the ability of microdosing to provide exploratory pharmacokinetics (concentration-time data) but exclude microdosing using positron emission tomography. The article provides a comprehensive review of data within the peer-reviewed literature as well as the latest applications and a look into the future, towards where microdosing may be headed. Expert opinion Evidence so far suggests that microdosing may be a better predictive tool of human pharmacokinetics than alternative methods and combination with physiologically based modelling may lead to much more reliable predictions in the future. The concept has also been applied to drug-drug interactions, polymorphism and assessing drug concentrations over time at its site of action. Microdosing may yet have more to offer in unanticipated directions and provide benefits that have not been fully realised to date. PMID:23550938

  18. The Expected Net Present Value of Developing Weight Management Drugs in the Context of Drug Safety Litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Anita; Carls, Ginger; Deng, Edmund; Tuttle, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Following withdrawals, failures, and significant litigation settlements, drug product launches in the anti-obesity category slowed despite a large and growing unmet need. Litigation concerns, a more risk-averse regulatory policy, and the difficulty of developing a product with a compelling risk-benefit profile in this category may have limited innovators' expected return on investment and restricted investment in this therapeutic area. The objective of the study was to estimate perceived manufacturer risk associated with product safety litigation and increased development costs vs. revenue expectations on anticipated return on investment and to determine which scenarios might change a manufacturer's investment decision. Expected net present value of a weight-management drug entering pre-clinical trials was calculated for a range of scenarios representing evolving expectations of development costs, revenue, and litigation risk over the past 25 years. These three factors were based on published estimates, historical data, and analogs from other therapeutic areas. The main driver in expected net present value calculations is expected revenue, particularly if one assumes that litigation risk and demand are positively correlated. Changes in development costs associated with increased regulatory concern with potential safety issues for the past 25 years likely did not impact investment decisions. Regulatory policy and litigation risk both played a role in anti-obesity drug development; however, product revenue-reflecting efficacy at acceptable levels of safety-was by far the most important factor. To date, relatively modest sales associated with recent product introductions suggest that developing a product that is sufficiently efficacious with an acceptable level of safety continues to be the primary challenge in this market.

  19. Interplay between Mutations and Efflux in Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Viveiros

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies show efflux as a universal bacterial mechanism contributing to antibiotic resistance and also that the activity of the antibiotics subject to efflux can be enhanced by the combined use of efflux inhibitors. Nevertheless, the contribution of efflux to the overall drug resistance levels of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood and still is ignored by many. Here, we evaluated the contribution of drug efflux plus target-gene mutations to the drug resistance levels in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. A panel of 17 M. tuberculosis clinical strains were characterized for drug resistance associated mutations and antibiotic profiles in the presence and absence of efflux inhibitors. The correlation between the effect of the efflux inhibitors and the resistance levels was assessed by quantitative drug susceptibility testing. The bacterial growth/survival vs. growth inhibition was analyzed through the comparison between the time of growth in the presence and absence of an inhibitor. For the same mutation conferring antibiotic resistance, different MICs were observed and the different resistance levels found could be reduced by efflux inhibitors. Although susceptibility was not restored, the results demonstrate the existence of a broad-spectrum synergistic interaction between antibiotics and efflux inhibitors. The existence of efflux activity was confirmed by real-time fluorometry. Moreover, the efflux pump genes mmr, mmpL7, Rv1258c, p55, and efpA were shown to be overexpressed in the presence of antibiotics, demonstrating the contribution of these efflux pumps to the overall resistance phenotype of the M. tuberculosis clinical isolates studied, independently of the genotype of the strains. These results showed that the drug resistance levels of multi- and extensively-drug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical strains are a combination between drug efflux and the presence of target-gene mutations, a reality

  20. Therapeutic drug monitoring in epilepsy clinic: a multi-disciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunee Lertsinudom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common public health problem and needs multi-disciplinary treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is one of step of the multi-disciplinary treatment in epilepsy at Epilepsy clinic, Khon Kaen University (Thailand. The TDM service has been established since 2008. Here, we aimed to study the roles of TDM order and epilepsy control. This is a prospective descriptive study in which data collection was done from January 1 to December 31, 2010, the period when pharmacists took part in assessing the appropriateness in measurement and interpretation of TDM in order to provide suggestions for physicians. The 112 patients under study had an average age of 38.21±15.36 years; 254 samples were collected for therapeutic drug monitoring; phenytoin was submitted mostly for drug monitoring at 46.46%; 44.49% of sub-missions for drug level monitoring were made owing to a suspected sub-therapeutic level. Associations were found between reasons of sending samples for drug level monitoring and the measured drug levels, i.e., 66.67% of drug levels found was so low that they were undetectable in sample for patients’ compliance investigation and 38.94% of the drug levels were found to be sub-therapeutic as for the case where submission of samples was done because of suspected sub-therapeutic level, 40% of the cases were found to be in toxicity range in the cases with suspected over-therapeutic levels and monitoring levels, 58.25% were found to be within the therapeutic range. Pharmacists used the interpreted results in patients’ care by recommending physicians to monitor therapeutic drug closely, to adjust the dosage of drugs, and to recommend checking patients’ compliance in their use of drugs at 56.5, 38.9, and 4.3%, respectively. Physicians’ responses were found to be absolute follow, partial follow and not follow at 77.95, 11.03, and 7.48%, respectively. In conclusion, associations were found between reasons of TDM order and measured drug

  1. 'False-positive' and 'false-negative' test results in clinical urine drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Bertholf, Roger L

    2009-08-01

    The terms 'false-positive' and 'false-negative' are widely used in discussions of urine drug test (UDT) results. These terms are inadequate because they are used in different ways by physicians and laboratory professionals and they are too narrow to encompass the larger universe of potentially misleading, inappropriate and unexpected drug test results. This larger universe, while not solely comprised of technically 'true' or 'false' positive or negative test results, presents comparable interpretive challenges with corresponding clinical implications. In this review, we propose the terms 'potentially inappropriate' positive or negative test results in reference to UDT results that are ambiguous or unexpected and subject to misinterpretation. Causes of potentially inappropriate positive UDT results include in vivo metabolic conversions of a drug, exposure to nonillicit sources of a drug and laboratory error. Causes of potentially inappropriate negative UDT results include limited assay specificity, absence of drug in the urine, presence of drug in the urine, but below established assay cutoff, specimen manipulation and laboratory error. Clinical UDT interpretation is a complicated task requiring knowledge of recent prescription, over-the-counter and herbal drug administration, drug metabolism and analytical sensitivities and specificities.

  2. Developing a mentoring program in clinical nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Robert G; McClave, Stephen; Heyland, Daren; August, David

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring programs in nutrition are essential to the survival of clinical nutrition as we know it today. The best method known to maintain an influx of talent to a discipline is by developing an active mentoring program. This paper describes 1 concept for development of a viable mentor program. Mentoring should be flexible and based on mentees' training background. Realistic goals should be set, with written and verbal feedback, to sustain a successful program. Programs should incorporate the Socratic Method whenever possible. Factors that leave doubt about the survival of nutrition as a viable area of focus for physicians include the inability to generate adequate funds to support oneself and limited numbers of mentors available with dedicated time to be a mentor. A healthy, sustainable mentoring program in clinical nutrition will ensure survival of physician-based nutrition programs.

  3. Out-patient drug policy by clinical assessment rather than financial constraints? The gate-keeping function of the out-patient drug reimbursement system in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, Marja H.; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1991, the Dutch Price Reference System (DPRS) has aimed at a growth reduction of out-patient drug costs without loss of medical quality. New drugs are excluded unless they pass legally anchored clinical criteria, i.e. substitutability with accepted drugs (DPRS-list 1a, implies a reimbursement

  4. Direct and Indirect Drug Design Approaches for the Development of Novel Tricyclic Antipsychotics: Potential 5-HT2A Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahantesh Namdev Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a mental disorder manifested largely by disintegration of thought processes and emotional responsiveness. Given the therapeutic and toxic limitations of clinically available drugs, it is clear that there is still a need for the development of new generation antipsychotic agents with an improved clinical profile. Development of novel hybrid atypical tricyclic antipsychotic pharmacophore was achieved using direct (by measuring docking score of designed molecules on modelled 5- receptor and indirect (current, clinically available therapeutic agents’ data drug design approaches.

  5. Evaluation of new drugs in daily clinical practice: anti-TNF alpha in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kievit, W.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the value and the validity of data collected in daily clinical practice for drug evaluation and cost-effectiveness studies, using data collected on TNFa blocking agents in rheumatoid arthritis. First, the need for and value of information from daily clinical practice was researched. Together, the results of Chapters 3, 4 and 5 illustrated that treatment of RA patients with anti-TNFa blocking agents in daily clinical practice was different from what ...

  6. Repurposing pharma assets: an accelerated mechanism for strengthening the schistosomiasis drug development pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthi, Roopa; Graef, Katy M; Dent, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, one of 17 diseases deemed to be neglected by the World Health Organization, has received little attention from the biopharmaceutical industry. Due to this, only a handful of drugs have been developed to treat schistosomiasis, with only one, praziquantel, used in most endemic regions. Growing concern over resistance coupled with praziquantel's incomplete efficacy across all stages of the Schistosoma platyhelminth life cycle highlights the urgent need for new drugs. The WIPO Re:Search consortium is a platform whereupon biopharmaceutical company compounds are being repurposed to efficiently and cost-effectively develop new drugs for neglected diseases such as schistosomiasis. This article summarizes recent clinical-stage efforts to identify new antischistosomals and highlights biopharmaceutical company compounds with potential for repurposing to treat schistosomiasis.

  7. Development and feasibility of the misuse, abuse, and diversion drug event reporting system (MADDERS®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Roi; Trudeau, Jeremiah J; Van Inwegen, Richard; Jones, Judith K; Katz, Nathaniel P

    2016-12-01

    Inappropriate use of analgesic drugs has become increasingly pervasive over the past decade. Currently, drug abuse potential is primarily assessed post-marketing; no validated tools are available to assess this potential in phase II and III clinical trials. This paper describes the development and feasibility testing of a Misuse, Abuse, and Diversion Drug Event Reporting System (MADDERS), which aims to identify potentially abuse-related events and classify them according to a recently developed classification scheme, allowing the quantification of these events in clinical trials. The system was initially conceived and designed with input from experts and patients, followed by field-testing to assess its feasibility and content validity in both completed and ongoing clinical trials. The results suggest that MADDERS is a feasible system with initial validity. It showed higher rates of the triggering events in subjects taking medications with known abuse potential than in patients taking medications without abuse potential. Additionally, experts agreed on the classification of most abuse-related events in MADDERS. MADDERS is a new systematic approach to collect information on potentially abuse-related events in clinical trials and classify them. The system has demonstrated feasibility for implementation. Additional research is ongoing to further evaluate its validity. Currently, there are no validated tools to assess drug abuse potential during clinical trials. Because of its ease of implementation, its systematic approach, and its preliminary validation results, MADDERS could provide such a tool for clinical trials. (Am J Addict 2016;25:641-651). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide. PMID:23986704

  9. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gaspar Carreño

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP. Methods: The procedure was developed in six phases: 1 hazard definition; 2 definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs’ selection and special handling; 3 detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4 categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5 information and training of professionals; 6 implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Results: Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. Conclusions: The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs.

  10. Core Competencies for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honorio eSilva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine, are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain Learning Outcomes anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide.

  11. The Importance of Prolonged Provocation in Drug Allergy - Results From a Danish Allergy Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Sara; Mosbech, Holger; Kappel, Mogens; Hjortlund, Janni; Poulsen, Lars K; Kvisselgaard, Ask D; Garvey, Lene H

    Drug provocation is the "Gold Standard" in drug allergy investigation. Recent studies suggest that a negative drug provocation on first dose should be followed by a prolonged provocation over several days. To evaluate drug allergy investigations on the basis of drug provocation, including prolonged provocation. Data from adult patients investigated for drug allergy in a Danish Allergy Clinic during the period 2010 to 2014 were entered into a database. Data included clinical details and results of provocations with suspected culprit drug (for penicillins performed only in specific IgE-negative patients). If provocation was negative on first dose, treatment was continued for 3 to 10 days. A total of 1,913 provocations were done in 1,659 patients, median age 46 years, of whom 1,237 (74.6%) were females. Drugs investigated were antibiotics, 1,776 (92.8%), of which 1,590 (89.5%) were penicillins; analgesics, 59 (3.1%); local anesthetics, 33 (1.7%); and other drugs, 45 (2.4%). In total, 211 of 1,913 (11.0%) provocations were positive. Causes were antibiotics, 198 (93.8%), of which 167 (84.3%) were penicillins; analgesics, 7 (3.3%); local anesthetics, 0; and other drugs, 6 (2.8%). Only 43 (20.4%) provocations were positive on first dose, whereas 95 (45.0%) turned positive more than 3 days later. Only 11.0% of the provocations were positive. Importantly, only 1 of 5 patients tested positive on the first dose, indicating that prolonged exposure should always be considered when drug provocation is included in allergy investigations. Most provocations were with penicillins, reflecting the pattern of antibiotic use in Denmark, which differs from that in other countries, especially outside Northern Europe. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Applicability of bioanalysis of multiple analytes in drug discovery and development: review of select case studies including assay development considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2006-05-01

    disease areas and/or in clinically important drug-drug interaction studies. A tabular representation of select examples of analysis is provided covering areas of separation conditions, validation aspects and applicable conclusion. A limited discussion is provided on relevant aspects of the need for developing bioanalytical procedures for speedy drug discovery and development. Additionally, some key elements such as internal standard selection, likely issues of mass detection, matrix effect, chiral aspects etc. are provided for consideration during method development.

  13. [Chapter 2. Transitions in drug-discovery technology and drug-development in Japan (1980-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Noriko; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In 1970s, the material patent system was introduced in Japan. Since then, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies have endeavored to create original in-house products. From 1980s, many of the innovative products were small molecular drugs and were developed using powerful medicinal-chemical technologies. Among them were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive organs and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese companies were able to launch some blockbuster drugs. At the same time, the pharmaceutical market, which had grown rapidly for two decades, was beginning to level off. From the late 1990s, drug development was slowing down due to the lack of expertise in biotechnology such as genetic engineering. In response to the circumstances, the research and development on biotechnology-based drugs such as antibody drugs have become more dynamic and popular at companies than small molecule drugs. In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the transitions in drug discovery and development between 1980 and 2010.

  14. Imaging mass spectrometry in drug development and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    During the last decades, imaging mass spectrometry has gained significant relevance in biomedical research. Recent advances in imaging mass spectrometry have paved the way for in situ studies on drug development, metabolism and toxicology. In contrast to whole-body autoradiography that images the localization of radiolabeled compounds, imaging mass spectrometry provides the possibility to simultaneously determine the discrete tissue distribution of the parent compound and its metabolites. In addition, imaging mass spectrometry features high molecular specificity and allows comprehensive, multiplexed detection and localization of hundreds of proteins, peptides and lipids directly in tissues. Toxicologists traditionally screen for adverse findings by histopathological examination. However, studies of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning toxicological and pathologic findings induced by candidate drugs or toxins are important to reach a mechanistic understanding and an effective risk assessment strategy. One of IMS strengths is the ability to directly overlay the molecular information from the mass spectrometric analysis with the tissue section and allow correlative comparisons of molecular and histologic information. Imaging mass spectrometry could therefore be a powerful tool for omics profiling of pharmacological/toxicological effects of drug candidates and toxicants in discrete tissue regions. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of imaging mass spectrometry, with particular focus on MALDI imaging mass spectrometry, and its use in drug development and toxicology in general.

  15. Privileged Electrophile Sensors: A Resource for Covalent Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marcus John Curtis; Aye, Yimon

    2017-07-20

    This Perspective delineates how redox signaling affects the activity of specific enzyme isoforms and how this property may be harnessed for rational drug design. Covalent drugs have resurged in recent years and several reports have extolled the general virtues of developing irreversible inhibitors. Indeed, many modern pharmaceuticals contain electrophilic appendages. Several invoke a warhead that hijacks active-site nucleophiles whereas others take advantage of spectator nucleophilic side chains that do not participate in enzymatic chemistry, but are poised to bind/react with electrophiles. The latest data suggest that innate electrophile sensing-which enables rapid reaction with an endogenous signaling electrophile-is a quintessential resource for the development of covalent drugs. For instance, based on recent work documenting isoform-specific electrophile sensing, isozyme non-specific drugs may be converted to isozyme-specific analogs by hijacking privileged first-responder electrophile-sensing cysteines. Because this approach targets functionally relevant cysteines, we can simultaneously harness previously untapped moonlighting roles of enzymes linked to redox sensing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Universal ethical principles and their application in clinical drug trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Sergio Eduardo

    2015